NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Alcohol @FAREAustralia : Overcoming #Indigenous #FamilyViolence. Download new study from @marcialangton #unimelb where experts find success in Alcohol Management Plans but fear government failure to understand the magnitude of the alcohol problem

Our research found that average annual hospital admissions for assault fell from 32.25 per 1,000 people to 5.7 over 11 years, in line with tightening alcohol supply restriction,

We’ve identified propositions for better AMP outcomes long-term, through realistic financial support and stronger community-led governance “

The Associate Provost and Chair of Australian Indigenous Studies, Professor Marcia Langton, who co-authored the paper, says since the AMP was introduced there has been a reduction in violent assaults and the severity of family violence across the traditional lands of the Thaayorre and Mungkan peoples on the western coast of Cape York Peninsula

Paper Title: The Alcohol Management Plan at Pormpuraaw, Queensland, Australia: An ethnographic community-based study

Download Alcohol Management Plan Melbourne Uni

Authors: Kristen Smith, Marcia Langton, Richard Chenhall, Penelope Smith & Shane Bawden

Read over 200 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alcohol and Other Drug articles published over pst 7 years 

Alcohol Management Plans (AMPs), including one that has helped dramatically reduce violent assault rates in the remote Indigenous community of Pormpuraaw in far north Queensland, are under threat.

Coinciding today with the 5th Annual Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence Forum in Melbourne, University of Melbourne researchers have released a new study on the successes and challenges of the Pormpuraaw AMP.

While the dramatic drop in hospital admissions showed the AMP was working extremely well, Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) Chief Executive Michael Thorn is concerned that AMPs are under threat and riddled with problems stemming from government inertia.

Mr Thorn said the Pormpuraaw AMP study highlighted the need for genuine government investment overseen by a strong national alcohol strategy for protecting children, women, families and communities from alcohol harms.

“The good news is that an AMP can be an effective tool to significantly reduce alcohol harm, including family violence. But there’s a gulf between the well-intended rhetoric of governments to address harms in Indigenous communities and the unrealistic, unsustainable government action on the ground,” Mr Thorn said.

The University of Melbourne in-depth, community-based study investigated how AMP controls, restrictions and responses are understood and managed with Australian Aboriginal communities.

Research Fellow and lead author of the paper, Dr Kristen Smith, says most community members in

Pormpuraaw welcomed the reduced violence and community disharmony.

“There is strong community commitment to ‘place-based’ programs, but there are many issues that are being experienced in the community which are not being addressed,” Dr Smith said.

Dr Smith said the biggest concern was government failure to understand the magnitude of the alcohol problem and therefore underestimate resourcing.

“Underfunding is compounded over time through erratic political and policy decisions that fail to reliably meet the community’s needs for treatment services or address issues such as ‘sly-grogging’, gambling and criminalisation,” she said.

Professor Langton said the AMPs were too vulnerable to political and policy instabilities to ensure their long-term success. “We’ve identified propositions for better AMP outcomes long-term, through realistic financial support and stronger community-led governance,” she said.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Research : Ministers @GregHuntMP and @KenWyattMP announce $160 million funding for Indigenous health research over 10 years targeting three flagship priorities and five key areas

“It is time to come together as a nation to work as partners in bringing equity in health outcomes”

The right research into improved treatments and services has the potential to dramatically accelerate the progress we have seen over the last six years in achieving better health for Indigenous Australians,”

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM

The fund is a vital step towards improving the health of our Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander communities. Ultimately, parity in health outcomes is the only acceptable goal, and this fund will help to achieve it.

The research into improving the system is critical, but we are also absolutely committed to delivering real, on-the-ground improvements and frontline services right now “

Health Minister Greg Hunt

” It is a great honour to be asked to co-chair this critical research platform for the future.  Health and social inequity as experienced by Indigenous Australians stands as one of our nations great challenges.  Only through dedicated, collaborative, adequately resourced action, led by community priorities and processes can we hope to make meaningful change. 

Our collective job is to unlock the expertise and capabilities of the Indigenous community, backed the brightest and most gifted scientists and medical researchers and their institutions to make a more equitable future for all Australians.”

Professor Alex Browne : South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute

The Federal Government will provide $160 million for a national research initiative to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Indigenous Health Research Fund will be a 10-year research program funded from the Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF).

It will support practical, innovative research into the best approaches to prevention, early intervention, and treatment of health conditions of greatest concern to Indigenous communities.

First three flagship priorities

The funding’s first three flagship priorities, which aim to deliver rapid solutions to some of the biggest preventable health challenges faced by our First Nations peoples, are:

  • Ending avoidable blindness
  • Ending avoidable deafness
  • Ending rheumatic heart disease

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM announced the first project to be funded under the Indigenous Health Research Fund on Sunday – $35 million for the development of a vaccine to eliminate rheumatic heart disease in Australia.

Rheumatic heart disease is a complication of bacterial infections of the throat and skin. Australia currently has the highest rate of rheumatic heart disease in the world.

Every year, nearly 250 children are diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever and 50 – 150 people die from rheumatic heart disease in Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 64 times more likely than non-Indigenous people to develop rheumatic heart disease, and nearly 20 times as likely to die from it.

“Rheumatic heart disease kills young people and devastates families. This funding will save countless lives in Australia and beyond,” Health Minister Greg Hunt said.

Five key areas of Research

The remaining $125 million Indigenous Health Research funding will be focussed on research projects that fall into five key areas – guaranteeing a healthy start to life, improving primary health care, overcoming the origins of inequality in health, reducing the burden of disease, and addressing emerging challenges.

An advisory panel comprising prominent Indigenous research experts and community leaders, cochaired by Prof. Alex Browne (South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute) and Prof. Misty Jenkins (Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research), will guide the Indigenous Health Research Fund investments.

It will be the first national research fund led by Indigenous people, and conducted with close engagement with Indigenous communities.

The Indigenous Health Research Fund will also seek contributions from philanthropic organisations, state governments, industry, and the private sector in order to increase the reach and impact of the fund.

The Indigenous Health Research Fund will provide the knowledge and understanding to make health programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people more effective and lead to lasting health improvements.

This is key to closing the gap in health outcomes since, despite considerable investment by the Commonwealth in existing programmes, Indigenous Australians currently have about a 10 year lower life expectancy and 2.3 times the burden of disease compared to non-Indigenous Australians.

The Morrison Government will provide separate funding of $3.8 million over four years to fund the University of Melbourne’s Indigenous Eye Health Program. This program aims to improve Indigenous eye health in Australia.

“The research into improving the system is critical, but we are also absolutely committed to delivering real, on-the-ground improvements and frontline services right now,” Minister Hunt said.

Our  Government has a long-standing and important commitment to achieving health equity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

The Government is investing $3.9 billion in Indigenous-specific health initiatives (from 2018-19 to 2021-22), an ongoing increase of around four per cent per year. This includes investment under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program.

The MRFF is key to the Government’s health and research plans and is delivering significant benefits for Australian researchers, with over $2 billion in disbursements announced to date

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Obesity #Diabetes News: 1. @senbmckenzie report #ObesitySummit19 and 2. @MenziesResearch are calling for immediate action to reduce risk the of #obesity and #diabetes in #Indigenous children and young people.

Type 2 Diabetes is a particular concern as there is a global trend of increasing numbers of young people being diagnosed, there is limited data available in Australia but anecdotally numbers are rising rapidly amongst young Indigenous Australians.

Childhood obesity and Type 2 diabetes leads to other serious health issues such as kidney disease which then puts a huge burden on families, communities and health facilities. When it occurs at a young age, it is a much more aggressive disease than in older people.

It is critical that we act now to prevent this emerging public health issue, with engagement of Indigenous communities in the design of interventions being crucial.

“A suite of interventions across the life course are required, targeting children and young people before they develop disease, particularly childhood obesity, as well as targeting their parents to prevent intergenerational transmission of metabolic risk” 

Dr Angela Titmuss, paediatric endocrinologist at Royal Darwin Hospital and Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) PhD student : See Press Release Part 1

Read over 150 Aboriginal Health and Diabetes articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years

Read over 70 Aboriginal Health and Obesity articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years

” The latest Australian Bureau of Statistics National Health Survey shows that previous efforts to combat obesity have had limited success.

Two-thirds of adults and a quarter of children aged from five to 17 years are now overweight or obese.

While the rate for children has been stable for 10 years, the proportion of adults who are not just overweight but obese has risen from 27.9 per cent to 31.3 per cent.

Overweight and obesity not only compromise quality of life, they are strongly linked to preventable chronic diseases—heart disease, diabetes, lung disease, certain cancers, depression and arthritis, among others.

Senator McKenzie #ObesitySummit19 See Press Release Part 2 Below

Researchers are calling for immediate action to reduce risk the of obesity and diabetes in Indigenous children and young people.

A suite of interventions across the life course are required, targeting children and young people before they develop disease, particularly childhood obesity, as well as targeting their parents to prevent intergenerational transmission of metabolic risk.

The in utero period and first 5 years of life are influential in terms of the long term risk of chronic disease, and we propose that identifying and improving childhood metabolic health be a targeted priority of health services.

In an article published in the Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) today, researchers have identified childhood obesity and the increasing numbers of young people being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes as emerging public health issues.

Lead author Dr Angela Titmuss, paediatric endocrinologist at Royal Darwin Hospital and Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) PhD student, says in the MJA Perspective article that collaboration between communities, clinicians and researchers across Australia is needed to get an accurate picture of the numbers involved.

In Indigenous Australian young people with type 2 diabetes, there are also higher rates of comorbidities, with 59% also having hypertension, 24% having dyslipidaemia and 61% having obesity.

These comorbidities will have a significant impact on the future burden of disease, and may lead to renal, cardiac, neurological and ophthalmological complications. Canadian data demonstrated that 45% of patients with youth onset type 2 diabetes had reached end‐stage renal failure, requiring renal replacement therapy, 20 years after diagnosis, compared with zero people with type 1 diabetes.

Youth onset type 2 diabetes was associated with a 23 times higher risk of kidney failure and 39 times higher risk of need for dialysis, compared with young people without diabetes.

This implies that many young people who are being diagnosed with diabetes now will be on dialysis by 30 years of age, with significant effects on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities.

Menzies HOT NORTH project is supporting this research through the Diabetes in Youth collaboration, a Northern Australia Tropical Disease Collaborative Research Program, funded by the NHMRC.

The MJA Article is available here

https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2019/210/3/emerging-diabetes-and-metabolic-conditions-among-aboriginal-and-torres-strait

 Comprehensive strategies, action plans and both funding and better communication across sectors (health, education, infrastructure and local government) and departments are required to address obesity, diabetes and metabolic risk among Indigenous young people in Australia.

It requires a radical rethinking of our current approach which is failing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people and communities, and a commitment to reconsider the paradigm, to be open to innovative approaches and the involvement of multiple sectors

Part 2

I again apologise for any offence taken by the unfortunate photo taken out of context at the Obesity Summit on Friday, and I am happy if my ridicule leads to action on the complex issue of obesity in this country.

The Senator has apologised.

The issue of obesity is a matter I take very seriously and would never triavisie it- or to add in any way to stigmatisation. I sincerely apologise for this very unfortunate photo taken as I demonstrated how my stomach felt after scrambled eggs reacted w yogurt I had just eaten.

That is exactly the reason I called international and Australian experts together for the National Obesity Summit last week

Last October, the Council of Australian Governments’ (COAG) Health Council— comprising federal, state and territory ministers—agreed to develop a national strategy on obesity.

Friday’s National Obesity Summit in Canberra represented an important first step towards a new nationally cohesive strategy on obesity prevention and control.

The Summit focussed on the role of physical activity, primary health care clinicians, educators and governments to work collaboratively rather than in silos.

At the Summit we heard from national and global experts because obesity is an international issue and we need to understand how other jurisdictions are tackling the problem.  We also heard that stigma surrounding obesity can be a barrier to help being accessed.

The latest Australian Bureau of Statistics National Health Survey shows that previous efforts to combat obesity have had limited success.

Two-thirds of adults and a quarter of children aged from five to 17 years are now overweight or obese.

While the rate for children has been stable for 10 years, the proportion of adults who are not just overweight but obese has risen from 27.9 per cent to 31.3 per cent.

Overweight and obesity not only compromise quality of life, they are strongly linked to preventable chronic diseases—heart disease, diabetes, lung disease, certain cancers, depression and arthritis, among others.

We know that there is not one simple solution to tackling the problem so we need to examine all options and develop a multi-faceted approach.

The Obesity Summit represented an important moment for Australians’ health and recognised that there is no magic fat-busting policy pill.

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #JunkFood : Increasing how much exercise we get and switching to a healthy diet can also play an important role in treating – and even preventing – depression

” The review found that across 41 studies, people who stuck to a healthy diet had a 24-35% lower risk of depressive symptoms than those who ate more unhealthy foods.

These findings suggest improving your diet could be a cost-effective complementary treatment for depression and could reduce your risk of developing a mental illness.

From the Conversation / Megan Lee

 ” NACCHO Campaign 2013 : Our ‘Aboriginal communities should take health advice from the fast food industry’ a campaign that eventually went global, reaching more than  20 million Twitter followers.”

See over 60 NACCHO Healthy Foods Articles HERE

See over 200 NACCHO Mental Health articles HERE 

Worldwide, more than 300 million people live with depression. Without effective treatment, the condition can make it difficult to work and maintain relationships with family and friends.

Depression can cause sleep problems, difficulty concentrating, and a lack of interest in activities that are usually pleasurable. At its most extreme, it can lead to suicide.

Depression has long been treated with medication and talking therapies – and they’re not going anywhere just yet. But we’re beginning to understand that increasing how much exercise we get and switching to a healthy diet can also play an important role in treating – and even preventing – depression.

So what should you eat more of, and avoid, for the sake of your mood?

Ditch junk food

Research suggests that while healthy diets can reduce the risk or severity of depression, unhealthy diets may increase the risk.

Of course, we all indulge from time to time but unhealthy diets are those that contain lots of foods that are high in energy (kilojoules) and low on nutrition. This means too much of the foods we should limit:

  • processed and takeaway foods
  • processed meats
  • fried food
  • butter
  • salt
  • potatoes
  • refined grains, such as those in white bread, pasta, cakes and pastries
  • sugary drinks and snacks.

The average Australian consumes 19 serves of junk food a week, and far fewer serves of fibre-rich fresh food and wholegrains than recommended. This leaves us overfed, undernourished and mentally worse off.

Here’s what to eat instead

Mix it up. Anna Pelzer

Having a healthy diet means consuming a wide variety of nutritious foods every day, including:

  • fruit (two serves per day)
  • vegetables (five serves)
  • wholegrains
  • nuts
  • legumes
  • oily fish
  • dairy products
  • small quantities of meat
  • small quantities of olive oil
  • water.

This way of eating is common in Mediterranean countries, where people have been identified as having lower rates of cognitive decline, depression and dementia.

In Japan, a diet low in processed foods and high in fresh fruit, vegetables, green tea and soy products is recognised for its protective role in mental health.

How does healthy food help?

A healthy diet is naturally high in five food types that boost our mental health in different ways:

Complex carbohydrates found in fruits, vegetables and wholegrains help fuel our brain cells. Complex carbohydrates release glucose slowly into our system, unlike simple carbohydrates (found in sugary snacks and drinks), which create energy highs and lows throughout the day. These peaks and troughs decrease feelings of happiness and negatively affect our psychological well-being.

Antioxidants in brightly coloured fruit and vegetables scavenge free radicals, eliminate oxidative stress and decrease inflammation in the brain. This in turn increases the feelgood chemicals in the brain that elevate our mood.

Omega 3 found in oily fish and B vitamins found in some vegetables increase the production of the brain’s happiness chemicals and have been known to protect against both dementia and depression.

Salmon is an excellent source of omega 3. Caroline Attwood

Pro and prebiotics found in yoghurt, cheese and fermented products boost the millions of bacteria living in our gut. These bacteria produce chemical messengers from the gut to the brain that influence our emotions and reactions to stressful situations.

Research suggests pro- and prebiotics could work on the same neurological pathways that antidepressants do, thereby decreasing depressed and anxious states and elevating happy emotions.

What happens when you switch to a healthy diet?

An Australian research team recently undertook the first randomised control trial studying 56 individuals with depression.

Over a 12-week period, 31 participants were given nutritional consulting sessions and asked to change from their unhealthy diets to a healthy diet. The other 25 attended social support sessions and continued their usual eating patterns.

The participants continued their existing antidepressant and talking therapies during the trial.

At the end of the trial, the depressive symptoms of the group that maintained a healthier diet significantly improved. Some 32% of participants had scores so low they no longer met the criteria for depression, compared with 8% of the control group.

The trial was replicated by another research team, which found similar results, and supported by a recent review of all studies on dietary patterns and depression. The review found that across 41 studies, people who stuck to a healthy diet had a 24-35% lower risk of depressive symptoms than those who ate more unhealthy foods.

These findings suggest improving your diet could be a cost-effective complementary treatment for depression and could reduce your risk of developing a mental illness.

 

NACCHO @RACGP Aboriginal Health Survey : 2 of 2 From now until February 2019, NACCHO and @RACGP  wants to hear from you about implementing the National Guide and supporting culturally responsive healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input!

Download this post as PDF and share with your networks

 We-seek-your-input-NACCHO-RACGP-Project

What we are currently doing:

  • Conducting practice team surveys and focus groups to:
    • understand current system requirements and how they can improve identification rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients in mainstream practices and
    • integrate the key recommendations from the National Guide into clinical software
  • Establishing a Collaborative with the Improvement Foundation to conduct rapid quality improvement cycles leading to the provision of better healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Engaging with medical software vendors to understand how we can improve identification rates and integrate the National Guide into clinical software
  • Developing resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people regarding preventive health assessments and follow up care
  • Working with our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led Project Reference Group to carry out all project activities.

From now until February 2019, we want to hear from you!

Do you have ideas, solutions or examples of good practice relating to:

  • how health services can ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients receive patient centred, quality health assessments (715) that meet their needs?
  • the resources that would support mainstream general practice teams to provide culturally responsive healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?
  • how guidelines, such as the National Guide, can be integrated into clinical software?
  • features of clinical software that will support improved identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients at your practice?
  • features of a 715 health assessment template that will support a comprehensive health assessment?

To participate in a short survey, please CLICK HERE

We also welcome your feedback and input at aboriginalhealth@racgp.org.au

With your feedback, we will:

  • understand the needs of our cohort
  • understand what works through our Collaborative model for improvement report
  • develop new resources to support you and your team with delivering better healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples regardless of where care is sought
  • share the lessons with mainstream general practice and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Early detection, preventing disease and promoting health

The National Guide is a practical resource intended for all health professionals delivering primary healthcare to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.

Its purpose is to provide GPs and other health professionals with an accessible, user-friendly guide to best practice preventive healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

See Website

New to the third edition!

National Guide podcasts

Subscribe to the National Guide Podcast (listen to the third edition) to hear host Lauren Trask, NACCHO Implementation Officer and CQI expert, speak to GPs  and researchers on updates and changes in the third edition of the National Guide.

Downloads

 National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (PDF 9.8 MB)

 Evidence base to a preventive health assessment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (PDF 9.4 MB)

 National Guide Lifecycle chart (child) (PDF 555 KB)

 National Guide Lifecycle chart (young) (PDF 1 MB)

 National Guide Lifecycle chart (adult) (PDF 1 MB)

NACCHO Aboriginal #SexualHealth #UandMeCanStopHIV Check out #ACCHO Events this week @atsihaw and we cover Minister @KenWyattMP Launches new TV and Social Media campaign to tackle First Nations #HIV

 

” A new television, social media and community campaign has been launched during Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week, to increase understanding of HIV and reduce new cases among First Nations people.

Part of a $3.4 million project funded by the Federal Government, through the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), the campaign aims to capitalise on a reduction in new HIV diagnoses last year.”

To view or download the new campaign resources visit see link below 

Check out over NACCHO 40 Aboriginal Sexual Health Articles like this HERE 

 “ Each year in the first week of December, to coincide with World AIDS Day, we host Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week – “ATSIHAW”.

The inaugural ATSIHAW was held in November 2014 to get a conversation going in our community about HIV prevention and the importance of regular testing for HIV.

The theme of ATSIHAW is “U AND ME CAN STOP HIV”.

ATSIHAW has proven itself to be a popular event – engaging our communities, as well as HIV researchers, doctors, health workers and policy-makers. Each year ATSIHAW events that aim to promote awareness of HIV are run in local community based organisations. Engagement is continuing to grow with the number of events reaching over 60 during the week of ATSIHAW in 2016.

ATSIHAW 2018 will run from 27 November to 1 December 2018, with the official launch at Parliament House, Canberra, on 27 November 2018. Senator Dean Smith hosted the launch, in his capacity as Chair of the Parliamentary Liaison Group on HIV/AIDS, Blood Borne Viruses and Sexually Transmitted Diseases.” 

ATSIHAW community events and activities are held across Australia

See full list of events below or HERE 

The campaign has First Nations voices and people speaking directly to First Nations people – communicating with cultural understanding, to help ensure these lifesaving messages get through.

To view or download the new campaign resources visit https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCizXGcmiz9tKjrf6BvdMlOQ 

In 2017 there were 31 new HIV cases diagnosed in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – 30 per cent less than in 2016 – but HIV among First Australians remains too high.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are disproportionately affected by HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

At 4.6 cases per 100,000, the per capita rate of HIV infection last year was still 1.6 times the rate for the non-Indigenous Australian-born population.

Although the majority of HIV cases in First Australians are in men who have sex with men, compared to other Australians, First Nations people are six times as likely to contract HIV as a result of injecting drugs, and more likely to contract it from heterosexual sex.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are also more likely to have undiagnosed HIV.

This is particularly concerning as international evidence shows that people diagnosed with HIV who receive appropriate treatment can reduce HIV to levels so low that it is undetectable.

This reduces the risk of transmission significantly. This is known as ‘Treatment as Prevention’, and it is essential that it is better promoted and understood in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

VIEW HERE

As well as the SAHMRI education campaign, our Government is funding awareness raising about the use of HIV medicines to prevent HIV transmission – known as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP.

We have committed $1.2 million over five years for education and awareness activities about PrEP for both doctors and other prescribers, and affected communities, including First Australians.

Since April, PrEP had been available through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, making it affordable for all. If taken daily, PrEP has been shown to be highly effective in protecting people from contracting HIV.

The Government will provide an estimated $180 million a year in subsidies for PrEP to reduce HIV, especially among First Australians, some migrant groups, and gay and bisexual men.

To continue the fight against HIV – among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and across the whole country – we will shortly be announcing new national Blood Borne Viruses and Sexually Transmissible Infections strategies.

To view or download the new campaign resources visit https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCizXGcmiz9tKjrf6BvdMlOQ 

ACT

NATSISN (National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Staff Network)

HIV and community – Awareness event
26 Nov – 3 Dec
Department of Health foyer
51 Ellerston Ave
Isabella Plains ACT 2905

Contact: Kartika Medcraft kartika.medcraft@health.gov.au
Awareness of rise of HIV/ STI in indigenous community, local services and prevention campaigns


Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services

Community BBQ
3-Dec
Winnunga Aboriginal Health Service
63 Boolimba Cres
Narrabundah ACT 2604

HIV Awareness

Contact: Christine Saddler, christine.saddler@winnunga.org.au

New South Wales

Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC)

Redfern AMS
28 Nov – 5 Dec at Redfern AMS
U and Me can stop HIV

Raising awareness, treatment and support options for clients and families

Contact: Sophie Scobie: sscobie@ahmrc.org.au


Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC)

Rural Doctors Network

28 Nov – 5 Dec Rural Doctors Network – Conf. stall
U and Me can stop HIV
Raising awareness, treatment and support options for clients and families to GPs

Contact: Angela Draper adraper@ahmrc.org.au


Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC) – Tharawal AMS

U and Me can stop HIV
28 Nov – 5 Dec Tharawal AMS

Raising awareness, treatment and support options for clients and families

Contact: Pauline Weldon-bowen pbowen@ahmrc.org.au


Albury Community Health

596 Smollett Street Albury NSW 2640

STIGMA Performance
8-Dec 7:20pm
Hothouse Theatre

Examining the prejudices, discrimination and stigma experiences by people living with HIV

Contact: Helen Best helen.best@awh.org.au


Bega Sexual Health Clinic (SERH, SNSWLH)

4 Virginia Drive Beg NSW 2550

You and Me can Stop HIV
29 and 30 November 10:00 – 2:00
SERH foyer and Bega AMS Katungul waiting room

Promote HIV prevention, testing and treatment
HIV prevention, safe sex promotion, promote HIV testing. Promote awareness of HIV treatment to prevent transmission and PeP and PrEP

Contact: Fiona Mckenna fiona.mckenna@health.nsw.gov.au


Griffith Community Health Centre Sexual Health

39 Yambil Street Griffith NSW 2680

World AIDS Day community Event
1-Dec 6:30pm – 8:30pm
Memorial Gardens Griffith

Remembrance and raising awareness of stigma of positive people. Community engagement and prevention, testing and treatment of HIV in the local region
Contact: Sally Davoren sally.davoren@health.nsw.gov.au


HARP Unit M & SNSW LHD

Level 3, 34 Lowe Street Queanbeyan NSW 2620

Displays and Information Stalls – U and Me can stop HIV, come have a yarn
10am – 2pm on 23 Nov – 30 Nov
Queanbeyan Hospital Foyer and Goulburn Community Health Centre.

Prevention, testing and treatment and information of HIV to local community members and health care workers. 
Discussions on our free and confidential services in the local area which offers, information, screening, treatment and support

Contact: Kevin Schamburg  kevin.schamburg@health.nsw.gov.au


Illawara Aboriginal Medical Service

2/30 Princess highway Dapto NSW 2530

U and Me can stop HIV BBQ
29-Nov at Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service (Wollongong)

Raising awareness, treatment and support options for clients and families

Contact: Debbie Gaudie dgaudie@illawarraamd.com.au


MLHD Brookong Centre Sexual Health

79 Brookong Avenue Wagga Wagga NSW 2650

Distribution to local Aboriginal services during week
26 Nov – 31 Nov at local Aboriginal and youth based services
That as a community we can all do our part in ending HIV as well as show our support for people living with HIV

Contact: Janine Sutton janine.sutton@health.nsw.gov.au


Aboriginal Health Goulburn

Aunty Jeans Goulburn
6-Dec 10:00am – 2:00pm
Bourke Street Health Service

HIV prevention and awareness for the local Aboriginal community

Contact: Rick Shipp richard.shipp@health.nsw.gov.au


Orange Aboriginal Medical Service

27-31 Perc Griffith Way Orange NSW 2800

HIV awareness week
28 Nov – 5 Dec
Orange Aboriginal Medical Service

Get tested more treatment options

Contact: Michael Halls michaelh@oams.net.au


Riverina Aboriginal Medical & Dental Corp

14 Trail Street Wagga Wagga NSW 2650

Yandarra
11-Nov 8:30 – 4:00
Jack mission Oval, Ashmont

Caring for our community for 30 years

Contact: Latoya Terry latoya.terry@rivmed.org


SNSWLHD – Eurobodalla

2 River street Moruya NSW 2537

1 December from 9:00 – 1:00
Batemans Bay and Moruya WAD Roadshow

Promotion and availability of HIV testing and treatment services in Eurobodalla 

Contact: Will Hooke william.hooke@health.nsw.gov.au


South East Regional Hospital, Health NSW

4 Virginia Drive Bega NSW 2550

Awareness of HIV
1-Dec 9:00am
Foyer of hospital

Heighten awareness

Contact: Jo Donovan, joanne.donovan@health.nsw.gov.au


Yoorana Gunya Aboriginal Family Healing Centre

40-70 Church Street Forbes NSW 2871

Health Awareness Day
14-Nov Main Street, Forbes
Knowledge of what testing can be done for HIV? AIDS and treatment

Contact: Deanne Anderson dee@yooranagunya.com.au

Northern Territory

Marthakal Homelands Health Service

World AIDS Day
1-Dec at Mapurrui Health Clinic

We want to tell people about HIV – encourage testing & promote prevention

Contact: Peter Malavisi: health.manager@marthakal.org


Royal Darwin Hospital – SHBBVU

Royal Darwin Hospital, Tiwi NT

Raising Awareness among community and staff around reducing the risk of infection.
29th Nov from 10am – 12:00pm at the Royal Darwin Hospital

Contact: Letishia Parter: letihsia.parter@nt.gov.au


Royal Darwin Hospital – SHBBVU

Royal Darwin Hospital, Tiwi NT

ATSIHAW BBQ 

Raising Awareness
Friday 30th Nov 7am- 9am – Casuarina shopping centre (Woolworth’s side under the carpark)
The Darwin Sexual Health Blood Borne Virus Unit will have an ATSIHAW BBQ in the Casuarina shopping centre carpark with the Larrakia Nations HEAL program for the homeless from 7am-9am. 
Come along learn about HIV and grab some free ATSIHAW merchandise.

Contact: Letishia Parter: letihsia.parter@nt.gov.au


Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

32 Priest Street Alice Springs NT 870

Health Promotion event 
30-Nov 10:00am
Congress main clinic

Safe sex, preventative programs and health promotion including other services

Contact: Natalee Norsworthy: natalee.norsworthy@caac.org.au

Queensland

Gar’ban’djee’lum Network

Brown Sugar
30-Nov 7:00pm til late
Australian National Hotel, 867 Stanley St, Woolloongabba QLD 4102
Raise awareness of HIV/AIDS and positive sexual health. 
Condoman and Lubelicious will be handing out condom and lube packs

Contact: ddtat64@gmail.com


 Giradula

 

50 George Street Bowen QLD

Together as a community we can stop HIV
29-Nov at Collinsville Town Park
To encourage all of community to be aware of HIV and how as a community we can stop HIV

Contact: Leanne Prise: lprise@girudala.com.au


Giradula

50 George Street Bowen QLD

Together as a community we can stop HIV
27-Nov at Proserpine Town Park

To encourage all of community to be aware of HIV and how as a community we can stop HIV

Contact: Leanne Prise: lprise@girudala.com.au


Mamu Health Service 23 Glady Street Innisfail QLD

HIV awareness week 
7-Dec at Main Clinic, Innisfail

Keep you clean, palya, Keep you safe

Contact: Teayana Salter: tsalter@mamuhsl.org.au


Giradula, Bowen QLD

Together as a community we can stop HIV
28-Nov at Bowen Town Square

To encourage all of community to be aware of HIV and how as a community we can stop HIV

Contact: Leanne Prise: lprise@girudala.com.au


Mens and Womens Health Torres NPA

WAD Ball
1-Dec evening
Thursday Island Bowling Club

To inform and educate the indigenous and non-indigenous people living in the Torres Strait communities about the risks involved with unsafe sex, having more than one partner and the importance of regular screening and testing. We need to let the community know about the importance of knowledge and understanding in regard to sexual health, also the Men’s and Women’s health staff will be promoting HIV Awareness Week leading up to world AIDS day

Contact: Sandra or Richard: sandra.gregson@health.qld.au or Richard.Mola@health.qld.gov.au

South Australia

Aboriginal Health Council of SA

220 Franklin Street Adelaide SA 5000

HIV is Everybodys business!
You and me can stop HIV
Information Stall 28 Nov – 5 Dec all day
Reception area of Aboriginal Health Council of SA

Contact: Sarah Betts: sarah.betts@ahcsa.org


Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service

1 Eyre Highway Ceduna SA 5690

CKAHSAC HIV awareness day
HIV day 22-Nov 10:30am – 1:00pm

Contact: Con Miller con.miller2@ckahsac.org.au


Drug and Alcohol Services SA

91 Magill Road Stepney SA 5069

ATSIHAW promotion through our clean needle exchange program 
26-Nov from 9:00am  at 91 Magill Road Stepney 
Promoting ATSIHAW to all clean needle program clients, making them aware of the importance of the week

Contact: Kendall Robertson kendall.robertson@sa.gov.au


Nunkuwarrin Yunti

182 – 190 Wakefield St Adelaide SA 5000

ATSIHIV awareness week 
31 Nov – 4 Dec 9:00am – 5:00pm at Nunkuwarrin Yunti Health Service 
You and Me can stop HIV

Contact: Jorge Carvajal jorgec@nunku.org.au


Pangula Mannamurna Aboriginal Corporation

191 Commercial St West Mt Gambier SA 5291

Community Awareness 28 Nov – 5 Dec 9am – 5pm 
Pangula Mannamurna reception area and clinic treatment room 
By getting information out to all community in the hope to raise awareness and start the conversation

Contact: Narelle Winterfield narelle@pangula.org.au


Pika Wiya

40-44 Dartmouth Street Pt Augusta SA 5700

Lets talk about HIV
28-Nov Pika Wiya Health Service – Well Womens House
A lot of education on HIV, risk what treatment, STI’s, give out pamphlets

Contact: Kerryn Dadleh kerryn.dadleh@pikawiya.org.au


SAMESH

57 Hyde street Adelaide SA 5000

ATSIHAW Red Ribbon Appeal
28-Nov 7:00am – 9:00am
Adelaide Railway Station and Tram stops 
Aboriginal people are effected by HIV percentage wise more than the rest of the population.

Contact: Daniel Jeffries daniel.jeffries@samesh.org.au


SIN

220 South Rd Mile End SA 5031

HIV awareness week at SIN 
28 Nov – 5 Dec daily 
HIV awareness, decreasing stigma

Contact: street@sin.org.au


Tullawon

303 Tullawon Square, Yalata Community Ceduna SA 5690

HIV awareness day 
10-Dec Yalata Clinic 
With HIV awareness we can prevent disease prevalence

Contact: Natasha Desai natashad@tullawon.org.au


Nungay Night 2018 – Get your Glitter on Gurl

Saturday 24th November 2018 at Chateau Apollo, 74 Frome Street, Adelaide

Black n Deadly Live Acts, food, drinks, laughs, DJ
Special guests, door prizes and silent auction
Due to Adult Themes, the event is 16+

Order your tickets here:  https://www.feast.org.au/events/nungay-night/

Victoria

Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS)

9 Nolan Street Kerang VIC 3579

HIV Awareness and Support Services
U and Me can stop HIV BBQ Event 
30-Nov 11:30am at MDAS Kerang

Contact: Melanie Lane mlane@mdas.org.au


Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS)

70 Nyah Road Swan Hill VIC 3585

HIV statistics and stigma, sexual health and support services
U and me, HIV community BBQ 
30-Nov 12:00pm at MDAS Community Hall

Contact: Djallarna Hamilton dhamilton@mdas.org.au


Victorian Aboriginal Health Service

186 Nicholson Street Fitzroy VIC 3065

HIV & AIDS Awareness day 
30-Nov 9:00 – 5:00 at VAHS Medical clinic 
Fitzroy HIV and awareness information

Contact: Jermaine Charles jermaine.charles@vahs.org.au


Thorne Harbour Health

Level 5, 615 St Kilda road Melbourne VIC

HIV awareness 
30-Nov 11:00 – 1:00 at Dandenong Aboriginal Health Service 
Be aware of the rising rates of HIV in the Aboriginal community and the new options for prevention, care and treatment

Contact: Peter Waples-Crow peter.wapless-crowe@thorneharbour.org

Western Australia

Aboriginal Health Council of WA
450 Beaufort Street Highgate WA

Be STI and BBV free
Encouraging health checks in your people, normalising STI and BBV testing with any presentation, showing the new animation for STI/BBV including what HIV and AIDS is
26/27/28 Nov 9:30 – 10:30 at  AHCWA offices for staff inviting DYHS and MC staff

Contact: Jen Needham jennifer.needham@ahcwa.org


Bega Gambirringu

16-18 Mcdonald Street Kalgoorlie WA 6430

HIV awareness week at Bega
Testing availability at Bega – confidentiality and culturally appropriate
3 – 7 Dec 8:30am – 4:30pm at the Aboriginal Health Service Courtyard at Bega

Contact: Alicia Sheridan alicia.sheridan@bega.org.au


Bega Gambirringu

16 – 18 McDonald Street Kalgoorlie WA 6430

HIV Awareness
10-Nov 8:30am at the Community Health Service HIV awareness within the indigenous community of the goldfields

Contact: Sonia Talamo robert.bell@bega.org.au


DAHS

1 Stanley Street Derby WA 6728

World AIDS Day 
7-Dec 8am – 12:30pm at DAHS waiting room 
World AIDS day messages/ yarning. We can walk hand in hand together

Contact: Theresa Kitaura traceyk@dahs.org.au


Derbal Yerrigan Health Service

156 Wittenoom Street East Perth WA 6004

No shame in getting a test 
19-Nov 12:00pm Derbarl Yerrigan Aboriginal Health Service 
No shame in getting a test

Contact: Jarrod Minnecon jarrod.minniecon@dyhs.org.au


Great southern Aboriginal Health Service

61 Serpentine Road Albany WA 6330

Family Fun Day 
28-Nov 11:00 – 2:00pm at the local Park 
To increase community awareness of HIV and other BBVS and STI’s and to promote safer sex and injecting practices and testing and treatment

Contact: Megan Robson megan.robson@health.wa.gov.au


Nullagine Clinic

Cooke Street Nullagine WA 6758

Random talks at the clinic when people present daily opening hours 
Informal meetings to be held at Nullagine Clinic Screen and stay safe. 
Protection

Contact: Mary Anne Hanson mary-anne.hanson@health.wa.gov.au


Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Service

1125 Ironwood Dr Kununurra WA 6743

Yarning HIV over Billy Tea 
27-Nov tbc at Ski Beach, bush location 
General education regarding HIV/ AIDS – so many young peoople have never hear of HIV much less understand it

Contact: Jane Anglis jane.a@ovahs.org.au


Pilbara Population Health

62 Balmoral Road Karratha WA 6714

School HIV awareness day in class with Girls Academy/ CLONTARF indigenous students at Karratha Senior High School 
The focus will be on de-stigmatising HIV and the testing process. 
How pilbara polulation health has free and easy testing available as well as free access to clean needles and condoms.

Contact: Chantelle Pears chantelle.pears@health.wa.gov.au


WACHS Public Health Karratha Health Campus 

63 Balmoral Road Karratha WA 6714

School Health Promotion 
26-Nov all day School, community HIV education including prevention and safe sex messages

Contact: Jan Marie Grantham jan-marie.grantham@health.wa.gov.au.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #refreshtheCTGRefresh : Download the @AIHW National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results for 2017 showing improvements in 16 out of a possible 23 measures

Between June and December 2017, improvements were seen in 16 out of a possible 23 measures for which comparable data for both periods were available (see Table S1 for details). Results for a further indicator remained stable between reporting periods.

The improvements were seen in 12 of the 15 process-of-care measures with comparable data. Improvements were also seen in 4 of the 8 outcome measures, while 1 outcome measure remained stable. The largest improvements (4 or 5 percentage points) were seen in the recording practices for the measuring of:

  • influenza immunisations for clients with type 2 diabetes, which rose from 31% to 36%
  • influenza immunisations for clients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which rose from 32% to 37%
  • influenza immunisations for clients aged 50 and over, which rose from 32% to 36%. ” 

 Extract from good news from AIHW Report

 Download full 158 page report HERE

aihw-ihw-200 (1)

Summary

This is the fifth national report on the Indigenous primary health care national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs) data collection. It presents data on all 24 nKPI indicators for the first time.

Data for this collection are provided to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) by primary health care organisations that receive funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to provide services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Some primary health care organisations included in the collection receive additional funding from other sources, including state and territory health departments.

As of the June 2017 data collection, changes have been made to the data extraction method, with the Department of Health introducing a new direct load reporting process. This allowed Communicare, Medical Director, and Primary Care Information System (PCIS) clinical information systems (CISs) to generate nKPI data within their clinical system, and transmit directly to the OCHREStreams portal. Best Practice services were provided with an interim tool while MMEx has always had direct load capability.

61.9 % our ACCHO’s

The new process was introduced to provide a greater level of consistency between CISs, but the change in the extraction method means that data from June 2017 onwards are not comparable with earlier collections.

As the June 2017 collection represents a new baseline for the collection, this report only presents data for June and December 2017.

For 2 indicators (Kidney function tests recorded and Kidney function test results) only December 2017 results are presented due to unresolved data quality issues in June 2017.

See Chapter 2 for more information on the change in extraction method, data quality, and the impact  on the collection, and Appendix E for data improvement projects and the nKPI/Online Service Reporting (OSR) review under way.

Improvements were seen for most indicators between June and December 2017. Although data from these 2 reporting periods are not comparable with earlier reporting periods, an overall pattern of improvement is in keeping with the pattern of improvement previously reported for the period June 2012 to May 2015 (see AIHW 2017). This indicates that health organisations continue to show progress in service provision.

Things to work on

For the 3 process-of-care indicators that did not show improvements—glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) result recorded (6 months), cervical screening, and Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) health assessment for those aged 0–4—the changes were very small (0.5, 0.4, and 0.1 percentage points, respectively).

In the case of cervical screening, this might be due to changes to the cervical screening program, which took effect from 1 December 2017 (see Chapter 4 for details).

Three outcome measures that did not show improvements—HbA1c result of 7% or less, low birthweight, and smoking status of women who gave birth in the previous 12 months—saw changes of between 0.8 and 1.8 percentage points.

Contents

  • 1 Introduction
    • The nKPI collection
    • Structure of this report
  • 2 Data quality
    • Data quality issues
    • Additional considerations for interpreting nKPI data
  • 3 Maternal and child health indicators
    • Why are these indicators important?
    • 3.1 First antenatal visit
    • 3.2 Birthweight recorded
    • 3.3 MBS health assessment (item 715) for children aged 0-4
    • 3.4 Child immunisation
    • 3.5 Birthweight result
    • 3.6 Smoking status of females who gave birth within the previous 12 months
  • 4 Preventative health indicators
    • Why are these important?
    • 4.1 Smoking status recorded
    • 4.2 Alcohol consumption recorded
    • 4.3 MBS health assessment (item 715) for adults aged 25 and over
    • 4.4 Risk factors assessed to enable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment
    • 4.5 Cervical screening
    • 4.6 Immunised against influenza-Indigenous regular clients aged 50 and over
    • 4.7 Smoking status result
    • 4.8 Body mass index classified as overweight or obese
    • 4.9 AUDIT-C result
    • 4.10 Cardiovascular disease risk assessment result
  • 5 Chronic disease management indicators
    • Why are these important?
    • 5.1 General Practitioner Management Plan-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.2 Team Care Arrangement-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.3 Blood pressure result recorded-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.4 HbA1c result recorded-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.5 Kidney function test recorded-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.6 Kidney function test recorded-clients with cardiovascular disease
    • 5.7 Immunised against influenza-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.8 Immunised against influenza-clients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
    • 5.9 Blood pressure result-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.10 HbA1c result-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.11 Kidney function test result-clients with type 2 diabetes-eGFR
    • 5.12 Kidney function test result-clients with type 2 diabetes-ACR
    • 5.13 Kidney function test result-clients with cardiovascular disease-eGFR
  • 6 Discussion
    • Data improvements
  • Appendix A: Background to the nKPI collection and indicator technical specifications
  • Appendix B: Data completeness
  • Appendix C: Comparison of nKPI results
  • Appendix D: State and territory and remoteness variation figures
  • Appendix E: Data improvement projects
  • Appendix F: Guide to the figures
  • Glossary
  • References

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #IDW2018 #NACCHOagm2018 Report 5 of 5 @Mayi_Kuwayu Landmark study to examine health benefits of Indigenous connection to country launched at #NACCHOagm2018

We are trying to plug gaps in data and change the mistaken narrative that being Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander is the cause of ill health,

It is important because past policies likely contribute to intergenerational health and wellbeing outcomes for our mob.”

“Governments and statistical agencies are very reluctant to collect and report information on that.”

Professor Ray Lovett said the main reason for the study was to highlight how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identity, cultural participation and knowledge was linked to better health outcomes.

” From Thursday, 20,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people will be mailed a copy of the survey, and a further 180,000 will have one by the end of January.

All Indigenous people over 16 who are registered with Medicare will receive a copy, or will be eligible to fill it out online.

Known as Mayi Kuwayu (from the Ngiyampaa-Wongaibon language, meaning to follow people over time), the study will follow the respondents for up to 50 years.”

See Guardian article Part 2 below 

Mayi Kuwayu biggest ever study of health and wellbeing among Indigenous adults was launched at our National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Members’ Conference. in Brisbane last week

Among the data to be collected by researchers is the impact of historical policy decisions such as the Stolen Generations and exposure to racism, as well as how culture is linked to wellbeing.

It is spearheaded by Australian National University Associate Professor and Wongaibon man Ray Lovett and is the first of its kind.

Hundreds of thousands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are expected to participate.

Watch Video HERE 

Professor Lovett said the main reason for the study was to highlight how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identity, cultural participation and knowledge was linked to better health outcomes.

“For many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people this concept is intuitive,” he said.

“We know if we maintain a connection to our country, to our languages, to strong family and kinship networks then that it is good for us, but we need the data.”

Associate Professor Lovett’s own grandmother was a member of the Stolen Generation, which has impacted on his own family.

“I’m a product of the Stolen Generations — my grandmother was taken,” he said. “This has had traumatic impacts within my own extended family.”

He said he hoped in the future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing policy focussed on connecting and reconnecting people to their country and cultural knowledge.

The study has been more than three years in the planning.

People can tell their story online at mkstudy.com.au or call 1800 531 600

Part 2 From the Guardian

The health benefits of connections to identity, culture and land for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are to be measured in a study, beginning on Thursday, that will follow them for up to 50 years.

Published HERE 

It has taken the Australian National University research team four and a half years, including two and a half years of consultation with dozens of Indigenous communities, to decide how to measure such long-held anecdotal beliefs in a statistically useful way.

“For many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, this concept is intuitive,” said the study leader, Assoc Prof Ray Lovett. “We know if we maintain a connection to our country, to our languages, to strong family and kinship networks, that it is good for us, but we need the data.”

Lovett said pilot studies in Victoria and central Australia had already demonstrated that better connections to country vastly improved the mental health of its Aboriginal participants. “Those two studies are showing the same thing in two totally different areas,” he said.

The survey also seeks to measure how racism, discrimination and past policies of forced removals have affected Aboriginal people’s physical and mental health.

“It’s personal for me, that question,” Lovett said. “Growing up, my grandmother was from the stolen generations, and that legacy lasted through my mother’s generation.

“In my own family there was a constant concern I sensed as a child, that they were quite worried about being monitored, about being under surveillance.

“There’s a constant level of stress we experience, from subtle or overt racism, and that level of distress is a real thing for many Aboriginal families. The intergenerational effects are profound.

“People confuse indigeneity with ill health and poor outcomes. A big part of our study is looking at how, when people are connected to culture, they are better off, and how those things really matter and should be part of our national health policy.”

The survey was launched at the annual conference of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, the peak body representing Aboriginal health agencies.

Talking about Culture

Our team have listened to many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people speaking about what culture means to them. The following quotes are from the Mayi Kuwayu focus groups held around the country in 2017.

Torres Strait

There’s three tiers that we look at in culture. Our physical connection, our emotional connection and the spiritual. That’s the number one important factor – all of our belief system and our connectivity bases on spirituality.

……………..

Every generation stands on the shoulders of the last generation. So you and me stand up on shoulders of giants. That’s why we’re here. We as Indigenous people come from the mind set of survival, not economics. We’re built on survival, which is each other.

……………..

Culture is our traditions, dance, and languages. Campfire yarns, sharing from elders, talking, family, preserving our identity so it doesn’t die out – and sharing all these things.

Ulladulla

Culture is so important. We provide the knowledge to our young ones so that they have something that they can carry on.

……………..

As a kid you weren’t allowed to go talking languages. You weren’t allowed to go doing any – you were also told that you didn’t know what you were talking about. And the best thing today is the fact that we now get the chance to teach our own culture and teach our language.

……………..

Our culture has been suppressed through Government policies. The more time goes on, the more policies that are implemented to prevent us from celebrating our own cultures.

Bunbury

The other thing that’s the main thing, is connection to country, and knowing where you come from.

……………..

If you don’t know where you come from, how do you know where you’re going?

Cowra

I can see a change now with strengthening culture. I can see that happening as more young people think about their culture. I just think language, when you speak it, it’s like a song when you’re speaking it. It’s real rhythmical, the language.

……………..

I’ve grown up with positive role models with my aunties and my uncles. I’ve grown up spiritually strong. And Mum, with what happened with her, I just think that affected her spirit. I think that’s a lot of Aboriginal people, their spirit has been affected. And our culture is spiritual. That’s the basis of our culture.

……………..

My mother, when she did the Census, she never, ever said she was Aboriginal and she definitely is. But she would never say because she thought they’d come back on her and take the kids away, you know? Just fear of something happening. And I’m sure a lot of people didn’t do the Census. That’s why we haven’t got good statistics.

Tangantyere

Culture for me is respecting our elders. They are our first teachers, they’re our guidance. They are our backbone of our family.

……………..

I always start with elders because they’re our teachers and they help us connect back into country. They teach us knowledge, history, storylines, song-lines. Laws. Caring and sharing with family. That family kinship connection that keeps us strong.

……………..

Our law is the law of our land and that’s what makes us strong.

CLC Ranger Group

Knowing where the story is and how the story is being involved in your country – is pretty strong.

……………..

When we go out on our traditional land, we do get some positive energy and it builds our strength. And drinking water from waterholes and eating tucker from out bush, all that. That’s what builds our people’s strength up.

……………..

You’ve got to start at the beginning where you’re made. Your belonging, you know. Where you’re from. Where you’re connected through not only country, but also how you fit in with family members in that area. Regrouping or grouping each other in cultural, but it starts off with ceremonies to know where you stand as a person for being involved in culture.

Cairns

When we go up on country, it’s about taking the kids through the landscape, talking to them about special significant sites and what happened and showing them the fish traps and ground ovens and all those sorts of things. So sharing that understanding is not just having a connection to your land but actually understanding their lands is really important.

……………..

You can flow between two cultures, but as soon as you’re a mob together, you just go for it. It just connects you. And it feels good, you know. And so for someone that’s not getting any of that in their life, there’s got to be an impact.

……………..

For me, that cultural wellbeing the biggest, the most ultimate thing is being able to go home at some time, in some way, shape or form. This is what we’ve actually done with our clients that nobody ever bothered to do.

And the Government wouldn’t fund it and things like that, but we found a way to do it. And the difference it’s made in those peoples’ lives is significant.

It’s just phenomenal, the difference once they’ve been able to go back to their country, sit on that dirt and be surrounded by the people they haven’t seen for many years. The biggest thing for me is that cultural wellbeing.

South Australia

Yeah, that’s our main concern. And culture and how it affects wellbeing. If we don’t have culture, we don’t always have wellbeing.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alert : Download the 50 Page @HealthInfoNet Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2017

 ” One area of positive change is in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-governance.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Members of the House of Representatives, Senators and other senior political leaders work to improve the health and wellbeing of their people

These developments have come after years of leadership from Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs).” 

Extract from Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2017

Download Summary+of+Aboriginal+and+Torres+Strait+Islander+health+status+2017

The new Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2017 makes keeping up to date easier. The Summary is a plain language version of the more comprehensive Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2017.

Our annual Summary is one of our most popular publications.

This year as part of our ongoing commitment to strengths based approaches, we have highlighted improvements to health factors that contribute to positive health outcomes.

The Summary presents the latest facts and evidence and provides the workforce with the tools to keep up to date on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and in a way that is easily understood.

The Summary highlights the areas whereAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s health continues to improve, such as the decline in infant mortality rates, a decline in the death rate from avoidable causes, and a decline in the death rate from cardiovascular disease.

There have also been improvements in eye health – for example, there has been a decrease in the prevalence of active trachoma among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in some remote communities.

The percentage of people who are daily smokers continues to fall which is another positive step as tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for ill health.

Introduction

This Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2017 is based on the Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2017 produced by the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet. It provides information about:

  • population
  • births
  • deaths
  • major health problems
  • health risk and protective factors.

Many reports and publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people focus on the negative differences between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous people. We pledge to also report positive differences and improvements in health whenever the information is available.

In this Summary, as part of our ongoing commitment to strengths based approaches, we have highlighted improvements to health and factors that contribute to positive health outcomes .

Most of the information in this Summary comes from government reports, particularly those produced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

Data for these reports come from:

  • health surveys (for example, the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health surveys)
  • hospitals and other government agencies (such as the birth and death registration systems and the hospital in-patient collections)
  • doctors across Australia.

The accuracy of identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in health data collections varies across the country

In this Summary, unless otherwise stated, statistics collected in the following jurisdictions New South Wales (NSW), Queensland (Qld), Western Australia (WA), South Australia (SA) and the Northern Territory (NT) are considered to be adequate, for example, for mortality.

However, for some collections such as hospitalisation, data is considered adequate across Australia.

Due to the difference in the age structures of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population and the non-Indigenous population (see Figure 1), any comparison of rates between the populations requires the data to be age-standardised (see Glossary).

All comparisons of rates in this Summary will be age-standardised unless otherwise stated.

How do historical and political factors influence health?

Aboriginal people have lived in Australia for at least 45,000 years [1] and possibly up to 120,000 years [2]. Torres Strait Islander people first lived on the islands in the Torres Straits and now live across mainland Australia and the Straits [2].

Before colonisation by Europeans, both Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people enjoyed a semi-nomadic lifestyle [2].

They lived in family and community groups and moved across their own territories according to the seasons.

The transition from living as active hunter-gatherers to a mostly inactive lifestyle with a Westernised diet has had serious effects on their health [3].

Colonisation led to the introduction of certain policies that have had a negative impact on quality of life and health.

Many of these policies have contributed to past and continuing experiences of:

  • racism
  • discrimination
  • the forced removal of children
  • loss of identity, language, culture and land [4].

What social factors affect people’s health?

The social determinants of health are the social factors that influence health [6]. They include the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age.

These conditions are created by policies, political systems and social customs [6, 7]. Other social factors that contribute to the gap in health between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous people include education, employment, income and the physical environment where they live.

Education

According to the 2016 Australian Census [8], among 20-24 year old Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people:
• 47% completed year 12 (compared with only 32% in 2006)
• women were more likely than men to have completed year 12 (51% compared with 43%)
• people living in urban areas were more likely to have completed year 12 compared with those living in rural areas (50% compared with 34%)
• the highest proportions of people completing year 12 were in the ACT (66%) and Qld (55%); the lowest proportion was in the NT (25%).

An ABS report about schools [9] showed that in 2016:

• there were 207,852 school students who identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, which was an increase of 3.6% from 20151
• 59.8% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students who started secondary school in year 7/8 continued through to year 12.
A national report on schooling in Australia [10] showed that in 2017:
• at least 77% of year 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students were at or above the national minimum standard for reading, writing, spelling, grammar and punctuation, and numeracy
• at least 69% of year 5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students were at or above the national minimum standard for reading, writing, spelling, grammar and punctuation, and numeracy.

Employment

According to the 2016 Australian Census [8]:
• 47% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people between the ages of 15 and 64 years were employed
• 70% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 to 24 years were either in full- or part-time employment, education
or training
• the top three areas of employment in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people worked were: health care and social
assistance (15%); public administration and safety (12%); and education and training (10%)
• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men were most likely to be employed in construction (17%) and women were most likely to be employed in health care and social assistance (24%).

Income

According to the 2016 Census [8]:
• 20% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported an equivalised2 weekly income of $1,000 or more compared with 13% in 2011 [8, 11]
• 53% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported an equivalised weekly household income of between $150 and $799 (compared with 51% of non-Indigenous people reporting an equivalised weekly household income of between $400 and $1249) [8].

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Download @GrattanInst #MappingPrimaryCare ‏Report : Reform primary care to improve health care for all Australians says @stephenjduckett

 ” Primary care policy needs an overhaul to ensure all Australians — especially the poor and the elderly — get the best possible health care, according to a new Grattan Institute report.

Mapping primary care in Australia shows many poorer Australians can’t afford to go to a GP when they need to or a dentist when they should, and people in rural and remote areas find it too hard to get to a pharmacist or medical specialist. “

Stephen Duckett, Health Program Director Grattan Institute see in full Part 1 below

Primary health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (ATSI) is delivered by a range of providers, including ATSI specific and general health service organisations.

The Indigenous Australians Health Programme105 provides Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with access to primary care services in urban, rural and remote locations, primarily through Aboriginal and Community Controlled Health Services.

Commencing in 2015-16, the Commonwealth committed $3.2 billion over four years to fund the Indigenous Australians Health Programme.

The programme funds primary care services, remote area health, and integrated team care. It targets a range of infectious, chronic and behavioural conditions that are particularly relevant for indigenous populations.

Data on the outcomes of Indigenous health services is better than for many other primary care services.

Most outcomes have improved over the last few years, although they remain well behind averages for the rest of the population.

See Pages 30 – 32 in the Grattan Report Download full report HERE

Grattan Institute -Mapping-primary-care

Part 1

Australians’ access to general practice varies according to their wealth. Two-thirds of patients are bulk-billed for all their visits to the GP, but the financial barriers for those who are not can be high. About 4 per cent of Australians say they delay seeing a GP because of the cost.

Individuals or their private health insurer have to pay for the bulk of dental care. As a result, about one in five Australians do not get the recommended level of oral health care. Worse, people on low incomes who can’t afford to pay often wait for years to get public dental services.

Access to allied health services such as physiotherapy and podiatry varies significantly according to where people live. People in the Northern Territory are about four times less likely to use Medicare-funded allied health services than Victorians.

The report finds that the funding, organisation and management of primary care has not kept pace with changes to disease patterns, the economic pressure on health services, and technological advances.

In particular, primary care services are not organised well enough to support integrated, comprehensive care for the 20 per cent of Australians who have complex and chronic conditions.

Nor is primary care well organised to prevent or reduce the incidence of conditions such as type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Governance and accountability are split between various levels of government and numerous separate agencies, making overall management of the system difficult. Neither the Commonwealth nor the states take the lead.

The report calls for:

  • A comprehensive national primary care policy framework to improve prevention and patient care.
  • Formal agreements between the Commonwealth, the states and Primary Health Networks to improve management of the primary care system.
  • New funding, payment and organisational arrangements to provide better long-term care for the increasing number of older Australians who live with complex and chronic conditions, and to help keep populations healthy in the first place.

“Primary care policy in Australia is under-done,” says Grattan Institute Health Program Director Stephen Duckett.

“Australia has good-quality primary care by international standards, but it can be better. This report shows how.”

PART 2 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health

5.1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners

According to National Health Workforce data, there were 451 ATSI health practitioners in 2015. As Figure 5.1 shows, most work in outer regional, remote and very remote areas,106 and as Figure 5.2 on the next page shows, most work in Aboriginal health services.

These services provide a comprehensive range of medical, oral, nursing and allied health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people tripled to around 50 per cent. Recording of blood pressure, blood sugar levels and kidney function also increased.

Results indicate that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services are on track to meet national goals by 2023, although results vary according to jurisdiction and remoteness.

All improvements must be considered in the context of the big gap in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

The life expectancy of Indigenous Australians is about 10 years shorter than for other Australians.

5.2 Indigenous primary health services

In 2015-16, there were 204 Indigenous primary health care services.

They employed 7766 full-time equivalent staff, of whom 53 per cent were Indigenous. They had about 5.4 million contacts with 461,500 patients. The vast majority of patients (79 per cent) were Indigenous.

As Table 5.1 shows, most of these services (69 per cent) are in outer regional, remote and very remote areas, and a similar proportion are Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs).108

5.3 Performance measurement

Significant effort has been made to measure the impact of primary care services on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The 24 National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health109 cover maternal and child health, preventative health and chronic disease management. They build on previous work including the Australian Primary Care Collaboratives Program.

The 2016 results indicated significant improvement on 12 of the 16 measures in the national minimum data set.

This included improvements in recording patients’ birth weight, alcohol consumption, and whether they smoke.

But outcome measures indicated high and increasing levels of chronic disease and chronic disease risk factors among patients from 2012 to 2016.

There were indications that coordination of the care of patients had improved. From 2012 to 2015, the proportion of patients with diabetes who had GP management plans and team care arrangements had tripled to around 50 per cent.

Recording of blood pressure, blood sugar levels and kidney function also increased.

Results indicate that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services are on track to meet national goals by 2023, although results vary according to jurisdiction and remoteness.

All improvements must be considered in the context of the big gap in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

The life expectancy of Indigenous Australians is about 10 years shorter than for other Australians.110

5.4 Funding

In 2013-14, about $6 billion was spent towards improving Indigenous health, of which 13 per cent went to community health services.111

The Commonwealth has introduced a range of measures to improve Indigenous Australians’ access to health care, including MBS and PBS concessions for Indigenous patients and deploying Medicare liaison officers to educate Indigenous people about the health care system.112

Available data suggests the distribution of Commonwealth-funded ATSI health services and other GP services matches the distribution of Indigenous populations, except in remote and very remote areas of Queensland and Western Australia.113

But more data is needed, including on services provided by state and territory governments, and on the quality of the coordination of care for Indigenous patients.

The available data also suggests Indigenous Australians may have poorer access to specialist services. And of course, access to a service does not ensure that the care provided is culturally appropriate.