NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Obesity #Diabetes News: 1. @senbmckenzie report #ObesitySummit19 and 2. @MenziesResearch are calling for immediate action to reduce risk the of #obesity and #diabetes in #Indigenous children and young people.

Type 2 Diabetes is a particular concern as there is a global trend of increasing numbers of young people being diagnosed, there is limited data available in Australia but anecdotally numbers are rising rapidly amongst young Indigenous Australians.

Childhood obesity and Type 2 diabetes leads to other serious health issues such as kidney disease which then puts a huge burden on families, communities and health facilities. When it occurs at a young age, it is a much more aggressive disease than in older people.

It is critical that we act now to prevent this emerging public health issue, with engagement of Indigenous communities in the design of interventions being crucial.

“A suite of interventions across the life course are required, targeting children and young people before they develop disease, particularly childhood obesity, as well as targeting their parents to prevent intergenerational transmission of metabolic risk” 

Dr Angela Titmuss, paediatric endocrinologist at Royal Darwin Hospital and Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) PhD student : See Press Release Part 1

Read over 150 Aboriginal Health and Diabetes articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years

Read over 70 Aboriginal Health and Obesity articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years

” The latest Australian Bureau of Statistics National Health Survey shows that previous efforts to combat obesity have had limited success.

Two-thirds of adults and a quarter of children aged from five to 17 years are now overweight or obese.

While the rate for children has been stable for 10 years, the proportion of adults who are not just overweight but obese has risen from 27.9 per cent to 31.3 per cent.

Overweight and obesity not only compromise quality of life, they are strongly linked to preventable chronic diseases—heart disease, diabetes, lung disease, certain cancers, depression and arthritis, among others.

Senator McKenzie #ObesitySummit19 See Press Release Part 2 Below

Researchers are calling for immediate action to reduce risk the of obesity and diabetes in Indigenous children and young people.

A suite of interventions across the life course are required, targeting children and young people before they develop disease, particularly childhood obesity, as well as targeting their parents to prevent intergenerational transmission of metabolic risk.

The in utero period and first 5 years of life are influential in terms of the long term risk of chronic disease, and we propose that identifying and improving childhood metabolic health be a targeted priority of health services.

In an article published in the Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) today, researchers have identified childhood obesity and the increasing numbers of young people being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes as emerging public health issues.

Lead author Dr Angela Titmuss, paediatric endocrinologist at Royal Darwin Hospital and Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) PhD student, says in the MJA Perspective article that collaboration between communities, clinicians and researchers across Australia is needed to get an accurate picture of the numbers involved.

In Indigenous Australian young people with type 2 diabetes, there are also higher rates of comorbidities, with 59% also having hypertension, 24% having dyslipidaemia and 61% having obesity.

These comorbidities will have a significant impact on the future burden of disease, and may lead to renal, cardiac, neurological and ophthalmological complications. Canadian data demonstrated that 45% of patients with youth onset type 2 diabetes had reached end‐stage renal failure, requiring renal replacement therapy, 20 years after diagnosis, compared with zero people with type 1 diabetes.

Youth onset type 2 diabetes was associated with a 23 times higher risk of kidney failure and 39 times higher risk of need for dialysis, compared with young people without diabetes.

This implies that many young people who are being diagnosed with diabetes now will be on dialysis by 30 years of age, with significant effects on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities.

Menzies HOT NORTH project is supporting this research through the Diabetes in Youth collaboration, a Northern Australia Tropical Disease Collaborative Research Program, funded by the NHMRC.

The MJA Article is available here

https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2019/210/3/emerging-diabetes-and-metabolic-conditions-among-aboriginal-and-torres-strait

 Comprehensive strategies, action plans and both funding and better communication across sectors (health, education, infrastructure and local government) and departments are required to address obesity, diabetes and metabolic risk among Indigenous young people in Australia.

It requires a radical rethinking of our current approach which is failing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people and communities, and a commitment to reconsider the paradigm, to be open to innovative approaches and the involvement of multiple sectors

Part 2

I again apologise for any offence taken by the unfortunate photo taken out of context at the Obesity Summit on Friday, and I am happy if my ridicule leads to action on the complex issue of obesity in this country.

The Senator has apologised.

The issue of obesity is a matter I take very seriously and would never triavisie it- or to add in any way to stigmatisation. I sincerely apologise for this very unfortunate photo taken as I demonstrated how my stomach felt after scrambled eggs reacted w yogurt I had just eaten.

That is exactly the reason I called international and Australian experts together for the National Obesity Summit last week

Last October, the Council of Australian Governments’ (COAG) Health Council— comprising federal, state and territory ministers—agreed to develop a national strategy on obesity.

Friday’s National Obesity Summit in Canberra represented an important first step towards a new nationally cohesive strategy on obesity prevention and control.

The Summit focussed on the role of physical activity, primary health care clinicians, educators and governments to work collaboratively rather than in silos.

At the Summit we heard from national and global experts because obesity is an international issue and we need to understand how other jurisdictions are tackling the problem.  We also heard that stigma surrounding obesity can be a barrier to help being accessed.

The latest Australian Bureau of Statistics National Health Survey shows that previous efforts to combat obesity have had limited success.

Two-thirds of adults and a quarter of children aged from five to 17 years are now overweight or obese.

While the rate for children has been stable for 10 years, the proportion of adults who are not just overweight but obese has risen from 27.9 per cent to 31.3 per cent.

Overweight and obesity not only compromise quality of life, they are strongly linked to preventable chronic diseases—heart disease, diabetes, lung disease, certain cancers, depression and arthritis, among others.

We know that there is not one simple solution to tackling the problem so we need to examine all options and develop a multi-faceted approach.

The Obesity Summit represented an important moment for Australians’ health and recognised that there is no magic fat-busting policy pill.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #DiabetesWeek #NDW2018 With Key Messages from @DiabetesAus @RuralDoctorsAus It’s About Time’ aims to raise awareness about the importance of early detection and early treatment for all types of diabetes

 ” Too many Australians especially Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are being diagnosed with diabetes too late. This is true for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The delay in diagnosis is putting many people at risk of major life-threatening health problems.

Early diagnosis, treatment, ongoing support and management can reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications.

Diabetes:

  • is the leading cause of blindness in adults
  • is a leading cause of kidney failure
  • is the leading cause of preventable limb amputations
  • increases the risk of heart attacks and stroke by up to four times

It’s About Time we detected all types of diabetes earlier and save lives

See the itsabouttime.org.au for more info

 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.”

Read over 140 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Diabetes articles published over past 6 years

Part 1

More info HERE

Or watch NDSS Video HERE

 ” This National Diabetes Week, the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) is urging rural and remote Australians to be alert for the early signs of diabetes, and to see their doctor as soon as possible if they are showing any symptoms.

RDAA is also urging those living in the bush to undertake preventative health checks to try to minimise the modifiable risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes, like being physically inactive, smoking, having a poor diet, and being overweight or obese ”

RDAA President, Dr Adam Coltzau see Part 2 Below

 ” Digital technology is changing the way people living in regional and remote communities access information, and now there’s a new app to help people with diabetes.

Taken directly from a program used in 70 touchscreen kiosks throughout Australia, the Diabetes Story is a health information module developed specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can download the app at www.diabetesstory.info

See Part 3 Below

Part 2 Rural Doctors Press Release

“The theme of National Diabetes Week this year, It’s About Time, reflects the fact that too many Australians are being diagnosed with diabetes too late” RDAA President, Dr Adam Coltzau, said.

“In the case of Type 1 diabetes, late diagnosis can be life-threatening.

“And with any type of diabetes, early diagnosis, treatment and ongoing management can reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications.

“There are various types of diabetes, including:

Type 1 diabetes (an auto-immune disease which is not linked to modifiable lifestyle factors, cannot be prevented or currently cured, and is more commonly diagnosed in childhood)

Type 2 diabetes (which is associated with modifiable lifestyle risk factors and usually develops in adults over the age of 45 years, but is increasingly occurring in younger age groups including children)

“Symptoms for both these types can include excessive thirst, passing more urine, feeling tired and lethargic, and always feeling hungry — though many people with Type 2 diabetes often display no symptoms at diagnosis.

“Gestational diabetes is another form of diabetes, which typically affects between 12% and 14% of pregnant women and usually occurs around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy.

“People who develop Type 1 diabetes will typically need to go onto insulin therapy for life (or until a cure is found), delivered either by multiple daily injections or via an insulin pump attached to their body.

“While Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented, Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented in up to 58 per cent of cases.

“Preventative health care starts with visiting your doctor for check ups and identification of early signs of Type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes.

“Maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active and following a healthy eating plan, as well as managing blood pressure, cholesterol levels and not smoking, all help to prevent Type 2 diabetes from developing.

“Should Type 2 diabetes develop, early detection and management through lifestyle modifications is key to minimising its impact, as well as ensuring the early detection and treatment of any complications.

“If you have immediate concerns that you may have diabetes, make an appointment with your local GP, community nurse or diabetes educator to get it checked out sooner rather than later.”

Part 3 There’s a new app to help people with diabetes

Digital technology is changing the way people living in regional and remote communities access information, and now there’s a new app to help people with diabetes.

Taken directly from a program used in 70 touchscreen kiosks throughout Australia, the Diabetes Story is a health information module developed specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can download the app at www.diabetesstory.info

It uses digital technology to explain a complex issue in a direct, interesting way that encourages people “to take charge of their diabetes”.  It is an interactive self-management module that delivers culturally appropriate health and wellbeing diabetes information.

Consumers can use it on their mobile phones while health workers and educators will be able to use it on tablets to conduct mediated diabetes education sessions, and to provide further support for self-management.

The six domains are:

  1. a)  What is diabetes
  2. b)  Managing diabetes
  3. c)  Fighting diabetes
  4. d)  Diabetes in Pregnancy
  5. e)  Personal Stories
  6. f)   Where to get help

The App also has an audio function.

The Diabetes Story, both the module and App, has been a collaborative partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations such as the Victorian Aboriginal community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS), Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in North Queensland, as well as Diabetes Victoria, Diabetes Qld and Diabetes Australia.

The Diabetes Story project is funded under the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS), an initiative of the Australian Government administered with the help of Diabetes Australia.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Diabetes : @raykellyfitness Too Deadly for Diabetes program gives hope to Bourke NSW resident who was ‘waiting to die’

“A lot of health professionals in the country still believe type two diabetes isn’t reversible or that you can’t go into remission,

My program, tailored to suit the lifestyle and culture of the Bourke participants, was not claiming to cure the disease but manage the impacts.

We say remission rather than cure because once people put weight back on, especially around the liver and pancreas area, they will get diabetes again so it’s a bit like cancer in that respect,”

Now thanks to a program called Too Deadly for Diabetes, Barbara Flick, the CEO of the Bourke Aboriginal Health Service , Margaret Grimes  and a group of 26 other Bourke residents are tackling the disease head on.

It’s a simple program of monitored diet and exercise under the guidance of Sydney exercise physiologist Ray Kelly — and the women said

Ms Flick asked him to come to Bourke after seeing him speak at a National Aboriginal Community Health Organisation conference.d their lives had changed dramatically.

Looking forward to life

Ms Flick has been planning on running another program for the local community in June.

She said she had worked in health for 47 years, including a role as a national indigenous health advisor, and said she was blown away by what she had witnessed in Bourke.

“A number of us have gone off blood pressure medication, we’ve lost weight and we’re all feeling so much better so excited about life and planning for the future and looking forward to their grandchildren growing up.”

Photo: Barbara Flick, Joanne Edwards, George Orcher and Julie Knight have all lost more than 10kg and significantly reduced their blood sugar levels. (Supplied: Too Deadly for Diabetes)

Visit Ray Kelly Fitness website HERE

From ABC New England

By Jennifer Ingall

Margaret Grimes says she was simply waiting to die after years of living with type 2 diabetes.

“I’m over giving myself needles every day, every night at the moment it’s just like I’m living for the needles,” said the 59-year-old woman from Bourke in Western NSW.

“I don’t really have a life at the moment. I’m trapped by this diabetes — I honestly am trapped.”

She was diagnosed more than 20 years ago and is not alone in her despair over life with the disease.

Barbara Flick, the chief executive officer of the Bourke Aboriginal Health Service, was diagnosed in 1986.

“It’s been daily torture for me, and the information I used to get which is still being given out today I never saw any improvement in my condition,” said Ms Flick.

“I believed that my life journey was to move on to renal failure and die. I believed that was my path,” she said.

Taking control of their destiny

Ms Flick’s mother died 10 years ago from complications from diabetes. She recalled her mother challenged her on her death bed not to succumb to the disease.

“I’ve lost fifteen kilos and my blood sugar levels are normal. I’ve gone from having five insulin injections a day to one small one in the morning and one small one at night,” said Ms Flick.

The most dramatic change has been for Ms Grimes, who has gone from four insulin injections a day to none and her sugar level readings have dropped from 17 to between six and seven.

Photo: Kangaroo soup: The program tailors meals to meet cultural needs. (Supplied: Ray Kelly)

“My doctor, he couldn’t be happier either — he couldn’t believe when I’d take my little book in and show him my readings,” she said.

Ms Flick asked him to come to Bourke after seeing him speak at a National Aboriginal Community Health Organisation conference.

“A lot of health professionals in the country still believe type two diabetes isn’t reversible or that you can’t go into remission,” said Mr Kelly.

He said his program, tailored to suit the lifestyle and culture of the Bourke participants, was not claiming to cure the disease but manage the impacts.

“We say remission rather than cure because once people put weight back on, especially around the liver and pancreas area, they will get diabetes again so it’s a bit like cancer in that respect,” he said.

Aboriginal people most affected by diabetes

These monumental wins for the two women were small by comparison to battles others still face.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes, according to Diabetes Australia.

That’s little comfort for those who have it. Nor are figures from a 2016 Grattan Institute report showing only a quarter of the nearly one million Australians diagnosed with type 2 diabetes get the monitoring and treatment recommended for their condition.

Disease specialist Professor Paul Zimmett said despite a world class reputation for treatment and management of the disease, more needed to be done.

“We certainly have to do much better for our Indigenous community, they have one of the highest rates of diabetes in the world, they’ve got some of the highest rates of complications of diabetes.”

The Monash University professor of diabetes co-chaired a national diabetes strategy advisory group in 2014 and is Victoria’s Senior Australian of the Year.

Professor Zimmett acknowledged Australia’s medical care of the disease was equal to anywhere in the world, but there were remote and rural areas who weren’t benefitting because of a lack of resources.

“If you can prevent many complications of diabetes, kidney disease, eye disease, the need for dialysis, there’s huge cost savings,” he said.

He said he was disappointed the government failed to implement many of the group’s recommendations, including the need for longitudinal studies.

“To monitor the risk factors and new cases and deaths from diabetes, heart disease and kidney disease so that we actually know what is happening with the money that is pouring in for prevention,” he said.

The Federal Government might be hesitating, but not so Professor Alex Brown, team leader of Aboriginal Health Research at the South Australia Health and Medical Research Institute, who is three years into a comprehensive study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“We hope to recruit about 4000 people to track over years to understand what the causes of diabetes, and the complications of diabetes are,” said Professor Brown.

The study involves initial screening including eyes, hearts and kidneys and then annual follow ups.

“This could answer things about the development of diabetes in Indigenous populations here in Australia,” he said.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health @KenWyattMP A Brave Young Aboriginal Dad’s Lifesaving Messages #diabetes #obesity, leading to #heart and #kidney failure.

“Jason strongly but humbly tells it like it is, there is no self-pity, just heartfelt statements of fact that apply to all Australians.

He pleads for everyone to re-think alcohol and drug use, including a special message for our Indigenous mob.

His words should be heeded by everyone but also reinforce my top Indigenous health priorities: Men’s health, kidney, eye and ear health, maternal and child health and reducing preventable hospital admissions.

His key message is for everybody, especially men, to look after themselves, so they can be there for their families and friends for as long as possible”

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt AM paid tribute to his cousin’s bravery, talent, compassion and legacy.

Read over 330 NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health articles published by over the past 5 years

A heartbreaking video message has been released today, realising Jason Bartlett’s dying wish to raise awareness of the importance of men taking personal responsibility for their health.

View Jason’s Video Here

The 36 year old singer, songwriter and former television music show star recorded the video nine days before he passed away in Royal Perth Hospital in June, from complications of diabetes and obesity, leading to heart and kidney failure.

“In 2009, Jason made it through to the Top 24 on Australian Idol and continued his career after the show, writing, recording and performing with the popular Bartlett Brothers band,” Minister Wyatt said.

“We lost Jason shortly after he made the brave but agonising decision to cease dialysis. His final words are haunting and hard-hitting and ones he wanted every Australian to hear.

“His vision was always to change the world for the better through his music but his dream became to get the health message out.”

In the video, titled “Passing on Wisdom: Jason’s Diabetes Story”, the father of two tells how he was diagnosed with diabetes at 19 years of age. A combination of lack of health education and ignoring the danger signs gradually lead to a tragic sequence of chronic conditions that eventually took his sight and his mobility.

His key message is for everybody, especially men, to look after themselves, so they can be there for their families and friends for as long as possible.

“He wants all of us to take personal responsibility, listen to our loved ones and take advice from doctors and health professionals,” said the Minister.

“Jason says that looking after ourselves is an essential part of giving love to those around us.

“All of us are privileged to have shared in his amazing life and now we’re determined to share his quest to save the lives of others, through his message.

“If it can help just one person to make life-changing choices, Australia will be better for it, but I am sure his story will help many more consider changes that will lengthen and potentially save their lives.

“I’m joining with Jason’s family in encouraging everyone to watch his video, listen to his story and share it on social media, especially with those you love.”

Photo: Jason Bartlett’s wife Jaimee, brother Phil and family members launched the video with Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt. (Supplied: Family)

The video was produced by Jason Bartlett’s family, the University of Western Australia’s WA Centre for Rural Health, and media organisation Health Communication Resources.

It can also be shared from the WA Centre for Rural Health’s YouTube channel, at https://youtu.be/RcbQmILeDTs with a subtitled version at https://youtu.be/TvC1Tv6Z6zU

 

Aboriginal Women’s Health @DiabetesAus #Diabetes #WDD2017 Our #SuperSHEroStrong Karen West Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa QLD

 ” It’s World Diabetes Day today and around the global, we’re acknowledging the extraordinary effort of women who are living with or caring for someone with diabetes.

Diabetes doesn’t take a break & neither do our Diabetes Super SHEroes! Who’s your SuperSHEro?

Our Hero : Karen West Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa QLD

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.

See Part 2 Below

Part 1 : Gestational diabetes – the epidemic posing an immediate threat to thousands of pregnancies, and a future threat to the health of mothers, babies and families.

NACCHO has published over 130 articles Aboriginal Health and Diabetes over the past 5 years

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/diabetes/

Health experts this week warned of the alarming increase in gestational diabetes which in the past 12 months has affected 38,000 Australian women during pregnancy.

“In the last ten years, more than 200,000 women have developed gestational diabetes. Latest projections show that over the next decade more than 500,000 women could develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy,” said Professor Greg Johnson, CEO of Diabetes Australia

14 November was World Diabetes Day and Diabetes Australia has warned that gestational diabetes is now the fastest growing type of diabetes in Australia.

“Importantly, gestational diabetes poses a dual threat – firstly without appropriate management and care, it can be a serious risk to mother and baby during the pregnancy, and secondly it poses a serious future risk for both mother and baby developing type 2 diabetes and other health issues,” he said.

“After gestational diabetes, women are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and children born to mothers who have gestational diabetes are also at an increased risk of being overweight or obese, or developing type 2 diabetes later in life.”

“The alarming increase in number of women developing gestational diabetes presents an intergenerational diabetes issue and threatens to make the type 2 diabetes epidemic even bigger in future.”

“Our latest projections suggest that gestational diabetes could trigger over 250,000 women to develop type 2 diabetes or prediabetes in the coming decade.”

“Developing gestational diabetes is one of the biggest risk factors for type 2 diabetes and we need to ensure Australian mums and families get the support they need after gestational diabetes to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. We need to break this intergenerational cycle of diabetes.”

A/Professor Alison Nankervis, an Endocrinologist at the Royal Melbourne and Royal Women’s Hospital said the short term complications for mother and baby can be serious, but the risk of complications can be reduced with good treatment and care.

“Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born. The abnormal blood glucose levels can affect both the mother and baby,” A/Professor Nankervis said.

“The condition makes pregnancy higher risk for both. Babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes are more likely to be born prematurely or via C-section, be larger babies, have shoulder dystocia and a range of other complications.”

“Women with gestational diabetes may need intensive glucose management to avoid serious problems. But with the best possible management and care, the risks can be reduced and women can avoid complications.”

A/ Prof Nankervis said growth in gestational diabetes was already putting pressure on health services with the number of women with the condition doubling at the Royal Women’s Hospital since 2014.

“There are a number of factors contributing to the growing rates of gestational diabetes including the age women are falling pregnant, the changing ethnic makeup of Australia’s society, and the weight of women when they fall pregnant. The growth of gestational diabetes has been exacerbated by recent lowering of the diagnostic threshold,” she said.

Professor Johnson said diabetes in pregnancy was a major priority in the Australian National Diabetes Strategy 2016-20 but there was still no clarity on the implementation plans from the Australian Government and the State and Territory Governments.

“New approaches are needed for pre-pregnancy, during pregnancy, and after pregnancy,” said Professor Johnson.

“There needs to be help for women to be a healthy weight before pregnancy. We need to improve access to diabetes education and support for women with gestational diabetes during pregnancy as well as ensuring they are getting the care and support they need after the birth.”

“This includes seeing their GP for follow up testing to detect type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, and access to type 2 diabetes prevention programs and health professionals including diabetes educators, dietitians and exercise physiologists who can help with lifestyle management to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes.”

“Sitting back and doing nothing is not an option. This is an avalanche that will bury the health system if we don’t act,” he said.

Melbourne mum Karla Jennings developed gestational diabetes during pregnancy and subsequently developed type 2 diabetes at the young age of 30.

“I had great support while I was managing gestational diabetes but it wasn’t enough to prevent me from developing type 2 diabetes,” she said.

“The day of my type 2 diabetes diagnosis was devastating. I cried and I cried for days.”

“It was much harder for me to accept than being diagnosed with gestational diabetes but I am determined to manage diabetes and keep living my life.”

“I do think it is critical that Australia does more to support mums like me and help reduce the number of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the future.”

Diabetes Australia is the national body for people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk. Diabetes Australia is committed to reducing the impact of diabetes.

We work in partnership with diabetes health professionals, researchers and the community to minimise the impact of diabetes.

PART 2

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.

Watch the short video below for a quick guide to the benefits of the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS).

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.

The following information is from the ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ flipcharts for Indigenous Australians. It is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical

The ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ resource was originally developed by Healthy Living NT with funding provided by the Department of Health and Ageing through Diabetes Australia. The reprinting and distribution of the most recent addition has been made possible with funding by the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) – an initiative of the Australian Government administered by Diabetes Australia.

How do you feel? (Symptoms)

If you have any of the following symptoms you should talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.

  • Feeling tired or weak
  • Go to the toilet a lot
  • Feeling thirsty
  • Leg cramps
  • Feeling itchy
  • Sores and boils that won’t heal
  • Blurry vision
  • Pins and needles
  • Feeling grumpy or angry.

Through a simple test, a doctor can find out if they’re the result of diabetes.

What is it? (About diabetes)

Sugar (glucose) gives your body energy. The sugar (glucose) moves from your blood into your muscles with something called insulin. With diabetes your insulin isn’t working properly, so the sugar (glucose) doesn’t get into your muscles and body easily and there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood.

Everyone has a little bit of sugar (glucose) in their blood. The optimum sugar (glucose) level is between 4 to 6 mmol/L (after fasting).

Sugar (glucose) is fuel that comes from some of the food you eat and drink. It gives your body energy to do all sorts of things:

  • Walk
  • Think
  • Play sports
  • Hunt
  • Work
  • Rake
  • Gardening
  • Resting.

To help the sugar (glucose) move into your muscles and body cells your body needs something called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas – a body part which is near your stomach.

Insulin helps keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

With diabetes, the insulin isn’t helping the sugar (glucose) move from your body into your muscles and body cells. So it stays and builds in your body, making your blood sugar (glucose) level high.

Type 2 Diabetes

There are different types of diabetes. A lot of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is when your body stops the insulin working properly.

Fat bellies, not being active enough, eating a big mob of fatty food can stop the insulin working properly in your body.

Being active, eating healthy and being a healthy weight can help your insulin work better to keep your sugar (glucose) normal. Sometimes people might need to take tablets and insulin everyday to keep their sugar (glucose) levels normal.

Gestational Diabetes

Another type of diabetes is gestational diabetes. This happens when you are pregnant, but not all women get it. It goes away after pregnancy but you and your baby can get type 2 diabetes later in life.

Pre Diabetes

There is also Pre Diabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT). This happens when your sugar (glucose) level is high, but not high enough to be called diabetes. It doesn’t mean you have diabetes now, but it does mean you might get it later. Being active and eating healthy you can slow down the start of type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes

Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 1 diabetes. This usually happens in kids and teenagers. Type 1 diabetes is when your body kills the insulin making part in the pancreas and no insulin is made in your body. To give the body the insulin it needs, insulin injections are needed every day for the rest of their life.

What do I do? (Management of diabetes)

When there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood it damages your heart, kidneys, feet, eyes and nerves.

You can keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal by:

Eating healthy

  • Have plenty of bush tucker and have shop foods and home cooked meals that are low in fat, sugar and salt.
  • Have something from each of the core food groups every day. They give you energy, fight sickness and help care for your body to keep it strong.
  • Drink plenty of water.

Avoiding and eat less fat, sugar and salt

  • Eat less fat as it makes you put on weight and gives you problems with your heart.
  • Pick meat with no fat or only small bits of fat on it. Cut the fat off the meat and take the skin off chicken.
  • Drain the juices (fat) after cooking meat and scoop out the fat from the top of stews.
  • Avoid cooking with or having fats like butter, oil, margarine or dripping.
  • It is better to boil, steam, stew, grill, microwave or stir-fry food.

Being a healthy weight (not too fat and not too skinny)

  • Do this by eating less, eating healthy and being more active.

Keeping active

  • It helps you lose weight and keep it off and it keeps you healthy.
  • It helps your insulin to work properly.
  • Walk, job, play sport, hunt, garden, work around the place.
  • Be active for 30 minutes or more every day OR do 10 minutes 3 times a day.

Taking your medicine

  • Take your medicine at the times the doctor tells you.
  • Take them with or after eating in the morning, afternoon and supper time every day.
  • Refill your medicine box in the morning (get some more medicine before it gets low and so you don’t run out).
  • Take your medicine with you when you go to see family, walkabout or away from home.
  • Put your medicines somewhere cool, dry and safe so they won’t go bad.
  • Keep your medicines out of reach of kids.

Remember to:

  • Have your check-ups with your doctor, health worker or nurse. Have regular check-ups for your eyes, feet, kidneys, blood pressure, skin and teeth. If you notice anything different about your body talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.
  • Check your sugar (glucose) levels at the times your doctor, health worker or nurse tells you.
  • See your doctor, health worker or nurse straight away if you feel sick.
  • Check your feet and skin for sores and/or cracks every day.

Why take medicine for? (Medications for diabetes)

Indigenous

Diabetes medicine helps to keep your body strong and well and it helps to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

When eating healthy, being active and being a healthy weight isn’t working at keeping your sugar (glucose) levels normal, you might need to take tablets and/or insulin.

The doctor might put you on tablets called Metformin to help your insulin work better and to lower the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood.

After a while the pancreas gets tired from working too hard and can’t make enough insulin, so your doctor might put you on tablets called Sulphonylurea. This medicine helps your body make more insulin.

Or, after awhile, the doctor might need to add another lot of tablets called Glitazone or Acarbose.

Remember to have your medicine with or after eating, in the morning, afternoon or supper time. Take them at the time the doctor tells you to.

All tablets work differently and some can have side effects.

If the following problems don’t go away or if you are still worried about them, then talk to your doctor.

  • Feel sick like you want to vomit (nausea)
  • A sore belly
  • Diarrhoea
  • Sugar (glucose) levels going too low
  • Have fluid build-up (retention)

When your sugar (glucose) levels get too high and stays high the doctor might put you on tablets and give you insulin.

  • Having insulin doesn’t mean you have type 1 diabetes.
  • Insulin isn’t like tablets so it shouldn’t be swallowed.
  • You inject the insulin under your skin in different places on your belly.

Talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse about insulin and what is right for you.

Having too much insulin or taking too many Sulphonylurea tablets can make your sugar (glucose) levels go too low (under 3) and make you hypo (hypoglycaemia).

You can also go hypo (hypoglycaemia) if you are:

  • Not eating, not eating enough or eating too late
  • Being extra active
  • Drinking grog (alcohol).

You might not feel anything when you have a hypo (hypoglycaemia), but sometimes you might feel:

  • Shaky
  • Hungry
  • Get headaches
  • Weak
  • Confused
  • Angry
  • Talk like you’re drunk when you’re not
  • Sweaty.

When you have these feelings or think you are having a hypo (hypoglycaemia), get your sugar (glucose) level up fast by drinking or eating something sweet.

Keep your sugar (glucose) level normal and stop having another hypo (hypoglycaemia) by eating a sandwich or meal after you have something sweet.

Remember, after taking your tablets or insulin:

  • Keep them somewhere cool, dry and safe (maybe in the fridge at home or at the clinic) so that they won’t go bad
  • Keep them out of reach of children
  • Get rid of your syringes/needles and finger pricking needles by putting them in a “sharps container” or “hard plastic” empty container with a lid (see if the clinic has one).

Remember when you go see family, walkabout or are away for home take your tablets and/or insulin with you.

Why me? (Risk factors)

Nobody knows how or why some people get diabetes but there are some things we know that can add to your chances of getting it. You have more chance of getting it when you are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, but not all Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islande people have diabetes.

Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people live different to how they used to live. Changes that add to your chances of getting diabetes are:

  • Not as active
  • More overweight
  • Eating fatty salty, sugary foods.

People living the old way were:

  • Active
  • Leaner and fit
  • Eating healthy food (bush tucker).

Other chances of getting diabetes include:

  • It is in your family tree or when someone in your family has diabetes
  • You had diabetes when pregnant
  • You get older
  • You eat too much and you eat too many fatty and sugary foods
  • You are overweight
  • You are not active enough
  • You have pancreatitis (a sickness of the pancreas).

There are things you can’t change or stop you from getting diabetes:

  • It’s in your family
  • You are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
  • You are pregnant with diabetes
  • You are getting older.

The things you can do to slow down the start of diabetes:

  • Eat healthy and be a healthy weight
  • Be active
  • Don’t drink too much grog.

Nobody knows why or how people get diabetes. After a while it can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves making you really sick.

Talk to your doctor, clinic, nurse or health worker about having a test to find out if you have diabetes. You can’t always feel it or see it happening, so you might not kn

NACCHO #Aboriginal Health and #Diabetes @theMJA the @NHMRC #Indigenous guidelines need update

Early onset of type 2 diabetes is very common in Aboriginal communities following Westernisation, so I agree with the recommendations of NACCHO and the RACGP, which recommended early screening.

Whether you do it annually or every 3 years is a less important question to me, and very patient-dependent.

Only 18% of Indigenous adults were tested for diabetes annually, as per the more intensive guidelines by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), leading the authors to claim that the RACGP/DA guidelines were more practicable “

Professor Kerin O’Dea, Professor Emeritus at the University of South Australia and Honorary Professor at the University of Melbourne, said that the NHMRC recommendations “really need to be updated”.

Originally published MJA

Read over 120 diabetes related posts by NACCHO over past 5 years

MORE can be done to increase diabetes screening rates among Indigenous Australians and enable earlier intervention, say experts who are calling for a greater focus on young adults.

A study published in the MJA found enormous variation in diabetes screening rates between different Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs).

The proportion of Indigenous adults screened for diabetes at least once in 3 years – as per the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners and Diabetes Australia (RACGP/DA) guidelines – ranged from 16% to 90% between different services.

Overall, 74% of Indigenous adults received a screening test for diabetes at least once between 2010 and 2013, the study found, based on de-identified data on 20 978 patients from 18 ACCHSs.

Only 18% of Indigenous adults were tested for diabetes annually, as per the more intensive guidelines by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), leading the authors to claim that the RACGP/DA guidelines were more practicable.

Extract Overview provided by NACCHO

Download a full copy of 2 nd edition

http://www.racgp.org.au/download/documents/AHU/2ndednationalguide.pdf

Type 2 diabetes is most commonly found in obese adults who develop increasing insulin resistance over months or years. For these patients there is a substantial ‘prediabetic’ window period of opportunity to offer preventive interventions. Screening for diabetes is safe, accurate and cost effective, and detects a substantial proportion of people who may not otherwise have received early intervention.1 This chapter discusses type 2 diabetes in adults who are not pregnant.

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is 3–4 times higher at any age than the general population, with an earlier age of onset.2 The precise prevalence is hard to pinpoint; a 2011 systematic review of 24 studies showed prevalence estimates ranged from 3.5–31%, with most lying between 10% and 20%. Diabetes prevalence in remote populations is approximately twice that of urban populations and is higher among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.3

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and women die from diabetes at 23 and 37 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australian men and women respectively, in the 35–54 years age group.4 Large scale clinical trials have demonstrated that appropriate management of diabetes can prevent the development or delay the progression of complications such as myocardial infarction, eye disease and renal failure.5

Obesity is a very strong predictor for diabetes; a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2 increases the absolute risk of type 2 diabetes by 1.8–19-fold, depending on the population studied. A cohort study of non-diabetic Aboriginal adults aged 15–77 years in central Australia found that those with a BMI of ≥25 kg/m2 had 3.3 times the risk of developing diabetes over 8 years of follow up compared to those with a BMI <25 kg/m2.1 The AusDiab study found that three measures of obesity: BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio, all had similar correlations with diabetes and CVD risk.6 Waist circumference performed slightly better than BMI at predicting diabetes in a remote Aboriginal community

The study defined screening tests to include glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) testing as well as the oral glucose tolerance test and venous glucose level testing.

Barriers to screening included being aged under 50 years, being transient rather than a current patient and attending the service less frequently, the study found. The authors concluded that particular attention should be given to increasing the screening rate in these groups.

The finding that young people were less likely to be tested was “intuitively reasonable”, the authors said, given that the risk of developing diabetes rises with age. However, they suggested that it was still best practice to test Indigenous adults from the age of 18 years, as it provided a “substantial opportunity for limiting the impact of type 2 diabetes”.

Indigenous Australians aged 25–34 years are five times more likely to have diabetes or high blood sugar levels than non-Indigenous Australians of the same age, they noted.

Despite this difference between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) only recommends screening Indigenous people for diabetes once they are aged over 35 years, and doing it every 3 years.

Professor Kerin O’Dea, Professor Emeritus at the University of South Australia and Honorary Professor at the University of Melbourne, said that the NHMRC recommendations “really need to be updated”.

“Early onset of type 2 diabetes is very common in Aboriginal communities following Westernisation, so I agree with the recommendations of NACCHO and the RACGP, which recommended early screening,” she told MJA InSight.

“Whether you do it annually or every 3 years is a less important question to me, and very patient-dependent,” she said.

Professor O’Dea said that more widespread use of HbA1c testing could increase the screening rate in Aboriginal communities, particularly among younger people and those who were more transient.

“If screening for diabetes was just a simple opportunistic HbA1c test, you wouldn’t have so many problems getting people to have it done,” she said. “HbA1c testing will give you a good idea of the mean glucose level, and unlike the glucose tolerance test, you don’t have to ask the patient to return in the fasting state.

“If it does turn out that the patient has borderline diabetes, then you can ask if they are prepared to do a glucose tolerance test,” she added.

Study co-author, Associate Professor Christine Paul, said that there was significant variation in the use of HBA1c testing across sites and across time in the study.

“I think it is possible that increasing the use of HbA1c as a screening test may help [to increase screening rates]; however, I don’t think it’s the main answer,” she said. “Clearly some health services need support to get systems in place, regardless of which test they use.”

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @DiabetesAus #NDW2017 #ItsAboutTime for National #Diabetes Week

 

 “It is National Diabetes Week from 9-15 July and Diabetes Australia’s “It’s About Time” campaign aims to raise awareness about the importance of early detection and early treatment for all types of diabetes.

Too many Australians are being diagnosed with diabetes too late. The is true for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The delay in diagnosis is putting many people at risk of major life threatening health problems.

It’s About Time  we detected all types of diabetes earlier and save lives.

 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes.

Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.”

See full Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander diabetes info below Part 1

Read over 120 NACCHO published articles about Diabetes  in past 5 years

 ” New research has found that only 5% of Australians aged over 40 have had a type 2 diabetes risk check in the past two years.

Also, more than half of people surveyed were unable name any diabetes related complication despite type 2 diabetes being a leading cause of vision loss, kidney damage, heart attacks, stroke and limb amputation.

The release of the research comes at the start of National Diabetes Week as Diabetes Australia launches a new campaign, It’s About Time, to raise awareness of the seriousness of the type 2 diabetes, and urge 500,000 Australians who could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes to get checked  ”

IT’S ABOUT TIME WE DETECTED  SILENT UNDIAGNOSED TYPE 2 DIABETES see Part 2 below

Part 1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander diabetes info

Watch the short video below for a quick guide to the benefits of the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) ”

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.

The following information is from the ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ flipcharts for Indigenous Australians.

It is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

The ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ resource was originally developed by Healthy Living NT with funding provided by the Department of Health and Ageing through Diabetes Australia. The reprinting and distribution of the most recent addition has been made possible with funding by the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) – an initiative of the Australian Government administered by Diabetes Australia.

How do you feel? (Symptoms)

If you have any of the following symptoms you should talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.

  • Feeling tired or weak
  • Go to the toilet a lot
  • Feeling thirsty
  • Leg cramps
  • Feeling itchy
  • Sores and boils that won’t heal
  • Blurry vision
  • Pins and needles
  • Feeling grumpy or angry.

Through a simple test, a doctor can find out if they’re the result of diabetes.

What is it? (About diabetes)

Sugar (glucose) gives your body energy. The sugar (glucose) moves from your blood into your muscles with something called insulin. With diabetes your insulin isn’t working properly, so the sugar (glucose) doesn’t get into your muscles and body easily and there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood.

Everyone has a little bit of sugar (glucose) in their blood. The optimum sugar (glucose) level is between 4 to 6 mmol/L (after fasting).

Sugar (glucose) is fuel that comes from some of the food you eat and drink. It gives your body energy to do all sorts of things:

  • Walk
  • Think
  • Play sports
  • Hunt
  • Work
  • Rake
  • Gardening
  • Resting.

To help the sugar (glucose) move into your muscles and body cells your body needs something called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas – a body part which is near your stomach.

Insulin helps keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

With diabetes, the insulin isn’t helping the sugar (glucose) move from your body into your muscles and body cells. So it stays and builds in your body, making your blood sugar (glucose) level high.

Type 2 Diabetes

There are different types of diabetes. A lot of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is when your body stops the insulin working properly.

Fat bellies, not being active enough, eating a big mob of fatty food can stop the insulin working properly in your body.

Being active, eating healthy and being a healthy weight can help your insulin work better to keep your sugar (glucose) normal. Sometimes people might need to take tablets and insulin everyday to keep their sugar (glucose) levels normal.

Gestational Diabetes

Another type of diabetes is gestational diabetes. This happens when you are pregnant, but not all women get it. It goes away after pregnancy but you and your baby can get type 2 diabetes later in life.

Pre Diabetes

There is also Pre Diabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT). This happens when your sugar (glucose) level is high, but not high enough to be called diabetes. It doesn’t mean you have diabetes now, but it does mean you might get it later. Being active and eating healthy you can slow down the start of type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes

Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 1 diabetes. This usually happens in kids and teenagers. Type 1 diabetes is when your body kills the insulin making part in the pancreas and no insulin is made in your body. To give the body the insulin it needs, insulin injections are needed every day for the rest of their life.

What do I do? (Management of diabetes)

When there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood it damages your heart, kidneys, feet, eyes and nerves.

You can keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal by:

Eating healthy

  • Have plenty of bush tucker and have shop foods and home cooked meals that are low in fat, sugar and salt.
  • Have something from each of the core food groups every day. They give you energy, fight sickness and help care for your body to keep it strong.
  • Drink plenty of water.

Avoiding and eat less fat, sugar and salt

  • Eat less fat as it makes you put on weight and gives you problems with your heart.
  • Pick meat with no fat or only small bits of fat on it. Cut the fat off the meat and take the skin off chicken.
  • Drain the juices (fat) after cooking meat and scoop out the fat from the top of stews.
  • Avoid cooking with or having fats like butter, oil, margarine or dripping.
  • It is better to boil, steam, stew, grill, microwave or stir-fry food.

Being a healthy weight (not too fat and not too skinny)

  • Do this by eating less, eating healthy and being more active.

Keeping active

  • It helps you lose weight and keep it off and it keeps you healthy.
  • It helps your insulin to work properly.
  • Walk, job, play sport, hunt, garden, work around the place.
  • Be active for 30 minutes or more every day OR do 10 minutes 3 times a day.

Taking your medicine

  • Take your medicine at the times the doctor tells you.
  • Take them with or after eating in the morning, afternoon and supper time every day.
  • Refill your medicine box in the morning (get some more medicine before it gets low and so you don’t run out).
  • Take your medicine with you when you go to see family, walkabout or away from home.
  • Put your medicines somewhere cool, dry and safe so they won’t go bad.
  • Keep your medicines out of reach of kids.

Remember to:

  • Have your check-ups with your doctor, health worker or nurse. Have regular check-ups for your eyes, feet, kidneys, blood pressure, skin and teeth. If you notice anything different about your body talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.
  • Check your sugar (glucose) levels at the times your doctor, health worker or nurse tells you.
  • See your doctor, health worker or nurse straight away if you feel sick.
  • Check your feet and skin for sores and/or cracks every day.

Why take medicine for? (Medications for diabetes)

Indigenous  

Diabetes medicine helps to keep your body strong and well and it helps to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

When eating healthy, being active and being a healthy weight isn’t working at keeping your sugar (glucose) levels normal, you might need to take tablets and/or insulin.

The doctor might put you on tablets called Metformin to help your insulin work better and to lower the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood.

After a while the pancreas gets tired from working too hard and can’t make enough insulin, so your doctor might put you on tablets called Sulphonylurea. This medicine helps your body make more insulin.

Or, after awhile, the doctor might need to add another lot of tablets called Glitazone or Acarbose.

Remember to have your medicine with or after eating, in the morning, afternoon or supper time. Take them at the time the doctor tells you to.

All tablets work differently and some can have side effects.

If the following problems don’t go away or if you are still worried about them, then talk to your doctor.

  • Feel sick like you want to vomit (nausea)
  • A sore belly
  • Diarrhoea
  • Sugar (glucose) levels going too low
  • Have fluid build-up (retention)

When your sugar (glucose) levels get too high and stays high the doctor might put you on tablets and give you insulin.

  • Having insulin doesn’t mean you have type 1 diabetes.
  • Insulin isn’t like tablets so it shouldn’t be swallowed.
  • You inject the insulin under your skin in different places on your belly.

Talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse about insulin and what is right for you.

Having too much insulin or taking too many Sulphonylurea tablets can make your sugar (glucose) levels go too low (under 3) and make you hypo (hypoglycaemia).

You can also go hypo (hypoglycaemia) if you are:

  • Not eating, not eating enough or eating too late
  • Being extra active
  • Drinking grog (alcohol).

You might not feel anything when you have a hypo (hypoglycaemia), but sometimes you might feel:

  • Shaky
  • Hungry
  • Get headaches
  • Weak
  • Confused
  • Angry
  • Talk like you’re drunk when you’re not
  • Sweaty.

When you have these feelings or think you are having a hypo (hypoglycaemia), get your sugar (glucose) level up fast by drinking or eating something sweet.

Keep your sugar (glucose) level normal and stop having another hypo (hypoglycaemia) by eating a sandwich or meal after you have something sweet.

Remember, after taking your tablets or insulin:

  • Keep them somewhere cool, dry and safe (maybe in the fridge at home or at the clinic) so that they won’t go bad
  • Keep them out of reach of children
  • Get rid of your syringes/needles and finger pricking needles by putting them in a “sharps container” or “hard plastic” empty container with a lid (see if the clinic has one).

Remember when you go see family, walkabout or are away for home take your tablets and/or insulin with you.

Why me? (Risk factors)

Nobody knows how or why some people get diabetes but there are some things we know that can add to your chances of getting it. You have more chance of getting it when you are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, but not all Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islande people have diabetes.

Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people live different to how they used to live. Changes that add to your chances of getting diabetes are:

  • Not as active
  • More overweight
  • Eating fatty salty, sugary foods.

People living the old way were:

  • Active
  • Leaner and fit
  • Eating healthy food (bush tucker).

Other chances of getting diabetes include:

  • It is in your family tree or when someone in your family has diabetes
  • You had diabetes when pregnant
  • You get older
  • You eat too much and you eat too many fatty and sugary foods
  • You are overweight
  • You are not active enough
  • You have pancreatitis (a sickness of the pancreas).

There are things you can’t change or stop you from getting diabetes:

  • It’s in your family
  • You are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
  • You are pregnant with diabetes
  • You are getting older.

The things you can do to slow down the start of diabetes:

  • Eat healthy and be a healthy weight
  • Be active
  • Don’t drink too much grog.

Nobody knows why or how people get diabetes. After a while it can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves making you really sick.

Talk to your doctor, clinic, nurse or health worker about having a test to find out if you have diabetes.

You can’t always feel it or see it happening, so you might not know you have it.

Part 2 :IT’S ABOUT TIME WE DETECTED  SILENT UNDIAGNOSED TYPE 2 DIABETES

New research has found that only 5% of Australians aged over 40 have had a type 2 diabetes risk check in the past two years.

Also, more than half of people surveyed were unable name any diabetes related complication despite type 2 diabetes being a leading cause of vision loss, kidney damage, heart attacks, stroke and limb amputation.

The release of the research comes at the start of National Diabetes Week as Diabetes Australia launches a new campaign, It’s About Time, to raise awareness of the seriousness of the type 2 diabetes, and urge 500,000 Australians who could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes to get checked.

Diabetes Australia CEO Professor Greg Johnson said there was great concern about the length of time many people have silent, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes without it being diagnosed.

“It’s about time we detected silent undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Many people have type 2 diabetes for up to seven years before being diagnosed and during that time up to half begin to develop a diabetes-related complication,” Professor Johnson said.

“The tragedy is that much of the damage to the body that causes diabetes-related complications like vision loss, kidney damage, heart attack, stroke and limb amputation is preventable.

“AUSDRISK is a free, online risk assessment you can take to determine your risk of type 2 diabetes. Despite over 60% of Australians having risk factors for type 2 diabetes, the research shows only 5% of Australians over the age of 40 have done the type 2 diabetes risk assessment in past two years” he said.

The survey found:

  •  Only 21% of Australians over the age of 40 had heard of the Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk (AUSDRISK) Assessment;
  •  Only 5% of Australians over the age of 40 had completed the AUSDRISK assessment in the past two years; and
  •  More than 51% of people over the age of 18 were unable to name any serious diabetes-related complication despite type 2 diabetes being a leading cause of vision loss and blindness, limb amputation, kidney damage, heart attacks and stroke.

Diabetes NSW & ACT CEO Sturt Eastwood urged people take the free type 2 diabetes risk assessment today.

“Type 2 diabetes is the single biggest challenge confronting Australia’s health system and it’s time we did a better job of detecting type 2 diabetes earlier,” Mr Eastwood said.

“The earlier a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes occurs, the sooner a management plan can be put in place delivering better outcomes for the individual and the community.

“The AUSDRISK check only takes about five minutes. If you take the check and get a high score, see your doctor so they can determine if you have type 2 diabetes.

“If you are diagnosed there is a lot of support and advice, and many effective treatments available to help you manage type 2 diabetes and reduce the risk of developing diabetes-related complications.”

Professor Lesley Campbell from St. Vincent’s Hospital said front line health professionals were spending more and more time treating patients who present with type 2 diabetes complications. Diabetes was often still undiagnosed until admission for heart attack, stroke or lung or heart transplantation.

“Unfortunately we are seeing people with type 2 diabetes diagnosed too late and the impact of late diagnosis and lack of treatment is filling our hospital beds,” Professor Campbell said.

“Diabetes is ranked in the top ten causes of death in Australia and is the leading cause of preventable blindness, limb amputation and end stage kidney disease.

“Much of this can be avoided with early diagnosis and optimal treatment.”

For Sydney woman Belinda Nakauta, having her toe amputated because of type 2 diabetes was a major wake up call.

“I went to the doctor about a urinary tract infection and he suggested I get checked for type 2 diabetes. I was shocked when it came back positive and the scary thing is I have no idea about how long I was living with type 2 diabetes before I was assessed,” Ms Nakauta said.

“Having a toe amputated a couple of years ago was a wakeup call. Having a part of your body cut off, no matter how small, is a scary experience. With the help of a dietitian and regular gym visits, I’ve lost more than 20 kilograms and dramatically cut back on the medication I need to manage my type 2 diabetes.

“I wish I had done something five or ten years ago. I don’t want to be that person in the ICU on dialysis. I don’t want to have foot complications or lose my eye sight. I don’t want to be that person.

“It was about time I started taking my diabetes seriously and I hope my story helps convince all Australians that it is about time we do something about diabetes.”

NACCHO supports World Health Day #WHD2016 by issuing a call for action on diabetes

untitled

“When type 2 diabetes was first suggested to Norm as the cause of his dizziness, he found it hard to believe. For a while he was in denial, until a blood glucose test confirmed it.

A series of serious and life-changing events, including a motorbike accident and cancer diagnosis, made it difficult for Norm to get into any sort of routine to manage his diabetes. After suffering a stroke, he decided he needed to focus on his diabetes, especially because it was one aspect of his health he could control.”

See Norms story below

Close the gap is about generational change and there are no quick fixes. Real gains, although small, are already being made in life expectancy and other key areas like maternal and child health.

The number of Indigenous Australians affected by the disease is particularly alarming.  Statistics show that one in six Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (18 per cent of the population) have diabetes or high blood sugar levels. 

Rates of diabetes are higher in remote areas, and compared to the rest of the population, Indigenous Australians are more than three times as likely as non-Indigenous people to have the disease.

We need to see continued, long-term commitments from all levels of government in the programs that work. In health, it’s Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services that are making the biggest inroads against the targets to close the gap.

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chairperson Matthew Cooke on World Health Day 2016

“The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, WHO announced ahead of World Health Day.

WHO is marking its annual World Health Day (7 April), which celebrates the Organization’s founding in 1948, by issuing a call for action on diabetes. In its first “Global report on diabetes”, WHO highlights the need to step up prevention and treatment of the disease.

Measures needed include expanding health-promoting environments to reduce diabetes risk factors, like physical inactivity and unhealthy diets, and strengthening national capacities to help people with diabetes receive the treatment and care they need to manage their conditions.

See Report Here

“This year World Health Day is focused on beating diabetes, a disease which affects up to 1.7 million Australians according to Diabetes Australia figures “

Alison Verhoeven
Chief Executive, The Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association

New Microsoft Word Document - Copy

Norm is now monitoring his diet and slowly losing weight in an effort to improve his blood glucose levels. He’s determined not to let his diabetes stop him from doing the things he enjoys and urges others in a similar situation not to be ashamed of their condition, especially Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Rates of diabetes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are estimated to be three times higher than for other Australians.

“The blood glucose test they do for diabetes is easy. It can be hard to change your lifestyle but with diabetes, it’s better to do something sooner rather than later.”

Norm’s doctor helped him sign up to the National Diabetes Services Scheme* (NDSS) when he was diagnosed, which gave him access to test strips, syringes and pen needles at much lower prices.

Norm says that more education is needed so that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities know about the benefits of the NDSS and the range of support services it provides for people with diabetes.

As the NDSS support services are targeted in areas with the highest number of registrations, people who register are helping ensure others in their community can get the support they need.

In his regular men’s group meetings, Norm says the guys were surprised to hear that his stroke was most likely caused by diabetes.

“They were shocked when they found out I had diabetes, and that it may have caused my stroke. I think we find it hard to relate to diabetes until we see someone who is directly affected by it.”

Diabetes educator Michael Porter talks to Norm’s men’s group about health issues every few months. He often encourages men at the group to get tested, and if they have diabetes, to register for the NDSS.

“Joining the NDSS can help fight diabetes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Anyone with diabetes can sign-up and get access to free and discounted products to help them live well with diabetes. The NDSS card also gives people access to education sessions and support groups, which can really help them make changes to get their health back on track.

“If we know there are a large number of people in an area with diabetes, then we can make sure to provide more support and education services in that area. The NDSS helps us to know where services are most needed.”

*The National Diabetes Scheme is an initiative of the Australian Government administered by Diabetes Australia. Major sponsor  NACCHO Aboriginal Health Newspaper Page 10 April edition : Download 24 pages here

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World Health Day’s diabetes focus shows importance of funding Healthier Medicare

World Health Day is a timely reminder of the importance of delivering proper funding for the government’s recently announced health care home trials, Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA) Chief Executive Alison Verhoeven said.

“This year World Health Day is focused on beating diabetes, a disease which affects up to 1.7 million Australians according to Diabetes Australia figures,” Ms Verhoeven said.

“The Commonwealth recently announced its Healthier Medicare package which includes measures that would be a welcome support for people with chronic disease, including some with diabetes. However, the funding for these reforms is very limited and tied to broader health funding, where further reform is still required.”

The proposal for Healthier Medicare included allocating an additional $21 million to the package, in addition to withholding $70 million in state hospital funding, to pay for the reforms. However, the AHHA has called on the government to consider alternative funding methods, including drawing money from the Medical Research Future Fund to support and evaluate the trials.

“The allocated funding is insufficient to fully implement the Healthier Medicare reforms,” Ms Verhoeven said.

“Additionally, without adequate evidence that the reforms are delivering a reduction in hospitalisations, withholding funding from hospitals remains an unsatisfactory solution.”

“The government’s priority must be to develop durable, adequate funding to support an equitable, accessible, sustainable health system that provides quality outcomes for all Australians.”

The AHHA also urges the government to consider preventive measures to halt Australia’s climbing obesity rates, to help reduce the growing burden of two of Australia’s most common chronic conditions – diabetes and heart disease.

“If funding is withheld from hospitals, reducing preventable hospitalisations will become a vital part of ensuring the health system does not become overburdened,” Ms Verhoeven said.

There remain questions over which approach the Commonwealth Government will take to tax reform and funding of the health system. The AHHA has called on state, territory and Commonwealth governments to proceed carefully on tax and health system reform and ensure there remains a consistent capacity for funding quality health services across all states into the future.

NACCHO Diabetes Health Alert :Maps show widespread impact of diabetes across Australia, Indigenous communities

 

aboriginal-woman-at-dialysis

“The number of Indigenous Australians affected by the disease is particularly alarming. 

Statistics show that one in six Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (18 per cent of the population) have diabetes or high blood sugar levels. 

Rates of diabetes are higher in remote areas, and compared to the rest of the population, Indigenous Australians are more than three times as likely as non-Indigenous people to have the disease. 

According to the NDSS map, over 10 per cent of the population around Alice Springs suffers from diabetes. “

The prevalence of diabetes, particularly Type 2, is rapidly increasing around the country. These maps show just how far it has spread, and the physical toll it is taking.

By Madeleine King, Jason Thomas

Every five minutes, someone in Australia is diagnosed with diabetes. That’s 280 people, every day.

Of those cases, it is estimated 85 per cent of them are being diagnosed as Type 2 diabetics.

It’s the form of the disease that is arguably most preventable, caused when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin, or cannot produce enough of the hormone, produced by the pancreas to keep the body’s blood sugar levels under control.

This week, Insight is looking into this particular strain of the disease.

Who is vulnerable, what are the causes, where does it occur, and is it preventable?

Diabetes Australia has developed an interactive map that shows how widespread the disease is, based off data provided by registrants to the government’s National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS).

Light blue parts of the map show electoral districts where diabetes has a low rate of occurrence in the population, through to dark red where the disease is highly prevalent.

In Sydney, more affluent suburbs in the east have a very low rate of diabetes, whereas people in the west, in areas around Fairfield, Blacktown and Liverpool, are much more affected by the disease.

In the suburbs around Wetherill Park, 8.3 per cent of the population are signed up for the scheme.

 Diabetes Australia map of diabetes prevalence in Sydney

The prevalence of diabetes in the Sydney region: NDSS

Disadvantaged areas are more likely to see cases of diabetes, and people from particular ethnic backgrounds – including Indigenous Australian, Pacific Islander, Chinese and sub-continental India – are more susceptible.

Does your area have a greater rate of diabetes? Find out here.

The number of Indigenous Australians affected by the disease is particularly alarming.

Statistics show that one in six Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (18 per cent of the population) have diabetes or high blood sugar levels.

Rates of diabetes are higher in remote areas, and compared to the rest of the population, Indigenous Australians are more than three times as likely as non-Indigenous people to have the disease.

According to the NDSS map, over 10 per cent of the population around Alice Springs suffers from diabetes.

 Rate of diabetes in and around Alice Springs

The rate of diabetes in and around Alice Springs: NDSS

A greater rate of diabetes comes with a higher likelihood of its associated complications: heart disease, stroke, amputation and blindness, to name a few.

The map below shows the rate of diabetes-related, preventable hospitalisations in the year 2013-2014.

In areas with large, remote Indigenous populations – northwest WA and central NT – there were over 800 hospitalisations.

NACCHO Promotion

Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Close the Gap Campaign for the governments of Australia to commit to achieving equality  for Indigenous people in the areas of health and  life expectancy within 25 years.”

Next publication date 6 April 2016

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Thanks to all our supporters, most especially our advertisers, NACCHO’S Aboriginal Health News is here to stay.

We are now looking to all our members, programs and sector stakeholders for advertising, compelling articles, eye-catching images and commentary for inclusion in our next edition.

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NACCHO Diabetes Day News: Australia delivers new national diabetes strategy 201

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Australia delivers new national diabetes strategy 2016-2020

“A growing number of people with diabetes also had other chronic diseases – known as co-morbidities – and therefore a key theme of the strategy was to provide a seamless partnership between people with diabetes and their health and community care providers”

Health Minister Sussan Ley

The Turnbull Government has released a new national strategy to tackle diabetes, which is emerging as a major chronic illness for patients – and threat to the health of the economy – in Australia.

DOWNLOAD THE STRATEGY HERE

To coincide with World diabetes Day, Health Minister Sussan Ley said the Australian National Diabetes Strategy was a blueprint for improving the prevention, care and management of diabetes to the end of the decade.

“It is likely that more than one million Australians, that is five per cent of adults, are living with diabetes,” Ms Ley said.

“In Australia Type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately 85 per cent of people with diabetes, with approximately 12 per cent with diabetes diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Around 12-14 per cent of pregnant women will develop Gestational Diabetes Mellitus which usually disappears following the birth of the baby, but puts women at risk of subsequently developing diabetes.

“Diabetes related complications including heart attack, stroke, amputation, blindness, kidney failure, depression and nerve disease but in many cases the disease is preventable.

“For this reason the emphasis of the strategy is on prevention, early diagnosis, intervention, management and treatment, centred on the role of primary care.”

Ms Ley said that the theme of this year’s World Diabetes Day was on healthy eating as a key factor in preventing the onset of Type 2 diabetes and an important part of the effective management of all Types of diabetes to avoid complications.

“This is an area that we have been concentrating on for the past two years with our Health Star Rating system on processed foods now well accepted by the food industry and consumers.

“Rural Health Minister Fiona Nash will also chair an historic first meeting of the new Healthy Food Partnership on Friday – a working group of health, retail and farm organisations which will agree on strategies to reformulate food, increase the eating of fresh fruit and vegetables and increase consumer awareness about portion sizes.”

Minister Ley said a growing number of people with diabetes also had other chronic diseases – known as co-morbidities – and therefore a key theme of the strategy was to provide a seamless partnership between people with diabetes and their health and community care providers.

“This will be enhanced by the work being undertaken by the Government’s Primary Healthcare Advisory Group and broader National Strategic Framework for Chronic Conditions,” Ms Ley said.

“Under this strategy people will be better informed about diabetes so they can make better decisions. In addition, research and evidence will strengthen prevention and care and, hopefully, move us that much closer to a cure for diabetes.”

The Australian government provides support to people with diabetes through Medicare and a range of programs and this new Strategy will not replace or override existing processes. This Strategy aims to better coordinate health resources across the sector to where they are needed most.