NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Ice #ClosingTheGap : Some call it an epidemic, others call it the “Ice Age”. What ever you call it , it is destroying families, and Indigenous culture

“You need to trust us to be able to deliver a service to our own people linked in with culture. Who are the right people to deliver that? Our people.

I have seen it a thousand times over. Once they are addicted to ice, culture’s gone, you don’t care about your kids, your primary focus is ‘I need this drug.’ It is worse than heroin.

Ice has a terrible impact on the family. Yet there was nothing to explain to families “why all your stuff is being sold at the pawn shop” and how to get help “

Tanya Bloxsome, a Waddi Waddi woman of the Yuin, who is chief executive of a residential rehabilitation service for men, Oolong House

Read over 60 Aboriginal Health and Ice articles published by NACCHO

Originally published SMH Julie Power

It makes Nowra grandmother Janelle Burnes’ day when her grandson Lucas* says, “Nanny, you’ve got a beautiful smile. I love you.”

The Wiradjuri woman has been punched and kicked by eight-year-old Lucas, who hears voices and suffers psychosis.

Janelle Burnes had to give up work to care for her eight-year-old grandson. He suffers from a range of mental illnesses, including psychosis, attributed to his parents’ ice addictions.

Abandoned by his mother as a baby, Lucas has fetal alcohol and drug syndrome attributed to his parents’ ice use when he was conceived.

Experts told the NSW special commission of inquiry into ice in Nowra last week that they were increasingly seeing multiple generations of users living together, exposing children to violence, neglect, abuse and witnessing sex and drug use by intoxicated adults.

Some call it an epidemic, others call it the “Ice Age”.

When Lucas hit his grandmother over the head with a guitar, she didn’t yell at him. Determined to stop the boy from becoming part of another generation broken by ice, Ms Burnes ignored the blood running down her face and the waiting ambulance.

“I walked back to him, I hugged him, I cuddled him, I told him, ‘You are going to hurt Nanny if you do stuff like that.’ And I gave him a kiss and I told him I still loved him.”

Ice is a stronger and more addictive stimulant than speed, the powder form of methamphetamine, the Alcohol and Drug Foundation says. It causes aggression, psychosis, stroke, heart attacks and death. It causes confusion, making it nearly impossible to get a rational response from someone under the drug’s influence.

Tanya Bloxsome, chief executive of Oolong House, a residential rehabilitation service where more than 90 per cent of its male residents have been addicted to ice. CREDIT:LOUISE KENNERLEY

Ms Burnes doesn’t blame Lucas for his behaviour, but ice. It is destroying Indigenous and non-Indigenous families across the Shoalhaven region. It is also destroying Indigenous culture.

To recover, Indigenous leaders say they have to develop role models and restore pride in their identity.

“You need to trust us to be able to deliver a service to our own people linked in with culture. Who are the right people to deliver that? Our people,” said Tanya Bloxsome, a Waddi Waddi woman of the Yuin, who is chief executive of a residential rehabilitation service for men, Oolong House.

“I have seen it a thousand times over. Once they are addicted to ice, culture’s gone, you don’t care about your kids, your primary focus is ‘I need this drug.’ It is worse than heroin.

“Ice has a terrible impact on the family,” she said. Yet there was nothing to explain to families “why all your stuff is being sold at the pawn shop” and how to get help.

Nearly two-thirds of 52 Indigenous and non-Indigenous children placed in out-of-home care in the Nowra region in the past year were removed because of ice use by their parents. It was also a “risk factor” in about 40 per cent of the 124 families working with Family and Community Services’ case managers.

When Indigenous groups met the commission last week, they said they needed more culturally appropriate programs, rehabilitation places and detoxification units (the closest are in Sydney, Canberra and Dubbo).

Indigenous Australians are more than 2.2 times as likely to take meth/amphetamine than other Australians.

In the opening address to the commission, Sally Dowling, SC, said the impacts of colonisation and dispossession, intergenerational trauma and socio-economic disadvantage had continued to contribute to high levels of amphetamine use in Indigenous communities.

Ice use in Nowra is not as bad as out west. But the region has seen the biggest year-on-year growth in arrests for possession and use since 2014, with a 31 per cent increase compared with 6 per cent across the state.

Cheaper than Maccas

Getting high on ice was “cheaper than going for Maccas”, said Nowra’s Aboriginal Medical Corporation’s substance abuse counsellor Warren Field, who runs a weekly men’s group for recovering addicts.

Ice had also become a “rite of passage” for some young people after they had received their first Centrelink payment or wage.

Mr Field said “99 per cent” of ice users had suffered some form of trauma. Nearly all had other mental health problems, including anxiety and depression.

“Everyone says there is nothing [like it] that will numb the pain and take the grief and loss away,” he said. It also makes women lose weight and gives men incredible sexual prowess.

“Most people are vulnerable when they go through a traumatic event and the Aboriginal community has had more than its fair share of that,” he said.

He argues they know what works – culturally appropriate rehabilitation which develops strong role models and a sense of identity. But there had to be more support when people came out of rehabilitation to stop them from relapsing.

The first year of rehabilitation was particularly hard. People in recovery were often depressed and their ability to feel happiness or pleasure without the drug was dulled.

Mr Field said “black fellas” were also unfairly targeted by police who, he argued, should spend more time closing the crack houses that “everyone” knew about.

 

At Oolong House, 21 men – 18 of whom were Indigenous – were getting themselves breakfast while 42-year-old Bobby McLeod jnr played guitar and a mate accompanied him on the didgeridoo.

More than 90 per cent of men in the program had been using ice, very often with other drugs, and increasingly with heroin, Ms Bloxsome said.

“Every addicted person who comes in here has a mental health issue,” she said. And residents addicted to ice were more psychotic than those addicted to other drugs.

Most residential programs are 12 weeks, but Oolong offers 16 weeks, and Ms Bloxsome believes even longer programs would be better. But like services up and down the South Coast, it can’t keep up with demand.

The program offered cognitive behavioural therapy, addressed mental and physical health, and encouraged the men to undertake training that would help them get work. Nearly all the men arrived with hepatitis C and those released from jail were, with few exceptions, addicted to the drug, bupe (buprenorphine).

The most powerful medicine, though, was getting back to culture by doing traditional dance, learning language and going on bush walks. After a lifetime in prison, Mr McLeod  said painting and writing songs about his life had helped his recovery.

When everything else was bad, ice had made him “feel invincible”. But it cost him his family and caused anxiety and depression, which made him feel suicidal.

His old man was a successful singer, his brother had travelled around the world with an Indigenous dance group, but he was the one who “went to jail”, Mr McLeod said.

Raising money for a funeral 

Ms Burnes lives in fear of a phone call telling her that Lucas’ 39-year-old mother is dead.

In anticipation of the inevitable – her nephew died earlier this year from a heart attack caused by his ice addiction – she is raising money for anticipated funeral costs.

Lucas’ mother has had three heart attacks caused by decades of addiction.

Janelle Byrnes is planning a funeral for her ice-addicted daughter. In a Facebook post, her 39-year-old daughter asks others to stop using ice. CREDIT:FACEBOOK

In a Facebook post, her daughter wrote about how her “huge addiction” had caused two heart attacks in two weeks.

“Now I’ve got to plan my funeral just in case I don’t make the next,” she wrote. “That’s not the saddest thing. It is listening to my mum cry and plan it with me. ”

“If U love your family reconsider having that pipe or putting that needle in your arm,” Ms Burnes’ daughter said.

In the meantime, Ms Burnes does everything she can to provide a stable home for Lucas.

She quit her job of 22 years as an Aboriginal education officer to care for her grandson, to ensure he gets to doctors’ appointments and maintain his schooling.

She’s been working with him to maintain his good results in reading and spelling, despite frequent suspensions for getting into fights, so he has a chance of fulfilling his dream of becoming a police officer.

* name changed

With additional reporting by Louise Kennerley.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #NRW2019 Our CEO Pat Turner Interview : Could @KenWyattMP historic Ministerial appointment be truly transformational for our mob #ClosingTheGap #Refresh and the #Voice

“Closing the Gap and the Voice are the two big issues, they’re separate but complimentary, and they can run in parallel. We want both. We want a real say over our lives. We have to be at the negotiating table.”

The Aboriginal heath sector is the biggest employer of Aboriginal people in Australia.

By investing in Aboriginal community controlled health organisations, they are investing in communities but they’re also employing Aboriginal people in real jobs.

They need to remove the punitive welfare measures immediately. they make absolutely no sense. It’s accountability gone mad. We’ve offered him a briefing, we’re looking forward to a positive working partnership, and for the ministry to be properly funded.”

It was well past time to get moving on the voice to parliament.

We are more than ready to finalise the model with our own people, and get out in the broader Australian community and have the conversations with them about why it’s important.

The PM said he wouldn’t be rushed on the matter of the voice, but the PM has to take a leadership role. When has he got the best chance of getting things done? In the first term. There’s no reason why we have to wait.”

CEO the National Coalition of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (NACCHO), Pat Turner said Wyatt had a big job ahead, facing “massive expectations” on all sides. Pat also co-chairs the joint council on Closing the Gap, a 10 year agreement between Australian governments and Aboriginal organisations to work together on solutions

Watch ABC TV News interview with Pat Turner

” When I saw Ken’s tweet about his appointment on Sunday, my heart grew big with pride. It was a welcome joy on a day that is always hard and sad – Sorry Day – the day we remember the pain and heartache of the stolen generations and all the histories and reverberations through families that came from this terrible period of pain, inflicted on First Australians by the government.

There is deep significance in Ken’s appointment being announced on Sorry Day, given his own family was directly affected by the then government’s actions.

Ken brings a depth of experience in Aboriginal education, health and policy, but of course the one thing he has that none of the previous office holders have ever had is that he is Indigenous. “

Dr Jessa Rogers is a Wiradjuri academic, consultant and board director based in Adelaide : see full article Part 2 Below

Part 1 from The Guardian 

Praise, hope and high expectation have followed the appointment of Noongar man Ken Wyatt as minister for Indigenous Australians in the new Morrison government.

Wyatt is the first Aboriginal person to hold the federal ministry, and the first Aboriginal person to sit in cabinet.

In a statement Wyatt said he was “incredibly honoured to be the first Aboriginal minister for Indigenous Australians, committed to working and walking together with our elders, families and communities, to ensure the greatness of our many nations is reflected in the greatness of the Australian nation, now and forever”.

The appointment, made on national Sorry Day and at the start of Reconciliation Week, has been welcomed by Aboriginal organisations and advocates, hopeful of progress on constitutional reform, a voice to parliamentClosing the Gap targets and long-standing welfare, health and justice issues.

Wyatt arrived in Canberra on Monday from his home state of Western Australia amid speculation about how he might consult Indigenous organisations and communities.

Scott Morrison said a new “national Indigenous Australians agency” would be established, but details are yet to be announced.

Nor would the prime minister give a timeframe for a referendum on constitutional reform and a voice to parliament.

The federal government has set aside $7.3m for co-design, and while Morrison said the work would start immediately, he would not set a deadline for a result.

“I’m committed to getting an outcome on recognition, but we need to work together across the aisle and across our communities to get an outcome that all Australians can get behind and we’ll take as long as is needed to achieve that,” Morrison said.

“My priorities for Indigenous Australians are to ensure Indigenous kids are in school and getting an education, that young Indigenous Australians are not taking their own lives and that there are real jobs for Indigenous Australians so they can plan for their future with confidence like any other Australian.

“Recognition must be achieved alongside these practical goals and we will continue to work together.”

Newly minted Labor leader Anthony Albanese said the ALP was ready to advance the agenda of the Uluru statement in a bipartisan manner.

“Our nation is diminished by not recognising first Australians in our constitution. And while Indigenous Australians are the most disadvantaged in our nation, Labor stands ready to cooperate on how we advance the agenda of the Uluru statement,” Albanese said.

The Greens also said a voice should happen without delay. Senator Rachel Siewert said Wyatt’s appointment was a “positive step towards self-determination”.

The social justice commissioner and fellow Western Australian, June Oscar, said Wyatt’s appointment was “truly historic”.

“Ken Wyatt carries the hopes and aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country, and we look forward to working together,” Oscar said.

The co-chair of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples, Rod Little, said Wyatt’s appointment “heightens our hope that things will be different”.

“We have hope every time there’s an election. We hope there are people who can work with us, who we can trust, who know how our communities are feeling, and we need somebody who is trustworthy and honest who is going to take on the challenges to make our lives better.”

Chief executive of the National Coalition of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (Naccho), Pat Turner said Wyatt had a big job ahead, facing “massive expectations” on all sides.

The first Indigenous member of the House of Representatives Ken Wyatt delivers his maiden speech to the House of Representatives in Canberra, 29 September 2010

Part 2 Ken Wyatt’s historic appointment could be truly transformational for Indigenous Australians : from Jessa Rogers

Also from The Guardian 

For the first time the final approval on policies and funding which affect our lives will be made by an Indigenous person

Ken Wyatt was announced the minister of Indigenous affairs on Sunday, which was also Sorry Day. Wyatt’s own family was part of the stolen generations. Photograph: Mick Tsikas/AAP

Scott Morrison has made an historic appointment early in his new term as prime minister that has the potential to radically alter the way Indigenous policy is made in Canberra.

One hundred and eighteen years after the commonwealth of Australia was formed we finally have our first ever minister of Indigenous affairs (now appropriately called minister for Indigenous Australians) who is actually Indigenous. Ken Wyatt, who in 2010 was the first Aboriginal man to be elected to the House of Representatives, has made history again. And while I do not know him well, I know he is a decent man with a heart for the people.

Some may argue that this appointment is merely symbolic given any major policy direction is likely to require the approval of the cabinet, but the minister for Indigenous Australians will have significant influence over major government programs and resources.

Ken brings a depth of experience in Aboriginal education, health and policy, but of course the one thing he has that none of the previous office holders have ever had is that he is Indigenous. And we now no longer have a non-Indigenous person with no experience in our world, making and influencing important decisions on our behalf.

This is the first time senior officials in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (where Indigenous Affairs is currently based) will have to answer to an Indigenous person. This will be the first time the final approval on policies and hundreds of millions of dollars will be made by an Indigenous person.

Having spent over a decade working in schools and universities where the people who hold the power to make the key decisions that affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and staff are almost always non-Indigenous, I am encouraged to think that this decision by Scott Morrison is more than just symbolic. It has the potential to be truly transformational.

The first Indigenous member of the House of Representatives, Ken Wyatt, delivers his maiden speech on 29 September 2010. On Sunday Wyatt was appointed the first ever minister of Indigenous affairs.

For many years now, I have had an image board of inspirational people, moments and quotes in my office. Ken Wyatt has been on that board, his image taken in September 2010, when he took his seat as member for Hasluck wearing a kangaroo skin.

That image made me proud then, as I know it did for many people. That symbol of leadership, presented by Elders, showed so much of what it means to be an Aboriginal person who also represents a wide and diverse group of Australians in his home electorate.

The picture I had of Ken delivering his first speech always reminded me of the important points he made that day, in particular his recollection of the apology. It brought tears to my eyes, and something burned inside me when he said that the standing orders at that point prevented an Indigenous response.

So during that speech, cloaked in kangaroo skin, Ken said: “On behalf of my mother, her siblings and all Indigenous Australians, I, as an Aboriginal voice in this chamber, say thank you for the apology delivered in the federal parliament.” That voice in the chamber was so important, just as his voice as minister for Indigenous Australians will be now.

‘I feel like Labor was the only hope for our mob’: Indigenous people cannot feel defeated

I have raised my children to believe that we as Aboriginal people cannot let negative opinions, low expectations or stereotypes hold us back from achieving our goals. We have the power to shape our futures, even though we still have a long road ahead of us

As Ken has said, the decisions we make determine our destiny, and the choices we make shape our future. We need to work hard towards a world where Indigenous people can determine our own destinies, but also take time to celebrate the wins, when we have them.

So, today I am celebrating Ken’s appointment as a step in the right direction for the newly elected government, and for us as Indigenous peoples in Australia.

I am hoping this appointment will bring about more than just symbolic change, because we need more than that to improve our lives as Indigenous Australians.

NACCHO Members #VoteACCHO #Election2019 #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #NSW @ahmrc @Galambila #Armajun ACCHO #VIC @VACCHO_org @VAHS1972 #NT @CAACongress #KatherineWest #QLD @DeadlyChoices #Gidgee #Mamu #SA #ACT

Feature Article this week from Apunipima ACCHO Cape York leading the way vaccinating the mob against the flu at no cost to the patient

1.1 National :  Report from the recent Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain National Conference 2019 hosted by AMSANT released

1.2 National : Survey Yarning with New Media Technology:
Mediatisation and the emergence of the First Australians’ cyber-corroboree.

1.3 NACCHO calls on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms

2.1 NSW : AHMRC April Edition of Message Stick is out now!

2.2 Brand new Ready Mob team and Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour CEO Reuben Robinson participate in Team Planning & Meet n’ Greet day.

2.3 NSW : Adam Marshall MP  catches up with the team from Inverell-based Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation to discuss their exciting $5.7 million expansion plans

3.1 VIC : VACCHO Launches its #Election 2019 Platform

3.2 VIC : VAHS ACCHO launches new new 2019 Deadly Choices Health Check Shirts

4.1 NT : Katherine West Health Board ACCHO prepare healthy lunches for the kids at Kalkarindji School everyday.

4.2 NT Congress farewells and thanks Sarah Gallagher from our Utju Health Service after 22 years of exceptional service as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

5.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa Comms & Marketing team were up in Doomadgee this week attending the ‘Get Set for School 2020 & Career Expo

5.2 QLD : MAMU Health Service Innisfail celebrates 29 Years of Service to community 

5.3 QLD : Deadly Choices Patrick Johnson say winter is coming!! Book into your local Aboriginal Medical Service ASAP for your flu shot and health check.

6.1 SA : Morrison Government is providing almost $250,000 to three South Australian Aboriginal medical services to replace outdated patient information systems.

7.1 ACT : Download the April edition of our Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter.

8.1 WA: KAMS ACCHO as an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services encourages the use of traditional bush medicines

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

Feature Article this week from Apunipima ACCHO Cape York leading the way vaccinating the mob against the flu at no cost to the patient

The Federal Government has recently announced a program that will ensure almost 170,000 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and adolescents are vaccinated against the flu at no cost to the patient, with an additional provision of $12 million provided to boost a national immunisation education campaign.

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children aged between 6 months and 14 years will have access to the influenza vaccine. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander experience a higher burden from influenza infection and are more likely to be hospitalised with the disease. This funding is a welcomed initiative.

The ‘Get the Facts about Immunisation’ campaign will be delivered over the next three years and will include a national television campaign, to help raise awareness around the benefits and importance of immunisation.

FOR MORE INFO about immunisation

1.1 National :  Report from the recent Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain National Conference 2019 hosted by AMSANT released

The conference report from the recent Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain National Conference 2019 held by Indigenous Eye Health (IEH) and co-hosted by Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) in Alice Springs on 14 and 15 March 2019.

We also include for your interest and information a two-page conference summary report and an A3 poster to celebrate activities at the Conference.

Over two days of the Conference, more than 220 delegates and over 60 speakers from all state and territories and including representation from community, local and regional services, state organisations, national peak and non-government agencies, and government came together to share, learn, and be inspired.

Conference attendance has grown significantly year to year since the first conference (+83%) held in Melbourne in 2017. This increase also reflects over 50 regions, covering more than 80% of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, that are now engaged in activities to close the gap for vision.

IEH would like to thank everyone that attended and contributed to the Conference and especially the speakers for sharing their stories, thoughts and learnings. Congratulations again to our deserved 2019 Leaky Pipe Award winners.

The feedback IEH has received from delegates and speakers has been very positive and supports the joint commitment to close the gap for vision by 2020.

The Conference reports, presentations, photo gallery, and other supplementary materials can be accessed here on IEH website. Please feel free to forward this email and information to your colleagues and networks and we also continue to welcome your further feedback, input and commentary.

We will look forward to welcoming you to the next national conference planned in March 2020 and in the year ahead let’s keeping working together to close the gap for vision.

Hugh R Taylor AC
Harold Mitchell Chair of Indigenous Eye Health
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
The University of Melbourne

1.2 : National : Survey Yarning with New Media Technology:
Mediatisation and the emergence of the First Australians’ cyber-corroboree.

Throughout this study, we use the terms ‘First Australian’ or ‘Indigenous Australian’ when referring to people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage, and ‘Peoples’ when referring to the collective group of Aboriginal nations.

We acknowledge the inadequacy of these homogenising Western terms used to describe such a diverse range of Peoples, languages and cultures.  However, we hope this terminology is sufficient for the purposes of this survey in describing the multi-dimensional relationship that this survey covers. We offer an unreserved apology in lieu of our inadequate terminology causing any undue annoyance or umbrage; this was not our intention.

Take the survey HERE

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FVPD3K6

Any questions or concerns should be addressed to:- keith.robinson2@griffithuni.edu.au

1.3 NACCHO calls on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

See NACCHO Election 2019 Website

2.1 NSW : AHMRC April Edition of Message Stick is out now!

Welcome to the April edition of the Message Stick!

Yaama from me, Dr Merilyn Childs! I recently joined AH&MRC in the role of Senior Research Advisor. This means that I help researchers improve the quality of research applications before they are sent to the AH&MRC Ethics Committee. I’ll be providing Professional Learning Opportunities and resources for researchers, and feedback on applications where appropriate.

While I’m with AH&MRC 3 days a week, I have other roles. For example, I’m Honorary Associate Professor at Macquarie University, and I’m on Academic Board for the newly proposed College of Health Sciences at the Education Centre of Australia.

As I write this, I think of my mother Helen. When I was a child in the 1960s, Helen taught me about racism, stolen land, and stolen Aboriginal lives and languages. She was a passionate advocate of land rights. With her, and my two-year-old toddler, I marched as an ally of First Nations people on January 26th, 1988 in Sydney.

Two decades later at Charles Sturt University I was fortunate enough to work for some years with the amazing team embedding Indigenous Cultural Competence into curriculum. Because of them I continued the journey I began with my mother as I tried respectfully to develop ‘yindiamarra winhanga-nha’ – the wisdom of respectfully knowing how to live well in a world worth living in, from the voices of the Wiradjuri people’. In 2015 I joined Macquarie University and collaborated with Walanga Muru colleagues to amplify Aboriginal voices in Higher Degree Research training.

I feel privileged to continue my journey working at AH&MRC with warm and amazing colleagues and with those of you I meet in the future, to improve the quality of research applications that are submitted to the AH&MRC Ethics Committee.

Read View HERE

2.2 Brand new Ready Mob team and Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour CEO Reuben Robinson participate in Team Planning & Meet n’ Greet day.

Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour CEO Reuben Robinson joined in the interactive activities and shared his vision for Ready Mob and Galambila  in moving forward in service of our communities. SEE FACEBOOK PAGE

2.3 NSW : Adam Marshall MP  catches up with the team from Inverell-based Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation to discuss their exciting $5.7 million expansion plans

Adam Marshall MP  catches up with the team from Inverell-based Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation to discuss their exciting $5.7 million expansion plans last week.

Armajun is planning to build a new and expanded health service centre next door to its current premises in River Street to cater for for patients and offer more health services to the community.

Part of this will be a $400,000 expanded dental clinic, which Adam will be approaching the State Government to fund.

Armajun provides services to many communities across the Northern Tablelands and do a wonderful job!

3.1 VIC : VACCHO Launches its #Election 2019 Platform

It’s out! We’ve just published our #auspol  #AusVotes2019  Election Platform.
Read all about what Aboriginal Communities need from the Federal Government to improve our health and wellbeing, to not just Close the Gap, but eliminate it all together.
Sustainability, Prevention Accountability to & for us.
Download HERE

3.2 : VAHS ACCHO launches new new 2019 Deadly Choices Health Check Shirts

VAHS, Essendon Football Club and The Long Walk have continued to work collaboratively that empowers our community to be more aware of their personal and family health by completing an annual health assessment.

An annual Health Assessment is a deadly way to monitor your own health and identify or prevent a chronic disease. Plus its 100% free if you complete this health assessment at VAHS. Anyone can complete an Health Check.

We have plenty of shirts for our mob all year, so don’t stress if you have completed an Health Check recently. You only allowed an annual Health Check every 9 months. Ring VAHS on 9419-3000 if you’re due for a health check.

Also we have another exciting news to announce very soon. Stay tune

4.1 NT : Katherine West Health Board ACCHO prepare healthy lunches for the kids at Kalkarindji School everyday.

This is Gabrielle and Mary they help prepare healthy lunches for the kids at Kalkarindji School everyday.  They are both great cooks and are working with myself to make their meals high iron and vitamin C so kids can have strong blood to learn and play.
#oneshieldforall

4.2 NT Congress farewells and thanks Sarah Gallagher from our Utju Health Service after 22 years of exceptional service as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

For 22 years with us, Sarah has been delivering culturally safe and responsive health care and programs to her people in the Utju community.

Born and raised in Utju, Sarah commenced her training as an AHP in the Utju Clinic, received her Certificate IV in AHP and progressed her career as a senior health practitioner and clinic manager.

In 2014 Sarah was a finalist at the ATSIHP Awards in the excellence in remote service delivery category. Sarah remains committed to the health and wellbeing of her people as elected Chairperson of the Utju Health Services board.

5.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa Comms & Marketing team were up in Doomadgee this week attending the ‘Get Set for School 2020 & Career Expo’

Was lovely to see so many people and services attend this event. If you pop down to the Gidgee Healing stall Guy Douglas our new Practice Manager at Doomadgee Clinic, Andrew, Trish or Gavin would be happy to help you fill in birth registration forms. There are a few goodies also so please go check them out and say hello.

5.2 QLD : MAMU Health Service Innisfail celebrates 29 Years of Service to community 

5.3 QLD : Deadly Choices Patrick Johnson say winter is coming!! Book into your local Aboriginal Medical Service ASAP for your flu shot and health check.

Make a Deadly Choices a healthy choice and get your DC beanie.

I’m sporting my North Queensland Toyota Cowboysbeanie what DC beanie are you sporting? Institute of Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH)

6.1 SA : Morrison Government is providing almost $250,000 to three South Australian Aboriginal medical services to replace outdated patient information systems.

Picture Above Minister Ken Wyatt visit earlier this year 

Ensuring high quality primary health care, delivered in a culturally competent way, is a key to improving the health and wellbeing of First Australians.

Federal Member for Grey Rowan Ramsey said it was important that all medical services across Australia were provided with the right tool kit to do their work.

“As a result of this announcement three Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in Grey, Nunyara in Whyalla, Pika Wiya in Port Augusta and and the Ceduna Kooniba Health Service will receive assistance to install new “state-of-the-art” patient record keeping systems”, Mr Ramsey said. “The efficiency of any good health system is dependent on good record-keeping and accurate, easy-to-access patient information.

“Streamlined modern information systems will enable healthcare professionals to gain instant, secure, and efficient access to the medical and treatment histories of patients. This can be especially valuable where we have transingent populations as is particularly the case with some indigenous families.”

This funding through the Morrison Government’s Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme will contribute to new systems to provide better patient care.

Under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme, the Morrison Government funds around 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services across Australia to provide culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care services to First Australians.

The Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt said the Federal Government is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities to develop practical, evidence-based policy and deliver programs that will make a real difference to the lives of First Australians.

”It is part of our focus on closing the gap and supporting culturally appropriate primary health care and programs,” Mr Wyatt said.

“Good health is a key enabler in supporting children to go to school, adults to lead productive working lives, and in building strong and resilient communities.”

The Morrison Government is providing $4.1 billion to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the next four years.

7.1 ACT : Download the April edition of our Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter.

 

April edition of our Winnunga Newsletter.

Read or Download Winnunga AHCS Newsletter April 2019 (1)

Please also note that the details for Winnunga’s National Sorry Day Bridge Walk for 2019 is included in this newsletter, so please Save the Date and join us.

8.1 WA: KAMS ACCHO as an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services encourages the use of traditional bush medicines

 ” Back in 2017 when I found some funding ($3,000) to start the idea of making some Bush medicine with a couple of ex- AHW’s at Balgo, was a very exciting time for us and them.

 The Bush medicines an integral part of Aboriginal culture and traditional customs.

Jamilah Bin Omar Acting SEWB Manager Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd.

 As an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services encourages the use of traditional bush medicines and talk up the bush medicine information through the Certificate III and Cert. IV Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Program under the competency units;

  • Support the safe use of medicines
  • Administer medicines

Myself and Joanna Martin (Pharmacist) from the KAMS Pharmacy Support team spent one week in Balgo working with the community Women Elders to make three different types of bush medicines.  These were;

  • Piltji (used on all parts of the body to heal internal injuries, organs, arthritis and many other problems)
  • Ngurnu Ngurnu (used for cold and flu and rubbed on the chest and head)
  • Yapilynpa (used as a rub on the chest and head for the relief of colds and headaches)

At the completion, bush medicines became available in the Balgo Health Centre, for patients to select and use individually or in conjunction with western medicine.

The Bush Medicines program is an opportunity for KAMS staff to collaborate with community members.  It will provide a forum for traditional practices to be used and passed onto future generations.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Election2019 #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO : Would Indigenous health and ‘the gap’ be better served by focusing on positives, not negatives @Mayi_Kuwayu #OurCulturesCount

 ” When you think of Indigenous health, what is the first thing that comes to mind?

Is it the Closing the Gap campaign? The gap in life expectancy? Over-representation in the criminal justice system?

Or is the first thing that comes to mind that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures are among the longest-surviving cultures in the world?

That mortality rates due to cardiovascular disease have dropped by 43 per cent since 1998?

Or that the prevalence of smoking has dropped by almost 10 per cent in the past decade?

It’s not too surprising if you didn’t think of the last three things — or if you didn’t even know these were true. Because this is not what we hear about in the media.

Think about the positive difference we could make by refocusing the conversation on strengths and success.”

Dr Katie Thurber is a Research Fellow in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program at Australian National University : See Full Report continued Part 1 Below

Dr Katie Thurber works with the Mayi Kuwayu Study team as a Postdoctoral Fellow. Katie assists with study development and data analysis. She completed her PhD at NCEPH under the supervision of Professor Emily Banks and Associate Professor Ray Lovett.

Katie’s PhD research explored the social determinants of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child health, focusing on nutrition and weight status.

Culture has long been considered a critical determinant of health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. But we haven’t been able to prove in quantitative terms that strong culture is linked to better health, because we have lacked reliable measures of culture.

This led to the development of the Mayi Kuwayu study, which spent four years working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country to develop measures of cultural participation and expression.

People are completing this survey right now, with the aim of providing large-scale quantitative evidence on how culture is linked to wellbeing

MKY invites you to complete this survey to help us understand how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture links to health and wellbeing.

They have worked with many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities to make this survey.

You can take the survey here:

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #IDW2018 #NACCHOagm2018 Report 5 of 5 @Mayi_Kuwayu Landmark study to examine health benefits of Indigenous connection to country launched at #NACCHOagm2018

The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is not a partisan political issue and cannot be sidelined any longer.

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable. “

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills

Check  our new Election2019 Page Here

Part 1 Continued from opening :  Picture above : Culture is considered critical for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s wellbeing. So how do we measure that? (ABC Kimberley: Ben Collins/file photo)

 Originally published on ABC Website 

A study found that in Western Australia, three quarters of all media stories about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in 2012 were negative, focusing on topics such as alcohol use, child abuse, petrol sniffing, violence, and suicide.

Together this paints a pretty grim picture.

We call this constant negative portrayal of a population “deficit discourse” — and it can have a profound influence on how we view Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

These negative stories, and the focus on problems, can reinforce negative stereotypes about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, which can then contribute to racist attitudes and behaviours.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who constantly hear these negative stories may internalise negative beliefs about their identity, which can contribute to low self-esteem and psychological distress.

It can also decrease people’s willingness to participate in health-promoting behaviours.

For example, in a study in the United States, African-American adults were shown one of a few different statements about colon cancer.

The key thing is that all of the statements were true, and based on the same data. The only thing that varied was how the statistic was framed.

Some of the participants saw the statistic in a deficit frame: either, black people are doing worse than white people; or, black people are improving, but less than white people. Others saw the statistic presented in a positive way: black people are improving over time.

The study found participants who saw the statistic framed positively had a better emotional response than those who saw the statistic framed negatively.

Even more, the study found these participants were more likely to want to be screened for colon cancer themselves.

So a simple change in how the exact same data was framed resulted in different health action.

This constant deficit discourse can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. The act of continually talking about gaps and problems may actually serve to make things worse.

What should we do about this?

We need to acknowledge the potential effects of continuing to present such a negative (and unfair) portrayal of Australia’s First Peoples.

The ‘deficit discourse’ of Indigenous health

Listen to Katie Thurber explain how negative stories can reinforce negative stereotypes about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for Ockham’s Razor.

We also need to change things. This can start with changing the way we conduct research, and how we present findings in the media.

As consumers, we need to critique and question what we hear in the media. We need to be mindful of the way we discuss these issues, whether with our friends or on social media.

As a researcher, I consider I have an ethical obligation to avoid “deficit discourse”, given the potential health consequences.

So, within our research group, we try to do things a bit differently.

We follow two broad principles to focus our research on strengths, rather than on problems.

The first principle: we look at how things are going within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

Our first concern is to understand how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are doing — what groups are doing well, what groups are doing less well, what is working, and what is not working.

This gives us the true story of what is going on, and it gives us real data we can feed back to communities.

We may compare this information with data from the non-Indigenous population where this is relevant, but this is always a lower priority.

Focusing on “the gap” only tells us the size of the space between two data points.

The size of “the gap” doesn’t tell us anything about how things are going for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, or for non-Indigenous people, for that matter.

The smoking gap, or why how we talk about statistics matters

I’ll give you an example of this using data about smoking prevalence, the percentage of the adult population that currently smokes daily.

A 2016 report looked at trends over time in smoking prevalence in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population relative to smoking prevalence in the non-Indigenous population.

The researchers found that in 2008, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults were 2.4 times as likely to smoke as non-Indigenous adults, and in 2013, they were 2.8 times as likely to smoke.

Because 2.8 is bigger than 2.4, they concluded the gap in smoking had widened. This sounds like a bad news story, and it could have been interpreted to mean that tobacco control efforts were not working.

This didn’t line up with what we were hearing on the ground, so we looked at the data another way.

Instead of focusing on comparing the data with the non-Indigenous population, we looked within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population to estimate the change in smoking prevalence in absolute terms.

We found the prevalence of smoking had dropped by 9 per cent in the past decade, matching the progress in the non-Indigenous population, where there was a 7 per cent decrease.

What this means in terms of real lives is that there are 35,000 fewer Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults smoking today, compared to if things had stayed the same. This will help avoid thousands of early deaths.

We saw particularly notable drops in smoking among younger people and those living in urban areas.

We learned that we need to redouble our tobacco control efforts for older age groups, and for those living in remote areas, building on what is working.

While both reports were accurate, they led to entirely different conclusions. The difference comes down to the way the statistics were framed.

We found there was a significant drop in smoking prevalence for both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults and for non-Indigenous adults — it was a good news story for both groups.

This good news is hidden when we focus on the comparison between the two groups.

Look at what’s helping, not just what’s harming

The size of the “gap” isn’t telling us the whole story — and it may be hiding real progress that is occurring.

We learn much more by exploring how things are going within a population than we do by only looking at the difference between two populations.

The second principle: rather than only looking at risk factors, or things that cause disease, we try to explore factors that might promote health and wellbeing. These are called a few names, such as protective factors, health assets, health resources, or salutogenic factors.

Looking at protective factors can be tricky, because while we have a reasonably good idea of the types of things that cause disease — such as smoking, high body mass index, and alcohol use — we don’t have as good of a grasp on what promotes wellbeing.

So to do this, we explore things that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have told us is important to their wellbeing such as their culture, their family, and their environment.

These are concepts that we don’t usually measure in large-scale studies — often because these things are considered “too hard” to measure. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try.

For example, culture has long been considered a critical determinant of health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. But we haven’t been able to prove in quantitative terms that strong culture is linked to better health, because we have lacked reliable measures of culture.

This led to the development of the Mayi Kuwayu study, which spent four years working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country to develop measures of cultural participation and expression.

People are completing this survey right now, with the aim of providing large-scale quantitative evidence on how culture is linked to wellbeing.

Identifying protective factors lets us design programs and policies that promote wellbeing, building on strengths that already exist within Indigenous families and communities. It’s an important complement to standard research that focuses on risk factors for disease.

I’ve explored these ideas in the context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, but this is something we can do for all populations, all the time.

Think about the positive difference we could make by refocusing the conversation on strengths and success.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts to #CloseTheGap : Features @VACCHO_org #Doctors @TheAHCWA @WinnungaACCHO @IAHA_National @MenziesResearch Plus ACCHO’s in #NT #NSW #SA #WA #QLD #ACT #TAS #VIC

Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1. ACCHO Workforce Scholarship NEWS

Lowitja are offering 16 full bursaries

SCHOLARSHIPS CLOSING APRIL 12 – IAHA and the RFDS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Scholarship.

1.1 Job/s of the week 

2.Queensland

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

7.3 Katungul ACCHO 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1. ACCHO Workforce Scholarship News : 

Lowitja are offering 16 full bursaries

The 2019 Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference is offering bursaries to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and community members to attend the conference.

There are two types of bursaries available. We are offering 16 full bursaries, which cover:

  • Full Conference registration, including the Welcoming Ceremony and Conference dinner
  • Domestic flights (economy) to Darwin
  • 3 nights accommodation (incl. breakfast) for those travelling from interstate
  • 4 nights accommodation (incl. breakfast) for those travelling from a remote area

We also offer conference attendance bursaries.

These cover costs up to the amount of AU$2000.

We will be asking bursary recipients to assist with some conference duties, and to be available for media and promotional activities during the event.

Who can apply:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students currently enrolled in a course or discipline related to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing (including VET, undergraduate, Masters or PhD) and
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members currently employed in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation, in the health and community service sector in Australia.

Selection criteria:

  • Eligible Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander current student or community person working in the sector
  • Benefit to studies and/or organisation has been demonstrated
  • Plans to further and/or share knowledge gained at the conference has been demonstrated
  • Applicant has demonstrated that they are an emerging leader in their environment
  • A reference has been submitted supporting the application.

How to apply:

  • Complete the application form below before midnight Friday 12 April 2019.
SCHOLARSHIPS CLOSING APRIL 12 – IAHA and the RFDS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Scholarship.
JCU Centre for Rural and Remote Health, Mount Isa (MICRRH) and IAHA Student Placement Scholarship Closing 12 April

Contact admin@iaha.com.au for more info

1.1 Jobs of the week 

VACCHO Aboriginal Life! Project Officer
  • Unique opportunity to join a dynamic team
  • Full-time, 12 month contract
  • New Program

VACCHO is Victoria’s peak representative Aboriginal health body, championing community control and health equality for our communities. We are a centre of expertise, policy advice, training, innovation and leadership in Aboriginal health, advocating for the equality and wellbeing of all Aboriginal people across the state.

This newly created role will be involved in consultation and development of a new approach and program model for the prevention of chronic disease, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease for Aboriginal Victorians

To be successful in this role you will need:

  • Proven leadership in public health, nutrition, physical activity and/or health promotion
  • Demonstrated understanding and commitment to the philosophy and practice of Aboriginal Community Control and self-determination
  • Strong project management skills and ability to recommend culturally appropriate solutions to problems arising

This is an Aboriginal Designated Position, classified under ‘special measures’ of section 12 of the Equal Opportunity Act 2010. Only Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are eligible to apply.

The successful applicant will have an opportunity to make a difference and support VACCHO’s members to create positive change in their communities. If this interests you, please review the Position Description and Application Form at our website http://www.vaccho.org.au/jobs.

To apply, please provide a copy of your resume and application form to employment@vaccho.org.au.

For queries about the position please contact the HR team on 9411 9411.  Applications close on Friday 5 April 2019.

More INFO

Doctors wanted for Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services is a community controlled health service providing holistic health care to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the ACT and surrounding areas. The Service manages various programs and employs more than 70 staff.  Employees enjoy attractive remuneration, salary sacrificing, support of continuing professional education, no after hours or weekends, satisfying work in a proven multidisciplinary team environment.

General Practitioners

The role of the GP is to enhance the clinical services offered at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services.  The aim of the clinical services team is to optimise the health outcomes for clients through providing best practice, evidence based clinical services and where appropriate to identify where a client requires referral to another team of the service or an external service provider.

Are you a Doctor who is passionate about Aboriginal Health and playing the part to close the gap in health between mainstream and Aboriginal Australia?

If you are, then opportunities exist at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services for permanent part time General Practitioners to work 5days/week either between the hours of 9.00am to 1.00pm or 1.00pm to 5.00pm.

Enquiries for the above positions may be directed to the CEO, Julie Tongs on 62846222 or email Julie.Tongs@winnunga.org.au

For more information and/ or a copy of the position description please call Roseanne Longford, HR Manager on 6284 6259 or email Roseanne.Longford@winnunga.org.au

All applications should be addressed and mailed to Julie Tongs, CEO, Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service 63 Boolimba Crescent, Narrabundah ACT 2604 or by email to Roseanne.Longford@winnunga.org.au

AHMRC Marketing and Communications Coordinator

We are looking for a Marketing and Communications Coordinator to join our team. We are searching for someone who truly wants to make a difference in their community and is passionate about all things – marketing and communications!

About the Job
As the Marketing & Communications Coordinator, you will be responsible for assisting in the development of new and innovative marketing campaigns; and, proactively supporting AH&MRC teams to deliver programs.

You will:

  • Take ownership of day-to-day marketing admin and enquiries
  • Manage the development and execution of AH&MRC’s digital collateral
  • Create and implement AH&MRC brand and marketing collateral
  • Manage marketing and communications for campaigns
  • Ensure collateral meets AH&MRC brand standards and requirements
  • Build strong relationships with stakeholders

About You
To be successful you will have;

  • A passionate approach to work and a can-do attitude
  • The ability to take initiative, learn and think creatively
  • A stakeholder/ member centric focus
  • Excellent organisational, oral and written skills
  • Understanding Aboriginal communities and cultures
  • Degree in marketing & communications and/or relevant experience

About Us
AH&MRC works across NSW to ensure Aboriginal communities receive high quality comprehensive primary health care services; from an adequately resourced and skilled workforce. AH&MRC works in collaboration with other Aboriginal health and non-Aboriginal health partners to systematically address the social determinants of health and wellbeing.

We Offer

  • Generous study opportunities
  • Salary sacrificing
  • Flexible working arrangements

Proving yourself in this role could lead to future opportunities within AH&MRC. We support our employees to take ownership of developing their career and encourage further development through study.

What’s next?
Apply via the link

Got questions?
Feel free to contact us on (02) 9212 4777 or email recruitment@ahmrc.org.au

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal community controlled health service providing comprehensive primary health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Innisfail and surrounding districts including Tully, Babinda and Ravenshoe.

We are recruiting to the position of Health Services Manager based at Innisfail. Your role is to provide strategic direction and leadership for the implementation and delivery of comprehensive PHC Services within Mamu Health Service Limited, strategic initiatives related to models of Primary Health Care (PHC), and strategic initiatives associated with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander PHC programs.

This position is also responsible for business planning, administration, financial management and working collaboratively as part of the Senior Management Team.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check and hold a current Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian

If you are interested please download an application package from our website on www.mamuhsl.org.au.  Applications close Friday 12th April 2019 at 5.00pm

Under section 25, of the Anti-discrimination Act 1991, there is a genuine occupational requirement of the incumbent to be of Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islander descent

MDAS ACCHO : New jobs this week in Mildura and Swan Hill.

Closing April 8

See Website for more info 

AHCWA Western Australia

If you are passionate about improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Western Australia then the below opportunities may interest you.

Alcohol and Drug Counsellor (FIFO 8:2)

Organisation: Spinifex Health Service, Tjuntjuntjara, Spinifex Lands, WA
Employment Type: Full time (8:2 roster), Fixed Term 12 Month Contract with a view to extend

Remuneration: $83,562 (negotiable for the right candidate) + superannuation + salary sacrifice + annual district allowance of $4333

About the Organisation

The Spinifex Health Service (SHS) is an expanding Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Service located in the Tjuntjuntjara Community on the Spinifex Lands, 680km north-east of Kalgoorlie in the Great Victoria Desert region of Western Australia.

SHS provides a comprehensive primary health care service from the Tjuntjuntjara Clinic, servicing approximately 200 people with a strong focus on chronic disease management, child and maternal health, social & emotional well-being, aged care and Home and Community Care (HACC).

To find out more about SHS, please visit http://www.spinifexhealth.org.au

About the Opportunity

As the Drug and Alcohol Counsellor, you will assist adults and young people to make healthy lifestyle choices, particularly in relation to alcohol and drugs.

Working within a strategic plan framework informed by the Health Committee (a sub Committee of the PTAC Board) and closely with the mental health team including a visiting Psychologist, your day to day responsibilities will include (but not be limited to) the following:

  • Implementing a range of strategies and interventions that support community and client awareness of Social and Emotional Wellbeing, Mental Health and Alcohol and Drug services;
  • Providing both individual and group education sessions on positive / healthy lifestyles choices focusing on community identified issues;
  • Planning, developing, preparing, promoting and delivering education and other activities consistent with program goals for footprints for better health;
  • Providing case-management and support for clients on an as needs basis.

To be successful, you will have a qualification in counselling, psychology, social work, alcohol and drug education and mental health or a related field paired with a commitment to Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing.

You will have an understanding of the social determinants of health affecting Aboriginal people and the ability to communicate sensitively in a cross-cultural environment. Your strong interpersonal, communication and organisational skills will enable you to strengthen existing community partnerships, establish and sustain stakeholder relationships and determine priorities in order to meet agreed timelines and achieve results.

To view the full position and selection criteria please visit http://www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

About the Benefits

$83,562 (negotiable for the right candidate) + superannuation + salary sacrifice + annual district allowance of $4333

  • 8:2 FIFO roster – travel provided from Kalgoorlie to the community and back each swing
  • Accommodation and utilities (including wifi) provided at a cost of $40 per week
  • Relocation allowance (including airfares from your place of origin to the community and the cost of freighting your belongings up to the cost of 1 Pallet)
  • 4 weeks annual leave
  • At your own cost, you can bring your partner out to the community on your swing!

This position offers the opportunity to engage in a dynamic, challenging and fast-paced role where no two days are the same. You’ll be working closely with remote Aboriginal communities and making a drastic impact to the health and well-being outcomes of these communities. You’ll enjoy fantastic career progression and growth as you advance your skills, with ongoing training and support provided.

Not only this, but you’ll be working in some of the most beautiful outback regions that Australia has to offer!

To find out more about the Tjuntjuntjara Community, please visit http://www.spinifex.org.au

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close at 5pm, 15 April 2019

For more information please contact Sarah Calder on 08 9227 1631

As per section 51 of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA) SHS seeks to increase the diversity of our workforce to better meet the different needs of our clients and stakeholders and to improve equal opportunity outcomes for our employees.

VIEW all opportunities HERE 

General Practitioners Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation

2 x General Practitioner – Location: Carnarvon

The Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Medical Corporation (CMSAC) is seeking to fill the above positions. CMSAC is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service; established in 1986 to provide health and medical services to the Aboriginal people of Carnarvon and the surrounding areas.

CMSAC provides a supportive employment environment that values and encourages initiative and an outcome-based focus on improving Aboriginal health. CMSAC foster close links with major providers of health services in the Aboriginal communities throughout the North West Gascoyne region of WA.

Summary Job role:

The General Practitioner is accountable to the Clinical Operations Manager and is responsible for the provision of high quality clinical and medical services for the Aboriginal people of Carnarvon and surrounding areas. This includes providing a range of culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care services taking account of the culture and practices of the community in which CMSAC operates.

To be successful you will need to meet the following essential and desirable requirements.

ESSENTIAL:  General skills, experience and knowledge

  • Registration with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency as a General Practitioner;
  • Possess at least three years postgraduate medical experience,
  • If not vocationally registered as a General Practitioner, hold relevant vocational Registration, or hold a Fellowship, FRACGP, FACRRM or be part of a GP training scheme.
  • Demonstrated understanding of the principles of comprehensive primary health care and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services as well as an understanding of the issues affecting the health and well being of Aboriginal people, including social determinants of health.
  • Relevant client case load management experience
  • Demonstrated clinical and procedural experience
  • Demonstrated highly developed communication and interpersonal skills, both written and verbal
  • A demonstrated capacity to work effectively and collaboratively within a multidisciplinary team
  • Understanding of family medicine, primary health care and preventative health care practice
  • The ability to maintain a high level of professionalism and confidentiality
  • Ability to work with minimal supervision and to work to deadlines
  • A demonstrated knowledge of Medicare billing framework and application in primary health care and a demonstrated willingness to appropriately maximize Medicare billing.
  • A demonstrated understanding of applicable accreditation standards including AGPAL accreditation standards and a willingness to provide leadership in continual quality improvement in clinical practice.
  • Working knowledge of  Communicare software package, will be an advantage,
  • Good time management skills with the ability to effectively plan, organise and coordinate own workload
  • Willingness to incorporate Aboriginal values into clinical practice.

WHAT TO EXPECT:

  • Employment Type: Full-tIme
  • Employment Classification: Permanent
  • Award: Medical Practitioners Award 2010 (Cth)
  • Working Hours: 8:30am – 4:30pm, Monday – Friday – no on-call
  • Remuneration:  $290,000 – $300,000 pa + superannuation + salary sacrifice benefits
  • Additional Benefits: House + Utilities + Vehicle
  • Leave Provisions: 6 weeks annual leave
  • Supportive GPs, Nursing, AHPs, AHWs, allied health and admin support

For further information or if you would like to become a part of CMSAC team and work towards improving the health of Aboriginal people please contact either

Suzanne Kent or Davies Chibale

E-mail: suzanne.kent@cmsac.com.au  / davies.chibale@cmsac.com.au

Telephone (08) 9947 2231 or 0438 739 849

To apply:

  1. Include Cover letter; addressing the selection Criteria
  2. Attach copy of your latest CV/Resume; relevant certificates, registration and documentation that supports your claim for the position.
  3. Complete and submit your application to Suzanne or Davies  by 5pm Monday 8th April 2019 (Closing date).

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CATSINaM Nursing and Midwife jobs in all States and Territories

The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) is the sole representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives in Australia.

CATSINaM’s primary function is to implement strategies to increase the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into nursing and midwifery professions.

Search Here by State and Territory 

Menzies : Research Program Manager

$117,691 – $136,988 pro-rata salary package (comprising gross salary $93,073 – $109,095 pro-rata, superannuation & salary packaging benefits)

Part time (0.6 FTE) contract until 30 November 2019 based in Darwin

Menzies NHMRC-funded Centre of Research Excellence in Ear and Hearing Health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children (CRE_ICHEAR) is dedicated to reducing educational and social disadvantage associated with ear disease and hearing loss, particularly in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

The Research Program Manager will:

  • Provide secretariat support to the CRE_ICHEAR Leadership Group.
  • Administer research grants and student scholarships.
  • Monitor and contribute to progress against CRE_ICHEAR objectives which include Indigenous capacity building, research outputs, research translation, stakeholder engagement and collaboration.
  • Participate in research activities such as electronic surveys, systematic reviews, evidence summaries and grant applications.
  • Review and monitor CRE_ICHEAR budgets and monitor financial status in conjunction with the Child Health Division’s Business Manager.
  • Liaise with various Corporate Services units within Menzies to meet obligations and mitigate risks.
  • Maintain the CRE_ICHEAR website, Facebook page and Twitter accounts and work with the Menzies Communications team to promote CRE activities.

The successful applicant will have:

  • Tertiary qualifications in a health or related field, along with relevant work experience.
  • High level oral and written communication skills in preparing and publishing high quality reports, reviews and grant applications.
  • Ability to identify, build and maintain networks and relationships.
  • Demonstrated qualities in integrity, ability to work cross-culturally, resourcefulness, initiative in the delivery of service to stakeholders and a positive attitude.
  • Experience with computer software applications, in particular Microsoft Excel, Word, Power Point, Outlook and Endnote or the ability to adapt new technologies.
  • Willingness and ability to travel interstate for face to face meetings, likely one week 6-monthly.
  • Driver’s license and working with children clearance.

Contact: Prof Amanda Leach on 08 8946 8560 oramanda.leach@menzies.edu.au

Closing date:  14 April 2019

Applications should be emailed tohumanresources@menzies.edu.au and should include the following information:

  • A brief covering letter identifying the position being applied for.
  • A statement addressing the selection criteria in the position description.
  • A curriculum vitae (resume).
  • Names and contact details of three referees.

 Menzies : Research Nurse or Midwife (2 positions available)

$107,399 – $115,578 pro-rata salary package (comprising gross salary $84,184 – $91,359 pro-rata, superannuation & salary packaging benefits)

2 year part time (0.6 FTE) contract based in Darwin

The D-Kids trial was awarded funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council to determine whether daily vitamin D supplementation compared to placebo given to Indigenous Australian mothers reduces the incidence of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in the infants’ first twelve months of life.

The Research Nurse will:

  • Ensure the trial meets standards of Good Clinical Practice, including informed consent, participant eligibility assessments and adverse event monitoring.
  • Be responsible for participant recruitment, clinical data and specimen collection and follow-up visits according to the study protocol and standard operating procedures.
  • Conduct visits to participating communities in urban and remote areas via either air or road (manual 4WD) under limited supervision.

The successful applicant will have:

  • Tertiary nursing or midwifery qualification and registration with the relevant Profession Health Board Licensing Authority.
  • Understanding and knowledge of health issues affecting the wellbeing of Indigenous children in contemporary Australian society.
  • Highly developed ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing to a range of audiences.
  • Strong record keeping skills, attention to detail, problem-solving skills, resourcefulness, punctuality and a positive attitude.
  • Experience with computer software applications, in particular Microsoft Excel.
  • Willingness and ability to travel on light aircraft or 4WD to remote communities as part of a team, for up to a week at a time, twice a month.
  • The ability to maintain a current Australian driver’s license and Working with Children Clearance.

Contact: Verity Powell on 08 8946 8603 orverity.powell@menzies.edu.au

Closing date:  14 April 2019

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

Applications should be emailed tohumanresources@menzies.edu.au and should include the following information:

  • A brief covering letter identifying the position being applied for.
  • A statement addressing the selection criteria in the position description (maximum one page)
  • A curriculum vitae (resume).
  • Names and contact details of three referees.

For information on how to apply for these positions and to obtain the Position Description and Selection Criteria please visitwww.menzies.edu.au/careers or phone 08 8946 8624. 

2.1 JOBS AT Apunipima ACCHO Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited has been providing primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for over 35 years. Our workforce has a range of professional, clinical, allied health, social emotional wellbeing and administration positions.

  • We have two sites in Cairns and a growing number of supplementary services and partnerships.
  • We have a diverse workforce of over 200 employees
  • 70 percent of our team identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people

Our team is dedicated to the Wuchopperen vision: Improving the Quality of Life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. If you would like to make a difference, and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, please apply today.

Expressions of Interest

We invite Expressions of Interest from:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Clinical Psychologists
  • Dietitians
  • Diabetes Educators
  • Exercise Physiologists
  • Medical Officers (FAACGP / FACCRM)
  • Registered Nurses
  • Midwives
  • Optometrists
  • Podiatrists
  • Speech Pathologists

In accordance with Wuchopperen’s privacy processes, we will keep your EOI on file for three months.

 Current Vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 30 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3  JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

 

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

 

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 2 POSITIONS VACANT

.

http://www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies

 

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

Check website for current Opportunities

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service (GWAHS) is an entity of Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service. GWAHS provides a culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care service for the local Aboriginal communities of western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains. GWAHS provides multidisciplinary services from sites located in Mt Druitt and Penrith.

The clinical service model includes general practitioners (GPs), Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, nursing staff, reception and transport staff. The service also offers a number of wraparound services and programs focused on child and maternal health, social and emotional wellbeing, Drug and Alcohol Support, chronic disease, as well as population health activities.

GWAHS is committed to ensuring that patients have access to and receive high quality, culturally appropriate care and services that meet the needs of local Aboriginal communities.

WEBSITE

7.3 Katungul ACCHO

Download position descriptions HERE 

8. Tasmania

 

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

University of Newcastle : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Care Services Research Assistant and Aboriginal Cultural Liaison

Newcastle, Maitland & Hunter, NSW

$67,185 to $77,936 pa (pro-rated for p/t) + super Healthcare & Medical Clinical/Medical Research

  • Travelling interstate will be required as part of this role
  • The role is based at the Hunter Medical Research Institute
  • Initially part time (0.6 FTE) for 6 months then may be renewed for full time

Work in the SISTAQUIT program contributing to trial implementation in the

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Care Services Research Assistant and Aboriginal Cultural Liaison

Faculty of Health and Medicine

School of Medicine and Public Health

Research Assistant and Aboriginal Cultural Liaison

Job Ref# 3925

About Us

At the University of Newcastle, our staff are curious. We think big, see opportunity and are open to ideas and ask why.  We share wisdom and partner with colleagues in Australia and around the globe to create an enduring impact. And we’re courageous – bold thinkers who have the confidence to take risks and to inspire change.  We attract, foster and retain remarkable professional staff who actively contribute to our reputation.  The University has an international reputation for research excellence and we continue to build on our research strengths, engagement with industry and partnering with outstanding international universities.

The Centre for Cancer Research, Innovation and Translation is a Priority Research Centre within the School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine at University of Newcastle.

Associate Professor Gillian Gould has a team that is developing interventions for Aboriginal smokers.

SISTAQUIT is a study of national importance to train health providers to deliver evidence-based care to pregnant Aboriginal women who smoke.

Is NEW for you?

This role will contribute to the cultural liaison for the cluster RCT in approximately 30 services in NSW and 4-5 other states, help set up the trial at the sites and support data collection and the on-site research facilitators.

Research activities include; Aboriginal Community consultations with ACCHS and their community members and relevant boards, site visits to ACCHS, engagement and training of Research Facilitators at ACCHS sites, site support, conducting interviews and surveys, data analysis, and the development of resources to support implementation.

What will you do?

This role will involve assistance with the cluster randomised controlled trial of the SISTAQUIT intervention in NSW and other states. The role will involve contributing to the management and trial implementation in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Care Services (ACCHS) and medical services nationally.

This role will involve travelling to sites to conduct on-site training, which includes; WA, SA, NT, QLD, VIC and NSW.  When not travelling the role is based at Hunter Medical Research Institute in Newcastle.

About you

  • Under section 31 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) female gender is a genuine occupation qualification of this role, as the position concerns predominantly sensitive Indigenous ‘women’s business’.
  • A degree in Psychology or Health with subsequent relevant experience; an equivalent combination of relevant experience and/or education/training.
  • Demonstrate success in the delivery of strengths-based initiatives and programs that are founded on positive connections, values and perspectives in the Indigenous community.

For a full job description visit https://www.newcastle.edu.au/aboutuon/jobsatuon/jobvacancies

Applications for this position will only be accepted from those with Australian residency or a valid work permit.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants are encouraged to apply.

As part of the University’s commitment to increasing Indigenous employment within its workforce, this role is a targeted Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander position. The University holds an exemption under Section 126 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) in relation to its targeted recruiting programs. Please note that both Indigenous and non-Indigenous candidates can apply, however priority will be given to Indigenous candidates who can demonstrate their Indigenous heritage by way of providing their Confirmation of Aboriginality with the completed application and successfully meet the selection criteria.

What NEW can offer?

From a flexible working environment to discounts in private health insurance and gym memberships, we offer access to a wide range of employee benefits including salary packaging. You can learn more about these at  https://www.newcastle.edu.au/aboutuon/jobsatuon/benefitsataglance

We provide opportunities for all people regardless of their background and experience, and this philosophy is reflected across all that we do.

The remuneration is from $67,185- $77,936 pa (pro-rated for part time) + 9.5% super and is commensurate with experience.

Your next steps

Click on ‘Apply for this job’. Your application will be assessed on selection criteria. Read all information about the role so you understand what is required. In addition:

  • Follow all directions and complete all necessary fields of the application; and
  • In your selection criteria demonstrate clearly how your skills and experience meet each point and should be a maximum of four pages.

Closing Date: 3 weeks

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Housing #SocialDeterminants @2019wihc News : @AIHW report Our #housing situation of #IndigenousAustralians has improved – with rises in #homeownership and housing provided through the private rental market, and falling levels of #homelessness.

 ” Stable and secure housing is fundamentally important to health and well-being.

Historically, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have experienced much higher rates of homelessness and have been overrepresented among clients seeking homelessness and social housing services than non-Indigenous Australians.

These higher rates of unstable housing relate to complex and interrelated factors including the lasting impacts of colonisation on Indigenous Australians, exposure to family violence, substance disorders, unemployment, low education levels and poor health—which are both contributors to, and outcomes of, insecure housing circumstances (Flatau et al. 2005; Keys Young 1998; Silburn et al. 2018).

Even though there is still much progress to be made, the findings in this report covering the last 15 years demonstrate the housing situation of Indigenous Australians has improved—with rises in home ownership and housing provided through the private rental market, and falling levels of homelessness. “

From AIHW Report March 2019 see Part 1 Below and Download the Report

aihw-housing Report

“The Territory Labor Government has fought long and hard for the housing funding that was promised to us 9 months ago. We’ve now won that fight.

“When you invest in housing and address indigenous disadvantage, you are investing in generational change – and saving money in the long term.

“Since coming to Government the Territory Labor Government has built and upgraded more than 1350 homes. The Federal Government’s contribution to our Government’s trail-blazing remote housing program will allow us to continue to make tangible and sustainable differences to the lives of Territorians.

Local Decision Making is at the core of our work in remote communities where we are building new homes, improving living conditions and creating jobs and generational change.

“People from the bush have told us that having jobs and better homes gives them a sense of pride and dignity. We know our remote housing program is working. It is changing the housing landscape and improving social outcomes in communities across the Territory.”

The Territory Labor Government has secured a $550 million investment from the Federal Government to continue to deliver remote housing in the NT. The deal comes nine months after the funding was first committed by the Commonwealth. 

The NT Government will work with the Federal Government and Land Councils to continue the delivery of remote housing.

The deal will see the Federal Government add $550 million to the NT Government’s investment of $1.1 billion for remote housing. In return, the NT Government will accept responsibility for remote housing leases until 2023

NT Chief Minister Michael Gunner

Download Full Press Release 

Territory Govt Housing Win

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

Thank you for your interest in the 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference will bring together Indigenous leaders, government, industry and academia representing Housing, health, and education from around the world including:

  • National and International Indigenous Organisation leadership
  • Senior housing, health, and education government officials Industry CEOs, executives and senior managers from public and private sectors
  • Housing, Healthcare, and Education professionals and regulators
  • Consumer associations
  • Academics in Housing, Healthcare, and Education.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference #2019WIHC is the principal conference to provide a platform for leaders in housing, health, education and related services from around the world to come together. Up to 2000 delegates will share experiences, explore opportunities and innovative solutions, work to improve access to adequate housing and related services for the world’s Indigenous people.

Key event details as follows:
Venue: Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre
Address: 2684-2690 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD 4218
Dates: Monday 20th – Thursday 23rd May, 2019 (24th May)

PLEASE NOTE: The Trade Exhibition is open Tuesday 21st May – Thursday 23rd May 2019

Please visit www.2019wihc.com for further information on transport and accommodation options, conference, exhibition and speaker updates.

Part 1

Read full AIHW Report Online HERE

More Indigenous households own their home or rent privately

Across the 4 most recent Censuses, there has been a steady rise in Indigenous home ownership, with 38% of Indigenous households (or around 100,000) owning a home (with or without a mortgage) in 2016, compared with 32% in 2001. The opposite trend was observed for other Australian households (69% home ownership in 2001, 66% in 2016).

For both Indigenous and other Australians, there was a steady fall in the proportion of households in social housing between 2001 and 2016, offset by a rise in the proportion of private renters. Indigenous households were consistently more likely than other households to be renting in private housing (32% compared with 25% in 2016) over the period. The largest difference between Indigenous and other households remains the proportion of households renting in social housing (21% compared with 4% in 2016), however, this gap has been narrowing over time.

Fewer households in mortgage stress, more in rental stress

Increasing home ownership levels are a positive sign, particularly when considered in combination with data about households in mortgage stress. The proportion of Indigenous households with a mortgage considered to be in mortgage stress has dropped from a peak of 30% in 2011 to 21% in 2016. In 2016, 68,000 Indigenous home owners had a mortgage (26% of Indigenous households).

In contrast, of those Indigenous households renting, the proportion considered to be in rental stress increased from 22% in 2001 to 39% in 2016. In private rental housing, rental stress for Indigenous households increased similarly in both urban and rural areas over this period (from 34% to 43% in urban areas and 29% to 38% in rural areas in 2016).

Indigenous households in public housing

While the proportion of the Indigenous household population living in social housing has decreased, the number of households has increased. There are three main types of social housing available to eligible Australians. In 2016–17, of the 66,700 Indigenous households in social housing:

  1. Half (50%, or 33,300) were in public housing, with this number rising by one-third (8,200 households) since 2008–09.
  2. The number of Indigenous households in community housing more than doubled from 2,700 households in 2008–09 to 5,800 in 2016–17.
  3. In contrast, the numbers of households in Indigenous-specific housing programs remained relatively stable over the period (around 10,000 for state owned and managed housing (SOMIH) and 18,000 for Indigenous community housing).

Fall in wait times for social housing

Waiting times for Indigenous Australians are generally shorter compared with other applicants. For both public housing and SOMIH housing programs there were improvements from 2013–14 to 2016–17. A larger proportion of clients waited less than 3 months (35% in 2013–14 and 42% in 2016–17 for public housing and 38% and 48% for SOMIH), and a smaller proportion waited more than 2 years to be housed. However, up to 1 in 6 (17%) Indigenous households waited more than 2 years for public housing.

Conditions in social housing have also improved over the 6 years to 2018. Data show a fall in overcrowding among Indigenous households, and a rise in the proportion of Indigenous tenants who rated their dwellings at an ‘acceptable’ standard.

1 in 28 Indigenous people are homeless

One in 28 Indigenous people (23,000) were homeless on Census night in 2016—representing more than 1 in 5 (22%) homeless Australians. More than half of Indigenous people experiencing homelessness lived in Very remote areas.

The rate of Indigenous homelessness decreased from 571 per 10,000 population in 2006 to 361 in 2016. The decline in Indigenous homelessness since 2006 is due predominantly to the decrease in Indigenous people living in ‘severely’ crowded dwellings (75% in 2006 to 70% in 2016). However, the 2016 Indigenous homelessness rate is 10 times that of non-Indigenous Australians. The differences in the rates of homelessness for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians were higher in Remote and Very remote areas than in Major cities.

The main type of homelessness experienced by Indigenous Australians was living in ‘severely crowded’ dwellings; that is, dwellings that need 4 or more extra bedrooms. Of those homeless on Census night 2016, Indigenous Australians (70%) were much more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (42%) to be living in severely crowded dwellings, yet the gap has narrowed over the past decade. Indigenous Australians were 68 times more likely to live in severely crowded dwellings in 2006; decreasing to 16 times more likely in 2016.

1 in 4 specialist homelessness services clients are Indigenous

Indigenous clients made up a quarter (25%) of all clients assisted by specialist homelessness services (SHS) in 2017–18; a rate 9 times that of non-Indigenous clients (803 per 10,000 population compared with 86). Most Indigenous people using these services were at risk of homelessness (53%), with the remainder homeless (47%), when they sought assistance.

Since 2011–12, SHS have assisted more Indigenous clients (43,600 in 2011–12; 65,200 in 2017–18). Of the Indigenous SHS clients in 2017–18:

  • 1 in 8 (13% or 8,500) were aged under 5, reflecting that families often seek assistance
  • 4 in 10 had experienced domestic and family violence (domestic and family violence was a reason they sought help and/or they required domestic or family violence assistance).

Homelessness services help clients keep tenancies and find homes

In 2017–18, more than half of Indigenous SHS clients (53% or 32,400 people) sought help when they were in unstable housing situations (at risk of homelessness)—more than 1 in 2 (16,400 clients) were living in social housing (either renting or rent free) when they sought assistance, while another third (12,100 clients) were in private or other housing (renting, rent free or owning). Most clients at risk of homelessness (89%) maintained their tenancies with SHS support.

Of the 20,700 Indigenous clients who were homeless when they sought help from SHS and had ended support in 2017–18, 38% (or 7,200 clients) were assisted into stable housing; an increase from 29% in 2012–13. In 2017–18 most Indigenous homeless clients who were assisted into housing ended support in social housing (around 3,800) with a further 3,100 clients in private rentals.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts to #CloseTheGap : #OurHealthOurChoiceOurVoice This week features # Bega ACCHO #FNQLD Mamu ACCHO CEO #NSW @ahmrc ACCHO CEO #Katungul ACCHO #WA @TheAHCWA #NT #Anyinginyi #Sunrise ACCHO @DanilaDilba @CAACongress @MiwatjHealth

Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1. ACCHO Employment NEWS

Scholarship program triples completion rates for Aboriginal TAFE students :Teaching model yields 96 percent completion rate

1.1 Job/s of the week 

2.Queensland

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

7.3 Katungul ACCHO 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Health roles at Children Ground Alice Springs:

  1. Social and Emotional Well-being Counsellor role
  2. Head of Health and Health Promotion role
  3. First Nations Health Promotion roles

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1. NACCHO Employment News : 

Scholarship program triples completion rates for Aboriginal TAFE students :Teaching model yields 96 percent completion rate
A unique teaching approach has more than tripled Aboriginal students’ completion rates at TAFE, new research from the University of Sydney has found.
Photo Above :Rachel Williams is a clinician at the Armajun Aboriginal Medical Service in Inverell.

The research, published in the Australian Health Review, analysed a customised model of learning support developed by the University’s Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

Under the model, 380 qualifications have been awarded to Aboriginal students in oral health, allied health, counselling and heath assistance through TAFE. The training model has yielded a 96 per cent completion rate, the paper’s lead researcher and Poche Centre research director Dr Kylie Gwynne found.

Dr Gwynne’s paper scrutinised the first cohort of students who enrolled under the Poche Centre’s training model. Her analysis proves the effectiveness of seven key factors which improve outcomes for Aboriginal students.

The enabling factors discussed in Dr Gwynne’s paper were varied and include:

  • Ensuring enrolling students were motivated and had strong community support
  • Ensuring Aboriginal support staff were involved in all aspects of the program
  • Ensuring training took into account students’ financial needs, academic requirements and family commitments
  • Fostering connections and relationships between students

“Vocational training is an important pathway into the health professions for Aboriginal people but completion rates for Aboriginal students are typically poor,” said Dr Gwynne.

“It is possible to improve completion rates if vocational training is designed to meet the cultural and familial needs of Aboriginal students.

“We’ve called this initiative Project5000, as we ultimately want 5000 Aboriginal people to be qualified and in local secure jobs. We are eager to offer the program to more communities and more scholars.

“Preliminary economic analysis undertaken by the Australian Social Investment Trust estimates a cost-benefit of more than $27,000 for every job secured. This is largely attributed to a decrease in welfare and increase in tax, ” she concluded.

About Project5000

  • Project5000 expands on the Poche Centre’s current program found to have delivered oral health care to Aboriginal communities in NSW at half the cost and twice the effectiveness of the NSW government’s model at the same time.
  • The model uses a localised approach, delivering services almost entirely in local communities with local community partnerships and accountability, employing both dentist and oral health therapists with new graduate clinicians.
  • It involves training and qualifying local Aboriginal people to enable them to deliver services to their own communities.
  • Project5000 is expected to include industries such as aged care, disability services, community health and hospitality – and could extend to construction and other industries depending on where local skills shortages are identified with local communities.
  • Over four years the project intends to work with 20 communities, over 1,300 participants, working in 1,000 jobs at a cost of $2.5m per year.
  • The Poche Centre will work with local industries to identify skills gaps, negotiate qualification type and level and agree paid work experience arrangements that are directly linked to the qualification being undertaken.

1.1 Jobs of the week 

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council : Health Policy Manager

An exciting opportunity for a high calibre professional, to provide high quality policy advice in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Salary: $102,000 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* South Brisbane Location

* This is an Indigenous – identified position. Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ATSICCHOs) across Queensland.

Role Overview

The Manager, Health Policy, will provide leadership to a small team responsible for providing high quality policy advice on complex and high-profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland. You will lead a team that advocates for QAIHC Members, supporting their needs and interests.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Experience managing small teams;

* Understanding of public policy development including Government budgetary cycles and decision-making processes;

* Experience in advocating for change in a public policy environment (health policy advocacy is highly desirable);

* Exceptional relationship skills and an ability to engage with a broad range of stakeholders;

* Advanced communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills;

* Highly developed influential writing skills;

* Understanding of the ATSICCHS and the issues facing them;

* Demonstrated experience of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business;

* Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role;

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 31st March 2019

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) Manager Primary Health.

Bega is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation based in Kalgoorlie. We are committed to providing culturally appropriate and sustainable holistic health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the Goldfields region. Bega is renowned as an employer of choice due to our positive work environment and very attractive terms and conditions. These include a 35-hour week, salary sacrifice options and ongoing professional development opportunities.

The Manager Primary Health is a key leadership role reporting to the Chief Operations Officer (COO) and is supported by the Assistant Manager Primary Health. The core function is to provide clinical governance oversight and expertise to ensure clinical services are conducted in accordance with best practice, including all relevant clinical and regulatory legislations. An integral component of this function is to ensure contractual reporting obligations of funding bodies are met in a timely manner while ensuring staff compliance with organisational and operational Policies across all levels of clinical programs. It is expected that you will be an exemplary leader who provides guidance, mentoring and coaching to all clinical staff in the pursuit of maintaining a workplace cultural that is free from unhealthy behaviours.

To be considered for this role, you will hold tertiary qualifications in health care and business management with at least five (5) years senior management experience in an Aboriginal Primary Health or similar setting. Your experience will also include development, implementation, change management and evaluation of complex service delivery systems or an equivalent combination of education, training and experience to fulfil this requirement. A deep and empathetic understanding of issues affecting Aboriginal people and a genuine passion for Aboriginal health is vital to your success in this role.

A highly attractive remuneration package, commensurate with experience and seniority of the role, will be offered to the successful candidate.

If you believe you are up for the challenge and possess the appropriate skill set, please submit a covering letter addressing the essential selection criteria and tell us why you are the best candidate for this exciting position.

A detailed position description is available on our website www.bega.org.au or can be requested via email recruitment@bega.org.au or by calling the Human Resource Officer on 08 9022 5500.

AHMRC Business Development Manager (Registered Training Organisation)

About the Organisation

The Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC) is the peak body for Aboriginal health in NSW and is comprised of 46 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations throughout the state.

The AH&MRC provides vital health and health related services in association with its member organisations and these combined services include:

  • Health service delivery
  • Supporting Aboriginal community health initiatives
  • Development and delivery of Aboriginal Health education
  • Research in Aboriginal Health
  • Collecting, evaluating and disseminating Aboriginal health data
  • Policy development and evaluation
  • Project and program planning, implementation and evaluation
  • Ethical evaluation of Aboriginal Health research and data
  • Advocacy and networking

The AH&MRC’s vision is that Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) are sustainable and are driving holistic and culturally strong approaches to redressing health inequities for Aboriginal peoples in NSW.

About the Opportunity

AH&MRC now has an exciting opportunity for a Business Development Manager to join their team, working to develop business opportunities within the Education and Training Unit (RTO) of AHMRC . This is a full-time role based in Little Bay, in Sydney’s inner suburbs.

Reporting to the Deputy Chief Executive, this role will see you primarily responsible for identifying and developing strategic business opportunities and maintaining relationships that will grow AH&MRC’s footprint and generate revenue.

What does this look like day-to-day?:

  • Seeking new business opportunities and partnerships through various channels;
  • Collaborating with internal project teams and external stakeholders to drive sales;
  • Providing excellent customer service to new and existing customer to maintain growth; and
  • Actively managing relationships through regular client visits, consultation and communication.

To be considered for this position you will have demonstrated business development experience within the NFP, primary health or ACCHO sectors. Any experience working within an RTO or in a training function will be highly regarded.

For more information regarding our ideal candidate, please click ‘apply now’.

About the Benefits

AH&MRC is offering the successful candidate an attractive remuneration package circa $85,000-$95,000 plus super, negotiable with skills and experience as well as inclusion in a performance-based incentive structure.

As a community health organisation, AH&MRC can also offer you $16,000 of your income salary packaged per annum. This figure is FBT exempt and no tax is payable on this amount, considerably increasing your take-home pay.

You will enjoy working within a friendly and collaborative team environment in a vibrant and central part of Sydney, with easy access to public transport, cafes, shops and a great selection of on-street parking.

This is a rare chance to join and help shape the services of a growing and innovative organisation committed to driving positive change. Don’t miss out- APPLY NOW!

Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Mamu ACCHO FNQ

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation with clinics in Innisfail, Tully, Babinda, and Ravenshoe.

We are currently recruiting for the position of Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to drive our organisation to achieve this vision through our strategic directives.

The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) will be accountable to the Mamu Health Service Limited Board of Directors for the leadership, efficient and effective management of the organisation according to strategic directives. The CEO will also be responsible for ensuring the legislative and funding requirements are met including appropriate financial, human resources, infrastructure, continuous quality and service delivery programs are in place to deliver high quality Comprehensive Primary Health Care.

This is a full time position located in the town of Innisfail. The successful applicant will be required to live within the Innisfail community in order to work and collaborate with the Board of Directors, as well as develop a strong network of relationships throughout the health industry and communities.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check, and must hold a current Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian.

To apply for this vacancy, a full application package can be obtained from our website on http://www.mamuhsl.org.au

Please submit your resume and written responses addressing the selection criteria to:

The Chairperson at ceorecruitment@mamuhsl.org.au

Applications close 5.00pm Monday 25th March 2019

Under section 25 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1991, there is a genuine occupational requirement for the incumbent to be of Ab

Chief Executive Officer : Bourke Aboriginal Health Service

About the business

The Bourke Aboriginal Community Health Service is an Aboriginal Community Controlled organisation established in November 1986 and incorporated on 19th day of October 1987 as a public company limited by guarantee.

The service is Aboriginal community controlled overseen by a body of Nine Directors who meet on a monthly basis.

Bourke Aboriginal Health Service has been in operation since 1986 delivering a highly professional Health Service to the Aboriginal community of Bourke and district, with a focus on Primary Health Care, Chronic Disease and specialist services.

About the role

This role will be responsible and accountable to the Bourke Aboriginal Health Service (BAHS) Board for the leadership, and efficient and effective management of the organisation in accordance with strategic directives, policies and procedures, as well as legislative and funding requirements.

Skills and experience

  • Pursuant to Section 14 of the Anti Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) the person must be of Aboriginal descent. Confirmation of Aboriginality from a recognised organisation must be provided in the application
  • Relevant tertiary qualifications in management, health management, business or similar discipline with a minimum of five years senior management experience
  • Proven ability to provide advice, making sound recommendations and implementing Board directions on complex issues, developing and implementing strategic, project and business plans
  • Proven high level of experience in a senior management role demonstrating excellent strategic thinking, planning and decision making skills
  • High level experience in managing the financial affairs of an organisation, including budgeting, financial management and reporting, and ensuring compliance with legal and funding obligations
  • Proven ability to take a lead role in communicating in high level meetings, committees and forums within Aboriginal communities, government departments and other agencies
  • Exemplary personal and professional ethics and conduct
  • Ability to promote a work environment that empowers, motivates and develops the diverse talents of all employees as well as implementing strategies that maximize staff performance
  • Current Class C Drivers Licence

How to apply

Applications must be received by BAHS by the closing of business 05 April 2019. Late applications will not be considered.

Contact person for enquiries re the position: Robert Knight, Chair Person (Board)

Applications to be sent to:

Post to (mark envelope Private and Confidential):-

Mr. Robert Knight Chair Person Bourke Aboriginal Health Service

P O Box 362

BOURKE NSW 2840

Personal Delivery (mark envelope Private and Confidential):-

Ms. Melanie Driscoll Human Resource Officer Bourke Aboriginal Health Service

61 Oxley Street

BOURKE NSW 2840

Email:

Application for position: melanied@bahs.com.au – Human Resource Officer

Enquiries re position: Zacmo@bahs.com.au – Corporate Services Manager

Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Regional Health and Community Services
Providing culturally appropriate health care to Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander communities on the Far South Coast of NSW.
We believe that our community deserve medical, dental and other health services that are culturally appropriate.
Interested in working for Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Regional Health and Community Services?
Social and Emotional Wellbeing Mentor, Batemans Bay

Social and Community Services Worker, Bega

Aboriginal Health Worker Clinical, Bega

Registered Nurse, Bega

Speech Pathologist – Part Time, Bega

Download position descriptions HERE 

Health Services Section Manager  : Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation (AHAC)

Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation (AHAC) is a multi-disciplinary organisation which provides primary health care services to the Aboriginal people of Tennant Creek and the surrounding Barkly region.

Anyinginyi consists of five different sections (Health Centre, Corporate Services, Public Health Unit, Sports and Recreation, and Piliyintinji-Ki Stronger Families) which allows them to have an holistic approach to health ensuring that clients’ physical and emotional health and wellbeing is given the utmost priority.

About the Opportunity

Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation has an exciting opportunity for a full time Health Services Section Manager to join their team based in Tennant Creek, on a 2 year contract basis.

As a member of the Anyinginyi Executive Leadership Team and reporting to the General Manager, this position will see you managing the staff and resources of the Anyinginyi Health Services (Health Centre, RRHS and allied health), to ensure a high standard of care is provided in a culturally responsive manner. You will work closely with fellow Section Managers in multi-servicing needs for Anyinginyi clients.

More specifically, some of your duties will include but not be limited to:

  • Ensuring strategic links are established and maintained with funding bodies and other service providers working in the areas associated with Primary Health Care, especially the internal liaison and service coordination between Anyinginyi Sections;
  • Preparing and managing budgets and monitoring Funding Agreement compliance, including reporting requirements;
  • Communicating Board and senior management decisions to staff and provide Board and senior management with regular status reports on the program, as directed by the General Manager;
  • Effectively manage the staff and resources of Health Services Section including attraction and retention of employees.

To be considered for this position, you will have considerable, Executive-Level experience delivering primary health care services, within the not-for-profit sector and/or within Aboriginal community-controlled organisations.

To view the full position description, please click ‘apply now’.

About the Benefits

This is a highly varied and interesting role where you will truly make a difference in the lives of Aboriginal people and experience real job satisfaction every day – don’t miss out!

In return for your hard work and dedication, you will be rewarded with attractive remuneration circa $129,684-$145,827 + super, negotiable with skills and experience. In addition, you will have access to a range of great benefits including:

  • Salary packaging up to $15,899.94;
  • Subsidised furnished accommodation is available for candidates coming from outside of the Barkly region;
  • 6 weeks annual leave giving you plenty of time to explore the beautiful Barkly region;
  • Vehicle provided for full work and private use (up to 2500km per year);
  • One paid ADO monthly;
  • Free general medical;
  • Free general dentistry (excluding laboratory work);
  • Free gym membership; and
  • Free personal medical prescriptions (conditions apply).

You will be joining a friendly and professional team, where you will also receive personal and professional development opportunities.

This opportunity won’t last long – if you think you have what it takes – apply now!

Please note: When responding to the application questions, please refer to the selection criteria on page 2 of the attached position description.

APPLY HERE and MORE INFO

AHCWA Western Australia

If you are passionate about improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Western Australia then the below opportunities may interest you.

VIEW all opportunities HERE 

CATSINaM Nursing and Midwife jobs in all States and Territories

The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) is the sole representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives in Australia.

CATSINaM’s primary function is to implement strategies to increase the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into nursing and midwifery professions.

Search Here by State and Territory 

Sunrise ACCHO Katherine : Intensive Family Support Service Manager

Job No: 108693 – https://applynow.net.au/jobs/108693

Applications close : Check with ACCHO

Location: Katherine

* Leadership opportunity for a Social Worker or Psychologist – join this established Community Controlled Health Organisation!

* Truly rewarding position focusing on community development & empowerment!

* Highly attractive base salary circa $102,921 – $115,267 + super, salary sacrificing options, generous leave & more!

About the Organisation

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is a Community Controlled Health Organisation.

The Sunrise approach involves community people taking part in controlling their own health. Everything from financial management and governance, staff selection and service delivery priorities are directed by the organisation’s Aboriginal Board and Community Health Committees.

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation works in partnership with Northern Territory PHN (NT PHN), who provide support services to health professionals and organisation across the Northern Territory. NT PHN offers support and assistance to eligible nurses and allied health professionals who are relocating to the NT for the purposes of employment.

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation has a rewarding opportunity for an Intensive Family Support Service Manager to join their dedicated team. This position is based in Katherine, however a large amount of time will be spent within the Ngukurr community, where accommodation will be provided for any overnight stays.

The primary purpose of this role is to provide Intensive Family Support Service (IFSS) assessment service interventions and counselling-related services. This includes home-based and community-based intensive services targeted to reduce child neglect, with a focus on improving parental skills and how to provide better care for children.

You will step into this position with the aim to build on and improve the existing program, rather than creating a new program from scratch. Your ultimate goal will be to develop key strategies in order to evolve the program to a point where the delivery of the service provision is transferred wholly to a local and sustainable community level service delivery model.

Some of your key responsibilities will include (but will not be limited to):

* Managing the IFSS Program including budgets, reporting and data analysis;

* Accepting referrals and undertaking assessments, developing plans and delivering services/activities for clients who have been referred to the program;

* Ensuring effective health promotion delivery and improved program outcomes;

* Providing advice to support, manage, direct and up-skill IFSS staff;

* Liaising regularly with senior elders for strategic or program issues; and

* Acting as an effective conduit between the Federal Department of Social Services (DSS), NT DCF, the Primary Health Care Manager, the Ngukurr Community and its service provider agencies. To view a full position description, please go to https://applynow.net.au/jobs/108693

About You

To be considered for this role, you must have a background and qualification in Social Work, Mental Health Social Work or Psychology, while a background in Child Protection or working with disadvantaged groups will be highly regarded.

Previous experience working with children and their families is essential, as is experience working within Aboriginal communities.

Sunrise is seeking an individual who can display the initiative, discretion and cultural sensitivity needed to support and drive this important program. You will be comfortable living in a remote environment and working under Aboriginal management and control. The ability to build capacity of both staff and the community will be critical to your success in this role.

In addition, as you’ll be providing in depth support and clinical guidance to your reports in adverse and high pressure situations, strong leadership skills and demonstrated clinical experience at a supervisory level is required.

About the Benefits

This is an incredible opportunity to work closely with, and build the capacity of, a remote Aboriginal community in order to improve their health and wellbeing.

Your dedication will be rewarded with a highly attractive base salary circa $102,921 – $115,267 (based on skills and experience) plus super.

You will also have access to a wide range of benefits including:

* 6 weeks leave per year;

* Up to 10 days study leave;

* Access to company vehicle for work-related travel;

* Laptop and Phone;

* Accommodation for any overnight stays while working in the communities;

* Salary packaging options up to $15,899 per year.

Working at Sunrise Health Service and living in the Katherine region has lifestyle benefits that are unique to the Northern Territory. With the Katherine Gorge on your doorstep and an incredible outdoor lifestyle on offer, combined with some of the best fishing in the world, the Northern Territory is the place to be to make the most of life’s adventures.

Don’t miss out on these unique opportunities in which you can truly make a difference – Apply Now! For more information, and to apply, please go to https://applynow.net.au/jobs/108693

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health : Child and Adolescent Psychologist

 

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services is a community controlled health service providing holistic health care to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the ACT and surrounding areas. The Service manages approximately 30 programs through various funding agreements and employs more than 70 staff offering salary sacrifice pursuant to tax department regulations and organisational policy.

Child and Adolescent Psychologist

The role of the Child and Adolescent Psychologist is to enhance the clinical services offered at Winnunga AHCS through working in collaboration with the multidisciplinary team in the delivery of psychology services to young clients and their families. This includes work on an individual basis to provide high level clinical consultations and therapeutic support to children, adolescents and their families to address mental health and wellbeing needs.

We are seeking an experienced Child and Adolescent Psychologist to work within our Clinical and Social Health Teams. The successful applicant will have registration as a psychologist with AHPRA, eligible for a Medicare provider number have sound clinical assessment and treatment skills and competency in evidence-based psychological treatments. Experience in trauma informed practice and experience working with and understanding and commitment to the philosophy and practice of an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service and the ability to work sensitively and effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Previous experience working in mental health and a demonstrated ability to work in a multidisciplinary team is desirable.

A current driver’s licence is essential.

A copy of the position descriptions and selection criterias may be obtained by calling Roseanne Longford on 02 62846259 or email to Roseanne.Longford@winnunga.org.au Applications should be addressed and mailed to Julie Tongs, CEO, Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service 63 Boolimba Cres Narrabundah ACT 2604 or by email to Roseanne.Longford@winnunga.org.au

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 29th March 2019

WORKING WITH VULNERALBLE PEOPLE CHECK (WWVPC)

All people employed at Winnunga are required to provide their WWVPC registration, or to carry out a WWVPC pursuant to the Working With Vulnerable People (Background Checking) Act 2011 (ACT).

 

2.1 JOBS AT Apunipima ACCHO Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

 

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited has been providing primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for over 35 years. Our workforce has a range of professional, clinical, allied health, social emotional wellbeing and administration positions.

  • We have two sites in Cairns and a growing number of supplementary services and partnerships.
  • We have a diverse workforce of over 200 employees
  • 70 percent of our team identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people

Our team is dedicated to the Wuchopperen vision: Improving the Quality of Life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. If you would like to make a difference, and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, please apply today.

Expressions of Interest

We invite Expressions of Interest from:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Clinical Psychologists
  • Dietitians
  • Diabetes Educators
  • Exercise Physiologists
  • Medical Officers (FAACGP / FACCRM)
  • Registered Nurses
  • Midwives
  • Optometrists
  • Podiatrists
  • Speech Pathologists

In accordance with Wuchopperen’s privacy processes, we will keep your EOI on file for three months.

 Current Vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 30 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3  JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

 

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 2 POSITIONS VACANT

.

http://www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies

 

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

Check website for current Opportunities

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service (GWAHS) is an entity of Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service. GWAHS provides a culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care service for the local Aboriginal communities of western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains. GWAHS provides multidisciplinary services from sites located in Mt Druitt and Penrith.

The clinical service model includes general practitioners (GPs), Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, nursing staff, reception and transport staff. The service also offers a number of wraparound services and programs focused on child and maternal health, social and emotional wellbeing, Drug and Alcohol Support, chronic disease, as well as population health activities.

GWAHS is committed to ensuring that patients have access to and receive high quality, culturally appropriate care and services that meet the needs of local Aboriginal communities.

WEBSITE

7.3 Katungul ACCHO

Download position descriptions HERE 

8. Tasmania

 

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Health roles Children Ground Alice Springs:

  1. Social and Emotional Well-being Counsellor role
  2. Head of Health and Health Promotion role
  3. First Nations Health Promotion roles

See all 3 PDF Downloads Below 

Head of Health/Health Promotion Exciting Opportunity with a Unique Organisation Children’s Ground is working to create a different future for First Nations children, families and communities. We are looking for an inspirational, dynamic and innovative individual to join our team in Central Australia as Head of Health/Health Promotion.

The position will lead a multi-disciplinary team focused on improving the health and wellbeing outcomes for the community. The Health team works with local First Nations people, supporting individuals and families in the development and implementation of health plans. The successful applicant will have significant expertise in health promotion and senior organisational health roles.

Children’s Ground encourages Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants to apply.
You will have the benefit of working within an intergenerational approach that supports and values an Aboriginal world view whereby language and culture is at the forefront of learning.

The salary for this position will be based on qualifications and experience and is expected to be between $88k – $96k (FTE) per annum plus superannuation, annual leave, and the opportunity to salary package up to $15,900 of salary. Six weeks annual leave (4 weeks annual leave with leave loading plus 2 weeks bonus leave over the Christmas period). Relocation assistance may be provided.

To submit your application, please email your CV and a cover letter (no more than 2 pages) addressing the Selection Criteria outlined in the position description to

cgadmin@childrensground.org.au

Please include the title of the role in the subject line of your email.
Applications must

Aboriginal Health Promotion CA PD Jan2019

Head of Health & Health Promotion PD 190312

Social Emotional Wellbeing PD Nov 2018 FINAL

Download the 4 Page PDF Here

dq-website-ad_atsi-health-practitioner_300119

Research Assistant, Injury Team and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program

  • Full time (1.0 FTE), fixed term for 2 years
  • Respected global research organisation
  • Make an impact on global health outcomes

‘The George’ is 600+ people globally focused on improving the health of millions of people. A medical research institute affiliated with leading universities and with projects in approximately 50 countries, we are challenging the status quo in healthcare to find the best ways to prevent and treat chronic disease and injury, and to influence policy and practice worldwide.

This role will provide research assistance to the Injury Division and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program. The role will also be supported by and work with the Research Support and Administration team in collaboration with the Academic Project Operations team who provide overall administrative and research services support.

The Injury Team seeks to identify and test cost-effective programs to reduce the global burden of injury, influence policy and scale up proven programs for sustainable change. Our research cuts across the causes of unintentional injury that contribute most to the global burden – road injury, falls, burns and drowning. Our global research extends from Australia across Asia and Africa, with major collaborations ongoing in India, China, Vietnam and Bangladesh.

Improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is a major priority for the George Institute. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program is a cross cutting program. We work in partnership with Aboriginal communities, research organisations and other key stakeholders in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health to conduct high quality research that delivers meaningful impact. The underlying principles of our program ensure genuine engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities with research broadly spanning across social determinants of health, healthcare delivery and key conditions and injuries. We ensure strong Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership of projects and focus on building the capacity of researchers to enable collaborative approaches to conducting high quality, ethically sound research.

The Role

The Research Assistant will provide research support across the Injury Team and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program. A Research Assistant is required to support the research and communications activities as well as being responsible for the associated general administrative responsibilities. The candidate will have the opportunity for on the job research and administration skills development and there is potential for the right candidate to progress to a Masters or PhD related to this work.

Key responsibilities of the role will include:

  • Assisting with the preparation of presentations, reports, grant applications, ethics applications and publications
  • Maintaining, updating and tracking CVs, publications and other academic contributions on program and portfolio management system and work with external research management systems
  • Liaising with and building effective working relationships with staff and external stakeholders including with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations
  • Contributing to and assisting with communications and translation of research including relevant media, submissions and website management
  • Working closely with other administrators across organisation providing weekly reception relief, as required
  • Assisting with the wider research and administration teamwork across the organisation to ensure smooth and effective workflow processes, task delegation, and ongoing achievement of identified tasks.
  • Preparing, providing support and attending various meetings, as required
  • Undertaking designated administrative duties, including travel arrangements, financial payments, budget monitoring and expense reimbursements
  • Managing incoming enquiries, emails and requests for information and responding when appropriate

Our ideal candidate will possess:

Essential

  • Relevant qualifications and/or experience in a similar business administration and/or research role
  • Strong analytical skills and ability to synthesise complex information
  • Demonstrated understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture
  • Awareness of issues affecting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and ability to work in a culturally safe manner
  • Proficient in the use of the Microsoft Office suite, including Word, Excel, Outlook and SharePoint
  • Demonstrated ability to work with business sensitive information and maintain confidentiality
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively in different interpersonal environments i.e. autonomously, in small teams and with a wide range of varying stakeholders
  • Ability to be flexible and adaptable in the face of changing organisational priorities
  • Ability to evaluate and recommend changes to existing processes and procedures for greater effect
  • Strong general administration skills and experience, including taking minutes, organising meetings, organising travel etc.
  • Ability to work with databases with a high level of attention to detail
  • Methodical with good attention to detail and strong focus on quality of work
  • Strong writing and communication skills
  • Ability to produce social media and web content
  • Excellent time management and organisation skills
  • Demonstrated interpersonal skills with the proven ability to work across several teams and managing own workload

Desirable

  • Experience working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities
  • Previous research experience in injury prevention or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
  • Experience working in the fast-paced Australian medical or scientific research environment.
  • Relevant health related degree

Application close date: 05 April 2019

We are reviewing applications as soon as we receive them, so apply now!

This is a great opportunity for you to work on an exciting new project and make an impact on global health outcomes.

We offer a flexible and inclusive work culture with excellent staff benefits including, salary packaging arrangements and sound learning opportunities.

The George Institute is an equal employment opportunity employer committed to equity, diversity and social inclusion. Applications are encouraged from people with a disability; women; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; people who identify as LGBTIQ; mature-aged adults and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Why work at the George?

We are committed to attracting, developing, rewarding and retaining the best people in their fields to conduct and support our innovative and highest quality research programs

More Info apply HERE 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Events and Conferences : This week features #ClosetheGap Day March 21 How to get involved in #NationalCloseTheGapDay #NCTGD#OurHealthOurChoiceOurVoice

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

21 March National Close the Gap Day

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane

22 March : The experts priorities for the 2019 Federal Election 

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured Save date

21 March National Close the Gap Day

For the last 10 years many thousands of Australians from every corner of the country, in schools, businesses and community groups, have shown their support for Close the Gap by marking National Close the Gap Day each March.

See RACGP CTG Video here 

This National Close the Gap Day, we have an opportunity to send our governments a clear message that Australians value health equality as a fundamental right for all.

On National Close the Gap Day we encourage you to host an activity in your workplace, home, community or school.

Our aim is to bring people together to share information, and most importantly, to take meaningful action in support of achieving Indigenous health equality by 2030.

How to get involved in National Close the Gap Day

  • Register your activity. You can download some online resources to support your event
  • Invite your friends, workmates and family to join you
  • Take action by signing the Close the Gap pledge and asking your friends and colleagues to do the same
  • Call, tweet or write to your local Member of Parliament and tell them that you want them to Close the Gap
  • Listen to and share the stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on Facebook – visit our Close the Gap Facebook page.
  • Share your photos and stories on social media. Use the hashtag #ClosetheGap
  • Donate to help our work on Close the Gap

With events ranging from workplace morning teas, sports days, school events and public events in hospitals and offices around the country — tens of thousands of people take part each year to make a difference.

Too many health gaps exist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

We must work to create equal access to healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Make a difference at: https://antar.org.au/campaigns/national-close-gap-day

#ClosetheGap #NationalCloseTheGapDay #NCTGD

#OurHealthOurChoiceOurVoice

Your actions can create lasting change. Be part of the generation that closes the gap.

National Close the Gap Day is a time for all Australians to come together and commit to achieving health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Close the Gap Campaign will partner with Tharawal Aboriginal Aboriginal Medical Services, South Western Sydney, to host an exciting community event and launch our Annual Report.

Register for event HERE 

Visit the website of our friends at ANTaR for more information and to register your support. https://antar.org.au/campaigns/national-close-gap-day

EVENT REGISTER

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane 

The Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery is hosting a workshop on Indigenous Ear Health in Brisbane on Thursday, 21 March 2019.

This meeting is the 7th to be organised by ASOHNS and is designed to facilitate discussion about the crucial health issue and impact of ear disease amongst Indigenous people.

The meeting is aimed at bringing together all stakeholders involved in managing Indigenous health and specifically ear disease, such as:  ENT surgeons, GPs, Paediatricians, Nurses, Audiologists, Speech Therapists, Allied Health Workers and other health administrators (both State and Federal).

Download Program and Contact 

Indigenous Ear Health 2019 Program

22 March : The experts priorities for the 2019 Federal Election 

Listen to 3 of Australia’s leading health advocates outline their top priorities for change

– Book Here

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

Interested in the health and wellbeing of rural or remote Australia?

This is the conference for you.

In March 2019 the rural health sector will gather in Hobart for the 15th National Rural Conference.  Every two years we meet to learn, listen and share ideas about how to improve health outcomes in rural and remote Australia.

Proudly managed by the National Rural Health Alliance, the Conference has a well-earned reputation as Australia’s premier rural health event.  Not just for health professionals, the Conference recognises the critical roles that education, regional development and infrastructure play in determining health outcomes, and we welcome people working across a wide variety of industries.

Join us as we celebrate our 15th Conference and help achieve equitable health for the 7 million Australians living in rural and remote areas.

Hobart and its surrounds was home to the Muwinina people who the Alliance acknowledges as the traditional and original owners of this land.  We pay respect to those that have passed before us and acknowledge today’s Tasmanian Aboriginal community as the custodians of the land on which we will meet.

More info 

28 March

28 March Close : DSS are drafting the Terms of Reference for the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation of People with Disability. @FPDNAus

https://engage.dss.gov.au/royal-commission-into-violence-abuse-neglect-and-exploitation-of-people-with-disability/

They have set up an on-line survey that is only open for the next 10 days. closes 28 March

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LSXH77X8

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

Thank you for your interest in the 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference will bring together Indigenous leaders, government, industry and academia representing Housing, health, and education from around the world including:

  • National and International Indigenous Organisation leadership
  • Senior housing, health, and education government officials Industry CEOs, executives and senior managers from public and private sectors
  • Housing, Healthcare, and Education professionals and regulators
  • Consumer associations
  • Academics in Housing, Healthcare, and Education.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference #2019WIHC is the principal conference to provide a platform for leaders in housing, health, education and related services from around the world to come together. Up to 2000 delegates will share experiences, explore opportunities and innovative solutions, work to improve access to adequate housing and related services for the world’s Indigenous people.

Event Information:

Key event details as follows:
Venue: Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre
Address: 2684-2690 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD 4218
Dates: Monday 20th – Thursday 23rd May, 2019 (24th May)

Registration Costs

  • EARLY BIRD – FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION: $1950 AUD plus booking fees
  • After 1 February FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION $2245 AUD plus booking fees

PLEASE NOTE: The Trade Exhibition is open Tuesday 21st May – Thursday 23rd May 2019

Please visit www.2019wihc.com for further information on transport and accommodation options, conference, exhibition and speaker updates.

Methods of Payment:

2019WIHC online registrations accept all major credit cards, by Invoice and direct debit.
PLEASE NOTE: Invoices must be paid in full and monies received by COB Monday 20 May 2019.

Please note: The 2019 WIHC organisers reserve the right of admission. Speakers, programs and topics are subject to change. Please visit http://www.2019wihc.comfor up to date information.

Conference Cancellation Policy

If a registrant is unable to attend 2019 WIHC for any reason they may substitute, by arrangement with the registrar, someone else to attend in their place and must attend any session that has been previously selected by the original registrant.

Where the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her place to another person, or to another event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

    • Registrations cancelled less than 60 days, but more than 30 days before the event are eligible for a 50% refund of the registration fees paid.
    • Registrations cancelled less than 30 days before the event are no longer eligible for a refund.

Refunds will be made in the following ways:

  1. For payments received by credit or debit cards, the same credit/debit card will be refunded.
  2. For all other payments, a bank transfer will be made to the payee’s nominated account.

Important: For payments received from outside Australia by bank transfer, the refund will be made by bank transfer and all bank charges will be for the registrant’s account. The Cancellation Policy as stated on this page is valid from 1 October 2018.

Terms & Conditions

please visit www.2019wihc.com

Privacy Policy

please visit www.2019wihc.com

 

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens 

The opening of the 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round has been moved forward! The National NAIDOC Grants will now officially open on Thursday 24 January 2019.

Head to www.naidoc.org.au to join the National NAIDOC Mailing List and keep up with all things grants or check out the below links for more information now!

https://www.finance.gov.au/resource-management/grants/grantconnect/

https://www.pmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/grants-and-funding/naidoc-week-funding

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

 

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO Aboriginal Youth Health #ClosingTheGap #Mentalheath : @SandraEades Connection to our country, culture and family can be profoundly healing. #OurHealthOurChoiceOurVoice Addressing the health deficits that young Aboriginal people face

For Aboriginal people, connection to our country, culture and family can be profoundly healing. But in the many decades we’ve spent working to improve the health of Australia’s first peoples, it’s a strength that has too often been ignored and squandered.

We need to change that, especially when it comes to addressing the health deficits that young Aboriginal people face, the great burden of which is their mental health.

And in their case, the strengths we need to build on includes the young people themselves.” 

PROFESSOR SANDRA EADES Associate Dean (Indigenous), Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne

This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article.

” Culturally-appropriate care and safety has a vast role to play in improving the health and wellbeing of our people.

In this respect, I want to make special mention of the proven record of the Aboriginal Community Health Organisations in increasing the health and wellbeing of First Peoples by delivering culturally competent care.

I’m pleased to be here at this conference, which aims to make a difference with a simple but sentinel theme of investing in what works, surely a guiding principle for all that we do

Providing strong pointers for this is a new youth report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Equipped with this information, we can connect the dots – what is working well and where we need to focus our energies, invest our expertise, so our young people can reap the benefits of better health and wellbeing “

Minister Ken Wyatt launching AIHW Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Adolescent and Youth Health and Wellbeing 2018 report at NACCHO Conference 31 October attended by over 500 ACCHO delegates including 75 ACCHO Youth delegates

Read Download Report HERE

NACCHO Youth Conference 2018

Consider this: Over 75 per cent of Aboriginal young people aged 15 to 24 report being happy all or most of the time.

That is according to last year’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent and youth health and wellbeing report, by the advisory group I chaired.

The report also found that over 60 per cent of Aboriginal young people recognise their traditional homelands, and over half identify with their clan or language group.

And they are increasingly finishing school and saying no to smoking. In the ten years to 2016, the proportion of Aboriginal young people completing Year 12 rose from 47 per cent to 65 per cent. Among 15 to 24-year-olds, some 56 per cent now report never having smoked compared with just 44 per cent in 2002.

In terms of alcohol consumption among Aboriginal aged 18 to 24 years old, some 65 per cent report that in the last two weeks they either hadn’t had a drink or hadn’t exceeded alcohol risk guidelines. That compares with just 33 per cent of non-Aboriginal 18 to 24-year-olds.

And what do they say when we ask them what they stress about most? Getting a job.

Aboriginal young people know the trajectory they want to take. They want to complete school, go to TAFE or University, and most of all get into work.

This tells us that we have a real opportunity to help them. Like all young people, it’s about helping them achieve small wins that can then build into bigger victories.

If you were to say to someone of British heritage that to be really Australian they had to leave Britain behind, forget their connection to their heritage and integrate, you would be laughed at.

But that is the message that has long been given to Aboriginal people even though we have over 50,000 years of connection to this country.

So, it should be no surprise we don’t feel we have to let go of our culture or let go of the strengths that go with being Aboriginal.

It is these unique strengths that we need to get better at integrating into how we deliver healthcare if we are to address the health gap. And the health gap is real.

Aboriginal young people have higher rates of mortality, self-harm and psychological distress.

Youth is a period of our lives when we are supposed to experiment and take risks. But if you are from a disadvantaged group, and being Aboriginal is the most disadvantaged group in the Australia, the issues of living with this disadvantage and intergenerational trauma, can tip the balance towards unhealthy risk taking.

The mental balance can tip towards hopelessness and despair.

But the overwhelming message from this report is that these health deficits are preventable conditions, and that a large part of the problem is gaps in services and support.

Young people aren’t easy to reach. In my career I’ve researched Aboriginal mothers, babies, young children and older people, and they are all much easier to engage with in health settings – but young people don’t tend to hang out at health clinics.

Engaging with young people isn’t an impossible challenge. In our NextGen research, in which we are surveying face-to-face over 2,000 Aboriginal young people about sensitive health topics, we have had to work differently to connect with them. Where we have had success is in the home and in community neighbourhood centres.

In many respects it is obvious. In our preliminary data, of the young people who tell us they have mental health issues, some 70 per cent say their parent and families are the first people they talk to about their problems.

It tells you that if you want to engage with Aboriginal young people you need to be engaging with their families. We need to rethink how services are delivered if we are to make them more effective in engaging with young people.

Since the 1970s, when the first Aboriginal health service opened in Sydney’s Redfern, a whole network has emerged and they are terrific. But they are largely geared toward maternal and child health, and the treatment of chronic conditions that affect mostly older people.

We need to think about how services can be made more accessible to young people specifically, and look at different delivery models. It might be that we need to extend existing services or we might need to look at creating dedicated services, in the same way that the Headspace mental health services are targeted at youth.

Whatever we do it will require more investment at a time when Aboriginal health services have been under severe funding pressure ever since the 2014 Federal government budget cuts.

But improving the health of young Aboriginals goes well beyond the health sector.

According to the report, among Aboriginal 15 to 24-year-olds, a third reported being unfairly treated because of their indigeneity in the last 12 months. And the most frequent setting for unfair treatment was school, in a training course, or at university.

This underlines the importance of educational institutions in embracing Aboriginal culture.

When I went to university in the 1980s the expectation was that we would have to leave our culture at the door. That is now changing thanks to the hard work of many people and universities have created dedicated centres of Aboriginal culture, like Murrup Barak at the University of Melbourne. This work needs to continue.

We need to allow Aboriginal young people to be who they are, and that means helping them to draw on the strengths in themselves and the strengths in the culture and community they rely on.

This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @END_RHD @telethonkids #RHD : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies welcome Minister @KenWyattMP announcement of $35 million funding for vaccine to end rheumatic heart disease

“Today is a game-changing step. Ending RHD is a critical, tangible target to close the gap in Indigenous life expectancy.

Our Government is building on the work of the Coalition to Advance New Vaccines Against Group A Streptococcus (CANVAS) initiative, by providing $35 million over 3 years to fund the creation of a vaccine that will bring an end, once and for all, to RHD in Australia.

The trials and development, led by Australia’s leading infectious disease experts and coordinated by the Telethon Kids Institute, will give hope to thousands of First Nations people whose lives and families have been catastrophically affected by this illness.”

The funding announced today by Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt AM is being provided from the Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF).

The eradication of rheumatic heart disease, a deadly and devastating illness largely affecting Indigenous communities, is taking a major step forward, with the Federal Government investing $35 million in the development of a vaccine to combat the disease.

SEE Full Press Release Part 2 Below

Pictured below  : Saving the lives of children like 7 year old Tenaya, who has Rheumatic Heart Disease – Perth Hospital

“It is wonderful that the Commonwealth Government research funds have been directed to address this leading cause of inequality for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. It is a turning point in progress towards a Strep A vaccine.

The Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector welcomes this funding for the Strep A vaccine as one part of the work needed to end RHD.

It does not distract us from the ultimate goal of addressing the social and environmental factors – such as inequality, overcrowding, inadequate housing infrastructure, insufficient hygiene infrastructure and limited access to appropriate health services – which drive the high rates of RHD in Australia.

We hope that research funds will be mirrored by investment in frontline health services, such as ours, as part of a comprehensive strategy to end rheumatic heart disease in Australia”

NACCHO CEO Ms Pat Turner AM

ACHWA was represented at the launch by Vicki O’Donnell Chairperson

Part 1 : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies welcome Federal Government funding for new Australian-led Strep A vaccine  

Download full Press Release 

ACCHO_END RHD Statement 240219 Announcement_

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies for the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector as leaders of END RHD advocacy alliance, warmly welcome Minister Wyatt’s announcement today of $35 million of funding for the acceleration of an Australian-led Strep A vaccine.

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT), Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA), Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), Aboriginal Health Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC), Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) are Founding Members of END RHD, leading a campaign calling for an end to rheumatic heart disease in Australia.

We congratulate Telethon Kids Institute, one of our fellow END RHD founding members, on being awarded this vital funding, and look forward to further engagement with researchers, communities, and other stakeholders as the project progresses.

END RHD has been calling for investment in strategic research and technology – including the development of a vaccine – as part of a range of funding priorities needed to eliminate rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in Australia. This funding is an important step towards that goal.

A vaccine has an important role to play in reducing the rates of rheumatic heart disease in years to come. We celebrate this announcement and recognise it is one important part of the comprehensive action needed to end RHD in Australia, and truly close the gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

We invite you to join the movement to end rheumatic heart disease in Australia. You can pledge your support for the END RHD campaign at https://endrhd.org.au/take-action/

Part 2 

It will allow manufacture and testing of a number of vaccines currently being developed, and fast-tracking and funding of clinical trials in Australia. The aim is to accelerate availability of a vaccine for use in Australia and internationally.

“Today is a game-changing step,” said Minister Wyatt. “Ending RHD is a critical, tangible target to close the gap in Indigenous life expectancy.

“Our Government is building on the work of the Coalition to Advance New Vaccines Against Group A Streptococcus (CANVAS) initiative, by providing $35 million over 3 years to fund the creation of a vaccine that will bring an end, once and for all, to RHD in Australia.

“The trials and development, led by Australia’s leading infectious disease experts and coordinated by the Telethon Kids Institute, will give hope to thousands of First Nations people whose lives and families have been catastrophically affected by this illness.”

Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is a complication of bacterial Streptococcus A infections of the throat and skin. Strep A and RHD are major causes of death around the world, with Strep A killing more than 500,000 people each year.

Australia has one of the highest incidences of rheumatic heart disease in the world. It is the leading cause of cardiovascular inequality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and is most commonly seen in adolescents and young adults.

Alarmingly, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 64 times more likely than non Indigenous people to develop rheumatic heart disease, and nearly 20 times as likely to die from it.

Every year in Australia, nearly 250 children are diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever at an average age of 10 years. 50 – 150 people, mainly indigenous children or adolescents, die from RHD every year.

“Rheumatic heart disease kills young people and devastates families. This funding will save countless lives in Australia and beyond,” said Health Minister Greg Hunt.

“This initiative will also benefit Australia by ensuring it continues to be the global leader in Strep A and RHD research and public health implementation, and can build on its worldclass clinical trial and medical industry.

“Vulnerable communities, in particular Indigenous communities, will get the medicines they need; and Australian industry will have the opportunity to collaborate in developing and distributing the breakthrough vaccine, both here and overseas.”

The End RHD vaccine initiative will be directed by Prof Jonathan Carapetis AM (Director of the Telethon Kids Institute in Perth) and overseen by a Scientific Advisory Board including leading Australian and International experts.

The project will also be informed by an Indigenous Advisory Committee who will ensure that the voices of our First Nations people are heard and acknowledged, and that all components of the work are culturally safe and appropriate.

This latest initiative builds on funding already provided under our Government’s Rheumatic Fever Strategy. This includes $12.8 million to continue support for the existing state-based register and control programs in the Northern Territory, Western Australia, Queensland and South Australia; and new funding of $6 million for focused prevention activities in high-risk communities to prevent the initial incidence of acute rheumatic fever.

Our Government has also provided $165,000 to the END RHD Alliance to complete development of a roadmap to eliminate the disease in Australia.

“The death and suffering caused by Strep A and RHD is preventable,” said Minister Hunt. “RHD can be stopped and we want to end it on our watch.

“This is a further demonstration of our Government’s strong commitment to health and medical research, which is a key pillar of our Government’s long term health plan.”