NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce Survey : Please support #CareerPathways the first national survey of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health staff across all professions, roles and locations.

Welcome to the first national survey of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health staff across all professions, roles and locations.

It is designed to better understand the development needs and career pathways within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce to inform strategies to improve employment, retention and career opportunities.

All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, present and past, are invited to take part.

Who is running this survey? This survey is part of the Career Pathways Project, funded by the Lowitja Institute. The Project was initiated by Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations (ACCHOs) and is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander investigators, partners and field researchers.  Partners and collaborators include Bila Muuji, AMSANT, UNSW Sydney, Western Sydney University, ACCHOs and government health services, as well as professional associations (including CATSINaM, IAHA, AIDA and NATSIHWA) and NACCHO affiliates.                  

Your privacy  Please be assured that your privacy is our highest priority and your anonymous response cannot be linked back to you.

In the survey you will be asked about any qualifications you may have, your past and current employment in the health sector, the barriers you may have faced in your work-life, opportunities you have had, and your ideas to improve career pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services staff in the future.

If you have done the survey before – thank you! Please do not complete it again.

Artwork by Joanne Nasir 2017. The Spirit People Dreaming from my great grandmother’s songline, Borroloola.  Each figure represents a state or territory. The purple and blue lines represent the career pathway (purple) of the worker and their professional, personal and spiritual journey by the blue. The cream circles at the bottom of the figures represent the Stone Dreaming to keep Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workers strong, resilient and spiritually connected to their cultural identity

ONLINE PARTICIPANT INFORMATION STATEMENT

  1. What is the research study about? You are invited to take part in the “Career Pathways Project”. This research study seeks to learn from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are employed in the health sector about their career development and progression and their ideas for improving career pathways. We will also seek to hear the views of other key people in the health system.
  2. Who is conducting this research? The project has many research partners: Bila Muuji Aboriginal Health Services Inc., Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory, Western Sydney University, UNSW Sydney, Awabakal Medical Service, Western NSW Primary Health Network, Western NSW Local Health District and South Western Sydney Local Health District. The research is being funded by the Lowitja Institute.
  3. Do I have to take part in this research study? Participation in the project is voluntary. If you do not want to take part, you do not have to. Your decision whether or not to participate will not affect your future relationship with your employing organisation or with any of the other research partners.
  4. What does participation involve and are there any risks involved? If you decide to participate you will complete this online survey which should take about 10-15 minutes of your time. The survey will cover your work history in the health sector, your experiences working in health, your views about the opportunities for career development in health, and what may help or not in progressing the careers and opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health staff. We don’t expect the questions  to cause any  discomfort, however if you would like to talk to someone you can let the research team know – see details at the end of this page.
  5. What are the possible benefits to participation? We hope that you enjoy sharing your experiences and ideas about how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health staff can be supported and developed in their careers. All of the information put together will provide information and guidance for health service managers and other stakeholders who want to grow and develop the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.
  6. How and when will I find out what the results of the research study are? A plain-language summary report of the survey findings which will be placed on the Lowitja Institute website and circulated to peaks and affiliates, professional associations and other key stakeholders to distribute to their members. We will also write articles and present the results at conferences. All the information published and presented will be done in a way that will not identify you – the survey is anonymous.
  7. What if I want to withdraw from the research studyIf you do consent to participate, you are free to stop participating at any time by ending the survey and exiting the site – your data will not be used if you do not complete and submit the survey. If you complete and submit the survey we cannot remove your responses as we will not know which responses our yours – the survey is anonymous.
  8. What should I do if I have further questions about my involvement in the research study? If you want any more information about this project you can contact a member of the research team.

Research Team Contacts for the survey:

Telphia-Leanne Joseph – t.joseph@unsw.edu.au

Sally Nathan –  s.nathan@unsw.edu.au

  1. What if I have a complaint or any concerns about the research studyThe project has been approved by the Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council Human Research Ethics Committee NSW (Ref 1306 17) and other State and Territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health ethics committees. Complaints may be directed to The Chairperson, AH&MRC Ethics Committee, P.O. Box 1565, Strawberry Hills NSW 2012; Telephone:  02-9212 4777 or email to ethics@ahmrc.org.au or to your relevant State and Territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health ethics committees  https://www.lowitja.org.au/ethics/contacts

START THE SURVEY HERE 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Remote Workforce News : @senbmckenzie announces Australia’s remote rural health workforce will receive additional training, support and professional services, thanks to a $13.7 million grant to @CRANAplus

 

This investment will help to ensure more than 1500 health professionals in remote Australia are properly supported to meet the unique challenges faced by those working in isolated practices,” 

The grant allows CRANAplus to continue supporting our rural and remote health professionals and ensure Australians living in our most geographically isolated regions can access high‑quality, professional healthcare services.

Remote communities often do not have local hospitals or general practitioners. Healthcare services are typically provided by Remote Area Nurses and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers, supported by visiting medical and allied health professionals.

Minister for Rural Health, Senator Bridget McKenzie, said the $13.7 million over three years would enable CRANAplus to continue its work addressing the barriers to recruiting and retaining health professionals in remote and isolated parts of Australia.

Australia’s remote rural health workforce will receive additional training, support and professional services, thanks to a $13.7 million grant to CRANAplus from the Federal Government.

CRANAplus is a member-based national organisation that provides health professionals and their families working in remote communities with training, support and professional services that are relevant and appropriate to their practices.

“Member-based training programs like CRANAplus are vital to attracting, maintaining and enabling the careers of remote healthcare workers.”

“Supporting their work is part of this Government’s continued commitment and investment in our healthcare workforce to deliver equality of healthcare for all Australians, no matter where they live,” the Senaor said.

CRANAplus Chief Executive Officer, Christopher Cliffe, said people living in remote parts of the country had less access to the sorts of health services most Australians took for granted.

“If you live, work or are travelling in remote Australia and become acutely unwell or have an accident, you are unlikely to have a local hospital or private general practitioner within ‘cooee’,” Mr Cliffe said.

“The first health professional you’ll see is probably going to be a Remote Area Nurse, who will provide your treatment or stabilise you for evacuation to the nearest hospital.

“Thanks to this grant, we will be able to continue supporting health professionals such as Remote Area Nurses to ensure they are available where and when people in remote parts of the country need them most,” he said.

The Coalition Government is absolutely committed to ensuring all Australians have access to a first-class health system.

Part of this is the Stronger Rural Health Strategy – a transformational policy to build a sustainable, high-quality health workforce that is distributed across regional Australia.

This Stronger Rural Health Strategy will deliver approximately 3000 additional specialist GPs for rural Australia, more than 3000 additional nurses in rural general practice and hundreds of additional allied health professionals in rural Australia over 10 years.

The Stronger Rural Health Strategy will also enable a stronger role for nurses and allied health professionals in the delivery of more multidisciplinary, team-based models of primary healthcare in rural and regional Australia.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities #Doctors wanted #Rural and Remote @Walgett_AMS Plus #NT@AMSANTaus @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #NSW @ahmrc #QLD @ATSICHSBris @DeadlyChoices @IUIH_ @Apunipima #VIC @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 ACCHO Job/s of the week 

1.2 NACCHO JOBS -Canberra Office Closing 28 August

1.3 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Royal Flying Doctor Service /IAHA 

Aboriginal Male Health 20 Scholarships 

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland

2.Queensland 

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 Rumbalara ACCHO  PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2  South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

7.3 Yerin : Permanent Full Time Aboriginal Permanency Support Manager (OOHC)

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

University of Melbourne in Indigenous Eye Health.

Project Officer UNSW

CRANAplus : Policy and Stakeholder Coordinator closes 31 August 

ABS Engagement Manager closes 2 September

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

1. 1 ACCHO Job/s of the week

General Practitioner / GP VMO / Doctor – Walgett

Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service Limited (WAMS) is an innovative, dynamic, fully managed GP practice, providing high quality healthcare to the Walgett community. The first AMS in NSW to be accredited with the QIC, WAMS is committed to providing an innovative model of healthcare that incorporates practice nursing, allied health and preventative healthcare.

Professional Benefits

  • Varied presentations will challenge your skills and ensure that your continued professional development is maintained.
  • Innovative models of care
  • Working in Walgett may fast-track your 10 Year Moratorium by as much as 7 years.
  • VMO subject to LHD credentialing
  • Outreach clinics in Brewarrina, Goodooga and Pilliga
  • Be supported by Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers and Allied Health staff

Highly attractive remuneration and conditions

  • Attractive remuneration structure to suit your experience – potential to earn more than $300k+ annually
  • Immediate patient base
  • Flexible work hours and arrangements
  • Practice is open Monday to Friday
  • Access to the GP Rural Incentive Program for eligible doctors
  • Access to NSW RDN’s Transition Grant for eligible doctors
  • Quality accommodation and car included in package
  • State of the art purpose-built service with an Administration Building, General Practice and Dental Practice
  • Services including –  Men’s Health, Ear Health, Eye Health, Drug & Alcohol, Family Health, Chronic Disease, Speech Pathology, Aboriginal Maternal and Infant Health Strategy and Early Childhood Family Health Nurse

Selection Criteria:

  • Must have current specialist medical registration with AHPRA or be eligible for Category 1 pathway with RACGP or ACRRM
  • Demonstrated experience working in the field of Aboriginal health
  • Full Medical Indemnity
  • WWCC / NCRC Clearances
  • Full Australian drivers licence
  • Demonstrated interest in training junior doctors
  • Willingness to contribute positively within a team environment

Helping communities in remote NSW

  • RDN is a not-for-profit organisation. Neither you nor the practice is charged a fee to use our services.

If you have vocational registration or hold FRACGP/FACRRM we’d love to hear from you.

To discuss possibilities please contact:

Mark Muchiri, Medical Workforce Consultant

NSW Rural Doctors Network:

Tel: +61 2 4924 8076
Email: mmuchiri@nswrdn.com.au

Christine Corby OAM, Chief Executive Officer

Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service Limited

Email: ChristineC@walgettams.com.au

 

Aboriginal Corporation  Medical Practitioner X 2

About the business

Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (PWHSAC) provides comprehensive Primary Health Care services to Aboriginal people in a proactive and culturally appropriate way.  PWHSAC is based in Port Augusta with clinics in Davenport Community, Copley and Nepabunna.

About the role

Medical Practitioners work with our experienced Aboriginal Health Workers and allied health professionals (Physio, Diabetic Educator, Imms Nurse etc with many visiting specialists).

Benefits and perks

In return for your hard work and dedication you will be rewarded with an attractive salary base, together with superannuation, generous salary packaging up to $16,000. through Maxxia, to increase you take home pay.  Substantial additional benefits through Rural Incentive payments also apply.

Relocation assistance

Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is also willing to negotiate relocation assistance and generous accommodation subsidies for the right candidate.

APPLY HERE

Rural GP – Aboriginal Health Service – Coastal South Australia

The RDWA is working with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service (CKAHS) to recruit a full time GP. This is a highly rewarding role and would suit a GP who thrives on a broad scope of practice and is committed to improving the health outcomes of the community. An excellent package is on offer and includes housing, generous remuneration between $240,000 – $260,000, relocation assistance, and top tier Commonwealth Government funded financial incentives.

The Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service is located on South Australia’s spectacular Eyre Peninsula. The practice provides a culturally appropriate service to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the township of Ceduna and surrounding outreach services.

Ceduna is a busy regional hub with a population of over 3,500. Boasting beautiful beaches and excellent fishing waters, it is a popular tourist spot and a hub for aquaculture including oyster farming. The town is well serviced with schools, government agencies and retail shops. There are daily flights to Adelaide.

The team at CKAHS consists of Aboriginal Health Workers, a Practice Manager, Practice Nurse and Clinical Coordinator and is well supported by regular visiting Specialist and Allied Health workers. The Ceduna District Health Service (Hospital) and GP Plus Health Care Centre are co-located with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service. Inpatient care and emergency on-call is managed by the town GPs as part of a shared roster. Doctors are well supported by excellent retrieval services and support networks for immediate specialist advice via phone or video link.

Criteria

  • 4 years of general practice experience
  • Emergency medicine experience

For more detailed information or to apply, contact the RDWA Recruitment Team on 08 8234 8277 or via email: recruitment@ruraldoc.com.au

(CKAHS) to recruit a full time GP. This is a highly rewarding role and would suit a GP who thrives on a broad scope of practice and is committed to improving the health outcomes of the community. An excellent package is on offer and includes housing, generous remuneration between $240,000 – $260,000, relocation assistance, and top tier Commonwealth Government funded financial incentives.

The Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service is located on South Australia’s spectacular Eyre Peninsula. The practice provides a culturally appropriate service to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the township of Ceduna and surrounding outreach services.

Ceduna is a busy regional hub with a population of over 3,500. Boasting beautiful beaches and excellent fishing waters, it is a popular tourist spot and a hub for aquaculture including oyster farming. The town is well serviced with schools, government agencies and retail shops. There are daily flights to Adelaide.

The team at CKAHS consists of Aboriginal Health Workers, a Practice Manager, Practice Nurse and Clinical Coordinator and is well supported by regular visiting Specialist and Allied Health workers. The Ceduna District Health Service (Hospital) and GP Plus Health Care Centre are co-located with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service. Inpatient care and emergency on-call is managed by the town GPs as part of a shared roster. Doctors are well supported by excellent retrieval services and support networks for immediate specialist advice via phone or video link.

Criteria

  • 4 years of general practice experience
  • Emergency medicine experience

For more detailed information or to apply, contact the RDWA Recruitment Team on 08 8234 8277 or via email: recruitment@ruraldoc.com.au

 

1.2 NACCHO JOBS -Canberra Office closing 28 August

1.2.1 Senior Policy Officer – National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

The person selected will be a senior member of a policy team including public health medical officers responsible for the development and review of Indigenous health and associated policies.

The person will also be required to represent NACCHO on national reference groups and working parties and at meetings with Government Departments and other agencies. The person would be expected to deliver highly complex correspondence and papers for the Executive, Board and other stakeholders and work with the team to advance the development and implementation of processes, procedures and tools that support the deliver of high quality policy advice.

Conditions of engagement

This position will be offered on a full-time, fixed-term contract for 3 years. An attractive salary of $120,000 pus superannuation will be offered to the successful applicant. NACCHO is a Public Benevolent Institution and therefore staff have access to taxation benefits.

More info and Apply

1.2.2 National Program Coordinator for the QUMAX Program (Quality Use of Medicines for Aboriginal Peoples)

NACCHO manages the QUMAX program on behalf of the Pharmacy Guild of Australia.  The program is designed specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and aims to improve how medicines are used. The program is accessed by some 80 Community Controlled Health Services nationally.

About the role

The person selected will have had experience in managing grants programs, be self- motivated and interested in continuous improvements. The person will be expected to work directly with Community Controlled Health Services and with the Pharmacy Guild of Australia’s QUMAX program manager.  The position is located in NACCHO’s Medicine Policy team.

More Info and APPLY 

1.3 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Royal Flying Doctor Service /IAHA

The IAHA RFDS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Scholarship supports students to do clinical placements in the rural & remote regions of Aust. Applications close COB Mon 27 Aug. Enquire at admin@iaha.com.au or call 02 6285 1010. 

2. Aboriginal Male Health 20 Scholarships 

 

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland


 

 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

2.1 There are 10 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd

Goolburri Health Adv Family Wellbeing and Participation Branch is a division of Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd established to auspice funds from the Department of Child Safety Youth and Women (Child Safety Services), South West Region.

The vision of the organisation is to provide both family wellbeing support, family participation and foster and kinship care functions to and with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families within the South West Region.

We are seeking expressions of interest for the following positions:

BackTrack Kids and Kin Project Officer – SW Region (Full-Time)
To establish and map kinship and community connections for children currently in Out of Home Care – not with Kin or community – and begin the contact and reconnection process with Kin and community.

Administration Officer – SW Region (Toowoomba based) (Part-Time)
To support the Project Officer to create project processes, project database, relevant documentation and in planning visits and travel.

Applications close 5:00pm, Friday 24th August 2018 and must be in writing.
Please forward to:
Family Wellbeing Services Manager
Email: fwb@goolburri.org.au
Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd
PO Box 1198
TOOWOOMBA QLD 4350

Application packages can be obtained by telephoning 07 4637 9953 during business hours.

All positions are “Identified” positions which means it is a genuine occupational requirement that they be filled by Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander persons, as permitted by and arguable under Section 24, 104 and 105 of the Queensland Anti-Discrimination Act (1991). Applicants must have a current Queensland driver’s license a Working with Children Check (Blue Card) and Criminal History Check.

Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd is an equal opportunity employer and encourages Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply.

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 There are 19 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

 

 

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 20 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3 There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

 

Current Vacancies
  • Administration Support Officer – SIF

  • Counsellor (Specialised) / Social Worker – Various Roles

  • Support Worker (Community Services)
  • Clinic Receptionist

  • Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

 

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

 

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

Job Vacancy Psychologist May 2018
Job Vacancy Case Management Worker
Job Vacancy General Practitioner FCS May 2018
Job Vacancy Psychiatrist – Child and Adolescent

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

Mental Health Clinician (three positions)
General Practitioner Swan Hill
Team Leader, Alcohol and Other Drugs and Mental Health
Kinship caseworker (Mildura)
Kinship caseworker (Swan Hill)
Kinship Reunification Caseworker (Mildura)
Kinship Reunification Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Home-Based Care Caseworker (Mildura)
Home-Based Care Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Aboriginal Family-Led Decision-making Caseworker (Swan Hill)
First Supports Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Caseworker, Prevention and Early Intervention (Swan Hill)
Koori Pre School Assistant (Mildura)
Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Service (ACSASS) case worker (Swan Hill)
Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Service (ACSASS) case worker (Robinvale)
Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Mildura)
Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Swan Hill)
Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Robinvale)
Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Mildura)
Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Service (ACSASS) case worker (Mildura)
Mental Health Nurse
General Practitioner Mildura

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 Rumbalara ACCHO  PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

New Position – Full time – 38 Hours per week 

The position exists to ensure that the management of the general practice:

  • Fully supports the delivery of quality clinical care by all clinicians working in the practice

  • Provides for the self-sustained operation of the practice (break-even at minimum)

Key Selection Criteria:

  • Understanding of, and commitment to, Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander culture

  • Understanding of general practice

  • Management experience in a small business, ideally general practice management

  • Demonstrated leadership capabilities

  • Development, implementation, and monitoring of policies and processes that ensure effective and efficient operation of a healthcare service

  • Experience in leading healthcare service accreditation

  • Quality management experience

  • Commitment to continuing professional education

  • Valid driver’s license

For further information on this role contact Mr. Soenke Tremper or Ms Cindy McGee on 03- 58200 – 035

Salary Packaging is available

You will be required to hold a valid Victorian Employee Working with Children Check and a current police check completed within the last 2 weeks prior to commencement.

For consideration for an interview, you must obtain a Position Description from Marieta on (03) 5820 6405 or email: marieta.martin@raclimited.com.au and address the Key Selection Criteria, include a current resume, copies of qualifications and a cover letter.

Applications close at 4pm on Tuesday, 28th August 2018 and are to be addressed to:

Human Resources Dept. Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative
PO Box 614
Mooroopna Vic 3629

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

 

AHMRC Job WEBSITE

7.2  South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

 

The Community Support Officer will be responsible for supervising and reporting on family contact, transport of children, young people and their families to supervised contacts, respite and other scheduled activities. The Community Support Officer may also be required to engage in mentoring activities.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Qualifications, Knowledge and Experience

Essential

* A tertiary qualification in Social Work / Welfare / Community Services / Disability Services or related fields or equivalent experience in a relevant sector

* Demonstrated ability in working with Aboriginal people, their communities and organisations

* The ability to develop and maintain effective working relationships with stakeholders, other agencies and service providers

* Proficiency in report writing and demonstrated ability to develop, organise and maintain records and reports in a timely manner

* Demonstrated computers skills, including the use of all Microsoft Office applications

* Ability to work autonomously under limited supervision, exercising sound professional judgement and seeking advice and consultation when appropriate as well as working as part of a wider team

* Personal organisation skills including time management and ability to prioritise competing demands

* Understanding of the importance of handling sensitive and confidential client or service information

* Clear Working with Children Check and National Police History Check

* Current, valid Driver’s Licence and willingness to transport clients, and travel overnight in regional and interstate areas if required

Desirable

* Aboriginality*

PERSONAL QUALITIES AND ATTRIBUTES

* Effective conflict resolution skills, negotiation, mediation and decision making skills

* Demonstrates initiative and an ability to problem solve

* Good literacy skills

* Effective communication skills including written and verbal communication with the ability to exercise these skills with people at all levels

For a full Position Description and an Application form, please email hr@southcoastams.org.au

7.3 Yerin : Permanent Full Time Aboriginal Permanency Support Manager (OOHC)

Permanent Full Time Aboriginal Permanency Support Manager (OOHC)

Yerin is seeking a suitability qualified Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander individual who will manage the Permanency Support Program (OOHC) team and work with other service providers to ensure high quality service. This role will see you working as part of a team and at times in isolation.

The successful applicant will have Tertiary Qualifications in Community Services or equivalent and a minimum 2 years’ experience managing Permanency Support Programs (OOHC), current working with Children’s Check and current NSW Drivers Licence and undergo a National Criminal History Check.

You’ll also have access to salary sacrificing options up to $15,950 to increase the value of your take home pay.

All applicants MUST obtain an application pack and complete all information contained in the pack, prior to lodging your application for the position. DO NOT APPLY VIA SEEK

This is an identified Position under Section 9A of the NSW Anti-Discrimination Act 1977.

For a confidential discussion about the position please contact Belinda Field, CEO Ph: 02 43511040.

To obtain an application pack – contact Jo Stevens E: recruitment@yerin.org.au or Ph: 02 43511040.

Applications close 5pm 1 September 2018

8. Tasmania

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

University of Melbourne in Indigenous Eye Health.

We currently have a position advertised for a PA/Administrator to join our team in Melbourne. We are really keen to have this job included in your communique for tomorrow. Is this a possibility? Job link below:

http://jobs.unimelb.edu.au/caw/en/job/897300/personal-assistant-indigenous-eye-health

10.2 Project Officer UNSW

UNSW Medicine is a national leader in learning, teaching and research, with close affiliations to a number of Australia’s finest hospitals, research institutes and health care organisations. With a strong presence at UNSW Kensington campus, the faculty have staff and students in teaching hospitals in Sydney as well as regional and rural areas of NSW including Albury/Wodonga, Wagga Wagga, Coffs Harbour and Port Macquarie.

The National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) was established at the University of New South Wales by the Commonwealth Government in 1986 to extend the knowledge base required for effective treatment of individuals with alcohol and other drug related problems and to enhance the overall research capacity in the drug and alcohol field. The Centre is highly regarded, both nationally and internationally, for its contribution to drug and alcohol research.

The Project Officer will oversee project planning, coordination, monitoring and reporting within The Centre of Research Excellence in Mental Health and Substance Use (CREMS). In particular the Project Officer will assist with the adaptation, development, evaluation and dissemination of culturally-appropriate evidencebased information about crystal methamphetamine (“ice”) for and in collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The role of Project Officer reports to a Senior Research Fellow

More INFO APPLY 

CRANAplus : Policy and Stakeholder Coordinator closes 31 August 

CRANAplus is the peak professional body for health professionals working in remote and isolated areas across Australia.

We currently have an exciting opportunity for an individual experienced in policy and stakeholder engagement to join our team and drive our organisations advocacy agenda.

The successful candidate will preferably be based in Canberra.

Click here for a copy of the position description or for further information please

email crana@crana.org.au or phone our head office in Cairns on 07 4047 6409.

Applications should include a letter addressing the qualification and experience required and be sent to crana@crana.org.au  by COB Friday 31st August 2018 

ABS Engagement Manager closes 2 September

Are you someone who enjoys making and helping others make informed decisions? At the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) we are seeking to fill a number of Engagement Manager (APS 6) or Engagement Officer (APS 5) roles in NSW, TAS and WA.

Over the next 12 months additional vacancies may be identified in VIC, NT, QLD and SA. This recruitment will be used to develop an order of merit.

https://www.apsjobs.gov.au/SearchedNoticesView.aspx?Notices=10732266%3A1&mn=JobSearch

NARI Research Officer/Fellow Closes 31 August

Part Time 0.8FTE until 31st December 2019

Salary $62,995 – $82,083

The National Ageing Research Institute (NARI) is an independent, non-profit, medical research organisation recognised internationally as a centre of excellence in gerontology and geriatrics research.  Located in the grounds of the Royal Park Campus of the Royal Melbourne Hospital in Parkville, NARI is a vibrant and dynamic work environment where research is brought to life through rapid translation into policy and practice. NARI’s multi-disciplinary team of researchers are committed to improving the life and health of older people through research.

We are seeking a Research Officer/Fellow to work on a project examining the way art centres in remote communities are supporting older aboriginal people and those living with dementia. The successful applicant will work closely with other members of the “Remote Art Centres and Older People” project to ensure all activities are able to be effectively implemented to a high standard.

The successful applicant will have a Bachelor degree with Honours or PhD qualifications in a relevant field, although previous relevant experience in aged care, health care or health research will be considered. Previous experience in remote communities or working with Aboriginal Controlled Organisations would be highly desirable.

Please see the position description for a full list of responsibilities and selection criteria.

Applicants should include a Cover Letter, CV and addressed Selection Criteria when responding.

For position description, visit:          http://www.nari.net.au

Pleassend application to:                hr@nari.unimelb.edu.au

For enquirieplease contact Dr. Scott Fraser at: s.fraser@nari.edu.au

Applicationclose Friday 31 August 2018

 

 

NACCHO Save a date Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #OchreDay2018 #MaleHealth Program Released #NACCHOAgm2018 Presenters Wanted and Institute for Urban Indigenous Health @IUIH_ System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations and Expressions of Interest now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

Expressions of Interest to present see below 

NACCHO is now calling for EOI’s from Affiliates , Member Services and stakeholders for Case Studies and Presentations for the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

Download the Application

NACCHO Members Expressions of Interest to present to the Brisbane Conference 2018 on Day 1

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members Conference; ‘Investing in What Works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Health’. We are seeking EOIs for the following Conference Sessions.

Day 1 Wednesday 31 October 2018

Concurrent Session 1 (1.15 – 2.00pm) – topics can include Case Studies but are not limited to:

  • Workforce Innovation
  • Best Practice Primary Health Care for Clients with Chronic Disease
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Sustainable Growth
  • Harnessing Resources (Medicare, government and other)
  • Engagement/Health Promotion
  • Models of Primary Health Care and
  • Clinical and Service Delivery.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Regional, Rural or Remote.  Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes in either the Plenary or Breakout rooms.

OR

Table Top Presentations (2.00-3.00pm)

Presenters will speak from the lectern and provide a brief presentation on a key project or program currently being delivered by their service.

Presentation will be 10 minutes in duration-with 5 minutes to present and
5 minutes for discussion and questions from delegates.

How to submit an EOI

Please provide the following information and submit via email to NACCHO-AGM@naccho.org.au by COB Monday 21st August 2018.

  • Name of Member Service
  • Name of presenter(s)
  • Name of program
  • Name of session
  • Contact details: Phone | Mobile | Email

Provide the key points you want to cover – in no more than 500 words outline the program/ project/ topic you would like to present on. Describe how your presentation/case study supports the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference theme ‘Investing in what works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Healt

SUBMIT DAY 1

SUBMIT DAY 2 

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane 

Registrations are currently open for the inaugural Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, to be held on Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 August 2018 in Brisbane.

This conference will focus on IUIH’s successful approach to Closing the Gap in Indigenous health and would be of interest to people working in

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Services
• Primary Health Networks (PHNs)
• Health and Hospital Boards and management
• Government Departments
• the University Sector
• the NGO sectorCome along and gain fresh insights into the ways in which a cross-sector and integrated system can make real impacts on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as we share the research behind the development and implementation of this system.
Featuring presentations by speakers across a range of specialisations including clinic set up, clinical governance, systems integration, wrap around services such as allied and social health, workforce development and research evidence.
For more information you can
·         Watch this video –https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6O1pQfZMLnk
·         Visit the conference registration website –https://www.ivvy.com.au/event/IUIH18/
·         Call us (07) 3828 3600
·         Email events@iuih.org.au

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

Download HERE

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will appear via Video 

Please note this EVENT is now closed Fully Booked

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launched its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program

Download OCHRE DAY 2018 Program HERE

NACCHO Ochre Day Program_WEB 2018

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

 

 

 

Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

 

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location: 233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health celebrates #AMAFDW18 AMA Family Doctor Week : @amapresident Speech to @PressClubAust #NPC Includes support #ulurustatement #prevention investment #obesity #Chronic Disease funding #MentalHealth

 

” I am very pleased that one of my first announcements as AMA President was the AMA endorsement of the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

The Uluru Statement expresses the aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with regard to self-determination and status in their own country.

The AMA has for many years supported Indigenous recognition in the Australian Constitution.

The Uluru Statement is another significant step in making that recognition a reality.

The AMA is committed to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

It is simply unacceptable that Australia, one of the wealthiest nations in the world, cannot solve a health crisis affecting fewer than three per cent of its citizens.”

AMA President Dr Tony Bartone speaking at the National Press Club 25 July 2018

 ” This week just happens to be AMA Family Doctor Week – a tribute to hardworking GPs.

GPs of Australia, I salute you. We all salute you.

Your hard work and dedication is highly valued. The AMA will always support you and promote you.

Your GP – your family doctor – will ensure that your health needs are met throughout all stages of your life.

Be it immunisation, preventative health care, age specific medical checks, chronic disease management, or aged care, the life long relationship with your GP underpins continuous and appropriate care.

This is especially the case for patients who are from culturally or linguistically diverse backgrounds. For them, GPs truly are their trusted health advocates.”

 ” The burden of chronic disease in Australia is significant.

Chronic disease is responsible for around 83 per cent of premature deaths and 66 per cent of the burden of disease.

Chronic disease has a significant impact on the health system, but the reality is that most of these conditions can be prevented.

It simply makes enormous sense to invest in prevention.

Taxes collected from tobacco and alcohol excise generate around $16 billion each year for the Government.

In return, total Government spending on prevention is around $2 billion a year, which equates to about $89 per person.

If we are to reduce the impact of chronic disease in Australia, all our governments must invest more in prevention.

Tackling obesity is a priority.

Doctors are well placed to identify and support patients who are overweight or obese. Two thirds of adults are either overweight or obese. ”

Full Speech : Health reform: Improving the patient journey

I acknowledge the traditional owners of the land on which we meet, and pay my respects to their elders past and present.

It is a humbling experience to be elected President of such a proud and respected organisation as the AMA.

It is an equally humbling experience to speak here at the National Press Club in Canberra. I thank the Press Club for this opportunity.

I am a GP, and I have been in practice in the northern suburbs of Melbourne for more than 30 years.

Some of you may know that I was inspired to become a GP by watching my own family doctor, who cared for my ill father when I was growing up.

Even now, my mother reflects on the care and dedication my family GP displayed in caring for her family. It’s no surprise that he became an early mentor in my professional life.

I have seen it all as I have looked after the health of my community and my patients, including generations of the same families.

I like to think that my experience has given me some credibility in knowing what works and what doesn’t work in the health system, especially in primary care.

My overarching concern has always been the patient journey – ensuring that people get the right care at the right time in the right place by the right practitioner.

The priorities for me are always universal access to care, and affordability.

Today, I will share my views on what can be done to make our great health system even better – how to improve the patient journey.

I will also introduce you to some of my patients, and reflect on the barriers in their access to timely care, to further illustrate our concerns.

General practice and primary care reform

On the day I was elected, I made it very clear that one of the hallmarks of my Presidency would be stridently advocating for significant investment in general practice.

This week just happens to be AMA Family Doctor Week – a tribute to hardworking GPs.

see intro for text

However, there is something really crook about how GPs have been treated by successive Governments.

They have paid lip service to the critical role GPs play in our health system, often borne out of ignorance and often in a misguided attempt to control costs.

General practice has been the target of continual funding cuts over many years. These cuts have systematically eaten away at the capacity of general practice to deliver the highest quality care for our patients.

They threaten the viability of many practices.

I talk to my GP members regularly, both metropolitan and rural.

The message is simple – some are at a tipping point and have a very bleak view of the future.

They see general practice becoming increasingly corporatised, burdened with more red tape, and GPs are less able to spend the necessary time with patients.

This is not the future that GPs want to see.

This is not the future that our patients want to see.

We can and must avoid these bleak predictions, but it requires significant real and immediate investment from the Government with a clear pathway to long-term reform.

Let me be very clear about this: we must put general practice front and centre in future health policy development.

We have seen too many mistakes. Too many poor policy decisions.

Despite the Government’s best intentions – and lots of goodwill within the profession – the Health Care Homes trial and implementation failed to win the support of GPs or patients.

Instead of real investment, the Trial largely shifted existing buckets of money around.

It has fallen well short of its practice enrolment targets, and it looks like only a small fraction of the targeted 65,000 patients will sign up.

There is no doubt that the challenge of transforming general practice was severely underestimated by policy makers. At least with this model.

But general practice still needs transformation and rejuvenation to meet growing patient demand and to keep GPs working in general practice.

The AMA has a plan for reform of general practice and primary care.

It is patient-centred and focuses on better access to long-term continuous quality care and managing patients more effectively in the community.

It takes the best elements of the ‘medical home’ concept and adapts them to the Australian context.

It is a plan that will require upfront and meaningful new investment, in anticipation of long-term savings in downstream health costs.

In the short term, the AMA plan for general practice will involve:

  • significant changes to Chronic Disease funding, including a process that strengthens the relationship between a patient and their usual GP, and encourages continuity of care;
  • cutting the bureaucracy that makes it difficult for GPs to refer patients to allied health services;
  • formal recognition in GP funding arrangements of the significant non-face-to-face workload involved in caring for patients with complex and chronic disease;
  • additional funding to support enhanced care coordination for those patients with chronic disease who are at risk of unplanned hospital admission – a similar model to the Coordinated Veterans Care Program funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs;
  • a properly funded Quality Improvement Incentive under the Practice Incentive Program – the PIP;
  • changes to Medicare that improve access to after-hours GP care through a patient’s usual general practice;
  • support for patients with chronic wounds to access best practice wound care through their general practice;
  • better access to GP care for patients in residential aged care; and
  • annual indexation of current block funding streams that have not changed for many years … including those that provide funding to support the employment of nursing and allied health professionals in general practice.

In the longer term, we need to look at moving to a more blended model of funding for general practice.

While retaining our proven fee-for-service model at its core, the new funding model must have an increased emphasis on other funding streams, which are designed to support a high performing primary care system.

This will allow for increasing the capability and improving the infrastructure supporting general practice to allow it to become the real engine room of our health system.

It is about scaling up our GP-led patient-centred multidisciplinary practice teams to better provide the envelope of health care around the patient in their journey through the health system.

A good example is the Blacktown Hospital Diabetes Outpatient Clinic in New South Wales.

This Clinic has a waiting time of less than a week because the service is distributed to its catchment GPs with the appropriate funding and support for both personnel and infrastructure.

This is a small example, but a significant one when you consider the scale and prevalence of diabetes across Australia, let alone the western suburbs of Sydney, and the average access times for outpatient hospital clinics.

We cannot continue to do things the way we always have.

The bulk-billing rate should not be the metric by which we judge the performance of general practice.

Chronic conditions have become more prevalent in Australia. The ones causing most concern are:

  • arthritis;
  • asthma;
  • back pain and problems;
  • cancer;
  • cardiovascular disease;
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease;
  • diabetes; and
  • mental health conditions.

One in two people now report having at least one of these eight common chronic conditions.

These conditions account for around 60 per cent of the total disease burden, and they contribute to nearly 90 per cent of deaths in Australia.

We must reshape our primary care system to meet these challenges.

We must put in place the funding support that general practice needs to better manage patients in the community – and keep people out of hospital.

Our plan is a smarter and more sustainable blueprint … a better plan for general practice. A better plan for Australians.

Public hospitals

We also need a better plan for public hospitals.

In an election year, voters tend to focus very closely on public hospitals when they are comparing health policies.

Public hospitals are a critical part of our health system. They are highly visible. They are greatly loved institutions in the community. They are vote changers.

The doctors, nurses, and other staff who work in our public hospitals are some of the most skilled in the world.

In 2016-17, public hospitals provided more than six and a half million episodes of admitted patient care. They managed 92 per cent of emergency admissions.

If the state of general practice is crook, then our public hospitals are on permanent code yellow.

Despite their importance, and despite our reliance on our hospitals to save lives and improve quality of life, they have been chronically underfunded for too long.

Between 2010-11 and 2015-16, average annual real growth in Federal Government recurrent funding for public hospitals has been virtually stagnant – a mere 2.8 per cent.

The AMA welcomes that, between 2014-15 and 2015-16, the Federal Government boosted its recurrent public hospital expenditure by 8.4 per cent.

But a one-off modest boost from a very low base is not enough.

I deal with the results of stressed public hospitals every day and manage the impact it has on my patients.

Ollie is a patient with well-controlled Parkinson’s disease. He now also has a recently diagnosed lung cancer, which has been caught early, resected, and appropriately managed.

But he has been denied care for his resulting poor control of his Parkinson’s disease in the same hospital’s neurology outpatient department and referred back to me.

I have been advised that I must source an alternative option for his neurological care.

Another of my patients, Carlo, is a victim of the never ending Federal-State buck passing when it comes to health.

Having developed poorly controlled reflux and having been referred to the local hospital outpatient department for a gastro consult, Carlo was referred back to me.

I was advised that I had to arrange a referral at the same hospital’s diagnostic imaging service for a possible coordination and swallowing problem, which ultimately proved correct.

He was then referred back to the gastroenterology department to manage his newly diagnosed oesophageal condition.

Barbara is another very common example of the funding chaos.

She is a very active 68-year-old lady who was troubled by severe osteoarthritis of the knee for many years. She was placed on a waiting list for surgery two years ago.

She has had to attend our practice regularly for pain management and supportive referrals for physiotherapy, while I continued to manage the consequences of her inability to lose weight due to her exercise restrictions and worsening diabetes and blood pressure profile.

She has just finally had her knee joint replaced.

These are the experiences of everyday patients.

They underpin the troubling headlines that came from the AMA’s 2018 Public Hospital Report Card. Our hospitals are stretched to the limit.

Likewise, the AMA’s Safe Hours Audit is a window into the lived experience of dedicated doctors, struggling to deliver quality care in over-crowded, under-funded hospitals.

But instead of helping the hospitals improve safety and quality, governments decided to financially punish hospitals for poor safety events.

There is no evidence to show that financial penalties work.

Health care is complex. Not all patient complications can be avoided.

The 2020-25 hospital funding agreement does little to improve the situation.

Funding levels stay the same, but public hospitals will have to do more with it to help coordinate patient care post-discharge.

The AMA supports better discharge planning and integrated care, especially for patients with complex and chronic disease.

But this will cost money – and public hospitals need extra funding.

The AMA calls on the major parties to boost funding for public hospitals beyond that outlined in the next agreement.

There must be a plan to lift public hospitals out of their current funding crisis, which is putting doctors and patients at risk.

Governments must stop penalising hospitals for adverse patient safety events.

We need policies to fully fund hospitals. We must help them improve patient safety and build their internal capacity to deliver high value care in the medium to long term.

They must link up and work with primary care to deliver better coordinated care.

I note that Labor has pledged an extra $2.8 billion for public hospitals.

I expect that the Coalition will match that as the election draws nearer.

They do not want another Medi-scare style campaign.

Medical care for older Australians

Older Australians are voters, too.

Aged care was, until very recently, one of the highest profile segments of the health system – but for all the wrong reasons.

It is now emerging as an area in need of significant reform as the population ages and lives longer.

Older Australians all too frequently do not have the same access to medical care as other age groups – a longstanding result of inadequate funding in the aged care system.

This inequity will likely only grow as the Australian population ages with more complex, chronic medical conditions requiring more medical attention than ever before.

We have witnessed numerous consultations and reviews.

Enough! Now is the time for action.

There is already sufficient information to underpin the final recommendations. It is simply unfair and unjust to delay this any further.

An increase in funding for GP visits to aged care facilities would result in many savings, including from reduced ambulance transfers to hospital emergency departments.

Changes to after-hours care remuneration must consider services that are currently provided under ‘urgent’ item numbers to patients in aged care facilities.

We also need to ensure that the critical role that nurses play in caring for older Australians is recognised in those facilities.

The AMA wants to see Medicare rebates that adequately cover the time that doctors spend with the patient assessing and diagnosing their condition and providing medical care.

We want new telehealth Medicare items that compensate GPs, and other medical specialists, for the time spent organising and coordinating services for the patient.

This includes the time that they spend with the patient’s family and carers to plan and manage the patient’s care and treatment.

There must be funding for the recruitment and retention of quality, appropriately trained aged care staff.

And we must reverse the decline in the proportion of Registered Nurses in aged care.

The AMA Aged Care Survey, released today, shows that AMA members who work in aged care have identified the shortage of Registered Nurses – who should be available 24 hours a day – as the biggest priority for aged care reform.

The survey also shows that one in three doctors are planning to cut back on, or completely end, their visits to patients in aged care facilities over the next two years.

This is largely because the Medicare rebates are inadequate for the amount of time and work involved.

The AMA will ensure that aged care gets the attention and profile it deserves in the election campaign.

Private health insurance:

Private health insurance has been in the headlines for much of the past year – again, for all the wrong reasons.

The AMA has always called for a simpler and fairer private health insurance system.

Without the private system, the public system would likely collapse.

But we cannot expect the private system to thrive – or even survive – if there is not value in insurance policies.

Patients are smart – they know there is no point outlaying thousands of dollars every year if the coverage isn’t there.

Affordability means very little without value.

We are clearly at a crisis point in private health insurance. And the Government knows it.

Hence the latest Review, and the recent announcement by the Minister of new categories of policies … and greater transparency.

We support the concept of developing Gold, Silver, and Bronze insurance categories.

We can’t expect consumers to understand the many different definitions, the carve outs, and exclusions of some 70,000 policy variations.

Australians want reasonable and simple things from their insurance.

They want coverage.

They want a choice of the practitioner, and a choice of the hospital.

They want treatment when they need it.

We can’t have patients finding out they aren’t covered after the event, or when they require treatment and it’s all too late.

To that end, we have been very clear – we don’t support the use of restrictions in Gold, Silver, and Bronze.

Restrictions lead people to believe they are covered, when in reality they are exposed to additional costs.

We don’t support junk policies. If a Basic policy category doesn’t provide much coverage, that should be made crystal clear.

We don’t support dismantling community rating. This must be protected to maintain equity of access to private health treatment.

When the objective is to support a strong private health sector to take pressure off the public sector, it makes no sense to financially discourage the patients who are most likely to need access to private health.

We support standard clinical definitions. Whatever is involved for coverage for heart conditions should not vary between insurers and policies.

I urge the Government to continue to work with the Colleges to ensure that these definitions are robust.

There is increasing corporatisation of private health and the market power is shifting in favour of private health insurers.

Insurers, whether private or via Medicare, cannot determine the provision of treatment in Australia.

They cannot and must not interfere with the clinical judgement of medical practitioners.

Australians do not support a US-style managed care health system. Neither does the AMA.

One area we are disappointed with in the recent announcements is pregnancy cover.

It does not make sense to us, as clinicians, to have pregnancy cover in a higher level of insurance only.

Many pregnancies are unplanned – meaning people are caught out underinsured when pregnancy is restricted to high-end policies.

Pregnancy is a major reason that the younger population considers taking up private health insurance.

They are less likely to be able to afford the higher-level policies. We need to make sure it is within reach.

I having female reproductive services at a different level to pregnancy coverage is, to us, problematic, and will leave a lot of people caught out.

There will be much more to talk about as the private health reforms are finalised and bedded down.

Mental Health

As a suburban GP who sees the whole range of health ailments and conditions, an area of special interest to me is mental health.

I do not think the unique role and special skills of GPs are used enough at the front line of mental health care.

The AMA earlier this year called for a national, overarching mental health “architecture”, and proper investment in both prevention and treatment of mental illnesses.

Almost one in two Australian adults – that is more than seven million people – will experience a mental health condition in their lifetime.

Almost every Australian will experience the effects of mental illness in a family member, friend, or work colleague.

The statistics are startling. For example:

  • More than half a million children and adolescents, aged four to 17, experienced mental health disorders in 2012-13.
  • Australians living with schizophrenia die 25 years earlier than the general population, mainly due to poor heart health.

And yet mental health and psychiatric care are grossly underfunded.

Strategic leadership is needed to integrate all components of mental health prevention and care.

For mental health consumers and their families, navigating the system and finding the right care at the right time can be difficult and frustrating.

There is no vision of what the mental health system will look like in the future.

Poor access to acute beds for major illness leads to extended delays in emergency departments.

Poor access to community care leads to delayed or failed discharges from hospitals.

And poor funding of community services makes it harder to access and coordinate prevention, support services, and early intervention.

Significant investment is urgently needed to reduce the deficits in care, fragmentation, poor coordination, and access to effective care.

We have repeatedly called for support for carers of people with mental illness, which is often the result of necessity, not choice.

Access to respite care is vital for many people with mental illness and their families, who are the ones who bear the largest burden of care.

Indigenous health

I am very pleased that one of my first announcements as AMA President was the AMA endorsement of the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

The Uluru Statement expresses the aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with regard to self-determination and status in their own country.

The AMA has for many years supported Indigenous recognition in the Australian Constitution.

The Uluru Statement is another significant step in making that recognition a reality.

The AMA is committed to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

It is simply unacceptable that Australia, one of the wealthiest nations in the world, cannot solve a health crisis affecting fewer than three per cent of its citizens.

Prevention

There is not enough time today to cover all the issues I would like to cover in one speech.

I could deliver a whole speech on each of the following topics – medical workforce, rural health, medical research, genetic testing, e-cigarettes and vaping, opioids, medicinal cannabis, scope of practice, asylum seeker health, the NDIS, or palliative care, to name just a few.

I could probably manage a few words about the My Health Record, too. No doubt there will be questions about that.

But I have to talk to you about prevention, if only briefly.

The burden of chronic disease in Australia is significant.

Chronic disease is responsible for around 83 per cent of premature deaths and 66 per cent of the burden of disease.

Chronic disease has a significant impact on the health system, but the reality is that most of these conditions can be prevented.

It simply makes enormous sense to invest in prevention.

Taxes collected from tobacco and alcohol excise generate around $16 billion each year for the Government.

In return, total Government spending on prevention is around $2 billion a year, which equates to about $89 per person.

This amounts to a measly 1.34 per cent of all health spending. This is considerably less than comparable countries such as Canada, the United Kingdom, and New Zealand.

If we are to reduce the impact of chronic disease in Australia, all our governments must invest more in prevention.

Tackling obesity is a priority.

Doctors are well placed to identify and support patients who are overweight or obese. Two thirds of adults are either overweight or obese.

The evidence shows that advice to lose weight given by a doctor increases the motivation to lose weight. It also increases engagement in weight loss behaviours.

But the support and advice from doctors can only achieve so much.

Population level measures are needed. We need to see action on a sugar tax, banning junk food advertising to kids, and improving urban planning to help get people moving and active.

Governments have the tools to implement these measures. A sugar tax would be a good start.

In closing, I know the challenges ahead for the health system.

I will dedicate my Presidency to improving health policy so that we have a system that delivers the best possible care to our patients.

The AMA will be a very strong and loud advocate.

There is nothing like a Federal election to help our political leaders share the public’s interest in good health policy.

The election will happen within twelve months, possibly this year.

Along with the members of the National Press Club, the AMA will be watching the political events of this weekend and the coming months with very close interest.

NACCHO #HealthBudget18 Coverage 3/5 Read and Download the Top 10 Peak Health Organisation Press Release responses to #Budget2018NACCHO

1.NATSIHWA welcomes the 2018 budget announcements of additional funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Health Workforce Professional Bodies

2. IAHA : Allied health undervalued in 2018 Federal Budget

3.AIDA funded to continue our work in improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians

4.1 AMA : SAFE AND STEADY HEALTH BUDGET, BUT BIGGER REFORMS ARE STILL TO COME

5.NRHA :RURAL HEALTH BUDGET $$ WELCOME – BUT NOT ENOUGH

6.AHHA : Health data boost right step on the road to reform

7. PHAA : Budget 2018 – prevention focus goes missing

8.RACGP : Signs Federal Government beginning to recognise vital role of specialist GPs in Australia’s healthcare system

9.CHF Health budget includes welcome consumer focus

10. Vision 2020 Australia welcomes the Australian Government’s investment to target major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Post 1 of our NACCHO Posts on #Budget2018 NACCHO

Post 2 will be the NACCHO Chair Press Release

Post 3 will be Health Peak bodies Press Release summary

Post 4 will be Government Press Releases

Post 5 Opposition responses to Budget 2018 (Monday )

ALL NACCHO BUDGET COVERAGE HERE

1.NATSIHWA welcomes the 2018 budget announcements of additional funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Health Workforce Professional Bodies

“Today’s budget announcement presents an important opportunity for NATSIHWA. It will enable us to progress key strategic priorities, including the development of a National Mentor program to support Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners. This is a very exciting time for our members”

Mr Karl Briscoe, NATSIHWA CEO.

Download full Press Release

1.NATSIHWA BUDGET Media Release 2018

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) welcomes the 2018 Australian Government budget announcement that signal growth in funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce organisations.

These organisations (NATSIHWA, CATSINaM, IAHA and AIDA) work togetherto support the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforces and improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“We thank the Australian government for the continued support of NATSIHWA. This funding will not only enhance the sustainability of our profession, but will also lead to opportunities that promote the recognition and professionalism of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners” said Ms Josslyn Tully, NATSIHWA Chairperson.

In particular, the budget announcement support the progression of NATSIHWA’s strategic plan 2017-2020. Key strategic priorities for NATISHWA over the next 12 months, include the:

  • Development of a National Mentoring Program for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners;
  • Implementation of the National Professional Development Symposium which will bring together over 100 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in Alice Springs in October 2018;
  • Continuation of Regional forums to support professional development and networking of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in regions across Australia;
  • Development of further educational resources to support individuals and services in defending Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners’ Scope of Practice; and,
  • Enhanced influence of national policy and program that improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and health workforce outcomes that support a culturally safe work environment.

“NATSIHWA looks forward to progressing these initiatives with our membership, which includes over 750 full members who are qualified Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners across Australia”, said Ms Josslyn Tully

2. IAHA : Allied health undervalued in 2018 Federal Budget

Improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing must remain a national priority. Action is needed to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Download full Press Release

2. Media-Release_allied-health-undervalued-in-2018-Federal-Budget

Those actions must involve: a coherent strategy to tackle the causes of disadvantage and enable our people to achieve their potential; governments showing the stamina to address issues that come from generations of trauma and disadvantage; and commitment to work with, hear and respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the knowledge they bring to issues that shape their lives.

IAHA now has a commitment of funding for a further four years. We also have a commitment of $1.55M per year in additional funding to share with our fellow Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce peak organisations: AIDA, CATSINAM and NATSIHWA. We have proven our approaches deliver results and build the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

IAHA has a significant advocacy role and interest in several other initiatives announced in the 2018-19 Budget, including measures responding to urgent needs across Australian communities, including:

  • $105M over four years to improve access to aged care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • $30M over four years for ear health assessment in pre-schools
  • $34.3M over four years for eye health and
  • Extra commitment to suicide prevention, additional mental health care.

IAHA CEO Donna Murray said “For initiatives to deliver for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, community must be involved in how those measures are developed and implemented. This applies to new measures and to addressing existing acute allied health shortages in health, disability, aged care and other social services.”

A culturally safe and responsive skilled workforce, is critical in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities. To ensure the workforce has the skills needed to deliver results, strategies and solutions need to be developed and delivered in partnership with IAHA, our members and communities.

“IAHAs success thus far in developing and implementing innovative allied health career pathway programs and supports, providing leadership opportunities and development, mentoring, in partnering and in promoting person-centred, multidisciplinary care needs to be leveraged further. We, therefore, welcome a stronger partnership with Government to enable this success to continue and grow”, said Ms Murray.

IAHA chairperson, Nicole Turner, commented “By leading and facilitating inter-professional approaches that fit with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander notions of health and wellbeing, we’ve supported and enabled rapid growth in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce. But we still represent less than 1 percent of the allied health workforce. Our workforce must continue to grow. Continued funding for IAHA is a vital step in the right direction.”

IAHA welcomes the $550M allocated to the Stronger Rural Health Strategy and the aim of ensuring the right health professionals are available when and where they are needed. However, IAHA remains concerned and disappointed that acute shortages in rural and remote allied health services have been largely ignored, and particularly that there appears to be almost no gain for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities who have little or no access to allied health services at present.

CEO, Donna Murray, added “IAHA will continue to advocate for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan and Implementation Plan to be fully funded. IAHA will continue to seek opportunities to work constructively with Government to achieve this result.”

3.AIDA funded to continue our work in improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians

This week the Australian Government announced the 2018/2019 Budget to the Australian public. The Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) welcomes the news of increased government investment into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak workforce organisations of $33.4 million over four years from 2018-2019.

Download full Press Release

3.AIDA-budget-response_MEDIA-RELEASE-9-May-2018

We take this as a tangible measure of the genuine commitment of the Turnbull Government to work with us to build the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

As the only professional association for both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors and medical students, AIDA is committed to improving the health of our people and enriching the health profession by growing the numbers of Indigenous doctors.

This renewed funding certainty will allow AIDA, through our strong relationships with key stakeholders, to keep supporting efforts to increase the cultural safety of mainstream medical education and health care systems.

This continued financial support from the government means job security for our employees, increased resourcing for emerging issues and the ability to continue to implement our long-term strategic agenda.

This includes:

  •  Development of our 2018 policy priorities
  •  Further investment in Indigenous-led health research
  • The delivery of a cultural safety program for doctors, by Indigenous doctor
  • Ongoing support to our student and doctor member base

Doing things with, not to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

AIDA encourages the Turnbull Government to maintain its stated commitment to work in a consultative and collaborative way with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

We remain concerned that there is no commitment in the 2018/19 Budget to adequately resource the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

AIDA maintains that this is the roadmap for the government to work with us to genuinely redress health disparity and deliver culturally appropriate and needs-based health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

We encourage the government to commit to implementing the social determinants of health framework into future Indigenous health policy development.

AIDA also remains concerned about the lack of targeted funding commitment around Closing the Gap.

We maintain that measureable targets, accountability mechanisms and appropriately funded policy design and program delivery are essential to closing the gap on Indigenous disadvantage.

With this renewed funding certainty, AIDA will continue working towards our vision for an Australian health care system that is free of racism, and one that affords Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples the health care they have a right to expect and receive.

4.1 AMA : SAFE AND STEADY HEALTH BUDGET, BUT BIGGER REFORMS ARE STILL TO COME

VIEW NACCHO TV HERE

The Government has tonight delivered a safe and steady Health Budget, which outlines a broad range of initiatives across the health portfolio – but some of the bigger reforms and the biggest challenges are yet to come.

AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, said the Government has provided some necessary funding to aged care, mental health, rural health, the PBS, and medical research, with many decisions directly responding to AMA policy.

Download full Press Release

4.1 Safe and Steady Health Budget, But Bigger Reforms Are Still to Come

4.2 AMSA Rural

AMSA Rural enthusiastically supports the changes to rural bonding and the opportunities presented by the Junior Doctor Training Program and the National Rural Generalist Pathway.

While the MDMS network may represent an expensive mis-step in addressing rural health workforce shortages, with funds better spent on rural Specialty Training Places, the announcement of better targeting, monitoring and planning for future rural workforce needs is encouraging.

Overall, AMSA Rural welcomes the government’s renewed focus on health equity for rural and regional communities, and looks forward to hearing more details of the Stronger Rural Health Strategy.

Download full Press Release

4.2 AMSA RH MR-  RURAL HEALTH IN FOCUS

5.NRHA :RURAL HEALTH BUDGET $$ WELCOME – BUT NOT ENOUGH

New funding to attract more doctors to country areas has been welcomed by the National Rural Health Alliance, Australia’s peak body for rural and remote health.

“We are pleased tonight’s Federal Budget allocates $550 million over 10 years to help fill the health workforce gaps that exist in so many parts of country Australia,” said Alliance CEO Mark Diamond.

The government says it will deliver 3,000 new specialist GPs, and 3,000 additional nurses over ten years mainly through providing end to end training in country areas.

“It’s not only doctors and nurses that are missing outside major cities. Equally there are not enough allied health professionals. Some areas have no psychologists, no physiotherapists, no occupational therapists,” Mr Diamond said.

A new Workforce Incentive Program will provide some funds to general practices to employ more nurses, doctors and, for the first time, allied health workers.

Download full Press Release

5. National Rural Health Alliance

6.AHHA Health data boost right step on the road to reform

‘The lack of any concrete action on preventive health is concerning—it has been allowed to slip down health budget priorities, despite its proven benefits in preventing big health bills later. This particularly applies to dental health, which once again has been overlooked.

‘In terms of Closing the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, we note some modest investments, including the commitment of $5 million per year for the next 3 years to address trachoma in Aboriginal communities’, Ms Verhoeven said.

‘It is disappointing that the government didn’t take the opportunity to address one of our pre-Budget recommendations to make the administrative changes to ensure patients discharged from hospital have access to Closing the Gap prescriptions.

This would have been a practical and relatively inexpensive measure to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.’

7.1 PHAA : Budget 2018 – prevention focus goes missing

Tonight’s national Budget continues to fund the health care systems, but is woefully short on preventative health measures to keep Australians from becoming sick in the first place, according to Public Health Association Australia (PHAA) Chief Executive Michael Moore AM.

“Despite repeated advice – and repeated commitments in principle – the Government is still not developing a preventative health focus for our health system,” said Mr Moore.

“It’s true there are a few modest measures tonight – including additional vaccinations funded, very welcome measures to promote mental wellbeing, and the Good Sports Program to reduce alcohol consumption in sporting contexts.”

“But Australia’s people will continue to experience avoidable chronic disease in the years ahead. People who should be destined to live healthy lives will not because of the preventable diseases they will suffer. While we need to look after the aged populations and those requiring medical treatment, we need to focus even more heavily on the younger generation we are failing,” Mr Moore said.

“The inevitable cost to Budgets far into the future will be greater than the investments that might have been funded.”

“What is also noticeable is that there are no preventive measures in this budget which impact negatively on industry.”

“Just last week we saw Australia’s first ever dedicated conference of preventative health professionals, with 300 expert Australians gathering in Sydney to debate the way forward to a more preventive approach to health and wellbeing.

“Yet tonight, preventive health has again been relegated to a low priority.”

“Future Health Ministers and Treasurers will rue the mistakes of this generation, including tonight’s Budget, in failing to invest in preventive health.”

Mr Moore also acknowledged Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt for securing a number of important initiatives in Indigenous health, Australia’s most agonizing continuing health crisis.

The Public Health Association welcomed a number of specific initiatives in tonight’s Budget:

  • Improving physical activity with a $50.4m investment to get people moving and expanding other physical activity.
  • Funding to expanding four forms of vaccinations, including Pertussis, and a targeted program to address low vaccination rate areas.
  • A National Injury Prevention Strategy for children and older people, including a program to prevent water and snow sport injuries
  • Additional funding for suicide prevention

Download 2 full Press Release

7.1 PHAA Prevention

7. 2 PHAA

NACCHO would also wish Michael a healthy future

8.RACGP Signs Federal Government beginning to recognise vital role of specialist GPs in Australia’s healthcare system

 

The Federal Government’s commitment to fund training for general practice is a sign political leaders are finally beginning to understand the vital role of specialist GPs in Australia’s healthcare system.

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) President Dr Bastian Seidel commended the government for investing to fund a world class, contemporary postgraduate training program for medical graduates through Australian medical colleges and in particular through the RACGP.

“We are cautiously optimistic that the penny has finally dropped,” Dr Seidel said.

“A commitment to unconditionally fund postgraduate GP training will ensure that all Australians have access to a doctor with specialist qualifications in general practice, and this has not always been the case.

Additionally, the commitment to support 3,000 international medical graduates (IMGs) to attain Fellowship as a specialist general practitioner is welcomed.

“Far too often, doctors without any postgraduate qualifications were placed in so called ‘areas of need’ and ‘district workforce shortages’.

“They were asked to work there with little or no professional support or continuous professional training.

“The funding made available in this year’s Federal Budget will finally start to rectify this shortcoming.”

Dr Seidel said while Australian GPs would be pleased with the Federal Government’s commitment to improving general practice training, there were still significant issues that needed to be addressed before the next Federal election. The indexation of general practice consultation item numbers, whilst welcome, does not go far enough.

Dr Seidel said he would like to see the Federal Government show its commitment to general practice by increasing the Medicare rebate for GP attendances by 18.5% to bring specialist GPs into line with other medical specialist attendance items.

“We must see coherent and cohesive funding for general practice that reflects the expertise of all specialist GPs.

“Appropriate investment in general practice has been proven, repeatedly, to be the most cost-effective way to deliver effective healthcare to the Australian population, particularly as the numbers of patients with chronic conditions continue to increase.

“Patients want to spend more time with their GP, and the evidence shows that time with your GP is good for patients,” Dr Seidel said.

“The Federal Government can really make a difference to the quality of care GPs are able to provide Australians by increasing this rebate before the Federal election and as a matter of urgency

 

9.CHF Health budget includes welcome consumer focus

The #digitalhealth slides from @CHFofAustralia #HealthBudget18 response. Note : Funding for things where digital health is a big part. Especially interesting is the work happening with Healthy Active Beginnings.Thx @deanhewson ‬

All 23 slides here:

Record funding for hospitals from 2020 and a $5 billion rise for aged care are contained in a Federal Budget which also provides for more consumer-focused approaches to care and research.

Download full Press Release

9. CHF Federal Health Budget

10. Vision 2020 Australia welcomes the Australian Government’s investment to target major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Vision 2020 Australia welcomes the Australian Government’s investment to target major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Download full press release

10. Vision Australia welcomes Eye Health Funding

The Government’s 2018-19 budget allocated $34.3 million to the eye health issues that disproportionately impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Vision 2020 Australia CEO Carla Northam said “Our members consistently tell us that the three major causes of vision loss for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are eye problems associated with diabetic retinopathy, uncorrected refractive error and the length of time people wait for cataract surgery.

“With the right amount of funding, we can address these debilitating eye conditions.”

Dr Dawn Casey, Acting CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) welcomed the focus on providing eye health checks, especially for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have diabetes. “We need to do all we can to make sure all Aboriginal people with diabetes have an annual eye test. At the moment, only around half are getting their eyes checked every year.”

Professor Hugh Taylor from Indigenous Eye Health, the University of Melbourne identified access to cataract surgery as needing serious attention. He said “Vision loss from cataract is twice as common in Indigenous Australians and they have to wait almost twice as long for surgery.”

Professor Taylor added “Eye care services at the local and regional levels must be planned and resourced to meet population-based needs.”

While the details on how the Government will spend the $34.3 million are unclear, Vision 2020 Australia believes that activity must focus on cutting cataract surgery wait times, making sure everyone with diabetes has an annual eye test and getting glasses to people who need them. Through these measures the Government will meet its commitment to address the major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health 50 + #JobAlerts and @senbmckenzie #Scholarship opportunities #Rural Health @RoyalFlyingDoc #Features @Apunipima @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @IUIH_ @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

For scholarships see Part 2 below after job listings

Jobs of the week 

Job opportunities at NACCHO – Canberra

Senior Project Officer Closing 10 May

Senior Grants Officer Closing 10 May

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled health organisation (NACCHO) is the national peak body representing Aboriginal health through its membership of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS). ACCHSs are the leading and preferred provider of culturally safe and comprehensive multidisciplinary primary health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities.

NACCHO represents its Membership of over 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services at the Commonwealth government level, advocating to government for evidence-supported, community-developed responses and solutions to the deep-seated social, economic and political conditions that prevail in many Aboriginal communities

The Senior Policy Officer is one of a team of policy officers and has responsibility for the development and implementation of the NACCHO’s policy papers.

The NACCHO’s Senior Policy Officer role is broad and covers a range of duties and activities across the policy lifecycle. The Senior Policy Officer provides timely, accurate and persuasive advice, underpinned by analysis, contextual awareness and stakeholder consultation. The NACCHO undertakes policy work in a range of different environments.

Officers in this role provide advice on highly complex and sensitive policy matters that contribute to the NACCHO’s and stakeholder’s strategic policy direction.

More info apply HERE

NACCHO is seeking a qualified Senior Grants Manager.

The Senior Grants Manager is responsible for overseeing the orderly administration of NACCHO’s grants management program and executing the National Network Funding Agreements. This will include developing implementation plans, tracking and reporting on deliverables, assessing application budget reviews and any other work assignments in accordance with established fiscal year work flow and job priorities.

Working collaboratively as part of the wider team, this role will develop systems and tools for efficient grant management and reporting; and ensure a coordinated approach to risk-management in cooperation with the Finance Team.

More info Apply HERE

There are 6 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

  • Medicare Coordinator
  • Primary Health Care Manager – Napranum
  • Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner – Napranum
  • Patient Safety Coordinator
  • Program Advisor Nutrition Strategy
  • Health Worker – Tackling Indigenous Smoking – Mapoon 
The link to  job vacancies on website is

 

There are 3 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

 + Podiatrist (Ongoing Full Time Position based at Windsor) + Care Coordinator CCSS (Ongoing, Full Time position located in Caboolture) MATSICHS + Family Partnership Worker – ANFPP South (Ongoing, Full Time Position)

 There are 13 JOBS at ATSICHS Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 30 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

There are 6 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

 

There are 3 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

Clinical Services Coordinator

Job No: 97950
Location: Adelaide, SA
Closing Date: 9 May 2018
  • Dynamic leadership opportunity for a Registered Nurse (RN3) or Aboriginal Health Practitioner (HS L6) to drive improved health outcomes for Aboriginal people
  • Predominant and well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia
  • Attractive remuneration with salary sacrificing options

About the Organisation 

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia, providing a range of health care and community support services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and advance their social, cultural and economic status.

More info Apply HERE

The MJD Foundation is seeking Expressions of Interest to fill the important role of Chairperson for the organisation.
The current Chairperson Neil Westbury PSM has informed the Board that he wishes to stand aside after 7 years in the position.
Neil’s succession plan has been openly discussed with Board members and Senior Management and the plan is for him to step down as Chair once a suitable replacement is found.
As a volunteer Chairperson, you will have the skills and experience to drive the Strategic direction of the organisation and will be required to work in close partnership with its CEO. You will have Board experience as well as a strong track record of successfully working with Aboriginal people and be familiar with issues and challenges facing remote communities.
The MJDF enjoys a cohesive and multi-skilled Board that is supported by Finance,  Research and Risk Management Sub-committees that provide expert advice and support to the Board. The organisation also has a highly professional and dedicated staff team with an impressive track record in supporting our clients.
Attached is a Position Description outlining the role and the skills we are seeking.
Please send your Expression of Interest, addressing the selection criteria to Board member Janice Oake (janiceoake@icloud.com) by 31st May 2018.
The preferred candidate may be invited to meet with the Board as a guest at Board meetings before a final decision is made.
Download Position details HERE

More Info apply :

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

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1.Scholarships to improve regional health services

Health professionals in rural and regional Australia wanting to increase their skills are being encouraged to apply for financial support under the Australian Government’s Health Workforce Scholarship Program.

Officially launching the program today, Minister for Rural Health, Bridget McKenzie, said the Government was investing $11 million in the scholarships over three years from 2017-18 to help make health services more accessible for people living in country areas.

“The Health Workforce Scholarship Program provides support based on the needs of communities — whether for GPs, nurses, dentists or allied health professionals,” Minister McKenzie said.

“The program is delivering better outcomes for patients in rural and regional communities across Australia by supporting health practitioners to build up their professional skills.

“Support may be provided to health professionals already working in areas experiencing a shortage of services, or to those willing to move to areas where there is a lack of services.

“Importantly, most of the scholarships in the forthcoming round will include a ‘return of service’ obligation to ensure the recipients practise in rural and regional Australia for at least 12 months on completion of their studies.”

Geraldton resident and Indigenous Community Business Development Officer, Lenny Papertalk, is one health professional who has made the decision to apply for a scholarship.

“I will be applying for a scholarship to pursue a Masters of Social Work at University of Western Australia after having identified a high number of youth suffering from depression and mental illness within the Indigenous communities in Geraldton,” she said.

“I’m very committed to making a difference in rural health, so am hopeful of gaining this scholarship in order to improve health outcomes in my community.”

Tim Shackleton, CEO of Rural Health West in Western Australia, said the scholarship program would ultimately help to expand the range of health services available for people living in rural and remote communities in WA.

“The Health Workforce Scholarship Program will provide grants to postgraduate rural health professionals undertaking further study in the field of medicine, nursing or allied health,” he said.

“One-off bursary and support payments are available to help cover the cost of attending training and these payments can be put towards course fees, conference registrations, and accommodation and transports costs.”

The Health Workforce Scholarship Program is administered by a consortium of Rural Workforce Agencies (RWAs) led by Health Workforce Queensland. RWAs are located in all states and the Northern Territory, and all RWAs are included in the consortium.

The RWAs work closely with Primary Health Networks, local and state governments and other workforce planning groups to determine what skills are needed and where.

Further information about the Health Workforce Scholarship Program, including how to apply for a scholarship can be found on each of the Rural Workforce Agencies websites.

State Rural Workforce Agency Website Address
QLD Health Workforce Queensland https://www.healthworkforce.com.au/
NSW Rural Doctors Network https://www.nswrdn.com.au/site/index.cfm
VIC Rural Workforce Agency Victoria https://www.rwav.com.au/
TAS HR Plus https://www.hrplustas.com.au/
SA Rural Doctors Workforce Agency https://www.ruraldoc.com.au/
WA Rural Health West http://www.ruralhealthwest.com.au/
NT Northern Territory Primary Health Network https://www.ntphn.org.au/health-professionals

 

Applications are now open to lead the Indigenous Girls’ STEM Academy!

An exciting opportunity to invest in a generation of . Apps close 4 May.

More info

Applications are open for Round 1 of the IAHA RFDS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Scholarship, which aims to support Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander allied health students to undertake a remote/rural clinical placement.

Apply here –

Applications for Milparanga – developing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leadership.

Milparanga is a leadership development program and was formerly known as the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leaders Program (NATSILP).

It is an 11-day, two session program, with the first session taking place in a regional location and the second session taking place in Canberra. Milparanga is for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who are 21 years or older.

There are full scholarships available (Australian Government), as well as placements for those who obtain their own funding.

The cost of Milparanga is $12,500 plus GST. This includes all accommodation, meals, on course travel, and equipment. Participants may be responsible for a small component of their travel to and from major transport services.

The participant contribution is $200 plus GST towards program costs and for lifetime membership of the Network of Fellows of the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation. They may also be responsible for a small component of their travel to and from major transport services.

Below are links to the website and social media posts, to share through your networks:

 

Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Queensland can now apply to participate in this year’s Queensland Indigenous Youth Leadership Program (QIYLP).

Deputy Premier, Treasurer and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Jackie Trad urged eligible people to apply and reap the benefits of QIYLP.

“This program is extremely beneficial to some of our youngest generations as it allows participants to develop their skills and gain valuable leadership experience,” Ms Trad said.

“QIYLP nourishes the ideas of young and emerging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders – allowing them to grow and create positive change in their communities.”

Minister for Child Safety, Youth and Women Di Farmer said the Queensland Indigenous Youth Leadership Program was a wonderful opportunity for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to develop leadership skills and learn about influencing change.

“The program brings together 40 participants from across the state to participate in a six-day residential program where not only will they develop leadership skills but they will also learn about the democratic processes in Queensland,” Ms Farmer said.

“The program is one of the country’s most prestigious and effective Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young leadership

programs.

“The young participants will undertake a range of experiences in QIYLP including leadership and professional development workshops, mentoring and networking opportunities and attend parliament workshops.”

“Many of these young people could be Indigenous or community leaders of the future and it is a great chance for them to have this type of experience under their belts as they embark into leadership roles,” Ms Farmer said.

“Applications are now open for those aged 18 to 25 years, for the six-day residential program that will take place in Brisbane from 30 June 2018 to 5 July 2018.

“There has already been more than 450 young people participate in QIYLP since its original inception in 2004 as a three day program, and what is even more pleasing is to see some returning as mentors and co-facilitators at this year’s program.

“I’d urge any young Aboriginal and Torres Strait young person to consider applying for the QIYLP.”

QIYLP is co-delivered by the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women and the Queensland Parliamentary Service, and supported through a partnership with mining company Glencore.

Applications are open now and will close on 4 May 2018.

For more information visit

http://www.qld.gov.au/atsi ( http://www.qld.gov.au/atsi )

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce Training News : @amsed24_7 New Module! #Privacy of Personal Health Information for Non-Clinical ACCHO Staff. Privacy of personal health information is one of the essential training elements for everyone working in healthcare

 ” Privacy is an important element in the trust between health service providers and patients.

It is every person’s right to be able to share personal health information and to have the information provided kept private. It is a serious breach of trust when this right is not respected.

Every employee of an Aboriginal health service will come across personal health information of patients at some time – it may be by accident, or as part of your role.

It may be because someone tells you something they shouldn’t and it may be because you have taken a phone message to pass on to a clinician.

Regardless, you need to know what your responsibility is and how you work with the rest of your colleagues to respect the right of every single Patient of your Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS).”

From AMSED 24/7 A world of eLearning 51 Modules at your fingertips

Read over 130 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce articles published over past 6 years and SUBSCRIBE here

Privacy of Personal Health Information for Non-Clinical Staff

View here with Free Trial Offer

This module is aimed at everyone working in an AMS who provides support other than direct clinical care.

It is for drivers, receptionists, environmental health workers, cleaners, finance officers, and IT support officers. Depending on the program, it may be appropriate for some program workers.

For all those providing direct clinical care and managers of clinical care workers, there is another module called ‘Privacy of Personal Health Information for Client Care Staff’.

At the end of this module participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the duty to keep personal health information confidential.
  2. Describe the principle that applies to disclosing personal health information.
  3. Identify examples of how breaches may occur.
  4. Identify simple ways to avoid breaches of privacy

At the recent WA Aboriginal Community Health Sector State Conference 2018

NACCHO Media Alerts : Top 10 Current Aboriginal Health News Stories to keep you up to date

1. Aboriginal sexual health: The Australian : Was the syphilis epidemic preventable ? NACCHO responds

2.Royal Flying Doctors Service extra 4-year funding $84 million Mental Health and Dental Services

3.Nurses PAQ continues political membership campaign spreading false and misleading information about our cultural safety

4.AMSANT has called for re-doubled efforts to implement the recommendations of the Royal Commission into the care and protection of children in partnership with NT Aboriginal leaders

5.Dialysis facilities worth $17 million are sitting padlocked, empty and unused in WA’s north

6.ALRC Report into Incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

7. Minister Ken Wyatt : Listening to Indigenous Needs: Healthy Ears Program Extended with $29.4 commitment

8.Tangentyere Alice Springs Women’s Family Safety Group visits Canberra

9.Minister Ken Wyatt launches our NACCHO RACGP National Guide to a preventative health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

10. Your guide to a healthy Easter : #Eggs-actly  

 

1.Aboriginal sexual health: The Australian : Was the syphilis epidemic preventable ? NACCHO responds

“These (STIs) are preventable diseases and we need increased testing, treatment plans and a ­culturally appropriate health ­education campaign that focuses resources on promoting safe-sex messages delivered to at-risk ­communities by our trained Aboriginal workforce,”

Pat Turner, chief executive of peak body the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, is adamant about this.

Read full article in Easter Monday The Australian or Part B below

2.Royal Flying Doctors Service extra 4-year funding $84 million Mental Health and Dental Services

Read full press release here

 

3.Nurses PAQ continues political membership campaign spreading false and misleading information about cultural safety

SEE NACCHO Response

SEE an Indigenous Patients Response

See Nurses PAQ Misleading and false campaign

4. AMSANT  has called for re-doubled efforts to implement the recommendations of the Royal Commission into the care and protection of children in partnership with NT Aboriginal leaders

Read full AMSANT press Release

Listen to interview with Donna Ah Chee

Press Release @NACCHOChair calls on the Federal Government to work with us to keep our children safe

#WeHaveTheSolutions Plus comments from CEO’s @Anyinginyi @DanilaDilba

4.Dialysis facilities worth $17 million are sitting padlocked, empty and unused in WA’s north

Read full Story HERE

6.ALRC Report into Incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People;

Read Download Full Transcript

Senator Patrick Dodson

Download the report from HERE

Community Groups Call For Action on Indigenous Incarceration Rates

7. Minister Ken Wyatt : Listening to Indigenous Needs: Healthy Ears Program Extended with $29.4 commitment

The Australian Government has committed $29.4 million to extend the Healthy Ears – Better Hearing, Better Listening Program, to help ensure tens of thousands more Indigenous children and young adults grow up with good hearing and the opportunities it brings.

Read Press Release HEAR

8.Tangentyere Alice Springs Women’s Family Safety Group visits Canberra

This week the Tangentyere Women’s Family Safety Group from Alice Springs were in Canberra. They shared with politicians, their own solutions for their own communities, and they are making an enormous difference.
Big thanks to all the Tangentyere women who made it to Canberra.

Read Download the Press Release

TANGENTYERE WOMEN’S FAMILY SAFETY GROUP (FED

9. Minister Ken Wyatt launches our NACCHO RACGP National Guide to a preventative health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Read press releases and link to Download the National Guide

10. Your guide to a  healthy Easter : #Eggs-actly  

And finally hope you had a Happy Easter all you mob ! After you have enjoyed your chocolate eggs and hot cross buns , this is how much exercise you will require to work of those Easter treats .

For medical and nutrition advice please check with your ACCHO Doctor , Health Promotion / Lifestyle teams or one of our ACCHO nutritionists

 

Part B Full Text The Australian Article Easter Monday

There is no reason it should have happened, especially not in a first-world country like Australia, but it has: indigenous communities in the country’s north are in the grip of wholly treatable sexually transmitted diseases.

In the case of syphilis, it is an epidemic — West Australian Labor senator Patrick Dodson ­described it as such, in a fury, when health department bureaucrats mumbled during Senate estimates about having held a few “meetings” on the matter.

There have been about 2000 syphilis notifications — with at least 13 congenital cases, six of them fatal — since the outbreak began in northern Queensland in 2011, before spreading to the Northern Territory, Western Australia and, finally, South Australia.

What’s worse, it could have been stopped. James Ward, of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, wrote in mid-2011 that there had been a “downward trend” over several years and it was likely at that point that the “elimination of syphilis is achievable within indigenous ­remote communities”.

But governments were slow to react, and Ward is now assisting in the design of an $8.8 million emergency “surge” treatment approach on the cusp of being rolled out in Cairns and Darwin, with sites in the two remaining affected states yet to be identified.

It will be an aggressive strategy — under previous guidelines, you had to have been identified during a health check as an active carrier of syphilis to be treated. Now, anyone who registers antibodies for the pathogen during a blood prick test, whether actively carrying syphilis or not, will receive an ­immediate penicillin injection in an attempt to halt the infection’s geographical spread.

This is key: the high mobility of indigenous people in northern and central Australia means pathogens cross jurisdictions with ­impunity. Australian Medical ­Association president Michael Gannon calls syphilis a “clever bacterium that will never go away”, warning that “bugs don’t respect state borders”.

Olga Havnen, one of the Northern Territory’s most respected public health experts, points out that many people “will have connections and relations from the Torres Strait through to the Kimberley and on to Broome — and it’s only a matter of seven or eight kilometres between PNG and the northernmost islands there in the Torres Strait”.

“This is probably something that’s not really understood by the broader Australian community,” Havnen says. “I suspect once you get a major outbreak of something like encephalitis or Dengue fever, any of those mosquito-borne diseases, and that starts to encroach onto the mainland, then people will start to get a bit worried.”

Olga Havnen, CEO of the Danila Dilba Health Service, says transmission is complex issue in Australia’s indigenous communities.
Olga Havnen, CEO of the Danila Dilba Health Service, says transmission is complex issue in Australia’s indigenous communities.

But it is not just syphilis — ­indeed, not even just STIs — that have infectious disease authorities concerned and the network of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations stretched.

Chlamydia, the nation’s most frequently diagnosed STI in 2016 based on figures from the Kirby Institute at the University of NSW, is three times more likely to be contracted by an indigenous Australian than a non-­indigenous one.

The rate was highest in the NT, at 1689.1 notifications per 100,000 indigenous people, compared with 607.9 per 100,000 non-indigenous Territorians. If you’re indigenous, you’re seven times more likely to contract gonorrhoea, spiking to 15 times more likely if only women are considered. Syphilis, five times more likely.

As the syphilis response gets under way, health services such as the one Havnen leads, the Darwin-based Danila Dilba, will be given extra resources to tackle it. “With proper resourcing, if you want to be doing outreach with those people who might be visitors to town living in the long grass, then we’re probably best placed to be able to do that,” she says.

But the extra focus comes with a warning. A spate of alleged sexual assaults on Aboriginal children, beginning with a two-year-old in Tennant Creek last month and followed by three more alleged ­attacks, has raised speculation of a link between high STI rates and evidence of child sexual assault.

After the first case, former NT children’s commissioner Howard Bath told this newspaper that STI rates were “a better indicator of background levels of abuse than reporting because so many of those cases don’t get reported to anyone, whereas kids with serious infections do tend to go to a ­doctor”. Others, including Alice Springs town councillor Jacinta Price and Aboriginal businessman Warren Mundine, raised the ­spectre of the need for removing more at-risk indigenous children from dangerous environments.

Children play AFL in Yeundumu. Picture: Jason Edwards
Children play AFL in Yeundumu. Picture: Jason Edwards

However, Sarah Giles, Danila Dilba’s clinical director and a medical practitioner of 20 years’ standing in northern Australia, warns this kind of response only exacerbates the problem. She is one of a range of public health authorities who, like Havnen, say connecting high STI figures to the very real scourge of child sex abuse simply makes no sense. They do not carry correlated data sets, the experts say.

“One of the things that’s really unhelpful about trying to manage STIs at a population level is to link it with child abuse and mandatory reporting, and for people to be fearful of STIs,” Giles says. “The problem is that when they’re conflated and when communities feel that they can’t get help ­because things might be misinterpreted or things might be reported, they’re less likely to present with symptoms. The majority of STIs are in adults and they’re sexually transmitted.”

Havnen says there is evidence of STIs being transmitted non-sexually, including to children, such as through poor hand ­hygiene, although Giles says that is “reasonably rare”. And while NT data shows five children under 12 contracted either chlamydia or gonorrhoea in 2016 (none had syphilis), and there were another five under 12 last year, Havnen points to the fact that over the past decade there has been no increasing trend in under 12s being affected. Where there has been a rise in the NT is in people aged between 13 and 19, with annual gonorrhoea notifications increasing from 64 cases in the 14-15-year-old ­female cohort in 2006 to 94 notifications in 2016.

In the 16-17-year-old female ­cohort the same figures were 96 and 141 and in the 12-13-year-old group it rose from 20 in 2006 to 33 in 2016. Overall, for both boys and girls under 16, annual gonorrhoea notifications rose from 109 in 2006 to 186 in 2016, according to figures provided to the royal ­commission into child detention by NT Health. Havnen describes the rise as “concerning but not, on its own, evidence of increasing ­levels of sexual abuse”.

Ward is more direct. Not all STIs are the result of sexual abuse, he warns, and not all sexual abuse results in an STI. If you’re a health professional trying to deal with an epidemiological wildfire, the distinction matters — the data and its correct interpretations can literally be a matter of life and death.

Indeed, in its own written cav­eats to the material it provided to the royal commission, the department warns that sexual health data is “very much subject to variations in testing” and warns against making “misleading assumptions about trends”. Ward says: “Most STIs notified in remote indigenous communities are ­assumed to be the result of sex ­between consenting adults — that is, 16 to 30-year-olds. Of the under 16s, the majority are 14 and 15-year-olds.” He says a historically high background prevalence of STIs in remote indigenous communities — along with a range of other ­infectious diseases long eradicated elsewhere — is to blame for their ongoing presence. Poor education, health services and hygiene contribute, and where drug and ­alcohol problems exist, sexually risky behaviour is more likely too. The lingering impact of colonisation and arrival of diseases then still common in broader ­society cannot be underestimated.

But Ward claims that an apparently high territory police figure of about 700 cases of “suspected child sexual offences” in the NT over the past five years may be misleading. He says a large number of these are likely to be the result of mandatory reporting, where someone under 16 is known to have a partner with an age gap of more than two years, or someone under 14 is known to be engaging in sexual activity. Ward points out that 15 is the nationwide ­median sexual debut age, an age he suggests is dropping. At any rate, he argues, child sex abuse is unlikely to be the main reason for that high rate of mandatory ­reporting in the NT.

Areyonga is a small Aboriginal community a few hours drive from Alice Springs.
Areyonga is a small Aboriginal community a few hours drive from Alice Springs.

Data matters, and so does how it is used. Chipping away at the perception of child sexual abuse in indigenous communities are the latest figures from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare showing the rate of removals for that crime is actually higher in non-indigenous Australia.

According to a report this month from the AIHW, removals based on substantiated sex abuse cases in 2016-17 were starkly different for each cohort: 8.3 per cent for indigenous children, from a total of 13,749 removals, and 13.4 per cent for non-indigenous children, from 34,915 removals.

Havnen concedes there is a need for better reporting of child abuse and has called for a confidential helpline that would be free of charge and staffed around the clock by health professionals.

It’s based on a model already in use in Europe that she says deals with millions of calls a year — but it would require a comprehensive education and publicity campaign if it were to gain traction in remote Australia. And that means starting with the adults.

“If you’re going to do sex ­education in schools and you start to move into the area about sexual abuse and violence and so on, it’s really important that adults are ­educated first about what to do with that information,” she says. “Because too often if you just ­educate kids, and they come home and make a disclosure, they end up being told they’re liars.”

These challenges exist against the backdrop of a community already beset by a range of infectious diseases barely present elsewhere in the country, including the STIs that should be so easily treatable. It is, as Havnen is the first to admit, a complex matter.

Cheryl Jones, president of the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, says the answer is better primary treatment solutions and education, rather than trying to solve the problem after it has ­occurred. “For any of these public health infectious disease problems in ­remote and rural areas, we need to support basic infrastructure at the point of care and work alongside communities to come up with ­solutions,” she says.

Sisters play in the mud after a rare rain at Hoppy's 'town camp' on the outskirts of Alice Springs.
Sisters play in the mud after a rare rain at Hoppy’s ‘town camp’ on the outskirts of Alice Springs.

Pat Turner, chief executive of peak body the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, is adamant about this. “These (STIs) are preventable diseases and we need increased testing, treatment plans and a ­culturally appropriate health ­education campaign that focuses resources on promoting safe-sex messages delivered to at-risk ­communities by our trained Aboriginal workforce,” Turner says.

The Australian Medical ­Association has called for the formation of a national Centre for Disease Control, focusing on global surveillance and most likely based in the north, as being “urgently needed to provide national leadership and to co-ordinate rapid and effective public health responses to manage communicable diseases and outbreaks”.

“The current approach to disease threats, and control of infectious diseases, relies on disjointed state and commonwealth formal structures, informal networks, collaborations, and the goodwill of public health and infectious disease physicians,” the association warned in a submission to the Turnbull government last year.

However, the federal health ­department has rebuffed the CDC argument, telling the association that “our current arrangements are effective” and warning the suggestion could introduce “considerable overlap and duplication with existing functions”.

“I think it (the CDC) might have some merit, if it helps to ­advocate with government about what needs to happen,” Havnen says, “but if these things are going to be targeted at Aboriginal bodies, it needs to be a genuine partnership. It’s got to be informed by the realities on the ground and what we know. That information has to be fed up into the planning process.”

Minister @KenWyattMP launches NACCHO @RACGP National guide for healthcare professionals to improve health of #Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients

 

All of our 6000 staff in 145 member services in 305 health settings across Australia will have access to this new and update edition of the National Guide. It’s a comprehensive edition for our clinicians and support staff that updates them all with current medical practice.

“NACCHO is committed to quality healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, and will work with all levels of government to ensure accessibility for all.”

NACCHO Chair John Singer said the updated National Guide would help governments improve health policy and lead initiatives that support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can Download the Guide via this LINK

A/Prof Peter O’Mara, NACCHO Chair John Singer Minister Ken Wyatt & RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel launch the National guide at Parliament house this morning

“Prevention is always better than cure. Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

Minister Ken Wyatt highlights what is new to the 3rd Edition of the National Guide-including FASD, lung cancer, young people lifecycle, family abuse & violence and supporting families to optimise child safety & wellbeing : Pic Lisa Whop SEE Full Press Release Part 2 Below

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) have joined forces to produce a guide that aims to improve the level of healthcare currently being delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and close the gap.

Chair of RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Associate Professor Peter O’Mara said the third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (the National Guide) is an important resource for all health professionals to deliver best practice healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

“The National Guide will support all healthcare providers, not just GPs, across Australia to improve prevention and early detection of disease and illness,” A/Prof O’Mara said.

“The prevention and early detection of disease and illness can improve people’s lives and increase their lifespans.

“The National Guide will support healthcare providers to feel more confident that they are looking for health issues in the right way.”

RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel said the RACGP is committed to tackling the health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

“The National Guide plays a vital role in closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health disparity,” Dr Seidel said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should have equal access to quality healthcare across Australia and the National guide is an essential part of ensuring these services are provided.

“GPs and other healthcare providers who implement the recommendations within the National Guide will play an integral role in reducing health disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, and ensuring culturally responsive and appropriate healthcare is always available.”

The updated third edition of the National Guide can be found on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website.

 

Free to download on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website:

http://www.racgp.org.au/national-guide/

and NACCHO

Part 2 Prevention and Early Diagnosis Focus for a Healthier Future

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians.

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, today launched the updated third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Prevention is always better than cure,” said Minister Wyatt. “Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

“The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.

“It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

The guide, which was first published in 2005, is a joint project between the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners RACGP).

“To give you some idea of the high regard in which it is held, the last edition was downloaded 645,000 times since its release in 2012,” said Minister Wyatt.

“The latest edition highlights the importance of individual, patient-centred care and has been developed to reflect local and regional needs.

“Integrating resources like the national guide across the whole health system plays a pivotal role in helping us meet our Closing the Gap targets.

“The Turnbull Government is committed to accelerating positive change and is investing in targeted activities that have delivered significant reductions in the burden of disease.

“Rates of heart disease, smoking and binge drinking are down. We are on track to achieve the child mortality target for 2018 and deaths associated with kidney and respiratory diseases have also reduced.”

The National Guide is funded under the Indigenous Australian’s Health Programme as part of a record $3.6 billion investment across four financial years.

The RACGP received $429,000 to review, update, publish and distribute the third edition, in hard copy and electronic formats.

The National Guide is available on the RACGP website or by contacting RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health on 1800 000 251 or aboriginalhealth@racgp.org.au.