NACCHO #HealthBudget18 Coverage 3/5 Read and Download the Top 10 Peak Health Organisation Press Release responses to #Budget2018NACCHO

1.NATSIHWA welcomes the 2018 budget announcements of additional funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Health Workforce Professional Bodies

2. IAHA : Allied health undervalued in 2018 Federal Budget

3.AIDA funded to continue our work in improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians

4.1 AMA : SAFE AND STEADY HEALTH BUDGET, BUT BIGGER REFORMS ARE STILL TO COME

5.NRHA :RURAL HEALTH BUDGET $$ WELCOME – BUT NOT ENOUGH

6.AHHA : Health data boost right step on the road to reform

7. PHAA : Budget 2018 – prevention focus goes missing

8.RACGP : Signs Federal Government beginning to recognise vital role of specialist GPs in Australia’s healthcare system

9.CHF Health budget includes welcome consumer focus

10. Vision 2020 Australia welcomes the Australian Government’s investment to target major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Post 1 of our NACCHO Posts on #Budget2018 NACCHO

Post 2 will be the NACCHO Chair Press Release

Post 3 will be Health Peak bodies Press Release summary

Post 4 will be Government Press Releases

Post 5 Opposition responses to Budget 2018 (Monday )

ALL NACCHO BUDGET COVERAGE HERE

1.NATSIHWA welcomes the 2018 budget announcements of additional funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Health Workforce Professional Bodies

“Today’s budget announcement presents an important opportunity for NATSIHWA. It will enable us to progress key strategic priorities, including the development of a National Mentor program to support Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners. This is a very exciting time for our members”

Mr Karl Briscoe, NATSIHWA CEO.

Download full Press Release

1.NATSIHWA BUDGET Media Release 2018

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) welcomes the 2018 Australian Government budget announcement that signal growth in funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce organisations.

These organisations (NATSIHWA, CATSINaM, IAHA and AIDA) work togetherto support the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforces and improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“We thank the Australian government for the continued support of NATSIHWA. This funding will not only enhance the sustainability of our profession, but will also lead to opportunities that promote the recognition and professionalism of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners” said Ms Josslyn Tully, NATSIHWA Chairperson.

In particular, the budget announcement support the progression of NATSIHWA’s strategic plan 2017-2020. Key strategic priorities for NATISHWA over the next 12 months, include the:

  • Development of a National Mentoring Program for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners;
  • Implementation of the National Professional Development Symposium which will bring together over 100 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in Alice Springs in October 2018;
  • Continuation of Regional forums to support professional development and networking of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in regions across Australia;
  • Development of further educational resources to support individuals and services in defending Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners’ Scope of Practice; and,
  • Enhanced influence of national policy and program that improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and health workforce outcomes that support a culturally safe work environment.

“NATSIHWA looks forward to progressing these initiatives with our membership, which includes over 750 full members who are qualified Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners across Australia”, said Ms Josslyn Tully

2. IAHA : Allied health undervalued in 2018 Federal Budget

Improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing must remain a national priority. Action is needed to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Download full Press Release

2. Media-Release_allied-health-undervalued-in-2018-Federal-Budget

Those actions must involve: a coherent strategy to tackle the causes of disadvantage and enable our people to achieve their potential; governments showing the stamina to address issues that come from generations of trauma and disadvantage; and commitment to work with, hear and respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the knowledge they bring to issues that shape their lives.

IAHA now has a commitment of funding for a further four years. We also have a commitment of $1.55M per year in additional funding to share with our fellow Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce peak organisations: AIDA, CATSINAM and NATSIHWA. We have proven our approaches deliver results and build the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

IAHA has a significant advocacy role and interest in several other initiatives announced in the 2018-19 Budget, including measures responding to urgent needs across Australian communities, including:

  • $105M over four years to improve access to aged care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • $30M over four years for ear health assessment in pre-schools
  • $34.3M over four years for eye health and
  • Extra commitment to suicide prevention, additional mental health care.

IAHA CEO Donna Murray said “For initiatives to deliver for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, community must be involved in how those measures are developed and implemented. This applies to new measures and to addressing existing acute allied health shortages in health, disability, aged care and other social services.”

A culturally safe and responsive skilled workforce, is critical in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities. To ensure the workforce has the skills needed to deliver results, strategies and solutions need to be developed and delivered in partnership with IAHA, our members and communities.

“IAHAs success thus far in developing and implementing innovative allied health career pathway programs and supports, providing leadership opportunities and development, mentoring, in partnering and in promoting person-centred, multidisciplinary care needs to be leveraged further. We, therefore, welcome a stronger partnership with Government to enable this success to continue and grow”, said Ms Murray.

IAHA chairperson, Nicole Turner, commented “By leading and facilitating inter-professional approaches that fit with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander notions of health and wellbeing, we’ve supported and enabled rapid growth in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce. But we still represent less than 1 percent of the allied health workforce. Our workforce must continue to grow. Continued funding for IAHA is a vital step in the right direction.”

IAHA welcomes the $550M allocated to the Stronger Rural Health Strategy and the aim of ensuring the right health professionals are available when and where they are needed. However, IAHA remains concerned and disappointed that acute shortages in rural and remote allied health services have been largely ignored, and particularly that there appears to be almost no gain for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities who have little or no access to allied health services at present.

CEO, Donna Murray, added “IAHA will continue to advocate for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan and Implementation Plan to be fully funded. IAHA will continue to seek opportunities to work constructively with Government to achieve this result.”

3.AIDA funded to continue our work in improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians

This week the Australian Government announced the 2018/2019 Budget to the Australian public. The Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) welcomes the news of increased government investment into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak workforce organisations of $33.4 million over four years from 2018-2019.

Download full Press Release

3.AIDA-budget-response_MEDIA-RELEASE-9-May-2018

We take this as a tangible measure of the genuine commitment of the Turnbull Government to work with us to build the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

As the only professional association for both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors and medical students, AIDA is committed to improving the health of our people and enriching the health profession by growing the numbers of Indigenous doctors.

This renewed funding certainty will allow AIDA, through our strong relationships with key stakeholders, to keep supporting efforts to increase the cultural safety of mainstream medical education and health care systems.

This continued financial support from the government means job security for our employees, increased resourcing for emerging issues and the ability to continue to implement our long-term strategic agenda.

This includes:

  •  Development of our 2018 policy priorities
  •  Further investment in Indigenous-led health research
  • The delivery of a cultural safety program for doctors, by Indigenous doctor
  • Ongoing support to our student and doctor member base

Doing things with, not to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

AIDA encourages the Turnbull Government to maintain its stated commitment to work in a consultative and collaborative way with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

We remain concerned that there is no commitment in the 2018/19 Budget to adequately resource the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

AIDA maintains that this is the roadmap for the government to work with us to genuinely redress health disparity and deliver culturally appropriate and needs-based health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

We encourage the government to commit to implementing the social determinants of health framework into future Indigenous health policy development.

AIDA also remains concerned about the lack of targeted funding commitment around Closing the Gap.

We maintain that measureable targets, accountability mechanisms and appropriately funded policy design and program delivery are essential to closing the gap on Indigenous disadvantage.

With this renewed funding certainty, AIDA will continue working towards our vision for an Australian health care system that is free of racism, and one that affords Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples the health care they have a right to expect and receive.

4.1 AMA : SAFE AND STEADY HEALTH BUDGET, BUT BIGGER REFORMS ARE STILL TO COME

VIEW NACCHO TV HERE

The Government has tonight delivered a safe and steady Health Budget, which outlines a broad range of initiatives across the health portfolio – but some of the bigger reforms and the biggest challenges are yet to come.

AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, said the Government has provided some necessary funding to aged care, mental health, rural health, the PBS, and medical research, with many decisions directly responding to AMA policy.

Download full Press Release

4.1 Safe and Steady Health Budget, But Bigger Reforms Are Still to Come

4.2 AMSA Rural

AMSA Rural enthusiastically supports the changes to rural bonding and the opportunities presented by the Junior Doctor Training Program and the National Rural Generalist Pathway.

While the MDMS network may represent an expensive mis-step in addressing rural health workforce shortages, with funds better spent on rural Specialty Training Places, the announcement of better targeting, monitoring and planning for future rural workforce needs is encouraging.

Overall, AMSA Rural welcomes the government’s renewed focus on health equity for rural and regional communities, and looks forward to hearing more details of the Stronger Rural Health Strategy.

Download full Press Release

4.2 AMSA RH MR-  RURAL HEALTH IN FOCUS

5.NRHA :RURAL HEALTH BUDGET $$ WELCOME – BUT NOT ENOUGH

New funding to attract more doctors to country areas has been welcomed by the National Rural Health Alliance, Australia’s peak body for rural and remote health.

“We are pleased tonight’s Federal Budget allocates $550 million over 10 years to help fill the health workforce gaps that exist in so many parts of country Australia,” said Alliance CEO Mark Diamond.

The government says it will deliver 3,000 new specialist GPs, and 3,000 additional nurses over ten years mainly through providing end to end training in country areas.

“It’s not only doctors and nurses that are missing outside major cities. Equally there are not enough allied health professionals. Some areas have no psychologists, no physiotherapists, no occupational therapists,” Mr Diamond said.

A new Workforce Incentive Program will provide some funds to general practices to employ more nurses, doctors and, for the first time, allied health workers.

Download full Press Release

5. National Rural Health Alliance

6.AHHA Health data boost right step on the road to reform

‘The lack of any concrete action on preventive health is concerning—it has been allowed to slip down health budget priorities, despite its proven benefits in preventing big health bills later. This particularly applies to dental health, which once again has been overlooked.

‘In terms of Closing the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, we note some modest investments, including the commitment of $5 million per year for the next 3 years to address trachoma in Aboriginal communities’, Ms Verhoeven said.

‘It is disappointing that the government didn’t take the opportunity to address one of our pre-Budget recommendations to make the administrative changes to ensure patients discharged from hospital have access to Closing the Gap prescriptions.

This would have been a practical and relatively inexpensive measure to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.’

7.1 PHAA : Budget 2018 – prevention focus goes missing

Tonight’s national Budget continues to fund the health care systems, but is woefully short on preventative health measures to keep Australians from becoming sick in the first place, according to Public Health Association Australia (PHAA) Chief Executive Michael Moore AM.

“Despite repeated advice – and repeated commitments in principle – the Government is still not developing a preventative health focus for our health system,” said Mr Moore.

“It’s true there are a few modest measures tonight – including additional vaccinations funded, very welcome measures to promote mental wellbeing, and the Good Sports Program to reduce alcohol consumption in sporting contexts.”

“But Australia’s people will continue to experience avoidable chronic disease in the years ahead. People who should be destined to live healthy lives will not because of the preventable diseases they will suffer. While we need to look after the aged populations and those requiring medical treatment, we need to focus even more heavily on the younger generation we are failing,” Mr Moore said.

“The inevitable cost to Budgets far into the future will be greater than the investments that might have been funded.”

“What is also noticeable is that there are no preventive measures in this budget which impact negatively on industry.”

“Just last week we saw Australia’s first ever dedicated conference of preventative health professionals, with 300 expert Australians gathering in Sydney to debate the way forward to a more preventive approach to health and wellbeing.

“Yet tonight, preventive health has again been relegated to a low priority.”

“Future Health Ministers and Treasurers will rue the mistakes of this generation, including tonight’s Budget, in failing to invest in preventive health.”

Mr Moore also acknowledged Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt for securing a number of important initiatives in Indigenous health, Australia’s most agonizing continuing health crisis.

The Public Health Association welcomed a number of specific initiatives in tonight’s Budget:

  • Improving physical activity with a $50.4m investment to get people moving and expanding other physical activity.
  • Funding to expanding four forms of vaccinations, including Pertussis, and a targeted program to address low vaccination rate areas.
  • A National Injury Prevention Strategy for children and older people, including a program to prevent water and snow sport injuries
  • Additional funding for suicide prevention

Download 2 full Press Release

7.1 PHAA Prevention

7. 2 PHAA

NACCHO would also wish Michael a healthy future

8.RACGP Signs Federal Government beginning to recognise vital role of specialist GPs in Australia’s healthcare system

 

The Federal Government’s commitment to fund training for general practice is a sign political leaders are finally beginning to understand the vital role of specialist GPs in Australia’s healthcare system.

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) President Dr Bastian Seidel commended the government for investing to fund a world class, contemporary postgraduate training program for medical graduates through Australian medical colleges and in particular through the RACGP.

“We are cautiously optimistic that the penny has finally dropped,” Dr Seidel said.

“A commitment to unconditionally fund postgraduate GP training will ensure that all Australians have access to a doctor with specialist qualifications in general practice, and this has not always been the case.

Additionally, the commitment to support 3,000 international medical graduates (IMGs) to attain Fellowship as a specialist general practitioner is welcomed.

“Far too often, doctors without any postgraduate qualifications were placed in so called ‘areas of need’ and ‘district workforce shortages’.

“They were asked to work there with little or no professional support or continuous professional training.

“The funding made available in this year’s Federal Budget will finally start to rectify this shortcoming.”

Dr Seidel said while Australian GPs would be pleased with the Federal Government’s commitment to improving general practice training, there were still significant issues that needed to be addressed before the next Federal election. The indexation of general practice consultation item numbers, whilst welcome, does not go far enough.

Dr Seidel said he would like to see the Federal Government show its commitment to general practice by increasing the Medicare rebate for GP attendances by 18.5% to bring specialist GPs into line with other medical specialist attendance items.

“We must see coherent and cohesive funding for general practice that reflects the expertise of all specialist GPs.

“Appropriate investment in general practice has been proven, repeatedly, to be the most cost-effective way to deliver effective healthcare to the Australian population, particularly as the numbers of patients with chronic conditions continue to increase.

“Patients want to spend more time with their GP, and the evidence shows that time with your GP is good for patients,” Dr Seidel said.

“The Federal Government can really make a difference to the quality of care GPs are able to provide Australians by increasing this rebate before the Federal election and as a matter of urgency

 

9.CHF Health budget includes welcome consumer focus

The #digitalhealth slides from @CHFofAustralia #HealthBudget18 response. Note : Funding for things where digital health is a big part. Especially interesting is the work happening with Healthy Active Beginnings.Thx @deanhewson ‬

All 23 slides here:

Record funding for hospitals from 2020 and a $5 billion rise for aged care are contained in a Federal Budget which also provides for more consumer-focused approaches to care and research.

Download full Press Release

9. CHF Federal Health Budget

10. Vision 2020 Australia welcomes the Australian Government’s investment to target major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Vision 2020 Australia welcomes the Australian Government’s investment to target major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Download full press release

10. Vision Australia welcomes Eye Health Funding

The Government’s 2018-19 budget allocated $34.3 million to the eye health issues that disproportionately impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Vision 2020 Australia CEO Carla Northam said “Our members consistently tell us that the three major causes of vision loss for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are eye problems associated with diabetic retinopathy, uncorrected refractive error and the length of time people wait for cataract surgery.

“With the right amount of funding, we can address these debilitating eye conditions.”

Dr Dawn Casey, Acting CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) welcomed the focus on providing eye health checks, especially for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have diabetes. “We need to do all we can to make sure all Aboriginal people with diabetes have an annual eye test. At the moment, only around half are getting their eyes checked every year.”

Professor Hugh Taylor from Indigenous Eye Health, the University of Melbourne identified access to cataract surgery as needing serious attention. He said “Vision loss from cataract is twice as common in Indigenous Australians and they have to wait almost twice as long for surgery.”

Professor Taylor added “Eye care services at the local and regional levels must be planned and resourced to meet population-based needs.”

While the details on how the Government will spend the $34.3 million are unclear, Vision 2020 Australia believes that activity must focus on cutting cataract surgery wait times, making sure everyone with diabetes has an annual eye test and getting glasses to people who need them. Through these measures the Government will meet its commitment to address the major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health 50 + #JobAlerts and @senbmckenzie #Scholarship opportunities #Rural Health @RoyalFlyingDoc #Features @Apunipima @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @IUIH_ @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

For scholarships see Part 2 below after job listings

Jobs of the week 

Job opportunities at NACCHO – Canberra

Senior Project Officer Closing 10 May

Senior Grants Officer Closing 10 May

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled health organisation (NACCHO) is the national peak body representing Aboriginal health through its membership of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS). ACCHSs are the leading and preferred provider of culturally safe and comprehensive multidisciplinary primary health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities.

NACCHO represents its Membership of over 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services at the Commonwealth government level, advocating to government for evidence-supported, community-developed responses and solutions to the deep-seated social, economic and political conditions that prevail in many Aboriginal communities

The Senior Policy Officer is one of a team of policy officers and has responsibility for the development and implementation of the NACCHO’s policy papers.

The NACCHO’s Senior Policy Officer role is broad and covers a range of duties and activities across the policy lifecycle. The Senior Policy Officer provides timely, accurate and persuasive advice, underpinned by analysis, contextual awareness and stakeholder consultation. The NACCHO undertakes policy work in a range of different environments.

Officers in this role provide advice on highly complex and sensitive policy matters that contribute to the NACCHO’s and stakeholder’s strategic policy direction.

More info apply HERE

NACCHO is seeking a qualified Senior Grants Manager.

The Senior Grants Manager is responsible for overseeing the orderly administration of NACCHO’s grants management program and executing the National Network Funding Agreements. This will include developing implementation plans, tracking and reporting on deliverables, assessing application budget reviews and any other work assignments in accordance with established fiscal year work flow and job priorities.

Working collaboratively as part of the wider team, this role will develop systems and tools for efficient grant management and reporting; and ensure a coordinated approach to risk-management in cooperation with the Finance Team.

More info Apply HERE

There are 6 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

  • Medicare Coordinator
  • Primary Health Care Manager – Napranum
  • Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner – Napranum
  • Patient Safety Coordinator
  • Program Advisor Nutrition Strategy
  • Health Worker – Tackling Indigenous Smoking – Mapoon 
The link to  job vacancies on website is

 

There are 3 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

 + Podiatrist (Ongoing Full Time Position based at Windsor) + Care Coordinator CCSS (Ongoing, Full Time position located in Caboolture) MATSICHS + Family Partnership Worker – ANFPP South (Ongoing, Full Time Position)

 There are 13 JOBS at ATSICHS Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 30 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

There are 6 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

 

There are 3 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

Clinical Services Coordinator

Job No: 97950
Location: Adelaide, SA
Closing Date: 9 May 2018
  • Dynamic leadership opportunity for a Registered Nurse (RN3) or Aboriginal Health Practitioner (HS L6) to drive improved health outcomes for Aboriginal people
  • Predominant and well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia
  • Attractive remuneration with salary sacrificing options

About the Organisation 

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia, providing a range of health care and community support services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and advance their social, cultural and economic status.

More info Apply HERE

The MJD Foundation is seeking Expressions of Interest to fill the important role of Chairperson for the organisation.
The current Chairperson Neil Westbury PSM has informed the Board that he wishes to stand aside after 7 years in the position.
Neil’s succession plan has been openly discussed with Board members and Senior Management and the plan is for him to step down as Chair once a suitable replacement is found.
As a volunteer Chairperson, you will have the skills and experience to drive the Strategic direction of the organisation and will be required to work in close partnership with its CEO. You will have Board experience as well as a strong track record of successfully working with Aboriginal people and be familiar with issues and challenges facing remote communities.
The MJDF enjoys a cohesive and multi-skilled Board that is supported by Finance,  Research and Risk Management Sub-committees that provide expert advice and support to the Board. The organisation also has a highly professional and dedicated staff team with an impressive track record in supporting our clients.
Attached is a Position Description outlining the role and the skills we are seeking.
Please send your Expression of Interest, addressing the selection criteria to Board member Janice Oake (janiceoake@icloud.com) by 31st May 2018.
The preferred candidate may be invited to meet with the Board as a guest at Board meetings before a final decision is made.
Download Position details HERE

More Info apply :

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.Scholarships to improve regional health services

Health professionals in rural and regional Australia wanting to increase their skills are being encouraged to apply for financial support under the Australian Government’s Health Workforce Scholarship Program.

Officially launching the program today, Minister for Rural Health, Bridget McKenzie, said the Government was investing $11 million in the scholarships over three years from 2017-18 to help make health services more accessible for people living in country areas.

“The Health Workforce Scholarship Program provides support based on the needs of communities — whether for GPs, nurses, dentists or allied health professionals,” Minister McKenzie said.

“The program is delivering better outcomes for patients in rural and regional communities across Australia by supporting health practitioners to build up their professional skills.

“Support may be provided to health professionals already working in areas experiencing a shortage of services, or to those willing to move to areas where there is a lack of services.

“Importantly, most of the scholarships in the forthcoming round will include a ‘return of service’ obligation to ensure the recipients practise in rural and regional Australia for at least 12 months on completion of their studies.”

Geraldton resident and Indigenous Community Business Development Officer, Lenny Papertalk, is one health professional who has made the decision to apply for a scholarship.

“I will be applying for a scholarship to pursue a Masters of Social Work at University of Western Australia after having identified a high number of youth suffering from depression and mental illness within the Indigenous communities in Geraldton,” she said.

“I’m very committed to making a difference in rural health, so am hopeful of gaining this scholarship in order to improve health outcomes in my community.”

Tim Shackleton, CEO of Rural Health West in Western Australia, said the scholarship program would ultimately help to expand the range of health services available for people living in rural and remote communities in WA.

“The Health Workforce Scholarship Program will provide grants to postgraduate rural health professionals undertaking further study in the field of medicine, nursing or allied health,” he said.

“One-off bursary and support payments are available to help cover the cost of attending training and these payments can be put towards course fees, conference registrations, and accommodation and transports costs.”

The Health Workforce Scholarship Program is administered by a consortium of Rural Workforce Agencies (RWAs) led by Health Workforce Queensland. RWAs are located in all states and the Northern Territory, and all RWAs are included in the consortium.

The RWAs work closely with Primary Health Networks, local and state governments and other workforce planning groups to determine what skills are needed and where.

Further information about the Health Workforce Scholarship Program, including how to apply for a scholarship can be found on each of the Rural Workforce Agencies websites.

State Rural Workforce Agency Website Address
QLD Health Workforce Queensland https://www.healthworkforce.com.au/
NSW Rural Doctors Network https://www.nswrdn.com.au/site/index.cfm
VIC Rural Workforce Agency Victoria https://www.rwav.com.au/
TAS HR Plus https://www.hrplustas.com.au/
SA Rural Doctors Workforce Agency https://www.ruraldoc.com.au/
WA Rural Health West http://www.ruralhealthwest.com.au/
NT Northern Territory Primary Health Network https://www.ntphn.org.au/health-professionals

 

Applications are now open to lead the Indigenous Girls’ STEM Academy!

An exciting opportunity to invest in a generation of . Apps close 4 May.

More info

Applications are open for Round 1 of the IAHA RFDS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Scholarship, which aims to support Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander allied health students to undertake a remote/rural clinical placement.

Apply here –

Applications for Milparanga – developing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leadership.

Milparanga is a leadership development program and was formerly known as the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leaders Program (NATSILP).

It is an 11-day, two session program, with the first session taking place in a regional location and the second session taking place in Canberra. Milparanga is for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who are 21 years or older.

There are full scholarships available (Australian Government), as well as placements for those who obtain their own funding.

The cost of Milparanga is $12,500 plus GST. This includes all accommodation, meals, on course travel, and equipment. Participants may be responsible for a small component of their travel to and from major transport services.

The participant contribution is $200 plus GST towards program costs and for lifetime membership of the Network of Fellows of the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation. They may also be responsible for a small component of their travel to and from major transport services.

Below are links to the website and social media posts, to share through your networks:

 

Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Queensland can now apply to participate in this year’s Queensland Indigenous Youth Leadership Program (QIYLP).

Deputy Premier, Treasurer and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Jackie Trad urged eligible people to apply and reap the benefits of QIYLP.

“This program is extremely beneficial to some of our youngest generations as it allows participants to develop their skills and gain valuable leadership experience,” Ms Trad said.

“QIYLP nourishes the ideas of young and emerging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders – allowing them to grow and create positive change in their communities.”

Minister for Child Safety, Youth and Women Di Farmer said the Queensland Indigenous Youth Leadership Program was a wonderful opportunity for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to develop leadership skills and learn about influencing change.

“The program brings together 40 participants from across the state to participate in a six-day residential program where not only will they develop leadership skills but they will also learn about the democratic processes in Queensland,” Ms Farmer said.

“The program is one of the country’s most prestigious and effective Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young leadership

programs.

“The young participants will undertake a range of experiences in QIYLP including leadership and professional development workshops, mentoring and networking opportunities and attend parliament workshops.”

“Many of these young people could be Indigenous or community leaders of the future and it is a great chance for them to have this type of experience under their belts as they embark into leadership roles,” Ms Farmer said.

“Applications are now open for those aged 18 to 25 years, for the six-day residential program that will take place in Brisbane from 30 June 2018 to 5 July 2018.

“There has already been more than 450 young people participate in QIYLP since its original inception in 2004 as a three day program, and what is even more pleasing is to see some returning as mentors and co-facilitators at this year’s program.

“I’d urge any young Aboriginal and Torres Strait young person to consider applying for the QIYLP.”

QIYLP is co-delivered by the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women and the Queensland Parliamentary Service, and supported through a partnership with mining company Glencore.

Applications are open now and will close on 4 May 2018.

For more information visit

http://www.qld.gov.au/atsi ( http://www.qld.gov.au/atsi )

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce Training News : @amsed24_7 New Module! #Privacy of Personal Health Information for Non-Clinical ACCHO Staff. Privacy of personal health information is one of the essential training elements for everyone working in healthcare

 ” Privacy is an important element in the trust between health service providers and patients.

It is every person’s right to be able to share personal health information and to have the information provided kept private. It is a serious breach of trust when this right is not respected.

Every employee of an Aboriginal health service will come across personal health information of patients at some time – it may be by accident, or as part of your role.

It may be because someone tells you something they shouldn’t and it may be because you have taken a phone message to pass on to a clinician.

Regardless, you need to know what your responsibility is and how you work with the rest of your colleagues to respect the right of every single Patient of your Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS).”

From AMSED 24/7 A world of eLearning 51 Modules at your fingertips

Read over 130 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce articles published over past 6 years and SUBSCRIBE here

Privacy of Personal Health Information for Non-Clinical Staff

View here with Free Trial Offer

This module is aimed at everyone working in an AMS who provides support other than direct clinical care.

It is for drivers, receptionists, environmental health workers, cleaners, finance officers, and IT support officers. Depending on the program, it may be appropriate for some program workers.

For all those providing direct clinical care and managers of clinical care workers, there is another module called ‘Privacy of Personal Health Information for Client Care Staff’.

At the end of this module participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the duty to keep personal health information confidential.
  2. Describe the principle that applies to disclosing personal health information.
  3. Identify examples of how breaches may occur.
  4. Identify simple ways to avoid breaches of privacy

At the recent WA Aboriginal Community Health Sector State Conference 2018

NACCHO Media Alerts : Top 10 Current Aboriginal Health News Stories to keep you up to date

1. Aboriginal sexual health: The Australian : Was the syphilis epidemic preventable ? NACCHO responds

2.Royal Flying Doctors Service extra 4-year funding $84 million Mental Health and Dental Services

3.Nurses PAQ continues political membership campaign spreading false and misleading information about our cultural safety

4.AMSANT has called for re-doubled efforts to implement the recommendations of the Royal Commission into the care and protection of children in partnership with NT Aboriginal leaders

5.Dialysis facilities worth $17 million are sitting padlocked, empty and unused in WA’s north

6.ALRC Report into Incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

7. Minister Ken Wyatt : Listening to Indigenous Needs: Healthy Ears Program Extended with $29.4 commitment

8.Tangentyere Alice Springs Women’s Family Safety Group visits Canberra

9.Minister Ken Wyatt launches our NACCHO RACGP National Guide to a preventative health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

10. Your guide to a healthy Easter : #Eggs-actly  

 

1.Aboriginal sexual health: The Australian : Was the syphilis epidemic preventable ? NACCHO responds

“These (STIs) are preventable diseases and we need increased testing, treatment plans and a ­culturally appropriate health ­education campaign that focuses resources on promoting safe-sex messages delivered to at-risk ­communities by our trained Aboriginal workforce,”

Pat Turner, chief executive of peak body the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, is adamant about this.

Read full article in Easter Monday The Australian or Part B below

2.Royal Flying Doctors Service extra 4-year funding $84 million Mental Health and Dental Services

Read full press release here

 

3.Nurses PAQ continues political membership campaign spreading false and misleading information about cultural safety

SEE NACCHO Response

SEE an Indigenous Patients Response

See Nurses PAQ Misleading and false campaign

4. AMSANT  has called for re-doubled efforts to implement the recommendations of the Royal Commission into the care and protection of children in partnership with NT Aboriginal leaders

Read full AMSANT press Release

Listen to interview with Donna Ah Chee

Press Release @NACCHOChair calls on the Federal Government to work with us to keep our children safe

#WeHaveTheSolutions Plus comments from CEO’s @Anyinginyi @DanilaDilba

4.Dialysis facilities worth $17 million are sitting padlocked, empty and unused in WA’s north

Read full Story HERE

6.ALRC Report into Incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People;

Read Download Full Transcript

Senator Patrick Dodson

Download the report from HERE

Community Groups Call For Action on Indigenous Incarceration Rates

7. Minister Ken Wyatt : Listening to Indigenous Needs: Healthy Ears Program Extended with $29.4 commitment

The Australian Government has committed $29.4 million to extend the Healthy Ears – Better Hearing, Better Listening Program, to help ensure tens of thousands more Indigenous children and young adults grow up with good hearing and the opportunities it brings.

Read Press Release HEAR

8.Tangentyere Alice Springs Women’s Family Safety Group visits Canberra

This week the Tangentyere Women’s Family Safety Group from Alice Springs were in Canberra. They shared with politicians, their own solutions for their own communities, and they are making an enormous difference.
Big thanks to all the Tangentyere women who made it to Canberra.

Read Download the Press Release

TANGENTYERE WOMEN’S FAMILY SAFETY GROUP (FED

9. Minister Ken Wyatt launches our NACCHO RACGP National Guide to a preventative health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Read press releases and link to Download the National Guide

10. Your guide to a  healthy Easter : #Eggs-actly  

And finally hope you had a Happy Easter all you mob ! After you have enjoyed your chocolate eggs and hot cross buns , this is how much exercise you will require to work of those Easter treats .

For medical and nutrition advice please check with your ACCHO Doctor , Health Promotion / Lifestyle teams or one of our ACCHO nutritionists

 

Part B Full Text The Australian Article Easter Monday

There is no reason it should have happened, especially not in a first-world country like Australia, but it has: indigenous communities in the country’s north are in the grip of wholly treatable sexually transmitted diseases.

In the case of syphilis, it is an epidemic — West Australian Labor senator Patrick Dodson ­described it as such, in a fury, when health department bureaucrats mumbled during Senate estimates about having held a few “meetings” on the matter.

There have been about 2000 syphilis notifications — with at least 13 congenital cases, six of them fatal — since the outbreak began in northern Queensland in 2011, before spreading to the Northern Territory, Western Australia and, finally, South Australia.

What’s worse, it could have been stopped. James Ward, of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, wrote in mid-2011 that there had been a “downward trend” over several years and it was likely at that point that the “elimination of syphilis is achievable within indigenous ­remote communities”.

But governments were slow to react, and Ward is now assisting in the design of an $8.8 million emergency “surge” treatment approach on the cusp of being rolled out in Cairns and Darwin, with sites in the two remaining affected states yet to be identified.

It will be an aggressive strategy — under previous guidelines, you had to have been identified during a health check as an active carrier of syphilis to be treated. Now, anyone who registers antibodies for the pathogen during a blood prick test, whether actively carrying syphilis or not, will receive an ­immediate penicillin injection in an attempt to halt the infection’s geographical spread.

This is key: the high mobility of indigenous people in northern and central Australia means pathogens cross jurisdictions with ­impunity. Australian Medical ­Association president Michael Gannon calls syphilis a “clever bacterium that will never go away”, warning that “bugs don’t respect state borders”.

Olga Havnen, one of the Northern Territory’s most respected public health experts, points out that many people “will have connections and relations from the Torres Strait through to the Kimberley and on to Broome — and it’s only a matter of seven or eight kilometres between PNG and the northernmost islands there in the Torres Strait”.

“This is probably something that’s not really understood by the broader Australian community,” Havnen says. “I suspect once you get a major outbreak of something like encephalitis or Dengue fever, any of those mosquito-borne diseases, and that starts to encroach onto the mainland, then people will start to get a bit worried.”

Olga Havnen, CEO of the Danila Dilba Health Service, says transmission is complex issue in Australia’s indigenous communities.
Olga Havnen, CEO of the Danila Dilba Health Service, says transmission is complex issue in Australia’s indigenous communities.

But it is not just syphilis — ­indeed, not even just STIs — that have infectious disease authorities concerned and the network of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations stretched.

Chlamydia, the nation’s most frequently diagnosed STI in 2016 based on figures from the Kirby Institute at the University of NSW, is three times more likely to be contracted by an indigenous Australian than a non-­indigenous one.

The rate was highest in the NT, at 1689.1 notifications per 100,000 indigenous people, compared with 607.9 per 100,000 non-indigenous Territorians. If you’re indigenous, you’re seven times more likely to contract gonorrhoea, spiking to 15 times more likely if only women are considered. Syphilis, five times more likely.

As the syphilis response gets under way, health services such as the one Havnen leads, the Darwin-based Danila Dilba, will be given extra resources to tackle it. “With proper resourcing, if you want to be doing outreach with those people who might be visitors to town living in the long grass, then we’re probably best placed to be able to do that,” she says.

But the extra focus comes with a warning. A spate of alleged sexual assaults on Aboriginal children, beginning with a two-year-old in Tennant Creek last month and followed by three more alleged ­attacks, has raised speculation of a link between high STI rates and evidence of child sexual assault.

After the first case, former NT children’s commissioner Howard Bath told this newspaper that STI rates were “a better indicator of background levels of abuse than reporting because so many of those cases don’t get reported to anyone, whereas kids with serious infections do tend to go to a ­doctor”. Others, including Alice Springs town councillor Jacinta Price and Aboriginal businessman Warren Mundine, raised the ­spectre of the need for removing more at-risk indigenous children from dangerous environments.

Children play AFL in Yeundumu. Picture: Jason Edwards
Children play AFL in Yeundumu. Picture: Jason Edwards

However, Sarah Giles, Danila Dilba’s clinical director and a medical practitioner of 20 years’ standing in northern Australia, warns this kind of response only exacerbates the problem. She is one of a range of public health authorities who, like Havnen, say connecting high STI figures to the very real scourge of child sex abuse simply makes no sense. They do not carry correlated data sets, the experts say.

“One of the things that’s really unhelpful about trying to manage STIs at a population level is to link it with child abuse and mandatory reporting, and for people to be fearful of STIs,” Giles says. “The problem is that when they’re conflated and when communities feel that they can’t get help ­because things might be misinterpreted or things might be reported, they’re less likely to present with symptoms. The majority of STIs are in adults and they’re sexually transmitted.”

Havnen says there is evidence of STIs being transmitted non-sexually, including to children, such as through poor hand ­hygiene, although Giles says that is “reasonably rare”. And while NT data shows five children under 12 contracted either chlamydia or gonorrhoea in 2016 (none had syphilis), and there were another five under 12 last year, Havnen points to the fact that over the past decade there has been no increasing trend in under 12s being affected. Where there has been a rise in the NT is in people aged between 13 and 19, with annual gonorrhoea notifications increasing from 64 cases in the 14-15-year-old ­female cohort in 2006 to 94 notifications in 2016.

In the 16-17-year-old female ­cohort the same figures were 96 and 141 and in the 12-13-year-old group it rose from 20 in 2006 to 33 in 2016. Overall, for both boys and girls under 16, annual gonorrhoea notifications rose from 109 in 2006 to 186 in 2016, according to figures provided to the royal ­commission into child detention by NT Health. Havnen describes the rise as “concerning but not, on its own, evidence of increasing ­levels of sexual abuse”.

Ward is more direct. Not all STIs are the result of sexual abuse, he warns, and not all sexual abuse results in an STI. If you’re a health professional trying to deal with an epidemiological wildfire, the distinction matters — the data and its correct interpretations can literally be a matter of life and death.

Indeed, in its own written cav­eats to the material it provided to the royal commission, the department warns that sexual health data is “very much subject to variations in testing” and warns against making “misleading assumptions about trends”. Ward says: “Most STIs notified in remote indigenous communities are ­assumed to be the result of sex ­between consenting adults — that is, 16 to 30-year-olds. Of the under 16s, the majority are 14 and 15-year-olds.” He says a historically high background prevalence of STIs in remote indigenous communities — along with a range of other ­infectious diseases long eradicated elsewhere — is to blame for their ongoing presence. Poor education, health services and hygiene contribute, and where drug and ­alcohol problems exist, sexually risky behaviour is more likely too. The lingering impact of colonisation and arrival of diseases then still common in broader ­society cannot be underestimated.

But Ward claims that an apparently high territory police figure of about 700 cases of “suspected child sexual offences” in the NT over the past five years may be misleading. He says a large number of these are likely to be the result of mandatory reporting, where someone under 16 is known to have a partner with an age gap of more than two years, or someone under 14 is known to be engaging in sexual activity. Ward points out that 15 is the nationwide ­median sexual debut age, an age he suggests is dropping. At any rate, he argues, child sex abuse is unlikely to be the main reason for that high rate of mandatory ­reporting in the NT.

Areyonga is a small Aboriginal community a few hours drive from Alice Springs.
Areyonga is a small Aboriginal community a few hours drive from Alice Springs.

Data matters, and so does how it is used. Chipping away at the perception of child sexual abuse in indigenous communities are the latest figures from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare showing the rate of removals for that crime is actually higher in non-indigenous Australia.

According to a report this month from the AIHW, removals based on substantiated sex abuse cases in 2016-17 were starkly different for each cohort: 8.3 per cent for indigenous children, from a total of 13,749 removals, and 13.4 per cent for non-indigenous children, from 34,915 removals.

Havnen concedes there is a need for better reporting of child abuse and has called for a confidential helpline that would be free of charge and staffed around the clock by health professionals.

It’s based on a model already in use in Europe that she says deals with millions of calls a year — but it would require a comprehensive education and publicity campaign if it were to gain traction in remote Australia. And that means starting with the adults.

“If you’re going to do sex ­education in schools and you start to move into the area about sexual abuse and violence and so on, it’s really important that adults are ­educated first about what to do with that information,” she says. “Because too often if you just ­educate kids, and they come home and make a disclosure, they end up being told they’re liars.”

These challenges exist against the backdrop of a community already beset by a range of infectious diseases barely present elsewhere in the country, including the STIs that should be so easily treatable. It is, as Havnen is the first to admit, a complex matter.

Cheryl Jones, president of the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, says the answer is better primary treatment solutions and education, rather than trying to solve the problem after it has ­occurred. “For any of these public health infectious disease problems in ­remote and rural areas, we need to support basic infrastructure at the point of care and work alongside communities to come up with ­solutions,” she says.

Sisters play in the mud after a rare rain at Hoppy's 'town camp' on the outskirts of Alice Springs.
Sisters play in the mud after a rare rain at Hoppy’s ‘town camp’ on the outskirts of Alice Springs.

Pat Turner, chief executive of peak body the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, is adamant about this. “These (STIs) are preventable diseases and we need increased testing, treatment plans and a ­culturally appropriate health ­education campaign that focuses resources on promoting safe-sex messages delivered to at-risk ­communities by our trained Aboriginal workforce,” Turner says.

The Australian Medical ­Association has called for the formation of a national Centre for Disease Control, focusing on global surveillance and most likely based in the north, as being “urgently needed to provide national leadership and to co-ordinate rapid and effective public health responses to manage communicable diseases and outbreaks”.

“The current approach to disease threats, and control of infectious diseases, relies on disjointed state and commonwealth formal structures, informal networks, collaborations, and the goodwill of public health and infectious disease physicians,” the association warned in a submission to the Turnbull government last year.

However, the federal health ­department has rebuffed the CDC argument, telling the association that “our current arrangements are effective” and warning the suggestion could introduce “considerable overlap and duplication with existing functions”.

“I think it (the CDC) might have some merit, if it helps to ­advocate with government about what needs to happen,” Havnen says, “but if these things are going to be targeted at Aboriginal bodies, it needs to be a genuine partnership. It’s got to be informed by the realities on the ground and what we know. That information has to be fed up into the planning process.”

Minister @KenWyattMP launches NACCHO @RACGP National guide for healthcare professionals to improve health of #Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients

 

All of our 6000 staff in 145 member services in 305 health settings across Australia will have access to this new and update edition of the National Guide. It’s a comprehensive edition for our clinicians and support staff that updates them all with current medical practice.

“NACCHO is committed to quality healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, and will work with all levels of government to ensure accessibility for all.”

NACCHO Chair John Singer said the updated National Guide would help governments improve health policy and lead initiatives that support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can Download the Guide via this LINK

A/Prof Peter O’Mara, NACCHO Chair John Singer Minister Ken Wyatt & RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel launch the National guide at Parliament house this morning

“Prevention is always better than cure. Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

Minister Ken Wyatt highlights what is new to the 3rd Edition of the National Guide-including FASD, lung cancer, young people lifecycle, family abuse & violence and supporting families to optimise child safety & wellbeing : Pic Lisa Whop SEE Full Press Release Part 2 Below

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) have joined forces to produce a guide that aims to improve the level of healthcare currently being delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and close the gap.

Chair of RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Associate Professor Peter O’Mara said the third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (the National Guide) is an important resource for all health professionals to deliver best practice healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

“The National Guide will support all healthcare providers, not just GPs, across Australia to improve prevention and early detection of disease and illness,” A/Prof O’Mara said.

“The prevention and early detection of disease and illness can improve people’s lives and increase their lifespans.

“The National Guide will support healthcare providers to feel more confident that they are looking for health issues in the right way.”

RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel said the RACGP is committed to tackling the health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

“The National Guide plays a vital role in closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health disparity,” Dr Seidel said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should have equal access to quality healthcare across Australia and the National guide is an essential part of ensuring these services are provided.

“GPs and other healthcare providers who implement the recommendations within the National Guide will play an integral role in reducing health disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, and ensuring culturally responsive and appropriate healthcare is always available.”

The updated third edition of the National Guide can be found on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website.

 

Free to download on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website:

http://www.racgp.org.au/national-guide/

and NACCHO

Part 2 Prevention and Early Diagnosis Focus for a Healthier Future

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians.

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, today launched the updated third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Prevention is always better than cure,” said Minister Wyatt. “Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

“The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.

“It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

The guide, which was first published in 2005, is a joint project between the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners RACGP).

“To give you some idea of the high regard in which it is held, the last edition was downloaded 645,000 times since its release in 2012,” said Minister Wyatt.

“The latest edition highlights the importance of individual, patient-centred care and has been developed to reflect local and regional needs.

“Integrating resources like the national guide across the whole health system plays a pivotal role in helping us meet our Closing the Gap targets.

“The Turnbull Government is committed to accelerating positive change and is investing in targeted activities that have delivered significant reductions in the burden of disease.

“Rates of heart disease, smoking and binge drinking are down. We are on track to achieve the child mortality target for 2018 and deaths associated with kidney and respiratory diseases have also reduced.”

The National Guide is funded under the Indigenous Australian’s Health Programme as part of a record $3.6 billion investment across four financial years.

The RACGP received $429,000 to review, update, publish and distribute the third edition, in hard copy and electronic formats.

The National Guide is available on the RACGP website or by contacting RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health on 1800 000 251 or aboriginalhealth@racgp.org.au.

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Cultural Safety Media Debate : The Truth behind the Nurses Code of Conduct and the false claims enforcing #WhitePriviledge “to apologise to #Indigenous clients for being white’

 

” National media outlets ( Including Peta Credlin on SkyNews and News Corp Newspapers see Part 5 below plus Today Tonight SA ) have aired wrongful claims that the codes would force white nurses to ‘apologise to Indigenous clients for being white’.

The codes do not say that – that idea was invented and then pushed on these media programs.

These stories were not based in facts, but seem to have been driven by the partisan politics of a fringe nursing group, and conservative politicians who have been approached to comment on the wrongful claims.

I am sure that some of our nursing and midwifery members and community will be hearing disturbing claims.

Let me be clear, nurses and midwives under the new code do not have to announce their ‘white privilege’ before treating Indigenous clients.

 I am really proud of these new codes, and not only because the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) contributed to their development, which included extensive consultation across nursing and midwifery and at the time no one opposed the inclusion of cultural safety “

Janine Mohamed CEO CATSINaM see IndigenousX  Part 1 below

Read over 90 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Racism articles published last 6 Years

Read 30 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Cultural Safety published last 6 years

” It is clear from the 2018 Closing the Gap Report tabled by Prime Minister Turnbull in February 2018 that Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples still experience poorer health outcomes than non-Indigenous Australians.

It is well understood these inequities are a result of the colonisation process and the many discriminatory policies to which Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Australians were subjected to, and the ongoing experience of discrimination today.

All healthcare leaders and health professionals have a role to play in closing the gap.

The approach the NMBA has taken for nurses and midwives (the largest workforce in the healthcare system) by setting expectations around culturally safe practice, reflects the current expectations of governments to provide a culturally safe health system.

(For more information please see the COAG Health Council 4 August 2017 Communiqué).

Combined Press Release Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia ,The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation, the Australian College of Nursing, the Australian College of Midwives and the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait see in full Part 2 Below

 ” I was stunned to read businessman Graeme Haycroft’s comments regarding nurses and indigenous Australians on the weekend, as part of his criticism of the new NMBA Codes and the term cultural safety which is defined in a glossary connected to the codes.

These codes were the subject of lengthy consultations with the professions of nursing and midwifery and other stakeholders including community representatives.

This review was comprehensive and evidenced-based. Our union and our national body the Australian Nursing Midwifery Federation (ANMF) were active participants in these consultations.

The codes, written by nurses and midwives for nurses and midwives, seek to ensure the individual needs and backgrounds of each patient are taken into account during treatment.”

QNMU Secretary Beth Mohle issued a statement clarifying misleading comments in the media around the NMBA’s new Codes of Conduct for nurses and midwives: See in Full part 3 Below

And just to reinforce that point, the entire premise for the segment was false.

There is no requirement for nurses to apologise for being white, which would be very awkward for the more the more than 1500 Indigenous nurses across Australia, and the countless others who also aren’t white to begin with. But, even for the nurses who are – THERE IS NO REQUIREMENT FOR THEM TO APOLOGISE FOR BEING WHITE.

So, why on Earth would Today Tonight run such a story?

Why would they base a story off the demonstrably false allegations of this Graeme Haycroft person? “

The truth behind the Nursing Code of Conduct lie ; Indigenous X Article Read in full Part 4

Watch Today Tonight TV

If you thought nursing was about quality health care, think again.

According to the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, “’cultural safety’ is as important to quality care as clinical safety”. And there’s no objective test of ‘cultural safety’; it’s determined, so the Board says, by the “recipient of care”. You see, it’s not just what the nurse does that matters but “how a health professional does something”.”

Nurses’ Code of Conduct undermines those who care

 

So who is this Graeme Haycroft

Businessman . Director of Queensland Association Services Group (QAS Group), Political activist , Anti Unionist

And according to peak Nurses groups Graeme has has no previous health experience or qualifications

From a recent BIO

Graeme has spent a lifetime working in industrial relations and was the man who set up Haycroft Workplace Solutions, leading provider of workplace consulting and management that has nearly 2000 workers on the payroll.

He is chair of the Liberal National Party’s labour market policy committee, active in the HR Nicholls Society, is a regular commentator on labour market issues, and has published his thoughts in such places as the IPA Review, Courier Mail and Online Opinion. But Graeme’s most important contributions have come through what he has done, not what he has written or said.

In the 1990s Graeme famously fought the Australian Workers’ Union to set up sub-contracting for shearers in Charleville, and went on to battle the CMFEU in helping to set up union-free high-rise construction sites. When the Howard government allowed Australian Workplace Agreements (AWAs), Graeme was instrumental in creating the most widely copied template in the country, and his business helped set up about 30,000 agreements.

Lately, Graeme has been working on a exciting new project with the potential to fundamentally change the role and power of unions in this country, while improving services for workers.

He is not waiting for politicians to act; he is changing the system himself… and after years of planning he is finally ready to show us how.

So who is this new Nurses Professional Association of Queensland ? 

Queensland Association Services Group QAS Group and Sajen Legal have established a new business model for Employee Associations Queensland Association Services Group (QAS Group), who are the contracted service providers for the  NPAQ, in conjunction with Sajen Legal have developed and set up a new association business  model.

Extract from NPAQ website

Working with a small group of dedicated and experienced nurses, they have built in a strict separation  between the money earned and spent on the one hand, and the control of the Association on the other.

To launch NPAQ, the  QAS Group , have backed the provision of services for ten years under contract. They have provided all of the seed funding for the administrative and legal services including the member  Professional Indemnity Insurance policy required of the Association..

Whilst it will be many years before all the seed funding is fully repaid, at the end of our second year, the membership income was sufficient to fund all the running expenses of the NPAQ

 ” And they quote no party politics

The NPAQ executive is resolute that there will be no party politics. Every cent of your NPAQ membership money is spent on nurse services and issues

When NACCHO pointed out that NursesPAQ was ”  using the definitions of two America right wing commentators to justify mounting a political membership campaign in which you sensationalise and falsely quote out of context  aspects of our Indigenous cultural safety in Australia ”

These videos were then removed from the NPAQ news page

http://www.npaq.com.au/news.php

Part 1 Janine Mohamed CEO CATSINaM

Originally Published Indigenous X

I rang my dad over the weekend. We’d hardly begun yarning before he asked me: “What’s this about white nurses having to apologise to us for being white?”

I could have just said, “Dad, you should know better than to believe what the mainstream media says about us.”

But instead I took the time to explain the truth behind recent misleading media reports on new codes of conduct for nurses and midwives.

Media outlets have aired wrongful claims that the codes would force white nurses to ‘apologise to Indigenous clients for being white’.

The codes do not say that – that idea was invented and then pushed on these media programs.

As Luke Pearson recently wrote for IndigenousX, these stories were not based in facts, but seem to have been driven by the partisan politics of a fringe nursing group, and conservative politicians who have been approached to comment on the wrongful claims.

I took the time to have the conversation with my Dad because it is important people understand how significant these new codes are for efforts to improve the care of our people, hence I thought it important to reach out to the readers of IndigenousX too.

I am sure that some of our nursing and midwifery members and community will be hearing disturbing claims.

Let me be clear, nurses and midwives under the new code do not have to announce their ‘white privilege’ before treating Indigenous clients.

I also had the conversation because, to be honest, I am really proud of these new codes, and not only because the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) contributed to their development, which included extensive consultation across nursing and midwifery and at the time no one opposed the inclusion of cultural safety.

We are delighted the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (NMBA) listened to CATSINaM in developing these new codes, and took on board our advice that cultural safety should be recognised as an integral part of ethical and competent professional practice. Further, they cited some of our work at CATSINaM in materials supporting the code.

CATSINaM has been at the forefront of advocating for cultural safety training for health professionals at all levels of health systems in order to improve care for both Indigenous clients and their families. Improving the cultural safety of workplaces is also a vital strategy for improving the recruitment and retention of Indigenous health professionals and staff. We need more of our people in the health system.

Rather than being criticised by sensationalist, inaccurate reports, the NMBA deserves credit for showing leadership in the area of cultural safety. They have set a great example for other health professions and organisations. It wouldn’t be the first time that nurses and midwives have been at the forefront of leading change.

In fact, this is also not the first time this has happened. In many ways, Australia is playing a game of ‘catch up’.

In New Zealand, cultural safety is part of the nursing and midwifery code of conduct and also in the laws that nurses and midwives must follow to be registered to practice. This happened well over 10 years ago because many Maori nurses worked hard for many years to teach their non-Maori colleagues about cultural safety and gain their support so they could provide better care for their people. This is considered completely normal in New Zealand.

Under the new codes, which took effect on 1 March, nurses and midwives must take responsibility for improving the cultural safety of health services and systems for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients and colleagues.

They are required to provide care that is “holistic, free of bias and racism”, and to recognise the importance of family, community, partnership and collaboration in the healthcare decision-making of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.

The codes advocate for culturally safe and respectful practice and require nurses to understand how their own culture, values, attitudes, assumptions and beliefs influence their interactions with people and families, the community and colleagues (for more information on our position on Cultural Safety please visit our website).

As part of such reflexive practice, nurses and midwives are encouraged to consider issues, such as white privilege, and how this can affect the assumptions and practices they bring to the care of clients and how they interact with their families. It must be said that privilege has been discussed in Australia for some time – although we are more used to talk about class privilege in Australia – those who have more financial resources compared to those who don’t.

Over time we have recognised there different forms of privilege – men have male privilege in contrast to women. Able-bodied people have able-bodied privilege compared to people living with different types of disabilities. Heterosexual people have heterosexual privilege compared to people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or queer. Not to mention what we have been socialised to believe is normal!

Many people have campaigned for decades to help us learn about these different forms of privilege and do something to change inequity they cause. This has involved education, advocacy, legislation, policies and professional codes of conduct. The acknowledgement of these different forms of privilege and the non-acceptance of biased treatment has resulted in improved circumstances for women, people living with disabilities and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or queer people. But there is still a long way to go in all of these areas, and especially so where they intersect.

There has been considerable work over the last 20-30 years to talk about white privilege and address the inequity that many white Australians don’t see or realise is there, although Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians live this every day.

Cultural safety training does include examining how Indigenous people have been locked out of the opportunities that most white people take for granted by past policies and this has resulted in intergenerational exclusion and Indigenous disadvantage. This means that white privilege is one of the areas that people must explore and understand. This is what the codes are asking nurses and midwives to do – to think this through so they do not make incorrect and unhelpful assumptions based on their idea of what is normal for non-Indigenous Australians, particularly white Australians.

A glossary accompanying the new codes cites CATSINaM materials. It identifies that the concept of cultural safety was developed more than 20 years ago in a First Nations’ context (in New Zealand) and holds that the recipient of care – rather than the caregiver – determines whether care is culturally safe. That means you determine if the care you receive is culturally safe.

Instead of providing care regardless of difference, such as when people say ‘I treat everyone the same’, to providing care that takes account of peoples’ unique needs. This includes their cultural needs.

While this is important for Indigenous clients, it also has the potential to improve all clients’ care by encouraging health practitioners to be more reflexive and responsive to the needs of different clients.

Despite what recent headlines might have us believe, there is widespread support for cultural safety’s implementation across the health system.

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan: 2013-2023 (2015) and its associated Implementation Plan (both available here) identify the importance of cultural safety in addressing racism in the health system, and many health services already provide cultural safety training for their staff.

The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation, the Australian College of Nursing, the Australian College of Midwives are united with CATSINaM in strongly supporting the guidance around cultural safety in the new codes of conduct.

The Council of Deans of Nursing and Midwifery also considers cultural safety an integral part of competencies for registered nurses and midwives. Providing culturally safe care that is free from racism should be a normal expectation. All health professionals learning about cultural safety and building it into their codes of conduct is a very important step to this becoming a reality. Hence nurses and midwives are currently required to study Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, culture, history, and cultural safety as part of their study programs.

Cultural safety is talked about and implemented in other fields, including education, and family and community services, although people in these fields are still learning about it so it is not always standard practice yet. In fact, CATSINaM recommended cultural safety training for journalists in our submission to the recent Senate Inquiry into the future of public interest journalism, and the latest media fracas indicates just how sorely this is needed.

It is important that we continue these conversations about the importance of cultural safety for healthcare and other systems – they are potentially life-saving.

 

For readers who wish to contribute to the discussion, I suggest you read the joint statement from nursing and midwifery organisations and the codes of conduct, which can be downloaded here.

Part 2

In response to Graeme Haycroft’s recent comments, we welcome the opportunity to provide further information on how important cultural safety is for improving health outcomes and experiences for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

It is clear from the 2018 Closing the Gap Report tabled by Prime Minister Turnbull in February 2018 that Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples still experience poorer health outcomes than non-Indigenous Australians. It is well understood these inequities are a result of the colonisation process and the many discriminatory policies to which Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Australians were subjected to, and the ongoing experience of discrimination today.

All healthcare leaders and health professionals have a role to play in closing the gap.

The approach the NMBA has taken for nurses and midwives (the largest workforce in the healthcare system) by setting expectations around culturally safe practice, reflects the current expectations of governments to provide a culturally safe health system. (For more information please see the COAG Health Council 4 August 2017 Communiqué).

Culturally safe and respectful practice is not a new concept. Nurses and midwives are expected to engage with all people as individuals in a culturally safe and respectful way, foster open, honest and compassionate professional relationships, and adhere to their obligations about privacy and confidentiality.

Many health services already provide cultural safety training for their staff. Cultural safety is about the person who is providing care reflecting on their own assumptions and culture in order to work in a genuine partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

Nurses and midwives have always had a responsibility to provide care that contributes to the best possible outcome for the person/woman they are caring for. They need to work in partnership with that person/woman to do so. The principle of cultural safety in the new Code of conduct for nurses and Code of conduct for midwives (the codes) provides simple, common sense guidance on how to work in a partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. The codes do not require nurses or midwives to declare or apologise for white privilege.

The guidance around cultural safety in the codes sets out clearly the behaviours that are expected of nurses and midwives, and the standard of conduct that patients and their families can expect. It is vital guidance for improving health outcomes and experiences for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

The codes were developed through an evidence-based and extensive consultation process conducted over a two-year period. Their development included literature reviews to ensure they were based on the best available international and Australian evidence, as well as an analysis of complaints about the conduct of nurses and midwives to ensure they were meeting the public’s needs.

The consultation and input from the public and professions included working groups, focus groups and preliminary and public consultation. The public consultation phase included a campaign to encourage nurses and midwives to provide feedback.

The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation, the Australian College of Nursing, the Australian College of Midwives and the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives all participated in each stage of the development and consultation of the new codes. The organisations strongly support the guidance around cultural safety in the codes for nurses and midwives.

Lynette Cusack

Chair Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia

Ann Kinnear

CEO
Australian College of Midwives (ACM)

Kylie Ward

CEO
Australian College of Nursing (ACN)

Janine Mohamed

CEO
Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses
and Midwives

Annie Butler

A/Federal Secretary Australian Nursing and Midwifery
Federation

For more information:

Part 3 QNMU Secretary Beth Mohle has issued a statement clarifying misleading comments in the media over the weekend around the NMBA’s new Codes of Conduct for nurses and midwives.



I was stunned to read businessman Graeme Haycroft’s comments regarding nurses and indigenous Australians on the weekend, as part of his criticism of the new NMBA Codes and the term cultural safety which is defined in a glossary connected to the codes.

These codes were the subject of lengthy consultations with the professions of nursing and midwifery and other stakeholders including community representatives. This review was comprehensive and evidenced-based. Our union and our national body the Australian Nursing Midwifery Federation (ANMF) were active participants in these consultations.

The codes, written by nurses and midwives for nurses and midwives, seek to ensure the individual needs and backgrounds of each patient are taken into account during treatment.

There’s no doubt cultural factors, including how a patient feels while within the health system, can impact wellbeing. For example, culture and background often determine how a patient would prefer to give birth or pass away.

Every day, nurses and midwives consider a range of complex factors, including a patient’s background and culture to determine the best treatment. These codes simply articulate what is required to support safe nursing and midwifery practice for all.

Mr Haycroft stated that the new code “has been sponsored and supported by the QNU to promote its party political social policy.”

This statement is disturbing on a number of levels. The Queensland Nurses and Midwives’ Union (QNMU) has repeatedly refuted Mr Haycroft’s allegations we donate to political parties. We do not. Nor are we affiliated with any political party. Yet Mr Haycroft continues to repeat these claims.

Secondly, this statement demonstrates a failure to understand the basics. It is the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (NMBA) that regulates the practice of nurses and midwives through its standards, codes and guidelines.

The QNMU actively participates in NMBA consultations and represents the interests of our members individually and collectively.  However, the new codes have not been “sponsored” by our union.

As a not-for-profit organisation run by nurses and midwives for nurses and midwives, the QNMU will remain steadfastly focused on advancing the values and interests of our members and the safety of those in their care.  We will not be diverted by the political or business agendas of others.

Author Luke Pearson Indigenous X

But first tonight, the contentious new code telling nurses to say “sorry for being white” when treating their Indigenous patients.

That’s how Today Tonight Adelaide began last night.

It continued:

“Now, it’s the latest in a string of politically correct changes for the health industry, but this one has led to calls for the Nursing Board boss to resign.”

It was followed by a five minute story with the new code being condemned by someone you’ve probably never heard of, Graeme Haycroft, explaining that:

“According to how the code is written, the white nurse would come in and say, ‘before I deal with you, I have to acknowledge to you that I have certain privileges that you don’t have” followed by Cory Bernardi calling it divisive.

It goes on in this vein for a full five minutes before it cuts back to the presenter, who finally says, “The Nursing and Midwifery Board has told us that the code was drafted in consultation with Aboriginal groups and has been taken out of context as it’s not a requirement for health workers to declare or apologise for white privilege”.

And just to reinforce that point, the entire premise for the segment was false. There is no requirement for nurses to apologise for being white, which would be very awkward for the more the more than 1500 Indigenous nurses across Australia, and the countless others who also aren’t white to begin with. But, even for the nurses who are – THERE IS NO REQUIREMENT FOR THEM TO APOLOGISE FOR BEING WHITE.

So, why on Earth would Today Tonight run such a story?

Why would they base a story off the demonstrably false allegations of this Graeme Haycroft person?

To answer that, it might useful to cut back to a 2005 Sydney Morning Herald story about Mr Haycroft:

“A member of the National Party and the H.R. Nicholls Society, he (Mr Haycroft) boasts that, because of a tussle he had with the Australian Workers Union 15 years ago, the union does not have a single member shearing sheep in south-western Queensland today.

Now he runs a labour hire firm with a thriving sideline in moving small-business employees off awards and collective agreements and onto the Federal Government’s preferred individual contracts, Australian Workplace Agreements.

…Mr Haycroft’s business stands out because he is targeting lower-skilled, lower-paid workers, often with poor English – the people unions say have much to fear from individual contracts.”

Cut back to 2018, and Graeme Haycroft now runs the Nurses Professional Association of Queensland, which promotes itself as an alternative to the Qld Nurses Union.

So, a man with a long history of fighting Unions, who ‘saved’ the mushroom farming business by showing businesses how to move “small-business employees off awards and collective agreements and onto the Federal Government’s preferred individual contracts, Australian Workplace Agreements.”

According to the 2005 article, “Mr Haycroft said workers had been more than happy to sign on, most with their penalty rates, holiday pay and other conditions being rolled into a flat rate.”

“However, [there is always a ‘however’], Mr Haycroft was stripped of his preferred provider status with the Office of the Employment Advocate on Thursday, after a Sydney picker, Carmen Walacz Vel Walewska, said she was sacked after she contacted the Australian Workers Union for advice on AWAs.”

With that track record, it’s hard to imagine why nurses would want to leave their current union in favour of his ‘professional association’.

It seems as though, once again, Indigenous people have become a political football and a convenient scapegoat for issues that have nothing to do with us.

Queensland has a long history of political success found through anti-Aboriginal sentiment, so what better way to undermine a Union and recruit new members to a professional association than to accuse the Union of ‘racism against white people’ and ‘political correctness gone made’ by spreading the blatantly false and misleading accusation that white nurses now have to apologise to Aboriginal people for being white?

And just like Dick Smith’s anti-immigration campaign, Blair Cottrell’s anti-African ‘community safety group’, and Prue McSween’s call for a new Stolen Generation, it seems Channel 7 is always more than happy to ignore the facts and sensationalise issues about race and racism.

There is always one more thing.

We, and others, will soon publish articles explaining what the Code of Conduct actually calls for, and explain why cultural competence and cultural safety are important (editor’s note: we did, here’s one of them), but I can’t help but be reminded of this quote from Toni Morrison:

“The function, the very serious function of racism is distraction. It keeps you from doing your work. It keeps you explaining, over and over again, your reason for being. Somebody says you have no language and you spend twenty years proving that you do. Somebody says your head isn’t shaped properly so you have scientists working on the fact that it is. Somebody says you have no art, so you dredge that up. Somebody says you have no kingdoms, so you dredge that up. None of this is necessary. There will always be one more thing.”

So, instead of working on the very real business of ensuring best practice within the nursing industry, our Indigenous experts in this area will have to take a few days away from this important work to explain that no one is asking for white nurses to apologise for being white.

Just like we have to explain that not all Aboriginal parents abuse their children, or that we don’t want to steal white people’s backyards, or that we had (and have) science, or that Australia wasn’t Terra Nullius, or, as Malcolm Turnbull suggested last year, that acknowledging Indigenous history and addressing the issue of colonial statues and place names across Australia is not a “Stalinist exercise of trying to wipe out or obliterate or blank out parts of our history”.

So long as Australian media and politics finds value, profit and opportunity in promoting racism, there will always be one more thing.

So, I might as well clear up a few others while I’m here, and empty a few more buckets out of the endless ocean of racist misinformation.

Child abuse isn’t a ‘cultural’ thing.

Police are not scared to arrest Aboriginal people out of fear of being called racist.

We don’t get free houses.

Aboriginal people using white ochre on their faces in dance and ceremony is not the same thing as white people dressing up in blackface.

We don’t get free university.

The Voice to Parliament is not a third chamber of parliament.

We are not the problem.

Anything else?

We aren’t vampires?

We don’t shoot laser beams out of our eyes?

We aren’t secretly developing a perpetual motion machine that runs on white tears?

I’m sure I, and countless others, will undoubtedly need to keep adding to this list because, as Toni Morrison tells us, there will always be one more thing.

If you thought nursing was about quality health care, think again.

According to the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, “’cultural safety’ is as important to quality care as clinical safety”. And there’s no objective test of ‘cultural safety’; it’s determined, so the Board says, by the “recipient of care”. You see, it’s not just what the nurse does that matters but “how a health professional does something”.

According to the commissars at the Board, “’cultural safety’ represents a key philosophical shift from providing care regardless of difference, to care that takes account of peoples’ unique needs”.

Changes to the Code mark a philosophical shift in the industry. (Pic: supplied)

What this means is that nurses are no longer required to be colourblind; instead, they must see colour and treat patients differently because of it.

According to the Code, the Board declares, “cultural safety provides a decolonising model of practice based on dialogue, communication, power sharing and negotiation and the acknowledgment of white privilege” (no, I am not making this up — it’s on page 15 of the Code effective 1 March 2018).

The Board decrees that “non-indigenous nurses must address how they create a culturally safe work environment that is free of racism”. Now I know many nurses, including my sister who has spent 20 years working selflessly in indigenous communities, and the idea that they are subtly racist or even insensitive to their patients’ needs is as offensive as the leftist sanctimony that has infected their professional body.

The changes to the Code were endorsed by COAG. (Pic: iStock)

When a body representing some nurses had the temerity to complain about this, Board Chair Associate Professor Lynette Cusack disdainfully replied that it had been endorsed by COAG.

Well, I checked with the Federal health minister Greg Hunt and that’s not accurate. The Minister’s own advice from his Chief Nursing Officer and health department noted that “while the Commonwealth Department of Health provided feedback in the public consultation process, the final changes to cultural safety were made after (this) process. The Department did not see the final version until it was publicly released in March 2018.”

Greg Hunt is one of the smartest politicians I know; I didn’t think he would have let this get through, had he known about it, without a fight.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #JobAlerts #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC Features @ahmrc @Galambila @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @IUIH_ @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

Jobs of the week 11 positions in QLD

+ Dentist (Ongoing Full Time/ Part Time) + Family Practitioner (Ongoing, Full Time position) + Adult/Paediatric Occupational Therapist (Ongoing Full Time Position – Windsor travel required across SEQ) + Casual Community Support Workers – Zillmere (North Brisbane Region) + Medical Receptionist – MATSICHS (Full Time, Ongoing) + Aboriginal Health Worker (Full Time, Ongoing) + Clinic Nurse (Full Time, Ongoing) + Dietitian Clinic Lead (Full Time, Ongoing) + Dietitian (Full Time/Part Time, Ongoing) + Diabetes Educator (Full Time/Part Time, Ongoing) + Practice Manager – MATSICHS Margate (Full Time, Ongoing) + Youth Programs Officer – DC Sistas (Fixed Term, Full Time) + Social Worker – BiOC (Full Time, Ongoing)

Jobs of the week 36 positions in the NT

More info and apply HERE

More info and apply HERE

More info and apply Here

 

More info and apply HERE

Jobs of the week 1 positions in Sydney  

More info and Apply HERE

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 

 Job Ref : N2018 – 85

ACCHO Member : ATSICHS

Position : Alcohol/Drug Care Worker

Location : Mackay – QLD

Closing Date : 23 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 -86

ACCHO Member : Tobwabba AMS

Position : Psychologist

Location : Forster – NSW

Closing Date : Open

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 89

ACCHO Member : Gidge Healing

Position : Doctor / GP

Location : Mt Isa – QLD

Closing Date : Open

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 -90

ACCHO Member : TAMS

Position : Practice Manager (Registered Nurse)

Location : Tamworth

Closing Date : On Application

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 -91

ACCHO Member : Anyinginy Health ACCHO

Position : Health Services Manager

Location : Tennant Creek – NT

Closing Date : Check with ACCHO see Download

More Info apply : 

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 92

ACCHO Member : Cunnumulla ACCHO

Position : Finance Officer

Location : Cunnumulla – QLD

Closing Date : March 23

More Info apply see Download : Positions Advertised March 2018

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 93

ACCHO Member : Galambila ACCHO

Position : Excecutive Assistant

Location : Coffs Harbour – NSW

Closing Date : 26 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 95

ACCHO Member :KAMS ACCHO

Position : Ear, Eye and Oral Health Officer

Location : Broome – WA

Closing Date : Check with ACCHO

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 96

ACCHO Member : Pika Wiya ACCHO

Position : Registered Nurse Immunisations

Location : Port Augusta – SA

Closing Date : check with ACCHO

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 97

ACCHO Member : Yura Yungi ACCHO

Position : Compliance and Risk Manager

Location : Halls Creek – WA

Closing Date : Check with ACCHO

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 98

ACCHO Member : Wathaurong ACCHO

Position : Aboriginal Maternity Health Worker

Location : Geelong – VIC

Closing Date : 25 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 99

ACCHO Member : QAIHC

Position : General Manager Commercial

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 18 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 -100

ACCHO Member : Anyinginyi Health ACCHO

Position: Policy Research Special Projects Officer

Location : Tennant Creek NT

Closing Date : Check with ACCHO

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 101

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder Murray PHN

Position :   Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Albury – NSW

Closing Date : 18 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 -102

ACCHO Member : Wurli – Wurlinjang ACCHO

Position : Case Manager

Location : Katherine – NT

Closing Date : On application

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 103

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder QUT

Position : Brisbane – QLD

Location : 18 March

Closing Date :

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 104

ACCHO Member : Gidgee Healing

Position : Deadly Choices Tobacco Action Officer

Location : Mt Isa – QLD

Closing Date : On application

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 105

ACCHO Member : KAMS ACCHO

Position :KMMS Project Officer

Location : Broome – WA

Closing Date : On application

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 106

ACCHO Member : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO

Position : Tobacco Action Worker

Location : Adelaide – SA

Closing Date : On application

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 107

ACCHO Member : Carbal ACCHO

Position : Aboriginal Health Worker

Location : Toowoomba/Warwick – QLD

Closing Date : 23 March

More Info apply :

 

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector 60 + #JobAlerts #NT 28 @DanilaDilba @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @IUIH_ @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing Plus #JoboftheWeek

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

Jobs of the week 8 positions in QLD

+ Regional Eye Health Assistant (Ongoing, Full Time) + Aboriginal Health Worker – Quality Use of Medicines Support – Pharmacy + Clinical Services Manager (Full Tme, Ongoing) + Social Health Operations Manager (Full Time, Ongoing) + Senior Communications Officer (Ongoing, Full Time) + Practice Manager -Morayfield + Family Support Worker (Ongoing, Full Time)

Jobs of the week 28 positions in the NT

More info and apply HERE

More info and apply HERE

More info and apply Here

Jobs of the week 6 positions in Sydney  

More info and Apply HERE

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 

ACCHO Member: Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service

Position: Executive Officer

Location: Perth – WA

Closing Date: 2 March

More Info apply:

Job Ref : N2018 – 70

ACCHO Member : AHMRC

Position: Comprehensive Care Practice Manager

Location: Surrey Hills- NSW

Closing Date: 5 March

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 71

ACCHO Member: AHMRC

Position: Policy Management Systems Officer

Location: Surrey Hills- NSW

Closing Date: 5 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 72

ACCHO Member: AHMRC

Position: Training and Workforce development coordinator

Location: Little Bay- NSW

Closing Date: 5 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 73

ACCHO Member: Stakeholder PHN

Position: Program Manager-Social and Emotional

Location: Central Queensland / Sunshine Coast

Closing Date: 5 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 76

ACCHO Member : Sunrise ACCHO

Position : Doctors

Location : Katherine – NT

Closing Date : Open

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 77

ACCHO Member : AHCWA/Carnavon ACCHO

Position : Property Asset Officer

Location : Carnavon – WA

Closing Date : March 5

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 78

ACCHO Member : Wellington ACCHO

Position : Nurse

Location : Western Sydney – NSW

Closing Date : 15 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 79

ACCHO Member : QLD Galangoor Duwalami ACCHO

Position: Practice Nurse

Location : Fraser Coast

Closing Date : Open

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 80

ACCHO Member : AHMRC

Position :     CEO

Location : Sydney- NSW

Closing Date : 12 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 81

ACCHO Member : Katungal ACCHO

Position : Doctor / GP

Location : Far South Coast – NSW

Closing Date : Open

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 82

ACCHO Member : Gidgee Healing

Position : Aboriginal Health Worker

Location : Mt Isa – QLD

Closing Date : 9 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 83

ACCHO Member : VACCHO

Position : Financial Accountant

Location : Melbourne – VIC

Closing Date : 13 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 84

ACCHO Member : AHMRC

Position : Nurse Educator

Location : Sydney – NSW

Closing Date : Open

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 85

ACCHO Member : ATSICHS

Position : Alcohol/Drug Care Worker

Location : Mackay – QLD

Closing Date : 23 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 -86

ACCHO Member : Tobwabba AMS

Position : Psychologist

Location : Forster – NSW

Closing Date : Open

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 87

ACCHO Member : TAIHS

Position : Registered Nurse

Location : Townsville – QLD

Closing Date : 12 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 88

ACCHO Member : TAIHS

Position : Placement Support Officer

Location : Townsville – QLD

Closing Date : 12 March

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 89

ACCHO Member : Gidge Healing

Position : Doctor / GP

Location : Mt Isa – QLD

Closing Date : Open

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 -90

ACCHO Member : TAMS

Position : Practice Manager (Registered Nurse)

Location : Tamworth

Closing Date : On Application

More Info apply :

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workers @NATSIHWA NEWS : Download National Framework for Determining Scope of Practice and read 5 Top tips for making the most of the Aboriginal Health Worker and Practitioner workforce

 

” The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) has today launched a supportive publication, the National Framework for Determining Scope of Practice for the Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker and Health Practitioner workforce.

The Framework is designed to support Employers and Managers to work with their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners to establish and define their scope of practice.”

See Part 1 below to download

 ” All who work in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health know about the vital role of Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

They are the link between the community and medical worlds. They are the faces of optimism and hope despite the challenges and burden of ill health.

They use language, cultural and social networks and knowledge to communicate effectively with clients. They are the providers and trainers in delivering culturally competent health care to community members and clients.

Enabling appropriate and culturally safe health care services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is critical, and this means building an appropriate and capable workforce.

Currently, members of this unique workforce are found in a great diversity of health roles, including not only clinical service delivery of primary health care, but in preventive health, allied health and rehabilitation, public health, chronic disease management and palliative care.

So, what can we do to ensure these roles are nurtured, fostered, expanded and supported in health care settings?

Karl Briscoe is Chief Executive Officer for NATSIHWA and Alyson Wright is Policy Officer with NATSIHWA, and Researcher with National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health at the Australian National University

See a few ideas Part 2 Below

Part 1 NATSIHWA encourages using a ‘Scope of Practice’ for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners

The Framework is a practical tool that guides a discussion and documentation in the workplace around the Scope of Practice for individual or groups of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Download the NATSIHWA Framework HERE

NATSIHWA-Scope of Practice

“This Framework is about helping services and our workforce better define their practices. We are hoping that it assists in building more capable staff and services, defining roles and greater recognition of the role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in health care”, said Mr Karl Briscoe, NATSIHWA CEO.

View Video HERE

The document provides a set of practical questions and template that need to be addressed when developing a Scope of Practice.

“We are aware that State and Territory legislation and regulation affects the work an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners are allowed to undertake. This Framework helps to consider these, but also draws on the role and responsibilities, the service needs and an individual’s training and qualifications” said Mr Briscoe.

Ms Josslyn Tully, Chairperson of NATSIHWA said “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners are vital to improving the health of our peoples. The Framework for developing a Scope of Practice will better enable and support these employees in health services to reach their potential and utilise their skills and capabilities. A Scope of Practice supports better service delivery and improves workforces”.

The NATSIHWA website will continue to be updated over time to feature best practice examples of the Framework being utilised by various health services.

To view our video on the Scope of Practice visit NATSIHWA’s Scope of Practice

MORE INFORMATION: https://www.natsihwa.org.au/content/what-we-do,

Part 2 Tips for making the most of the Aboriginal Health Worker and Practitioner workforce

Here are a few ideas for the health sector

1. Define the scope of practice for Health Workers or Health Practitioners in the workplace

Aboriginal Health Workers and Health Practitioners routinely exercise extended practices that reflect community and service needs, often informally developed while working alongside other practitioners.

A ‘formalised’ scope of practice establishes an individual’s practices, contributions and value adds in the workplace and reduces ambiguity about where the responsibility lies.

The scope of practice is defined by individual circumstances and is based on their training, qualifications, service requirements, supervision available and job responsibilities and role. It also is influenced by jurisdictional health care legislation and therefore should be a tailored document for an individual or group in the workplace.

NATSIHWA has recently launched a national framework to guide workplaces and services in developing Health Workers and Practitioners’ scope of practice.

The Framework describes key elements required to develop a scope of practice and provides practical steps and a template for Managers and Health Workers to work through in establishing their scope of practice.

Better definition of an employee’s scope of practice helps everyone in the workplace, and secures greater confidence and capabilities in the workforce. Staff at NATSIHWA can help people work through the development of a scope of practice.

2. Tap into NATSIHWA 2018 Regional Forums and October Professional Development Symposium

Opportunities to build and expand professional networks and develop skills and capabilities is recognised as important.

Every year NATSIHWA hosts regional forums across Australia to support and develop our workforce. Typically these forums are for members and other Health Workers and Health Practitioners, although others may be invited to participated or present.

These forums are developed based on local priorities and provide networking and professional development opportunities for Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

A 2018 calendar of forums is being finalised, so have a look at upcoming dates and locations, and register your interest in attending. If you have ideas or suggestions for these, please contact NATSIWHA now.

Further, planning has already started for the 2018 NATSIHWA Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs in October this year. This event is a not to be missed opportunity to brush up on your skills and expertise in key health care areas.

3. Encourage Health Workers and Health Practitioners to register on the NATSIHWA portal

For a health professional, building and maintain qualifications and skills set are mandatory, as is recording your continuing professional development (CPD) hours. NATSIHWA has created an online tool to help Health Workers and Health Practitioners keep a track the professional development activities.

The portal is online resource that helps Health Workers and Health Practitioners store professional development activities and accreditation details. It also updated regularly with training opportunities and relevant news. It allows Health Workers and Health Practitioners to keep track of CPD hours. All our members have the opportunity to register for the NATSIHWA portal.

4. Use models of care that embed Health Worker or Health Practitioners at the CORE

We have heard a lot over the past couple of years about the most appropriate model of care for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. It necessary to have Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and practitioners in core roles of delivering health care for culturally safe service provision.

Other issues to resolve this year

Finally, there are other administrative issues that Health Workers and Health Practitioners are also hoping will be resolved in 2018.

5 .These include:

A decision on the Health Worker/Practitioner new award. From 2015-16, NATSIHWA and other stakeholders have been involved in negotiations on Health Worker Award with the Australian Fairwork Commission. We are hoping the final decision will be announced over the next 12 months.

Greater allocation of resources and funding for more Health Workers and Health Practitioners across the health sector, including not only in the community-controlled sector but also hospitals, general practices and other health services.

Resourced action on social and cultural determinants of health.

We need Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners right across the health sector. Just as we need Indigenous doctors, Indigenous allied health staff, and Indigenous nurses in the sector.

Making, developing and defining their role in health services builds effectiveness and efficacy in services, better enables cultural safe care to be practiced and is more responsive to needs of clients.

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Leadership News : New @VACCHO_org CEO Has a Vision for a Culturally Confident Aboriginal Community

 

” Look it would be easy to say that we haven’t got anywhere, but the fact is with Aboriginal health, I look at this holistically.

So there’s health in the traditional notions of health, that is physical well-being and mental health well-being, and then there’s the broader concept of health which is the whole of the person’s life and all the things that impact on that.

I think we’re making gains, but given our starting point and where we’re coming from, things don’t change quickly. It will take a number of generations for us to get to what I’d call self-equity.

It’s taken us 200 years to get where we are now, so to turn it around and get on a level par with everybody else is going to take quite a while as well. So I think we are trending in the right direction, but it will require a sustained and increased effort over many years to come, to get us really on the path or to reach the point of health equity.”

Ian Hamm has just been appointed CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), after more than 30 years’ experience working with the Indigenous community.

He is this week’s Changemaker

Job Vacancy  Manager Cultural Safety Training

• Be a part of the change you want to see in the world
• Take on a leadership role
• This is an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander identified position

VACCHO is the peak body for Aboriginal health in Victoria and champions community control and health equality for Aboriginal communities.

Apply HERE of see below Part 2

Hamm was appointed CEO of VACCHO for 18 months, while Jill Gallagher AO takes a leave of absence to commence as Victorian Treaty Advancement Commissioner from February.

He described himself as a proud Aboriginal man, who has extensive experience in the public service, including as executive director of Aboriginal Affairs Victoria.

Hamm currently serves as chair of the Koorie Heritage Trust, the First Nations Foundation and Connecting Home Ltd (Stolen Generations Service).

In this week’s Changemaker, Hamm speaks about his plans for VACCHO in the next 18 months, details his sister Cherie’s special connection to the organisation, and explains what keeps him motivated to serve the Indigenous community.

Have you been involved with the community sector before?

I’ve been in government for a bit over 31 years. So this is my first time working in the community sector itself, but I have worked closely with the community sector over that time. I’ve worked for federal and state governments, mostly around Indigenous community stuff. But I’ve also worked in education, in health justice economics and so forth.

What attracted you to work in the community sector?

I suppose it was the opportunity to get to work in the sector that I’d always worked with, if you like. So over the period of 31 years, I’ve worked across a range of different things to do with the Aboriginal community. I’ve worked closely with the sector. So when the opportunity came along to be CEO of one of the leading community organisations for 18 months, you get asked these things once and once only and you don’t say no.

What are your plans for VACCHO during your term as CEO?

At the moment there are a lot of developments going on in Victoria on Aboriginal matters. So quite clearly, the predominant one at the moment is the treaty discussions which are which are about to take off. The person whose role I’m taking, Jill Gallagher, is going to be the treaty commissioner for 18 months. So that’s the big piece of work in Victoria, in fact Australia to be honest.

Victoria is also doing work around self-determination and how do we bring self-determination to life. So those are two really big things going on. So clearly I want to make sure that VACCHO is well engaged in those two pieces of work and also continues to prosecute the efforts around improvement in Aboriginal health outcomes and also ensuring that our members are best practice organisations, in terms of their administration, their governance, their workforce development and all that kind of stuff as well. So there’s a fair bit I want to do and obviously looking at VACCHO itself, is there an opportunity for VACCHO to improve? I mean everywhere can improve over time and develop its operating and business models. So I want to look at VACCHO itself and how we work as an organisation.

How do you see a typical day going for you as CEO of the organisation?   

A lot of my background has been around [strategic] long-term outcome focus, around where we want to be in a number of years from now as opposed to where we are now. So my type of day as I see it, [will involve] a lot of time spent with an external focus, building up critical relationships and ensuring we’re well engaged with the members, because VACCHO exists by right of its membership. So ensuring that we have good and productive relationships with our members [is vital] and we’re supporting them in what they do.

I’ll obviously be having an oversight of the organisation but leaving the day-to-day operating, the daily grind as you might call it, to the people who are much better and much more skilled at that type of work than I am within the organisation. So a typical day for me will probably be in a number of meetings, making sure that at a higher level I’m across stuff around the operating of the organisation and probably talking to the chair of the organisation once a week or a fortnight just to make sure that the leader of the board is across stuff. So it’ll be a mixed bag of things that CEOs do, that you can never quite put your finger on when somebody asks you “what is it that you do exactly?”

You have spoken in the past about how your sister Cherie has a special connection to VACCHO, what does this mean to you?

My sister Cherie worked at VACCHO for many years, for 10 years if not longer. She not only was a worker there but she was part of the soul of the place. And she did a lot of work particularly around palliative care. She confronted the difficult issue of when Aboriginal people are passing and not just looking at health improvement, but dealing with the dreadful reality that people die.

She herself died of breast cancer in 2014. She was well loved by the VACCHO people, the VACCHO staff and the VACCHO community as a whole. So to be CEO of the organisation that she was such an intimate part of, not just in a work sense but in a soul sense, is an additional thing for me that was one of the reasons I took this job.

Amongst all the work that you do, how do you find time for yourself and what do you like to do in your spare time?

I learnt a new word in 2017. It’s called “no”, as in “no I cannot go onto another board, no I cannot do this”. I’m actually on seven boards in addition to being CEO of VACCHO now, and I do other stuff outside of that. So when I do find the time just to myself, I like to cook, and I still play cricket at the age of 53. So I’m still going around on a Saturday playing in a 4th XI as a wicketkeeper, which I should have given away many years ago, but I get to play cricket with a bunch of blokes who have no idea what I do for a living.

So there’s that kind of stuff. Obviously my pride and joy are my children Jasper and Isabel. I have a special relationship with my niece Narita, Cherie’s daughter, and she’s just had a little boy. So I enjoy being part of his life, [even though] he’s only about three months old. That’s the type of thing I do privately and is my little piece of paradise.

You’ve been advocating for Indigenous causes for a long time. How do you remain motivated and optimistic despite all the challenges that arise?

It’s just a fundamental thing inside me that I can’t stand inequity, I can’t stand people not being given the opportunity to be the best that they can be. I can’t actually describe it any deeper than that, but particularly with our own community, I have a deep commitment to us finding what I believe is our rightful place in the great Australian community. That to me is what drives me. It’s something that I find hard to describe. It just is. It’s just what makes me get out of bed in the morning.

It’s what makes me do work which is essentially really hard. But I wouldn’t do anything else. There are a lot easier ways to make more money than this, but for me and everyone else in this sector, it’s not just about job satisfaction or what you get out of it as a job. It’s a much deeper thing, this isn’t about me this is about everyone. So that’s what gets me out of bed in the morning and makes me do what I do.

What kind of future would you like to see for the Indigenous community in the years ahead?

One of the things which I’ve always had in my mind around what I try to do with anything [regarding] the Aboriginal community, is not just looking at what are the problems we have now and how do we fix them. If you just focus on that you never get ahead. I’ve always said in my mind, “What does Aboriginal Victoria look like in 20 years from now?” So if I jump forward a generation, Aboriginal Victoria will have equity on most things which we measure.

So economic equity, health equity, education equity etc. Most critically, Aboriginal community identity will be a confident one. It will be not only culturally strong, but culturally confident in itself and its place in the wider Victorian community. It will be universally respected and in fact, may even be the thing that the rest of the Victorian community aspires to. That is where I want to see Aboriginal Victoria as a whole 20 years from now.

Do you have any particular people that inspire the work that you do?

Oh there’s a number of people. So William Cooper, my great uncle, he inspires me. There’s Doug Nicholls, and Alf Bamblett who I knew quite well. Those three people inspire me. I went into government 30 years ago and decided to stay there to work for Aboriginal people. Charlie Perkins, he inspires me to no end. And he got sacked a couple of times, but he did what he thought was right for the Aboriginal community.

I got sacked once for doing what I thought was right for the Aboriginal community, and getting sacked from high profile positions is never fun, but you know what, I could sleep at night because I knew I had done the right thing. So those type of people inspire me and there’s a whole range of others. My own family inspire me, my aunty Claire, she’s one of those people who inspired me and there’s a whole range of people.

Part 2 Manager Cultural Safety Training job opportunity

• Be a part of the change you want to see in the world
• Take on a leadership role
• This is an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander identified position

VACCHO is the peak body for Aboriginal health in Victoria and champions community control and health equality for Aboriginal communities. We are a centre of expertise, policy advice, training, innovation and leadership in Aboriginal health. VACCHO advocates for the health equality and optimum health of all Aboriginal people in Victoria.

VACCHO’s cultural safety training incorporates cultural awareness training and builds on this learning to provide practical tips and skills that can be utilised to improve practice and behaviour, which assist in making Aboriginal people feel safe. In shifting the focus to health systems, our participants begin to learn how to strengthen relationships with Aboriginal people, communities and organisations so that access is improved.

We are looking for someone to provide leadership in the sustainability, development, coordination and delivery of our Cultural Safety training.

You will need to be comfortable presenting to other people, be good at networking and building relationships and have an understanding of cultural awareness issues as it relates to Aboriginal communities and individuals as well as experience in managing and leading a team.

You will be joining a great team and will be provided with guidance and support to learn the training packages.

If this sounds like the job you are looking for then you can download the Position Description and Application Form from our website http://www.vaccho.org.au/jobs.

To apply please email a copy of your resume and application form to employment@vaccho.org.au.

For queries about the position please contact Paula Jones-Hunt on 9411 9411 Applications close on Monday 12 February.

APPLY HERE


Luke Michael  |  Journalist |  @luke_michael96

Luke Michael is a journalist at Pro Bono News covering the social sector