NACCHO Aboriginal Health Events #SaveADate #amafdw17 #HealthyAustralia #NACCHOAgm17 @IAHA_National @AIDAAustralia

23- 29 July   : NACCHO supports Family Doctor Week #amafdw17

July 26 : Martin Bowles from the Dept. of Health Twitter live stream

4 August : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s day

7 August : Victorian Aboriginal Health Education Conference

8-9 August : 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis Alaska in August 2017

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

20-23 September : AIDA Conference 2017

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

10 October  : CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

30 October2 Nov  :NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

27-30 November  :Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

If you have a Conference, Workshop Funding opportunity or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media

mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

23- 29 July  NACCHO supports Family Doctor Week #amafdw17 :

See our NACCHO post : Our ACCHO doctors – are the key to better physical and mental health for all our mob

July 26 Martin Bowles from the Dept. of Health Twitter live stream

How do we create a ?

Join at 8am this Wed on Twitter+livestream for a with Martin Bowles from the Dept. of Health

4 August each year, Children’s Day

SNAICC has announced the theme for this year’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s day

Held on 4 August each year, Children’s Day has been celebrated across the country since 1988 and is Australia’s largest national day to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

The theme for Children’s Day 2017 is Value Our Rights, Respect Our Culture, Bring Us Home which recognises the 20th anniversary of the Bringing them Home Report and the many benefits our children experience when they are raised with strong connections to family and culture.

The ‘Children’s Day’ website is now open

7 August Victorian Aboriginal Health Education Conference

See above for registration links

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

Developed in consultation with NACCHO and produced by the Mental Health Professionals’ Network a federally funded initiative

Join our interdisciplinary panel as we explore a collaborative approach to reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services.

The webinar format will include a facilitated question and answer session between panel members exploring key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities.

The panel will discuss strategies to enhance cultural awareness and develop responsive services for Indigenous communities affected by incarceration. Strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing of individuals will also be explored.

When: Wednesday 13th September, 2017

Time: 4.30pm – 5.45pm (AEST)

Where: Online – via your computer, tablet or mobile

Cost: Free

Panel:

  • Dr Mark Wenitong (Medical Advisor based in QLD)
  • Dr Marshall Watson (Psychiatrist based in SA)
  • Dr Jeffrey Nelson (Clinical Psychologist based in QLD)
  • Julie Tongs (OAM) (CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service – Narrabundah ACT)

Facilitator:

  • Dr Mary Emeleus (General Practitioner and Psychotherapist based in QLD)

Read more about our panel.

Learning Outcomes:

Through an exploration of incarceration, the webinar will provide participants with the opportunity to:

  • Describe key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities
  • Develop strategies to enhance culturally aware and responsive services for Indigenous people and communities affected by incarceration
  • Identify strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing

Before the webinar:

Register HERE

 

20-23 September AIDA Conference 2017

The AIDA Conference in 2017 will celebrate 20 years since the inception of AIDA. Through the theme Family. Unity. Success. 20 years strong we will reflect on the successes that have been achieved over the last 20 years by being a family and being united. We will also look to the future for AIDA and consider how being a united family will help us achieve all the work that still needs to be done in growing our Indigenous medical students, doctors, medical academics and specialists and achieving better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This conference will be an opportunity to bring together our members, guests, speakers and partners from across the sector to share in the reflection on the past and considerations for the future. The conference will also provide a platform to share our individual stories, experiences and achievements in a culturally safe environment.

Conference website

30 Sept : The 2017 Human Rights Photography competition  Closes

The 2017 Human Rights Photography competition is now open to children and adults around the country, with a $600 camera prize up for grabs for the most outstanding image!

For almost a decade, the Australian Human Rights Commission has been holding photo competitions every couple of years. Our last competition attracted a record 450 entries.

Photography is a powerful medium with a long history in the promotion and advancement of human rights around the world. Photos foster empathy for the suffering and experience of others, community engagement and positive social change. No one can forget the impact of photos such as Nick Ut’s famous photo The Terror of War of child Kim Phuc after a napalm attack during the Vietnam War.

Our focus for this year’s competition will be the experiences of people at home. The theme for the 2017 competition is Home, inspired by Eleanor Roosevelt’s famous quote “Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home…

The shortlisted and winning photos to be displayed at the 2017 Human Rights Awards on 8 December in Sydney.

So, what are you waiting for?

About the competition

  • Enter at https://photocompetition.humanrights.gov.au/
  • There will be two categories for entries: Under 18 and 18 & over.
  • Overall winners will receive their prizes at the 2017 Human Rights Awards on December 8 in Sydney. A selection of photos from the Competition will also be on display.
  • Main prizes worth $600.
  • The competition will close on 30 September 2017.

If you have a query about the competition, please email photocomp@humanrights.gov.au

Photo Credit: Nimboi’s Bat by Sean Spencer, from the 2011 competition.

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

catsinam

Contact info for CATSINAM

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

We are pleased to announce the 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference will be held at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa in Broome, Western Australia, from 18 to 20 October 2017.

THE FUTURE OF REMOTE HEALTH AND THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY

Since the organisation’s inception in 1982 this event has served to create an opportunity for likeminded remote and isolated health individuals who can network, connect and share.

It serves as both a professional and social resource for the Remote and Isolated Health Workforce of Australia.

We aim to offer an environment that will foster new ideas, promote collegiate relationships, provide opportunities for professional development and celebrate remote health practice.

Conference Website

 

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

‘Translation at the Centre’ An educational symposium

Alice Springs Convention Centre, Alice Springs

This year the Symposium will look at research translation as well as the latest on diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.  The event will be run over a day and a half.
The Educational Symposium will feature a combination of relevant plenary presentations from renowned scientists and clinicians plus practical workshops.

Registration is free but essential.

Please contact the symposium coordinator on 1300 728 900 (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) or via email at events@baker.edu.au  

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

We welcome you to attend the 2017 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference.

On the new NACCHO Conference Website  you find links to

1.Registrations now open

2. Booking Your Accommodation

3. Book Your Flights

4. Expressions of Interest Speakers, case studies and table top presentations Close

5. Social Program

6.Conferences Partnership Sponsorship Opportunities

7.NACCHO Conference HELP Contacts

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Where :Hyatt Hotel Canberra

Dates : Members’ Conference: 31 October – 1 November 2017
Annual General Meeting: 2 November 2017

CLICK HERE

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

iaha

Abstracts for the IAHA 2017 National Conference are now open!

We are calling for abstracts for concurrent oral presentations and workshops under the following streams:
– Care
– Cultures
– Connection

For abstract more information visit the IAHA Conference website at: https://iahaconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

NACCHO supports Family Doctor Week #amafdw17 : Our ACCHO doctors – are the key to better physical and mental health for all our mob

  ” The key to a longer and healthier life is eliminating risky health habits and behaviours from your daily routine, and the best advice on minimising health risks is available from your local GP

Many Australians face the prospect of a premature death or lower quality of life through risky behaviours that are often commonplace, but are still very detrimental to their health.

Many people may not even realise that they are putting themselves, and sometimes others, at risk through everyday poor health habits and decisions

AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon pictured above recently visiting Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin with NACCHO Chair Matthew Cooke

Launching AMA Family Doctor Week 2017 – the AMA’s special annual tribute to all Australia’s hardworking and dedicated GPs – AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, urged all Australians to establish and maintain a close cooperative relationship with their local family doctor.

Photo above  :All AMA Presidents from all states and Territories met at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service (AHS) for Close the Gap Day Event : Winnunga is an Aboriginal community controlled ACCHO primary health care service for Canberra and the ACT community

See interview here : Dr Nadeem Siddiqui Executive Director Clinical Services Winnunga AMS ACT

Dr Gannon said that having a trusting professional relationship with a GP is the key to good health through all stages of life, for every member of the family.

“GPs are highly skilled health professionals and the cornerstone of quality health care in Australia,” Dr Gannon said.

“They provide expert and personal advice and care to keep people healthy and away from expensive hospital treatment.

“General practice provides outstanding value for every dollar of health expenditure, and deserves greater support from all governments.”

Dr Gannon said that 86 per cent of Australians visit a GP at least once every year, and the average Australian visits their GP around six times each year.

“Around 80 per cent of patients have a usual GP, which is the best way to manage your health throughout life,” Dr Gannon said.

“Your usual GP will be able to provide comprehensive care – with immediate access to your medical history and a long-term understanding of your health care needs, including things like allergies or medications.

NACCHO APP : Find an ACCHO Doctors at one of our 302 clinics

Photo above : The NACCHO App contains a geo locator, which will help you find the nearest Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in your area and  provides heath information online and telephone on a wide range of topics and where you can go to get more information or assistance should you need urgent help 

Links to Download the APP HERE

“Family doctors are the highest trained general health professionals, with a minimum of 10 to 15 years training.

“They are the only health professionals trained to diagnose undifferentiated conditions and provide holistic care from the cradle to the grave

“Your GP, your family doctor, is all about you.

“When you are worried about your health, or just want to know how to take better care of your health, you should talk to your GP.”

View Interview Here : Dr Marjad Page Gidgee Healing Mt Isa Aboriginal Health In Aboriginal Hands

Dr Gannon said that the specialised work of GPs is in great demand due to the growing and ageing population, and because of health conditions that result from our contemporary lifestyles and diets.

“The importance of quality primary health care and preventive health advice has never been higher due to our modern way of life,” Dr Gannon said.

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW):

  • 45 per cent of Australians are not active enough for a healthy lifestyle;
  • 95 per cent of Australians do not eat the recommended servings per day of fruit and vegetables;
  • 63 per cent of Australians are overweight or obese;
  • 27 per cent of Australians have a chronic disease;
  • 21 per cent of Australians have two or more chronic diseases; and
  • 20 per cent of Australians have had a mental disorder in the past 12 months.

“Our hardworking local GPs – our family doctors – are the key to better physical and mental health for all Australians,” Dr Gannon said.

“They provide quality expert health advice and help patients navigate their way through the health system to achieve the most appropriate care and treatment for their condition.

“Join the AMA in acknowledging their great work during Family Doctor Week.”

Follow all the FDW action on Twitter: #amafdw17

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce : Download National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Strategic Framework (2016‐2023

 

 ” This National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Strategic Framework (2016‐2023) (the Framework) is a mechanism to guide national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce policy and planning.

The Framework focuses on prioritisation, target setting and monitoring of progress against growing and developing the capacity of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

It will assist in contributing to the needs of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce across all service delivery areas (both public and private), including: social and emotional wellbeing; drug and alcohol; and the mental health workforce.”

Download PDF version :

National-Aboriginal-and-Torres-Strait-Islander-Health-Workforce-Strategic-Framework

MS WORD VERSION HERE

See NACCHO TV for Interviews with our ACCHO workforce

NACCHOTV Aboriginal Health in Aboriginal Hands

The Framework has been developed by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Working Group (ATSIHWWG), a working group of the Health Workforce Principal Committee of the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council, with input from key Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health stakeholders.

The structural approach to the Framework has been to define a vision, guiding principles and strategies for action. The vision is the direction in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce effort should be focused, the principles are the underlying fundamentals that will guide strategic action to achieve the vision and the strategies are the planned actions that will deliver the vision.

The principles are the core of the Framework and the application of the principles to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce policy will be critical to the Framework’s success. The purpose of the principles is to provide a set of guidelines that will be applicable to all stakeholders, and applied by all stakeholders to health workforce policy.

The strategies outline actions that can be used to implement the vision. The strategies are deliberately broad to encompass the wide range of actions that may be undertaken by stakeholders nationally, within jurisdictions, within particular locations and within sectors of the health system.

Stakeholder partnership and collaboration will be essential to the delivery of the vision and the implementation of the Framework principles. It is anticipated that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce policy will be better coordinated across government, service settings, professional groups and the education, training and regulation sectors so as to maximise investment in its health workforce.

ATSIHWWG acknowledges and appreciates the commitment of all stakeholders in developing the Framework.

Aims

The Framework aims to contribute to the achievement of equitable health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through building a strong and supported health workforce that has appropriate clinical and non-clinical skills to provide culturally‑safe and responsive health care.

Implementation of the Framework is expected to contribute to the delivery of the following outcomes:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people being strongly represented across all health disciplines;
  • The representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the health workforce being proportional to the composition of the total population;
  • A health workforce that is able to adapt to changing health needs and service delivery environments;
  • Health workforce planning that optimises access to health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
  • Workplaces that attract, encourage and develop the talents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals;
  • A collaborative approach to health workforce development that involves all relevant stakeholders;
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals are supported to lead the development of social, human, economic and cultural capital within the health workforce;
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals playing a vital role in enhancing the Aboriginal health workforce capability through a range of career pathways;
  • Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals recognise the trained skill sets and cultural knowledge of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce; and
  • Best practice training to build a culturally-safe and responsive health workforce.
  • Achieving these outcomes will require leadership at all levels of government and across the health service delivery and education sectors. Through leadership, effective resources are allocated and partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and relevant organisations are developed and maintained.

Key policy linkages

The Framework has been developed within the overall policy context of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 (the Health Plan), and its specific goal to ensure that Australia has a health system that delivers clinically‑appropriate care that is culturally safe, non-discriminatory and free from racism, high quality, responsive and accessible for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Health Plan provides a long-term, evidence-based strategic policy framework as part of the overarching Council of Australian Governments’ (COAG) approach to closing the gap in Indigenous disadvantage, which was set out in the National Indigenous Reform Agreement (NIRA) signed in 2008.

The NIRA was established to frame the task of closing the gap in Indigenous disadvantage. It sets out the objectives, outcomes, outputs, performance indicators and performance benchmarks agreed by COAG.  The Agreement is centred on five priority areas: tackling smoking; providing a healthy transition to adulthood; making Indigenous health everyone’s business; delivering effective primary health care services; and better coordinating the patient journey through the health system.

The Health Plan is complemented by its Implementation Plan, which addresses the broad changes needed to make the health system more comprehensive, culturally safe and effective. The Implementation Plan recognises that building Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce capability is a key component of building health systems effectiveness.  The Framework is acknowledged as the principal reference for supporting, growing and increasing the capability of the current and future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

Cross‑portfolio linkages for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce

There are links at the Commonwealth level between the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Department of Education and Training, Department of Human Services and the Department of Health and corresponding Ministries within states and territories.

The Department of Education and Training is the policy lead on Indigenous higher education. The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet is responsible for administering programs that support the Government’s policy objectives in this area.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Partnership Forums

Members of the Forums include the Commonwealth Department of Health, state and territory governments, and local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health peak bodies. Other invited guests include Primary Health Networks, and representatives from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

State and Territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce plans

States and territories have developed jurisdictional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce strategies and action plans. ATSIHWWG provides a forum for states and territories to articulate and report against jurisdictional work plans to address health workforce development strategies.  Through ATSIHWWG, jurisdictions report annually to the Health Workforce Principal Committee against agreed performance indicators, including the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people working in health roles and the numbers training towards health workforce qualifications.

Cultural Respect Framework

This Framework is consistent with the Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, which commits the Commonwealth government and all states and territories to embedding cultural respect principles into their health systems; from developing policy and legislation, to how organisations are run, through to the planning and delivery of services.   The Cultural Respect Framework will guide and underpin the delivery of culturally‑safe, responsive, and quality health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and contribute to progress made towards achieving the Closing the Gap targets agreed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG).

Higher education

For the purpose of the Framework, ‘higher education’ refers to all post-secondary study, including vocational education and training.

The publication Pathways into the Health Workforce for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: A Blueprint for Action was prepared for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council in 2008, and remains a key policy reference for maximising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation in the health workforce.  It discusses strategies for promoting and improving pathways between school, vocational education, training and higher education; and retaining and building the capacity of the existing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

The Review of Australian Higher Education (2008) was established to address whether the higher education sector positions Australia to compete effectively in the new globalised economy.  The Review concluded that while the system has great strengths, it faces significant challenges.

The Review recommended major reforms to the financing and regulatory frameworks for higher education and establishment of initiatives to increase both the enrolment of, and success of, students from disadvantaged backgrounds, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. The Review recommended that the Government regularly review the effectiveness of measures to improve higher education access and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Review of Higher Education Access and Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People (2012) builds on the Review of Australian Higher Education and examines how improving higher education outcomes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people will contribute to nation building and reduce Indigenous disadvantage.  The Review proposed a profound shift in the way that higher education institutions, governments and other education providers approach Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander higher education.  The Review envisaged a future with more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander professionals in decision-making roles across government, professions and industry, and in which our higher education institutions value and embed Indigenous knowledges and perspectives.  It challenges leaders and policy makers to lift their aspirations and work to establish higher education as a natural pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

In December 2015, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Advisory Council released its recommendations to progress priority areas in Indigenous higher education. The Council identified the need for better connections between policies and program responses across the education cycle from early childhood, through schooling and post-school education, which clearly places higher education as a natural post-school destination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.  It also noted the need for better connections between higher education and other Indigenous policy priorities; for example, higher education is the critical component for Indigenous economic development and governance, but is not highly visible in a policy agenda centred on training and employment.

In 2015, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework (the Health Curriculum Framework) was completed.  Implementation of the Health Curriculum Framework will provide a benchmark towards national consistency for the minimum level of capability required by graduates to effectively deliver culturally‑safe and responsive health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Health Curriculum Framework evolved from recommendation 23 of Health Workforce Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Project, final report Growing Our Future, December 2011:

Embed mandatory cultural competency curricula, including an understanding of the role of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker, in vocational and tertiary education for health professionals.

The Health Curriculum Framework has been developed specifically for the tertiary sector.  Further work will need to be undertaken to adapt the Health Curriculum Framework for use within the vocational education and training sector.

Vision and Principles

Vision

This Framework shares the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013‑2023 vision of an Australian health system that is free of racism and inequality, and where all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have access to health services that are effective, high quality, appropriate and affordable; and that the health system is comprised of an increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce delivering culturally‑safe and responsive health care.

Principles

The Framework is based on a commitment to the following principles.

Centrality of Culture

  • Effective, comprehensive and culturally-safe and responsive approaches to service delivery should have the flexibility to reflect the local context and the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce participation is an essential element within all health workforce initiatives, settings and strategies.
  • Cultural diversity, rights, views, values and expectations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are respected in the delivery of culturally‑safe and responsive health services.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce initiatives, and the wider health system, acknowledge and respect a holistic view of health that includes attention to physical, spiritual, cultural, emotional and social well‑being, community capacity and governance.
  • Cultural knowledge, expertise and skills of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals are reflected in health services models and practice.

Health Systems Effectiveness

    • Developing a health workforce with appropriate clinical and cultural capabilities to address the health needs and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is central to increasing access to health services that are effective, high quality, appropriate and affordable. Appropriate ongoing professional development and training that is recognised, supported and resourced is essential to achieving this.
  • Workplaces must be free of racism, culturally safe, supportive and attractive to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

 

Partnership and Collaboration

  • Respectful and effective partnerships and collaboration between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, government and non–government sectors (within and outside the health sector) that recognise the need for community-led initiatives, with shared commitment and responsibility, are required when designing and implementing programs to grow and develop the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce in both clinical and non‑clinical roles.
  • Ongoing inter-professional collaboration, education and support is essential to build a strong and sustainable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.
  • All stakeholders, including the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and communities, must be actively included in decision making.

 

Leadership and Accountability

  • Strong quality Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership at the senior manager and executive levels is essential to planning and designing culturally‑respectful health care services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Intentional leadership and talent development initiatives are required to advance Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in both targeted and mainstream positions.
  • Creation of structured career pathways is a vital element in leadership development and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees.
  • Commitment to achieving a culturally‑proficient and safe health workforce must come from the top and then filter down through the different levels of each organisation. This is key to growing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce, and will require sound policy, budgetary directions and strong leadership across governments.
  • Strong leadership from both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non‑Indigenous health professionals is essential in building social participation and eliminating racism from the health system. Commitment and accountability across and between all levels of government and non‑government sectors are critical requirements to support health workforce strategies.
  • Workplaces must be encouraged to attract and develop Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across all levels of the organisation, including management and representation in governance arrangements.

Evidence and Data

  • Workforce models and strategies are needed to develop an effective Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce. They must be based on community needs and evidence‑based practice, which is supported by meaningful and reliable data.

Key Strategies

Strategy 1: Improve recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals in clinical and non-clinical roles across all health disciplines

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Develop and implement communication strategies and community awareness campaigns to promote health careers.
  • Develop and implement flexible, innovative and culturally‑safe recruitment strategies that target Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Use measures intended to achieve equity and increase the representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the health workforce.
  • Develop and implement succession plans and clear career pathways, along with associated resources in both targeted and mainstream positions.
  • Create supportive and culturally‑safe workplaces.
  • Develop and implement mentoring programs.
  • Where possible, ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals are given the opportunity to work to their full scope of practice.
  • Ensure that the role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Practitioners is understood and valued.
  • Support ongoing professional development in strengthening both clinical and non‑clinical skills and capabilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals.

Strategy 2: Improve the skills and capacity of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce in clinical and non-clinical roles across all health disciplines

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Provide culturally-appropriate clinical supervision.
  • Provide professional development opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health staff that are tailored to local needs and build inter‑professional collaboration and networks.
  • Provide opportunities for the development of leadership capability, at all levels; from entry to leadership positions, which includes access to ongoing training and work‑based experience.
  • Provide and resource professional development of both clinical and non-clinical skills of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals.
  • Ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are able to participate in management, decision making and governance activities.

Strategy 3: Health and related sectors be supported to provide culturally‑safe and responsive workplace environments for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Ensure health service staff at all levels receive ongoing cultural safety training and embed completion of cultural safety training into performance management and/or professional development requirements.
  • Provide and resource appropriate cultural mentoring for non‑Indigenous health professionals.
  • Provide clinical placements in Aboriginal community‑controlled health services and in appropriate mainstream settings for both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non‑Indigenous students.
  • Embed the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework into higher education health courses in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • Identify and remunerate cultural professionals (cultural brokers, liaison officers etc) to assist in understanding health beliefs and practices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the service area.
  • Work with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to co-design and co‑deliver workforce programs and initiatives.

Strategy 4: Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students studying for qualifications in health

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Develop and implement communication strategies and awareness campaigns and deliver these at primary and secondary school health careers initiatives.
  • Offer extended learning opportunities to improve the preparedness of students entering higher education (both at the tertiary and vocational education and training levels).
  • Provide work experience and work‑readiness skills programs in the health and wider sector settings where opportunities exist, promoting the holistic approach to health and wellbeing.
  • Offer and resource scholarships, expanded cadetship and graduate programs, traineeships and internships.
  • Develop partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations at local, regional and national levels in planning and implementing activities to increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students studying for qualifications in health.

Strategy 5: Improve completion/graduation and employment rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health students

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Develop, resource and implement mentoring programs that are available from the first year of health studies.
  • Maintain scholarship programs that are fair and equitable across health disciplines.
  • Develop articulated career pathways.
  • Facilitate health services working with education providers at the local level to match training to employer needs and available jobs.
  • Work with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to co-design and co‑deliver workforce programs.
  • Develop relevant and appropriate place‑based workforce models to meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Strategy 6: Improve information for health workforce planning and policy development

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Create a systematic approach and best‑practice guidelines for the establishment, collection, recording, usage, definitions and interpretation of data about and for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.
  • Data collection capacity and mandated performance indicators to ensure cultural safety targets are being achieved and service delivery is improving.
  • Collaborate with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals to develop and maintain these best‑practice guidelines.
  • Ensure that the perspectives, aspirations and needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals are embedded in these guidelines and reflected in their usage.
  • Develop partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to lead community‑driven workforce models and policy initiatives.

Monitoring and Reporting

ATSIHWWG will oversee implementation of the Framework through an annual work plan that is consistent with the Framework and broader government health workforce reform agendas across all sectors. It will include timeframes, targets and milestones for agreed priorities and actions.

ATSIHWWG will monitor and report progress on the Framework at each ATSIHWWG meeting and to the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council (AHMAC), through its annual report to Health Workforce Principal Committee (HWPC).

Annual reporting will encompass reporting against agreed performance indicators by Commonwealth, state and territory governments, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce professional bodies, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community‑controlled health sector.

Contributing to closing the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the broader population within a generation is a key aim of the health workforce development and reform activities embedded in the Framework. Progress in implementing the Framework will also be guided by, and influence, key bodies such as the Council of Australian Governments (COAG).

NACCHO TOP 10 Aboriginal health #JobAlerts #Kimberleys #Brisbane #Adelaide #Grafton #Casino this week : #Aboriginal Health Workers / #Nurses

This weeks #Jobalerts 21 June

Please note  : Before completing a job application check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Nurse Supervisor (Registered Nurse / Midwife)

2. Broome Project Coordinator – Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial

3-6 Kimberley AMS Four Nurse positions

7. Grafton and Casino Registered Nurse (RN) & Early Childhood Nurse (ECN)

8-10 Brisbane :North Stradbroke Island part of the Yulu-Burri-Ba team?

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 

1.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Nurse Supervisor (Registered Nurse / Midwife)

Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program

  • Ongoing, full time position
  • Attractive remuneration package
  • Starting Salary $95,693.98 + Super + access to Salary Sacrifice
  • Significant career and training development opportunities

 

Nunkuwarrin Yunti works to promote and deliver improvement in the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and to advance their social, cultural and economic status. The Organisation places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best

The Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) is a program of sustained and scheduled home visiting for Aboriginal families that begins during the antenatal period and continues until the child is 2 years old. Based on the model developed by Professor David Olds in the USA, the AFNPP involves nurses and/or midwives and Aboriginal Family Partnership Workers working in partnership with women who are pregnant with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander baby, through an intensive home visiting program of evidence based interventions.

The position of Nurse Supervisor contributes by leading, modelling, coordinating and working with a team of 3 Nurse Home Visitors and 3 Aboriginal Family Partnership Workers. The position is located in Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Women Children and Family Health Unit and will be based at Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Mile End site. The position manages the team who will provide support to women and families who live within the catchment areas of Playford, Port Adelaide and Enfield (Adelaide Metro) including the two maternity hospitals (Women’s and Children’s Hospital and Lyell McEwin Hospital).

Key Duties

  • Coordinate the development and implementation of the ANFPP and model a strength-based, culturally safe and client-centred program to achieve operational outcomes.
  • Provide leadership to the team for practice governance and day to day operations of the ANFPP program in line with the national ANFPP program guidelines and relevant Nunkuwarrin Yunti Clinical and Practice Governance systems.
  • Develop and maintain a positive learning environment, taking a reflective approach to service, team and individual performance development inclusive of formal training, clinical supervision and regular team meetings.

 Key Requirements

  • Current AHPRA registration as a Registered Nurse and/or Midwife
  • Demonstrated high level of nursing practice in maternal and/or child and family health within a comprehensive primary health care context
  • Experience in the provision of mentoring and leadership to a team of health professionals, preferably including clinical supervision and reflective practice
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander co-workers, clients and communities

Click here to download the Job Description

Click her to download the Application Form

Enquiries about the role can be addressed to Virginia Healy at virginiah@nunku.org.au or on (08) 84061600.

Applications to include completed Application Form, Resume and Covering Letter including a brief overview against the key requirements above.

Applications to be forwarded to Ms Jynaya Smith, Human Resource Administration Officer C/o Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc, PO Box 7202, Hutt Street, Adelaide, SA 5000 or Email: jynayam@nunku.org.au

Note – current driver’s license and National Police Check required prior to employment

ABORIGINAL PEOPLE ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY

APPLICATIONS CLOSE DATE – FRIDAY 7th JULY 2017

2. Broome Project Coordinator – Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial

Job No: 90286
Location: Broome, WA
Employment Status: Full-time
Closing Date: 10 Jul 2017
  • Rewarding and varied role with the region’s leading provider of Aboriginal health services!
  • Attractive remuneration circa $81,682 – $96,948 base, PLUS district allowance AND accommodation allowances!
  • Do you want to really make a difference in your career? This is a unique opportunity to work with Indigenous communities in the spectacular Kimberley region!

About the Organisation

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services LTD (KAMS) is a well-established regional Aboriginal community controlled health service, founded in 1986, which provides centralised advocacy and resource support for 6 independent member services, as well as providing direct clinical services in a further 6 remote Aboriginal communities across the region.

KAMS has successfully delivered high-quality, accessible comprehensive primary health care services over its 30 years of operation and has provided innovation and national leadership in areas such as health information management and evidence-based best practice in primary health care.

About Broome

Broome is located 2,240km north of Perth and has a permanent population of 14,436. Broome promotes a relaxed and easy-going lifestyle, with nearby shopping centres, Sunday markets as well as a broad range of restaurants and entertainment options. It is founded on the traditional lands of the Yaruwu people and is rich in history, culture and beautiful surrounds.

Broome has a deep history in the pearling industry, spanning back to the 1800’s, with memorials throughout the town to commemorate those lost in the early years of pearling. Cable Beach is also a must-see, being named in honour of the Java-to-Australia undersea telegraph cable that reaches shore there. You can explore its beautiful scenery with a bit of 4WDing at low tide, or you can even take a camel ride every day at sunset!

Roebuck Bay is known as one of the most beautiful beaches that surround Broome, with its “Staircase to the moon” phenomenon drawing food and craft markets each time it occurs. The combination of a receding tide and rising moon create a natural phenomenon that can only be described as breath-taking.

About the Opportunity

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd (KAMS) has a truly rewarding opportunity for a Project Coordinator – Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial to join their team in Broome, WA. This is a full-time, fixed term role to 30 June, 2018.

This position has an indirect report to the Executive Steering Group of the Kimberley Suicide Prevention Working Group. The Working Group is charged to set strategy and oversee the Kimberley Suicide Prevention Trial in accordance with the parameters described in the National Suicide Prevention Trial Background and Overview, April 2017.

Reporting to the Deputy CEO, you will be responsible for delivering project deliverables and progress reports in accordance with the agreed project timeline set by the Steering Group. This will involve a range of project coordination and community development tasks.

Some of these tasks will include (but will not be limited to):

  • Identifying needs and service gaps, and community strengths and assets, and support for service mapping activities;
  • Facilitating stakeholder engagement;
  • Collecting and analysing local and regional data;
  • Developing detailed planning, schedules and resource requirements for identified projects;
  • Providing high-level reports, strategic policy, and advice;
  • Ensuring the Program works within the identified KAMS values and is culturally safe; and
  • Delivering the position’s work plan within the approved budget and financial delegations.

To be successful you will need:

  • A qualification in Community Development, Health or related discipline;
  • Demonstrated skill and experience in managing diverse and high level stakeholders at a regional level;
  • Demonstrated ability in project management and monitoring and evaluating a regional program using both qualitative and quantitative techniques, including participatory action research methodologies;
  • Self-motivation and the ability to organise own workload with minimal direction;
  • Excellent problem-solving skills including a high level of conceptual and analytical ability; and
  • Demonstrated commitment to the principles of Aboriginal Community Control and demonstrated knowledge of cultural safety principles and practices.

KAMS are looking for candidates with well-developed interpersonal and cross-cultural communication skills and the ability to maintain client confidentially at all times within and outside the workplace. Ideally, you will have experience working within an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation or an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Community Organisation and experience working in a mental health or social and emotional wellbeing role, however, this is not mandatory.

A ‘C’ Class Driver’s License, Federal Police Clearance and willingness to travel often by 4WD vehicle and light aircraft will be required.

To download a full position description, please click here. 

Please note: Candidates must address the selection criteria outlined in the position description. Please attach answers in a word document and upload with your application. 

About the Benefits

If you are looking for a change of routine, a change of lifestyle or a new adventure, this is the role for you. You will see and experience more of Australia’s real outback than most people ever will – and get paid to do it!

KAMS is an organisation that truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. In addition, staff development programs are not only encouraged but are often paid for by KAMS. This is a highly attractive opportunity for someone with a desire to develop their professional knowledge and experience in the area of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health!

While you will face diverse new challenges in this role, you will also enjoy an attractive remuneration package circa $81,682 – $96,948 + super. 

There is also a wide range of additional benefits for the role including:

  • District allowances – $2,920 single $5,840 double p.a;
  • Electricity allowance $1,440
  • Accommodation allowance $13,000;
  • Annual Airfares to the value of $1,285 pa (after 12 months of employment).   

Don’t miss this exciting and rewarding opportunity to have a positive impact on the mental health outcomes of Indigenous communities in the spectacular Kimberley region – Apply Now!

Please note: Candidates must respond to the questions below and attach a current resume to be considered.

3-6 Kimberley AMS Four Nurse positions

3. Registered nurse child health and midwife

http://kamsc-dahs.applynow.net.au/jobs/90282-registered-nurse-child-health-and-midwife

4.Registered nurse town clinic

http://kamsc-dahs.applynow.net.au/jobs/89298-registered-nurse-town-clinic

5.Remote schools registered nurse

http://kamsc-dahs.applynow.net.au/jobs/90281-remote-school-registered-nurse

6.Child health nurse

http://applynow.net.au/jobs/90283-child-health-nurse

About the Organisation

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services LTD (KAMS) is a well-established regional Aboriginal community controlled health service, founded in 1986, which provides centralised advocacy and resource support for 6 independent member services, as well as providing direct clinical services in a further 6 remote Aboriginal communities across the region.

KAMS has successfully delivered high-quality, accessible comprehensive primary health care services over its 30 years of operation and has provided innovation and national leadership in areas such as health information management and evidence-based best practice in primary health care.

7. Grafton and Casino Registered Nurse (RN) & Early Childhood Nurse (ECN)

Job No: 89222
Location: Grafton, NSW & Casino, NSW
Closing Date: 12 Jul 2017
  • Take on one of these uniquely rewarding roles and expand your career in Aboriginal Health!
  • Enjoy above award remuneration plus super & salary sacrificing options!
  • Enjoy great work/life balance with Monday to Friday, 35 hour week & family oriented work environment!

About Bulgarr Ngaru

Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (BNMAC) is a not-for-profit Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, providing primary health care services to Aboriginal people throughout the Clarence and Richmond Valleys through its’ network of clinics in Grafton, Casino and Maclean.

With a commitment to promoting health, wellbeing and disease prevention, involving a holistic approach to diagnosis, and the management of illness, Bulgarr Ngaru is a central part of the economic and social fabric of the region

Bulgarr Ngaru employs more than 50 people from local communities across the region including health professionals, clerical, and managerial staff. They are the leading employer of Aboriginal people and workers in the primary health sector in the region and more than 60% of staff members are Aboriginal people.

Building on their current regional network of health facilities and a significant client base, Bulgarr Ngaru looks forward to the next two decades of service development and innovation.

About the Opportunities

Registered Nurse – General Primary Health Care

Bulgarr Ngaru is looking for full-time Registered Nurses to join their teams in Grafton and Casino.

As a Registered Nurse, you will be responsible for assisting clients to address health issues in an holistic way. You’ll work collaboratively with Doctors and Health Workers to develop educational and intervention programs that address the contributory factors to wellness and empower clients to put in place a strategy that will improve their overall health and sense of wellbeing.

More specifically, some of your key duties will include:

  • Working within the treatment room and on outreach clinics taking and recording clinical data;
  • Performing patient recalls;
  • Undertaking Health Assessments and Care Plans;
  • Working alongside the Medical Officers to ensure efficient and effective primary health care to clients of the organisation, outreach clinics and in clients’ homes as required;
  • Implementing treatment room protocols to ensure optimum infection control, quality primary health care and patient monitoring and immunisations; and
  • Ensuring compliance with Accreditation procedures regarding cold chain monitoring, drug cabinet and doctor’s bag ordering and monitoring.

The successful RN candidates will be Registered Nurses with AHPRA Registration and relevant post-graduate experience in either an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation or General Practice. Knowledge of clinical accreditation is required, and experience with organisational accreditation processes will be highly regarded.

Importantly, you’ll have a comprehensive understanding of the primary health needs, early intervention, psychosocial and cultural issues impacting on Aboriginal families, and a genuine desire to further your experience in the area of Aboriginal Health. The ability to work closely with Aboriginal Health Workers as an integral part of the team will be well regarded.

Your highly developed interpersonal and liaison skills will ensure your ability to build strong working relationships with service providers, clients and other key stakeholders.

The ideal applicants will radiate patience and adaptability, and will be the type of person who thrives in busy, varied and often unpredictable work environment. Team players who are willing to jump into any task at hand will fit well within Bulgarr Ngaru‘s dynamic team.

Although not essential, knowledge of / experience with Practice Incentive and Service Incentive Payments (Diabetes and Asthma Cycles of Care) would be well regarded.

Early Childhood Nurse

Bulgarr Ngaru is also looking for a full-time Early Childhood Nurse to join their team in Casino.

Due to the nature of this role, applicants are required to be female. In this position, an applicant’s gender is a genuine occupational qualification and is authorised by section 31 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1997.

This position will be responsible for working within the New Directions Mothers and Babies Services – a service that provides Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with young children access to a range of child and maternal care.

You’ll be responsible for providing a coordinated assessment, identifying goals, planning strategies, and implementing and evaluating nursing care of children and families by:

  • Monitoring the growth, development and health status of the child (0 to 5 years of age) within the context of the family;
  • Providing pre and post-natal support, advice, health information, first line counselling (where appropriate) and referral of mothers and families to relevant service providers; and
  • Actively promoting and providing a holistic approach to care.

The successful ECN will be a Registered Nurse with AHPRA Registration, and will hold recognised qualifications in Child and Family Health Nursing. A background in working with families and young children, particularly within a community setting, will be essential for your success.

It is essential that you have the ability to effectively and sensitively communicate with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and have a comprehensive understanding of the primary health needs, early intervention, psychosocial and cultural issues impacting on Aboriginal families. Due to the nature of the role, you must also have demonstrated experience working specifically with Aboriginal children and their families.

Additionally, it’s important you have the ability to plan and coordinate client care, while operating effectively within a multidisciplinary team. Effective communication skills and competency in the use of computer programs will ensure your success.

Please note: Candidates for both roles must be willing to provide outreach services on a rotating roster, and a current driver’s license is required. Accreditation as a Registered Nurse Immuniser (or the willingness to obtain this qualification within six months of employment) is also a requirement for both positions.

About the Benefits

If you are looking for a new challenge, a change of lifestyle or a new adventure, this is the role for you. You’ll love being surrounded by stunning beaches on one side and glorious mountains and rivers on the other, with the Gold Coast, Brisbane and Sydney all a quick hop, skip and a jump away!

Bulgarr Ngaru truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. You will have access to genuine ongoing training opportunities and professional development.

In return for your hard work and dedication, you’ll be rewarded with an above award, attractive remuneration plus super, salary sacrificing and access to an employee assistance program.

Bulgarr Ngaru offers a family friendly, supportive workplace with strong community ties, and a 35-hour Monday to Friday week, ensuring you achieve a healthy work/life balance.

This is an excellent opportunity to enhance your cultural knowledge in a stunning location. Make a positive difference – Apply Now!

Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islanders are strongly encouraged to apply.

8-10 Brisbane :North Stradbroke Island part of the Yulu-Burri-Ba team?

Yulu-Burri-Ba, in collaboration with ATSICHS Brisbane will be providing Family Wellbeing Services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community within the North Stradbroke Island and Bayside catchment area.

The aim of this new service is to provide family wellbeing targeted interventions to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in our community who are experiencing family wellbeing challenges.

To deliver these new services, Yulu-Burri-Ba has created three new positions:

Click the position title to download the corresponding Position Description

  1. Family Wellbeing Care Coordinator / Lead Case Worker – Identified position*
  2. In-home Family Mentor – Identified position*
  3. Family Counsellor – Indigenous person preferred

Why work for Yulu-Burri-Ba?

We can offer you:

  • An opportunity to make a difference to the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families
  • Ability to salary sacrifice
  • A positive, supportive and learning work environment
  • Challenging and rewarding employment

 

How to apply

Please send us your resume and a covering letter addressing why you would be the best person for the job.

Applications close

Wednesday, 5 July 2017 – 9AM

Need more information?

Email us at mailto:HR@ybb.com.auor call the Human Resource Team on (07) 3409 9596

*This position is identified to be filled by an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person

 

Aboriginal Health : Second Atlas of Healthcare Variation highlights higher Aboriginal hospitalisation rates for all 18 clinical conditions

 

“The report, compiled by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, shows us that high hospitalisation rates often point to inadequate primary care in the community, leading to higher rates of potentially preventative hospitalization

The most disturbing example of this  has been the higher hospitalisation rates for all of the 18 clinical conditions surveyed experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, people living in areas of relative socioeconomic disadvantage and those living in remote areas.

 Chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson who is a member of the Atlas Advisory Group.

 “Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Please note

  • Features of the second Atlas include: Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status

DOWNLOAD Key-findings-and-recommendations

Mr Martin Bowles Secretary Dept of Health  launches the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation

A new report showing dramatic differences in treatment rates around Australia signals a pressing need for reforms to ensure equitable access to appropriate health care for all Australians, the Consumers Health Forum, says.

“A seven-fold difference in hospitalisation for heart failure and a 15-fold difference for a serious chronic respiratory disease depending on place of residence, are among many findings of substantial variations in treatment rates in Australia revealed in the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation,” the chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson, said.

“While there are a variety of factors contributing to these differences,  the variation in health and treatment outcomes is, as the report states, an ‘alarm bell’ that should make us stop and investigate whether appropriate care is being delivered.

“These findings show that recommended care for chronic diseases is not always provided.  Even with the significant funding provided through Medicare to better coordinate primary care for people with chronic and complex conditions, fragmented health services contribute to suboptimal management, as the report states.

“We support the report’s recommendation for a stronger primary health system that would provide a clinical ‘home base’ for coordination of patient care and in which patients and carers are activated to develop their knowledge and confidence to manage their health with the aid of a healthcare team.

“The Atlas provides further robust reasons for federal, state and territory governments to act on the demonstrated need for a more effective primary health system that will ensure better and more cost effective care for all Australians.

“The Atlas also examined  variations in women’s health care, and its findings included a seven-fold difference in rates of hysterectomy and  21-fold  difference in rates of endometrial ablation.  The report states that rates of hysterectomy and caesarean sections in Australia are higher than reported rates in other developed nations.  These results highlight the need for continuing support and information on women’s health issues,” Mr Lawson said.

The Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation (second Atlas) paints a picture of marked variation in the use of 18 clinical areas (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications) across Australia.

This Atlas, the second to be released by the Commission, illuminates variation by mapping use of health care according to where people live.  As well, this Atlas identifies specific achievable actions for exploration and quality improvement.

The second Atlas includes interventions not covered in the first Atlas, such as hospitalisations for chronic diseases and caesarean section in younger women. It also builds on the findings from the first Atlas – for example, examining hysterectomy and endometrial ablation separately, and examining rates of cataract surgery using a different dataset.

Priority areas for investigation and action arising from the second Atlas include use of:

  • Hysterectomy and endometrial ablation
  • Chronic conditions (COPD, diabetes complications)
  • Knee replacement.

Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Healthcare Variation – what does it tell us

Some variation is expected and associated with need-related factors such as underlying differences in the health of specific populations, or personal preferences. However, the weight of evidence in Australia and internationally suggests that much of the variation documented in the Atlas is likely to be unwarranted. Understanding this variation is critical to improving the quality, value and appropriateness of health care.

View the second Atlas

The second Atlas, released in June 2017, examined four clinical themes: chronic disease and infection – potentially preventable hospitalisations, cardiovascular, women’s health and maternity, and surgical interventions.

Key findings and recommendations for action are available here.

View the maps and download the data using the interactive platform.

What does the Atlas measure?

The second Atlas shows rates of use of healthcare interventions (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications,) in geographical areas across Australia.  The rate is then age and sex standardised to allow comparisons between populations with different age and sex structures. All rates are based on the patient’s place of residence, not the location of the hospital or health service.

The second Atlas uses data from national databases to explore variation across different healthcare settings. These included the National Hospital Morbidity Database and the AIHW National Perinatal Data Collection.

Who has developed the second Atlas?

The Commission worked with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) on the second Atlas.

The Commission consulted widely with the Australian government, state and territory governments, specialist medical colleges, clinicians and consumer representatives to develop the second Atlas.

Features of the second Atlas include:

  • Greater involvement of clinicians during all stages of development
  • Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status
  • Analysis of data by patient funding status (public or private).

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Chronic disease and infection: potentially preventable hospitalisations

1.1 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
1.2 Heart failure
1.3 Cellulitis
1.4 Kidney and urinary tract infections
1.5 Diabetes complications

Chapter 2 Cardiovascular conditions

2.1 Acute myocardial infarction admissions
2.2 Atrial fibrillation

Chapter 3 Women’s health and maternity

3.1 Hysterectomy
3.2 Endometrial ablation
3.3 Cervical loop excision or cervical laser ablation
3.4 Caesarean section, ages 20 to 34 years
3.5 Third- and fourth-degree perineal tear

Chapter 4 Surgical interventions

4.1 Knee replacement
4.2 Lumbar spinal decompression
4.3 Lumbar spinal fusion
4.4 Laparoscopic cholecystectomy
4.5 Appendicectomy
4.6 Cataract surgery
Technical Supplement
About the Atlas
Glossary

Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation data set specifications are available at http://meteor.aihw.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/674758

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Mental Health : Download report “Mental health in remote and rural communities “

 ” The poorer mental health of remote and rural Indigenous Australians is also impacted by the social determinants of Indigenous health, which are well recognised nationally and internationally.

These relate to the loss of language and connection to the land, environmental deprivation, spiritual, emotional and mental disconnectedness, a lack of cultural respect, lack of opportunities for self-determination, poor educational attainment, reduced opportunities for employment, poor housing, and negative interactions with government systems

The relationship of remoteness to health is particularly important for Indigenous Australians, who are overrepresented in remote and rural Australia (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2014a).

The National Mental Health Commission (2014a, p. 19) identified that “the mental health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are significantly higher than those of other Australians.”

Photo above

“ The women of Inkawenyerre, a small settlement in the Utopia community four hours by road north of Alice Springs, regularly take part in a different kind of mental health therapy, known as ‘narrative therapy.’

Narrative therapy taps into the centuries-old tradition among Aboriginal people of story-telling and expression through art. At the family Urapuntja Clinic, both women and children take part in narrative therapy.

They recreate what is commonly seen on any given evening in an Aboriginal community—people sitting around the fire, relating to one another and telling stories.

The activity is enjoyable for participants with group members often laughing and supporting one another as they tell stories and work on their painting—all while promoting good mental health living practice,”

Lynne Henderson, former RFDS Central Operations mental health clinician.

“People who live in the country get less access to care. And they become sicker,”

To increase the access to care, the RFDS said it needed a massive increase in funding. Country Australians see mental health professionals at only a fifth the rate of those who live in the city,

So there should be a five-fold increase in access to mental health care for country Australians.”

RFDS CEO Martin Laverty see story Part 2 below

Mental health in remote and rural communities

Mental health disorders are not more common in rural and regional Australia than they are in Australia’s cities, according to a new report from the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS), but they are a lot harder to treat.

The report, Mental Health in Remote and Rural Communities, found about one in five remote and rural Australians — 960,000 people — experience mental illness.

Download the report HERE

RN031_Mental_Health_D5

But a combination of lack of access to facilities, social stigma, and cultural barriers present challenges to getting people the help they need.

AHCRA believes that’s something that everyone should be concerned about, with access to care regardless of location.

 

Part 1  Indigenous mental health and suicide

Data from the 2011 Australian Census demonstrated that 669,881 Australians, or 3% of the population, identified as Indigenous (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013b), and that 142,900 Indigenous Australians, or 21% of the Indigenous population, lived in remote and very remote areas (Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, 2014).

Around 45% of people in very remote Australia (91,600 people), and 16% of people in remote Australia (51,300 people) were Indigenous (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013b; Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, 2014).

In 2011–2012 around one-third (30%) of Indigenous adults reported high or very high levels of psychological distress—almost three times the rate for non-Indigenous Australians (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2014).

In 2008–2012, in NSW, Queensland (Qld), WA, SA and the NT, there were 347 Indigenous deaths11 from mental health-related conditions (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare,

2015a). Specifically, age-standardised death data demonstrated that Indigenous Australians (49 per 100,000 population) were 1.2 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (40 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). Age-standardised deaths from mental and behavioural disorders increased with increasing age in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in 2008–2012.

Very few Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians under the age of 35 years died as result of mental and behavioural disorders in 2008–2012. However, Indigenous Australians aged 35 years or older were more likely to die from mental and behavioural disorders than non-Indigenous

Australians in 2008–2012. Specifically, Indigenous Australians (7.2 per 100,000 population) aged 35–44 years were 5.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (1.3 per 1200,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and

Welfare, 2015a). In 2008–2012, Indigenous Australians (14.7 per 100,000 population) aged 45–54 years were 4.9 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (3.0 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

In 2008–2012, Indigenous Australians (18.3 per 100,000 population) aged 55–64 years were 2.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (6.9 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). In 2008–2012,

Indigenous Australians (91.2 per 100,000 population) aged 65–74 years were 2.9 times as likely

as non-Indigenous Australians (31.3 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

Further exploration of death data from mental and behavioural disorders illustrates the significant impact of psychoactive substance use (ICD-10-AM codes F10–F19) on Indigenous mortality (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). In 2008–2012, 29.1% of Indigenous deaths due to mental and behavioural disorders were the result of psychoactive substance use, such as alcohol, opioids, cannabinoids, sedative hypnotics, cocaine, other stimulants such as caffeine, hallucinogens, tobacco, volatile solvents, or multiple drug use. During this period, Indigenous Australians (7.3 per 100,000 populations) were 4.8 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to die as a result of psychoactive substance use (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

Similarly, in 2006–2010, there were 312 Indigenous deaths from mental health-related conditions (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013a). Indigenous Australians living in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT were 1.5 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to die from mental and behavioural disorders in 2006–2010 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013a).

11 Deaths from mental and behavioural disorders do not include deaths from intentional self-harm (suicide). Intentional self-harm is coded under ICD-10-AM Chapter 19—Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes.

Age-standardised death data demonstrated that Indigenous males (49 per 100,000 population) were 1.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous males to die from mental and behavioural disorders. Indigenous females were 1.3 times as likely as non-Indigenous females to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013a).

The greater number of deaths from mental and behavioural disorders with age may also represent the impact of conditions associated with ageing, such as dementia. For example, in 2014, Indigenous Australians (50.7 per 100,000 population) in NSW, Qld, SA, WA and the NT were 1.1 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (45.3 per 100,000 population) to die from dementia (including Alzheimer disease) (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016a).

In 2014–2015, Indigenous Australians (28.3 per 1,000 population) were 1.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (16.3 per 1,000 population) to be hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016a).

In 2011–2013, 4.2% of Indigenous hospitalisations were for mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). Age-standardised data demonstrated that Indigenous Australians (27.7 per 1,000 population) were twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (14.2 per 1,000 population) to be hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders in 2011–2013 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

In 2008–2009, Indigenous young people aged 12–24 years (2,535 per 100,000 population) were three times as likely to be hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders than non-Indigenous young people (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2011).

 

The leading causes of hospitalisation for mental and behavioural disorders amongst Indigenous young people were schizophrenia (306 per 100,000 population), alcohol misuse (348 per 100,000 population) and reactions to severe stress (266 per 100,000 population) (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2011).

A preliminary clinical survey of 170 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in Cape York and the Torres Strait, aged 17–65 years, with a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, was undertaken to describe the prevalence and characteristics of psychotic disorders in this population (Hunter, Gynther, Anderson, Onnis, Groves, & Nelson, 2011).

Researchers found that: 62% of the sample had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 24% had substance-related psychoses, 8% had affective psychoses, 3% had organic psychoses and 3% had brief reactive psychoses; Indigenous Australians aged 30–39 years were overrepresented in the psychosis sample compared to their representation in the population (37% of sample versus 29% of population) with slightly lower proportions in the 15–29 years and 40 years and older age groups; almost three-quarters (73%) of the sample were male (versus 51% for the Indigenous population as a whole); Aboriginal males (63% in the sample compared to 46% for the region as a whole) were overrepresented; a higher proportion of males (42%) than females (5%), and Aboriginal (44%) than Torres Strait Islander patients (10%) had a lifetime history of incarceration; comorbid intellectual disability was identified for 27% of patients, with a higher proportion for males compared to females (29% versus 20%) and Aboriginal compared to Torres Strait Islander patients (38% versus 7%); and alcohol misuse (47%) and cannabis use (52%) were believed to have had a major role in the onset of psychosis (Hunter et al., 2011).

In 2015, Indigenous Australians (25.5 deaths per 100,000 population) in Qld, SA, NT, NSW and WA were twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (12.5 deaths per 100,000 population) to die from suicide (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016b). In their spatial analysis of suicide, Cheung et al. (2012) concluded that higher rates of suicide in the NT and in some remote areas could be explained by the large numbers of Indigenous Australians living in these areas, who demonstrate higher levels of suicide compared with the general population.

The poorer mental health of remote and rural Indigenous Australians is also impacted by the social determinants of Indigenous health, which are well recognised nationally and internationally.

These relate to the loss of language and connection to the land, environmental deprivation, spiritual, emotional and mental disconnectedness, a lack of cultural respect, lack of opportunities for self-determination, poor educational attainment, reduced opportunities for employment, poor housing, and negative interactions with government systems

Part 2 Flying Doctors fight barriers to treat mental illness in rural Australia

Source ABC

Like so many in the bush, Brendan Cullen has a lot on his plate.

He manages a 40,000-hectare property south of Broken Hill. There are 8,000 sheep to keep track of. And that’s just a fraction of the number he looked after previously at another station.

A few years ago, the mustering, the maintenance, juggling bills and family — it all caught up to him.

“You just bottle stuff up. And sometimes you can’t find an out,” he said.

“In the bush you have a lot of time by yourself.”

He spent a lot of that time thinking about his problems. But Mr Cullen was lucky.

He heard about a mental health clinic being run by the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) in a nearby community and decided to go along.

“Catching up with one of the mental health nurses gave me the tools to be able to work out how I go about living a day-to-day life,” he said.

“My life’s a hell of a lot easier now than what it used to be.”

Mental health disorders are not more common in rural and regional Australia than they are in Australia’s cities, according to a new report from the RFDS, but they are a lot harder to treat.

The report, Mental Health in Remote and Rural Communities, found about one in five remote and rural Australians — 960,000 people — experience mental illness.

But a combination of lack of access to facilities, social stigma, and cultural barriers present challenges to getting people the help they need.

“People who live in the country get less access to care. And they become sicker,” RFDS CEO Martin Laverty said.

To increase the access to care, the RFDS said it needed a massive increase in funding.

“Country Australians see mental health professionals at only a fifth the rate of those who live in the city,” Mr Laverty said.

“So there should be a five-fold increase in access to mental health care for country Australians.”

The impact of distance and isolation when it comes to treating mental disorders can be seen in suicide rates. In remote Australia, the rate is nearly twice what it is in major metropolitan areas — 19.6 deaths per 100,000 people.

The suicide rate is even greater in very remote communities.

If you or anyone you know needs help:

The RFDS has responded by increasing its mental health outreach. In communities like Menindee, about an hour’s drive from Broken Hill in the far west of New South Wales, a mental health nurse is on call once a fortnight.

“I have needed them in the past. I got down to rock bottom at one stage. Even now I appreciate that support,” Menindee resident Margot Muscat said.

Ms Muscat plays an active role in the remote community. But she has also felt pressure in the past to manage that role, her work, and family commitments.

Mental health counselling has given her a valuable outlet.

“Just to know that I wasn’t alone. And that you don’t have to take the drastic step of suiciding, so to speak,” Ms Muscat said.

Some the RFDS’s mental health counselling is done over the airwaves. From its regional base in Broken Hill, mental health nurse Glynis Thorp counsels patients over the phone. Often calls are simply people checking in.

“It’s critically important…often there might only be two people on the property. So no one to talk to maybe,” she said.

“We might get out to a clinic every fortnight, but we might have follow up phone calls to check how people are going. For myself it’s probably a ratio of four to one.”

The RFDS report reveals every year hundreds of serious mental illness incidents require airplanes to be dispatched to remote areas to fly patients out for treatment.

Over three years from July 2013 the RFDS conducted 2,567 ‘aeromedical retrievals’.

The leading causes for evacuation flights due to mental disorder are

The RFDS also uses airplanes to carry its mental health nurses to very remote areas. On a typical day in Broken Hill, the medical team takes off just after dawn to head to three communities hundreds of kilometres away: Wilcania, White Cliffs and Tilpa.

In the opal mining town of White Cliffs, the mental health nurse sees patients at the local clinic. One is “Jane”, who doesn’t want her full name used.

“Without them, we would really be lost here,” she said.

Jane has been counselled by the RFDS and was recently directed to mental health treatment in Broken Hill. But she’s still reluctant to talk openly in town about the help she’s getting.

“In a small community it’s not wise to talk to other people in town,” she said. “And mental health, it does carry a stigma.”

Back on his station south of Broken Hill, Mr Cullen believes that stigma over mental health is slowly changing in the bush.

“People get wind that someone’s had a mental health problem, people talk now. As opposed to, let’s go back five years even, 10 years. It was a closed book,” he said.

“With these clinics, once upon a time you might have had a dental nurse, a doctor, and the like.

“But now you have a mental health nurse…And these clinics are close by. So you’re able to go to them. They come to you.”

NACCHO TOP #JobAlerts #NRW2017 : This week in Aboriginal Health : #Doctors #GP #Aboriginal Health Workers / #Nurses / Health #Promotions

 

1.South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

2. Senior Drug and Alcohol Educator – Murdi Paaki Drug and Alcohol Network

3- 8 Danila Dilba Health Services Darwin  (see above graphic )

9. Aboriginal Quitline Coordinator

10.Congress ORGANISATIONAL CAPABILITY MANAGER\ Alice Springs

11. Congress EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST- CLIENT SERVICE ROLES

12. Congress General Practitioner

13.SA Aboriginal Health Educator/Liaison Officer

14. NT Medical Practitioner / General Practitioner

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Healt

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 1.South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) is a non Government Health Service based in Bunbury which provides a variety of health services to Aboriginal people in the South West of Western Australia.  SWAMS delivers a wide range of community programs and has a strong growth strategy through partnership opportunities and future community development.

Aboriginal Health Worker (50d) Full Time

Here at SWAMS we have an exciting position available for someone looking to make a difference. As an Aboriginal Health Worker, you will be involved in assessment, care coordination, support, advocacy and community development activities.

Specific requirements of this position include but are not limited to;

Essential Criteria

  • Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders descent under section 50(d) Equal Opportunity Act.
  • Current Certificate IV (preferred) in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care.
  • Demonstrated ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with Aboriginal people.
  • A demonstrated understanding of the unique issues affecting and impacting upon the health of Aboriginal people
  • Experience, skills and knowledge in multidisciplinary teamwork and conflict management.
  • Sound written and oral communication skills.
  • Demonstrated organisational and time management skills along with an ability to adapt to changing needs.
  • Knowledge and experience in the provision of health promotion programs.
  • Knowledge of community and local Aboriginal cultural issues.

Desirable Criteria

  • Knowledge and expertise in the use of Communicare or similar clinical database system.

All candidates must have a WA Drivers License and will be required to undertake a National Police Check prior to beginning employment.

In addition to above award wages, Salary Sacrifice is available for the right candidate .

For Information 

For further information about this position, please telephone the Human Resources Coordinator on (08) 9791 1166 during normal business hours.

To Apply

To apply for this role, please visit http://www.swams.com.au Current Vacancies and click on the role that you would like to apply for. This will take you to through the online application process. Alternatively please come and see one of the friendly HR staff who will be able to assist you in going through the online application process

Applications must be received by 5pm Wednesday, 14th June 2017

SWAMS reserves the right to withdraw this advertisement prior to the stated closing date.

To apply online, please click on the appropriate link below. Alternatively, for a confidential discussion, please contact Tia Ashwin on , quoting Ref No. 758896.

2. Senior Drug and Alcohol Educator – Murdi Paaki Drug and Alcohol Network

  • Rewarding opportunity to develop the capacity of health workers and support Aboriginal communities in the Murdi Paaki region.
  • Attractive remuneration package & excellent professional development opportunities.
  • Immediate start, contract position until 30th June 2018.

The organisation

Lyndon is a non-government organisation providing drug and alcohol services in regional, rural and remote areas, including: residential services in Orange and outreach programs to the Central West, Blue Mountains, the Murdi Paaki Region (West and Far West NSW) and Bega on the South Coast of NSW.

Lyndon provides innovative, person-centred and evidence-based programs to clients across the lifespan to improve the wellbeing of individuals, families and the community.

The role

Lyndon is seeking an experienced Drug and Alcohol Clinician for a Senior Drug and Alcohol Educator role in the Murdi Paaki Drug and Alcohol Network (MPDAN), a workforce development strategy that aims to reduce the harm done by drugs and alcohol in Aboriginal communities.

Based at the Clinical Hub in Orange NSW, the position is responsible for providing: clinical, group and practice supervision, training and education and capacity building services to primary health care providers such as Aboriginal Health Workers, D&A workers and other community service workers in the MPDAN region. An important part of this role is supporting service development of partner Aboriginal Health Services in the region.

Regular travel to the region (i.e. Bourke, Broken Hill, Walgett and Coonamble) is required.

The position is full-time until 30th June 2018.

The candidate

The ideal candidate will have:

  • Tertiary qualifications in health, welfare or related disciplines.
  • A minimum of 5 years’ experience in drug and alcohol service delivery.
  • A commitment to upskilling the drug and alcohol workforce including: evaluation, research, ongoing program development and quality improvement.
  • Experience providing education and supervision to clinical staff.
  • An ability to work in a multi-disciplinary, cross-agency and cross-cultural environment.
  • Experience working with or for Aboriginal organisations and communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with relevant experience and qualifications are encouraged to apply.

The benefits

Enjoy an attractive remuneration package negotiable with experience, plus superannuation, salary packaging, flexible working hours, laptop, paid travel expenses and excellent professional development and training opportunities.

How to apply

For further information on the position or to view a copy of the position description, contact RenCare Recruit on 0439 906 284 or email: renee@rencare.com.au.

 

To apply, email a cover letter (addressing the selection criteria, available at www.rencare.com.au/jobs) and your CV to renee@rencare.com.au. All applications will be reviewed upon submission.

3- 8 Danila Dilba Health Services Darwin

3.SOCIAL WORKER

(Integrated Team Care)

*Total Salary $101,200 – $106,344

Full Time / Fixed Term / 1 position

The Social Worker will be responsible for working collaboratively with patients, general practitioners, practice staff and Aboriginal Health Workers to provide appropriate multidisciplinary care and services for Aboriginal people with a chronic condition.

For further information please contact Malcolm Darling (General Manager, Darwin) on 0418 855 839 or email Malcolm.Darling@ddhs.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

 

To apply please select HERE

4.FAMILY PARTNERSHIP WORKER (FPW)

(ANFFP)

*Total Salary $66,097 – $70,920

Full Time / Fixed Term / 2 position

The Family Partnership Worker (FPW) is integral to the successful implementation of the Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program (ANFPP).

The Family Partnership Worker is responsible for maintaining high level standards of community practice, foster acceptance of the ANFPP model in the community and observe the Primary Health Care Service’s policies and guidelines. The FPW is an identified position.

joy.mclaughlin@daniladilba.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

 

To apply please select HERE

5.NURSE SUPERVISOR

(ANFFP)

*Total Salary $107,818 – $115,833

Full Time / Fixed Term / 1 position

The Nurse Supervisor will facilitate the implementation and delivery of the Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) to pregnant women with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander baby and their families using a therapeutic, partnership approach.

joy.mclaughlin@daniladilba.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

 

To apply please select HERE

6.COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER

*Total Salary $81,186 – $89,229

Full Time / Fixed-Term / 1 position

The Marketing and Communications Officer works as part of Corporate Services Team in providing quality support services to the GM Marketing and Corporate Affairs in day-to-day communications, events and stakeholder engagement.

Kyrn.Stevens@ddhs.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

 

To apply please select HERE

7.REGISTERED MIDWIFE

*Total Salary $118,730 – $123,714

Full Time / ongoing / 1 position

The Registered Midwife will contribute to the quality and delivery of primary health care within the Danila Dilba Health Service Mothers and Babies Clinic, by providing high quality, comprehensive and culturally appropriate midwifery care to patient with the aim of improving maternal and birth outcomes.

Elle.Crighton@ddhs.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

8.CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST

(P101-213)

*Total Salary $107,666

Full Time / Fixed Term / 1 position

The Clinical Psychologist is responsible for the provision of high quality mental health and social and emotional wellbeing services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. These services may include clinical evidence based counselling, brief psychological interventions, case management, trauma informed practice and coordination of care/aftercare.

This position is supported by the Team Leader, Social and Emotional Wellbeing directly and also forms part of a larger team within Community Programs.

For further information please contact Joseph Knuth (Head of Programs) on 0417 404 419 or email Joseph.Knuth@ddhs.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 22 May 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

 

To apply please select HERE

All Employees must hold a current Drivers Licence, be willing to undergo a Police Check and be able to obtain Ochre card clearance.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply

*Includes base salary, superannuation and leave loading

To apply please select HERE

9. Aboriginal Quitline Coordinator

Medibank


We’re passionate about nurturing careers.

We support new innovation and thinking, and openly collaborate and share new ideas. We’re healthy and active in our lives and wellbeing is encouraged at every level.  Our people play an important role in the future of health and healthcare and we believe that working together, we’re stronger.

About Us

Medibank is a leading private health insurer with 40 years of experience delivering better health to Australians. We look after the health cover needs of millions of customers and deliver a wide range of programs to support health and wellbeing in the community.

The Opportunity

Medibank is delivering the best possible smoking cessation outcomes for Aboriginal clients in NSW and ACT on behalf of Quitline, the Cancer Institute of NSW and Healthdirect Australia.

The Aboriginal Quitline Program provides both inbound and outbound calls to Aboriginal clients who are considering smoking cessation. We have a dedicated team of counsellors who provide specific interventions such as delivering one off counselling, focusing on quit planning, supporting with quitting (including managing withdrawal symptoms), providing strategies for relapse prevention and providing outbound milestone checks.

Joining our Relationship Management team, the Aboriginal Coordinator will provide team leadership and program direction in relation to Quitline, specifically focused on the delivery of the program to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Clients. This is a 12 month maternity leave contract and will be critical in promoting the service & liaising with Aboriginal Health workers & key Aboriginal Health & Community Controlled Services to ensure strong partnerships. The role will have a distinct community focus and will be key in the promotion of the program amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. This is a satisfyingly broad role with a range of responsibilities including:

  • Develop and implement Aboriginal Health Community Engagement Strategies for the NSW and ACT Aboriginal Quitline program
  • Foster relationships within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to promote awareness of services by travelling to identified communities;
  • Represent NSW Quitline at Aboriginal Health community events, organising and hosting promotional stalls as required;
  • Lead Aboriginal Advisory Groups with participation from key influencers in Aboriginal health groups to inform service design and the delivery of service improvement initiatives;
  • Lead engagement efforts to increase the variety of services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities;
  • Support the development and delivery of cultural education and training across the business and contribute to the Aboriginal Employment Strategy.

About You

You have exceptional communication and stakeholder engagement skills which enable you to build strong and lasting relationships across a range of internal and external stakeholders/clients and community groups. Critical thinking, decision making and problem solving skills are your strong suit as is your ability to lead and motivate others to achieve shared goals and objectives. You will also have the following skills and experience:

  • Strong community engagement experience with Aboriginal communities, ideally in health, welfare or similar;
  • Strong delivery focus; project management skills will be highly regarded;

Highly desirable – experience as a Counsellor, Registered Nurse or Allied Health Professional

This position will only be open to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander applicants – Medibank considers this to be a genuine occupational requirement under the relevant anti-discrimination legislation.

What We Offer

In return for your hard work we offer a range of great benefits. Furthermore, we take the health and wellbeing of our employees seriously, offering flexible working conditions and encouraging well-being at all levels of life.

Medibank is an equal opportunity employer committed to providing a working environment that embraces and values diversity and inclusion. If you have any support or access requirements, we encourage you to advise us at the time of application to assist you through the recruitment process.

A Career at Medibank adds up to more. More achievement. More progress. More passion and more innovation for health.

For a career option that will suit you better, click to apply.

Please note, if this position attracts a large volume of interest, the closing date for applications may be brought forward. With this in mind, we encourage you to submit your application as soon as possible.

MORE INFO

10.Congress ORGANISATIONAL CAPABILITY MANAGER\ Alice Springs

Reference: 3522029

Are you an experienced HR Generalist looking for a new challenge!

An exciting opportunity has arisen for an HR generalist to lead projects that will develop organisational capability, performance, development and engagement of Congress’ growing workforce. You will be an expert advisor at both operational and strategic levels with the ability to design and deliver practical and pragmatic solutions to develop organisational capability.

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 43 years’ experience providing comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal people living in Central Australia.

As well as a wonderful lifestyle and rewarding work, Congress offers:

  • Competitive salaries
  • Six (6) weeks annual leave
  • 9.5% superannuation
  • Generous salary packaging
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Family friendly conditions
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)
  • District allowance

For more information on the position please contact General Manager Human Resources, Kim Mannering on 0437 459 638 and email: kim.mannering@caac.org.au.

Applications close: Monday 5 June 2017.

*Total effective package includes: base salary, district allowance, superannuation, leave loading, and estimated tax saving from salary packaging options.

Contact Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or vacancy@caac.org.au for more information.

For more information about jobs at Congress visit http://www.caac.org.au/hr.

11. Congress EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST- CLIENT SERVICE ROLES

Alice Springs
Reference: 3511700
  • Client Service Officer
  • Across Multiple Sites​
  • Base Hourly Rate $25.84 – $31.10

Aboriginal Identified

Due to expansion of service locations in Alice Springs Congress is seeking experienced Client Service Officers who will provide a high standard of client service and general administrative support to various Congress Clinical Teams, the roles may involve evening and weekend shiftwork.

Congress offers the following:

  • Competitive salaries and allowances
  • Six (6) weeks’ annual leave
  • Generous salary packaging up to $30,000 per annum
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)
  • Access to selected Congress health services at no cost for self and eligible family.

Applications will be reviewed as they are received.

Application close: MONDAY 31 JULY 2017.

For more information about jobs at Congress call Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or email vacancy@caac.org.au or visit www.caac.org.au/hr.

Applications Close: 31 Jul 2017

12. Congress General Practitioner

Alice Springs

Reference: 3326264

  • Base salary between $179,818 and $208,556 depending on experience (includes district allowance)
  • Paid annual leave 6 weeks plus 1 week paid professional development leave
  • Flexible working conditions
  • Medicare incentive scheme
  • NFP salary sacrifice up to $30,000 pa
  • General Practice Rural Incentives Program (as at 1 November 2016). Congress operates in MM6 and MM7 regions, providing access to annual gross payments of up to $35K and $60K respectively depending on performance.
  • Working with a large team of general practitioners
  • Access to Congress provided selected medical services at no cost for self and eligible family..

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 40 years’ experience providing comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal people living in Central Australia. Congress is seeking a General Practitioner who is interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

This position is based in Alice Springs with a town of 27,000 people, with good access to good schools, flights, amenities.

For more information on the position please contract, Medical Director, Sam Heard 0438 556 050 or sam.heard@caac.org.au.

For more information about jobs at Congress call Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or email vacancy@caac.org.au or visit www.caac.org.au/hr.

Applications will be reviewed as they are received.

Applications Close: 30 Jun 2017

13.SA Aboriginal Health Educator/Liaison Officer

GPEx is the South Australian Training Organisation which delivers training to doctors selected to specialise in general practice in Australia.

We are a provider of the Australian General Practice Training program that is administered by the Department of Health and funded by the Australian Government.

GPEx is built on GPExpertise, centered on GPExperience and is a vision of GPExcellence

The role of Aboriginal Health Educator/Liasion Officer involves liaison and engagement with core stakeholders, program partners and other GPEx staff in the implementation of the ATSI Strategic Plan.

Reporting to the Director Medical Education Operations the key responsibilities will be:

  • Assist in the planning, implementation and evaluation of the ATSI Strategic Plan.  This will include:
    • Developing and supporting the role of cultural mentors within identified Aboriginal health training posts
    • Supporting the increase of Aboriginal health training posts by assisting the identified Aboriginal Health Services in becoming accredited training posts
    • In collaboration with the AGPT team, Aboriginal health team and relevant Medical Educators, assist with the integration of Aboriginal health within GPEX’s training program
    • Help facilitate the Aboriginal Health and Culture Workshops for registrars and staff
    • Contributing to internal and external communication of the GPEx Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Strategic Plan
    • Preparing, contributing to and managing relevant correspondence
    • Assist with the development of communication strategy to promote Aboriginal health training posts to registrars.
  • Prepare internal and external reporting, submissions and grant applications as required
  • Develop and maintain successful working relationships with key stakeholdersCandidates will ideally have relevant experience working in a health, education or policy environment.Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.The position is full time until December 2018 and will be located in our new offices at 132 Greenhill Road, Unley.Further information and a position description can be obtained via our website at http://www.gpex.com.au or by contacting the People and Culture Support Officer Sarah Magill on 08 8490 0400 or via email sarah.magill@gpex.com.au.Applications to Rebecca Pit Manager People and Culture rebecca.pit@gpex.com.auApplications close Wednesday 7 June 2017.

14. NT Medical Practitioner / General Practitioner

Job No: 89281
Location: Ngukkur, Katherine region, NT
Closing Date: 8 Jul 2017
  • Rewarding opportunity for experienced GP to join a well-established Community Controlled Health Organisation! 
  • Contribute to the improvement of medical services for a number of remote communities!
  • Highly attractive remuneration package circa $330,000 including a number of fantastic benefits!

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation now has a rewarding opportunity for a Medical Practitioner / General Practitioner to join their dedicated team in Ngukurr, within the Katherine Region of the Northern Territory.

As a Remote Medical Practitioner (RMP) at SHSAC, you will work as part of a multi-disciplinary team, led by the Director of Public Health and Planning. The role will involve provision of primary health care, support for and sharing of skills with other health centre staff and participation in key primary health care initiatives and community consultation.

To be considered for this position you must have the following:

  • Registration as a General Practitioner with AHPRA;
  • An understanding and commitment to the principles of Aboriginal community control in primary health care delivery; and
  • Broad based experience in primary health care appropriate to working in a rural/remote location.

Your dedication will be rewarded with a highly attractive salary package negotiable with skills and experience and salary packaging options.

You will be working in brand new, state of the art facility and also have access to a huge range of other benefits including:

  • 6 weeks leave per year;
  • Up to 10 days study leave;
  • Fully subsidised air-conditioned housing, utilities, subsidised phone rental and up to $100 in phone calls;
  • Salary packaging options up to $15,899 per packaging year;
  • Full support from the health team; and
  • Generous relocation and repatriation.

About the Organisation

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (SHSAC) is a community Controlled Health Organisation providing medical services to a number of remote communities throughout the Katherine region including Barunga, Manyallaluk, Wugularr, Bulman, Mataranka, Jilkminggan, Minyerri, Ngukurr and Urapunga.

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation works in partnership with Northern Territory PHN (NT PHN), who provide support services to health professionals and organisation across the Northern Territory. NT PHN offers support and assistance to eligible nurses and allied health professionals who are relocating the to the NT for the purposes of employment.

Don’t miss out on this unique opportunity in which you can truly make a difference – Apply Now!

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce #NRW2017 : @RoyalFlyingDoc Strengthening Indigenous health workforce will help #ClosetheGap

“Cultural safety and removal of racism in health care can be achieved by supporting Indigenous health care students and graduates to become the health system leaders of tomorrow.”

Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia (RFDS) CEO Martin Laverty

Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt, yesterday  launched a new partnership of the RFDS with

  • The Australian Indigenous Doctors Association (AIDA),
  • The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses  and Midwives (CATSINaM),
  • Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA)

to deliver the RFDS Indigenous Health Scholarship Scheme.
RFDS scholarships will support Indigenous students undertaking remote or rural clinical placements in medicine, nursing, midwifery and allied health.

Minister Wyatt announced  the first recipients as:

• Ms Amanda Robinson, for medicine;
• Mr Tim Haynes, for medicine;
• Amanda Bailey, for allied health;
• Amy Thompson, for nursing/midwifery;
• Jennifer Mairu, for allied health.

Tim, member of AIDA receiving his scholarship. Tim is heading to Cairns, Alice and Broken Hill.

AIDA CEO Craig Dukes said “The RFDS Indigenous health scholarship provides great opportunities for AIDA members to undertake placement in rural and remote areas.

On behalf of AIDA I congratulate recipients, Ms Amanda Robinson and Mr Tim Haynes and thank the RFDS for their continued support towards career opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors. This experience for Ms Robinson and Mr Haynes contributes not only towards their own professional development, and to the broader goal we all share to create a culturally safe health care system.”

CATSINaM CEO Janine Mohamed said “We would like to thank the RFDS for the funding to not only assist with the implementation of their Reconciliation Action Plan, but also to help us grow the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nursing and midwifery professions. The clinical placement experience will afford the students with insight into what it means to live and work in rural and remote Australia, which we hope is a direction they pursue once they graduate.”

Amanda, member of IAHA receiving her scholarship. Amanda moves from nursing into OT, congratulations

IAHA CEO Donna Murray said “The RFDS scholarships will provide much needed support for allied health students to undertake a rural or remote clinical placement which is critical for developing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce. This is also an important step in further supporting locally driven workforce development models that provide culturally safe and responsive allied health services with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Workplace Health : New Guidelines Safety and Security for Remote and Isolated Health

” The drive to improve the safety and security of the remote health workforce became an industry wide priority following the tragic murder of remote area nurse Gayle Woodford in 2016.

This caused the remote health industry to critically reflect on long held practices health industry to critically reflect on long held practices and challenge its acceptance of the risks that were routinely considered “just part of the job

The goal of theses guidelines is to provide broad statements with examples of activities, which can be implemented by employers, service providers, communities, clinicians, and other stakeholders to establish and maintain safe and effective operating systems in remote health services.”

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE IN REMOTE HEALTH IS AN ONGOING AND ESCALATING CONCERN THAT PRESENTS UNIQUE CHALLENGES NOT FACED IN URBAN AREAS.

Download a PDF copy of Guidelines HERE :

2017-SS-Guidelines-for-Remote-Isolated-Health

In the 2016 – 2017 financial year, CRANA plus received funding by the Commonwealth Department of Health to undertake a remote health workforce safety and security project.

A diverse representative expert advisory group informed the entire project. The members of this group included a representative from NACCHO (Rob Starling ) see Page 4 for the full list

The completion of phase one of the project saw the release of the National remote Health workforce Safety and Security Report : Literature Review, Consultation, and Survey results in January 2017.

The report included a literature review building on the work of the Working safe in Rural and Remote Australia Project. Additionally, utilising workshops, surveys and social media, CRANAplus undertook a “national conversation” with remote health stakeholders.

This provided an opportunity to seek the views of the workforce, employers, and other stakeholders, and test existing assumptions on the real and perceived issues around safety and security.

The report identified several significant issues :

  • The need for employers and staff to conduct hazard identification and risk assessment, event reporting, and workplace review of significant events and near-misses ;
  • The need for staff to be accompanied on-call, and at other times when risks are identified ;
  • The need for more comprehensive and timely orientation of new staff;
  • The need to promote individual resilience and manage the risk of fatigue;
  • The need to address high workforce turnover and issues relating to bullying and harassment;
  • The need for reliable, accessible transport and emergency after hours communication systems, including monitoring, supported by staff training in equipment use;
  • The need to provide access to patient information and data in staff accommodation;
  • The need for staff training and practice in communication and de-escalation techniques, to mitigate the risk of conflict leading to violence.

The full report can be accessed on the CRANAplus website www.crana.org.au

Recognising that the safety of staff and services are essential for the effective provision of health services, the guidelines contribute to supporting two significant government initiatives:

The Commonwealth Work Health and Safety Act ; and the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards (Standard One; Governance for Safety and Quality in Health Service Organisations).

The goal of theses guidelines is to provide broad statements with examples of activities, which can be implemented by employers, service providers, communities, clinicians, and other stakeholders to establish and maintain safe and effective operating systems in remote health services.

The guidelines identify seven safety and security priority areas, each of which is to be considered through the lense of the individual, the team, the employer, the infrastructure, the environment and the culture and community.

These guidelines provide a structured pathway to identify risk and prioritise areas for improvement. Ultimately, it will be highly valuable to develop agreed national standards for remote health workforce safety and security. Standards will provide clear, measurable expectations on safety and security issues, providing greater impetus to drive reform.

Although developed primarily for small remote towns and communities, these guidelines can be contextualised to any area or industry that requires health service provision in an isolated setting.

HOW TO USE THE GUIDELINES

  1. The infographic provides a summary overview of the guidelines and lenses.
  2. The summary table assists to identify the complexity of issues, roles and responsibilities contributing to remote health workforce safety and security.
  3. More detailed information, is provided under the heading of Guidelines, Aims and Activities. This information is provided as a guide only. Activities should be developed according to the context of individual services and communities, and with the contribution of local stakeholders.
  4. The final component of this document provides activities on how different remote health stakeholders can contribute to safety and security issues.

Download a PDF copy of Guidelines HERE :

2017-SS-Guidelines-for-Remote-Isolated-Health

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #Midwives @CATSINaM : Indigenous #midwives walk #Redfern 5 May to #closethegap

 

” Indigenous midwives will gather and march in Redfern to highlight the need to close the gap in healthcare in Indigenous communities.

Indigenous Midwifery facts:

  • There are only 230 Indigenous midwives nationally; a further 618 are needed
  • Indigenous mothers are three times as likely to die as their non-Indigenous counterparts
  • Indigenous babies up until the age of one are twice as likely to die as non-indigenous children

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander midwives led by Leona McGrath, Indigenous Health advisor, NSW Government and Dr Donna Hartz from the National Centre for Cultural Competence at the University of Sydney will walk through Redfern on 5 May to celebrate International Day for the Midwife and highlight a number of key issues in the sector.

Email Contact Dr Hartz

 ” Aboriginal women in Australia have significantly worse pregnancies than non-indigenous women.

In fact, they fare worse on just about every health measure.

And yet all the evidence tells us there will be no significant improvement in the shocking rates of poor indigenous health until we significantly improve the health of indigenous women.

This article serves as a clarion call from the President of RANZCOG, Professor Stephen Robson. We can only hope policy makers heed this call, as the health of the nation’s indigenous communities depend on it. See full article below

 ” Picture above 2016 Midwives across Western Sydney Local Health District (WSLHD)  banded together with the Australian College of Midwives to raise funds for the Rhodanthe Lipsett Indigenous Midwifery Charitable Fund, which will sponsor Indigenous student midwives and their midwifery studies.

WSLHD midwives, supported by WSLHD Aboriginal Liaison Officer Narelle Holden and Professor of Midwifery at Western Sydney University Hannah Dahlen, representing the Australian College of Midwives, proudly presented a cheque to Leona McGrath, the co-chair of the Rhodanthe Lipsett Indigenous Midwifery Charitable Fund “

Dr Hartz says there is a greater need for Indigenous midwives due to the significantly higher mortality rate for Indigenous mothers and babies.

“We have really embarrassingly poor outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers and babies here in Australia in 2017,” says Dr Hartz.

“We have women dying at three times the rate of non-Indigenous women. We have Indigenous babies dying at twice the rate and we have babies being born prematurely or at a low birth weight at nearly twice the rate of non-Indigenous babies.

“The current rates of preterm and low birth weight babies means that many babies are predisposed to chronic diseases later in life. When we have Indigenous women caring for Indigenous women in childbirth, the outcomes improve for both mother and baby.”

Currently 50 per cent of Indigenous women live where there are no local birth services. Dr Hartz says the training of Aboriginal midwives is crucial to providing culturally sensitive care to Indigenous mothers.

“We’ve had closing of maternity services from rural, regional and remote areas which has meant that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have to travel hundreds and hundreds of kilometres to receive care.

“In terms of spirituality, tradition and culture, the women are Birthing off Country – Birth on Country is of great spiritual significance to have connection to Country. What we’re hoping through programs of training midwives is to bolster maternity services back in the communities so women can have care and give birth closer to their homes,” she says.

Only one per cent of Australian midwives are of an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background whereas six per cent of all Australian births are Indigenous. A further 618 Indigenous midwives are required for parity.

“On International Day of the Midwife for the first time in Australia we’re going to have the biggest gathering of Aboriginal midwives in one event. I think it will speak loudly to how we feel about healing our communities and training more midwives.”

Organisers of the march invite interested parties to “Walk with Midwives” in aid of an Australian College of Midwives campaign that aims to raise funds for the Rhodanthe Lipsete Trust. The Trust aims to increase the number of Indigenous midwives.

The University of Sydney campaign is supported by the National Centre for Cultural Competence, the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses & Midwives and the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

Indigenous women and the hidden health-gap

 ‘ At an international scientific meeting in Brisbane, just over two years ago, I attended a session devoted to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The statistics presented and the picture painted for the assembled group was disheartening. The gap between the health of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians seemed too great to bridge.”

Stephen Robson BMedSc MBBS MM MPH MD FRANZCOG FRCOG
President, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

Discouraged, I asked one of the senior presenters where we could even start to help, to put things right. “That’s easy,” he replied, “You start by making women healthy. The rest will follow.” At the time, I was Vice-President of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG). This advice was something I could work with. Two years later, I am President of RANZCOG. Improving the health of Indigenous women is the biggest challenge that I, and my College, face.

“That’s easy,” he replied, “You start by making women healthy.

Women, and mothers in particular, hold a special place in Indigenous communities. Women manage not only their own health, but the health of their children; the health of their partners; and often the health of other relatives. Women who are healthy and health-literate are the single most important influence on the health of their communities.

Health begins in the womb. A healthy environment for a baby during pregnancy is perhaps the strongest influence on life-long health for all of us. This is especially true for Indigenous Australians. Babies of Aboriginal women tend to be smaller, and this reflects many influences: socioeconomic disadvantage; the mother’s nutrition; illnesses during pregnancy. Importantly, it can reflect alcohol consumption and use of tobacco.

Indigenous women have less opportunity to become healthy and prepare for pregnancy. When pregnant, they see their midwives and doctors later in pregnancy, and less often than non-indigenous women. They have lesser access to the standards of antenatal care that other women take for granted during pregnancy. They suffer racism, marginalisation, and exposure to violence.

The babies of Aboriginal women are more likely to be born prematurely, and more likely to die in pregnancy or soon after birth. As infants, their mortality rates exceed those of non-Indigenous infants. They are more likely to suffer childhood diseases.

The babies of Aboriginal women are more likely to be born prematurely, and more likely to die in pregnancy or soon after birth.

As adults, Indigenous Australians are more likely to be hospitalised. The reasons for this include injuries, infections, and kidney disease in particular. Cancers – lung cancer and cancer of the cervix – are much more likely to strike Aboriginal women. Women are more likely to die from cancer, and cervical cancer in particular has a death rate more than four times higher. Indigenous women are less likely to participate in screening programs that can prevent cervical cancer.

So many of these problems are completely preventable, and arise from what we call ‘social determinants of health.’ Social conditions and economic opportunity influence health at all levels, from the individual up to the entire community. Education, income and employment, adequate housing, access to health and other services, social supports – all of these play a role in shaping health.

Many Australian doctors struggle to understand how Indigenous people view medical treatment. For many Aboriginal people, health is viewed as the social, emotional, and cultural wellbeing of the whole community. It is subsumed into a connection to the land, the community, social relationships, and the environment.

Trust is a major factor influencing the way Indigenous people access, and interact with, the health system. Many will have had bad experiences with our hospitals and health-care workers, however well-meaning many doctors and nurses are. It is common to have Aboriginal people discharge themselves from hospital against the advice of their carers.

Pregnancy is a time when it is possible to turn this around. It is a time when it should be possible to build good, trusting relationships with women and their families. By making the effort to tailor maternity care to the needs of Indigenous women, it should be possible to engage in a positive way. To promote health screening, and help build enduring relationships with carers.

Pregnancy is a time when it is possible to turn this around. It is a time when it should be possible to build good, trusting relationships with women and their families.

Recently, the Presidents of a number of medical Colleges met with the Indigenous Health Minister, the Honourable Ken Wyatt. Over the course of the morning, it became clear that there is a new determination to put things right. To identify and work hard to remove the roadblocks to health for Indigenous Australians.

As the saying goes, every great journey begins with a single step. Making sure that Indigenous women prepare for pregnancy, have healthy pregnancies and births, and that their children are healthy, are all key to long-term improvements in community health. I am hoping that we can all take these steps together.

Learn more about Indigenous women’s health at:

http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/population-groups/women/reviews/our-review#infant-mortality