NACCHO Aboriginal Workplace Health : New Guidelines Safety and Security for Remote and Isolated Health

” The drive to improve the safety and security of the remote health workforce became an industry wide priority following the tragic murder of remote area nurse Gayle Woodford in 2016.

This caused the remote health industry to critically reflect on long held practices health industry to critically reflect on long held practices and challenge its acceptance of the risks that were routinely considered “just part of the job

The goal of theses guidelines is to provide broad statements with examples of activities, which can be implemented by employers, service providers, communities, clinicians, and other stakeholders to establish and maintain safe and effective operating systems in remote health services.”

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE IN REMOTE HEALTH IS AN ONGOING AND ESCALATING CONCERN THAT PRESENTS UNIQUE CHALLENGES NOT FACED IN URBAN AREAS.

Download a PDF copy of Guidelines HERE :

2017-SS-Guidelines-for-Remote-Isolated-Health

In the 2016 – 2017 financial year, CRANA plus received funding by the Commonwealth Department of Health to undertake a remote health workforce safety and security project.

A diverse representative expert advisory group informed the entire project. The members of this group included a representative from NACCHO (Rob Starling ) see Page 4 for the full list

The completion of phase one of the project saw the release of the National remote Health workforce Safety and Security Report : Literature Review, Consultation, and Survey results in January 2017.

The report included a literature review building on the work of the Working safe in Rural and Remote Australia Project. Additionally, utilising workshops, surveys and social media, CRANAplus undertook a “national conversation” with remote health stakeholders.

This provided an opportunity to seek the views of the workforce, employers, and other stakeholders, and test existing assumptions on the real and perceived issues around safety and security.

The report identified several significant issues :

  • The need for employers and staff to conduct hazard identification and risk assessment, event reporting, and workplace review of significant events and near-misses ;
  • The need for staff to be accompanied on-call, and at other times when risks are identified ;
  • The need for more comprehensive and timely orientation of new staff;
  • The need to promote individual resilience and manage the risk of fatigue;
  • The need to address high workforce turnover and issues relating to bullying and harassment;
  • The need for reliable, accessible transport and emergency after hours communication systems, including monitoring, supported by staff training in equipment use;
  • The need to provide access to patient information and data in staff accommodation;
  • The need for staff training and practice in communication and de-escalation techniques, to mitigate the risk of conflict leading to violence.

The full report can be accessed on the CRANAplus website www.crana.org.au

Recognising that the safety of staff and services are essential for the effective provision of health services, the guidelines contribute to supporting two significant government initiatives:

The Commonwealth Work Health and Safety Act ; and the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards (Standard One; Governance for Safety and Quality in Health Service Organisations).

The goal of theses guidelines is to provide broad statements with examples of activities, which can be implemented by employers, service providers, communities, clinicians, and other stakeholders to establish and maintain safe and effective operating systems in remote health services.

The guidelines identify seven safety and security priority areas, each of which is to be considered through the lense of the individual, the team, the employer, the infrastructure, the environment and the culture and community.

These guidelines provide a structured pathway to identify risk and prioritise areas for improvement. Ultimately, it will be highly valuable to develop agreed national standards for remote health workforce safety and security. Standards will provide clear, measurable expectations on safety and security issues, providing greater impetus to drive reform.

Although developed primarily for small remote towns and communities, these guidelines can be contextualised to any area or industry that requires health service provision in an isolated setting.

HOW TO USE THE GUIDELINES

  1. The infographic provides a summary overview of the guidelines and lenses.
  2. The summary table assists to identify the complexity of issues, roles and responsibilities contributing to remote health workforce safety and security.
  3. More detailed information, is provided under the heading of Guidelines, Aims and Activities. This information is provided as a guide only. Activities should be developed according to the context of individual services and communities, and with the contribution of local stakeholders.
  4. The final component of this document provides activities on how different remote health stakeholders can contribute to safety and security issues.

Download a PDF copy of Guidelines HERE :

2017-SS-Guidelines-for-Remote-Isolated-Health

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #Midwives @CATSINaM : Indigenous #midwives walk #Redfern 5 May to #closethegap

 

” Indigenous midwives will gather and march in Redfern to highlight the need to close the gap in healthcare in Indigenous communities.

Indigenous Midwifery facts:

  • There are only 230 Indigenous midwives nationally; a further 618 are needed
  • Indigenous mothers are three times as likely to die as their non-Indigenous counterparts
  • Indigenous babies up until the age of one are twice as likely to die as non-indigenous children

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander midwives led by Leona McGrath, Indigenous Health advisor, NSW Government and Dr Donna Hartz from the National Centre for Cultural Competence at the University of Sydney will walk through Redfern on 5 May to celebrate International Day for the Midwife and highlight a number of key issues in the sector.

Email Contact Dr Hartz

 ” Aboriginal women in Australia have significantly worse pregnancies than non-indigenous women.

In fact, they fare worse on just about every health measure.

And yet all the evidence tells us there will be no significant improvement in the shocking rates of poor indigenous health until we significantly improve the health of indigenous women.

This article serves as a clarion call from the President of RANZCOG, Professor Stephen Robson. We can only hope policy makers heed this call, as the health of the nation’s indigenous communities depend on it. See full article below

 ” Picture above 2016 Midwives across Western Sydney Local Health District (WSLHD)  banded together with the Australian College of Midwives to raise funds for the Rhodanthe Lipsett Indigenous Midwifery Charitable Fund, which will sponsor Indigenous student midwives and their midwifery studies.

WSLHD midwives, supported by WSLHD Aboriginal Liaison Officer Narelle Holden and Professor of Midwifery at Western Sydney University Hannah Dahlen, representing the Australian College of Midwives, proudly presented a cheque to Leona McGrath, the co-chair of the Rhodanthe Lipsett Indigenous Midwifery Charitable Fund “

Dr Hartz says there is a greater need for Indigenous midwives due to the significantly higher mortality rate for Indigenous mothers and babies.

“We have really embarrassingly poor outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers and babies here in Australia in 2017,” says Dr Hartz.

“We have women dying at three times the rate of non-Indigenous women. We have Indigenous babies dying at twice the rate and we have babies being born prematurely or at a low birth weight at nearly twice the rate of non-Indigenous babies.

“The current rates of preterm and low birth weight babies means that many babies are predisposed to chronic diseases later in life. When we have Indigenous women caring for Indigenous women in childbirth, the outcomes improve for both mother and baby.”

Currently 50 per cent of Indigenous women live where there are no local birth services. Dr Hartz says the training of Aboriginal midwives is crucial to providing culturally sensitive care to Indigenous mothers.

“We’ve had closing of maternity services from rural, regional and remote areas which has meant that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have to travel hundreds and hundreds of kilometres to receive care.

“In terms of spirituality, tradition and culture, the women are Birthing off Country – Birth on Country is of great spiritual significance to have connection to Country. What we’re hoping through programs of training midwives is to bolster maternity services back in the communities so women can have care and give birth closer to their homes,” she says.

Only one per cent of Australian midwives are of an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background whereas six per cent of all Australian births are Indigenous. A further 618 Indigenous midwives are required for parity.

“On International Day of the Midwife for the first time in Australia we’re going to have the biggest gathering of Aboriginal midwives in one event. I think it will speak loudly to how we feel about healing our communities and training more midwives.”

Organisers of the march invite interested parties to “Walk with Midwives” in aid of an Australian College of Midwives campaign that aims to raise funds for the Rhodanthe Lipsete Trust. The Trust aims to increase the number of Indigenous midwives.

The University of Sydney campaign is supported by the National Centre for Cultural Competence, the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses & Midwives and the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

Indigenous women and the hidden health-gap

 ‘ At an international scientific meeting in Brisbane, just over two years ago, I attended a session devoted to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The statistics presented and the picture painted for the assembled group was disheartening. The gap between the health of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians seemed too great to bridge.”

Stephen Robson BMedSc MBBS MM MPH MD FRANZCOG FRCOG
President, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

Discouraged, I asked one of the senior presenters where we could even start to help, to put things right. “That’s easy,” he replied, “You start by making women healthy. The rest will follow.” At the time, I was Vice-President of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG). This advice was something I could work with. Two years later, I am President of RANZCOG. Improving the health of Indigenous women is the biggest challenge that I, and my College, face.

“That’s easy,” he replied, “You start by making women healthy.

Women, and mothers in particular, hold a special place in Indigenous communities. Women manage not only their own health, but the health of their children; the health of their partners; and often the health of other relatives. Women who are healthy and health-literate are the single most important influence on the health of their communities.

Health begins in the womb. A healthy environment for a baby during pregnancy is perhaps the strongest influence on life-long health for all of us. This is especially true for Indigenous Australians. Babies of Aboriginal women tend to be smaller, and this reflects many influences: socioeconomic disadvantage; the mother’s nutrition; illnesses during pregnancy. Importantly, it can reflect alcohol consumption and use of tobacco.

Indigenous women have less opportunity to become healthy and prepare for pregnancy. When pregnant, they see their midwives and doctors later in pregnancy, and less often than non-indigenous women. They have lesser access to the standards of antenatal care that other women take for granted during pregnancy. They suffer racism, marginalisation, and exposure to violence.

The babies of Aboriginal women are more likely to be born prematurely, and more likely to die in pregnancy or soon after birth. As infants, their mortality rates exceed those of non-Indigenous infants. They are more likely to suffer childhood diseases.

The babies of Aboriginal women are more likely to be born prematurely, and more likely to die in pregnancy or soon after birth.

As adults, Indigenous Australians are more likely to be hospitalised. The reasons for this include injuries, infections, and kidney disease in particular. Cancers – lung cancer and cancer of the cervix – are much more likely to strike Aboriginal women. Women are more likely to die from cancer, and cervical cancer in particular has a death rate more than four times higher. Indigenous women are less likely to participate in screening programs that can prevent cervical cancer.

So many of these problems are completely preventable, and arise from what we call ‘social determinants of health.’ Social conditions and economic opportunity influence health at all levels, from the individual up to the entire community. Education, income and employment, adequate housing, access to health and other services, social supports – all of these play a role in shaping health.

Many Australian doctors struggle to understand how Indigenous people view medical treatment. For many Aboriginal people, health is viewed as the social, emotional, and cultural wellbeing of the whole community. It is subsumed into a connection to the land, the community, social relationships, and the environment.

Trust is a major factor influencing the way Indigenous people access, and interact with, the health system. Many will have had bad experiences with our hospitals and health-care workers, however well-meaning many doctors and nurses are. It is common to have Aboriginal people discharge themselves from hospital against the advice of their carers.

Pregnancy is a time when it is possible to turn this around. It is a time when it should be possible to build good, trusting relationships with women and their families. By making the effort to tailor maternity care to the needs of Indigenous women, it should be possible to engage in a positive way. To promote health screening, and help build enduring relationships with carers.

Pregnancy is a time when it is possible to turn this around. It is a time when it should be possible to build good, trusting relationships with women and their families.

Recently, the Presidents of a number of medical Colleges met with the Indigenous Health Minister, the Honourable Ken Wyatt. Over the course of the morning, it became clear that there is a new determination to put things right. To identify and work hard to remove the roadblocks to health for Indigenous Australians.

As the saying goes, every great journey begins with a single step. Making sure that Indigenous women prepare for pregnancy, have healthy pregnancies and births, and that their children are healthy, are all key to long-term improvements in community health. I am hoping that we can all take these steps together.

Learn more about Indigenous women’s health at:

http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/population-groups/women/reviews/our-review#infant-mortality

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Delivery to @DaveGillespie of #RuralHealthConf priority delegate recommendations

 

 ” Rural and regional Australians have higher rates of major diseases including heart disease and stroke, chronic lung conditions, diabetes, asthma, and arthritis.

We also have a persistent and disturbingly large gap in health outcomes and life expectancy, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians “

Minister Gillespie said Australia’s long life expectancy and good average health outcomes disguised unacceptable differences between population groups and communities, particularly in rural Australia : See Full Response press release from Minister below

After four action-packed days, the 14th National Rural Health Conference with its theme of ‘A World of Rural Health’, has concluded with the delivery of the priority recommendations to emerge from the event to Assistant Minister for Health, David Gillespie.

According to CEO of the NRHA, David Butt, “the Conference provided an excellent opportunity for learning and sharing the evidence of what works in rural and remote health.

“People who live and work in rural and remote Australia have the knowledge about what works and what needs to change to improve health and wellbeing.

“Very importantly, through the conference they have identified key recommendations for health systems reform, to improve the health and wellbeing of the seven million people who live in rural and remote Australia,” Mr Butt said.

Download a PDF Copy of all recommendations

Recommendations14NRHC

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

Digital Health

Workforce

AUSTRALIA LEADS IN INNOVATION FOR RURAL HEALTH

Press Release

The Coalition Government’s innovative reforms to improve the health of rural, regional and remote communities were today showcased to the 14th World Rural Health Conference.

In his opening address to the conference in Cairns, Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie, outlined a series of major changes to improve rural health which will start or bed down over the coming year.

These included:

  •  legislation to establish the first independent National Rural Health Commissioner;
  •  pathways to recognise rural GPs as “Rural Generalists”;
  •  Primary Health Networks across Australia commission health services to ensure that local health needs are met;
  •  federally funded mental health services including suicide prevention and drug and alcohol rehabilitation now managed at the regional level by PHNs;
  •  200 general practices and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services will soon start providing Health Care Home services, to coordinate care for people with chronic conditions.

Minister Gillespie said Australia’s long life expectancy and good average health outcomes disguised unacceptable differences between population groups and communities, particularly in rural Australia.

Rural and regional Australians have higher rates of major diseases including heart disease and stroke, chronic lung conditions, diabetes, asthma, and arthritis.

“We also have a persistent and disturbingly large gap in health outcomes and life expectancy, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians,” he said.

Minister Gillespie also represented the Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, at the National Rural Health Alliance Conference held as part of the World of Rural Health event.

“I know that it takes determination, resilience and flexibility to provide the care that your patients need, without the resources available to your counterparts in the cities,” Minister Gillespie said.

“The Prime Minister shares my passion – your passion – for rural Australia.

“Like you, and me, he believes that Australians have a right to high quality, affordable and accessible health care, wherever they live and whatever their circumstances.

“Meeting the needs of rural families and communities is one of the top priorities in the long term national health plan.”

Smile: $11m reduces gap in rural and remote dental services

Press Release 2

People living and working in rural and remote Australia will now have access to dental services that were previously unavailable.

Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie, said today that the Coalition Government is providing $11 million to the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) to provide dental services.

“The Royal Flying Doctor Service is well-placed to provide these essential mobile outreach dental services in rural and remote Australia,” Minister Gillespie said.

“Where there is an identified market failure and there are gaps in services, it is important that the Government steps in to provide assistance. Today we deliver on our election commitment to ensure people outside our major cities have better access to high quality dental services.”

The Government provides funding to the RFDS under the RFDS Program, which aims to ensure access to essential emergency aeromedical and other primary health care services in rural and remote areas of Australia.

“The Flying Doctor welcomes this new funding for dental services in rural and remote Australia,” RFDS of Australia CEO, Martin Laverty, said.

“There are only one third the dentists in remote areas, with 72 dentists per 100,000 people in major cities, and less than 23 per 100,000 people in remote areas.”

“The research statistics are compelling, with more than one-third of remote area residents living with untreated decay. Essentially, when people from remote areas visit the dentist, they are more likely to require acute intervention – 1 in 3 had a tooth extraction in a year, compared with less than 1 in 10 in metropolitan areas.”

“This funding from the Federal Government will enable the Flying Doctor to expand its dental outreach program to start tackling the disparity that exists between city and the bush – and for that we are very, very thankful”.

On 28 June 2016, the Government announced it would continue to support the RFDS by extending its contract for continued delivery of aeromedical services until 30 June 2020.

The announcement included a commitment of an additional $11 million over two years for the RFDS to expand its existing non-Commonwealth funded dental services for the period 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2019.

Labor Party Response

Labor supports the development of a national rural health strategy and associated implementation plan, as part of ensuring there is clear and targeted action towards closing the gap in health outcomes between Australians living in rural areas and their metropolitan peers. 

Shadow Minister for Health Catherine King announced Labor’s support for a strategy at the National Rural Health Conference in Cairns, calling on the Government to join in bipartisan support.

“The impact of inequity on health and recognising the challenges that some groups face which require more targeted support – including rural and remote Australians – was a clear theme to emerge from Labor’s National Health Summit in March,” Ms King said

“We think that a national rural health strategy is an important step to ensuring we have a defined roadmap to improving health outcomes for Australians living outside our big cities and I hope the Government follows our lead.”

Shadow Assistant Minister for Medicare, Tony Zappia, said while Labor welcomes the implementation of the National Rural Health Commissioner, this single role will not be a cure-all.

“The National Rural Health Commissioner would aid in the implementation of a national rural health strategy, but we still need to have an understanding of where we are going, and what we are trying to achieve in rural heath,” Mr Zappia said.

“A national rural health strategy would help achieve this goal of all levels of Government working more closely together, to reduce fragmentation and duplication.”

NACCHO TOP10+ #JobAlerts : This week in Aboriginal Health : #RuralHealthConf Doctors, Aboriginal Health Workers etc. etc

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application check with the ACCHO that job is still available

1-2 .Danila Dilba Health Service Darwin (2 positions )

3-4-5 Awabakal (3 positions )

6. AH&MRC NSW Public Health and Member Services Support units.

7.Urapuntja Community  NT : Psychologist 

8. Ballarat : Director of Health and Home Support Services

9. Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service – GP

10-13 Employment opportunities Lowitja Institute (3 positions)

14.Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

15.Nunkuwarrin Yunti SA Chronic Condition Management Team

16.Congress Alice Springs : SENIOR ABORIGINAL YOUTH ENGAGEMENT OFFICER

17. Wheatbelt Health Network WA Care Coordinator (Integrated Team Care)

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 1-2 .Danila Dilba Health Service Darwin (2 positions )

Danila Dilba Health Service is going through a dynamic period of expansion, growth and review and currently has the following vacancies

We offer:

  • Attractive salary with salary packaging benefits
  • Six weeks annual leave
  • Flexible hours
  • Training and development

1.OUTREACH WORKER

(SEWB)

*Total Salary: $66,322 – $71,376

Fixed Term – 1 Position – Full Time

The Outreach Worker will provide extensive support to identified clients affected by domestic violence to address social and family needs and to ensure their access to needed services in the Darwin and Palmerston regions. The Outreach Worker will also work with groups of people in the community to develop community resilience and capacity that is protective against violence

Applications Close:

MONDAY 1 MAY 2017

(Close of business 5.00 p.m.)

2.ABORIGINAL HEALTH  PRACTITIONER

(Palmerston)

*Total Salary: $69,137 – $75,584

1 Position – Full Time

The Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) will participate in the provision of comprehensive primary health care to the Indigenous people of the Greater Darwin Area. In addition the AHP will provide a support role to other health practitioners both within the organisation and the community. The AHP is crucial to maintaining cultural integrity and advocates strongly for our patients.

*Total salary includes leave loading and superannuation

Applications Close:

MONDAY 8 MAY 2017

(Close of business 5.00 p.m.)

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people encouraged to apply.
Danila Dilba Health Service is an Aboriginal community controlled organisation that provides comprehensive, high-quality primary health care and community services to Biluru (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) people in Yilli Rreung (greater Darwin) region.
Details: www.daniladilba.org.au

3-4-5 Awabakal (3 positions )

3. Awabakal Business Manager

4.Awabakal Community Liaison

5. Awabakal Project Officer

 6. AH&MRC NSW Public Health and Member Services Support units.

Full-Time positions available Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council NSW

AH&MRC are looking for highly skilled employees with Aboriginal Health related experience.

We currently have full-time vacancies available in our Public Health and Member Services Support units.

Experience required

  • Knowledge, understanding and experience of Aboriginal health issues, including the social determinants of health – essential
  • Bachelor qualifications preferred but not essential
  • Experience working as an effective team member
  • Verbal communication skills that demonstrate an ability to communicate effectively through consultative processes with Aboriginal communities
  • Written communication skills that demonstrate your ability to prepare and present reports, briefs and general correspondence
  • Demonstrated computer and keyboard skills to operate Microsoft programs and other business applications with knowledge of word processing and spread sheet applications
  • A current driver’s license or the ability to acquire a license and capacity to undertake travel including to rural, remote and regional NSW communities and interstate
  • Attractive salary and salary packaging available
  • Based in Surry Hills, close to Central station and Hyde Park

About AH&MRC

The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC) is the peak representative body and voice of Aboriginal communities on health in NSW. We represent our members, the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) that deliver culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care to their communities.

The AH&MRC is governed by a Board of Directors who are Aboriginal people elected by our members on a regional basis. We represent and support our members and their communities on Aboriginal health at state and national levels.

For further information and to view position descriptions for the roles available please contact Gordana Agic (HR Coordinator) on (02) 9212 4777 or email mailto:gagic@ahmrc.org.auor simply send through your CV via the Apply button below.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply

The AH&MRC is, and promotes, a smoke-free environment

(The AH&MRC considers that being Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander is a genuine occupational qualification under s 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW))

APPLY HERE

7.Urapuntja Community  NT : Psychologist 

URAPUNTJA HEALTH SERVICE ABORIGINAL CORPORATION

POSITION DESCRIPTION – PYSCHOLOGIST

Title                                     Psychologist

Responsible To                 Clinic Manager

Location                             Amengernternenh Community, Utopia and Ampilatwatja        Community

SUMMARY OF POSITION

The Urapuntja Community is situated on the Sandover Highway some 280 km north east of Alice Springs. Urapuntja Community comprises 16 Outstation communities spread out over some 3230 square km of desert. There are some 900 people who are mainly Anmatyerre and Alyawarra speaking people. Distances to the outstations vary from 5 to 100 kms from the clinic.

Urapuntja Health Service developed from many years of negotiations by Aboriginal people to have their own health service. Urapuntja is a community controlled health service with a Board of Directors which is elected from and by the community at the Annual General Meeting held each year. The Directors meets regularly to discuss issues and make decisions relevant to the Organisation.

The Psychologist position has been funded by the NTPHN to provide services to the residents of both the Urapuntja and Ampilatwatja Health Service areas.

The Psychologist will work as a member of the Social and Emotional Wellbeing Team as well as the clinical team, to provide psychological services addressing the needs of all clients using the bio-psychosocial to community members who self- refer or are referred by a provider. At times the Psychologist will work under the supervision of the Clinic Manager. At other times the Psychologist will be required to work with limited assistance. The Psychologist will be required to travel by 4WD vehicle to provide clinical services to remote outstations in both the Urapuntja and Ampilatwatja Health Service Areas.

 

DUTIES OF THE POSITION

  1. Create, develop and nurture culturally appropriate interactions within Primary Health Care (PHC) teams and with the community.
  2. Develop a positive culture within integrated PHC teams through development of “core” behavioural health skills including cooperative interpersonal relationship building strategies.
  3. Make appropriate referrals to other providers and seek resources to aid team members and community residents.
  4. Perform assessment and provide brief treatment for a wide range of psychological and behavioural health needs using brief therapy.
  5. Maintain currency of job knowledge and skills and assist PHC team members to self-care.
  6. Utilises professional communication and conflict resolution skills with team members, various brief therapeutic modalities including group learning circles, individual, child, family, couples counselling, and family support services.
  7. Direct Caseload that involves documentation and procedural adherence; includes Medicare billing as appropriate and provide identified social and emotional wellbeing services to clients.
  8. Provide evidence-based culturally appropriate interventions (including assessment, therapy and case management) on individual, group and family levels.
  9. Ensure the development of Mental Health Care Plans in collaboration with GP’s, for all eligible clients in the service, and facilitate the provision of co-ordinated clinical care and treatment for referred clients.
  10. Follow defined service quality standards and relevant Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) policies and procedures to ensure high quality, safe services are being provided within a safe workplace.

Further

  1. Contribute to opportunities to Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) processes, quality and service delivery outcomes
  2. Participate in opportunistic and community screening activities
  3. Work with other community health program staff and seek advice and assistance from a General Practitioner
  4. Enter data accurately into the Communicare system
  5. Collect specified data on all client contacts in accordance with Clinic and funding body requirements
  6. Liaise with other staff within Urapuntja Health Service in regards to patient care, referrals and follow up as required
  7. Assist other health staff requiring community, cultural and/or linguistic assistance with clients where culturally appropriate
  8. To provide quality and professional service of care and work ethics at all times
  9. Work within strict confidentiality guidelines, ensuring all client and organisational information is kept secure
  10. Undertake any other duties at the request of the Clinic Manager which are considered relevant to the position and the level of classification

 

SELECTION CRITERIA

Essential

  • Recognised qualifications in Psychology with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) registration to practice as a Psychologist.
  • Proven ability to be self-directed and self-motivated as well as working effectively as a member of a team.
  • Demonstrated knowledge of current issues, standards and trends in the delivery of mental health and social and emotional well-being services to Aboriginal people.
  • Demonstrated recent experience in the mental health and social and emotional wellbeing assessment, treatment and rehabilitation methods appropriate to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) people.
  • Proven ability to be able to develop the behavioural health and working skills required by each employee working within a PHC team.
  • Proficiency in and commitment to the use of electronic information systems for the maintenance of clinical and service delivery records.
  • Hold a current Northern Territory (NT) manual driver’s licence or ability to obtain, ability and willingness to undertake travel by 4WD or light aircraft to remote communities, and capacity to reside in a remote community.
  • A good level of health and fitness that matches the requirements of the role. Note: If so required by UHSAC at any time, you must undergo a satisfactory medical examination (including a pre-employment medical examination) for the purpose of determining whether you are able to perform the inherent requirements of your position. Any such medical examination will be at the employer’s cost, and copies of any medical report will be provided to you. You must advise UHSAC of any illness, injury, disease, or any other matter relating to your health or physical fitness which may prevent you from performing your duties, or which may affect your ability to work safely.
  • Excellent communication skills, in particular the ability to communicate sensitively in a cross-cultural environment
  • Current Drivers Licence
  • Ochre Card (Working with Children Clearance)

 

Desirable

    • Masters in Clinical Psychology qualification.
    • Awareness of/sensitivity to Aboriginal culture and history
    • Experience in using a Patient Information and Recall System and in data collection and analysis including the ability to use word processing, spreadsheet, and database software to produce effective reports.
    • Previous experience working with primary health care teams.
  • Experience working in the area of Indigenous Primary Health

 

  • Highly developed cross cultural communication skills and willingness to take cultural advice from Aboriginal staff
  • Previous experience working with remote Aboriginal communities and Aboriginal organisations and groups

 

 

8. Ballarat ACCHO : Director of Health and Home Support Services
 

The role of the Director of Health and Home Support Services is to provide overarching management across the organisation in the areas of Health and Home Support Services. The position will require the incumbent to effectivly managet and provide service development across the BADAC Health program, Medical Clinic, Social and Emotional Wellbeing program and the Home Support Services.

The Director of Health and Home Support Services will be required to review the current service delivery provided by the organisation and implement concepts and ideas that will work toward the further development of the program and generate possible business concepts that will assist in the directorates operational oncosts and contribute to the organisations overarching goal of achieving self-sustainability.

Applicaitions for this position close on the 3rd of May 2017-5pm.

For information on the position, please contact David Carter (Director of Human Resources and Early Childhood Services) on dcarter@badac.net.au

For position description and application submission, please contact Emily Carter (Human Resource Administrator) on ecarter@badac.net.au

APPLY HERE

9.Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service – GP

Medical practice in rural and remote Australia

10-13 Employment opportunities Lowitja Institute (3 positions)

Become part of a leading national Aborginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation

Competititve salary with generous salary sacrifice options

For all enquiries please contact the Lowitja Institute reception on t: 03 8341 5555 or e: admin@lowitja.org.au 

Communications Officer

  • Full time
  • Melbourne-based

The Communications Officer will be a member of the Innovation and Business Development Team, working with the Communications Manager to establish and deliver the Institute’s communications agenda in service of enhancing the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm AEST, Wednesday 1 May 2017.

Position description

Apply online

Research Project Officer

  • Full time
  • Melbourne-based

The Research Project Officer will be a member of the Research and Knowledge Translation team, which is responsible for the creation and management of the research-related activities and products required to meet the strategic and operational objectives of the Institute. The Research Project Officer will work within one of the Lowitja Institute’s broader activities, Insight, which converts key elements of research findings into approaches for evidence-based decision making by policymakers, communities and service practitioners.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm AEST, Wednesday 1 May 2017.

Position description

Apply online

Product Innovation Specialist

  • Full time
  • Melbourne-based

The Product Innovation Specialist will be a member of the Innovation and Business Development Team, working with the Team Director to establish and deliver the Institute’s innovation pipeline agenda including consultancies to enhance the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm AEST, Wednesday 1 May 2017.

Position description

Apply online

14. Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

 

Galangoor Duwalami Primary Healthcare Service is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled primary health care service, operating in both Hervey Bay and Maryborough, servicing the entire Fraser Coast area.

Galangoor Duwalami collaborates with health and well-being partner agencies to enable integrated continuity of care for the community, and continue to work to contribute to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy and program reform in Queensland to address the Burden of disease and Close the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

General Practitioner (GP) two positions available

This is an exciting opportunity to join an innovative and flexible employer, enthusiastic and committed team and make a direct impact on improved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Fraser Coast area.

The Practice:

Galangoor Duwalami (meaning a ‘happy meeting place’) is located on the Fraser Coast in sunny Queensland, with two clinics (Hervey Bay and Maryborough). Originally established in 2007 we offer a comprehensive suite of Health Services within the Fraser Coast region.

The Hervey Bay clinic is situated at the beachside, while a newly built practice in the heart of Historical Maryborough, offers exceptional facilities with 10 consulting rooms including a mums and bubs room, new equipment and large reception. The practice is Community Controlled and has a well-established clientele and reports indicate continued growth.

This is a rewarding prospect for a compassionate, engaging, visionary and thorough General Practitioner with an ability to work within a diverse interdisciplinary team exhibiting admirable communication skills.

  • Two positions available – 2 Part Time – hours negotiable OR 1 Full Time and 1 Part Time
  • Well balanced working environment – Monday to Friday from 0830 to 1700.
  • No on-call requirements
  • Competitive Salary Package
  • Salary packaging
  • Annual Leave plus Study Leave
  • 9.5% Superannuation Entitlement

Key Requirements:

Must Have:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding current registration with the Medical Board of Australia
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number

Download this Information GP Advertisement

Application Process:

A Position Description is available by email. All applications, including a covering letter, are to be e-mailed to: ann.woolcock@gdphcs.com.au

For further details regarding this position please contact Ann Woolcock on 07 41945554.

15.Nunkuwarrin Yunti SA Chronic Condition Management Team

Nunkuwarrin Yunti has multiple positions on our Chronic Conditions Management team.

Location: Adelaide, SA

Reference: 87409

Link to job ad/to apply: http://applynow.net.au/jobs/87409

Job Title: Chronic Conditions Clinical Workers

Short description/teaser: Multiple opportunities to join a well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation renowned throughout South Australia!

About the Organisation

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia, providing a range of health care and community support services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

First incorporated in 1971, Nunkuwarrin Yunti has grown from a welfare agency with three employees to a multi-faceted organisation with over 100 staff who deliver a diverse range of health care and community support services.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and wellbeing of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide, and advance their social, cultural and economic status. The organisation places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative multidisciplinary working culture to achieve the best possible outcome for clients.

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is seeking a number of Chronic Conditions Clinical Workers to join their team on a full-time basis.

Reporting to the Chronic Conditions Coordinator, you will provide services for clients with chronic health conditions engaged with the Chronic Conditions Management team. Working alongside a range of service providers, you will ensure coordinated, flexible and accessible care for individual clients.

Working under general or limited direction (depending on level) of the Chronic Conditions Coordinator the primary role of the Chronic Conditions Clinical Worker is to deliver a range of services which includes, but is not limited to:

  • Development, management and implementation of multidisciplinary care plans based on best practice, to optimise health and wellbeing outcomes for individual clients;
  • Management of care coordination processes including recall and referral, case conferencing and coordination of visiting specialist clinics;
  • Liaison with external agencies as necessary for individual client care and development of accessible and appropriate systems and services for the client group; and
  • Information and education to increase awareness and understanding of healthy lifestyles.Working in conjunction with a team of highly skilled health professionals, you’ll have the opportunity to provide a much needed service for your clients. You’ll be given the chance to work closely with a wide variety of people and make a real impact on their health and welfare outcomes, as well as working towards Closing the Gap in Aboriginal Health!Nunkuwarrin Yunti is committed to nurturing ongoing professional development and growth, with training, mentoring and guidance provided. You’ll be granted a number of opportunities for career advancement, alongside the chance to build your experience within Aboriginal health.
  • This is a fantastic opportunity to join an influential Aboriginal health organisation in metropolitan Adelaide. Apply now! Please Note: Applications close 12pm ACST on the 26th of April, 2017.
  • Your dedication and hard work will be rewarded with a competitive remuneration circa $59,045 – $66,566, commensurate with skills and experience, plus super. You’ll also enjoy extensive salary packaging options that greatly increase your take home pay!
  • About the Benefits

Here is the link to the advertisement.

https://www.seek.com.au/job/33171419?type=standard&tier=no_tier&pos=1&whereid=3000&userqueryid=633e3c0a1b7c540e57937f39f915feb3-1213354&ref=beta

16.Congress Alice Springs : SENIOR ABORIGINAL YOUTH ENGAGEMENT OFFICER

  • Base Salary: $62,263- $67,567(p.a.)
  • Total Effective Package: $79,126 – $85,041(p.a.)*
  • Full-time, fixed term contract up to 30/09/2017

This is an Aboriginal Identified Position

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 40 years’ experience providing comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal people living in Central Australia. Congress is seeking a Senior Aboriginal Youth Engagement Officer who is interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

The position leads the Aboriginal Youth Engagement Officer’s (YEO) with responsibility for team and relationship management of the Congress After Hours Services. The Senior Aboriginal Youth Engagement Officer engages with young people in the Alice Springs CBD at night, assists transport of young people off the streets to a safe place and provides brief crisis intervention and referrals.

Night and weekend work is an inherent requirement of the position.

Alice Springs offers a unique lifestyle in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere in the heart of Australia. It is within easy reach of Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Watarrka (Kings Canyon) and a host of other world heritage sites.

As well as a wonderful lifestyle and rewarding work, Congress offers the following:

  • Competitive salaries
  • Six (6) weeks annual leave
  • 9.5% superannuation
  • Generous salary packaging
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Family friendly conditions
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)

For more information on the position please contact the Social and Emotional Wellbeing Manager, Dr Jon-Paul Cacioli on (08) 8959 4799 or jon-paul.cacioli@caac.org.au.

Applications close: FRIDAY 28 APRIL 2017.

*Total effective package includes: base salary, district allowance, superannuation, leave loading, and estimated tax saving from salary packaging options.

Contact Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 for more information.

For more information about jobs at Congress visit www.caac.org.au/hr.

To apply for this job go to: http://www.caac.org.au/hr & enter ref code: 3460868.

For more information about jobs at Congress visit
http://www.caac.org.au/hr

17. Wheatbelt Health Network WA Care Coordinator (Integrated Team Care)

 
We are seeking a Care Coordinator (Integrated Team Care) to join our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health team at the Wheatbelt Health Centre in Northam, WA.
The Care Coordinator will coordinate care and support to ATSI clients, to facilitate client self-management of chronic conditions and assist them to achieve optimal health outcomes.
The Coordinator works collaboratively as part of a multidisciplinary team to provide comprehensive support to clients and will take a lead role in liaising with the local ATSI community.
The applicant must have a Aboriginal Health Worker or Aboriginal Health Practitioner background.
This is an Indigenous-identified position

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #457 Workforce Survey : Will your ACCHO be effected by #457visa changes ?

 ” NACCHO would like to know if your service is effected by the Australian Government’s abolition of 457 visas in over 200 occupations which could have adverse effects on the supply of health services in rural areas and remote regions?”

The health sector /ACCHO’s has yesterday (20 April ) had a press release and video response from Assistant Health Minister, Dr David Gillespie (see above extract and in full below )

 ” The changes announced this week will not have any significant impact on the ability of rural and regional areas to recruit temporary skilled overseas trained health professionals”

WATCH VIDEO HERE

But according to National Rural Health Alliance Chief Executive David Butt (see press release 2 below )  there were nearly 4,000 medical practitioners in Australia on 457 visas, as well as 1,800 nurses, 500 allied health workers, nearly 400 specialists, around 200 dental professionals, and nearly 650 other health professionals, including aged care, disability, health administration and medical science workers.

Read yesterdays NACCHO post with press release concerns /responses from National Rural Health Alliance , the AMA and the Rural Doctors Association of Australia

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce and #457visas : Overseas trained doctors still essential in the bush: assurances needed on 457

Let us know if you have any concerns about your workforce issue regarding health care workers on a 457 visa and the occupations in your service impacted by the proposed changes.

You can email your concerns to NACCHO NEWS Or

or leave your comments at the end of this post

Please note: On 18 April 2017, the Government announced that the Temporary Work (Skilled) visa (subclass 457 visa) will be abolished and replaced with the completely new Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa in March 2018.

The TSS visa programme will be comprised of a Short-Term stream of up to two years and a Medium-Term stream of up to four years and will support businesses in addressing genuine skill shortages in their workforce and will contain a number of safeguards which prioritise Australian workers.

Rural doctors not affected by 457 visa changes says Minister

Assistant Health Minister, Dr David Gillespie ( Pictured above visiting his local ACCHO last month ) has reassured doctors and rural communities on the impacts of the Coalition Government’s changes to the temporary and permanent employer sponsored skilled migration schemes.

Download the Press Release HERE 457 Visas

“The changes announced this week will not have any significant impact on the ability of rural and regional areas to recruit temporary skilled overseas trained health professionals,

“While I note the concerns of the Australian Medical Association and the Rural Doctors’ Association of Australia about the future of international medical graduates in rural communities, appropriately qualified health professionals will continue to have access to Australia’s Temporary Migration scheme.”

Minister Gillespie said the changes are intended to prioritise opportunities for Australian workers and professionals, and will be introduced in stages through to March 2018.

“Initially, the skilled occupation lists have been tightened to remove some occupations, including some health occupations where very few people had accessed the visa over the last four years.

This will have minimal impact, with less than a handful of overseas professionals currently working in Australia,” Minister Gillespie said.

Minister Gillespie said the visa assessment process for overseas trained doctors is already quite stringent.

“All overseas trained doctors, regardless of their visa category, are assessed against their prior work experience and their English language skills before they can enter Australia.

This testing is conducted as part of the medical registration and credentialing processes that inform visa application assessments,” Minister Gillespie said.

Many temporary resident overseas trained doctors who have entered Australia under the current 457 visa arrangements are being employed to work in state-approved supervised Area of Need positions.

“These positions are approved only after the prospective employer has completed labour market testing and can demonstrate a need for an overseas-trained doctor to fill a position.

“In addition, the Medicare legislation places a requirement on overseas trained doctors to work in areas recognised as districts of workforce shortage.”

Minister Gillespie said there will be consultation process ahead of the more significant changes in March next year.

“The Department of Health will continue to ensure that any future changes to the skilled occupation lists support health workforce requirements.

He said the Coalition Government remains heavily invested in boosting the Australian-trained regional and rural workforce through initiatives such as the Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training program.

As part of this initiative, we’ve recently announced an additional $54.4 million over two years to 2018-19 for 26 regional training hubs and three additional University Departments of Rural Health,” Minister Gillespie said.

“This will provide additional opportunities for health and medical students to live, study and work in rural and regional Australia and improve access to health services for the people that live in those communities.”

Press Release 2 :Abolition of 457 visas could lead to rural health service shortages

‘While we fully support education and training strategies to build a strong health workforce within Australia, it’s a fact that it is still a challenge to fill some roles, particularly in regional and rural areas’, said AHHA Chief Executive Alison Verhoeven.

Download Press Release NRH AHHA 457 Visas

National Rural Health Alliance Chief Executive David Butt said there were nearly 4,000 medical practitioners in Australia on 457 visas, as well as 1,800 nurses, 500 allied health workers, nearly 400 specialists, around 200 dental professionals, and nearly 650 other health professionals, including aged care, disability, health administration and medical science workers.

‘Many of these people are working in rural and regional areas’, Mr Butt said.

‘These skilled clinicians and other health professionals who have come to Australia on 457 visas have made a substantial contribution to our capacity to provide to provide health services, particularly to people in the bush.

Many have stayed on to become permanent residents, and are highly valued members of our community.’

Ms Verhoeven said feedback from AHHA members ‘on the ground’ in rural areas is that the opportunity to transition from a 457 visa to permanent residency was a significant incentive for much-needed overseas-trained doctors to take up positions in Australia, and especially in rural areas. This ability to transition is not part of the replacement 2- and 4-year visas now being offered.

‘We think that there could well be a negative impact, not only on availability of clinicians, but on continuity of care if visas are only issued for 2 or 4 years’, Ms Verhoeven said.

‘We also think that this impact will stretch beyond medical practitioners to a range of health and disability and aged care workers, including administrative staff who code and collect the health data that are so important to health services planning and funding.’

Mr Butt said people in rural and regional areas, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, already experience reduced access to health services, and more illness and injury compared with other Australians.

‘We must ensure that market testing is not the cause of further delay to these communities. I also strongly urge the Government to look at these issues as part of a more comprehensive plan to address workforce distribution.

‘Changes to the visa program must therefore take into account our need to ensure good health services are available for all community members—skill shortages cannot be fixed overnight and require long term planning and investment’, Mr Butt said.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce and #457visas : Overseas trained doctors still essential in the bush: assurances needed on 457

 ” While the Federal Government’s work to deliver more Australian-trained doctors to the bush is very positive and welcome, International Medical Graduates (IMGs) will continue to be essential in providing medical care in rural and remote communities for at least the next 5 years — and probably for the next 15 years “

RDAA President, Dr Ewen McPhee Rural Doctors Association of Australia has warned. (article 1 below )

View the many current Doctor vacancies in our ACCHO’s

 Advertised each week in our NACCHO #Jobalerts

Many communities would not have doctors if it were not for the excellent work of IMGs,”

It is important that we strike the right balance between filling vacancies with locally trained graduates and ensuring that communities, especially in rural and remote Australia, have doctors in the right numbers and with the appropriate specialist skills and experience to meet patient needs.

The AMA welcomes the emphasis of the new arrangements to better target recruitment and the mandatory requirement for labour market testing, which the AMA has been calling for in light of the significant increases in locally-trained medical graduate numbers. ”

AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon (article 2 below)

Australian government to replace 457 temporary work visa  Source

Returning now to the Government’s announcement today that it’s scrapping the 457 visa program for foreign workers.

It is interesting to note that, of the 2618 people who arrived on Government sponsored 457 visas last year, 2268 were health professionals. It’s a huge proportion.

This graphic, which was published originally by The Guardian, shows the most common 457 visa jobs in different areas in Australia. You can see a lot of blue there, which represents café workers, but all the green that you can see on that graphic, mainly there in rural and regional areas, does represent doctors and nurses, health workers who have been brought in on 457 visas.

SkyNews interview Dr Michael Gannon (article 3 below )

Banning 457 visas will have an immediate and potentially significant impact on the recruitment of health professionals in rural and remote Australia.

Despite the increase in the number of health professionals graduating from Australian universities, recruiting professionals to work in rural and remote Australia is still difficult.

“I would love to be in the situation where we rely on locally trained health professionals to fill all vacancies in rural and remote communities“,

David Butt, Chief Executive Officer of the National Rural Health Alliance (article 4 below )

Article 1 RDAA continued

For this reason, RDAA has urged the Government to assure these much-needed doctors of their continued future support in Australia, under the 457 visa changes announced yesterday.

“Many rural medical practice employers, as well as IMGs, are highly concerned about the as yet unexplained requirements of the new visa arrangements, particularly around market testing and the changes to permanent residency applications” RDAA President, Dr Ewen McPhee, said.

“Market testing evidence has been a requirement for IMGs in applying for a Medicare provider number for many years, so we are hoping this is not going to duplicate a process that is already in place for these doctors.

“It is important that the Government works closely with all stakeholders — including rural medical practices and IMGs themselves — to educate them on the changes to the visa requirements, as this announcement has caused significant angst for many IMGs and practices with regards to what it means for them.

“RDAA understands that doctors listed in the revised visa arrangement’s ‘medium category’ will be eligible for a four year visa, with permanent residency applications eligible after three years — a change from the two year requirement under the current 457 visa.

“The recruitment of an IMG is a long process involving many steps. A number of the steps outlined in the Government’s new visa policy, such as market testing and criminal history checks, are already in place for IMG recruitment, therefore it is essential this change to the visa requirements does not duplicate but rather replaces the processes that are already in place.

“IMGs have been a backbone of medical care in rural and remote Australia for many years — and they will continue to be for at least the next 5 years, and probably even up to 15 years.

“If it weren’t for the many dedicated and highly trained IMGs who have delivered medical care in rural and remote Australia for many years, a large number of communities would not have had access to a local doctor for decades.

“Even with the very positive measures that the Federal Government has been taking to encourage more Australian-trained doctors to work in the bush, we are still a minimum of 4-5 years away from seeing the full benefits of these measures being realised.

“It will take time to deliver more of the next generation of Australian-trained doctors who are able to work unsupervised in rural and remote communities, and then it will be a slow, ongoing process of capacity building, with a gradual year-on-year increase in the number of Australian-trained doctors choosing to work in the bush.

“With IMGs still comprising approximately 40% of Australia’s rural and remote medical workforce, we will continue to need IMGs in country Australia in the short and medium-term at least, and probably well into the long-term for some locations.

“IMGs are highly appreciated and respected by the many rural and remote communities they serve, as well as by their Australian-trained colleagues.

“They deserve significant and increased support in their critical role, particularly at a time when they are highly concerned about what the 457 visa changes will mean for them and their families.”

Article 2 : AMA CAUTIOUSLY WELCOMES NEW VISA ARRANGEMENTS FOR OVERSEAS DOCTORS

The AMA has cautiously welcomed the Government’s new visa arrangements, but is seeking more detail and clarification of the possible impact of the changes on medical workforce shortages.

The current 457 visas will be abolished from March 2018, and replaced by a new Temporary Skills Shortage Visa, which will have tighter conditions and have a smaller number of eligible occupations. It will also be harder to progress to permanent residency from the new visa class.

The AMA has been advised that doctors will still be eligible for the new visa, but there is little detail about medical specialties or groups. Existing 457 visa holders will continue on the same conditions they have now. It is important that doctors with these visas who have been working hard towards permanent residency are not disadvantaged.

AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, said that international medical graduates (IMGs) have made a huge contribution to the Australian medical workforce, especially in rural areas and during periods of chronic workforce shortages.

“Many communities would not have doctors if it were not for the excellent work of IMGs,” Dr Gannon said.

“Australia is presently in the fortunate position of producing sufficient locally-trained medical graduates to meet current and predicted need. It is time to focus our energies on training the hundreds of Australian medical graduates seeking specialist training.

“But we still need to have the flexibility to ensure that under-supplied specialties and geographic locations can access suitably-qualified IMGs when locally trained ones cannot be recruited.

“It is important that we strike the right balance between filling vacancies with locally trained graduates and ensuring that communities, especially in rural and remote Australia, have doctors in the right numbers and with the appropriate specialist skills and experience to meet patient needs.

“The AMA welcomes the emphasis of the new arrangements to better target recruitment and the mandatory requirement for labour market testing, which the AMA has been calling for in light of the significant increases in locally-trained medical graduate numbers.

“We also need to see the Government step up policy efforts to encourage local graduates to work in the areas and the specialties where they are needed.”

Today, the chief executive officer of the National Rural Health Alliance, David Butt, did warn that banning 457 visas will have an immediate, and potentially significant, impact on the recruitment of health professionals in rural and remote Australia.

Article 3 SkyNews interview

So what does the Australian Medical Association think of the change? Joining me now live from his office in Perth is Dr Michael Gannon. He’s the President of the Australian Medical Association. Dr Gannon, thank you for your time. Do you have any concerns about the changes announced today?

MICHAEL GANNON: Well, we cautiously welcome these changes, but what we want to see is flexibility in the new arrangements to make sure that areas that still do have genuine shortages, like the rural and regional areas you mentioned, do have the ability to recruit doctors, nurses, other health workers, if need be.

ASHLEIGH GILLON: I note, looking down the list of just over 200 job categories that are being removed from that list as to people who are eligible to apply for these visas to work here, doctors are obviously not on that list, but there are plenty in the medical field. Occupations being taken off the list include medical administrators, nurse researchers, operating theatre technicians, pathology collectors, dental therapists, mothercraft nurses, first aid trainer, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers, also exercise physiologists. Are you confident those type of roles can actually be filled by Australians?

MICHAEL GANNON: Well, certainly what we’ve seen in Australia in recent years is tremendous investment in medical students, and we’ve seen similar investments in a lot of these other health professions. We need to see flexibility in the arrangements, so for those specialties or those areas of the workforce where genuine shortages remain, that we are able to get staff from overseas. But what we’ve seen too much of is this mechanism gamed. We need employers to be more honest about the needs for extra staff, and what we need to see is greater investment in training positions for those hundreds of locally trained doctors who are now lining up desperately trying to find specialist training, and then deploy them where they’re needed, making sure that Australians in rural and regional areas continue to be well serviced by health professionals.

ASHLEIGH GILLON: How far away are we from that point? From being in a position where we don’t actually need foreign doctors and nurses to bolster our health system, especially in those rural and regional areas?

MICHAEL GANNON: Well, certainly, in terms of numbers, we’ve got it about right. If anything, we’ve got an oversupply. But what we need to do, and this is going to require the input of government, it’s going to require the profession to change, we need to make sure that those potentially thousands of extra doctors that we’ve got are deployed in areas where we need them.

So we need to get smart in the future. The AMA’s calling for a third of all medical students to come from rural areas. We want to see more positive experiences for junior doctors and medical students when they go to the regions. We know from evidence that that means they’re more likely to go and work in the bush later.

There’s a moral dimension to these changes: every time Australia recruits a doctor from a Third World country, or from another country, they are taking those doctors away from populations that desperately need them. Australia’s definitely reached self-sufficiency in terms of total numbers of medical graduates. We’ve got to make sure that the public hospitals, the private hospitals, the general practices, have the training positions so that we can get Australian-trained doctors out there and working.

ASHLEIGH GILLON: Aside from the job numbers that are decreasing in terms of occupations that we’re looking for to fill some of the roles here in Australia, there still are some substantial changes involved in the announcement today, including mandatory police checks, labour market testing, but is it safe to assume that already happens in the medical field? Do you see any of the changes announced today impacting specifically people working in the health area?

MICHAEL GANNON: Look, I think that there’s going to be plenty of positives to this announcement, as long as we do maintain that flexibility. So if there is the opportunity for us to recruit a genuine superstar of academia, or someone who brings a new skill to Australia, we need the flexibility to be able to employ them. If we identify specialty by specialty, or region by region, genuine shortages, we must maintain that flexibility to employ them.

But too often it’s been easy in the public hospital system to say to Australian-trained doctors with genuine grievances, ‘look, take your problem and take it away with you. We’ll find another doctor from overseas’. It’s incumbent that the employers actually produce environments that are safe for doctors to work with and to work within. And it’s actually incumbent on them to listen to doctors if they identify shortages or shortcomings in the system.

This will make it harder for hospitals just to ignore problems. They might find it harder to just say to an Australian-trained doctor, ‘go away, we can find someone else from overseas to fill the shortage’.

ASHLEIGH GILLON: Just on another matter Dr Gannon, expectations are pretty high that the Government will be lifting the freeze on Medicare rebates for doctor visits in the Budget. You’ve been lobbying pretty hard for this change, for a long time now. How confident are you that we will see that change on Budget night?

MICHAEL GANNON: Look, I’m very confident that we’ll see some change. But one of the reasons that discussions continue between myself and the Health Minister is that he’s got a budgetary environment that is hard to give me everything that I’m asking for. We would like to see the freeze lifted across the entire Medicare Benefits Schedule. The freeze on patient rebates not only impacts on GPs, but it impacts on specialists who bulk bill their payments. And what it’s meant is that for many years now, procedural specialists have had the amount that they’re paid by the insurers frozen. That, in turn, has an impact on the public hospital system.

So you can see that the freeze is impacting across the board. To thaw out across the entire system costs over $3 billion. I’m sure there’s a situation where every other Minister is being asked to deliver substantial cuts in their budgets. And in the health sphere, we’re asking for increased spending. That’s difficult for the Minister to deliver on. Equally, he’ll be in no doubt that we want to see the freeze unravelled across the entire schedule.

ASHLEIGH GILLON: Only a few weeks to go and we’ll know all. And just finally, Dr Gannon, before you go, we saw these reports yesterday that doctors are fearing that the overuse of antibiotics could see common illnesses become life threatening. It follows the death of a woman in the US from an antibiotic resistant infection. Should we be worried about this? Should we be concerned that simple childhood illnesses could one day again become deadly?

MICHAEL GANNON: I think we’ve got a lot to worry about, and it’s not just children that need to worry, it’s adults as well. We potentially face returning to the pre-antibiotic era. This has numerous dimensions of concern. We might see what we regard now as very simple operations become too dangerous to perform. We might see people who are potentially able to be cured of auto-immune disease or cured of cancer denied these treatments because we can no longer deal with the infections that come from immune suppression.

This requires numerous elements of attention. It requires international cooperation through bodies like the G20 to recognise there is market failure in here and big pharmaceutical companies can’t afford to make the investment in looking for new antibiotics. At the individual hospital level, we need to see smarter antibiotic stewardship. At the individual patient level, we need to see patients understanding reasons why doctors don’t just want to dish out antibiotics for viral infections. These individual reports are going to become more common.

ASHLEIGH GILLON: So you think Australians at the moment are taking too many antibiotics when they don’t really need them?

MICHAEL GANNON: Well, certainly, individual doctors need to get smarter when they’re prescribing antibiotics. We need to de-escalate treatment in accordance with the results of microbiological testing, where it’s appropriate to use a narrower spectrum antibiotic. Individual patients need to get smarter in preventing the infections that can be prevented through vaccination, and they need to get smarter in understanding the difference between a virus and a bacterial infection, and if the doctor says you don’t need antibiotics for bronchitis or you don’t need antibiotics because this is a virus, they need to heed that advice and do their bit to prevent antibiotic resistance.

ASHLEIGH GILLON: Dr Michael Gannon, appreciate you joining us live there from Perth. Thank you.

MICHAEL GANNON: Pleasure, Ashleigh.

Article 4 : 457 visas vital for rural and remote health workforce

Banning 457 visas will have an immediate and potentially significant impact on the recruitment of health professionals in rural and remote Australia.

Despite the increase in the number of health professionals graduating from Australian universities, recruiting professionals to work in rural and remote Australia is still difficult.

“I would love to be in the situation where we rely on locally trained health professionals to fill all vacancies in rural and remote communities”, said David Butt, Chief Executive Officer of the National Rural Health Alliance, “but that is still many years away. Without overseas trained health professionals, many rural and remote communities would simply be without access to health care.”

“I note that a new class of visa will be available, and while I have not yet seen the requirements, I would urge the Government to be mindful of the need to ensure implementation does not impact negatively on the health needs of the seven million people living outside Australia’s major cities,” said Mr Butt.

“The people who live in rural and remote Australia have higher rates of diseases than their city cousins, and have poorer health outcomes, with death rates up to 60% higher for Coronary heart disease and 35% higher for lung cancer.

NACCHO TOP10+ #JobAlerts : This week in Aboriginal Health : Doctors, Aboriginal Health Workers etc. etc.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Workforce News : $54.4 million for high quality health training in the “bush “

Both of these initiatives of the Coalition Government support high quality rural placements for health students from across Australia, to help ensure rural communities have access to doctors, nurses, midwives and allied health professionals in the future.

These hubs will work with local health services to help move medical students through the pipeline, enabling students to continue rural training through university into postgraduate medical training, and then working within rural Australia.

Supporting high quality regional and rural health training is not only an important way to address rural health workforce shortages, but also maintain and improve overall services in the bush”

Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie, announcing $54.4 million funding and the locations of 26 regional training hubs and three new UDRHs, and the universities that will operate them.

Health and medical students will have greater opportunities to live, study and work in rural and regional Australia as part of the Federal Coalition’s Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training (RHMT) program – another key initiative aimed at boosting Australia’s regional and rural health workforce.

Under the RHMT program $54.4 million has been allocated over 2016-17 to 2018-19 for new Regional Training Hubs and University Departments of Rural Health (UDRH). Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie, today announced the locations of 26 regional training hubs and three new UDRHs, and the universities that will operate them.

“Training facilities like University Departments of Rural Health are essential to the regional health workforce of the future.”

With funding of $26 million, University of Notre Dame (WA), Charles Sturt University (NSW) and University of Queensland (QLD) have been selected to establish UDRHs in, respectively, Broome and the Kimberley in Western Australia, southern and central New South Wales, and South-East Queensland. This now takes the number of UDRHs across Australia to 15.

Each of these Departments will support current health workforce priorities in their region, and expand support for clinical placement activity for nursing, midwifery, dental or allied health students.

Minister Gillespie said the 26 new Regional Training Hubs across rural and regional Australia, form an essential component of the Integrated Rural Training Pipeline for Medicine.

“Supporting high quality regional and rural health training is not only an important way to address rural health workforce shortages, but also maintain and improve overall services in the bush. Good quality accessible health services are an important and essential part in the growth of a regional economy,” Minister Gillespie said.

“These initiatives will also help the Federal Coalition Government deliver on our commitment to provide first rate health and medical services to all Australians – regardless of where they live,” he added.

Australia’s GPs welcome new investment in regional health training

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) has warmly welcomed the Australian Government’s announcement of funding for 26 Regional Health Training Hubs and three University Departments of Rural Health.

Download RACGP press release RACGP PR

RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel said the new hubs and university departments are being funded through the Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training Program and will provide much needed support for clinical training across regional Australia.

“This $54.4 million investment in clinical training will create even more high quality rural health and medical placements for students across Australia. It will also provide people living in rural communities with more GPs, nurses, midwives and allied health professionals,” Dr Seidel said.

The new university departments will support clinical placements for nursing, midwifery, dental or allied health students. The new training hubs will play a critical role in the Integrated Rural Training Pipeline for Medicine.

In 2013, the RACGP was commissioned by the Australian Government to develop national policy options for connecting and enabling an integrated rural training pathway for medical practitioners.

The RACGP’s Final report: new approaches to integrated rural training for medical practitioners helped shape the Australian Government’s Integrated Rural Training Pipeline for Medicine and recommended greater investment in integrated rural training hubs.

“A key to the success of each training hub will be its partnerships at the local level including its partnership with RACGP Rural and the integration of its teaching resources with the faculty’s teaching resources”, Dr Seidel said.

 

NACCHO TOP10 #JobAlerts This week in Aboriginal Health : Doctors, Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers Drug and Alcohol , Mental Health

Help Close the Gap and create healthy futures for our mob

This weeks featured jobs on our NACCHO Job Alert

Please note before completing a job application check with the ACCHO that job is still available

1.Nunkuwarrin Yunti SA Alcohol and Other Drug Work

2.Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

3.Non-Member Board Director — Specialist in Primary Health Care

4.Aboriginal Health Worker, Mental Health – Walgett AMS

5. Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Walgett AMS

6.Remote Area Nurses & Nurse-Midwives Nganampa Health Council SA

7. General Practitioner – Full Time :Durri ACMS NSW

8.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Mental Health Recovery Program

9. Indigenous Health Promotion Officer Mawarnkarra Health Service WA

10.Urapuntja Health Service :  3 positions currently available : No closing date

Monash Health, Aboriginal Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Cadetship Program 2017

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.Nunkuwarrin Yunti SA Alcohol and Other Drug Work

Three new employment vacancies are available at Nunkuwarrin Yunti in the area of Alcohol and Other Drug Work

Our name was adopted from the dialects of the two largest clans in the southern region – Ngarrindjeri and Narungga to represent the community, the services and the spirit in which they are provided.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti means ‘Working Together – Doing Right Together’ and proclaims our belief of one community sharing a united vision for the future.

This simple belief has seen Nunkuwarrin Yunti at the forefront of initiatives to improve the health, life expectancy and lifestyle prospects for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
We work with the community, our staff and other organisations to improve and expand our service delivery.

Three new employment vacancies are available at Nunkuwarrin Yunti in the area of Alcohol and Other Drug Work.

Applications Close COB Monday 10th April 2017.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People are encouraged to apply.

2. Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

 

Galangoor Duwalami Primary Healthcare Service is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled primary health care service, operating in both Hervey Bay and Maryborough, servicing the entire Fraser Coast area.

Galangoor Duwalami collaborates with health and well-being partner agencies to enable integrated continuity of care for the community, and continue to work to contribute to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy and program reform in Queensland to address the Burden of disease and Close the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

General Practitioner (GP) two positions available

This is an exciting opportunity to join an innovative and flexible employer, enthusiastic and committed team and make a direct impact on improved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Fraser Coast area.

The Practice:

Galangoor Duwalami (meaning a ‘happy meeting place’) is located on the Fraser Coast in sunny Queensland, with two clinics (Hervey Bay and Maryborough). Originally established in 2007 we offer a comprehensive suite of Health Services within the Fraser Coast region.

The Hervey Bay clinic is situated at the beachside, while a newly built practice in the heart of Historical Maryborough, offers exceptional facilities with 10 consulting rooms including a mums and bubs room, new equipment and large reception. The practice is Community Controlled and has a well-established clientele and reports indicate continued growth.

This is a rewarding prospect for a compassionate, engaging, visionary and thorough General Practitioner with an ability to work within a diverse interdisciplinary team exhibiting admirable communication skills.

  • Two positions available – 2 Part Time – hours negotiable OR 1 Full Time and 1 Part Time
  • Well balanced working environment – Monday to Friday from 0830 to 1700.
  • No on-call requirements
  • Competitive Salary Package
  • Salary packaging
  • Annual Leave plus Study Leave
  • 9.5% Superannuation Entitlement

Key Requirements:

Must Have:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding current registration with the Medical Board of Australia
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number

Download this Information GP Advertisement

Application Process:

A Position Description is available by email. All applications, including a covering letter, are to be e-mailed to: ann.woolcock@gdphcs.com.au

For further details regarding this position please contact Ann Woolcock on 07 41945554.

3.Non-Member Board Director — Specialist in Primary Health Care

For 40 years, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress has been a voice for Aboriginal people in Central Australia. Today, the organisation provides comprehensive primary health care to Aboriginal people living in Alice Springs and five remote communities in Central Australia.

As a Non-Member Board Director — Specialist in Primary Health Care, you will have the following attributes:

• Ability to identify key issues in relation to primary health care and have oversight of appropriate policies to define the parameters within which the organisation will operate.

• Knowledge, experience and networks in public health including health policy, community health and wellbeing, health needs analysis, health planning, resource allocation, analysis of population health trends, critical appraisal of published evidence and service delivery.

• Knowledge, experience and understanding of primary health care, for example nursing, allied health, medical practice and specialties and community health service provision.

• An understanding of clinical governance, knowledge and experience in clinical leadership, safety and quality standards of service delivery in primary health care, and associated performance measurement and reporting.

• Knowledge and experience in the strategic use and governance of information management and information technology, particularly in the context of health, tele-health, the collection of health data and electronic health records, and including personal information in privacy and security risk management.

• Ability to commit to the responsibilities including the time required by this role and an ability to contribute to continuing to build the capacity and governance of the organisation.

The responsibilities and duty of care for Non-Member Directors is equal to that of Member Directors. As a Non-Member Director, it is not a requirement that you reside in Central Australia.

Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people are encouraged to apply

Download the FACT  and Contact

5.2 2017_Executive_ CAACAC Non-Member Directors Fact Sheet_Primary Health Care

For further information on these positions, please contact Donna Ah Chee, CEO Ph: 08 8951 4401

To submit your application, please ph: 08 8951 4401 or

email: directorate.execsec@caac.org.au

4.Aboriginal Health Worker, Mental Health – Walgett AMS

Walgett is a nestled in north-central New South Wales. With a population of 2,300, Walgett is a regional hub for the wool, wheat and cotton industries. It is also the gateway to the New South Wales opal fields. Walgett Shire offers a friendly relaxed lifestyle and there are many sporting and recreational pursuits available.
The Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service (WAMS) will work with the Aboriginal Communities of the Walgett Shire area to provide a quality culturally appropriate health service.
The organisation has grown from strength to strength and we have shown all members of the community we are here to help in any way we can.
This position is a permanent full time position and reports through to the Chronic Disease Manager. Duties will include, but not limited to:
 Maintain Confidentiality and Privacy at all times;
 Develop, coordinate and implement community development activities;
 Develop and facilitate cross-cultural awareness training;
 Coordinate referrals to specialist and other agencies services e.g. psychiatrists, psychologists etc.
 Working with WAMS team to research, develop and implement, monitor and evaluate the Aboriginal Mental Health program.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE REQUIRED TO CARRY OUT THIS ROLE:

Essential:
– Aboriginality: a genuine requirement of this position, as per section 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977;
– Certificate four in Aboriginal Mental Health and/or relevant qualification;
– Experience working with rural and remote communities;
– Knowledge of current Aboriginal health issues;
– Experience researching, designing and implementing primary health care strategies and an Aboriginal Health program
– Demonstrated knowledge of Aboriginal Mental Health issues significant to Aboriginal people;

– Ability to liaise with both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal organisations and individuals;
– Ability to organise, co-ordinate and facilitate workshops and conferences;
– Sound knowledge of the application of community protocols and the Aboriginal Health Information Guidelines; and
– Current NSW driver’s license.
Desirable:
– Knowledge of Walgett and surrounding communities’ services by WAMS;
– Experience working in mental health and/or related fields;
– First Aid certificates; and
– Ability to create and maintain a client data base, analyse client data and adapt program according to client and community needs.
If you’re looking for a change of pace and the opportunity to gain a unique rural experience, then this is the role for you. Applicants must send through a copy of their resume along with a cover letter outlining their experience. Additional training may be provided to the right candidate.

APPLY HERE

5. Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Walgett AMS

Walgett is a nestled in north-central New South Wales. With a population of 2,300, Walgett is a regional hub for the wool, wheat and cotton industries. It is also the gateway to the New South Wales opal fields.  Walgett Shire offers a friendly relaxed lifestyle and there are many sporting and recreational pursuits available.

The Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service (WAMS) will work with the Aboriginal Communities of the Walgett Shire area to provide a quality culturally appropriate health service.

The organisation has grown from strength to strength and we have shown all members of the community we are here to help in any way we can.

This position is a permanent full time position and reports through to the Chronic Disease Manager.  Duties will include, but not limited to:

  • Maintain Confidentiality and Privacy at all times;
  • Increase community awareness of the effects of the abuse of alcohol and other addictive substances;
  • Increase community awareness of all diseases caused by alcohol and other drug substances;
  • Plan, implement and evaluate culturally appropriate programs;
  • Work with judicial and police system to give support to clients requiring counselling and rehabilitation as directed by these agencies;
  • Assist with transportation to outsourced facilities; and
  • Work and assist Doctors and fellow team members at WAMS.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE REQUIRED TO CARRY OUT THIS ROLE:

Essential:

  • Aboriginality: a genuine requirement of this position, as per section 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977;
  • Certificate three (3) in Aboriginal Mental Health and/or relevant qualification;
  • Certificate four (4) in Drug and Alcohol;
  • Experience working with rural and remote communities;
  • Knowledge of current Aboriginal health issues;
  • Experience researching, designing and implementing primary health care strategies and an Aboriginal Health program
  • Demonstrated knowledge of Aboriginal Mental Health issues significant to Aboriginal people;
  • Ability to liaise with both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal organisations and individuals;
  • Ability to organise, co-ordinate and facilitate workshops and conferences;
  • Sound knowledge of the application of community protocols and the Aboriginal Health Information Guidelines;
  • Current NSW driver’s license;
  • Clean NCC; and
  • Clean WWCC.

Desirable:

  • Knowledge of Walgett and surrounding communities’ services by WAMS;
  • Experience working in mental health and/or related fields;
  • First Aid certificates; and
  • Ability to create and maintain a client data base, analyse client data and adapt program according to client and community needs.

The successful candidate will need to provide to us, prior to the commencement of work:

  • Clean WCC (Working with Children Check)
  • Clean NCC (National Crime Check)
  • Undergo a Pre-Employment Medical Clearance.

If you’re looking for a change of pace and the opportunity to gain a unique rural experience, then this is the role for you.  Applicants must send through a copy of their resume along with a cover letter outlining their experience.  Additional training may be provided to the right candidate.

APPLY HERE

6.Remote Area Nurses & Nurse-Midwives Nganampa Health Council SA

Remote Area Nurses & Nurse-Midwives

Exciting and varied opportunities for Registered Nurses and Nurse – Midwives to join a highly recognised Aboriginal Health Service. If you have recent Medical/ A&E and Clinical experience, are passionate about making a difference and looking to be remunerated for your efforts – then read on..

Your new company

Nganampa Health Council is an Aboriginal owned and controlled health organisation operating on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands in the far north-western region of South Australia. The APY Lands cover roughly 103,000 square km, with a population of approx. 3,000 Anangu people. The region is freehold land controlled by the Anangu people.

Across this area, Nganampa Health operates seven clinics, an aged care facility and assorted health related programs including aged care, sexual health, environmental health, health worker training, dental, women’s health, male health, children’s health and mental health.

Nganampa Health Council is widely recognised as being an exemplar Aboriginal health service in the country. Their successes include significantly reducing the rates of sexually transmitted infections, increasing birth weights through their antenatal program, consistently keeping childhood immunisation rates at 100% and providing high quality residential and respite aged care at their Tjilpiku Pampaku Ngura aged care facility.

Further information can be found at www.nganampahealth.com.au

Your new career

Nganampa Health Council has opportunities for full-time clinic-based Registered Nurses and Registered Midwives to join their clinical teams, based in remote South Australia.

In these highly varied roles, you will be responsible for delivering primary health care according to the CARPA Standard Treatment Manual, and assisting in the early detection and management of chronic illness as part of a multi-disciplinary team. 

Working under the direction of the Medical Director and Clinical Service Manager, some of your areas of responsibility will include:

  • Working collaboratively with Medical Officers, Anangu Health Workers and other health staff to provide primary health care;
  • Treating acute illness and chronic medical conditions, and managing computerised recalls and patient follow-up care;
  • Child health monitoring and immunisations;
  • Patient health education;
  • Assessment and referral of social welfare issues;
  • Public health screening for STI, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis A, B & C;
  • Public health surveying and programs;
  • Antenatal and post natal care;
  • General education support for Anangu Health Workers; and
  • Day-to-day administration of the clinics.

On offer is an extremely attractive salary package circa $204,581 – $238,133, commensurate with remote area experience, (this includes estimated non-cash benefits of $37,615 – $47,141).

Successful candidates will also be supplied with rent-free modern accommodation, including all rent, electricity, gas and basic essentials! Benefits include:

  • District allowance;
  • Work allowance;
  • Superannuation;
  • Annual retention bonus;
  • Leave loading;
  • Annual airfare;
  • 12 days study leave;
  • Recreation leave allowance;
  • 12 weeks annual leave; and
  • Assistance with relocation costs (negotiable)

About you

Candidates need to be adaptable and flexible individuals who can display the initiative, discretion and cultural sensitivity needed to support and drive the organisation’s objectives and values. Your ability to communicate and participate effectively within a cross-cultural, multi-disciplinary health team will be a must.

Individuals who are open to change, accepting of Aboriginal people, comfortable living in a remote environment and who are willing to learn the ways of the people will be well suited to these roles. The ability to work under Aboriginal management and control will also be highly regarded, as will a demonstrated understanding of issues affecting Aboriginal health, the principles of Primary Health Care and relevant legislation. No two days will be the same and as a result, highly resourceful candidates will thrive!

To be considered, you will:

  • Be a Registered Nurse or an RN / Registered Midwife, and be registered with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency (AHPRA);
  • Have a minimum of three years post graduation/ post bridging course, along with recent acute Medical / A&E experience;
  • Have demonstrable experience working in a clinical environment and hospital-based general nursing experience in the past 5 years (both of which are essential);
  • Ideally hold post basic nursing qualifications in Emergency Care, Critical Care and or rural and remote area Nursing (not essential);
  • Be able to demonstrate a sound professional clinical background and an ability to manage their own tasks; and
  • Have a good degree of computer literacy — health records and organisational documentation is computerised

Midwives must have done some acute general work within the past 5 years.

These positions are based in busy community clinics that are open from 9am to 5:30pm Monday to Friday. Nurses do provide an after hours on-call service, and you will require advanced nursing clinical skills including excellent clinical assessment skills and confidence in managing diversity in presentations — trauma, acute and chronic medical conditions — across all age groups.

The successful candidates must also be willing to undergo a Police Check and a Working With Children Check. A manual driver’s licence is essential and it would be advantageous to have experience with 4WD vehicles, although a 2 day 4WD training course is provided in your orientation week.

If you have a diverse background in clinical experience, including in clinical acute medicine, A&E, paediatrics and/or Aboriginal health care – then we want to hear from you!

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

To receive regular updates from Nganampa Health including future job opportunities, follow Nganampa Health Council on Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nganampa-Health-Council/306940186003663

Apply Now

7. General Practitioner – Full Time :Durri ACMS NSW

For over 30 years, Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service has provided essential and culturally appropriate medical, preventive, allied and oral health services to Aboriginal communities.  Located in Kempsey and surrounds and the Nambucca Valley on the Mid North Coast of NSW. Durri is committed to making health care and education accessible to improve the health status and wellbeing of our communities.

Download the Selection Criteria Apply

Application Pack General Practitioner – Durri Nambucca

8.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Mental Health Recovery Program

Be part of a unique and significant Social Health program!

  • Enjoy fantastic work/life balance with generous leave entitlements!
  • Attractive remuneration package of $71,296 PLUS super and salary sacrifice!

 

About the Mental Health Recovery Program

Nunkuwarrin Yunti‘s Mental Health Recovery Program aims to provide members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities with accessible, culturally safe and therapeutically sound psychological and counselling services. Mental Health Recovery team members comprise a mix of Psychological Services Providers including Registered Psychologists, Mental Health Accredited Social Workers, Social and Emotional Wellbeing Counsellors and related roles who provide one-to-one therapy and group therapy for our client group.

The Program has close links to Social Health Case Work services, community health promotion programs, clinical health programs and Stolen Generations support services.

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is seeking a Team Manager to lead their Mental Health Recovery Program on a full-time basis.

You’ll be leading a team of highly trained and qualified Psychological Service providers including Psychologists, Mental Health Social Workers and Counsellors across a small number of offices in metropolitan Adelaide, as well as a team member in Murray Bridge. This is a new team and some initial work to on-board new staff will be required.

Reporting to the Middle Manager – Social and Emotional Wellbeing, you will be responsible for delivering key services in alignment with funding agreements and service relevant legislation, such as privacy, mandatory reporting, and collection and reporting of service statistics. Core service delivery will comprise maximising the number of face to face counselling and psychological service sessions delivered to the target client groups, as well as some service promotion to key referral and client groups.

More specifically, some of your key duties will include:

  • Providing high level leadership and support to staff within the Mental Health Recovery Program;
  • Managing staff rosters, leave approvals, recruitment and induction, and regular performance reviews;
  • Supporting staff continuing professional development and operating as a resource to support team members in ethical and professional decision making;
  • Ensuring program outcomes are achieved and that all service delivery meets legislative requirements;
  • Maintaining strong communication pathways between internal and external stakeholders, in particular promoting the service and developing networks to build community support;
  • Providing input to the strategic direction of Nunkuwarrin Yunti through developing and implementing annual program action plans;
  • Creating and managing program budgets in collaboration with Middle Management and the Finance Manager; and
  • Reviewing and evaluating the program in order to complete reports to the funding body, and undertaking continuous improvement.

The ideal candidate will hold a Diploma or higher in Management, Social Health or similar discipline. Professional registration with bodies such as AHPRA or AASW will be highly regarded, as will management experience within the Human Services sector, preferably within an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

An in-depth knowledge of contemporary challenges faced by members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, the history of past government policies designed to remove Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, alongside a demonstrated understanding of how to deliver accessible services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, will be paramount to your success. Additionally, the ability to effectively communicate to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in a culturally sensitive manner will ensure your success in this position.

You’ll have strong experience in staff management, with the ability to encourage and motivate team members. Confidence in using the Microsoft Office Suite and client database systems is essential.

Please note: It is a requirement of this role that the successful candidate has a current driver’s licence, and is willing to undergo a National Police Check prior to employment with Nunkuwarrin Yunti.

To view the full position description, please click here.

For further information, telephone Chris Howland on 8406 1693 or 0401 615 511.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are encouraged to apply.

About the Benefits

The successful candidate will be rewarded with an attractive salary circa $71,296, dependent on skills and qualifications, plus super. This package provides you with excellent flexible salary sacrificing options which will allow you to significantly increase your take home pay.

Your dedication to the organisation will also be rewarded with generous leave allowances, including 7 days paid leave over the Christmas period in addition to your four weeks of annual leave!

By joining the supportive Nunkuwarrin Yunti team, you will receive career and personal growth opportunities within a multicultural workforce, and ongoing professional development and training. The benefits of working for South Australia’s largest Aboriginal primary healthcare service will become apparent as you experience genuine opportunities to advance your career within the organisation!

Don’t miss this opportunity to give back to the community and enjoy a rewarding challenge – Apply Now!

Please Note: Applications will be reviewed by COB 17th April, 2017.

 Added

Nunkuwarrin Yunti has multiple positions on our Chronic Conditions Management team.

Here is the link to the advertisement.

https://www.seek.com.au/job/33171419?type=standard&tier=no_tier&pos=1&whereid=3000&userqueryid=633e3c0a1b7c540e57937f39f915feb3-1213354&ref=beta

 

9. Indigenous Health Promotion Officer Mawarnkarra Health Service WA

We are seeking an Indigenous Health Promotions Officer to enhance the holistic primary health care services provided to the Aboriginal people of the West Pilbara, by undertaking activities aimed to develop & implement a coordinated team-based approach to Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health, as well as facilitate working relationships and communication exchange between mainstream organisations, Aboriginal Medical Services, and their peak bodies.

The successful applicant must be willing to travel on a regular basis therefore will need to hold a “C” class driver’s license. The skills required include the ability to complete reporting duties into various computer programs, taking initiative and working within a team environment. Excellent communication, interpersonal skills and organisational skills is also mandatory. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

Interested applicants are encouraged to request a copy of the Position Description and Selection Criteria from our Human Resources team on (08)9182 0801 or via emailmailto:hrofficer@mhs.org.au

10.Urapuntja Health Service :  3 positions currently available

The Urapuntja Community is situated on the Sandover Highway some 280 km north east of Alice Springs. Urapuntja Community comprises 16 Outstation communities spread out over some 3230 square km of desert. There are some 900 people who are mainly Anmatyerre and Alyawarra speaking people. Distances to the outstations vary from 5 to 100 kms from the clinic.

Note to above :

Urapuntja Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is celebrating 40 years of service. To mark the occasion we are planning events on the 28th of July 2017. We are also on the hunt for photo’s and stories documenting our history and would greatly appreciate you forwarding this to anyone you may know that has contributed to the success of our service.
For further information and to register interest please contact 40years@urapuntja.org.au

Urapuntja Health Service developed from many years of negotiations by Aboriginal people to have their own health service.

Urapuntja is a community controlled health service with a Board of Directors which is elected from and by the community at the Annual General Meeting held each year. The Directors meets regularly to discuss issues and make decisions relevant to the Organisation.

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Remote Area Midwife
Location Amengernternenh Community, Utopia, NT
12 month limited term contract full time (38 hours p.w.)
Download Job and Person Specification

General Practitioner
Location Amengernternenh Community, Utopia, NT
12 month limited term contract full time (38 hours p.w.)
Download Job and Person Specification

Remote Area Nurse
Location Amengernternenh Community, Utopia, NT
12 month limited term contract full time (38 hours p.w.)
Download Job and Person Specification

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce : @KenWyattMP meets medical colleges to boost Aboriginal health care

” Providing health care that was culturally appropriate for Indigenous people was crucial.

Ultimately, what I want to see is that Aboriginal people, if they come into a hospital, they take the full patient journey,

The procedures and treatment regimes are the same as any other Australian receives so that we push out life and we move to closing the gap.

Increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people working in health care will also be discussed.

If we don’t get our initial training and ongoing education right, we will never deliver a culturally safe health system,

The colleges are critical partners in getting this right with ideas on training and recruitment and retention initiatives.”

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt

Photo above : Danielle Dries  pictured above with the minister in an inspiring final-year Aboriginal medical student from the Australian National University was the recipient of the MDA National and Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) Rural Health Bursary for 2016. Read full Story here

NACCHO Background Info

Read NACCHO Articles Cultural Safety

Aboriginal Health ” managing two worlds ” : How Katherine Hospital, once Australia’s worst for Indigenous health, became one of the best

Senior representatives from Australia’s medical colleges are converging on Canberra today for a roundtable aimed at improving treatment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

As reported by ABC NEWS this morning

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt will host the 12 colleges at Parliament House in a bid to boost outcomes and access to health care over the next decade.

The powerful groups include the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

“[They’re] important for me to partner with if I’m going to close the gap,” Mr Wyatt told the ABC.

“I believe that they can make an incredible difference, it’s just we’ve never asked them to in this sense.”

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s Closing the Gap report to Parliament last month showed six of the seven targets were off track, including life expectancy and child mortality.

Mr Wyatt earlier this year became Australia’s first-ever Indigenous federal government minister.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Workforce Funding Applications open : $10 million to train junior doctors in regional/rural Aboriginal Medical Services / General Practices

team

“I am pleased to announce with Minister Gillespie, that applications are now open for organisations to develop training rotations under the Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund ( RJDTIF)

The RJDTIF is designed to enable rural based junior doctors completing their intern year to gain experience in rural general practice, in addition to their hospital based rotations.

At least 60 junior doctors will be supported under the program each year, at a cost of up to $10 million.

They will train in a variety of primary care settings, such as general practice and Aboriginal Medical Services.

This will improve the pathway for new graduates into challenging and rewarding careers as doctors with the skills needed by rural communities. ”

Joint Press Release 6 March The Hon Greg Hunt MP Minister for Health and The Hon Dr David Gillespie MP Assistant Minister for Health

Photo above : Greg Hunt, Ken Wyatt and David Gillespie at the recent swearing in of the Health Minister’s team 

Coalition to deliver more doctors for regional and rural Australia

  • Funding for rural based junior doctors to access a rotation in primary care setting
  • Rotations must be undertaken in primary care settings in regional and rural areas
  • Supports at least 60 full-time places annually, equal to 240 accredited intern rotations

Hundreds of new junior doctors are set to experience work as a general practitioner in regional and rural Australia through a new Coalition Government initiative.

The opening of the Coalition Government’s Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund (RJDTIF) will work as part of the Integrated Rural Training Pipeline measure to help tackle one of Australia’s biggest health challenges – locating doctors, particularly GPs, in regional, rural and remote Australia.

Minister Gillespie said doctors who live and train in regional and rural areas are more likely to practice in similar areas once they qualify.

“Having practiced most of my 33 years in medicine in regional Australia, I know how important training doctors in regional areas is in our overall efforts to attract and retain doctors in the bush,” Minister Gillespie said.

“The RJDTIF is an innovative step by the Coalition Government to address the medical workforce shortage in rural Australia and, in turn, improve the health outcomes of people living in these areas.

“Our Government is committed to strengthening rural training for junior doctors in rural areas.

How to Apply

Agency:

Department of Health

Close Date & Time:

12-Apr-2017 14:00 PM (ACT Local Time)
Show close time for other time zones

Location:

ACT, NSW, VIC, SA, WA, QLD, NT, TAS

Selection Process:

Open Competitive

Description:

This is an opportunity to apply for funding for rural based junior doctors to access an accredited intern rotation in a rural primary care setting. This opportunity builds on rural training networks funded by the states and territories, will develop rural training capacity and will strengthen rural training pathways.
Accredited intern rotations must be undertaken in primary care settings in Australian Statistical Geography Standard – Remoteness Areas (ASGS-RA) 2 to 5.
The RJDTIF will foster the development of innovative rural junior doctor training within the larger rural training networks for interns, established within state and territory health systems through supporting at least 60 full-time equivalent (FTE) places annually, comprising around 240 accredited intern rotations annually into primary care settings.

Eligibility:

The details of eligibility are listed at Section 4 of the Grant Guidelines

Grant Activity Timeframe:

Funding will commence in 2018 and cease 30 June 2020.

Total Amount Available (AUD):

$26,674,000.00

Instructions for Lodgement:

Email your completed application and Attachment 1 to grant.atm@health.gov.au by 2pm, 12 April 2017.

Please include ‘Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund’ and ‘H1617G021’in your email title.

Other Instructions:

Note last questions close 5 April 2017. Include ‘Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund’ and ‘H1617G021’in your email title.
Ensure your application meets the eligibility criteria and addresses the selection criteria.

Addenda Available:

Yes