Aboriginal Heath News : NACCHO supports #OchreRibbonWeek #saveFVPLS: 12th – 19th February and call for action to end the violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – particularly our women and children.

 

” This week is Ochre Ribbon Week. It’s a week to raise awareness of the devastating impacts of family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and call for action to end the violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – particularly our women and children.

Violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women is a national emergency. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 34 times more likely to be hospitalised because of family violence and 10 times more likely to die from a violent assault than other women.

Every single Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander man, woman and child deserves to live a life free of violence and fear, and thrive in culture and identity. ‘

The National Convenor of the Forum is Antoinette Braybrook (CEO, FVPLS Victoria), and the Deputy Convenor is Phynea Clarke (CEO, CAAFLU).

 

Prevention is the key to ensuring safety for our children and mothers, keeping families connected and strong in culture. The holistic, wrap-around response that FVPLSs provide is essential to ending family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their children.

The goal of the Forum is to work in collaboration across Family Violence Prevention Legal Services (FVPLSs) and increase access to justice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victim/survivors of family violence. The Forum provides advice and input to Government and ensures a unified FVPLS response to addressing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family violence.

The Forum has worked with members to develop tools for capacity building, good governance, professional development, training, data collection and evaluation.

The Forum is supported by a Secretariat, and Forum members are represented by their CEO/Co-ordinator (or delegate) at meetings and activities.

Family Violence Prevention Legal Services

FVPLSs are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisations – our communities know and trust our staff and services. We are unique, experienced and specialist service providers delivering culturally safe legal and non-legal services within which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture is acknowledged and celebrated.

FVPLSs provide legal assistance, casework, counselling and court support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults and children who are victim/survivors of family violence. Legal services are provided to victim/survivors in matters related to:

  • Family violence (i.e. VRO, AVO different terminology across jurisdictions);
  • Victims of crime compensation;
  • Family law; and
  • Child protection.

FVPLSs also provide an important community legal education and early intervention and prevention function. FVPLSs have adopted a holistic, wrap-around service delivery model that prioritise legal service delivery while recognising and addressing the multitude of interrelated issues that our clients face. Nationally 90% of our clients are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children.

FVPLSs are expected to ensure that the services offered are culturally inclusive and accessible to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults and children in the specified service region, regardless of gender, sexual preference, family relationship, location, disability, literacy or language.

Objectives of the National FVPLS Forum

The objectives of the Forum are to:

  1. Support and enhance the capacity of FVPLSs to provide high quality services that deliver results for clients and communities;
  2. Coordinate and facilitate communication, information sharing and relationship building between FVPLS units;
  3. Develop policy positions that identify areas of FVPLS work in need of reform and make recommendations for change;
  4. Provide advice and input to Government on issues relevant to the FVPLS program and its operation;
  5. Engage with key stakeholders including through participation in activities and national meetings that will benefit and promote National Forum positions;
  6. Promote the existence of the National Convenor/Secretariat role and FVPLSs in the appropriate forums and media; and
  7. Facilitate a co-ordinated approach to building a secure and sustainable resource base that meets the needs of FVPLSs and their clients.

Further information on some of our members’ services is available here.

This Ochre Ribbon Week, show your support in the following ways:

  1. Add the Ochre Ribbon Week 2020 frame to your Facebook profile picture here: https://www.facebook.com/profilepicframes
  2. Follow the National Family Violence Prevention and Legal Services Forum on Twitter and Facebook
  3. Donate to our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander controlled FVPLSs across the country
  4. Spread the word! Forward this email to your contacts

To find out more about Ochre Ribbon Week, head to https://www.nationalfvpls.org/

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News Alerts : Indigenous culture not to blame for alcohol abuse, violence says NT MP Yingiya Guyula

” To tackle the problems that (Jancita ) Price and myself and all of us want to see fixed requires a more mature conversation.

This should start with focusing on the behaviour and not pointing the finger at “culture “.

The idea that abandonment of culture is the great hope for Aboriginal people is false, offensive, and dangerous.

We must connect our past, present, and future as we look to address these ­issues.”

Yingiya Guyula is a senior leader for the Liya-Dhalinymirr clan of the Djambarrpungu people within the Yolngu Nation.

He is an independent member of the Northern Territory parliament.

Published in todays AUSTRALIAN

The efforts by Jacinta Price and others to blame Aboriginal culture for violence and abuse serve no one and achieve nothing positive.

The argument that Aboriginal culture is to blame for Aboriginal people being over-represented in cases of domestic and other forms of violence is wrong.

Our culture is who we are. We are inextricably part of our culture, our language, our customs, our spirituality, our worldview. Our law maintains our culture. To take these things away is to remove our identity.

It is a dangerous discussion because it is about the systematic dehumanisation of a group that might have catastrophic consequences.

Price wrote on this page about Yolngu law, but she is not a member of the Yolngu nation and she is not from Yolngu country. She has referred to an article titled Ngarra Law that has no authority.

It was written in English by one Yolngu elder and edited by a non-indigenous man who has no connection to, or authority, under Yolngu law, and was published in a journal no longer in print.

It was not supported by any other Yolngu leader or elder and was challenged by Yolngu leaders in meetings in Galiwin’ku, Ramingining and Maningrida in 2017 to dispute much of the content. We are disappointed about what has been written of our law.

I am not relying on anyone else for my understanding of my law. I am a djirrikaymirr (senior leader) and djungaya (manager) and djagamirr (caretaker) for many Yolngu law ceremonies, including a custodian of Ngarra rom (an institution of law). Our law is not merely a collection of crimes and punishments, it is a whole system of education, discipline and leadership that starts at a young age and continues for a lifetime.

I know this not from reading an article but because I have been trained in this all my life. I was taught by my elders to keep true to the law. When I went away to school I was warned there would be many outside temptations (like alcohol, drugs, greed) and that I must hear the sound of clapsticks and feel the painting on my skin, that signifies living by discipline and a pathway to leadership.

This law system has kept alive and made strong a society that has existed since time began. But these are modern-day issues, they are new to us, and just as Western law has adjusted, we need the opportunity for our elders — men and women — to apply a modern Yolngu response. It’s up to us to do that. It must come from us.

It is clear that foreign solutions are not working for our people. Billions of dollars are spent each year trying to solve what others call the “Aboriginal problem”, but as the Intervention continues to evidence, this pathway is failing everyone.

It is a very sad thing that these days visitors to our communities see all of the outward signs of poverty and disadvantage. These should never be confused with our system of law and culture. Alcohol and drugs are not our culture; overcrowding is not our culture; unemployment and bored kids are not our culture; high rates of imprisonment are not our culture; poor health and suicide are not our culture; and family violence is not our culture. These are not a product of our culture, they are all the side-effects found in every society around the world that is affected by poverty, disadvantage, and colonisation.

As a senior leader, I need to be clear: the family violence that we are seeing in our communities is not lawful — it is breaking the law.

But we are also facing issues of alcohol and drug addictions, gambling addictions, high levels of unemployment, high levels of welfare dependency, and low levels of self-worth, and we must solve these issues too if we are to be successful.

If a visitor to our communities is fortunate enough to attend our ceremonies or live with us, they will see elders leading and organising and educating. They will see young men, fit and confident, humble and dedicated. They will see young women proud and strong. They will see small children everywhere learning and observing. This is our culture, it is full of healthy and vibrant life. At one point not so long ago, this was our everyday — where our communities were governed without outside influence.

To tackle the problems that Price and myself and all of us want to see fixed requires a more mature conversation. This should start with focusing on the behaviour and not pointing the finger at “culture”. The idea that abandonment of culture is the great hope for Aboriginal people is false, offensive, and dangerous. We must connect our past, present, and future as we look to address these ­issues.

Yingiya Guyula is a senior leader for the Liya-Dhalinymirr clan of the Djambarrpungu people within the Yolngu Nation. He is an independent member of the Northern Territory parliament.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Smoking : Download the @RACGP Supporting #smokingcessation Guide : Smoking daily is three times as high in the lowest socioeconomic areas of Australia compared to the highest.

“The likelihood of smoking daily is three times as high in the lowest socioeconomic areas of Australia compared to the highest.

What this means is that smoking-related health problems disproportionately affect those least able to afford the medicines that are essential to helping them quit.

We have made massive inroads, now it’s time for the final, decisive push to reduce daily smoking levels.

These medicines work, we just need to do more to help get them into the hands of people who need them most and removing restrictions on prescribing will do just that.”

RACGP President Dr Harry Nespolon said that the Government should act to assist those who struggle to afford the medicines that are proven to help people quit smoking.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

 ” Indigenous Australians are still more than twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to be current daily smokers.2 However, there has been a progressive decrease in daily smoking rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, declining from 49% in 2002 to 45% in 2008, and then to 41% in 2012–13.3

People who identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander qualify for PBS authority listing that provides up to two courses per year of nicotine patches, each of a maximum of 12 weeks. Under this listing, participation in a support and counselling program is recommended but not mandatory. Access t nicotine patches for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can be facilitated through the Closing the Gap PBS co-payment measure (see page 45).”

Extracts from GUIDE

Download the RACGP Supporting smoking cessation: A guide for health professionals (2nd edition) smoking-cessation

Read over 130 Aboriginal Health and Smoking articles published by NACCHO over past 8 years

Read Aboriginal Health and our partnership with RACGP articles published by NACCHO over past 8 years

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) has today recommended allowing greater flexibility in prescribing for smoking cessation pharmacotherapy.

The bold proposal, contained in the RACGP’s newly released Supporting smoking cessation: A guide for health professionals (2nd edition) (“the guide”), could prove a game-changer for reducing smoking rates.

Pharmacotherapy options available in Australia include nicotine replacement therapy (NRT, e.g. a transdermal patch or acute forms such as an oral spray, gum, inhaler or lozenge), varenicline (a drug that blocks the pleasure and reward response to smoking) and bupropion hydrochloride (which reduces the urge to smoke and helps with nicotine withdrawal).

Oral forms of NRT subsidised on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) are gum and lozenges for use as the sole PBS-subsidised therapy. This means that combination NRT (i.e. using two forms of NRT together such as a patch and gum) is not currently PBS-subsidised.

Under PBS rules, a maximum 12 weeks of PBS-subsidised NRT is available per 12-month period.

Australia has made commendable inroads in tobacco control and smoking rates with daily smoking nearly halved from 24% in 1991 to 12.8% in 2013. However, the job is not complete and there has been a slowing in the rate of decline with little change in prevalence from 2013 to 2016 (12.2%).

The latest National Tobacco Strategy aims to reduce the national adult daily smoking rate to 10% of the population and halve the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult daily smoking rate.

RACGP President Dr Harry Nespolon said that the Government should act to assist those who struggle to afford the medicines that are proven to help people quit smoking.

“Some people can quit unassisted; however, those who take advantage of behavioural support and vital medicines including combination NRT, varenicline and bupropion will substantially increase their chances of quitting.

“The science is in – a host of randomised clinical trials tell us that these medicines work. Varenicline or combination NRT almost triples the odds of quitting and bupropion and NRT alone almost double the odds of quitting versus a placebo at six months. The evidence is also clear that combination NRT is most effective.

“However, as things stand we have fixed PBS rules that don’t reflect best-practice medical assistance. As a result, people trying to quit smoking miss out on PBS subsidies that could make a real difference.

“We need to improve flexibility in prescribing to cut costs for patients using pharmacotherapy so that people who could really benefit from these medicines can access them.

“It’s vital to allow for PBS-subsidised combination NRT, which is proven to be the most effective form of NRT.

“We should also allow GPs to prescribe a second round of PBS-subsidised NRT within a 12-month period because it will help reduce relapse in people who have stopped smoking at the end of a standard course of NRT. This is a public health policy no-brainer, pure and simple.”

Dr Nespolon noted that the inflexibility in PBS prescribing was particularly troubling given that smoking rates are inverse to socioeconomic status.

Chair of the Expert Advisory Group behind the guide, Professor Nicholas Zwar, said that health professionals including GPs should also be encouraged to embrace the “brief intervention” approach to smoking cessation.

“One of the most often cited barriers to providing smoking cessation advice is that it can prove time consuming.

“Up until now health professionals have used a ‘5A’s approach’ which involves identifying patients who smoke, assessing nicotine dependence and barriers to quitting, advising patients to quit, offering assistance and arranging a follow up. It is sound practice but it does take time.”

Professor Zwar said that under the three-step model developed by Quit Victoria, advice and help for patients trying to quit smoking could be easier to provide and more frequently offered by a range of health professionals.

“This three-step model offers patients best practice smoking cessation treatment by linking into multi-session behavioural interventions such as Quitline and encouraging the use of pharmacotherapy.

“It can be summarised as ask, advise and help. Ask and record a patient’s smoking status, advise people who smoke to quit and on the most effective methods for doing so and help them by offering to arrange referral, encourage use of behavioural intervention and the use of evidence-based pharmacotherapy.”

The guide update was funded by VicHealth and the Australian Government Department of Health.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Healthy Ageing News : The @georgeinstitute is looking to partner with ACCHO services in NSW, WA and SA to deliver a healthy ageing research project, called the #Ironbark project

The George Institute for Global Health is looking to work with Aboriginal communities on a healthy ageing research project, called the Ironbark project.

They are ready to partner with ACCHO services in NSW and SA to deliver either the Ironbark: Standing Strong and Tall program (weekly exercise group and yarning circle), and the Ironbark: Healthy Community program (a weekly social program).

Services are funded and trained to deliver one of the programs for 12 months with groups of Aboriginal men and women 45 years and older.” 

What is the study about?

The Ironbark Study is comparing two different programs aimed at improving health and wellbeing of older Aboriginal people. Both involve an ongoing program delivered weekly by a local person, in a community setting. The Ironbark: Standing Strong program is a weekly exercise and discussion program, and the Ironbark: Healthy Community program is a weekly program that involves discussions and social activities.

Who is conducting the research?

The study is being conducted by researchers from The George Institute for Global Health, The University of NSW, The University of Sydney, Flinders University, Wollongong University and Curtin University.

What does the study involve?

Services participating in the study are randomly assigned to either receiving the Ironbark: Standing Strong program or the Ironbark: Healthy Community program. Both programs aim to improve the health and wellbeing of older Aboriginal people.

At the end of the trial, sites that delivered the Ironbark: Healthy Community program will have the opportunity to deliver the Ironbark: Standing Strong program for a further 6 months, including all resources and equipment needed.

Being a site in the study involves recruiting 10 – 15 eligible Aboriginal people aged 45 years or older to participate in a weekly facilitated meetings at a culturally appropriate and accessible venue.

Participants

Participants must be: of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent; aged 45 years or older; living independently; prepared to attend the program weekly.

People cannot participate if: they have not gone outside without physical assistance from another person in the past month; they have been diagnosed with dementia; they have a medical condition precluding exercise (e.g., unstable cardiac disease).

People who do not fit the criteria, including non-Aboriginal family and community, will be able to attend classes but data collected will not be included in the trial.

What data will be collected?

A health assessment will be conducted with all participants by the study research assistants. This includes an interview where they will be asked about health and wellbeing, including questions about medication, sleep, physical activity and diet. Participants will also be asked to do some simple tests to measure their health, including strength and balance, and waist circumference. The interview and tests will take around one hour to complete.

Participants will be asked a few questions each week about their health, sleep, falls and physical activity.

These will take only 1-2 minutes to complete.

Every three months they will be asked some questions about their health, lifestyle and enjoyment of the program, and asked to complete some simple tests to measure strength and balance. These tests and questions will take about 30 minutes to complete.

At the end of the program participants will repeat the health assessment. This will include an interview where they will also be asked about quality of life and physical activity.

Ironbark: Standing Strong program

Sites allocated the Standing Strong program will be supported to deliver a weekly class that runs for around 1.5 hours – about 30 – 45 minutes is exercises, and 30 – 45 minutes will be a yarning circle facilitated by a trained worker. The program will run for the whole year, with additional weekly home exercise recommended.

Participants will be required to provide a form from their doctor indicating they are physically fit enough to do the class.

Ironbark: Healthy Community program

Sites allocated the Healthy Community program will be supported to deliver weekly yarning circles. The yarning circles will include discussions and activities that are important to community wellbeing and possibly social activities. Guest speakers may attend the program on request of the group.

How will the study benefit Aboriginal communities?

Being involved in the study will benefit participants directly by creating additional opportunities for them to meet with family and community, discuss topics important to older Aboriginal people, and have their experiences included in the findings.

The study will also contribute to employment opportunities for local Aboriginal people to participate as site managers and/or program facilitators.

It is also expected that the findings of the study will build on the evidence base around appropriate wellbeing programs for older Aboriginal people, and inform national policy development in this area.

What is needed from participating services?

We plan to recruit 60 Aboriginal community or health services in NSW, Western Australia and South Australia into the Ironbark Trial.

We are ready to work with services in NSW and SA : Services need to;

  • Be well established within their local Aboriginal community, and have existing relationships
  • Be able to offer programs or services specifically for older Aboriginal people, and can recruit 10 – 15 eligible participants. Groups should not already be doing a regular exercise

Ironbark – overview

  • Have existing Aboriginal staff working at the service who are willing to oversee program delivery on a weekly basis over the duration of the trial
  • Utilise a culturally appropriate venue that is accessible to participants
  • Be willing to actively participate in both the program delivery and research components of this

How will our service be supported to participate in the study?

The Study team will provide sites:

  • Funding to employ locally based staff on a casual basis
  • Weekly stipend to cover cost of morning/afternoon tea for group meetings
  • Ironbark: Standing Strong program sites will receive training and ongoing support on delivering the program, the Ironbark: Standing Strong and Tall Manual and handouts, all equipment needed to deliver the exercise program
  • Ironbark: Healthy Community program sites will receive training and ongoing support to deliver the program, resources to facilitate discussions and organise activities.
  • At the end of the trial, sites that delivered the Ironbark: Healthy Community program will have the opportunity to deliver the Ironbark: Standing Strong program, including all resources and equipment needed
  • All sites will receive site specific data from the study, as well as information about the results of the research

What will happen to the results?

All participating sites will receive copies of the findings of the study, in a format that is accessible to staff and community. Sites will also receive site specific information about the findings.

To inform program and policy development, we will also be disseminating the findings through peer review publications, reports to the funding body, presentations and reports to policy makers and to key stakeholders such as peak Aboriginal health and other organisations.

The findings will be presented in a non-identifying way, to maintain confidentiality of sites and individuals involved. Only the site managers will have access to non identifying information on participants, for emergency purposes and for accurate data collection.

Consent

Participation in this study is entirely voluntary – sites and services can stop at any time. All participants (sites and individuals), will be required to sign a consent form, prior to participation.

Contact check out their website:

www.ironbarkproject.org.au

The project is a collaboration between The George Institute for Global Health, University of NSW, Flinders University, University of Wollongong, Curtin University and University of Sydney.

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #SuicidePrevention @cbpatsisp : Health Minister @GregHuntMP welcomes the #YouCanTalk campaign, encouraging our mob struggling with their mental health to reach out and find support

“ The Federal Government welcomes the #YouCanTalk campaign, which encourages Australians struggling with their mental health to reach out and find support.

The awareness campaign is a collaboration between several organisations, including Beyond Blue, Everymind, headspace, Lifeline, ReachOut, RU OK?, SANE Australia, the Centre of Best Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention, Roses in the Ocean and the Black Dog Institute.

The campaign will take place over the December-January holiday period, in recognition of how difficult this time of year can be for many Australians.

Our Government commends the collaboration of these organisations to raise awareness about the importance of starting a conversation, particularly over the Christmas-New Year period.” 

Health Minister Greg Hunt Press Release continued Part 1 below 

Read over 160 Aboriginal Health and Suicide Prevention articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years 

” Suicide has emerged in the past half century as a major cause of premature mortality and is a contributor to the overall health and life expectancy gap for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

In 2018 it was the fifth leading cause of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the age-standardised suicide rate was more than twice as high as the non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s rate.”

What we know about suicide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people : or see Part 3 Below

Sadly, more than 3,000 Australians choose to end their lives each year – about eight people a day.

Every life lost to suicide is a tragedy, creating a ripple effect that flows through families, friendship groups, schools, workplaces and communities.

That’s why the Federal Government has committed to Towards Zero – working towards reducing the suicide rate to zero.

Towards Zero is a total commitment to the value of each and every life, and recognises the importance of all lives, in all ages, and all groups.

This commitment is backed by our investment of $5.2 billion in mental health and suicide prevention services this financial year, including $63.3 million on suicide prevention activities.

It’s so important for Australians who are struggling to reach out and seek support.

The #YouCanTalk campaign also aims to connect people with tools that can support them through their website

www.lifeinmindaustralia.com.au/youcantalk.

#YouCanTalk exists to encourage all Australians to have a conversation with a friend, family member or work colleague they’re concerned about.

While it can be difficult to talk about suicide, research shows you can have a positive influence on someone who may be considering suicide by initiating a conversation with them and supporting them to seek help.

The main message is you don’t need to be a clinician, a GP, or a nurse to check-in with someone you are worried about.

It is OK to let someone know you have noticed they are struggling and ask them if they are experiencing thoughts of suicide.

It is normal to feel worried or nervous about having a conversation with a friend, family member or work colleague who might be experiencing suicidal thoughts, but there are resources available to help you.

Life in Mind is a national digital gateway providing organisations and communities access to suicide prevention information, programs, services, resources and research.

Part 3

Suicide has emerged in the past half century as a major cause of premature mortality and is a contributor to the overall health and life expectancy gap for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

In 2018 it was the fifth leading cause of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the age-standardised suicide rate was more than twice as high as the non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s rate.

The standardised death rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (24.1 per 100, 000) was higher than the non-Indigenous rate (12.4 per 100, 000)2.

On average, over 100 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons end their lives through suicide each year, accounting for 1 in 20 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths.

STATISTIC

Further suicide data can be found at the Centre of Best Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention, and from the ATSISPEP report.

Three main issues can be identified:

  1. There is variable quality of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identification at the state and national levels, resulting in an expected under-reporting of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suicides.
  2. Lack of reporting on suicide due to questions regarding intent, especially in the case of childhood suicides. Similarly, it can be demonstrated that there may be a reluctance to classify adult deaths as suicides for a variety of reasons also.
  3. Delays in reporting data, whereby incidences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suicide might not be known for months and often years after the fact.

NACCHO Aboriginal #SexualHealth @atsihaw Resources and Events : Plus Dawn Casey ” NACCHO recognises the importance of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander #HIVAwarenessWeek #WorldAIDSDay2019 “


“Exposure to STIs differs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Our women are diagnosed with HIV, STIs and BBVs at a greater rate than other Australian women and are facing infertility, ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous preterm birth or still-birth.

NACCHO believes this requires greater recognition and commitment from all levels of government to work collaboratively across portfolios and mainstream organisations.

A good example is the current partnership between the Commonwealth Department of Health and NACCHO to address the syphilis outbreak, which has been extraordinary!

It highlights innovation in science and the great work done on the ground by Aboriginal health workers.

There is no better way to provide healthcare than through the 145 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs), who deliver holistic, culturally safe, comprehensive primary healthcare across Australia, including those living in very remote areas

Studies have shown that ACCHOs are 23% better at attracting and retaining Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients than mainstream providers. 

If funded adequately ACCHOs are the solution to addressing the increasing rates of STIs, BBVs and HIV/AIDS.”

Dr Dawn Casey, Deputy CEO of NACCHO who spoke at the 2019 parliamentary World AIDS Day breakfast this week. See continued NACCHO Press Release Part 1 and speech notes part 2 Below 

“ATSIHAW has grown bigger, with 132 ATSIHAW events to be held by 73 organisations across Australia this year – mostly in ACCHOs. ACCHOs have embraced ATSIHAW wholeheartedly and this has been key to ATSIHAW’s success.

Community engagement has been pivotal to the improvements in Australia’s HIV response and it’s time to focus on getting HIV rates down in our communities.”

South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) Head, Aboriginal Health Equity—Sexual Health and Wellbeing, A/Prof James Ward

Download the 30 Page PDF Report 

2019-SAHMRI-ATSIHAW-booklet

ATSIHAW 2019 dates are November 28 to December 5

View the ATSIHAW 2019 registered events on Facebook or below by state.

NSW | QLD | SA | VIC | WA | ACT | NT | TAS

See Web Page

Part 1 NACCHO Press Release continued 

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) recognises the importance of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week (ATSIHAW) and the 2019 World AIDs Day to draw attention to the increasing impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

In Australia, it has been recorded that the cases of new HIV diagnoses amongst Australians represent a decline of 23% in the last five years.

However, the HIV notification rates within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in 2018 was more than twice the rate for the Australian-born non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Source: Kirby Institute

Australia is perceived on the global stage as a world leader in HIV prevention and treatment.

But considering the high prevalence of this issue in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, NACCHO understands there is still some way to go.

Part 2 Dawn Casey Speaking Notes

World AIDS Day Parliamentary Breakfast – 27 November 2019

Traditional Owners of this land, the Ngunnawal and Ngambri People. I like to acknowledge other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the room.

I would like to thank AFAO for inviting me here to speak this morning.

I would like to acknowledge the Hon Greg Hunt, Minister for Health, the Hon Chris Bowen, Shadow Minister for Health and all the Members of Parliament present here. It is just fabulous to see a bipartisan approach taken to this issue.

Exposure to STIs, HIV and BBVs differs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Research tells us that it is more likely attributed to heterosexual sex and injection drug use coming into our communities. And we know that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are diagnosed with HIV, STIs and BBVs at a greater rate than other Australian women.

This is extremely concerning as the next generation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women living in remote communities are facing infertility, ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous preterm birth or still-birth.

Let me remind you that there is no better way to provide healthcare than through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs). They have been around here for many years and are established and operated by local communities, through locally elected Boards of Management, to deliver holistic and culturally safe and comprehensive primary healthcare.

They punch above their weight, with 145 services nationally providing about three million episodes of care each year for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Australia, including those living in very remote areas.

ACCHOs provide culturally safe, comprehensive primary health care consistent with our people’s needs, this includes: home and site visits; provision of medical, public health and health promotion services; allied health, nursing services; assistance with making appointments and transport coordination; help to access child care or to deal with the justice system and drug and alcohol services.

Our people trust us with their health. Studies have shown that ACCHOs are 23% better at attracting and retaining Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients than mainstream providers.

If funded adequately ACCHOs are the solutions to addressing the increasing rates of STIs, BBVs and HIV/AIDS. The current partnership between the Department of Health to address the syphilis outbreak has been extraordinary! It highlights innovation in science and the great work done on the ground by Aboriginal health workers.

I would like to leave with one message:

It is only with everyone working together that we will be able to help minimise the impact of STIs, BBVs and HIV/AIDS in the community. Mainstream organisations need to do their part and collaborate and work collectively with us.

Nationally, there is a high-quality network of Aboriginal controlled service providers that get results – understand them, connect with them and identify mutually beneficial areas to work together

Picture above Tim Wilson MP and his quote : At Parliament today, we gathered to remember & honour those lost to HIV/AIDS, redouble our efforts to stop new transmissions and stigma + mark tomorrow’s start of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week.

Find out more here: atsihiv.org.au

Part 3 Health Minister Greg Hunt Press Release 

World AIDS Day is held on 1 December each year. It raises awareness across the world and in the community about HIV and AIDS.

It is a day for people to show their support for people living with HIV and to remember and honour those who we have lost.

In the 2019–20 Budget, the Morrison Government invested $45.4 million to implement Australia’s five National Blood-Borne Viruses (BBV) and Sexually Transmissible Infections (STI) Strategies.

These strategies will make a deep and profound difference in reducing the health impacts and stigma of BBV and STI, including HIV.

Today, I am pleased to announce that our Government will provide additional, ongoing support for people with HIV and other BBV and STI’s by extending funding to six national peak organisations, providing almost $3 million for 2020-21.

In addition, from 1 December 2019, Australians living with HIV will save more than $8,500 a year with the listing of a new combination medicine on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS).

It is estimated that 850 Australians with HIV will benefit from the listing of Dovato® (dolutegravir with lamivudine) on the PBS, which will provide more choice for them in how they can manage their HIV.

Effective once daily treatments such as Dovato and other new medicines can control the virus so that people living with HIV can enjoy long, healthy and productive lives.

With the PBS subsidy, people living with HIV will pay just $40.30 per script, or $6.50 with a concession card for Dovato®.

Australia continues to be a world leader in the response to HIV. The number of new HIV diagnoses today is at its lowest in nearly 20 years.

Our success is built on a model of partnership between government, people living with HIV, community based organisations, health professionals and researchers.

We are seeing more people tested for HIV and initiating treatment for HIV. There are also more people living with a suppressed viral load. In addition, improved access to HIV prevention methods, including the PBS-listed pre exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), helps reduce the number of new HIV diagnoses.

We are also looking to address stigma and discrimination.

The Eighth National HIV Strategy 2018-22, guides our partnership approach over the next four years to virtual elimination of HIV transmission by 2022.

We aim to be one of the first countries in the world to eliminate new HIV transmissions.

NACCHO Aboriginal Men’s Health and #Movember  : Your last chance to support @DeadlyChoices Charlie Jia and Nathan Appo’s personal and professional journeys improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

“I’ve seen and experienced first-hand the debilitating effects and consequences when men disregard personal health and become overcome with life’s pressures.

My own Dad struggled with anxiety and depression to a point where he had to be hospitalised during the past few years which is very confronting.

I’ve also had mates and family pass away due to the mental issues they were dealing with. So it’s important to shine a light on these issues rather than sweep them under the carpet and have those individuals fend for themselves.  

Everyone has a responsibility to act and assist in these circumstances, even if it’s simply to put people in touch with the right support networks.

A particular highlight for me has been the focus on Australia’s Indigenous men as part of this year’s campaign, an area not usually appropriately reflected in mainstream health campaigns.

The work we do with IUIH and Deadly Choices allows us to shine a spotlight on our communities and work towards alleviating the barriers faced by individuals towards achieving optimum health.

It’s these hardships in itself that lie at the root of underlying mental and physical health problems being experienced by all our men.

Community members are reminded that the best way to counter any underlying health issues, or to simply keep in the best possible physical and emotional shape, it’s important to maintain regular health checks, and if you have any major concerns, visit your local, community-controlled Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS /ACCHO) “

Nathan Appo :

The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities right across Australia is at the very heart of Charlie Jia and Nathan Appo’s personal and professional journeys, fulfilling various roles with the Brisbane-based Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH).

Read over 400 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Men’s Health articles published by NACCHO over 7 Years 

Hey you mob! This is the last week of Movember so make sure to join our Movember All Stars team and raise/donate $50 to score a special edition Deadly Choices Movember shirt

Charlie Jia ( pictured above ) 

Donate HERE

Fundraising efforts through the 2019 Deadly Choices Movember All-Stars campaign have once again raised close to $15,000.

Among the many millions of participants involved in this year’s Movember activities across the world, two Australian men from the same City, working under the same roof, have been helping to change the face of men’s health as global Ambassadors for the health promotion charity.

The passionate pair join the likes of former Australian Test Cricket Captain, Michael Clarke, Aussie professional surfer Mick Fanning and Queensland cricketing great Andrew Symonds, who have all advocated on behalf of the Movember Foundation, an organisation that seeks to raise awareness of men’s health issues such as anxiety, prostate cancer, testicular cancer and men’s suicide.

But for Charlie and Nathan they’ve been literally the ‘face’ or ‘mos among the bros’ in 2019, with their characters part of an international TV advertising campaign and their typical Movember likeness adorning global billboards, bus-backs and even subway locations across New York City.

“Nathan and I were invited to a photo and video shoot in London earlier this year which took place at the renowned Nomad Barber Shop in Shoreditch. It was pretty exciting just to be selected firstly and to do it alongside a fellow employee of IUIH made it all the more special,” confirmed Charlie. 

“At IUIH we’ve consistently undertaken Movember activities, raising funds towards assisting the Movember Foundation to create greater awareness of health issues faced by our men in communities.

“Men’s health issues have been a big part of what I do at IUIH, having formulated the MomenTIM program which focuses on Tomorrow’s Indigenous Men (TIM), supporting young men aged 10 – 17 to understand mental health, improve their relationships and learn about self-care in a supportive group environment.

Charlie’s Movember moniker for this year’s campaign is ‘The Grey One’, with his wirily whiskers acknowledging the indiscriminate nature of health issues facing all men, young and old.

“Three years ago I was diagnosed with prostate cancer so the underlying men’s health concerns that are dealt with during the Movember campaign are something very close to me,” added Charlie.

“Each year, more than 3,400 Australian men die from prostate cancer and the biggest thing with this disease is that you don’t get any symptoms.

“This year we did a ‘Move’ event at our Morayfield AMS clinic where we had our DC Ambassadors Steve Renouf, Petero Civoniceva, Brenton Bowen, Willie Tonga and Janice Blackman help to clock up 60 kilometres on the treadmill and stationary bike, in recognition of the 60 men’s lives lost to related issues, every hour, of every day across the world.”     

For Nathan the chance to contribute towards the international push for Movember was something he too was wholeheartedly invested in.

As for having his face emblazoned worldwide as a part of the cause, Nathan takes it all in his stride, using humour and an uncanny sense of fun, to gain optimum cut-through in communities.

“Despite being given the opportunity to create our own personas, I was bestowed the honour of ‘The Furry One’ as part of the campaign. Multiple times I had my request for ‘The Oddly Sexy One’ denied by the Foundation,” Nathan quipped with a wry, hairy-lipped smile.   

“A particular highlight for me has been the focus on Australia’s Indigenous men as part of this year’s campaign, an area not usually appropriately reflected in mainstream health campaigns.

“The work we do with IUIH and Deadly Choices allows us to shine a spotlight on our communities and work towards alleviating the barriers faced by individuals towards achieving optimum health. It’s these hardships in itself that lie at the root of underlying mental and physical health problems being experienced by all our men.

Ironically, the third Australian Movember Campaign Ambassador, Harvee Pene also lives and works in the Brisbane suburb of Windsor, with the trio collectively living by the Foundation ethos, “It doesn’t matter what you grow, you’ll save a bro” which has ensured a close-knit, communal feel, to a highly worthwhile and rewarding international initiative.  

Donate HERE

Fundraising efforts through the 2019 Deadly Choices Movember All-Stars campaign have once again raised close to $15,000.

Community members are reminded that the best way to counter any underlying health issues, or to simply keep in the best possible physical and emotional shape, it’s important to maintain regular health checks, and if you have any major concerns, visit your local, community-controlled Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS).

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Prisoner Health #ClosingThe Gap #HaveYourSayCTG : What are the barriers preventing community-controlled health organisations providing care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in prison ?

“Findings showed that while most participant ACCHOs had delivered services to people in the community upon release from prison, opportunities to deliver primary health care services to individuals in prisons were very limited.

Two key barriers to implementing holistic and culturally appropriate health care in prisons were lack of access to prisoners due to security protocols and prison staff attitudes, and lack of a sustainable funding model.

A reliable funding model underpinned by consistent access to prisoners and access to certain Medicare items could resolve this conundrum, as has been previously proposed.23

To this end, we encourage the Commonwealth of Australia to engage in appropriate discussions to resolve this matter.

Additionally, custodial and prison health providers need to engage in meaningful discussions with ACCHOs to address prisoner access issues. “

Download the Research Paper Here or READ Online

Barriers prevent ACCHOs from getting care to prisoners

Read all the Aboriginal health and Just Justice articles by NACCHO

How likely are you to go to jail? As an Aboriginal adult you are 16 times more likely to be incarcerated. Juveniles in Western Australia are 52 times more likely to be imprisoned than their white peers [15

Closing the Gap / Have your say about the prison system see Part 3 below

Deadline extended to Friday, 8 November 2019.

Part 1 PHAA Press Release

New research has revealed that Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) face barriers to deliver to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners what they do best – holistic primary health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Researchers interviewed nineteen staff from four ACCHOs close to prisons across three Australian jurisdictions.

They found that while most ACCHOs deliver post release programs, their capacity to deliver health care to prisoners is limited by security protocols that restrict access to prisoners and funding constraints.

The study results are published today in the Public Health Association of Australia’s journal, the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.

ACCHOs are universally acknowledged as organisations that are run by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, delivering holistic primary health care that’s local and community owned.

The authors make several recommendations including reliable funding for ACCHOs and better and consistent access to prisoners.

State governments are encouraged to address prison access issues while the Federal Government is urged to consider changing the rules that prevent ACCHOs from using Medicare to fund work undertaken in the prison setting.

The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is poorer than that of other Australians. They are over-represented in Australian jails. Due to the unique cultural, social and historical factors, specific solutions to address health issues are required.

Part 2 Selected extracts

The offender population is one of the most stigmatised and socially excluded groups in society. Epidemiological studies of prisoners consistently find high levels of physical ill health, psychiatric illness and communicable diseases, and engagement in health risk behaviours such as smoking, alcohol consumption, illicit drug use and violence.12

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (hereon ‘Indigenous’) offenders, disadvantage is further compounded by poor social determinants of health.

Since colonisation more than 230 years ago, Indigenous Australians have lower levels of political representation, educational attainment and income when compared to the general Australian population, as well as higher rates of social exclusion, unemployment, trauma and ill‐health, and shorter life expectancy.3 Indigenous Australians frequently experience racism and low levels of access in mainstream health services and the legal system.45 These issues underscore the importance of community controlled primary health care for Indigenous offenders that is contextually relevant, holistic and culturally safe.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) provide culturally appropriate, autonomous primary health care services that are initiated, planned and governed by local Aboriginal Australian communities through an elected board of directors.6

ACCHOs are represented nationally by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (NACCHO), which engages directly with policy makers and funding bodies, links ACCHOs to facilitate health service delivery and research, advises on research, and provides leadership on service delivery principles such as community control.

Community control is vital for culturally appropriate and acceptable health care services in Indigenous communities and enacts articles of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, ensuring self‐reliance, self‐determination, appropriate and acceptable health care.6

Since the establishment of the first ACCHO in inner Sydney in 1971, the network of ACCHOs has grown to 143 across Australia, providing more than three million episodes of care each year for approximately 350,000 people.7

Primary health care services provided by ACCHOs embody the Aboriginal definition of health, which is not just about an individual’s physical wellbeing but also the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the community, and takes a whole‐of‐life perspective that incorporates a cyclical concept of life–death–life.8

ACCHOs provide comprehensive primary health care that includes health education, health promotion, social and emotional wellbeing support and a range of other community development initiatives.9

Limited access to primary health care services for Indigenous peoples is a major barrier to addressing the overall aim of the Australian Government’s ‘Closing the Gap’ framework.10 Data show that, compared to mainstream services, ACCHOs are frequently accessed by Indigenous people.11

A 9% growth in Indigenous community members accessing their local ACCHO was observed between 2012–13 and 2014–15, with a 23% increase in the total number of episodes of care during this time.7 In a study comparing outcomes and indicators between ACCHOs and mainstream services, ACCHOs performed better in terms of best practice care, monitoring clinical performance, increasing engagement of Indigenous community members, and better leadership in training non‐Indigenous staff in Indigenous health matters.12

Barriers to accessing mainstream services extend also to Indigenous Australians in the criminal justice system. In Australia, Indigenous people comprise 28% of the prisoner population, but only 2% of the general population.13 Australian state and territory legislation states that prisoners must be able to access health care when they require it, and that they have the right to the same level of care as in the wider community14 – a right referred to in the international context as the ‘equivalence of care’ principle.15

Incarceration causes a person to be separated from their community.17 A recommendation (168) by the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody (RCIADIC) requires that a person be incarcerated as close to their home community as possible.16 Incarceration can also disrupt continuity of holistic health care provided by an ACCHO,17 if that ACCHO has no means of accessing the prisoner.

Other custodial health and safety recommendations made by the RCIADIC state that Corrective Services departments should review the provision of health services to Indigenous prisoners including the level of involvement of ACCHOs (Recommendation 152c) and the exchange of relevant health information between prison medical staff and ACCHOs (Recommendation 152e).16

Australia’s National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (NIDAC) asserts that improvements in health services for Indigenous prisoners and juvenile detainees may assist in reducing the overall prisoner numbers.18 Areas noted for improvement included health screening on reception, increasing uptake of recommended treatments, and enhancing prisoner throughcare by facilitating access of Indigenous health and other services to Indigenous prisoners.18

NIDAC highlighted that “the provision of a ‘one health service fits all’ model, as in the case for many corrections systems, creates a disjointed and unsuitable approach” for addressing health needs of Indigenous prisoners.18

In response, NIDAC recommended several strategies for involving ACCHOs to improve the health care of prisoners and their ongoing care post‐release.18 However, there is a dearth of literature on external health care provision to Australia’s prisoners from which to plan coordinated actions and resource allocation. Only a small number of reports are available on health care provided by community‐based organisations in prisons.1920

Health care varies greatly in Australia’s state‐ and territory‐based prisons, with government Departments of Health providing health care services to some through agencies such as the Justice and Forensic Mental Health Network in New South Wales (NSW), and Departments of Justice or contracted private companies providing services to others.21

There is no nationally coordinated approach or body whose role it is to monitor prisoners’ health care needs, and no national strategy for assessing or meeting the specific health needs of Indigenous prisoners.22 Australia’s publicly funded universal health care system – the Medicare Benefits Scheme and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, collectively known as Medicare – is suspended for prisoners during incarceration.

This is because other state‐ and territory‐level government departments become responsible for providing health care to prisoners.23 However, this arrangement has been identified as problematic, with concerns that it reduces resources or opportunities for providing comprehensive health care to prisoners that is equivalent to that available in the community.23

This project was designed by a team of Aboriginal and non‐Aboriginal researchers working at the nexus of the justice and health systems, and with specialisations in Indigenous health research, epidemiology, qualitative research and health services research and evaluation. Three of the team members identified as Indigenous Australians.

The primary aim of the research was to explore prisoner health services and programs provided by a selection of ACCHOs, including the challenges and enablers of delivering these, and implications for further research.

Part 3 Closing the Gap / Have your say about the prison system

Deadline extended to Friday, 8 November 2019.

 

The engagements are now in full swing across Australia and this is generating more interest than we had anticipated in our survey on Closing the Gap.

The Coalition of Peaks has had requests from a number of organisations across Australia seeking, some Coalition of Peak members and some governments for more time to promote and complete the survey.

We want to make sure everyone has the opportunity to have their say on what should be included in a new agreement on Closing the Gap so it is agreed to extend the deadline for the survey to Friday, 8 November 2019.

This will help build further understanding and support for the new agreement and will not impact our timeframes for negotiating with government as we were advised at the most recent Partnership Working Group meeting that COAG will not meet until early 2020.

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

NACCHO Aboriginal Men’s #MentalHealth : ‘ Whatever you grow will save a bro’ says @DeadlyChoices Nathan Appo selected to be one of the faces for the 2019 International #Movember campaign. Please support Donate

A few months ago I was asked to travel to London to be one of the faces of the 2019 International Movember campaign.

Of course I said yes and I’m honoured and blessed to be apart of such an important cause.

If you know me you’d know I’m very passionate about mental health and educating our mob around the importance of staying mentally healthy.

Too many of my brothers are passing away from suicide, don’t be shame my brothers. We need to be there for each other & educate our people around mental health & depression

This is just another way in supporting friends and family going through depression and anxiety as we can always educate someone around us.

This year Movember is reminding us that not everyone can grow the world’s best moustache but that shouldn’t stop you because ‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’.

 No matter if it’s patchy, lopsided or just kind of…furry, like mine! Every Mo has the power to save 

Your donation will help Movember fund groundbreaking work in prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention.

To donate please click on Nathan’s link 

Nathan Appo from Innisfail / Mamu / Goreng Goreng / Bundjalung /Living in Brisbane and working with Deadly Choices

Men’s health charity, Movember, has launched its 2019 campaign for its annual month of moustache-growing.

This year, the campaign’s tagline is ‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’, acknowledging the variety of shapes and styles of moustache that are grown during Movember.

UK-based creative agency, MATTA, was behind the campaign. The ad was voiced by comedian Dave Lawson, and features testicular cancer survivor Harvee Pene, prostate cancer survivor Charlie Jia and mental health advocate Nathan Appo.

” Training isn’t always about physical health and strength. ‪I exercise to stay mentally healthy, mentally fit.‬
#MovemberMotivation‪What’s your Deadly Choice?‬ Says Nathan 

To donate please click on Nathan’s link 

“It’s amazing to see so many different faces from all over the world featured in the Movember campaign this year,” Jia said.

“As well as being a lot of fun to shoot and highlighting that anyone can grow a Mo, ‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’ has put Indigenous men’s health front and centre. It also shows that background, colour and beliefs don’t matter, because prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health issues won’t discriminate.”

A second video released shows Pene recount his story with testicular cancer to his barber.

Movember’s chief marketing officer, Juliette Smith, said: “‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’ arose from the insight that some men want to support the charity, but feel embarrassed by their facial hair, or its perceived inadequacy.

It also nods to the fact that the landscape of male grooming has changed, where the ask for many is no longer ‘grow a moustache’ but increasingly more often ‘shave your beard’, adding another layer of vulnerability for the grower.

 ” No matter if it’s patchy, lopsided or just kind of…furry, like mine! Every Mo has the power to save lives. My father Neily Apps is the reason why I participate in Movember, it’s a chance to educate and support our fellow men ” Says Nathan Appo 

To donate please click on Nathan’s link 

“The campaign aims to dispel these anxieties, demonstrating the ultimate importance of Movember; that the wider awareness of our charity and its causes; prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health, can change lives for better.”

MATTA’s design and production director, Tom Allwood, said: “Movember is so important in raising often un-talked about issues among men. We found a way of bringing people together from all backgrounds, showing that we’re all unique, but focusing throughout on the integral message of the movement.”

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth Download @NMHC National Report 2019 Released today : The Australian Government encourages PHNs to position Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services as preferred providers for mental health and suicide prevention services for our mob

” Working to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is a priority area for PHNs.

The PHN Advisory Panel Report recommended that PHN funds for mental health and suicide prevention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be provided directly to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) as a priority, unless a better arrangement can be demonstrated.

The Senate Inquiry into the accessibility and quality of mental health services in rural and remote Australia also made a similar recommendation.

PHNs should continue to work on formalising partnerships with ACCHS.

The NMHC supports the recommendations made by both these reports and recommends that the Australian Government encourages PHNs to position ACCHS as preferred providers for mental health and suicide prevention services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people “

Extract from Page 14 

Recommendation 16: The Australian Government encourages PHNs to position Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services as preferred providers for mental health and suicide prevention services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The National Mental Health Commission today released its National Report 2019 on Australia’s mental health and suicide prevention system, including recommendations to improve outcomes.

Download the full 97 Page Report HERE 

National_Report_2019

or 9 Page Summary HERE 

National Report 2019 Summary – Accessible PDF

The Commission continues to recommend a whole-of-government approach to mental health and suicide prevention.

This broad approach ensures factors which impact individuals’ mental health and wellbeing such as housing, employment, education and social justice are addressed alongside the delivery of mental health care.

National Mental Health Commission Advisory Board Chair, Lucy Brogden, said we are living in a time when we’re seeing unprecedented investment and interest in making substantial improvements to our mental health system.

“Current national reforms are key, but complex, interrelated and broad in scope, and will take time before their implementation leads to tangible change for consumers and carers,” Mrs Brogden said.

“The National Report indicates while there are significant reforms underway at national, state and local levels, it’s crucial that we maintain momentum and implement these recommendations to ensure sustained change for consumers and carers.”

National Mental Health Commission CEO Christine Morgan said the National Report findings align with what Australians are sharing as part of the Connections Project, which has provided opportunities for the Commission to hear directly from consumers, carers and families, as well as service providers, about their experience of the current mental health system.

“What’s clear is we must remain focused on long term health objectives. Implementation of these targeted recommendations will support this focus,” Ms Morgan said.

The NMHC recommendations require collaboration across the sector.  As part of its ongoing monitoring and report role, the NMHC will work with stakeholders to identify how progress of the recommendations can be measured.

For your nearest ACCHO contact for HELP