NACCHO CEO Press Release #ClosingtheGap : Aboriginal led solutions the key to closing the health gap #Redfernstatement

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The Prime Minister committed to working with our people this morning and from this date on we expect nothing less,

For NACCHO the acceptance that our Aboriginal controlled health services deliver the best model of integrated primary health care in Australia is a clear demonstration that every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person should have ready access to these services, no matter where they live.

We can more than double the current 140 Aboriginal medical services that will improve health outcomes.”

NACCHO  CEO  Pat Turner Press Release : 

Malcolm Turnbull and Bill Shorten receive the Redfern statement, a blueprint for improvement in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs, before the release of the Closing the Gap report. Photograph: Mike Bowers for the Guardian

Download :  naccho-1702-mr-naccho-response-to-closing-the-gap

ICYMI Todays other NACCHO posts below

NACCHO Aboriginal Health download the #ClosingtheGap report #Redfernstatement Post 4 of 5

Today’s Closing the Gap Report demonstrates the need to more than double the network and reach of Aboriginal controlled medical services to Close the Gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

National Aboriginal and Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), CEO, Pat Turner, said despite some improvement in education outcomes, only one out of seven Closing the Gap targets is on track ( see ABC link below )

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The 9th Closing the Gap Report shows there have been small improvements over time in some areas of health but we are not on track to Close the Gap in average life expectancy and the gap in deaths from cancer is widening.

“Governments at all levels need to make a massive long term investment to redress the social and cultural determinants of health, which are responsible for more than 30 per cent of ill health in our communities.

“Early childhood education delivered in a culturally respectful manner by our own people, trained to work locally in their communities must be a priority.”

Ms Turner said current Commonwealth Government policies remain disconnected and siloed.

“In 2017 we need to see greater connectivity across all government portfolios at the Ministerial and departmental levels and more accountability from state and territory governments for the funding they receive to improve the lives of Aboriginal people.

“In every jurisdiction we see inconsistent data collection.  In 2017, with such innovative information technology available, all governments should implement open, transparent, consistent data collection and reporting to ensure their accountability to the Australian people at large.

“NACHHO stands ready, willing and able to work with everyone to negotiate better solutions to public policy and program investments that affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people”

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ICYMI todays posts

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Redfernstatement 1 of 5 posts : PM to release #closingthegap report today

NACCHO #closingtheGap Aboriginal Health and the #Redfernstatement Its time for this new approach

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Redfernstatement #closingtheGap Post 3 of 5 : New relationship with government is desperately needed

NACCHO Aboriginal Health download the #ClosingtheGap report #Redfernstatement Post 4 of 5

NACCHO SNAPSHOT progress Against Health Targets:

We are not on track to close the gap in life expectancy by 2031.

Over the longer term, Indigenous mortality rates have declined significantly by 15 per cent since 1998.

There have been significant improvements in the Indigenous mortality rate from chronic diseases, particularly from circulatory diseases (the leading cause of death) since 1998.

However, Indigenous mortality rates from cancer (second leading cause of death) are rising and the gap is widening.

There have been improvements in health care access and reductions in smoking which should contribute to long-term improvements in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Working collaboratively across governments, the health sector and with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities on local and regional responses is central to the Government’s approach to improve life expectancy.

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See ABC Website for all Targets

Indigenous Australians don’t live as long as other Australians. Their children are more likely to die as infants. And their health, education and employment outcomes are worse than non-Indigenous people.

Australia has promised to close this gap on health, education and employment. But a new report card finds we are failing on six out of seven key measures.

Target: To close the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a generation (by 2031).

  • Progress: Indigenous Australians die about 10 years younger than non Indigenous Australians, and that hasn’t changed significantly.
  • With increasing life expectancy in the non-Indigenous population, to close the gap “Indigenous life expectancy would need to increase by 16 years and 21 years for females and males respectively”.
  • That means gains of at least 0.6 years per annum, but in the five years to 2012 there was only a gain of 0.8 years for men and 0.1 for women — a fraction of what is needed.
  • The mortality rate (the number of deaths per 100,000 people in a year) for Aboriginal people is 1.7 times that of the Australian population, and that hasn’t changed since 1998.

Target: To halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade (by 2018).

  • Progress: There has been no significant decline in child mortality rates since 2008, and child mortality rates actually increased slightly from 2014 to 2015.
  • In 2015, there were 124 Indigenous child deaths. This was four deaths outside the range of the target and an increase of six deaths since 2014.
  • Between 2011 and 2014 Indigenous children aged 0-4 were more than twice as likely to die than non-Indigenous children.

Advertising and editorial wanted for the April 5  #Closingthegap  #Redfernstatement edition ?

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NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

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While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Invites all health practitioners and staff to a webinar : Working collaboratively to support the social and emotional well-being of Aboriginal youth in crisis

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NACCHO invites all health practitioners and staff to the webinar: An all-Indigenous panel will explore youth suicide in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. The webinar is organised and produced by the Mental Health Professionals Network and will provide participants with the opportunity to identify:

  • Key principles in the early identification of youth experiencing psychological distress.
  • Appropriate referral pathways to prevent crises and provide early intervention.
  • Challenges, tips and strategies to implement a collaborative response to supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in crisis.

Join hundreds of doctors, nurses and mental health professionals around the nation for an interdisciplinary panel discussion. The panellists with a range of professional experience are:

  • Dr Louis Peachey (Qld Rural Generalist)
  • Dr Marshall Watson (SA Psychiatrist)
  • Dr Jeff Nelson (Qld Psychologist)
  • Facilitator: Dr Mary Emeleus (Qld GP and Psychotherapist)

Read more about the panellists.

Working collaboratively to support the social and emotional well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in crisis.

Date:  Thursday 23rd February, 2017

Time: 7.15 – 8.30pm AEDT

REGISTER

No need to travel to benefit from this free PD opportunity. Simply register and log in anywhere you have a computer or tablet with high speed internet connection. CPD points awarded.

Learn more about the learning outcomes, other resources and register now.

For further information, contact MHPN on 1800 209 031 or email webinars@mhpn.org.au.

The Mental Health Professionals’ Network is a government-funded initiative that improves interdisciplinary collaborative mental health care practice in the primary health sector.  MHPN promotes interdisciplinary practice through two national platforms, local interdisciplinary networks and online professional development webinars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosingtheGap Run and Walk : 3 ways you can support Indigenous Marathon Foundation

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 ” IMP uses the marathon as a vehicle to promote healthy lifestyles to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Running is accessible to any age, ability and location and has the tremendous power to instil a sense of personal accomplishment when one has pushed beyond what they thought possible.

Robert De Castella Founder Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF)

You are invited by the Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF) support the project in 3 ways

  1. To participate in their Closing the Gap Run-and-Walk, held on the eve of the release of the Prime Minister’s 2017 Closing the Gap Report.
  2. Donate or assist in fundraising The Indigenous Marathon Foundation Ltd is a registered health promotion charity Donations over $2 are tax deductable and support our programs and inspirational Graduates celebrate Indigenous achievement, resilience and promote health and physical activity PO Box 6127 Mawson ACT 2607 (02) 6162 4750
  3. The search for the 2017 squad of the Indigenous Marathon Project : Promote to your community see 2017 Remaining try-out tour dates and locations below  

The IMF are a not-for-profit organisation that uses running to drive social change, create young leaders and address Indigenous health and social issues by celebrating Indigenous resilience and achievement.

Their program has inspired communities across Australia to take up running not just for exercise, but also to connect and share stories in a supportive environment.

Healthy lifestyle programs like those run by the IMF are a vital part of the Australian Government’s initiative to close the substantial gap in health, education and employment outcomes between Indigenous and other Australians.

Please come to join runners from the IMF and staff from the Department’s IAG Health Branch for a 5 kilometre run-and-walk to support the successful impact sport and recreation programs have in Indigenous communities and kick start the launch of the 2017 Closing the Gap Report.

1.Event details 

Date: Monday 13 February 2017 Time: 6:45 am arrival for a 7:00 am start

Location: Reconciliation Place, Lake Burley Griffin 

Please bring a water bottle or something to drink on the way. A light breakfast will be available after the run and a coffee van will also be present at the site.

Please RSVP to Rachael at Rachael.Norman@pmc.gov.au

3.The search for the 2017 squad of the Indigenous Marathon Project

The search for the 2017 squad of the Indigenous Marathon Project began in Canberra on February 1 when former world champion runner and IMP Founder Rob de Castella, and 2014 IMP Graduate and Head Coach Adrian Dodson-Shaw put applicants through their paces for a place on the life-changing project.

No running experience is required, as the project is not necessarily looking for athletes, but for young Indigenous men and women who show the potential to become community leaders.

The national tour will visit communities around Australia and select six men and six women in a trial that includes a 3km run for women and 5km run for men, in addition to an interview with Mr Dodson-Shaw. The group will also be expected to complete a Certificate III in Fitness, First Aid & CPR qualification and Level 1 Recreational Running coaching accreditation as part of the project’s compulsory education component.

There were a record number of applications in 2016, and high numbers are anticipated for the 2017 try-outs.

“There’ll be some pretty exciting times ahead as we begin the national IMP 2017 try-out tour, and what better place to start than the nation’s capital,’’ Mr Dodson-Shaw said.

“It’s going to be a busy two months on the recruitment drive but I’m looking forward to meeting the applicants and choosing the next squad to take on the New York City Marathon.”

Mr de Castella said the selection of a new squad is always an exciting time.

‘’The marathon is synonymous with struggle and achievement and it is one of the hardest things you can choose to do,’’ he said. ‘’Doing a full marathon from no running experience, on the other side of the world, in the biggest city in the world, in the biggest marathon in the world, is an incredible feat of hard work and determination.

‘’We are now recruiting a new squad to follow in the footsteps of the 65 IMP Graduates we have produced since 2010.

‘’I encourage every young Indigenous man and woman who wants to make change happen to come along and be part of this amazing life-changing and life-saving adventure!’’

Try-outs are open to all Indigenous men and women aged 18-30, and applications can be made on the day.

The IMP is a program of the Indigenous Marathon Foundation, a not‐for‐profit Foundation established by Rob de Castella. Each year IMP selects a squad of 12 young Indigenous men and women, to train for the New York City Marathon in November, complete a compulsory education component – a Certificate III in Fitness, media training and coaching accreditation – and through their achievements celebrate Indigenous resilience and success.

The IMP relies on the generous support of the Australian Government Department of Health, Department of PM&C, Department of Regional Australia, local Government, Arts and Sport, Qantas, ASICS, Accor and the Australian public.

For more information please contact Media Manager Lucy Campbell on (02) 6162 4750 or 0419 483 303. More information about IMP can be found at or visit our Facebook page, The Marathon Project. ABN 39 162 317 455

2017 Remaining try-out tour dates and locations

  • Newcastle  February 8  8am

Empire Park, Bar Beach

  • Sydney  February 10  6pm

Redfern Oval

  • Perth  February 14  8am

Lake Monger, between Leederville and Wembley

  • Karratha  February 15  5pm

Bulgarra Oval

  • Broome  February 16  5pm

Peter Haynes Oval (Frederick Street)

  • Adelaide  February 21  8am

Barratt Reserve, West Beach

  • Brisbane  February 28  8am

QSAC Track Kessels Road, Nathan

  • Townsville  March 1  8am

Muldoon Oval

  • Cairns  March 2  5pm

Pirate Ship, The Esplanade

  • Thursday Island  March 3  5pm

Mr Turtle

  • Alice Springs  March 8  5pm

Head Street Oval

  • Port Macquarie  March 11  11am

Westport Park

  • Darwin  March 20  6pm

Outside Darwin Military Museum, Alec Fong Lim Drive

  • Timber Creek  March 21  6pm

Timber Creek Oval

NACCHO #ACCHO Member News : Western Sydney returns to culturally appropriate Aboriginal Community Controlled Health

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“The scope of the arrangement includes operations of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Health Services provided from the Mt Druitt premises as well as Aboriginal health services to Penrith and the Healthy4Life services to Nepean Blue Mountain areas,

WACHS will work closely with WentWest to transition their current operational  arrangement to WACHS for the 1 April deadline “

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service  CEO Darren Ah See said the organisation is extremely pleased to have formally signed off on the funding agreement following negotiations with the Commonwealth and State Governments

See background to original closure

 July 2015 SMH report Aboriginal Health Service closes over unpaid tax bill

Photo above : WACHS CEO, Darren Ah See, Uncle Greg Simms, Blacktown-Mt Druitt Hospital General Manager, Sue-Anne Redmond and WentWest Primary Health Netowrk CEO, Walter Kmet. Photo: As reported in Wellington Times

The Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) has announced its tender for the provision of culturally appropriate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services to Western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains has been successful.

The joint tender process was led by the Commonwealth government in partnership with the NSW Ministry of Health.

The Commonwealth funding has been awarded to WACHS under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme for Western Sydney and Nepean Blue Mountains regions for 2016-17 and 2017-18.

The NSW Ministry of Health is also providing funding for the provision of culturally safe services for Aboriginal people including population health, chronic care, mental health and drug and alcohol.

Under this arrangement, WACHS will formally take on these services from the 1 April 2017.

Currently the Western Sydney Primary Health Network (WentWest) over sees the operations of the Sydney West Aboriginal Health Service (SWAHS), which is supported by funding from both the NSW Ministry of Health and the Commonwealth Government.

WentWest CEO, Walter Kmet welcomed the funding announcement.

“WACHS has a long-standing reputation for a strong business model which delivers culturally appropriate services. WentWest will work closely with WACHS during the transition of these services in line with the new arrangement.”

Western Sydney Local Health District CEO, Danny O’Connor also confirmed a commitment to working closely with WACHS and the PHN to strengthen Aboriginal health services in the city’s west.”

“WSLHD has already developed a relationship with WACHS and is looking forward to the opportunities that this new arrangement will bring to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Western Sydney.”

CEO of Nepean Blue Mountains PHN, Lizz Reay said she was looking forward to the continuation Healthy4Life program in the Blue Mountains region.

Have you got a similar good news story about one of our ACCHO members ?

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NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

km-kw

While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health “Ministerial Champions ” visit our remote #ACCHOS #CapeYork and #DerbyWA

 

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 ” Ministerial champion ”  for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt toured the Derby Aboriginal Health Service  with NACCHO CEO  Pat Turner : See background story 2 below

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Story 1

 ” Ministerial Champion for Wujal Wujal ” Leeanne Enoch MP, Minister for Innovation, Science and Digital Economy and Minister for Small Business recently visited the Apunipima Cape York Health Council.

Image (L-R) Director-General Jamie Merrick, Minister Enoch, Apunipima CEO Cleveland Fagan

The Minister, accompanied by the Government Champion for Wujal Wujal, Jamie Merrick, Director-General, Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation met with Apunipima’s senior managers to discuss the services and activities Apunipima provides to Wujal Wujal – a remote Aboriginal community which lies 70 km south of Cooktown.

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The Champions program is based around supporting Mayors and communities to achieve the social and economic outcomes which they identify as important.

Apunipima CEO Cleveland Fagan said he welcomed the visit with the Minister and Director-General.

‘We were pleased to meet with Minister Enoch and Mr. Merrick to discuss our role in supporting the community and leadership in Wujal Wujal to achieve the goals that matter to the community.’

‘Apunipima provides culturally appropriate primary health care to the people of Wujal Wujal including a GP, Maternal and Child Health Nurse and Midwife, Podiatrist, Dietitian and Diabetes Educator.’

‘There are some real success stories when it comes to the health of the people of Wujal Wujal – 100 percent of children aged 12, 24 and 60 months are fully immunised, 75 percent of newborn bubs are within the normal weight range and nearly 90 percent of clients with type 2 diabetes have a GP Management Plan in place.’

‘There are some challenges, particularly around smoking rates and obesity and we will be working with community to address these health issues.’

‘We look forward to continuing to work closely with Minister Enoch and the Queensland Government to continue to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Cape York.’

Story 2 Derby Aboriginal Health Service

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Mission

To deliver holistic primary health care services which;

  • ŸAre based on the social justice principles of equity and access
  • ŸAddress the needs of Aboriginal people, and
  • ŸRespect and reflect the cultural values of the communities we serve.

The Derby Aboriginal Health Service has been established by Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people, with the purpose of;

  • Empowering Aboriginal people in the prevention and management of ill-health, and in the promotion of well-being for individuals, families and communities, as well as;
  • Empowering Aboriginal people in the processes of decision-making, planning and service delivery

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History

In early 1995 Winun Ngari Aboriginal Corporation received funding from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) to carry out a comprehensive health planning exercise for Aboriginal people and communities in the Jayida Buru Ward of the Malarabah ATSIC Regional Council of the West Kimberley.

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This region includes Aboriginal Communities in and around Derby town, south of Derby along the Fitzroy Valley, north east of Derby and along the Gibb River Road and Outstations north along the coast and up into the Mitchell Plateau.  The Jayida Buru Health Strategy was the result of this process, and was the first health strategy for Aboriginal people in the Derby region which was developed from the Aboriginal perspective.

Amongst its findings was recognition that:

“…there appears to be little acknowledgement of the diverse needs of these population groups in the structure and operation of most mainstream services in the Derby region.  These services often operate under constraints imposed by a Perth based policy and practise…and an organisational culture that excludes Aboriginal people from information and decision making”.

The Strategy outlined five key objectives;

  • Aboriginal community and self-management of health related issues
  • ŸService and program planning based on identical local health need
  • ŸA comprehensive, integrated and coordinated range of programs and services
  • ŸEquitable access to services
  • ŸAppropriate levels of resource allocation

and determined that;

“There are compelling reasons for the establishment of an Aboriginal Health Service in the Jayida Buru region; the health needs of the Aboriginal people in the region greatly exceed the capacity of the mainstream provider; the scope and models of mainstream service provision are not currently culturally appropriate or readily accessible; and there is no choice of health provider available to us.”

In April 1997 the Winun Ngari Aboriginal Corporation Committee established a Derby Aboriginal Medical Service (DAMS) Committee.  This committee, with the support of the Winun Ngari Committee and Administration, began its struggle to establish a culturally appropriate health service to address the concerns raised through the Jayida Buru Health Strategy.

Funding from the Office of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (OATSIH) was received in early 1997.   On September 17, the first committee of the Derby Aboriginal Health Service Council was elected.

NACCHO Promotion

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NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

km-kw

While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Redfernstatement Parliamentary Event @Congressmob Invite 14 February

redfern-statement

Background to the Redfern Statement

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55 leaders met today  9th of June 2016, in Redfern where in 1992 Prime Minister Paul Keating spoke truth about this nation – that the disadvantage faced by First Peoples affects and is the responsibility of all Australians.

Photo above NACCHO CEO Pat Turner addressing the national media

An urgent call for a more just approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs

“Social justice is what faces you in the morning. It is awakening in a house with adequate water supply, cooking facilities and sanitation. It is the ability to nourish your children and send them to school where their education not only equips them for employment but reinforces their knowledge and understanding of their cultural inheritance. It is the prospect of genuine employment and good health: a life of choices and opportunity, free from discrimination.”

Mick Dodson, Annual Report of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, 1993.

The Redfern Statement

Download the 18 Page document here

Redfern Statement June 2016 Elections 18 Pages

Redfern Statement

A call for urgent Government action

 

Aboriginal Mental Health : NACCHO welcomes funding model for Mental Health and Suicide Prevention from the PHN

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Congratulations Galambila Coffs Harbour  on the successful tender to address Mental Health and Suicide Prevention in your region.

NACCHO applauds the Galambila Aboriginal Community Controlled efforts to ensure our people have ready access to these vital services at the local level.

We believe Galambila will be best placed to ensure these services are not only high quality and professional but most certainly are culturally relevant, appropriate and safe for our people who need to use them”.

“NACCHO welcomes the funding for Mental Health and Suicide Prevention from the PHN and looks forward to this outcome being replicated with all our Member ACCHs throughout the country.

Well done in leading the way in this important initiative“.

Pat Turner CEO NACCHO

Pictured above with PHN representatives are Local Federal Member Hon Luke Hartsuyker MP with Galambila Chair Reuben Robinson, Board members Christian Lugnan , Kerrie Burnet and CEO Kristine Garrett

North Coast Primary Health Network (NCPHN) is excited to announce funding of $300,000 for Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Coffs Harbour to deliver the Aboriginal Mental Health Capacity Building Project in partnership with Werin Aboriginal Medical Service in Port Macquarie.

The project will:

  • Put in place integrated social and emotional wellbeing plans for Aboriginal people in Port Macquarie with complex needs, focussing on improving wellbeing and recovery
  • Develop a tailored care model for Aboriginal mental health in Coffs Harbour and Hastings Macleay
  • Improve cultural competence for health professionals working with the Aboriginal community
  • Improve awareness among the Aboriginal community of mental health and suicide prevention services

NCPHN’s Chief Executive Dr Vahid Saberi said the project would be an innovative and much needed addition to mental health services available for Aboriginal people.

“The latest figures available show that Aboriginal people on the Mid North Coast and Hastings Macleay are experiencing nearly twice the yearly hospitalisation rate (2857) of non-Indigenous people (1654) for mental health related issues.

“We are pleased with the scope of the Galambila project which includes the development of a special care model for Aboriginal mental health,” he added.

Galambila’s CEO Kristine Garrett welcomed the project funding.

“The Aboriginal Mental Health Capacity Building Project will improve mental health outcomes for local Aboriginal people,” Ms Garrett said.

Galambila Aboriginal Medical Service was awarded the funding as a result of a tender process. Organisations were invited to establish novel mental health services, as well as implement projects to increase the capacity of the mental health system to respond to the needs of Aboriginal people and support their access to services.

Through North Coast Primary Health Network, the Australian Government has provided funding of $3.8 million for mental health, suicide prevention, drug and alcohol services and projects to improve the health system. Over coming months, NCPHN will use this funding to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of mental health and drug and alcohol services across the region.

 

ABOUT NORTH COAST PRIMARY HEALTH NETWORK (NCPHN)

We work alongside community members and health professionals to improve access to well-coordinated quality health care. Our aim is to work together to transform the healthcare system and reduce health inequities.

Our work begins by gaining an understanding of health care needs of the North Coast.

This needs assessment involves our community, clinicians and service providers and is available for all to use. We use this information to work with health professionals and community members to find gaps and facilitate local solutions.

We do this by commissioning services – this is a new way of all of us working together to design services that best meet our community’s needs.  Our priorities are

  1. Better mental health and emotional well-being
  2. Closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
  3. Improving our population’s health and wellbeing
  4. Building a highly skilled and capable health workforce
  5. Improving the integration of health services through electronic and digital health platforms
  6. Improving the health and wellbeing of older people

For more information, go to: http://www.ncphn.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Human Rights : Nomination open 2017 National Indigenous #HumanRights Awards

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 ” The National Indigenous Human Rights Awards recognises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who have made significant contribution to the advancement of human rights and social justice for their people.”

The awards were established in 2014, and will held annually. The inaugural awards were held at NSW Parliament House, and were welcomed by the Hon Linda Burney, MP and included key note speakers Dr Yalmay Yunupingu, Ms Gail Mabo, and Mr Anthony Mundine. A number of other distinguished guests such as political representatives, indigenous leaders and others in the fields of human rights and social justice also attended.

The Awards were presented by leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander elders, and leading Indigenous figures in Indigenous Social Justice and Human Rights. All recipients of the National Human Rights Award will be persons of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage.

To nominate someone for one of the three awards, please go to https://shaoquett.wufoo.com/forms/z4qw7zc1i3yvw6/
 
For further information, please also check out the Awards Guide at https://www.scribd.com/document/336434563/2017-National-Indigenous-Human-Rights-Awards-Guide

AWARD CATEGORIES:

 

DR YUNUPINGU AWARD – FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
 
To an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of Human Rights for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples. Dr Yunupingu is the first Aboriginal from Arnhem Land to achieve a university degree. In 1986 Dr Yunupingu formed Yothu Yindi in 1986, combining Aboriginal (Yolngu) and non-Aboriginal (balanda) musicians and instrumentation.

In 1990 was appointed as Principal of Yirrkala Community School, Australia’s first Aboriginal Principal. Also in that year he established the Yothu Yindi Foundation to promote Yolngu cultural development, including Garma Festival of Traditional Cultures Dr Yumupingu was named 1992 Australian of the Year for his work in building bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities across Australia.

THE EDDIE MABO AWARD FOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN SOCIAL JUSTICE

In memory of Eddie Koiki Mabo (1936-1992), this award recognises an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of Social Justice for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Eddie Koiki Mabo was a Torres Straits Islander, most notable in Australian history for his role in campaigning for indigenous land rights.

From 1982 to 1991 Eddie campaigned for the rights of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to have their land rights recognised. Sadly, he died of cancer at the age of 56, five months before the High Court handed down its landmark land rights decision overturning Terra Nullius. He was 56 when he passed away.

THE ANTHONY MUNDINE AWARD FOR COURAGE

 

To an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of sports among Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Anthony Mundine is an Australian professional boxer and former rugby league player. He is a former, two-time WBA Super Middleweight Champion, a IBO Middleweight Champion, and an interim WBA Light Middleweight Champion boxer and a New South Wales State of Origin representative footballer. Before his move to boxing he was the highest paid player in the NRL.

In 2000 Anthony was named the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Person of the Year in 2000. He has also won the Deadly Award as Male Sportsperson of the Year in 2003, 2006 and 2007 amongst others.

He has a proud history of standing up for Indigenous peoples, telling a journalist from the Canberra Times: “I’m an Aboriginal man that speaks out and if I see something, I speak the truth.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health scholarships: Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme close 15 January

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Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme

Applications open now; close 15 January 2017

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme (PHMSS) is available to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who are studying a course in ATSI health work, allied health, dentistry/oral health, medicine, midwifery or nursing.

It is an Australian Government initiative designed to encourage and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Dr Puggy Hunter – NACCHO Chairperson 1991-2001 BIO

Dr. Arnold “Puggy” Hunter was a pioneer in Australian Aboriginal health and recipient of the 2001 Australian Human Rights Medal.

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 150 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996.

He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council.

He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

Puggy had a long and passionate role in the struggle for justice for Aboriginal people. He was born in Darwin in 1951, where his parents had fled Broome and Western Australian native welfare policies.[1]

Numerous Australian scholarships are named in his honour.

He was quoted in Australian Parliament as saying: “You white people have the hearing problems because you do not seem to hear us

Application form

Online application form 

Applications are open now; close on 15 January 2017.

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course.
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

ACN receives high volume of applications; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship scheme is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Cashless Welfare Card : NACCHO CEO Pat Turner questions lack of evidence

the-card

“The cashless welfare card is unfair, a form of control and reminds Aboriginal people every day that they are treated as second- and third-class citizens in their own land,”

One of the key issues in many of the areas where the card operates, such as in remote areas of South Australia, is the difficulty of accessing fresh produce at reasonable prices.

Where is the evidence that this card increases this access and enables Aboriginal people to get the healthy food they need?

A person’s dignity can also be lost when having to use such a card which can also have detrimental impacts on both their mental and physical health and wellbeing.”

Pat Turner, the chief executive of NACCHO  national peak body on Aboriginal health

From Melissa Davey The Guardian

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The welfare card was “unfair” and “a form of control”, Turner said in response to a Guardian Australia report from the South Australian town of Ceduna which found welfare recipients on the card felt disempowered and dictated to.

But Turner, who before being appointed to the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (Naccho) was the longest-serving chief executive of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission and spent 18 months as Monash Chair of Australian Studies at Georgetown University in Washington, questioned the evidence from the government’s report

The trial of the card, known as the indue card, began in Ceduna in March and in the Western Australian towns of Kununurra and Wyndham in April. Welfare recipients in those towns now receive 80% of their welfare payments into the indue card, which cannot be used to withdraw cash or buy alcohol or gambling products. The remaining 20% can be withdrawn as cash.

The government, including the prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, and the human services minister, Alan Tudge, say the card has so far been a success.

In a report released six months into the card’s trial, anecdotal evidence and early data found poker machine revenue in the Ceduna region between April and August last year was 15.1% lower than for the equivalent period in 2015.

There had also been a strong uptake of financial counselling, the report said, with 300 people seeking counselling since the trial began. Anecdotally, there had been a significant decline in people requesting basic supplies like milk and sugar from the Koonibba Community Shopfront in Ceduna, the report also said.

Most people on welfare in the trial towns are Aboriginal.

Guardian Australia has contacted the Department of Health and Human Services for comment.

The strength of data used in the government’s cashless welfare card progress report has been questioned by Aboriginal elders, health economists and the Greens senator, Rachel Siewert.