NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosingTheGap #NAIDOC2019 : @AIHW Key results report 2017-18 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations:

Findings from this report:

  • Just under half (45%) of organisations provide services in Remote or Very remote areas

  • In 2017–18, around 483,000 clients received 3.6 million episodes of care

  • Nearly 8,000 full-time equivalent staff are employed in these organisations and 4,695 (59%) are health staff

  • Organisations reported 445 vacant positions in June 2018 with health vacancies representing 366 (82%) of these
  • In 2017–18, nearly 200 organisations provided a range of primary health services to around 483,000 clients, 81% of whom were Indigenous.
  • Around 3.6 million episodes of care were provided, nearly 3.1 million of these (85%) by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

See AIHW detailed Interactive site locations map HERE

In 2017–18, Indigenous primary health services were delivered from 383 sites (Table 3). Most sites provided clinical services such as the diagnosis and treatment of chronic illnesses (88%), mental health and counselling services (88%), maternal and child health care (86%), and antenatal care (78%). Around two-thirds provided tobacco programs (69%) and substance-use and drug and alcohol programs (66%).

Most organisations provided access to a doctor (86%) and just over half (54%) delivered a wide range of services, including all of the following during usual opening hours: the diagnosis and treatment of illness and disease; antenatal care; maternal and child health care; social and emotional wellbeing/counselling services; substance use programs; and on‑site or off-site access to specialist, allied health and dental care services.

Most organisations (95%) also provided group activities as part of their health promotion and prevention work. For example, in 2017–18, these organisations provided around:

  • 8,400 physical activity/healthy weight sessions
  • 3,700 living skills sessions
  • 4,600 chronic disease client support sessions
  • 4,100 tobacco-use treatment and prevention sessions.

In addition to the services they provide, organisations were asked to report on service gaps and challenges they faced and could list up to 5 of each from predefined lists. In 2017–18, around two-thirds of organisations (68%) reported mental health/social and emotional health and wellbeing services as a gap faced by the community they served.

This was followed by youth services (54%). Over two-thirds of organisations (71%) reported the recruitment, training and support of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff as a challenge in delivering quality health services.

Read full report and all data HERE

This is the tenth national report on organisations funded by the Australian Government to provide health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Indigenous primary health services

Primary health services play a critical role in helping to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Indigenous Australians may access mainstream or Indigenous primary health services funded by the Australian and state and territory governments.

Information on organisations funded by the Australian Government under its Indigenous Australians’ health programme (IAHP) is available through two data collections: the Online Services Report (OSR) and the national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs). Most of the organisations funded under the IAHP contribute to both collections (Table 1).

The OSR collects information on the services organisations provide, client numbers, client contacts, episodes of care and staffing levels. Contextual information about each organisation is also collected. The nKPIs collect information on a set of process of care and health outcome indicators for Indigenous Australians.

There are 24 indicators that focus on maternal and child health, preventative health and chronic disease management. Information from the nKPI and OSR collections help monitor progress against the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Closing the Gap targets, and supports the national health goals set out in the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023.

Detailed information on the policy context and background to these collections are available in previous national reports, including the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: Online Services Report—key results 2016–17 and National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results for 2017.

At a glance

This tenth national OSR report presents information on organisations funded by the Australian Government to provide primary health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It includes a profile of these organisations and information on the services they provide, client numbers, client contacts, episodes of care and staffing levels. Interactive data visualisations using OSR data for 5 reporting periods, from 2013–14 to 2017–18, are presented for the first time.

Key messages

  1. A wide range of primary health services are provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In 2017–18:
  • 198 organisations provided primary health services to around 483,000 clients, most of whom were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (81%).
  • These organisations provided around 3.6 million episodes of care, with nearly 3.1 million (85%) delivered by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs).
  • More than two-thirds of organisations (71%) were ACCHSs. The rest included government-run organisations and other non-government-run organisations.
  • Nearly half of organisations (45%) provided services in Remoteand Very remote
  • Services were delivered from 383 sites across Australia. Most sites provided the diagnosis and treatment of chronic illnesses (88%), social and emotional wellbeing services (88%), maternal and child health care (86%), and antenatal care (78%). Around two-thirds provided tobacco programs (69%) and substance-use and drug and alcohol programs (66%).

See this AIHW detailed Interactive site locations map HERE

  1. Organisations made on average nearly 13 contacts per client

In 2017–18, organisations providing Indigenous primary health services made around 6.1 million client contacts, an average of nearly 13 contacts per client (Table 2). Over half of all client contacts (58%) were made by nurses and midwives (1.8 million contacts) and doctors (1.7 million contacts). Contacts by nurses and midwives represented half (49%) of all client contacts in Very remote areas compared with 29% overall.

  1. Organisations employed nearly 8,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) staff

At 30 June 2018, organisations providing Indigenous primary health services employed nearly 8,000 FTE staff and over half of these (54%) were Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. These organisations were assisted by around 270 visiting staff not paid for by the organisations themselves, making a total workforce of around 8,200 FTE staff.

Nurses and midwives were the most common type of health worker (14% of employed staff), followed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and practitioners (13%) and doctors (7%). Nurses and midwives represented a higher proportion of employed staff in Very remote areas (22%).

  1. Social and emotional health and wellbeing services are the most commonly reported service gap

Organisations can report up to 5 service gaps faced by the community they serve from a predefined list of gaps. Since this question was introduced in 2012–13, the most commonly reported gap has been for mental health and social and emotional health and wellbeing services. In 2017–18, this was reported as a gap by 68% of organisations.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #SaveADate : This weeks feature @AMSANTaus #AMSANT25Conf Prospectus 6- 8 August #OCHREDay 29-30 August Register your Interest Plus @IAHA_National @SNAICC @CATSINaM @IAHA_National #NACCHOAgm2019

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

6 – 8 August 2019 Our Health, Our Way Leadership Conference Alice Springs 

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

10 July Minister Ken Wyatt at the National Press Club 

2-5 August Garma Festival 

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

13- 14 August Indigenous Health Justice Conference (IHJ) Darwin 

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured Save a date this week

6 – 8 August 2019 Our Health, Our Way Leadership Conference Alice Springs 

AMSANT is holding a one and a half day conference to celebrate its 25th Anniversary of working with and supporting the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector and member services.

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) have a long and successful history as leaders in providing best practice primary health care to our communities, starting in the NT in 1973 with the establishment of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress). This was only two years after the first Aboriginal Medical Service was established at Redfern in Sydney.

At a meeting in Alice Springs in 1994, ACCHSs in the NT formed our own peak body, the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT (AMSANT). Our sector has not looked back. AMSANT now has 26 member services across the Territory and is continuing to expand and strengthen its membership.

The last 45 years has seen our sector grow significantly, supported for the past 25 years through AMSANT’s leadership and advocacy. The innovation and leadership of the ACCHSs sector has influenced system-wide improvements in primary health care.

This record of achievement has ensured that ACCHSs are the preferred model for primary health care services to Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory. Currently, our member ACCHSs provide over half of all primary health care services delivered to our people in the Northern Territory and there is an ongoing process for further transition to community control in coordination with our partners in the NT Aboriginal Health Forum.

A nationally-significant conference

The Our Health Our Way – 25 of Health Leadership Conference 2019 will be held at the Alice Springs Convention Centre and will bring together key local and national speakers to discuss the achievements and successes of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector in the Northern Territory and the future development of Aboriginal comprehensive primary health care here and beyond.

The themes of the conference will cover key aspects of our sector, from health leadership and governance through to research and data and continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes, and growing a sustainable Aboriginal health workforce.

The conference will showcase the successes of AMSANT’s member health services in effectively delivering primary health care services and developing local, community based and led programs across a range of areas including social and emotional well-being, health and housing, and expanding community controlled health services.

The conference format will include keynote speakers, plenary sessions and breakout workshop sessions on key topics. The conference program will be available soon on AMSANT’s website.

Conference Dinner

A Conference Dinner will be held on the evening of Wednesday 7th August at the Convention Centre featuring dinner and entertainment.

Individual seats or tables may be booked as part of the registration process.

Partner information stalls

The Our Health, Our Way – 25 Years of Health Leadership Conference 2019 will provide opportunities for government and NGO partners to hold information stalls within the conference venue to promote their work.

If you are interested in holding a stall during the conference please contact us using the details provided below.

Further information and registration

Further information including registration for the event will be available on AMSANT’s website: http://www.amsant.org.au

Inquiries can be made by phone or email or in person:

Mia Christophersen

Email: mia.christophersen@amsant.org.au

Phone: 08 8944 6666 (Darwin)

AMSANT Darwin Office: 43 Mitchell St, Darwin

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

7-14 July NAIDOC week

VOICE. TREATY. TRUTH.

We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people for a better future.

The Indigenous voice of this country is over 65,000 plus years old.

They are the first words spoken on this continent. Languages that passed down lore, culture and knowledge for over millennia. They are precious to our nation.

It’s that Indigenous voice that include know-how, practices, skills and innovations – found in a wide variety of contexts, such as agricultural, scientific, technical, ecological and medicinal fields, as well as biodiversity-related knowledge.  They are words connecting us to country, an understanding of country and of a people who are the oldest continuing culture on the planet.

And with 2019 being celebrated as the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages, it’s time for our knowledge to be heard through our voice.

For generations, we have sought recognition of our unique place in Australian history and society today. We need to be the architects of our lives and futures.

For generations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have looked for significant and lasting change.

Voice. Treaty. Truth. were three key elements to the reforms set out in the Uluru Statement from the Heart. These reforms represent the unified position of First Nations Australians.

However, the Uluru Statement built on generations of consultation and discussions among Indigenous people on a range of issues and grievances. Consultations about the further reforms necessary to secure and underpin our rights and to ensure they can be exercised and enjoyed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

It specifically sequenced a set of reforms: first, a First Nations Voice to Parliament enshrined in the Constitution and second, a Makarrata Commission to supervise treaty processes and truth-telling.

(Makarrata is a word from the language of the Yolngu people in Arnhem Land. The Yolngu concept of Makarrata captures the idea of two parties coming together after a struggle, healing the divisions of the past. It is about acknowledging that something has been done wrong, and it seeks to make things right.)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people want their voice to be heard. First Nations were excluded from the Constitutional convention debates of the 1800’s when the Australian Constitution came into force.  Indigenous people were excluded from the bargaining table.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have always wanted an enhanced role in decision-making in Australia’s democracy.

In the European settlement of Australia, there were no treaties, no formal settlements, no compacts. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people therefore did not cede sovereignty to our land. It was taken away from us. That will remain a continuing source of dispute.

Our sovereignty has never been ceded – not in 1788, not in 1967, not with the Native Title Act, not with the Uluru Statement from the Heart. It coexists with the sovereignty of the Crown and should never be extinguished.

Australia is one of the few liberal democracies around the world which still does not have a treaty or treaties or some other kind of formal acknowledgement or arrangement with its Indigenous minorities.

A substantive treaty has always been the primary aspiration of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movement.

Critically, treaties are inseparable from Truth.

Lasting and effective agreement cannot be achieved unless we have a shared, truthful understanding of the nature of the dispute, of the history, of how we got to where we stand.

The true story of colonisation must be told, must be heard, must be acknowledged.

But hearing this history is necessary before we can come to some true reconciliation, some genuine healing for both sides.

And of course, this is not just the history of our First Peoples – it is the history of all of us, of all of Australia, and we need to own it.

Then we can move forward together.

Let’s work together for a shared future.

Download the National NAIDOC Logo and other social media resources.

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

Symposium: Our Voice, Our Truth
Kick off NAIDOC week in Canberra with a Symposium event with keynote speakers and expert panel on the topic of good governance through strong leadership. A daylong event, fully catered with morning and afternoon tea, lunch and post-event drinks and canapes with entertainment to conclude.
This is an exclusive ticketed event in a stunning lakeside venue with limited seats available.
6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

10 July Minister Ken Wyatt at the National Press Club 

During NAIDOC week and in his first major Address as Indigenous Affairs Minister, Ken Wyatt will lay out the pathway towards possible constitutional recognition for Australia’s first peoples and the importance of its view on the voice to parliament.

Ken Wyatt AM will outline how he and the Government want to do things differently – how partnerships, pride, respect and responsibility underpin his vision for a better future for Indigenous Australians and a stronger nation, even more confident in its cultural heritage and history.

Our first Aboriginal Minister for Indigenous Australians will detail the critical role of education, culture, community safety, suicide prevention, health, hope, employment and business development.

He will share the importance of co-designing and planning with Indigenous Australians at all levels, from the grassroots to peak representative bodies – and how inclusion and understanding is the only pathway towards Constitutional recognition.

As he has said, his dream is to ensure the greatness of our many Indigenous nations is reflected in the greatness of our Australian nation, now and forever.


Ken Wyatt was elected in 2010 as the Federal Member for Hasluck, located east of Perth, making history as the first Aboriginal Member of the House of Representatives.

The traditional garment worn by Ken on special occasions is a booka, a traditional kangaroo skin cloak presented to him by Perth’s Noongar elders and decorated with cockatoo feathers that signify his status in Noongar culture as a leader.

Since his election, Ken has worked tirelessly to be a strong advocate for his electorate to help build a stronger local community.

In 2015 Ken became the first Aboriginal member of the Federal Executive after being sworn in as Assistant Minister for Health, responsible for Aged Care, as well as for Dementia, the Organ and Tissue Authority and Australian Hearing.

In January 2017, Ken made history as the first Aboriginal Minister to serve in a Federal Government, after being appointed as Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

In August 2018, he was made Minister for Senior Australians & Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

In May 2019, he again made history when he became the first Aboriginal person to be made Minister for Indigenous Australians.

Before entering politics Ken worked in community and senior government roles in the fields of health and education including as Director of Aboriginal Health in both New South Wales and Western Australia.

In addition to Ken’s extensive public service career, he has made an enormous contribution to the wider community which was recognised in 1996 when he was awarded the Order of Australia for services to health, education and Indigenous affairs.

In 2000, Ken received a Centenary of Federation Medal for his contribution to improving the quality of life of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and mainstream Australian society.

BOOK HERE 

 

2-5 August Garma Festival 

Garma Website

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

We Play, We Learn, We Belong
We play on our land.
We learn from our ancestors.

We belong with our communities.

In 2019, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day is celebrating the early years, and promoting the importance of early years education and care for our little ones.

We recognise the critical role that family, community, country and culture play in their development.

And we will continue to fight for better access to culturally appropriate early childhood education for our children through Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations.

Our 2019 Ambassador is Nanna from the animated children’s series Little J & Big Cuz.

We are delighted to have Nanna representing Children’s Day this year.

Children’s Day has been celebrated on the 4th of August for more than 30 years. It’s a special time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to celebrate our children, and for all Aussies to learn about our cultures.

Around the 4th of August, schools, kinders and communities run Children’s Day events. On this website you can get ideas for how to run a Children’s Day event, and register your event so we can see Children’s Day growing each year across the nation.

We sell Children’s Day bags with fun toys and activities for kids to play with at your event. We can send you posters to promote Children’s Day and we will have a video of Nanna that you can show at your event.

Aboriginal Childrens Day Website

Are you holding a Children’s Day event this year? Call us on (03) 9419 1921 or email info@snaicc.org.au to order your FREE Children’s Day poster!

13- 14 August Indigenous Health Justice Conference (IHJ)

This year AMSANT is pleased to partner with the group representing Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander lawyers and law students in the Northern Territory – Winkiku Rrumbangi NT Indigenous
Lawyers Aboriginal Corporation – to host the Indigenous Health Justice Conference (IHJ) in Darwin

This conference will run parallel to the 14th National Indigenous Legal Conference being held in Darwin for the first time. Collaborations between Health and Justice services are gaining momentum nationally and internationally because the broadly accepted evidence shows these can lead to improved outcomes.

AMSANT’s policy focus has raised the importance of dealing with the social determinants of healthand, for some individuals, unresolved legal issues can also be determinants of health.

To discuss this conference further, please contact John Rawnsley via email
directors.wrnt@gmail.com.

 

Website 

29th  – 30th  Aug 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

Ochre Day is on again! This is the space to let us know you are interested in attending ! Register to get on the Early Bird list now!

About this Event

This year the event will be held at the Pullman on the Park in Melbourne between 29-30 August 2019.

As we count down to the conference we are calling for you to express your interest in attending.

Your expression of interest will secure you a spot at the FREE OCHRE DAY MENS CONFERENCE .

TELLING US YOU WANT TO COME MEANS YOU WILL KNOW:

– when registration opens

– link to the registration

– the code to book your accommodation direct with the hotel BEFORE registration opens, securing your room with the fabulous PULLMAN ON THE PARK MELBOURNE

– receive a link to the conference APP

THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO BE IN THE KNOW.

REGISTER YOUR INTEREST HERE TODAY

 

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

Preliminary program and registration information available to download now!

Less than 3 weeks until our discounted early bird offer closes.

Visit  for more information.

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

Print

Location:             Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin NT
Theme:                 Disruptive Innovations in Healthcare
Register:              Register Here
Web:                     www.aida.org.au/conference
Enquiries:           conference@aida.org.au

The AIDA 2019 Conference is a forum to share and build on knowledge that increasingly disrupts existing practice and policy to raise the standards of health care.

People with a passion for health care equity are invited to share their knowledges and expertise about how they have participated in or enabled a ‘disruptive innovation to achieve culturally safe and responsive practice or policy for Indigenous communities.

The 23rd annual AIDA Conference provides a platform for networking, mentoring, member engagement and the opportunity to celebrate the achievements of AIDA’S Indigenous doctor and students.

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

2019 Marks 10 years since the formation of NATSIHWA and registrations are now open!!!

Come and celebrate NATSIHWA’s 10 year Anniversary National Conference ‘A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition’ which is being held in Alice Springs. We aim to offer an insight into the Past, Present and Future of NATSIHWA and the overall importance of strengthening the primary health care sector’s unique workforce of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners throughout Australia.

During the 9-10 October 2019 delegates will be exposed to networking opportunities whilst immersing themselves with a combination of traditional and practical conference style delivery. Our intention is to engage Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in the history and knowledge exchange of the past, todays evidence based best practice programs/services available and envisioning what the future has to offer for all Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Watch this space for the guest speaker line up, draft agenda and award nominations

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

Want to be kept updated on the WIHC in November 2019 ?

Inbox us your email address and we will add you to the mailing list or email our Principal Project Manager- Brandon.etto@nationalcongress.com.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

Aboriginal Health and #ChronicDisease 1 of 2 #SaveADates Submissions Close 15 July for Reviewing the Practice Incentives Program Indigenous Health Incentive (PIP IHI). Register for Workshops 17 June to 3 July #NSW #QLD #VIC #SA #WA #NT#ACT


NACCHO Aboriginal Health Promotion #ClosingTheGap and the #AHW Workforce : Download Research : How can we make space for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community health workers in health promotion ?

“Too many white Australians think the door opens to opportunity from the outside, when you’ve got to be let into the door from the inside’.

Noel Pearson, Aboriginal activist, The Australian, 7 May 2015. (Bita, 2015)

 “ The ‘AHW’ role was first established in the Northern Territory and recognized by the Western health system in the 1950s (Topp et al., 2018).

It was formally incorporated into Australia’s national health system in 2008 (National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association, 2016).

Individuals can become an AHW if they are pursuing or hold a Certificate III, IV or higher degree diploma in, for example, primary health care, public health or a specific area of practice such as mental health.

In the mainstream health care sector, AHWs serve in ‘health worker’ or ‘outreach’ roles, providing clinical services, community outreach and education to improve access, health outcomes and the cultural appropriateness of services (McDermott et al., 2015).

Some also have specified AHW positions in prevention and health promotion. But the delivery of Indigenous health promotion in Australia is best exemplified by the work of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs).

ACCHOs are primary health care services operated by the local Aboriginal community that they serve (NACCHO, 2018).

Their approach to providing comprehensive and culturally competent services draws on the cultural knowledge, beliefs and practices of their communities, and aligns with the Ottawa Charter principles aimed at enabling communities to take control of their own health care needs (WHO, 1986).

 AHW positions within ACCHOs may, therefore, reflect the full range of role types outlined in Table 1.

It is primarily within ACCHO-developed community programmes that other types of CHW roles and models for their delivery have been implemented, for example, lay-leader or peer-to-peer education models (McPhail-Bell et al., 2017).

 Yet many of these initiatives are only documented in programme reports within the ‘grey literature’ with much of the work undertaken in Aboriginal health promotion remaining under-researched and underreported ” 

Read over 290 Aboriginal Health Promotion articles published by NACCHO over the past 7 years 

Read this full research paper online HERE

Article Contents

Download the PDF Copy

Aboriginal Health Workers and Promotion

Photo top banner

 ” Mallee District Aboriginal Services health promotion co-ordinator Emma Geyer and MDAS regional tackling Indigenous smoking worker Nathan Yates are on the lookout for a local “deadly hero”. Picture: Louise Barker

MALLEE District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) is on the hunt for a “deadly hero” who will be the face of a campaign to encourage more Indigenous residents to visit the service for regular health check-ups.

MDAS regional tackling indigenous smoking worker Nathan Yates said the overarching aim of the campaign was to boost the health of the local indigenous population.

“Deadly Choices in our terminology is about making a good choice so for this it’s about making really healthy lifestyle choices because it’s all about trying to bridge the gap between life expectancy of indigenous and non-indigenous people,” Mr Yates said

Picture and story originally published Here

Abstract

Despite a clear need, ‘closing the gap’ in health disparities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities (hereafter, respectfully referred to as Aboriginal) continues to be challenging for western health care systems.

Globally, community health workers (CHWs) have proven effective in empowering communities and improving culturally appropriate health services.

The global literature on CHWs reflects a lack of differentiation between the types of roles these workers carry out.

This in turn impedes evidence syntheses informing how different roles contribute to improving health outcomes.

Indigenous CHW roles in Australia are largely operationalized by Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs)—a role situated primarily within the clinical health system.

In this commentary, we consider whether the focus on creating professional AHW roles, although important, has taken attention away from the benefits of other types of CHW roles particularly in community-based health promotion.

We draw on the global literature to illustrate the need for an Aboriginal CHW role in health promotion; one that is distinct from, but complementary to, that of AHWs in clinical settings.

We provide examples of barriers encountered in developing such a role based on our experiences of employing Aboriginal health promoters to deliver evidence-based programmes in rural and remote communities.

We aim to draw attention to the systemic and institutional barriers that persist in denying innovative employment and engagement opportunities for Aboriginal people in health.

Kirstin Kulka prepares fruit and salad wraps for children at Coen.

Selected extracts

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures in Australia are acknowledged to be the oldest living cultures in the world (Australian Government, 2017a), maintaining thriving and diverse communities for over more than 60 000 years, and implementing land management practices that are exemplary in their sustainability and productivity (Pascoe, 2018).

Hereafter, we use the term Aboriginal to describe the many different clans that make up this diverse peoples, including those from the Torres Strait. Following the British invasion and subsequent colonization of Australia, Aboriginal people across the nation suffered a sudden and complete rupture to all aspects of life including kinship, language, spirituality and culture.

The resulting health disparities experienced by Aboriginal people since colonization, and the inequalities that contribute to them, are well documented (AIHW, 2015). Despite the preponderance of evidence as to these inequities there has been only marginal progress in implementing effective strategies to improve health (McCalman et al., 2016).

Not enough research has focused on how Aboriginal knowledge is reflected in health programmes and services, and there are continued calls for Aboriginal people to be leaders of health-promoting endeavours (National Congress of Australia’s First People, 2016; NHMRC, 2018).

However, combatting systemic racism and reorienting the institutions of the dominant non-Aboriginal culture—i.e. government, health care, education—to include Aboriginal people in decision making and to enable their leadership is proving to be an ongoing challenge in both global and local health settings (George et al., 2015). The opening quote of this paper draws attention to this often-contested issue.

Community ownership of decision making for health has long been recognized as key to addressing the social determinants of health that underlie health disparities (WHO, 1978). Internationally, community health workers (CHWs) enable community involvement in health systems—particularly among minority communities—and contribute to positive health outcomes in a variety of settings (Goris et al., 2013; Kim et al., 2016).

In the USA, for example, the Indian Health Service has funded American Indian ‘Community Health Representatives’ since 1968 (Satterfield et al., 2002).

These health workers provide links between communities and health services, and build trust, relationships and culturally appropriate education and care. Maori CHWs play a similar bridging role in New Zealand by linking community members with health interventions and clinical services, providing health education and also working alongside traditional healers and supporting tribal development (Boulton et al., 2009).

In Australia, CHWs are largely operationalized as Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs), although there is considerable variation in the kinds of roles they perform. The result is that some AHWs experience inflated role expectations that can contribute to unmanageable workloads and stress, reduced job satisfaction, and barriers to integration with other members of the health workforce (Bailie et al., 2013; Schmidt et al., 2016).

Yet variations in role definition for CHWs, and the associated problems, are not unique to Australia (Topp et al., 2018) and are well documented in the broader global CHW literature (Olaniran et al., 2017; Taylor et al., 2017). This variation is problematic as it impedes research into how CHWs influence health outcomes.

In this paper, we explore the lack of differentiation in the global literature between the types of CHW roles both internationally and within the Australian context. Differentiating the various types of CHW roles has enabled us to articulate the need for a specific community health promotion role, one that is distinct from, but complementary to, that of AHWs in clinical settings.

The impetus for writing this paper came from the experiences of two of the authors (NT and JG), an Aboriginal and a non-Aboriginal woman, who have worked in partnership for more than 15 years delivering and evaluating health promotion programmes in Australia.

The challenges we experienced in creating Aboriginal CHW-type positions within two mainstream health promotion programmes caused us to question whether the focus on AHW roles had created unintended barriers to involving Aboriginal people in other opportunities to address health.

By detailing our experience in creating community-based, Aboriginal CHW positions in health promotion, we aim to draw attention to the systemic and institutional barriers that impede expanding employment opportunities for Aboriginal people wanting to work in health.

The National Tackling Indigenous Smoking Workers Workshop was held from Tuesday 2 April to Thursday 4 April 2019 in Alice Springs. This workshop was one of the largest gatherings of TIS workers, partners, experts and supporters of the TIS program.

CHWs AND AHWs

Broadly, CHWs are individuals who may or may not be paid, who work towards improving health in their assigned communities and who often share some of the qualities of the people they serve. These may include similar cultural, linguistic or demographic characteristics; health conditions or needs; shared experiences or simply living in the same area.

However, the degree to which CHWs demographic or experiential profiles ‘match’ the target population also varies. And while most bring cultural and community knowledge to the role, many CHWs have little or no training in Western medicine or in navigating its health systems prior to becoming CHWs (Olaniran et al., 2017).

There is less agreement on the specifics of the CHW role including what they do, how they are trained, how these parameters link to outcomes, and even the titles they are given. One review evidenced 120 terms used to describe CHW roles including variants of ‘lay health educators’, ‘community health representatives’, ‘peer advisors’ and ‘multicultural health workers’ (Taylor et al., 2017).

Syntheses of literature on CHWs illustrate that the tasks they undertake are highly varied but often inadequately or inconsistently defined (Jaskiewicz and Tulenko, 2012; Kim et al., 2016). These issues, coupled with a general lack of contextual information about the role of CHWs, make it difficult to determine patterns or predictors of success.

This lack of clarity is documented as an ongoing barrier to the sustainability of CHW programmes, sometimes causing negative impacts on the workers themselves including burnout due a lack of appropriate training and mentoring support (Jaskiewicz and Tulenko, 2012; Schmidt et al., 2016). One review concluded that ‘the [CHW] role can be doomed by overly high expectations, lack of clear focus, and lack of documentation’ [(Swider, 2002), p. 19].

Previous research has classified CHW roles into typologies of main tasks and activities performed (Olaniran et al., 2017; Taylor et al., 2017). These include providing: (i) social support, (ii) clinical care, (iii) service development and linkages, (iv) health education and promotion, (v) community development, (vi) data collection and research and (vii) activism.

In practice, CHW activities overlap substantially, and tasks regularly extend across categories—both formally and informally (Jaskiewicz and Tulenko, 2012). In Table 1, we present different CHW role types alongside the theoretical models that underpin each.

Linking roles to theory can help differentiate and specify the mechanisms by which CHWs are meant to influence health through the core tasks they perform, and the specific skills related to each task.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts : Features this week @NACCHOAustralia Coalition of 40 Peaks 3 Positions #ClosingTheGap Secretariat @VACCHO_org Director Policy @ahmrc CEO #NT @AMSANTaus @CAACongress #QLD @IUIH_

Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

ACCHO Training News

IAHA and SARRAH together are committed to address systemic problems and promoting innovative sustainable models

1. Job/s of the week 

1.1 The Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peaks Bodies on Closing the Gap is recruiting to establish a policy and secretariat team. Applications close June 17

1.2 VACCHO Executive Director – Research, Evaluation & Strategic Policy

1.3 AHMRC Chief Executive Officer for the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW.

2.Queensland

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

7.3 Katungul ACCHO 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Family Case worker to join the team at our Pinangba Cape York Family Centre.

Children’s Ground 

  • Early Years Educators – Alice Springs
  • Project Officer – Communications, Partnerships & Investments – part time – Abbotsford
  • Project Officer – Communications, Partnerships & Investments – full time – Abbotsford
  • Social Enterprise Coordinator – Darwin

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 ACCHO Training News : 

IAHA and SARRAH together are committed to address systemic problems and promoting innovative sustainable models

If you live in rural or remote Australia your chances of accessing allied health services if and when you need them are much worse than for other Australians. If you are Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, your chances are even worse.

Many of our health and social service systems work well, but there are persistent gaps and systemic shortfalls. These have real impacts on people. For many their quality of life, health and recovery from illness or accident is compromised because of who they are and where they live.

“If you need help to speak, swallow or walk again after a stroke, if you have experienced family trauma and need mental health care, if you have problems with your teeth, hearing, eyesight, have a debilitating back injury, or a thousand other conditions, you probably need help from an allied health professional”, said Cath Maloney, SARRAH’s acting CEO.

“If you need allied health services, whether it’s through the health system, aged care, other community services or the NDIS, it shouldn’t make a difference if you are Indigenous or not. It shouldn’t make a difference whether you live in Meekatharra, Rockhampton or Toorak, but it does”, said Nicole Turner, IAHA Chairperson.

Services that many people, especially in our major population centres, expect are available can be rare, impossible to access or simply do not exist in many communities. These communities also tend to be where the rates of chronic disease, premature deaths and avoidable hospitalisations are highest, and where preventive health care is low or non-existent.

The evidence is there. It gets reported regularly. But being used to hearing about a problem does not make the impact any less for those who experience it, does not make it normal or justify it continuing.

National Reconciliation Week, which closed this week, is a time to reflect on the serious disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and other Australians, the causes that have led and continue to reinforce that disparity. More importantly, it’s time to address it.

Our commitment needs to be tangible. IAHA and SARRAH together are committed to address systemic problems and promoting innovative sustainable models that:

  • Improve access to reliable, affordable, culturally safe and responsive allied health services and reducing the disadvantage experienced by people living in rural and remote communities, particularly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
  • Promote the funding and program coherence needed to ensure allied health services are able to establish and operate sustainably in rural and remote communities; and
  • Recognise the improved outcomes in health and wellbeing available through allied health inclusive, person and community-centred primary health care services.The new Federal Government and all governments across Australia have the opportunity to work together, work with and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and for rural and remote communities across Australia to ensure fair access to the health services all Australians need. This would be a real step in respecting the intent of Reconciliation week.

Read / Download  2 job opportunities with IAHA

2019 Engagement Officer – IAHA 260519 (2)

2019 IAHA Business Manager Duty Statement Final

1.1 Jobs of the week

The Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peaks Bodies on Closing the Gap is recruiting to establish a policy and secretariat team. Applications close June 17

This is an exciting opportunity to be part of a small, high calibre and dynamic team to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders from across the country in the negotiations, agreement, implementation and monitoring of a new National Agreement on Closing the Gap, and as partners with the Council of Australian Governments.

Further information on the Coalition of Peaks and our work on Closing the Gap with COAG is here:

Information on these 4 positions and how to apply are available here: ­

 https://www.seek.com.au/NACCHO-jobs.

Location: ACT
Up to $80,000 per annum plus 15% superannuation
  • Attractive salary plus 15% superannuation and salary packaging
  • Full-time, fixed-term contract for 3 years
  • Friendly team and great location

Administration Officer to act as a point of contact for the Secretariat and perform administration duties.

Location:ACT 
Up to $100,000 per annum plus 15% superannuation
  • Attractive salary plus 15% superannuation and salary packaging
  • Full-time, fixed-term contract for 3 years
  • Friendly team and great location

Supporting the Secretariat of the Coalition of Peaks.

Senior Policy Officer

Location: ACT

 $140,000 per annum plus 15% superannuation

  • Attractive salary plus 15% superannuation and salary packaging
  • 2 positions available. Full-time, fixed-term contract for 3 years
  • Friendly team and great location

The Secretariat to the Coalition of Peaks will provide high level and comprehensive policy and strategic advice.

Applications are sought by 17 June 2019.

The positions are for three years and are made possible by a grant from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet under the Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap.

The positions are hosted by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, however the policy and secretariat team are there to support all members of the Coalition of Peaks.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are strongly encouraged to apply.

Should you have any questions about the positions, please don’t hesitate to contact alice.kemble@naccho.org.au

VACCHO Executive Director – Research, Evaluation & Strategic Policy

About the Organisation

The Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) is the peak body for the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people living in Victoria and is a centre of expertise, policy advice, training, innovation and leadership.

VACCHO is entering a new exciting chapter of its existence, experiencing growth and change in a significant time of self-determination and Community Control. VACCHO advocates for strength-based approaches to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people.

As a result of this change, the organisation has created four new Executive Director roles to lead and drive a stronger presence helping the community, and leading the state in improving Aboriginal Health.

This is an exciting opportunity for dynamic and energetic leaders to nurture and lead VACCHO and their teams across four units of educational services; research and policy; member and workforce support; and corporate services and to make a difference and create positive change in Victorian Aboriginal communities.

About the Opportunity

The Executive Director Research, Evaluation and Strategic Policy is a full-time, 3-year contract position based in Collingwood in Melbourne’s inner northern suburbs.

This position will form part of the highly motivated Executive Team of VACCHO and head up one of the newly formed units within the organisation redesign. You will be responsible for the implementation and transition to the new structure and play a key role in the change management process underpinning successful change.

The Research, Evidence and Strategic Policy Unit leads the development of well-reasoned, evidence-based policy and advocacy to ensure that VACCHO and its members are strategically positioned to improve the Aboriginal community’s health and wellbeing outcomes.

Some of your key areas of accountability will include:

  • Leading and implementing the VACCHO data and research strategy to expand the organisation’s data collection and support data sovereignty;
  • Supporting and implementing a collaborative approach with Members and key stakeholders that results in more strategic use, interpretation and analysis of meaningful data within the sector; and
  • Developing a strategy to ensure all VACCHO policy position statements and advocacy are informed by evidence-based practice, knowledge and research.

This is an Aboriginal Designated Position, classified under ‘special measures’ of section 12 of the Equal Opportunity Act 2010. Only Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are eligible to apply.

To view the Position Description with the full role overview and list of accountabilities and selection criteria, please click ‘apply now’.

The remuneration package for this position is set between $140,000-$150,000 + super, commensurate with the skills and experience that you are bringing to the role.

You will also have access to a range of additional benefits including salary packaging (up to $15,999), additional annual leave and great work-life balance!

Located on Sackville Street in Collingwood, the VACCHO office is a close walk to Victoria Park station and tram stops as well as the cafes and great coffee spots on Smith Street and Brunswick Street.

This is a rare and exciting opportunity. If you want to be a part of the strategic decision making that will help close the gap in Aboriginal health in Victoria,

Apply Now.

AMSANT Research Project Officer – Trauma Informed Care Project – Alice Springs / Darwin Applications close: 14 June, 2019. 

AMSANT’s SEWB/Culturally responsive trauma informed care program team is seeking a researcher with expertise in action research and knowledge/interest in culturally responsive trauma informed care (CRTIC) approaches within Aboriginal primary health care to implement an exciting action research project that will evaluate CRTIC implementation in community controlled health service.

This role requires a commitment to collaborative Aboriginal led approaches to improving effectiveness of health service delivery and strong organisational skills.

The successful applicant will be joining an experienced and dynamic team and an organisation that is supporting a growing community controlled sector in the NT.

Contract Type: 0.6 Full Time Equivalent (part-time role) for 24 months.

Salary: An appropriate salary will be negotiated based on the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications. Generous salary packaging is also available.

Location: Alice Springs (preferable) / Darwin (negotiable).

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

Download a copy of the Position Description and selection criteria from www.amsant.org.au or click on the attachment below.

How to apply for this jobYour application must address the selection criteria and include your CV, a cover letter and details of two referees. Email applications to hr@amsant.org.au using the subject line: Research Project Officer – Trauma Informed Care Project application via EthicalJobs.

For further information contact Human Resources on 08 8944 6666.
Supporting materials FINAL Position Description_Research Officer – Trauma Informed Care (Culturally Responsive).pdf

AHMRC Chief Executive Officer for the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW.

About AH&MRC

We are looking for a Chief Executive Officer for the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW. The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC ) is the peak representative body and voice of Aboriginal communities on health in NSW. We represent our members, the Aboriginal Community

Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) that deliver culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care to their communities.

Aboriginal Community Control has its origins in Aboriginal people’s right to self-determination. This is the right to be involved in health service delivery and decision-making according to the protocols or procedures determined by Aboriginal communities based on the Aboriginal definition of health:

Aboriginal health means not just the physical well-being of an individual but the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole Community in which each individual is able to achieve their full potential as a human being thereby bringing about the total wellbeing of their Community. It is a whole of life view and includes the cyclical concept of life-death-life.
About the Job
The CEO will be responsible to the Board of Directors (the ‘Board’) for implementing strategic and operational policy and for the continued growth and viability of the organisation. The primary purpose of the role is to develop and grow the organisation’s services to members and to provide strategies and advice to the Board. In addition, the position is accountable for managing the day-to-day operations of all business units and operating in the best interests of members.

The position also performs the function of Company Secretary to the Board of AH&MRC.
Responsibilities

  • AH&MRC governance
  • Business operations
  • Strategic planning
  • Financial management
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Risk management
  • People management
  • Reporting
  • Company secretary functions

About You
To be successful you will have;

  • Tertiary qualifications in Business / Law / Health and/or extensive Executive Management experience
  • Comprehensive knowledge of relevant legislation, policies and procedures related to Aboriginal Community and Controlled Health organisations
  • Analytical and problem-solving skills in a complex environment
  • Ability to lead, motivate and manage a team, demonstrating effective understanding and experience in human resource management, leadership and motivational skills at strategic and operational levels
  • Demonstrated high level interpersonal skills in relationship management, establishing and maintaining partnerships and negotiation skills with internal and external stakeholders
  • A knowledge of and understanding of Aboriginal (and Torres Strait Islander) societies and cultures and an understanding of the issues, particularly in the health area which are affecting Aboriginal people as well as a demonstrated ability to communicate sensitively and effectively with Aboriginal people.

We Offer

  • Generous professional development opportunities
  • Salary sacrificing
  • Flexible working arrangements

The constitution provides that there is a requirement for the CEO to be an Aboriginal person and to demonstrate an understanding of and commitment to AH&MRC objectives, and Aboriginal community.

A competitive remuneration package that reflects the senior nature of this role will be negotiated.

The application form 

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Mount Isa Health Services Operations Manager (Identified position)

Gidgee Healing is currently seeking a Mount Isa Health Services Operations Manager (Identified position). This position is full time and based in Mount Isa with required travel to remote communities.

If you are passionate about the health in the Mount Isa community and want to make a difference we want to hear from you!

ABOUT GIDGEE HEALING: 

Gidgee Healing (Gidgee’) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service, with our strategic direction determined by a Board of Directors comprising Aboriginal people from across the region, as well as two skills-based Directors. Gidgee’s organisational mission and vision statements demonstrate a commitment to providing holistic and culturally appropriate health services, underpinned by a philosophy of community participation, and a with a strong focus on care coordination.

POSITION SUMMARY:

The Mt Isa Health Services Operations Manager is responsible for the operational management of Primary Health Care Clinics, Maternal and Child Health Service and transportation services within Mt Isa to ensure the delivery of efficient and effective primary health care services.

This includes responsibility for line management in the implementation of:

  • Cultural integrity of service delivery
  • Service delivery in line with the Model of Care
  • Effective Staff Management practices

The scope of the position includes management, human resources management and health service quality assurance and delivery.

It is a genuine occupational requirement that this position be filled by an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person. One of the referees should be an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who can attest to the applicant’s background, knowledge, skills and experience as they relate to the cultural capabilities.

THE LIFESTYLE:

The Mount Isa region is the gateway to the Outback of Queensland, offers a relaxed and casual lifestyle, with a wealth of camping and exploring, scenic national parks, gorges, as well as top river, lake and open water fishing and recreation.

This position closes COB Sunday 9th June 2019

If this position interests you and you would like to review the Position Description please contact People and Culture Team Leader, Priscilla Kondolo.

Direct Line: 07 4749 6508

Mobile: 0436 814 790

APPLY HERE

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General Practitioner and Senior Medical Officer – OVAHS

About the Organisation

The Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Service (OVAHS) provides a comprehensive Primary Health Care service to Aboriginal people in the East Kimberley region in Western Australia using a holistic approach that includes a high standard of service delivery, the promotion of social justice and the overcoming of the health issues that affect so many people in the region.

Preventative and public health programs include Maternal and Child Health, Women’s Health, Chronic Disease, Sexual Health and along with the OVAHS Social Support Unit which offers AOD, Mental Health Services, health promotion and education programs in the areas of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders prevention, smoking cessation, chronic disease prevention, childhood health promotion and sexual health.

OVAHS provides a fulfilling and stimulating work environment in a diverse range of areas for those seeking an exciting career in Indigenous Health.

About the Opportunities

OVAHS now has a number of fantastic opportunities available within their team of dedicated health professionals in Kununurra,WA:

  • 2 x General Practitioners (Full-time, ongoing)
  • 1 x Senior Medical Officer – Permanent full-time (or option to FIFO, 2 months on, 2 months off, with some flexibility around roster)

The successful candidates will be Vocationally Registered GP (FRACGP, FACRRM, or equivalent) and be eligible for registration as a medical practitioner in WA. Demonstrated experience in general practice is also essential.

The Senior Medical Officer is a senior management position responsible for ensuring the smooth operation of clinical services. As such, a background in performance management and experience in the professional development and supervision of staff is a requirement for this role.

Importantly, you will be committed to providing culturally sensitive healthcare and demonstrate an interest in working closely with Aboriginal communities, to understand their health issues and work with them to find solutions.

To view the position description for these positions, please click ‘apply now’.

About the Benefits

OVAHS is an organisation that truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. It offers a stable, safe and supportive work environment with a large, multi-disciplinary team including doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, an audiologist, dietitian, mental health workers and a social support unit.

A highly attractive remuneration package is on offer circa $400,000 + super (pro-rata if FIFO arrangements), commensurate with qualifications and experience. This includes a fixed salary of $250,000 + super (pro-rata for FIFO), plus a range of benefits to significantly increase the value of your overall remuneration package including:

Specific benefits include:

  • Paid medical insurance and registration
  • Salary packaging options
  • No on call or weekend work is required
  • Quality Staff housing with all utilities included + NBN internet
  • Fully maintained 4WD Vehicle with fuel for work and personal use (within 100km of Kununurra)
  • 5 weeks Annual leave (pro rata)+ additional Christmas/New Year break of up 10 days
  • Generous Study leave and allowance
  • Relocation assistance
  • 17.5% leave loading (paid at the end of 12 months continual service)
  • Annual flight allowance to Perth (paid at the end of 12 months continual service)
  • Public holidays as paid days off
  • Sociable hours (Mon-Fri 8am-4.30pm)

Additionally, working at OVAHS in Kununurra has lifestyle benefits that are unique to the Kimberley Region. With Australia’s most stunning landscapes on your doorstep and an incredible outdoor lifestyle on offer, the Kimberley is the place to be to make the most of life’s adventures.

This is an excellent opportunity to develop your skills, advance your career and enhance your cultural knowledge in a stunning outback location. Make a positive difference – Apply Now!

General Practitioners – Sunrise Health Katherine Region

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is now seeking two General Practitioners to join their dedicated team in the Katherine Region of the Northern Territory.

These roles are being offered on a permanent full-time basis, however shared job arrangements (such as 2 months on, 2 months off) would be considered. We also require a GP from early May to early September 2019 each year.

Working as part of a multi-disciplinary team, led by the Director of Public Health and Planning, this position is responsible for providing direct primary healthcare services, support for and sharing of skills with other health centre staff, and participating in key primary healthcare initiatives and community consultation.

You will work across a number of the nine communities that Sunriseservices, primarily carrying out clinic-based work. The extended team you’ll work with on a day to day basis includes a range of Allied Health Professionals who provide both clinical and health promotional activities.

About the Benefits

If you’re looking for an opportunity to contribute to the improved health of remote Aboriginal communities, this could be the position for you!

Your dedication will be rewarded with a highly attractive base salary circa $250,000 – $280,000 plus super and a range of benefits including:

  • 6 weeks leave per year;
  • Up to 10 days study leave;
  • Phone and laptop;
  • Vehicle for work and personal use;
  • Annual housing allowance of $20,000 while in Katherine;
  • Accommodation for any overnight stays while working in the communities;
  • Salary packaging options up to $15,899 per packaging year; and
  • Annual flight back to your point of hire.

Working at Sunrise Health Service and living in the Katherine region has lifestyle benefits that are unique to the Northern Territory. With the Katherine Gorge on your doorstep and an incredible outdoor lifestyle on offer, combined with some of the best fishing in the world, the Northern Territory is the place to be to make the most of life’s adventures.

For more information and to apply, please click “Apply Now”.

2.1 JOBS AT Apunipima ACCHO Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited has been providing primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for over 35 years. Our workforce has a range of professional, clinical, allied health, social emotional wellbeing and administration positions.

  • We have two sites in Cairns and a growing number of supplementary services and partnerships.
  • We have a diverse workforce of over 200 employees
  • 70 percent of our team identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people

Our team is dedicated to the Wuchopperen vision: Improving the Quality of Life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. If you would like to make a difference, and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, please apply today.

Expressions of Interest

We invite Expressions of Interest from:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Clinical Psychologists
  • Dietitians
  • Diabetes Educators
  • Exercise Physiologists
  • Medical Officers (FAACGP / FACCRM)
  • Registered Nurses
  • Midwives
  • Optometrists
  • Podiatrists
  • Speech Pathologists

In accordance with Wuchopperen’s privacy processes, we will keep your EOI on file for three months.

 Current Vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 20 + JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3  JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

 

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

 

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 2 POSITIONS VACANT

.

http://www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies

 

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

Check website for current Opportunities

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service (GWAHS) is an entity of Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service. GWAHS provides a culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care service for the local Aboriginal communities of western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains. GWAHS provides multidisciplinary services from sites located in Mt Druitt and Penrith.

The clinical service model includes general practitioners (GPs), Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, nursing staff, reception and transport staff. The service also offers a number of wraparound services and programs focused on child and maternal health, social and emotional wellbeing, Drug and Alcohol Support, chronic disease, as well as population health activities.

GWAHS is committed to ensuring that patients have access to and receive high quality, culturally appropriate care and services that meet the needs of local Aboriginal communities.

WEBSITE

7.3 Katungul ACCHO

Download position descriptions HERE 

8. Tasmania

 

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

We have an exciting opportunity for an energetic, passionate and highly capable Family Case worker to join the team at our Pinangba Cape York Family Centre.

In this role you will visit and assess high needs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Families at high risk of breakdown due to alcohol and drug use who also have secondary related mental and/or physical health issues. Supplementing this you will also manage their transition back to community living which will include coordinating any additional support services they may require to have a seamless re-integration.

For more information and to apply, please visit our website

bluecare.mercury.com.au

Or Contact Shirley Sues During Business hours on 0740822420

Children’s Ground 

Align your career with a compelling cause. Help to create an Australia free from extreme poverty and inequity by applying for one of our career vacancies or volunteer opportunities.

  • Early Years Educators – Alice Springs
  • Project Officer – Communications, Partnerships & Investments – part time – Abbotsford
  • Project Officer – Communications, Partnerships & Investments – full time – Abbotsford
  • Social Enterprise Coordinator – Darwin

More Info Apply Here 

NACCHO #Jobalerts Aboriginal Health : Nationwide ACCHO Employment Opportunities to #CloseTheGap : Features #NSW CEO @ahmrc #WA CEO Derbarl Yerrigan ACCHO #Vic Rumbalara #QLD @IUIH_ ACCHO #Doctors #NT @DanilaDilba #Sunrise ACCHO Plus #NSW #SA #ACT #TAS #VIC

Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

ACCHO Workforce News

Free training through The Benchmarque Group, with the Federal Department of Health providing a fully funded program to address ear disease within Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities.

1.1 Job/s of the week 

2.Queensland

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

7.3 Katungul ACCHO 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1. ACCHO Training News : Free training through The Benchmarque Group, with the Federal Department of Health providing a fully funded program to address ear disease within Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities. 

The opportunity exists to receive free training through The Benchmarque Group, with the Federal Department of Health providing a fully funded program to address ear disease within Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities. 

The Course in Tympanometry (10637NAT) is designed to provide the skills and knowledge for a range of health professionals and others working within Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health to undertake tympanometric screening and tympanometry.

Using as its foundation the ‘Recommendations for Clinical Care Guidelines on the Management of Otitis Media in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Populations’*, the course enables students to provide client-centred education, health promotion and the provision of basic care and advice in relation to the management of otitis media.

The course includes a 1-day workshop, skills activities and online assessment. Students must have completed Otitis Media Management Program prior to attending the Tympanometry workshop.

About The Benchmarque Group

The Benchmarque Group is a registered training organisation delivering a range of clinical skills programs to meet the needs of a broad range of health professionals across Australia.

The Benchmarque Group has been engaged by the Federal Department of Health to deliver training programs that will be suitable for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners, nurses, general practitioners and a range of clinicians supporting improvements in ear health.

The number of courses available are strictly limited. To express your interest, please click here and complete the expression of interest form, or for more information, visit www.benchmarquegroup.com.au

Recommendations for Clinical Care Guidelines on the Management of Otitis Media in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Populations (April 2010), Australian Government Department of Health.

The Benchmarque Group | 1300 855 568 | courses@benchmarquegroup.com.au

1.1 Jobs of the week

Chief Executive Officer for the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW.

About AH&MRC

We are looking for a Chief Executive Officer for the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW. The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC ) is the peak representative body and voice of Aboriginal communities on health in NSW. We represent our members, the Aboriginal Community

Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) that deliver culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care to their communities.

Aboriginal Community Control has its origins in Aboriginal people’s right to self-determination. This is the right to be involved in health service delivery and decision-making according to the protocols or procedures determined by Aboriginal communities based on the Aboriginal definition of health:

Aboriginal health means not just the physical well-being of an individual but the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole Community in which each individual is able to achieve their full potential as a human being thereby bringing about the total wellbeing of their Community. It is a whole of life view and includes the cyclical concept of life-death-life.
About the Job
The CEO will be responsible to the Board of Directors (the ‘Board’) for implementing strategic and operational policy and for the continued growth and viability of the organisation. The primary purpose of the role is to develop and grow the organisation’s services to members and to provide strategies and advice to the Board. In addition, the position is accountable for managing the day-to-day operations of all business units and operating in the best interests of members.

The position also performs the function of Company Secretary to the Board of AH&MRC.
Responsibilities

  • AH&MRC governance
  • Business operations
  • Strategic planning
  • Financial management
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Risk management
  • People management
  • Reporting
  • Company secretary functions

About You
To be successful you will have;

  • Tertiary qualifications in Business / Law / Health and/or extensive Executive Management experience
  • Comprehensive knowledge of relevant legislation, policies and procedures related to Aboriginal Community and Controlled Health organisations
  • Analytical and problem-solving skills in a complex environment
  • Ability to lead, motivate and manage a team, demonstrating effective understanding and experience in human resource management, leadership and motivational skills at strategic and operational levels
  • Demonstrated high level interpersonal skills in relationship management, establishing and maintaining partnerships and negotiation skills with internal and external stakeholders
  • A knowledge of and understanding of Aboriginal (and Torres Strait Islander) societies and cultures and an understanding of the issues, particularly in the health area which are affecting Aboriginal people as well as a demonstrated ability to communicate sensitively and effectively with Aboriginal people.

We Offer

  • Generous professional development opportunities
  • Salary sacrificing
  • Flexible working arrangements

The constitution provides that there is a requirement for the CEO to be an Aboriginal person and to demonstrate an understanding of and commitment to AH&MRC objectives, and Aboriginal community.

A competitive remuneration package that reflects the senior nature of this role will be negotiated.

The application form 

Derbarl Yerrigan ACCHO Chief Executive Officer Closes 27 May

About the Organisation

The name “Derbarl Yerrigan” is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River.  The Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC) is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation which was established in 1974 as the Perth Aboriginal Medical Service and has been an integral part of the Perth metropolitan primary healthcare landscape for the past 45 years.

DYHSAC provides holistic and integrated primary health care services to Aboriginal people living in the Perth metropolitan region. We employ 118 staff, have an annual turnover of $14 million and our GP services are delivered from clinics located at East Perth, Maddington, Midland and Mirrabooka.

DYHSAC targets the social, emotional, cultural and physical wellbeing of Aboriginal people living on Noongar country. Our clinic services are robust and delivered by a multi-disciplinary team of clinicians.

About the Opportunity

DYHSAC is seeking to appoint an experienced and highly competent Chief Executive Officer (CEO).

The position provides an exciting and challenging opportunity for a suitably experienced professional, with the ability to oversee the day-to-day operations of a well-established Aboriginal community controlled health service currently operating through an extensive change management process.

The CEO will work directly with the DYHSAC Board of Directors, Aboriginal Health Council of WA (AHCWA) and the Executive Management Team, managing the day to day operations and delivery of primary healthcare services to the local Aboriginal communities across four sites in the in the Perth metropolitan region (East Perth, Midland, Mirrabooka and Maddington).

Currently operating through a period of change, DYHSAC is seeking an individual with extensive executive management experience including a proven ability to achieve key strategic objectives in a dynamic and challenging environment.

Key Selection Criteria includes:

  1. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander pursuant to Section 50D of the Equal Opportunity
  2. Demonstrable leadership experience within an Aboriginal Community Controlled organisation or medium sized Not for Profit of similar size and complexity.
  3. Outstanding team leadership skills with a focus on developing a positive workplace culture and the development and mentoring of staff.
  4. Thorough knowledge and appreciation of contemporary issues in Aboriginal health and well-being.
  5. Strong operational and financial management skills.
  6. Excellent communication, influencing and negotiation skills.
  7. Tertiary qualifications in Business, Health Management or related fields.

Contact Details

All enquiries regarding this position and the application process should be directed to Ms Ceri Writer – Human Resources Manager at ceri.writer@dyhs.org.au or on (08) 9421 3857.

How to Apply

Please apply through SEEK and applications should include a cover letter, current resume including a contact number and a document addressing the selection criteria.

The Application Information Pack containing the Position Description can be obtained from contacting Ms Ceri Writer – Human Resources Manager on 08 9421 3857 or email ceri.writer@dyhs.org.au.

Applications close: 4.00pm Monday May 27th 2019.

APPLY HERE 

Please note that the Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is an equal opportunity institution, providing educational and employment opportunities without regard to race, colour, gender, age, or disability.

The Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation reserves the right to contact the current or most recent employer and evaluate past employment records of applicants selected for interview. The organisation reserves the right to re-advertise the position or to delay indefinitely final selection if it is deemed that applicants for the position do not constitute an adequate applicant pool.

General Practitioners – Sunrise Health Katherine Region

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is now seeking two General Practitioners to join their dedicated team in the Katherine Region of the Northern Territory.

These roles are being offered on a permanent full-time basis, however shared job arrangements (such as 2 months on, 2 months off) would be considered. We also require a GP from early May to early September 2019 each year.

Working as part of a multi-disciplinary team, led by the Director of Public Health and Planning, this position is responsible for providing direct primary healthcare services, support for and sharing of skills with other health centre staff, and participating in key primary healthcare initiatives and community consultation.

You will work across a number of the nine communities that Sunriseservices, primarily carrying out clinic-based work. The extended team you’ll work with on a day to day basis includes a range of Allied Health Professionals who provide both clinical and health promotional activities.

About the Benefits

If you’re looking for an opportunity to contribute to the improved health of remote Aboriginal communities, this could be the position for you!

Your dedication will be rewarded with a highly attractive base salary circa $250,000 – $280,000 plus super and a range of benefits including:

  • 6 weeks leave per year;
  • Up to 10 days study leave;
  • Phone and laptop;
  • Vehicle for work and personal use;
  • Annual housing allowance of $20,000 while in Katherine;
  • Accommodation for any overnight stays while working in the communities;
  • Salary packaging options up to $15,899 per packaging year; and
  • Annual flight back to your point of hire.

Working at Sunrise Health Service and living in the Katherine region has lifestyle benefits that are unique to the Northern Territory. With the Katherine Gorge on your doorstep and an incredible outdoor lifestyle on offer, combined with some of the best fishing in the world, the Northern Territory is the place to be to make the most of life’s adventures.

For more information and to apply, please click “Apply Now”.

Leaving Care and Independence Development Worker –

CAREER CHANGING OPPORTUNITY!!

Rumbalara Engagement and Family Services now have the following vacancy based at the Rumbalara Road, Mooroopna office

Rumbalara Aboriginal Cooperative – Better Futures

Leaving Care and Independence Development Worker –

Part Time position – 30.4 Hours per week – Fixed Term (12 months)

We advertise this position as an Identified Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander position only in line with ‘special measures’ under the Equal Opportunity Act 2010 Section 12 example 1.

The role

Rumbalara Aboriginal Cooperative in partnership the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) and Berry Street are working to develop a practice framework, resources and tools for young people transitioning from out-of-home care into independence. This is the Better Futures framework.

The Better Futures framework will be trialled in the Goulburn Area (East Division) and delivered by Rumbalara Engagement and Family Services and Berry Street.

Primarily, this position will apply an advantage thinking approach through a key development worker to Aboriginal young people eligible for Leaving Care services and their families, services and agencies connected to the young person.

The role will work directly with the case management and care teams ensuring a shared understanding of key issues related to: theoretical frameworks including attachment theory, trauma theory, brain development, ages and stages of development, resilience theory, advantaged thinking approach, adult learning principles and the neurobiological development of maltreated children.

Minimum qualifications required to be considered for this position include: Tertiary qualification in Community Services, Social Work, Youth Work or related discipline.

Salary Packaging is a benefit available for Part or Full Time Employees

For further information on each individual role and to download the position description, please visit www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies alternatively contact Marieta Martin on (03) 5820 6405 or

Email: marieta.martin@raclimited.com.au

To be considered for an interview, applications must include resume, cover letter and a statement addressing the key selection criteria on a separate document and are to be submitted by 4pm, Wednesday 29th May, 2019 and addressed to:

Human Resources Dept.

Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative

PO Box 614

Mooroopna Vic 3629

Your application must include a copy of your Victorian Employee Working with Children Check and a National Police Check obtained within the last 2 months.

Rumbalara Aboriginal Cooperative – Kinship Case Manager

POSITION VACANT

CAREER CHANGING OPPORTUNITY!!

Rumbalara Engagement and Family Services now have the following vacancy based at the Rumbalara Road, Mooroopna office

Rumbalara Aboriginal Cooperative – Kinship Case Manager

Two Full time position – 38 Hours per week – Fixed Term (12 months)

The role

The primary focus of the kinship case management position is to manage contracted Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) child protection cases by supporting Aboriginal children and young people, who are unable to live with their parents, to reside with family within their extended family. The role will work directly within case management and care teams ensuring a shared understanding of key issues related to: theoretical frameworks including attachment theory, trauma theory, brain development, ages and stages of development, resilience theory, strength-based approach and the neurobiological development of maltreated children.

Minimum qualifications required to be considered for this position include: Tertiary qualification in Community Services, Social Work, Youth Work or related discipline.

Salary Packaging is a benefit available for Part or Full Time Employees

For further information on each individual role and to download the position description, please visit www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies alternatively contact Marieta Martin on (03) 5820 6405 or

Email: marieta.martin@raclimited.com.au

To be considered for an interview, applications must include resume, cover letter and a statement addressing the key selection criteria on a separate document and are to be submitted by 4pm, Wednesday 29th May, 2019 and addressed to:

Human Resources Dept.

Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative

PO Box 614

Mooroopna Vic 3629

Your application must include a copy of your Victorian Employee Working with Children Check and a National Police Check obtained within the last 2 months.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community are encouraged to apply

2.1 JOBS AT Apunipima ACCHO Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited has been providing primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for over 35 years. Our workforce has a range of professional, clinical, allied health, social emotional wellbeing and administration positions.

  • We have two sites in Cairns and a growing number of supplementary services and partnerships.
  • We have a diverse workforce of over 200 employees
  • 70 percent of our team identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people

Our team is dedicated to the Wuchopperen vision: Improving the Quality of Life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. If you would like to make a difference, and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, please apply today.

Expressions of Interest

We invite Expressions of Interest from:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Clinical Psychologists
  • Dietitians
  • Diabetes Educators
  • Exercise Physiologists
  • Medical Officers (FAACGP / FACCRM)
  • Registered Nurses
  • Midwives
  • Optometrists
  • Podiatrists
  • Speech Pathologists

In accordance with Wuchopperen’s privacy processes, we will keep your EOI on file for three months.

 Current Vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 20 + JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3  JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

 

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

 

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 2 POSITIONS VACANT

.

http://www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies

 

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

Check website for current Opportunities

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service (GWAHS) is an entity of Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service. GWAHS provides a culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care service for the local Aboriginal communities of western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains. GWAHS provides multidisciplinary services from sites located in Mt Druitt and Penrith.

The clinical service model includes general practitioners (GPs), Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, nursing staff, reception and transport staff. The service also offers a number of wraparound services and programs focused on child and maternal health, social and emotional wellbeing, Drug and Alcohol Support, chronic disease, as well as population health activities.

GWAHS is committed to ensuring that patients have access to and receive high quality, culturally appropriate care and services that meet the needs of local Aboriginal communities.

WEBSITE

7.3 Katungul ACCHO

Download position descriptions HERE 

8. Tasmania

 

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

NACCHO’s 10 policy proposals for Aboriginal Health #VoteACCHO Acting @NACCHOChair Donnella Mills encourages the @ScottMorrisonMP Government to seize the moment and make Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health a national priority

 

“NACCHO welcomes the opportunity to work with Prime Minister Morrison and his Government to reduce the burden of disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

We are calling on Prime Minister Morrison to take a holistic approach to Indigenous health. Closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health requires a range of measures including increased funding for comprehensive primary health care, housing and infrastructure.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are disproportionately affected by many chronic diseases. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is rare in the wider Australian community but remains substantially high in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

To this end, NACCHO is calling on Prime Minister Morrison and his government to support the following 10 policy proposals “

NACCHO Acting Chair, Ms Donnella Mills

Download the full NACCHO Press Release HERE

Read all the 37 + Vote ACCHO Articles published over the past 5 weeks

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) congratulates the Honourable Prime Minister Scott Morrison and the Coalition on the federal election win.

To this end, NACCHO is calling on Prime Minister Morrison and his government to support the following 10 policy proposals:

These proposals are made in the knowledge that an appropriately resourced Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector represents an evidence-based, cost-effective and efficient solution for Closing the Gap in health outcomes.

1.Increase base funding of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations

  • Increase the baseline funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations to support the sustainable delivery of high quality, comprehensive primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.
  • Work together with NACCHO and its State Affiliates to agree to a new formula for the distribution of comprehensive primary health care funding that is relative to need.

2.Increase funding for capital works and infrastructure upgrades

  • Increase funding allocated through the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme for:
    • capital works and infrastructure upgrades, and
    • Telehealth services
  • Around $500 million is likely to be needed to address unmet needs.

3.End rheumatic heart disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

  • Support END RHD’s proposal for $170 million over four years to integrate prevention and control levels within 15 rural and remote communities across the country.
  • END RHD is a national contingent of peak bodies committed to reducing the burden of RHD for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia and NACCHO is a co-chair. Rheumatic heart disease is a preventable cause of heart failure, death and disability that is the single biggest cause of disparity in cardiovascular disease burden between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians.

4.Address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide rates

  • Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities
  • Fund new Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management
  • Fund regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance; and
  • Provide accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

5.Improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander housing and community infrastructure

  • Expand the funding and timeframe of the current National Partnership on Remote Housing to match at least that of the former National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing.
  • Establish and fund a program that supports low cost social housing and healthy living environments in urban, regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

6.Allocate Indigenous specific health funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations

  • Transfer the funding for Indigenous specific programs from Primary Health Networks to ACCHOs.
  • Primary Health Networks assign ACCHOs as preferred providers for other Australian Government funded services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples unless it can be shown that alternative arrangements can produce better outcomes in quality of care and access to services

7.Expand the range and number of MBS payments for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce

  • Provide access to an increased range and number of Medicare items for Aboriginal health workers, Aboriginal health practitioners and allied health workers.

8.Improve the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs

  • Expand the authority to write Close the Gap scripts for all prescribers.
  • Simplify the Close the Gap registration process and expand who may register clients.
  • Link medicines subsidy to individual clients and not practices through a national identifier.
  • Improve how remote clients can receive fully subsidized medicines in non-remote areas.
  • Integrate the QUMAX and s100 Support programs into one unified program.

9.Fund Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations to deliver dental services

  • Establish a fund to support ACCHOs deliver culturally safe dental services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • Allocate Indigenous dental health funding to cover costs associated with staffing and infrastructure requirements.

10.Aboriginal health workforce

  • Increased support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and increased support for workforce for the ACCHO sector which includes the non-Indigenous health professionals on which ACCHOs rely
  • Develop an Aboriginal Employment Strategy for the ACCHS sector

NACCHO is the national peak body representing 145 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations across the country on Aboriginal health and wellbeing issues.

NACCHO Aboriginal #Vote1RuralHealth #VoteACCHO #AusVotesHealth : Major health groups @NRHAlliance @amapresident @RuralDoctorsAus express concern over lack of #Election2019 focus on #RuralHealth #RemoteCommunities

“ We have a crisis in rural Australia – health outcomes have not improved and we continue to see measurable disparities in levels of access to health care and health outcomes.

I note that yesterday the Australian Medical Association and the Rural Doctors Association of Australia raised similar concerns. They’re concerned about the lack of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce and staffing levels in hospitals and health services.”

Mark Diamond  CEO National Rural Health Alliance See full press release PART 1

“It is inconceivable that millions of Australians who experience higher incidence of the drivers of chronic disease could be overlooked.

People in rural, regional, and remote Australia face many obstacles when they require access to the full range of quality medical and health services.

There are shortages of doctors and other health professionals.

It is harder to access specialist services such as maternity and mental health.

And country people often have to travel to capital cities and large regional centres for vital services such as major surgery or cancer care.”

We need to see tailored and targeted policies to address these inequities.

Rural Australians deserve nothing less.”

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said today that rural Australians are still waiting to hear major announcements from the major parties to address the serious and specific health needs of rural and remote communities. See Part 2 Below

“ With less than two weeks left to go until polling day, rural doctors are calling out the major parties on their absence of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce.

This is a cone of silence that Maxwell Smart would be proud of

There continues to be a massive maldistribution of doctors and other health professionals between urban Australia and the bush, yet this critical issue remains largely overlooked. “

President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), Dr Adam Coltzau

NACCHO has developed a set of policy  10 #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

The current health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are unacceptable. 65% of Indigenous people live in rural Australia.

We are calling on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

Our ACCHO TOP 10 key asks of a new Federal Government

Read all the 10 Recommendations HERE

Part 1

A chorus of concern over the major parties’ failure to focus on rural health issues in the election campaign is growing, the National Rural Health Alliance says.

The peak body for rural, regional and remote health says the 7 million people living in rural Australia have been unable to discern what the big health policy announcements mean for them.

“Nor has there been a specific focus by the Liberal-Nationals Coalition and Labor on how access to health and preventive health services will be improved for them,” CEO Mark Diamond said.

“We have a crisis in rural Australia – health outcomes have not improved and we continue to see measurable disparities in levels of access to health care and health outcomes.

“I note that yesterday the Australian Medical Association and the Rural Doctors Association of Australia raised similar concerns. They’re concerned about the lack of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce and staffing levels in hospitals and health services.

“The Greens have acknowledged that they recognize the significance of health care in rural areas and have issued a specific rural health statement which I commend them for.

“And yesterday, the Independent candidate for Indi, Helen Haines, joined the call for a boost to the allied health professions taskforce.

“Getting more allied health professionals into rural Australia is vital to address the chronic inequality of access to health services.

“This is a key part of the National Rural Health Alliance’s 2019 Election Charter.” (See www.ruralhealth.org.au/election19)

The NRHA is calling for

  • An additional 3000 Aboriginal Health Workers and practitioners
  • Increased funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (Labor has committed some funds for this)
  • An additional 3000 allied health positions
  • Trials created in 20 rural and remote sites to test for the best workforce models
  • A community grants program that communities can apply to for funds for better digital infrastructure so they can access healthcare online
  • Medicare rebates for online or telehealth consults to people in outer regional, remote and very remote areas
  • A special Mission for Rural Health created in the Medical Research Future Fund that is allocated a share of the fund proportionate to the population in rural Australia (28% = $360m)
  • A commitment to endorse the Uluru Statement and establish a Makarrata Commission for the sake of the nation’s wellbeing

Mr Diamond said parties must show they can govern for all of Australia, not just cities.

With 28% of the population and 7 million people, it’s important that all parties represent the interests of people in country areas. Rural health matters.

Part 2

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said today that rural Australians are still waiting to hear major announcements from the major parties to address the serious and specific health needs of rural and remote communities.

Dr Bartone said it is surprising and disappointing that rural health remains largely neglected this far into the election campaign.

“It is inconceivable that millions of Australians who experience higher incidence of the drivers of chronic disease could be overlooked,” Dr Bartone said.

“People in rural, regional, and remote Australia face many obstacles when they require access to the full range of quality medical and health services.

“There are shortages of doctors and other health professionals.

“It is harder to access specialist services such as maternity and mental health.

“And country people often have to travel to capital cities and large regional centres for vital services such as major surgery or cancer care.

“We need to see tailored and targeted policies to address these inequities. Rural Australians deserve nothing less.”

Dr Bartone said that there will be some flow-on to rural Australia from the policies already announced by the major parties, including public hospital funding, new PBS drugs, the Government’s Rural Generalist Pathway medical training initiatives, and Labor’s cancer and seniors’ dental plans, but there are still major gaps.

“It is staggering that there was very little mention of rural health during last week’s Health Debate at the National Press Club,” Dr Bartone said.

“The situation is critical.

“Rural communities need real investment in medical infrastructure and incentives to attract more permanent doctors.

“Country towns are seeing medical services closed on them with no other options provided.

“Rural maternity services are deteriorating. Earlier this year, expectant mothers in Queensland were sent DIY birthing kits because their nearest birthing unit was too far to get to.

“Many communities are struggling with few or no doctors, and many doctors will be looking to retire in the coming years with no one there to take over for them.

“In a recent AMA poll, the top priority for our rural doctors was extra funding and resources for hospitals to support improved staffing levels, including core visiting medical officers, to allow workable rosters.

“The pressure on public hospital staff and resources is felt even more acutely in rural, regional, and remote areas.

“Training the next generation of rural doctors is a major priority. We need strategic policies that support students from rural backgrounds to study medicine.

“We want to see investment in programs that create positive training experiences for prevocational doctors in rural areas.

“We need to support these students to complete their training rurally so that they can choose to stay to live and work in rural areas and deliver the care these communities need.

“Rural Australian families need the confidence and comfort of being able to see a doctor or other health professional when they need care or advice, and to be able to get to hospital when they are sick or injured.

“It is not too late for the major parties to provide rural Australians with that security.”

The AMA’s Key Health Issues for the 2019 Federal Election calls on the major parties to:

  • provide funding and resources to support improved staffing levels and workable rosters for rural doctors, including better access to locum relief and investment in hospital facilities, equipment, and practice infrastructure;
  • expand the successful Specialist Training Program to 1,400 places by 2021, with higher priority being given to training places in regional and rural areas, generalist training, and specialties that are undersupplied;
  • fund a further 425 rural GP infrastructure grants of up to $500,000 each;
  • provide additional funding/grants to individual GPs and practices to support nonvocationally registered doctors to attain fellowship through the More Doctors for Rural Australia Program; and
  • support further reforms to medical school selection criteria for Commonwealth supported students; and introduce changes to the structure of courses so that the targeted intake of medical students from a rural background is lifted from 25 per cent of all new enrolments to one-third of all new enrolments, and the proportion of medical students required to undertake at least one year of clinical training in a rural area is lifted from 25 per cent to one-third.

The AMA’s health policy wish list – Key Health Issues for the 2019 Federal Election – is available at https://ama.com.au/article/keyhealthissues2019federalelection

 

Part 3 Rural doctors urge parties to “Get Smart”  on rural health workforce plan

With less than two weeks left to go until polling day, rural doctors are calling out the major parties on their absence of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce.

“This is a cone of silence that Maxwell Smart would be proud of”

President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), Dr Adam Coltzau, said.

“There continues to be a massive maldistribution of doctors and other health professionals between urban Australia and the bush, yet this critical issue remains largely overlooked.

“Yes, there has been funding committed by both the Coalition and Labor to kick-start a National Rural Generalist Pathway, and this is very welcome – but if the major parties think that the Pathway will be the panacea for the shortage of doctors and other health professionals in the bush, they are sadly mistaken.

“The Pathway needs to be just one component of a much wider rural health workforce strategy – one that not only delivers more Rural Generalist doctors to the bush, but also more GPs, specialists, nurses, midwives and allied health professionals.

“The challenges of accessing health services in rural areas have not been resolved, and will require the incoming government to ‘get smart’ in improving this.

“It will require a practical, big picture strategy, not just tinkering at the edges.

“It will require the incoming government to invest in more training places in the bush, so newly-minted doctors are able to access the training they need in their intern and junior doctor years.

“There is real opportunity for rural hospitals, rural general practices and other rural health settings to meet the growing demand for junior doctor training, and to keep these doctors in the bush – but the right supports will be needed to make this happen.

“More also needs to be done to increase the capacity for regional training opportunities in non-GP Specialist training and Advanced Skills posts.

“These places are largely controlled by the specialist colleges, and it is virtually impossible for young doctors to access this training outside metropolitan areas or very large regional centres.

“This makes it very difficult for those doctors who want a career as a non-GP specialist in rural Australia to follow that path.

“The lack of commitment from the major parties to fix the rural health workforce crisis is a major black hole in the election campaign – and it needs urgent attention before polling day.”

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #Rural #Remote Health #VoteACCHO  #Vote1RuralHealth #AusVotesHealth : With 65% of Indigenous people living in rural Australia @NRHAlliance prioritises our mobs health

” The National Rural Health Alliance (NRHA) has named four key areas an incoming Federal Government must address to help rural Australians get healthier and live longer.

The nation’s peak body for rural, regional and remote health has also listed in detail what needs to be done in each area.

The four areas are:

1.Improving the health of Indigenous Australians

2.Boosting the supply and distribution of allied health care workers in rural, regional and remote areas

3.Creating a greater research focus on factors affecting rural health;

4.Developing a new National Rural Health Strategy.

NRHA CEO Mark Diamond says much needs to be done so everyone in Australia enjoys better health. Currently those living beyond major cities carry 1.3 times the cost, mortality and disability associated with illness and disease. See full Press Release Part 1 below

 ” The body representing 37 rural health organisations has urged the next government to endorse the Uluru Statement from the Heart and establish a “voice” to federal parliament as its No 1 priority to improve Indigenous health.

Launching its election charter at Parliament House, National Rural Health Alliance chair Tanya Lehmann said Australia needed to start tackling problems impacting on people’s health — problems that would not be fixed by more doctors or technology.

Connection to country, spiritual wellbeing, overcoming intergenerational trauma are central to the health of indigenous Australians,”

NRHA Chair Tanya Lehmann told The Australian. see full article Part 4 below

Download the NRHA 9 Page PDF #Election2019 Charter Document HERE

Rural Health Matters 2019 Election Charter FINAL_1

Part 1 Priority 1. Improve Indigenous health

The current health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are unacceptable. (65% of Indigenous people live in rural Australia.)

We seek a commitment from an incoming government to

  1. Endorse the Uluru Statement from the Heart and the Makarrata, ie establish a First Nations Voice in the Australian Constitution and establish a Makarrata Commission to supervise a process of agreement-making between governments and First Nations and truth-telling about our history.
  2. Fund an additional 3000 Aboriginal Health Workers and practitioners. ($180m over 4 years; $180m per year ongoing)
  3. Increase base funding of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.
  4. Eliminate Rheumatic Heart Disease. Get serious about meeting targets set under the END RHD program. ($170m over 4 years.)

See Rationale Part 3 Below  

Fund an additional 3000 Aboriginal Health Workers and practitioners. ($180m over 4 years; $180m per year ongoing)

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills

Visit NACCHO for more info

Part 2 :  NRHA CEO Mark Diamond says much needs to be done so everyone in Australia enjoys better health. Currently those living beyond major cities carry 1.3 times the cost, mortality and disability associated with illness and disease.

“We are looking for commitments from all sides of politics as we go into this election not only to fund immediate needs but to take a long-term strategic view for the sake of the future of the seven million people living outside major cities.

“We need a new National Rural Health Strategy. The previous strategy was based on a framework endorsed by the COAG Health Council in 2011.

“It’s use and effectiveness has not been evaluated since and we need to understand how widely that framework or guide for decision-making in planning and delivering effective and better health care and health promotion services is being used and what, if anything, needs to change.

“In short, we need to prepare a new National Rural Health Strategy for the approaching third decade of the 21st century to ensure all governments and health care service providers are pulling in the same direction when it comes to rural health.”

Mr Diamond says that if people living in rural, regional and remote areas had the same mortality rates as people living in major cities, there would have been almost 20,000 fewer deaths, according to Australian Institute of Health and Welfare data for 2009-2011.

“In these areas, coronary heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, transport accidents, diabetes, lung cancer and suicide – all preventable conditions – killed 11 more people a day compared with metropolitan areas.

“This situation is unfair and untenable. All that is required is the political will to fix it. In the lead up to this 2019 Federal election we are keen that voters, candidates and political parties understand what it will take for an incoming government to provide good healthcare and health promotion for all regardless of where they live.”

Over the next four weeks the NRHA will roll out more detail on what it is asking of Australia’s next Federal Government. To learn more, check www.ruralhealth.org.au/election19

The NRHA represents all professions and services dedicated to helping rural Australians get health care and health promotion services. Among them are nurses, physiotherapists, doctors, pharmacists, paramedics, surgeons and other allied health professionals. Its 37 members include national organisations representing those professions and other bodies such as NACCHO ,the Country Women’s Association of Australia, the Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association and the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia.

Part 3 Indigenous Health Rationale

  1. More than 1,100 delegates from around Australia voted at the 15thNational Rural Health Conference in March to seek government endorsement for the Uluru Statement from the Heart as a key priority. Poorer health outcomes in non-metropolitan Australia reflect the widening gap that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience in their health care compared with non-Indigenous people. It is only when we listen to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices that we will be able to deliver health solutions that will succeed.
  2. Aboriginal Health Workers and health practitioners are critical to achieving better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through culturally safe preventative health and treatment services. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have three-fold higher levels of preventable hospital admissions and deaths than other Australians and the burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is 2.3 times higher. A significant driver behind these numbers is that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can often feel unsafe in accessing the health care they need. 2016 data from the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association shows the number of Indigenous workers in health professions was 1347.A ratio of one for every 150 Indigenous people would require 4328 practitioners – this would mean putting 3000 more Aboriginal Health Workers and practitioners on the ground.
  3. Increasing the baseline funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations will remove funding insecurity that threatens their programs and services.
  4. Young Indigenous Australians are 55 times more likely to die of rheumatic heart disease than their non-Indigenous peers, yet it is preventable. Priorities have been established under the END RHD program – these need to be implemented immediately.

Updated Part 4 Indigenous voice key to wellbeing

The body representing 37 rural health organisations has urged the next government to endorse the Uluru Statement from the Heart and establish a “voice” to federal parliament as its No 1 priority to improve indigenous health.

Launching its election charter at Parliament House, National Rural Health Alliance chair Tanya Lehmann said Australia needed to start tackling problems impacting on people’s health — problems that would not be fixed by more doctors or technology.

“Connection to country, spiritual wellbeing, overcoming intergenerational trauma are central to the health of indigenous Australians,” she told The Australian.

“Recognising indigenous Australians appropriately in the ­Constitution is an important symbol but it’s more than a symbol, it’s ­actually essential to changing the trajectory of the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people. It’s ­essential to closing the gap.”

Bill Shorten plans to hold a ­referendum on indigenous recognition in the first term of his prime ministership if he wins the ­election.

Scott Morrison committed $7.3 million in the budget to investigate a model for an advisory body such as a “voice to parliament”.

In its charter, the NRHA said: “It is only when we listen to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices that we will be able to deliver health solutions that will succeed.”

The Uluru Statement from the Heart, released in 2017, called for a First Nations voice to be enshrined in the Constitution, with a Makarrata commission to supervise “a process of agreement-making between governments and First ­Nations people and truth-telling about our history”.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce News : #Election2019 #VoteACCHO #AusVotesHealth #Vote1RuralHealth : @NRHACEO The 4 key approaches an incoming Federal Government needs to immediately address to reduce the critical shortage 2. Plus @IAHA_National Press release

 

We have people living in our remote and rural regions who don’t know what optometrists or audiologists are, let alone having visited one, yet such professionals are readily available in our metropolitan cities.

Do Australians think this is fair?

We acknowledge the Federal Coalition Government’s $550m commitment to fund 3000 additional doctors and 3000 additional nurses but doctors and nurses alone won’t do it.

We also need physiotherapists, psychologists, audiologists, social workers and many other allied health professions to be on the ground to provide the comprehensive care needed to address the woeful health statistics in our non-metropolitan regions.

We know that telehealth can deliver things like home-based rehabilitation, mental health care services and aged care support but when 80 per cent of 400 Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory alone don’t even have a 3G or 4G mobile phone signal, there is no way to deliver it.

We want communities to identify digital connectivity solutions for online health care that will work for their area and for the Federal Government to fund these solutions through a national grants program. “

National Rural Health Alliance CEO Mark Diamond acknowledged considerable progress by previous governments in addressing rural doctor shortages but says this is only part of the solution : See full Press Release below 

NACCHO Recommendation 10 of 10 #VoteACCHO

Aboriginal health workforce

  • Increased support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and increased support for workforce for the ACCHO sector which includes the non-Indigenous health professionals on which ACCHOs rely
  • Develop an Aboriginal Employment Strategy for the ACCHS sector

 ” Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) welcome the announcement of $4.65 million in funding from the Commonwealth Government to support the expansion of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Academy Model.

The academy is a community-led learning model focused on academic achievement and re-shaping the way training pathways are co-designed and delivered with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander high school students.

The model aims to embed culturally safe curricula and to be inclusive of local cultural aspirations for successful outcomes where social, cultural and environmental determinants are addressed with wraparound supports. ”

See full Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) Press Release Part 2 

National Rural Health Alliance Press Release 

An incoming Federal Government needs to immediately address the critical shortage of allied health professionals in rural, regional and remote Australia if the nation is to have any hope of making healthcare accessible to those regions, the National Rural Health Alliance says.

Download a PDF Copy of the full press release

National Rural Health Alliance Workforce Election 2019

To ensure all Australians have access to healthcare, the NRHA is recommending four key approaches. They are:

  • Fund an additional 3000 allied health care professionals. ($300m over 4 years)
  • Fund 20 demonstration sites in rural and remote regions with a workforce to match the needs to each and use this to develop future workforce models. ($50m over 4 years)
  • Establish a grants program to make sure Australians in rural, regional and remote areas have telecommunications connectivity so they can access healthcare remotely. ($400m over 4 years)
  • Make Medicare rebates available for online or telehealth consults offered by GPs and other allied health professionals to people in outer regional, remote and very remote areas. ($420m over 4 years and $180m per year thereafter).

Funding demonstration sites would guide workforce planning for the future.

Some regions, such as western NSW, had already identified that short-term contracts and fly-in, fly-out allied health workforces failed to provide sustainable care with strong impacts on health outcomes.

Grants to improve digital connectivity would also help make healthcare more accessible.

Mr Diamond said the fourth option for improving access to health care was to make Medicare rebates available for online or telehealth consultations offered to people in outer regional, remote and very remote areas.

Medicare rebates for telehealth consultations provided by doctors and psychologists to people in drought-affected areas are already in place.

This initiative would mean extending those rebates to more professions and make them available to people in non-drought affected areas.

The NRHA represents 37 national organisations whose members work in rural, regional and remote Australia.

Check NRHA Election Charter Rural Health Matters! at  www.ruralhealth.org.au/election19

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) welcome the announcement of $4.65 million in funding from the Commonwealth Government to support the expansion of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Academy Model.

The academy is a community-led learning model focused on academic achievement and re-shaping the way training pathways are co-designed and delivered with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander high school students. The model aims to embed culturally safe curricula and to be inclusive of local cultural aspirations for successful outcomes where social, cultural and environmental determinants are addressed with wraparound supports.

In announcing the funding, Minister for Indigenous Health, The Hon. Ken Wyatt MP, said:

“I am proud to support the IAHA National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Academy (which is) an incredible achievement in creating training and career pathways into the health sector. These pathways play an important role in improving health care for all Australians, and I acknowledge the work of IAHA in establishing the academy.”

The first academy, the Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Academy (NTAHA), was officially launched in early 2018 in partnership with Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT). Twenty-five Aboriginal students from five Darwin high schools enrolled in the first intake of the NTAHA, with the first cohort due to complete their Certificate III in Allied Health Assistance in December 2019.

IAHA will build on the successes to date and develop partnerships to expand the academy into new regions, including QLD, NSW and the ACT. Local communities and stakeholders will be critical to the future planning and implementation of the new academies, including universities where students can build their knowledge and understanding of the tertiary sector and potential pathways.

IAHA members, as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health graduates, have played an important role in providing mentorship and guidance to academy students. IAHA Chairperson, Nicole Turner, has been active in the formation and operation of the academy and said:

“Students are now on an educational and training pathway leading to long term careers in health and have shown interest in a broad range of professions including oral health, pharmacy, speech pathology, nursing, midwifery and medicine. The importance of this model is that it is about supporting students make informed choices and contextualise their opportunities to their local community and workforce needs.”

IAHA look forward to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, families, communities and other key stakeholders to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to pursue meaningful careers in health.

Download media release HERE

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