NACCHO @TheAHCWA Aboriginal Health and the Cashless Welfare card debate

 

 ” Graphic video footage played recently to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and other influential politicians cuts to the core. It is horrific, sickening and gut-wrenching, and would affect any compassionate human being.

But the intent behind the carefully edited emotive video – further pushing a ( Cashless Welfare ) card to supposedly tackle every imaginable social problem in vulnerable communities – is ill-conceived and ideologically driven.

Michelle Nelson-Cox Chair  : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia press release Opinion piece (part 2 Below )

 

 ” We need to recognise that the best way of dealing with problems is with respect, working together, and focussed on commonly agreed goals. We do not need a new generation of community members under the control of those who want to use punitive measures to coerce and control them. When has this approach ever been shown to work?

We need to ask why we are not doing it differently, treating the very causes of the dislocation and alienation of our communities — facing up to and turning around the hopelessness and despair that beleaguers them.

The Rural Doctors have made it clear when they said: “Those that do have problems will not be helped by measures that feel punitive, such as switching them to a cashless debit card, rather than payments. Tough love is rarely successful in treating substance abuse – particularly when it’s from the Government.”

I support the Rural Doctors and our community organisations working with families dealing with these issues. This is where we have to take this debate.”

Shadow assistant minister for Indigenous affairs and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Senator for Western Australia, Patrick Dodson responds to article portraying the state as a ‘war zone’ .Full article HERE

” Senator Rachel Siewert has criticised a new video campaign showing graphic depictions of violence in Indigenous communities as shock tactics designed to scare the Federal Government into rolling out more cashless welfare cards in remote Western Australia.

Using violent imagery then offering a one-dimensional, paternalistic and previously failed approach to a complex problem shows that Andrew Forrest is more concerned about furthering his ideologies than looking at what works.

“I share concerns about disadvantage and agree we need to be addressing severe disadvantage in communities like Port Hedland. We need a multifaceted approach including addressing alcohol supply, drug and alcohol services, and wrap around services driven by the community.

“I agree we do need to be investing in communities but in approaches that work ‘ Senator Rachel Siewert

Read Senator Rachel Siewert full press release part 4 below

Mining magnate Andrew Forrest and local leaders from the East Kimberley region, last week launched #timetoact an online anti-violence campaign in the nation’s capital. It features a video that shows disturbing scene of violence.”

Watch video HERE

” The concerted push by outgoing WA Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan that the cashless welfare system should be expanded to somehow protect children from sexual abuse, particularly in the north-west town of Roebourne, is fundamentally flawed.

There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

Instead, greater investment is needed in programs that address social determinants and build strong families and communities.

Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.

AHCWA does not support simplistic apparent solutions imposed from outside Aboriginal communities. Rather, it advocates for greater investment in community designed and driven programs to build strong families and communities.

Our sector has been delivering positive outcomes in Aboriginal health for more than 40 years, but in that time we have often dealt with the unintended negative consequences of whatever “silver bullet” solution is politically fashionable at the time.

Extracts from Michelle Nelson-Cox Chair  : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia press release (part 1and 2 below)

 

Elder Ted Carlton with a card

Part 1 : AHCWA rejects Karl O’Callaghan’s call to expand cashless welfare

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia has challenged outgoing Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan to look in his own backyard and adequately police remote communities rather than advocate for greater disempowerment of indigenous Australians.

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox today rejected calls by Mr O’Callaghan, whose contract ends on August 15 after 13 years at the helm of WA Police, for an urgent expansion of the cashless welfare system to combat child sex crimes in regional WA.

“The cashless welfare card is not a panacea to complex social problems,” Ms Nelson-Cox said.

“While AHCWA supports the government’s commitment to improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal people and prevent child sexual abuse, we do not support the ill-conceived idea that cashless welfare cards can turn the tide on the abhorrent abuse of children.

“There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

“Instead, greater investment is needed in programs that address social determinants and build strong families and communities.

“Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

Ms Nelson-Cox said Mr O’Callaghan’s admissions in The West Australian newspaper that his officers could not protect children in remote communities was gravely concerning.

“At what point does the buck stop with police and governments to keep communities safe? Over the past 13 years, how have the high instances of sexual abuse not have been addressed earlier?” she said.

“There is a large police presence in Roebourne, and admissions by Karl O’Callaghan that ‘police were not capable of protecting children in those communities’ and ‘neither the police nor government can guarantee protection of these children’ shows a lack of commitment to work with communities to effectively address these issues.

“The reality is there are a huge number of people very unhappy with the way they have been affected by the cashless welfare system imposed by the Federal Government.

“If anything, this is a failure of policing in the Roebourne area to address these crimes.

“The cashless welfare card does not need to be expanded. The solution does not lie in the disempowerment of Aboriginal people, but rather additional police resources and a greater commitment to stamp out these shocking and abhorrent crimes.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) currently engaged as members.

Part 2 : AHCWA rejects Karl O’Callaghan’s call to expand cashless welfare

 

Graphic video footage played recentlt to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and other influential politicians cuts to the core. It is horrific, sickening and gut-wrenching, and would affect any compassionate human being.

But the intent behind the carefully edited emotive video – further pushing a card to supposedly tackle every imaginable social problem in vulnerable communities – is ill-conceived and ideologically driven.

The concerted push by outgoing WA Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan that the cashless welfare system should be expanded to somehow protect children from sexual abuse, particularly in the north-west town of Roebourne, is fundamentally flawed.

The belief that the cashless welfare card can prevent child sexual abuse is based on nothing more than a distorted perception that quarantining income will address all social problems in remote Aboriginal communities.

To date, there has been no conclusive evidence that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or sexual abuse.

In fact, the most comprehensive review of income management in the Northern Territory has proven that this strategy will not work and will likely only create further dependence.

WA communities like Roebourne do not need the next new idea imposed by white people who live elsewhere.

Instead, they need to work with Aboriginal people and support under resourced local initiatives already being worked on.

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) currently engaged as members.

AHCWA does not support simplistic apparent solutions imposed from outside Aboriginal communities. Rather, it advocates for greater investment in community designed and driven programs to build strong families and communities.

Our sector has been delivering positive outcomes in Aboriginal health for more than 40 years, but in that time we have often dealt with the unintended negative consequences of whatever “silver bullet” solution is politically fashionable at the time. These days, the cashless welfare card is seen as the quick fix.

The cashless welfare card has been delivered as part of a Cashless Debit Card Trial (CDCT), a program developed to reduce the harm associated with alcohol consumption, illicit drug use and gambling in Ceduna in South Australia and the East Kimberley in WA (Kununurra and Wyndham).

The trial began in early 2016, when participants were issued a debit card which could not be used to buy alcohol, gambling products or to withdraw cash.

The system quarantines 80 per cent of income support payments into a restricted account linked to the card, with the remainder of these payments accessible through a normal, unrestricted bank account.

Remarkably, and perhaps unsurprisingly, an evaluation of the current trial showed that the majority of people using the card, and their families, did not report gambling, using illicit drugs, or consuming alcohol in excess.

To put it simply, this trial has been socially disempowering for a huge number of community members. Strong resistance and opposition has been made clear at public meetings, strikes and petitions.

Admissions by Karl O’Callaghan in the video shown to the PM that “police can’t save them” shows a lack of commitment to work with communities to effectively address these issues.

If anything, his comments reflect a failure of policing in the Roebourne area to address these crimes and protect the town’s most vulnerable people.

We support any commitment to improve the safety and health of Aboriginal people, particularly children, in WA and turn the tide on the appalling abuse of our youngsters, but the answer is not an expansion of the cashless welfare card.

The solution does not lie in the disempowerment of Aboriginal people, which has been an ongoing tactic by governments. Instead it lies in additional police resources and a genuine commitment to work with communities to stamp out these shocking and abhorrent crimes.

We agree it is time to act – it is time for the police to act.

“Using violent imagery then offering a one-dimensional, paternalistic and previously failed approach to a complex problem shows that Andrew Forrest is more concerned about furthering his ideologies than looking at what works,” Senator Siewert said today.

“I share concerns about disadvantage and agree we need to be addressing severe disadvantage in communities like Port Hedland. We need a multifaceted approach including addressing alcohol supply, drug and alcohol services, and wrap around services driven by the community.”

Part 3  :  Graphic video campaign pushing for welfare card slammed as ‘one dimensional’  

Continued from opening                                

Mr Forrest was joined yesterday by Jean O’Reerie, Aboriginal Education Worker from Wyndham in East Kimberley- a Cashless Debit Card trial site, her colleague, local Bianca Crake, and the Mayor of Port Hedland, Mr Camillo Blanko.

Mr Forrest claims that the government’s current system to stop drug and alcohol fuelled violence against children in the Pilbara and East Kimberley region isn’t working.

Linking what he described as horrific child abuse to alcohol and drug use, Mr Forrest is pushing for the Cashless Welfare Card to be introduced into more West Australian communities.

“Elders of communities, mayors of major towns are standing up and saying enough is enough. We need the system to change. What we have had is not enough. It’s delivering our children into hell and they have to be protected,” he told a media conference yesterday.

Mr Forrest yesterday brough elders and civic leaders, from Western Australia and South Australia, to meet personally with the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, the leader of the opposition Bill Shorten and his deputy leader Tanya Plibersek.

Figures from the West Australian Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan’s department claimed that one in three children are being abused, in a town of 500 children – 158 were sexually assaulted, 36 men face 300 charges of child abuse and in another town six children committed suicide in six months. It was not specified whether the children affected were Indigenous or Non- Indigenous.

Jean O’Reerie an Aboriginal Education Worker from Wyndham in the East Kimberley was emotional as she described the situation in her community.

“We need help, we need the government to intervene and help us out as community leaders. We can’t do it on our own. We need change for our community, our kids are hurting,” she said.

“We, the grassroots people, live with it every day. The hurt, the suffering, and the abuse.”

Part 4 : Trying to scare people into supporting the cashless card a worrying ramp up of Andrew Forrest’s campaign: Senator Rachel Siewert

Andrew Forrest is trying to use similar shock tactics to those of the previous Howard Government to scare people into supporting the cashless welfare card, Australian Greens Senator Rachel Siewert said last week

“We are seeing a worrying ramp up of Andrew Forrest’s cashless welfare card campaign that uses children, violence and fear just like the Howard Government did in 2007 over the NT Intervention.

“The Howard Government did this to justify the Northern Territory Intervention to impose income management and the Basics Card, at the time the Little Children are Sacred report was used to scare people into supporting income management.

“The final evaluation of the NT Intervention shows that it met none of its objectives. Ten years on we are still seeing the number of children going into out of home care increasing and appalling disadvantage persists.

Using violent imagery then offering a one-dimensional, paternalistic and previously failed approach to a complex problem shows that Andrew Forrest is more concerned about furthering his ideologies than looking at what works.

“I share concerns about disadvantage and agree we need to be addressing severe disadvantage in communities like Port Hedland. We need a multifaceted approach including addressing alcohol supply, drug and alcohol services, and wrap around services driven by the community.

“I agree we do need to be investing in communities but in approaches that work. The Government invested over $1.2 billion in the NT Intervention which met none of its objectives. We should stop wasting money on income management style approaches and start looking at real solutions that work”.

 

NACCHO This weeks top Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts : #Aboriginal Health Workers #Dental #Pharmacy #Doctors #TacklingSmoking

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

2. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

3.Aboriginal Program Project Officer Cancer Council Victoria Closes 14  August

4.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

5. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

6- 7 Congress Senior Policy Officer and Media Communications Officer

8.Pharmacist – FIFO to Maningrida – Arnhem Land

9. ATSICHS Dental Services Brisbane : Oral Health Therapist

10.Tackling Indigenous Smoking Support Officer (OVAHS) close 16 August

11. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

12.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

13.Senior Research Fellow, CREATE Adelaide

14.Employment at Miwatj Health NT

15.Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program added 10 August

  Register or more INFO

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

For over 30 years, Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service has provided essential and culturally appropriate medical, preventive, allied and oral health services to Aboriginal communities.  Located in the Macleay and Nambucca valleys on the Mid North Coast of NSW.  Durri is committed to making health care and education accessible to improve the health status and wellbeing of our community.

An exciting opportunity has arisen for a Aboriginal Health Worker with an interest in the area of Drug & Alcohol to join the passionate team at our Nambucca Heads clinic site.

This challenging role would suit an experienced and motivated Aboriginal Health Worker with a desire to achieve positive outcomes in indigenous health.  You will work with a dedicated team of healthcare professionals.

The successful candidate will enjoy beautiful beaches, World Heritage Rainforest, and relaxed lifestyle of the mid north coast whilst making a real difference in the community.

Benefits include 9.5% super, attractive salary sacrifice, training and access to an employee assistance program.

To apply to to our website:  www.durri.org.au, download a copy of the Application Pack and submit this along with your resume not exceeding 4 pages, and your submission for each of the selection criteria to: hr@durri.org.au, or mail to:

Application

Chief Operations Officer

Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Services

PO Box 136

Kempsey  NSW 2440

Applications close: 21 August 2017 at 5.00 pm 

Applicants must have a current Police and Working with Children Check Clearance and Confirmation of Aboriginality.

Pursuant to Section 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) Australian Aboriginality is a genuine occupational qualification for this position.

Applications that do not attach a completed selection criteria submission will not be considered. 

Contact: Paula 02 65602360

2. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

The Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service is a fast growing and innovative health service that aims to provide the local Aboriginal community with culturally appropriate, high quality care. The following position is now available:-

Aboriginal Health Worker
Part Time 22.8 hours per week (Ongoing)

The successful applicant will be part of a service aimed at providing intensive case work and direct support to Aboriginal people.  You will facilitate clinical assessments, work in partnership with the clinical practice, and provide cultural expertise to ensure the provision of holistic and culturally appropriate health care. You will also assist Aboriginal people to access appropriate primary care services, and liaise with internal and external practitioners to assist in the delivery of culturally appropriate services. You will work in North Geelong and also in Colac.   Qualifications as an Aboriginal Health Worker are desirable or a willingness to undertake study to achieve the qualification.

This is an identified position, open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants only.

If you have extensive experience in related areas of work and a solid understanding of the issues confronting Aboriginal communities then we want to hear from you.

A Position Description is available from www.wathaurong.org.au

A police check, Working with Children Card and a driving license are required for all positions.

Applications to be sent to Human Resources preferably via email jobs@wathaurong.org.au or post to Wathaurong Aboriginal Cooperative, PO Box 402, North Geelong 3215.  Applications that fail to answer the key selection criteria will not be considered.

Closing date for these positions is 20 August 2017

Wathaurong is a Child Safe organisation

Wathaurong is a smoke free workplace

3.Aboriginal Program Project Officer Cancer Council Victoria Closes 14  August

 
 
Description of position:
Cancer Council Victoria is looking for an Aboriginal Programs Project Officer to join the Screening, Early Detection and Immunisation Program.
The successful applicant will work in partnership with stakeholders to deliver community-based projects, support the implementation of innovative media and communications activities and engage with the workforce sector to support participation in cancer screening, early detection and immunisation programs and reduce the impact of cancer in the Victorian Aboriginal community.
This is a part-time (0.6 or 0.8 FTE) fixed term position until March 2018.
Applications for this role close at the end of the day on Monday 14th August.
Cancer Council Victoria has a Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan and is strategically working to help Close the Gap.
 
 

4.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Salary: Level B $98,775 – $117,290 p.a. plus 9.5% superannuation or Level C $120,993 – $139,510 p.a. plus 9.5%superannuation

Indigenous Eye Health in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne has developed and is supporting implementation of the Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision. The work is of national and international significance and is demonstrating effective translational research through the systematic implementation of evidenced-based, sustainable public health reform in Indigenous eye health.

You will support the regional implementation of The Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision from a health system perspective and contribute to and lead improvements in Indigenous eye health across Australia. As part of a small, strategic and responsive team, you will collaborate with stakeholders within regions, jurisdictions and nationally to implement the Roadmap recommendations and provide technical advice and support. You will contribute to Roadmap advocacy and support submission of national and international peer reviewed publications and be actively involved in conference and meeting presentations.

To be successful in the position, you must have:
-Leadership experience or demonstrated potential for leadership and engagement in research or health systems
-Demonstrated understanding and knowledge of key issues related to Indigenous health
-Demonstrated experience working, communicating and engaging effectively with Indigenous communities
-Demonstrated capacity to maintain and contribute to industry partnerships and collaborations with a broad range of stakeholders.

This could be the next great step in your career. In addition, you will have access to many benefits enjoyed by our staff. To learn more about the benefits and working at the University, see http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/working/benefits and http://joining.unimelb.edu.au

This is a re-advertised position. Previous applicants need not re-apply.

Close date: 3 Sep 2017

Position Description and Selection Criteria

Download File 0043281_REVISED_Level B or C_July 2017.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/search/info/selection-criteria

5. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this exciting role.

The AMA

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) is the most influential membership organisation representing registered medical practitioners and medical students of Australia.

The AMA exists to promote and protect the professional interests of doctors and the health care needs of patients and communities.

The Federal Secretariat of the AMA contributes to the achievement of this Mission through reinforcing the AMA’s peak status in the development and implementation of health policy and identifying and acting upon the main issues affecting members.

The Federal Secretariat also delivers relevant member services and works with members directly to grow and value membership of the AMA.

Public Health

The AMA’s Public Health team is responsible for the AMA’s work on population and community health issues, including prevention, substance abuse, child and youth health and Indigenous health. The Secretariat assists in developing the AMA’s policies and political advocacy on Public Health issues of national importance.

The Role 

The Policy Adviser (maternity leave cover, part-time) will provide high level policy and strategic advice to the AMA President on Indigenous health issues. The Policy Adviser will write policy responses and take a lead in the development of AMA policy on all Indigenous health issues.

The Policy Adviser will develop policy positions for consideration by the Task Force on Indigenous Health and resolutions informed by research and input from within the AMA and when required from other medical organisations and health stakeholders.

The Policy Adviser will take a lead in the development of strategies to advocate AMA policies and prepare written material to support AMA campaigns and advocacy on Indigenous health.

The Policy Adviser will manage the AMA Indigenous Medical Scholarship and coordinate support for scholarship recipients, and will also coordinate the production of the AMA’s annual Report Card on Indigenous Health,

The Policy Adviser will provide secretariat support for the AMA Taskforce on Indigenous Health, represent the AMA at meetings and on external committees such as the Close the Gap Campaign Steering Committee.

Selection Criteria

  • demonstrated experience in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the ability to communicate in a culturally sensitive manner
  • knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health issues
  • experience working as a Policy Adviser or similar type of role on Indigenous health issues;
  • established networks in the Indigenous health sector;
  • relevant qualifications or a combination of qualifications and experience relevant to the role;
  • demonstrated ability to contribute to policy development;
  • an ability to identify relevant issues and to collate and present information to substantiate policy advice;
  • demonstrated ability to work independently, using initiative to solve problems and produce high quality accurate work with a minimum of supervision and under tight deadlines;
  • excellent communication skills both written and verbal;
  • the ability to liaise effectively and build collaborative working relationships with stakeholders;
  • demonstrated ability to work effectively as part of a small team, including the ability to supervise staff;
  • experience in using modern computer software and office systems to analyse data, produce documents dealing with complex issues, and maintain accurate records;
  • an enthusiastic and flexible approach.

To apply for this role please submit a cover letter and an up to date resume via SEEK. For further information or for a confidential discussion in respect of this role please contact Alyce on 02 6270 5482. Remuneration for this role will be determined after assessment of relevant skills, experience and qualifications.

Closing Date for Applications – Tuesday 22 August 2017 – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

APPLY HERE

6- 7 Congress Senior Policy Officer and Media Communications Officer

Work for Congress! Congress is currently seeking a Senior Policy Officer, Media Communications Officer to work full-time at our new headquarters in Canberra.

Check out the job descriptions below and apply today

3.Media and Communications Officer

Apply HERE

4.Senior Policy Officer

Apply HERE

8.Pharmacist – FIFO to Maningrida – Arnhem Land

We are seeking an enthusiastic professional pharmacist passionate about providing quality services to the people of Maningrida in western Arnhem Land. This onsite position presents unique and rewarding challenges as part of the primary health care team.

About the Role

The position is full-time (40 hours per week) providing direct dispensing and counselling about medicines to clients of the Aboriginal Health service.

  • The pharmacist also acts as advisor to medical, nursing and allied health staff including Aboriginal staff on the safe and effective use of medicines in the community.
  • Dose administration aid packing is minimal as this is co-ordinated offsite

Skills and Requirements

  • A degree in pharmacy and registration as a pharmacist with the Australian Health Professional Registration Authority is essential
  • Experience and high level of performance in clinical pharmacy.
  • Demonstrated ability, or willingness to acquire the ability, to interact with Aboriginal people in a sensitive and culturally safe way.
  • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively in a multidisciplinary health care team
  • Ability to plan, negotiate and implement changes to day to day practice to ensure the highest standard of care possible to clients of the service.

Benefits

There is potential to increase the impact of clinical services for the people of Maningrida for the innovative person who can develop professional services to suit the population and the health service.

Other benefits include

  • Generous salary including remote living and relocation allowances
  • Conditions are negotiable and can be by fly in fly out from Darwin or living in the community
  • Professional support and mentoring is available from the co-ordinating pharmacy in Darwin

For further information please contact

Shelley Forester Ph: 0412700560

Email: shelley.forester@udcp.com.au

  • Applicants are required to provide a current CV and contact details for at least two referees.
  • Applicants are asked to submit a one page summary of how they meet the above criteria.

9. ATSICHS Dental Services Brisbane : Oral Health Therapist

Position Title
Oral Health Therapist
Department/Team
Department/Team Dental
Location
ATSICHS Dental Services
Salary Range
$70,835 – $80,508 base salary, plus Superannuation
Employment Status
12 month contract role with view to permanency
Reports To
Dental Services Manager
Direct Reports
Nil

Organisational History and Structure      

ATSICHS Brisbane is a not-for-profit community owned health and human services organisation delivering on the unique health and wellbeing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in greater Brisbane and Logan. We are the largest, most comprehensive Aboriginal Medical Health Service in Queensland, and Australia’s second oldest. We are determined to create a flourishing future and lasting legacy for our people and our community.

Our services include medical and dental clinics, mums and bubs programs, an aged care facility, family and child safety services, foster and kinship care, social and emotional wellbeing services, kindergarten programs and a youth service.

We have five core values which shape the way that we work:

  • Community
  • Respect
  • Collaboration
  • Quality
  • Accountability

Our vision for the future is that we are world leaders in Indigenous health and social support services provided in an urban setting. To do this we are focussing on four strategic priorities:

  1. Work smarter, work together
  2. Ensure easy to access services for every stage of life
  3. Champion healthy individuals and thriving families
  4. Build a strong and sustainable organisation.

Position Outline               

As a key member of the ATSICHS Brisbane team, the Oral Health Therapist is expected to personally contribute to the shaping and achievement of ATSICHS vision and goals. The Oral Health Therapist will provide three (3) key functions:

Supports dental care delivery:

Supports dental care delivery by providing general and emergency oral health care to Murri School Students as well as other eligible clients; diagnosing dental decay and gum diseases, provide dental examinations, cleaning, scaling and extracting, taking X-Rays and impressions for mouthguards, and brining complex dental items to the attention of Dentist. Educates students and patients by giving oral hygiene, plaque control, and postoperative instructions. Assist in encouraging students and patients to make an active change to their oral care with the aid of ATSICHS approved oral health educational material.

Operates within CQI and clinical governance framework:

Oral Health Therapists support processes that ensure the delivery of dental care is performed within the highest quality. Included activities involve CQI, contributing to policy implementation, audits and reporting of clinical incidents.

Actively contributes in developing a flourishing team:

Support fellow staff in a team environment to build collegiality and a sense of belongingness within the team and ATSICHS family. Staff will actively participate in team activities and contribute to a flourishing workplace culture that promotes the ethos and values of ATSICHS Brisbane as a long standing Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation.

Skills, Competencies, Qualifications, Education and Experience

Essential:

  • Certificate, Diploma or Degree in Oral Health Therapy and be eligible to register with AHPRA
  • Hold a current radiation licence
  • Demonstrated experience that demonstrates practical skills and knowledge in the provision of dental care to clients
  • Demonstrated ability to meet targets and performance outcomes
  • Ability to support a continuous improvement model for achieving outcomes
  • Proven ability to prioritise workload and meet deadlines
  • Effective communication skills – both in writing ad verbal
  • Working with Children’s Card (Blue Card) or be eligible to apply.

Desirable, but not mandatory:

  • Previous experience working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Knowledge of EXACT

How to Apply    

Applications can only be submitted through seek link

Applications must be submitted before 14th August 2017

ATSICHS HR on 07 3240 8900

APPLY HERE

10.Tackling Indigenous Smoking Support Officer (OVAHS) close 16 August

11. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

To find out more, visit http://www.cmsac.com.au/about-us/

About the Opportunity

Exciting opportunities exist for 2 Full-Time, experienced and passionate Aboriginal Health Workers / Practitioners to join the CMSAC team.

Reporting directly to the Senior Registered Nurse, the Aboriginal Health Worker will be responsible for providing supportive, effective and efficient Primary Health Care services to clients in the clinic and within the community.

As an Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner, your responsibilities will include (but not limited to):

  • Work with members of the clinical team to deliver Primary Health services to clients
  • In collaboration with the multidisciplinary team, conduct health checks on clients
  • Using the Therapeutic Guidelines, perform consultations with clinic clients, including listening to their story, providing a basic physical examination and consulting with more experienced clinical staff as necessary, and to advise on the treatment and management of a client’s health problems
  • Assist the Senior Registered Nurse and Program Nurses to address areas of improvement
  • Provide education to clients and families on health care and health promotion
  • Demonstrate leadership in maintaining infection control principles
  • Have an understanding of CMSAC reporting requirements

About You

The successful applicant will have a demonstrated ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. You will have a sound understanding of the unique issues impacting the health of Aboriginal peoples whilst have experience in the provision of health promotion programs.

In addition to the above, the successful applicant will possess:

  • Certificate IV Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice
  • Current Apply First Aid certificate, or willingness to obtain
  • Current, unencumbered C-Class Manual Drivers Licence
  • Working with Children Check and a National Police Clearance, or willingness to obtain
  • The ability to pass a pre-employment drug and alcohol test

About the Benefits

CMSAC is dedicated to recognising and rewarding dedication. As such, you will enjoy an attractive remuneration package including salary sacrificing options!

In addition:

  • CMSAC will negotiate relocation assistance with the right candidate
  • You’ll enjoy a fantastic work/life balance, with Monday – Friday hours, 8:30am – 5.00pm and 5 weeks annual leave!

Applications close Monday 21 August at 5pm.

APPLY FOR THIS JOB

12.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

The Role
Cornerstone Medical are seeking Vocationally Registered Doctor for an exciting permanent position within an Aboriginal Medical Service in the NT. You be will be responsible for providing holistic primary health care services alongside an experienced team of Registered Nurses and visiting specialists.The Centre
You will work alongside an experienced team of 1 additional GP, 14 nurses, allied health workers, and an experienced support team. The hours of work are 5pmwith no on call or after hours. There is a pharmacy onsite, numerous health programs and visiting specialists weekly.The location
You will be located on the beautiful and untouched coastline of NT; right on the coast. This is an is an indigenous community in one of the largest most remote towns of Australia’s Northern Territory. The renowned fishing town is the major service centre for the population of 2,300 as well as more than 30 outstations or homelands, with a school, health clinic, multiple food outlets, two supermarkets, service station, arts centre, créche and a tarmac airport with daily commercial flights to Darwin.The Criteria 
To be eligible for this position you must meet the following criteria:

  • MBBS
  • Vocational AHPRA registration
  • Interest in indigenous health, Chronic Disease and remote GP work

The Package
On appointment for this position, you will be offered:

  • OTE $240-350,000 per annum including
  • Free Accommodation and full relocation assistance
  • Quarterly return flights to Darwin with accommodation
  • Yearly retention allowance lump sum $35,000
  • Salary sacrificing up to $30,000
  • Professional development allowance and Attraction allowance
  • 4 return trips to Darwin per annum incl accommodation
  • House, vehicle, laptop and phone
  • Indemnity insurance reimbursed
This really is a fantastic opportunity to expand your career in Indigenous Health as a part of a supportive and community focused organisation.  For more information on this or other exciting opportunities please phone Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe today on 07 3171 2929 or email aoife@cmr.com.au
Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe
07 3171 2929

13.Senior Research Fellow, CREATE Adelaide

SAHMRI146
FTC – Full-time Contract
SAHMRI North Terrace

Applications close Friday 11, August 2017

12 Month Contract

Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit

The Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Chronic Disease Knowledge Translation and Exchange (CREATE)

At the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), we are committed to achieving innovative, ground-breaking health and medical research that fundamentally improves the quality of life for all people.

The Aboriginal Research Unit (Wardliparingga  Unit) within SAHMRI conducts health and well-being research that is of direct relevance to, and in partnership with, Aboriginal people in South Australia. Our research is focused on the significant difference between the health status and life opportunities available to Aboriginal people and other Australians. Our research is broad in nature, including epidemiology, health services research, evaluation and clinical trials.

The Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Chronic Disease Knowledge Translation and Exchange (CREATE) focuses on translating research to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, with particular focus on the prevention, treatment and management of chronic diseases. The Centre is a collaborative enterprise between The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), the Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit, SAHMRI; The Joanna Briggs Institute, University of Adelaide, and The School of Public Health, University of Adelaide.

The aim of CREATE is to assist the Aboriginal health sector to use existing knowledge (published and unpublished) on best practice chronic disease prevention and treatment as well as service delivery models to improve the coverage and appropriateness of their services and care.

CREATE is guided by a Leadership Group comprising of senior representatives from Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations around Australia.

The Senior Research Fellow, CREATE will provide academic and operational leadership to the CREATE team, acting as a conduit between the CREATE Chief Investigators and the Adelaide based research and administration team. The position has the responsibility for day to day oversight and support of specified research projects and staff, providing expertise and supervision as required.

The Senior Research Fellow, CREATE is broadly responsible for the achievement of a range of determined project outcomes, and is required to apply high level qualitative analytical skills and demonstrated excellence in written and verbal communication. Dissemination strategies will require CREATE findings are published within peer-reviewed journals and to translate these findings to stakeholders with influence on Aboriginal health policy and practice.

SAHMRI has a strong commitment to employment Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into these roles. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are therefore strongly encouraged to apply.

Everything we do is underpinned by our core values and our institute is dedicated to grow a culture that pursues, enables and demands research excellence. We’re proud of the work we do and work hard as a team to make a positive difference to the community.  Excellence, Innovation, Courage, Integrity and Teamwork are what help us achieve our goals. If these are also your qualities and goals, apply today.

For a copy of the position description please click here

Applications close: 11 August 2017

APPLY HERE

14.Employment at Miwatj Health NT

Miwatj Health offers a wide range of employment opportunities for health and other professionals, in a unique primary healthcare environment.

We offer satisfying career paths for doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Practitioners, allied health staff, public/population health practitioners, health informatics specialists, administrative, financial and management personnel.

If you are suitably qualified and are looking for a rewarding and challenging experience in one of the most diverse, beautiful and interesting regions of Australia, we invite you to apply for any of the current vacancies listed below.

All applications for current vacancies must include:

  • a current Resumé,
  • names and contact details of at least two referees, at least one of whom must be a employment referee.

We encourage applications from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly those with links to and knowledge of local communities in the region.

Separately from the list of current vacancies, you may also submit a general expression of interest, with a current Resume, and we shall retain it on file for future reference if an appropriate vacancy arises.

Miwatj strongly prefers that all applications and expressions of interest submit your application via our recruitment platform by clicking the link below.

You may contact HR via recruitment@miwatj.com.au. However, if that is not possible, EOI or resume may be mailed or faxed, to arrive by the closing date, to:
Miwatj Health – Human Resources Department
PO Box 519
Nhulunbuy NT 0881
Fax number (08) 8987 1670

See Website for all details and APPLY

https://miwatj.applynow.net.au/

Two New Vacancies are available within the Link Up Program.

Both positions are 12 month Contract position that may be extended subject to funding.

Link Up Caseworker:   (Click for more information)

Link Up Counsellor: (Click for more information)

Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program is funded by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (Federal), and also receives reunion funding from the Department of Premier & Cabinet, Aboriginal Affairs & Reconciliation (State).

Link Up provides family tracing, reunion and counselling services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their families who have been separated under the past policies and practices of the Australian Government. Assistance is also provided to people over the age of 18 years who have been adopted, fostered or raised in institutions.

For more information about Link Up (Click here)

Please feel free to communicate this opportunity through your networks.

Applications close – COB Monday 14th August 2017.

 

 

Aboriginal Health #Garma2017 : #Makarrata ,canoes and the #UluruStatement @TurnbullMalcolm @billshortenmp Full Speech transcripts

 ” Djapiri said Bill and I are in the same canoe and on this issue we certainly are – but we are not alone, we are not alone in the canoe. We are in the same canoe with all of you as well and we need to steer it wisely to achieve our goal, to achieve that goal of Makarrata.

Beyond Constitutional Recognition, that work continues every day. I reflect on the Makarrata discussion of the late 70’s and 80’s. A list of demands was sent to the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs in 1981. It called for rights to land and resources, compensation, the creation of Aboriginal schools, medical centres and an Aboriginal bank.

Despite a final agreement not being reached at the time, we have achieved some of the policies called for. The Commonwealth provided $433 million to 137 Aboriginal Medical Services across the country last financial year.

As Prime Minister I will continue to do all I can to ensure that being an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian means to be successful, to achieve, to have big dreams and high hopes, and to draw strength from your identity as an Indigenous person in this great country.

That’s why, as we renegotiate the Closing the Gap targets with the various state and territory jurisdictions later this year, my Government has insisted on a strengths based approach.

Indigenous people are not a problem to be solved.

You are our fellow Australians. Your cultures are a gift to our nation.”

Selected extracts from the full Prime Minister Speech 5 August Garma see Part 2 Full Speech

Download full copy Garma 2017 PM full Speech

” Djapirri said, she told me of a dream of a canoe, paddled by the Prime Minister and myself.

That in itself is an arresting image. Two captains. But in all seriousness, we appreciated I think the power of that illusion, the power of that dream.

Here at Garma, on the lands of the Gumatj, we gather to talk about a Yolngu word. Makarrata.

It is not just now a Yolngu word – I put it to you it’s a national test.

Coming together, after a struggle.

And for the first Australians, it has been a very long struggle indeed.

– A struggle against dispossession and discrimination, exclusion and inequality.

– A struggle against violence and poverty, disease and diminished opportunity.

– A struggle for better health, for better housing, for safer communities, more jobs, for longer lives.

– A struggle against injustice and racism: from the sporting field to the courts of our land.

Above all, a struggle for a better future for their children: a struggle to be counted, to be heard, to be recognised.

At Uluru, you gave us the statement from the heart.

A call for:

– A voice enshrined in the Constitution

– A declaration to be passed by all parliaments, acknowledging the unique place of the first nations in Australian history, their culture, their connection.

And a Makarrata Commission to oversee a process of agreement-making and truth-telling.

All three of these objectives speak to the long-held and legitimate aspirations of our First Australians:

– A proper acknowledgment of Aboriginal histories and the dispossession that followed upon the arrival of the Europeans

– A bigger say in the issues which affect you – no more ‘solutions’ imposed without consultation or consent

And a more lasting settlement, a new way forward, a new pathway including through treaties.

These ideas are not new – but the Uluru statement did articulate these with new clarity, a new passion, a new sense of truth and purpose “

Selected extracts The Hon Bill Shorten speech  Garma 5 August 2017 see in full Part 3 Below

Download full speech Garma 2017 PM full Speech

Part 1 Media Coverage

View NITV Media coverage

When it comes to Aboriginal constitutional reform, picture Malcolm Turnbull and Bill Shorten sitting in a canoe – and the opposition leader thinks he’s the only one paddling.

The Labor leader has backed a referendum question on an indigenous voice to parliament, while the prime minister has failed to commit bipartisan support.

The two politicians are moving together downstream, struggling to balance the boat to achieve reconciliation, Gumatj leader Djapirri Mununggirritj has told Garma Festival in northeast Arnhem Land.

Mr Shorten called it an “arresting image” but said he was disappointed Mr Turnbull dismissed his end of year referendum question deadline as “very ambitious”.

“We support a declaration by all parliaments, we support a truth telling commission, we are not confronted by the notion of treaties with our first Australians,” he said.

Mr Turnbull acknowledged many Aboriginal leaders were disappointed the government didn’t give “instant fulfilment” to the Referendum Council’s recommendations.

He described the Yolgnu elder’s canoe analogy as apt, saying his cabinet will give the matter careful consideration to keep the aspiration of Makarrata, or coming together after a struggle, from capsizing.

An “all or nothing approach” to constitutional change risks rocking the boat, resulting in a failed referendum, and Mr Turnbull called for time to develop a winnable question to put to Australian voters.

“We are not alone in the canoe, we are in the canoe with all of you and we need to steer it wisely to achieve that goal of Makarrata,” he said.

Mr Turnbull said there’s still many practical questions about what shape the advisory body would take, whether it would be elected or appointed and how it would affect Aboriginal people around the country.

Specifically, he questioned what impact the voice to parliament would have on issues like child protection and justice, which are largely the legislative domain of state and territory governments.

But Mr Shorten said debate over Aboriginal recognition in the nation’s founding document has dragged on for the past decade.

“I can lead Mr Turnbull and the Liberal party to water but I can’t make them drink,” he said.

Having led the failed 1999 republic referendum campaign, Mr Turnbull warned that Australians are “constitutionally conservative”, with just eight out of 44 successful since federation.

But Mr Shorten said “Aboriginal Australians do not need a balanda [white person] lecture about the difficulty of changing the constitution”.

Mr Shorten’s proposal of a joint parliamentary committee to finalise a referendum question has been met with cynicism by indigenous leaders.

The Above AAP

 

 Part 2 PRIME MINISTER Garma SPEECH :

Ngarra buku-wurrpan bukmak nah! Nhuma’lanah.

Ngarra Prime Minister numalagu djal Ngarra yurru wanganharra’wu nhumalangu bukmak’gu marrigithirri.

Ngarra ga nhungu dharok ga manikay’ ngali djaka wanga’wu yirralka.

I acknowledge and pay respect to your country, and your elders.

As Prime Minister, I’m here to talk to you and learn from you.

I acknowledge and respect your language, your song lines, your dances, your culture, your caring for country, and your estates.

I pay my respects to the Gumatj people and traditional owners past, present and future, on whose land we are gathered.

I also acknowledge other Yolngu people, First Peoples from across the country and balanda here today including Bill Shorten, Nigel Scullion and all other Parliamentary colleagues but above all I acknowledge our Parliamentary colleagues, Indigenous Parliamentary colleagues. Truly, voices of First Australians in the Parliament. Thank you for being here today and for the wisdom you give us, you together with my dear friend Ken, so much wisdom in the Parliament.

I offer my deep respect and gratitude to the Chairman of the Yothu Yindi Foundation, Dr Galarrwuy Yunupingu for hosting Lucy and me with your family. It was lovely to camp here last night and the last music was beautiful, serene and like a lullaby sending us all off to our dreams. Thank you. Emily was the last singer – beautiful.  And of course we woke here to the beautiful sounds of Gulkala.

I again as I did yesterday extend our deep condolences to the family of Dr G Yunupingu at this very sad time. He brought the Yolngu language to the people of Australia and his music will be with us forever.

I’ve come here to North East Arnhem Land to learn, participate respectfully and can I thank everyone so far I’ve had the chance to talk with. I am filled with optimism about our future together as a reconciled Australia.

Last month scientists and researchers revealed new evidence that our First Australians have been here in this land for 65,000 years.

These findings show that Indigenous people were living at the Madjedbebe rock shelter in Mirarr Country, at Kakadu east of Darwin, 18,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Among the middens, rock paintings, remains, plants and ochre, was the world’s oldest-known ground-edge axe head.

These findings place Australia on centre stage in the story of human origin, including mankind’s first long-distance maritime voyage – from Southeast Asia to the Australian continent.

Our First Peoples are shown as artistically, as technologically advanced, and at the cutting edge of technology in every respect.

Importantly, they confirm what Aboriginal people have always known and we have known – that your connection, your intimate connection to the land and sea are deep, abiding, ancient, and yet modern.

This news is a point of great pride for our nation. We rejoice in it, as we celebrate your Indigenous cultures and heritage as our culture and heritage – uniquely Australian.

As Galarrwuy said yesterday as he spoke in Yolngu, he said: “I am speaking in Australian.” Sharing, what a generosity, what a love, what a bigness he showed there as he does throughout his life and his leadership.

I want to pay tribute to the work of so many of you here today, who are leading the healing in communities, building bridges between the old and new, and looking for ways to ensure families and communities are not just surviving, but thriving.

Particularly the Indigenous leaders who every day wear many hats, walk in both worlds, and yet give tirelessly for their families and their communities. You often carry a very heavy load, and we thank you.

Where western astronomers look up at the sky and look for the light, Yolngu astronomers look also deep into the dark, using the black space to uncover further information, to unravel further mysteries.

So while we are both looking at the night sky, we are often looking at different parts. And yet through mutual respect, sharing of knowledge and an openness to learning, together we can see and appreciate the whole sky.

Those same principles are guiding us toward Constitutional Recognition.

The final Referendum Council report was delivered, as you know, on the 30th of June. Bill Shorten and I were briefed by the Referendum Council two weeks ago. The report was a long time coming and I know some would like an instant fulfillment of its recommendations.

Let me say, I respect deeply the work of the Referendum Council and all of those who contributed to it, and I respect it by considering it very carefully and the Government is doing so, in the first instance with my colleagues, including Ken Wyatt the first Indigenous Australian to be a Federal Minister, and together we consider it with our Cabinet. That is our way, that is our process, that is how we give respect to serious recommendations on serious matters.

And I do look forward to working closely and in a bipartisan way with the Opposition as we have done to date.

Djapiri said Bill and I are in the same canoe and on this issue we certainly are – but we are not alone, we are not alone in the canoe. We are in the same canoe with all of you as well and we need to steer it wisely to achieve our goal, to achieve that goal of Makarrata. Thank you again Galarrwuy for that word.

We share a sense of the significance of words. I love words and language. There is a great definition. What is the difference between poetry and prose? The best definition of poetry that I have ever found is that which cannot be translated, it can only be felt.

The Referendum Council’s report as Marcia reminded us is the fourth major report since that time and it adds immensely to the depth of knowledge. It gave us the Uluru Statement from the Heart, and I congratulate all those who attended on reaching an agreement. That was no small task.

It tells us that the priority for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is to resolve the powerlessness and lack of self-determination experienced – not by all, but certainly by too many.

I have been discussing it with leaders, the leaders of our First Australians and will continue to do so as we develop the next steps.

But there are still many questions:

What would the practical expression of the voice look like? What would the voice look like here for the Yolngu people? What would it look like for the people of Western Sydney, who are the largest population of Aboriginal peoples in Australia?

Is our highest aspiration to have Indigenous people outside the Parliament, providing advice to the Parliament? Or is it to have as many Indigenous voices, elected, within our Parliament?

What impact would the voice have on issues like child protection and justice, where the legislation and responsibility largely rest with state and territory governments?

These are important questions that require careful consideration. But the answers are not beyond us.

And I acknowledge that Indigenous Australians want deeper engagement with government and their fellow Australians, and to be much better consulted, and represented in the political, social and economic life of this nation.

We can’t be weighed down by the past, but we can learn from it.

Australians are constitutionally conservative. The bar is surmountable, you can get over it but it is a high bar. That’s why the Constitution has often been described as a frozen document.

Now many people talk about referendums, very few have experienced leading a campaign. The 1999 campaign for a Republic – believe me, now, one of the few subjects on which I have special knowledge – the 1999 campaign for a Republic has given me a very keen insight into what it will take to win, how hard it is to win, how much harder is the road for the advocate for change than that of those who resist change. I offer this experience today in the hope that together, we can achieve a different outcome to 1999. A successful referendum.

Compulsory voting has many benefits, but one negative aspect is that those who for one reason or another are not interested in an issue or familiar with it, are much more likely to vote no – it reinforces an already conservative constitutional context.

Another critical difference today is the rise of social media, which has changed the nature of media dramatically, in a decade or two we have a media environment which is no longer curated by editors and producers – but freewheeling, viral and unconstrained.

The question posed in a referendum must have minimal opposition and be clearly understood.

A vital ingredient of success is popular ownership. After all, the Constitution does not belong to the Government, or the Parliament, or the Judges. It belongs to the people.

It is Parliament’s duty to propose changes to the Constitution but the Constitution cannot be changed by Parliament. Only the Australian people can do that.

No political deal, no cross party compromise, no leaders’ handshake can deliver constitutional change.

Bipartisanship is a necessary but far from a sufficient condition of successful constitutional reform.

To date, again as Marcia described much of the discussion has been about removing the racially discriminatory provisions in the Constitution and recognising our First Australians in our nation’s founding document.

However, the Referendum Council has told us that a voice to Parliament is the only option they advise us to put to the Australian people. We have heard this, and we will work with you to find a way forward.

Though not a new concept, the voice is relatively new to the national conversation about constitutional change.

To win, we must all work together to build a high level of interest and familiarity with the concept of a voice, and how this would be different, or the same, as iterations of the past like the National Aboriginal Conference or the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission.

We also need to look to the experience of other countries, as we seek to develop the best model for Australia.

The historic 1967 Referendum was the most successful in our history because of its simplicity and clarity. The injustices were clearly laid out – Indigenous people were not enjoying the rights and freedoms of other citizens. The question was clearly understood – that the Commonwealth needed to have powers to make laws for Indigenous Australians. And the answer seemed obvious – vote yes to ensure the Commonwealth gave Indigenous people equal rights.

To succeed this time around, we need to develop enough detail so that the problem, the solution and therefore the question at the ballot box are simple, easily understood and overwhelmingly embraced.

One of the toughest lessons I learnt from the Referendum campaign of ‘99 was that an ‘all or nothing’ approach sometimes results in nothing. During the campaign, those who disagreed with the model that was proposed urged a “no” vote, arguing that we could all vote for a different Republic model in a few years. I warned that a “no” vote meant no republic for a very long time.

Now, regrettably, my prediction 18 years ago was correct. We must avoid a rejection at a referendum if we want to avoid setting Makarrata reconciliation back.

We recognise that the Uluru statement is powerful because it comes from an Indigenous-designed and led process. And because it comes from the heart, we must accept that it is grounded in wisdom and truth.

It is both a lament and a yearning. It is poetry.

The challenge now is to turn this poetry that speaks so eloquently of your aspiration into prose that will enable its realisation and be embraced by all Australians.

This is hard and complex work. And we need to take care of each other as we continue on this journey. We need to take care of each other in the canoe, lest we tip out of it.

Yesterday afternoon was a powerful show of humanity. As we stood together holding hands – Indigenous and non-Indigenous people – we stood together as Australians. As equals.

And we will have the best chance of success by working together. This cannot be a take it or leave it proposal. We have to come to the table and negotiate in good faith, and I am committed to working with you to find a way forward.

Galarrwuy – you gave us your fire words yesterday, thank you again. We will draw on them as we look to light the path forward for our nation.

And when considering how to do that, we are inspired by the success of the Uluru process. The statement that emerged from Uluru was designed and led by Indigenous Australians and the next steps should be too.

To go to a referendum there must be an understanding between all parties that the proposal will meet the expectations of the very people it claims it will represent.

Now we have five Aboriginal members of our Parliament. They will be vital in shaping and shepherding any legislation through the Parliament. They too are bridge builders, walking in both worlds, and their contribution to the Parliament enriches us all.

The Australian Parliament and the nation’s people – Indigenous and non-Indigenous – must be engaged as we work together to find the maximum possible overlap between what Indigenous people are seeking, what the Australian community overall will embrace and what the Parliament will authorise.

I have been learning that the word Makarrata means the ‘coming together after a struggle’— Galarrwuy told us a beautiful story this morning about a Makarrata here in this country. And a Makarrata is seen as necessary, naturally, if we are to continue our path to reconciliation.

But just like the night sky, reconciliation means different things to different people. This complexity convinces me that our nation cannot be reconciled in one step, in one great leap. We will only be reconciled when we take a number of actions, both practical and symbolic.

Beyond Constitutional Recognition, that work continues every day. I reflect on the Makarrata discussion of the late 70’s and 80’s. A list of demands was sent to the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs in 1981. It called for rights to land and resources, compensation, the creation of Aboriginal schools, medical centres and an Aboriginal bank.

Despite a final agreement not being reached at the time, we have achieved some of the policies called for. The Commonwealth provided $433 million to 137 Aboriginal Medical Services across the country last financial year. Indigenous Business Australia provides low interest loans to help Indigenous Australians secure economic opportunities including home ownership with 544 new housing loans made last year. The Aboriginal Benefits Account supports Northern Territory Land Councils and provides grants for the benefit of Aboriginal people living in the Territory.

We now spend $4.9 billion on the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

And we are empowering communities through our Indigenous Procurement policy.

I am pleased to announce today the Commonwealth has officially surpassed half a billion dollars in spending with Indigenous businesses all over Australia. I am looking forward to sharing the full two-year results in October. This is a spectacular increase from just $6.2 million being won by Indigenous businesses only a few years ago under former policies.

Since 2008 the Commonwealth has been helping improve remote housing and bring down rates of overcrowding, with $5.4 billion to build thousands of better homes over ten years.

And the land is returning to its traditional owners.

More than 2.5 million square kilometres of land, or about 34 per cent of Australia’s land mass is today recognised under Native Title. Another 24 per cent is covered by registered claims and by 2025, our ambition is to finalise all current Native Title claims.

So we are standing here on Aboriginal land – land that has been rightfully acknowledged as yours and returned to you. And we are standing here near the birthplace of the land rights movement. A movement of which the Yolngu people were at the forefront.

As a nation we’ve come a long way.

In the Northern Territory, more than 50 per cent of the land is now Aboriginal land, recognised as Aboriginal land.

Just like the land at Kenbi which, on behalf of our nation, I returned to the traditional owners, the Larrakia people last year.

Earlier this year I appointed June Oscar AO, who has been acknowledged earlier, as the first female Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, who has agreed to report on the issues affecting Indigenous women and girls’ success and safety.

And all of that work contributes to a better future for our First Australians.

But there is much more to be done in not just what we do, but how we do it – as we work with our First Australians. We are doing things with our First Australians, not to them.

Now Galarrwuy – I have read and read again your essay Rom Watungu. It too is a story from the heart, of your father, of his life and when his time came, how he handed his authority to you, the embodiment of continuity, the bearer of a name that means “the rock that stands against time”

But rocks that stand against time, ancient cultures and lore, these are the strong foundations on which new achievements are built, from which new horizons can be seen – the tallest towers are built on the oldest rocks.

You, Galarrwuy, ask Australians to let Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders breathe and be free, be who you are and ask that we see your songs and languages, the land and the ceremonies as a gift.

As Prime Minister I will continue to do all I can to ensure that being an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian means to be successful, to achieve, to have big dreams and high hopes, and to draw strength from your identity as an Indigenous person in this great country.

That’s why, as we renegotiate the Closing the Gap targets with the various state and territory jurisdictions later this year, my Government has insisted on a strengths based approach. Indigenous people are not a problem to be solved. You are our fellow Australians. Your cultures are a gift to our nation.

There’s so much more work to be done.

But in doing so, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and all Australians, continue to connect with pride and optimism – with mabu liyan, in Pat’s language from the Yawuru people – the wellbeing that comes with a reconciled harmony with you, our First Australians, our shared history truthfully told and a deeper understanding of the most ancient human cultures on earth, and the First Australians to whom we have so much to thank for sharing them with us.

Thank you so much.

Part 3 Opposition Leader’s Garma Speech

Good morning everybody.

I’d like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land upon which we meet, I pay my respects to elders both past and present.

I recognise that I stand on what is, was and always will be Aboriginal land.

I acknowledge the Prime Minister and his wife Lucy.

I wish to thank Gallarwuy and the Gumatj for hosting us – and on behalf of my Labor team who are here, Senator Pat Dodson, Senator Malarndirri McCarthy, the Hon Linda Burney, the Hon Kyam Maher, supported also by local Members of Parliament the Hon Warren Snowden and Luke Gosling, and Territory Minister Eva Lawler.

We are very grateful to be part of this gathering.

Also Clementine my daughter asked me to thank you for letting her join in the bunggul yesterday afternoon, she loved it.

At the opening yesterday, we were privileged, all of us, to be at a powerful ceremony, where we remembered Dr G Yunupingu, a man who was born blind – but helped Australians see.

From his island, his words and his music touched the world.

But I also understand that the words of our host were about setting us a test, reminding all of us privileged to be here that there is serious business to be done.

Here at Garma, on the lands of the Gumatj, we gather to talk about a Yolngu word. Makarrata.

It is not just now a Yolngu word – I put it to you it’s a national test.

Coming together, after a struggle.

And for the first Australians, it has been a very long struggle indeed.

– A struggle against dispossession and discrimination, exclusion and inequality.

– A struggle against violence and poverty, disease and diminished opportunity.

– A struggle for better health, for better housing, for safer communities, more jobs, for longer lives.

– A struggle against injustice and racism: from the sporting field to the courts of our land.

Above all, a struggle for a better future for their children: a struggle to be counted, to be heard, to be recognised.

In 2015, the Referendum Council was created with a very clear mission.

To consult on what form Constitutional Recognition should take – how it should work.

To listen to Aboriginal people and to be guided by their aspirations.

And to finally give them a say in a document from which too long they been excluded.

Since then, thousands of the first Australians have explained to the rest us what

Recognition means – for all of us, for our children and indeed for all of our futures.

We asked for your views, we sought your counsel – and, in large numbers, it was answered.

At Uluru, you gave us the statement from the heart.

A call for:

– A voice enshrined in the Constitution

– A declaration to be passed by all parliaments, acknowledging the unique place of the first nations in Australian history, their culture, their connection.

– And a Makarrata Commission to oversee a process of agreement-making and truth-telling.

All three of these objectives speak to the long-held and legitimate aspirations of our

First Australians:

– A proper acknowledgment of Aboriginal histories and the dispossession that

followed upon the arrival of the Europeans

– A bigger say in the issues which affect you – no more ‘solutions’ imposed without consultation or consent

– And a more lasting settlement, a new way forward, a new pathway including through treaties.

These ideas are not new – but the Uluru statement did articulate these with new clarity, a new passion, a new sense of truth and purpose.

And let me speak truthfully on behalf of Labor, the Opposition.

I cannot be any more clear than this: Labor supports a voice for Aboriginal people in our Constitution, we support a declaration by all parliaments, we support a truth-telling commission.

We are not confronted by the notion of treaties with our first Australians.

For us the question is not whether we do these things, the question is not if we should do these things but when and how.

The Parliament needs to be engaged.

The Parliament needs to be engaged now.

The Parliament needs to start the process of engaging with the people of Australia now.

It does not come as a surprise to me, that following upon a report of the

Referendum Council, the Parliament’s next step must be to consider this report.

And in doing so, we must carry its message from the heart of Australia into our hearts as parliamentarians. With optimism, with understanding, not with a desire to find what is wrong, but to find the desire to make these concepts work in the interests of all.

If we were all gathered here now, back in 1891 and 1894 and 1897 to write the Constitution, we would never dream of excluding Aboriginal people from the Census.

But in 1901, they did.

If we were starting the Constitution from scratch, we would not diminish the independence of Aboriginal people – with racist powers.

But in 1901, they did.

And if we were starting on an empty piece of paper, we would, without question, recognise the First Australians’ right to a genuine, empowered voice in the decisions that govern their lives.

Now as you know, we cannot unmake history. We do not get the change to start all over again – but it doesn’t mean that we are forever chained to the prejudices of the past.

The Prime Minister’s observations though are correct about the difficulties of constitutional change. But I ask also that we cannot let the failure of 1999 govern our future on this question.

Voting for a constitutional voice is our chance to bring our Constitution home, to make it better, more equal and more Australian.

A document that doesn’t just pay respect to the weight of a foreign crown, but also recognises the power and value of the world’s oldest living culture, recognises that

Aboriginal people were here first.

And of course, let us reject those who say that symbolic change is irrelevant because dealing with these questions does not mean walking away from the real problems of inequality and disadvantage.

– Talking about enshrining a voice does not reduce our determination to eradicate family violence

– It doesn’t stop us creating good local jobs, training apprentices, treating trachoma or supporting rangers on country.

– It doesn’t distract us from the crisis in out-of-home care, youth suicide or the shocking, growing number of Aboriginal people incarcerated for not much better reason than the colour of their skin.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples don’t have to choose between historical justice and real justice, you don’t have to choose between equality in society and equality in the Constitution – you have an equal right to both.

The Uluru Statement has given us a map of the way forward – and today I finally want to talk about how we follow it, how we take the next step.

Not the obstacles ahead, not the problems, real as they are.

Aboriginal Australians don’t need a balanda lecture about the difficulty of changing the Constitution, our inspiration friends, should not be the 1999 referendum, it should be the 1967 referendum.

You have lived that struggle, every day.

Let me be very clear. In my study of our history, in my experience, nothing has ever been given to Aboriginal people – everything that is obtained has been fought for, has been argued for, has been won and built by Aboriginal people.

Think of the Freedom Riders

Think of the Bark Petition, which Gallarwuy was witness to

Think of the Gurindji at Wave Hill

Eddie Mabo and his fight for justice

Nothing was ever sorted by simply waiting until someone came along said let me do it for you. It is not the way the world is organised.

Every bit of progress has been driven by pride, by persistence by that stubborn refusal to not take no for an answer when it comes to the pursuit of equality.

Now making the case for change and encouraging Australians to vote yes for a recognition, reconciliation, and truth – this is not easy.

But before we can do that we surely must agree on the referendum question that has to be the long overdue next step.

I have written to our Prime Minister, we’ve proposed a joint parliamentary committee – which they’re taking on board, having a look at – to be made up of Government, the Opposition and crossbench MPs – to work with Aboriginal leaders right across Australia.

This committee will have two key responsibilities.

One – advising the Parliament on how to set-up a Makarrata Commission and create a framework for truth-telling and agreement making, including treaties.

Two – what would a voice look like. Whilst there are many questions, none of these are insurmountable.

And three, as a matter of overdue recognition – to endeavour to finalise a referendum question in a timely fashion. There’s no reason why that couldn’t be done by the end of this year.

The issues have been traversed for a decade.

Now friends this is not a committee for the sake of a committee, it’s not another mechanism for delay. It is the necessary process of engagement of the Parliament.

But we have had ten years plus of good intentions, but it is time now perhaps, for more action.

The Parliament does have a key role to play here, in setting the question.

The Parliament could agree on the question this year if we all work together so that the people could vote not long after that.

Voting to enshrine a voice in a standalone Referendum – free from the shadow of an election, or the politics of other questions.

It may seem very hard to imagine, it may seem very hard to contemplate.

But it is possible to imagine a great day, a unifying day, a famous victory, a Makaratta for all.

As I said yesterday, we’ve heard plenty of speeches, there are many fine words… but perhaps people have a right to be impatient after ten years – indeed after 117 years.

So the test I set isn’t what we say here, in this beautiful place.

It’s what we do when we leave.

It’s the honesty of admitting that after the event, what is it that we do.

The test I set for myself is can I come here at future Garmas and look you in the eye and say I have done everything I can, because if I cannot say to you that I have done everything I that I can, then I can’t be truthful with my heart.

Yesterday Gallarwuy spoke with a tongue of fire, he told a powerful truth.

He said that for more than two centuries we had been two peoples – living side-by-side, but not united.

I think that is the challenge for politics too.

Djapirri who just spoke up before me, she’s talked about hope. There is the hope that you refer to, you have the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition. We are here side-by-side, and now we need to be united, not to kick the can down the road, but united on a process that says this parliament will respect what we have heard from Aboriginal people.

Not just at Uluru, but for decades.

In 1967, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were counted. In 2017, you are being heard.

There is no reason why we can’t enshrine a voice for Aboriginal people in our Constitution.

Djapirri said, she told me of a dream of a canoe, paddled by the Prime Minister and myself. That in itself is an arresting image. Two captains. But in all seriousness, we appreciated I think the power of that illusion, the power of that dream.

My party is ready.

I think Australia is ready.

The fine words that we heard at the opening yesterday, they remind me of the fire dreaming symbol, which is in the front of the Parliament of Australia.

Fire.

That fire dreaming symbol is from central Australia but it is connected isn’t it, by the word of Djapirri yesterday.

Again, that spirit of fire it is a gift from Indigenous people to all Australians and I sincerely will endeavor to make sure that spirit of fire infuses our Parliament.

NACCHO Research Alert : @NRHAlliance Aboriginal health risk factors #rural and #remote populations

 ” Health risk factors like smoking, excessive drinking, illicit drug use, lack of physical activity, inadequate fruit and vegetable intake and overweight have powerful influences on health, and there are frequently clear inter-regional differences between the prevalence of these.

While it can be argued that there is some degree of personal choice involved in whether individuals have a poor health risk profile, there is clear evidence that external factors such as environment, opportunity, and community culture each have very strong influences.

For example, access to affordable healthy food can often be poor in smaller communities and this, coupled with lower incomes in these areas, adversely affects the quality of peoples’ diets, the prevalence of overweight, and consequently the prevalence of chronic disease.”

From the National Rural Health Alliance Research View HERE

National data pertaining to personal health risk factors typically comes from the ABS National Health Survey and the AIHW National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS). Some State and Territory Health Departments run their own health surveys (which cannot be aggregated nationally with each other or with the ABS survey because of the different methodologies and definitions used (think different State rail gauges). Consequently data describing aspects of health in regional and especially remote areas can be thin (ie with imprecise estimates in some or all areas).

Example 1

Table 14: Fruit and vegetable consumption, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 15+ years, 2012-13

Roughly 60% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians 15+ in Major cities and regional/rural areas have inadequate fruit intake, closer to 50% in remote areas (compared with around 50% of all Australians 18+ in major cities and regional/rural areas).

Roughly 95% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians 15+ in Major cities and regional/rural areas have inadequate vegetable intake, perhaps higher (98%) in Very remote areas (compared with around 90%-94% of all Australians 18+ in major cities and regional/rural areas).

Example 2

NACCHO provided graphic

Table 16 Below : Overweight and Obesity, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 15+ years, 2012-13

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in rural/regional and Remote areas (29%-33%) were a little more likely to be overweight than those in Major cities (28%), with those in Very Remote areas (26%) least likely to be overweight.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Inner regional areas (41%) were more likely to be obese than those in Major cities (38%), but those in Outer regional (36%) and remote areas (~33%) were less likely to be obese.

Overall, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Inner Regional areas were most likely to be overweight/obese (70%), those in Major cities, Outer Regional and Remote areas were less likely to be overweight/obese (~66%), while those in Very Remote areas were the least likely to be overweight/obese (59% )

At the time of writing, the most recent National Health Survey was conducted in 2014-15[1], while the most recent AIHW NDSHS[2] was conducted in 2016, with most recently available results from the 2013 NDSHS. The most recent ABS Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey[3] was conducted in 2012-13.

Some organisations (eg the Public Health Information Development Unit (PHIDU)) have calculated modelled estimates for small areas (eg SLA’s and PHN’s), where the prevalence of some risk factors has been predicted based on the age, sex and socioeconomic profile of the population living there.

Some sites (eg ABS) present risk factor data as crude rates, other sites (eg PHIDU) present risk factor data as age-standardised rates.  The advantage of the age-standardised rates is that the effect of age is largely removed from inter-population comparisons.

For example, older populations (eg those in rural/regional areas) would be expected to have higher average blood pressure than younger (eg Major cities) populations even though the underlying age-specific rates happened to be identical in both populations (because older people tend to have higher blood pressure than younger people).

While crude rates for the older population will be higher, the age-standardised rates in such a comparison would be the same – indicating a higher rate that is entirely explainable by the older age of one of the populations.

Both crude and age standardised rates are useful in understanding the health of rural and remote populations.

 


[1] http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/4364.0.55.001

[3] http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4727.0.55.0012012-13?OpenDocumentSmoking

Table 1: Smoking status, by remoteness, 2013 and 2014-15

MC

IR

OR/Remote

Percentage

Current daily smoker (18+) (crude) 2014-15 (a)

13.0

16.7

20.9

Current smoker (18+) (Age standardised) 2014-15 (b) (includes daily, weekly, social etc smoking)

14.6

19.0

22.4

MC

IR

OR

Remote+ Very Remote

Current smoker (daily, weekly, or fortnightly) 14+ (crude) 2013 (c)

14.2

17.6

22.6

24.6

Current smoker (daily, weekly, or fortnightly) 14+ (Age standardised) 2013 (d)

14.2

18.6

23.6

24.4

Mean number of cigarettes smoked per week, smokers aged 14 years or older 2013 (e)

85.9

113.1

109.4

126.2

Sources:

Compared with Major cities (13%), the prevalence of daily smoking by people 18 years and older in Inner regional (17%) and Outer regional/Remote areas (21%) is higher.

The NDSH survey reflects these trends albeit with a slightly different age group (14+) and a different definition of smoking (daily plus less frequently), but the NDSH survey adds detail for remote areas where smoking rates are higher again (around 25% versus around 23% in Outer regional).

In addition, the average number of cigarettes smoked by each smoker is higher in regional/rural areas (~110/week) than in Major cities (86/week), and higher again (126/week) in remote areas.

 

Smoking – exposure, uptake, establishment, quitting

Table 2: Smoking characteristics by Remoteness, 2013, 2014 and 2014-15

MC

IR

OR

remote

8.8

17.8

19.3

27.8

Proportion of pregnant women who gave birth and smoked at any time during the pregnancy (2013, crude, National Perinatal Data Collection, exposure tables, Table 5.1.2 )

8.5

17.0

18.9

27.5

Proportion of pregnant women who gave birth and smoked in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy (2013, crude, National Perinatal Data Collection) exposure tables, Table 5.2.2)

3.6

3.1

4.1

*9.4

Proportion of dependent children (aged 0–14) who live in a household with a daily smoker who smokes inside the home (2013, crude, NDSHS exposure tables, Table 6.3)

2.5

2.0

2.7

*2.9

Proportion of adults aged 18 or older who live in a household with a daily smoker who smokes inside the home (2013, crude, NDSHS, exposure tables, Table 7.3)

16.2

15.4

14.7

15.5

Average age at which people aged 14–24 first smoked a full cigarette (2013, crude, NDSHS, uptake tables, Table 9.3)

17.8

22.7

17.8

28.3

Proportion of 12–17 year old secondary school students smoking at least a few puffs of a cigarette (2014, crude, Australian Secondary Students Alcohol and Drug Survey 2014, uptake tables, Table 10.3

54.7

61.1

64.9

67.2

Proportion of persons (aged 18 or older) who have smoked a full cigarette (2013, crude,  NDSHS, uptake tables, Table 10.8)

2.5

3.4

2.5

3.7

Proportion of secondary school students (aged 12–17) who have smoked more than 100 cigarettes in their lifetime (2014, crude, Australian Secondary Students Alcohol and Drug Survey 2014, transition tables, Table 2.3)

20.2

25.9

44.1

45.2

Proportion of young people (aged 18–24) who have smoked more than 100 cigarettes in their lifetime (2013, crude, NDSHS, transition tables, Table 2.6)

21.3

16.8

19.0

15.5

Quitting: Proportion successfully gave up for more than a month (2013, crude, NDSHS, cessation tables, Table 4.3)

29.2

34.2

31.7

32.9

Quitting, Proportion unsuccessful (2013, crude, NDSHS, cessation tables, Table 4.3)

46.3

48.0

47.4

45.2

Quitting: Proportion any attempt (2013, crude, NDSHS, cessation tables, Table 4.3)

35.2

36.3

36.1

36.0

Mean age at which ex-smokers aged 18 or older reported no longer smoking (2013, crude, NDSHS, cessation tables, Table 11.2)

53.1

51.5

46.3

45.0

The proportion of ever smokers aged 18 or older who did not smoke in the last 12 months (2013, crude, NDSHS, cessation tables, Table 12.3)

4.9

6.0

4.8

7.0

Proportion of secondary school students (aged 12–17) who were weekly smokers (2014, crude, Australian Secondary Students Alcohol and Drug Survey 2014, established tables, Table 1.3)

6.9

9.3

6.8

10.4

Proportion of secondary school students (aged 12–17) who were monthly smokers (2014, crude, Australian Secondary Students Alcohol and Drug Survey 2014, established tables, Table 13.3)

13.0

16.7

21.2

18.8

Proportion of adults aged 18 or older who are daily smokers (2014-15, crude, ABS NHS, established tables, Table 3.3)

10.9

7.8

2.9

n.p.

Proportion of smokers aged 18 or older who are occasional smokers (smoke weekly or less than weekly) (2014-15, crude, ABS NHS, established tables, Table 14.3)

40.1

44.7

42.3

52.7

Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 18 or older who are daily smokers (2012-13, crude, ABS Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey 2012–13, established tables, Table 8i.3)

Source: http://www.aihw.gov.au/alcohol-and-other-drugs/data/ (sighted 11/7/17)
Note: Those estimates above with asterix have large standard errors and should be treated carefully.

Women in rural and remote areas were much more likely to smoke during pregnancy, with 28% of women in remote areas smoking during pregnancy, compared with 18-19% in regional/rural areas, and 9% in Major cities.

It is unclear whether exposure to environmental tobacco smoke varies by remoteness.

Young people outside major cities appeared to have their first cigarette at an earlier age (~15 years as opposed to ~16 years in Major cities.

Secondary school students in Inner regional (~23%) and remote (~28%) areas were more likely to have had at least a few puffs of a cigarette than those in major cities (~18%).

While 20% of young people in Major cities had smoked more than 100 cigarettes in their lifetime, 26%, 44% and 45% of young people in Inner regional, Outer regional and remote areas had done so.

People outside Major cities were as likely or slightly more likely to have attempted to quit smoking, but were less likely to be successful (and more likely to be unsuccessful).

A higher proportion of secondary students outside Major cities were weekly or monthly smokers (6%, 5% and 7% in IR, OR and remote areas versus 5% in Major cities weekly, 9%, 7%, and 10% in IR, OR and remote areas versus 7% in Major cities monthly).

Table 3: Current daily smoker, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 15+ years, by Remoteness, 2012-13

MC

IR

OR

R

VR

Crude Percent

Current daily smoker

36.2

40.9

39.8

47.4

51.1

Source: http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4727.0.55.0012012-13?OpenDocument Table 2 (sighted 12/7/17)

Prevalence of smoking amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 15 years and older is around 35%-40% in Major cities and regional/rural areas, and close to 50% in remote areas. Note that while the pattern is similar in Table 2 and Table 3 above, the figures for 18+ and 15+ year olds are slightly different.

Smoking Trends

Table 4: Comparison of declines in smoking rate estimates across remoteness areas, people 18+, based on ABS NHS surveys, 2001 to 2011-12

Survey year

MC

IR

OR/Rem

Australia

Crude percent daily smokers

2001

21.9

21.9

26.5

22.4

2004-05

19.9

23.0

26.2

21.3

2007-08

17.5

20.1

26.1

18.9

2011-12

14.7

18.3

22.2

16.1

2014-15

13.0

16.7

20.9

14.5

Source: ABS National Health Surveys

From Table 4 above, rates of smoking have clearly declined in Major cities areas, but have been slower to decline in Inner regional and Outer regional/Remote areas. Rates of smoking in rural areas, apparently static last decade, now appear to be declining. Rates in Major cities and Inner regional areas have declined to 0.59 and 0.76 times the 2001 rates in these areas. The 2014-15 rate in Outer regional areas is 0.79 times the 2001 rate.

Figure 1: Daily smokers 18 years and older, 2007-08, 2011-12 and 2014-15, NHS

Figure 1: Daily smokers 18 years and older, 2007-08, 2011-12 and 2014-15, NHS

Source: ABS NHS http://www.aihw.gov.au/alcohol-and-other-drugs/data/ established tables, Table 3.3 (sighted 11/7/17)

Figure 2: Smokers 14 years and older, 2007, 2010 and 2013, NDSHS

Figure 2: Smokers 14 years and older, 2007, 2010 and 2013, NDSHS

Source: AIHW NDSHS http://www.aihw.gov.au/alcohol-and-other-drugs/data/ tobacco smoking table S3.12 (sighted 11/7/17)

Note: Smokers include daily, weekly and less frequent smokers.

Figures 1 and 2 above both show clear declines in Major cities and Inner regional areas, but the trend in Outer regional and Remote areas is less clear, with ABS data showing a decline in daily smoking rates for people aged 18+ between 2007-8 and 2014-15, but NDSHS data showing little change in smoking rates for people 14+ between 2007 and 2013.

Alcohol

Table 5: Alcohol risk status, by remoteness, 2013 and 2014-15

Alcohol consumption

MC

IR

OR/Rem

Exceeded 2009 NHMRC lifetime risk guidelines, people 18+, crude %, 2014-15 (a)

16.3

18.4

23.4

Exceeded 2009 NHMRC lifetime risk guidelines, people 15+, age standardised %, 2014-15 (b)

15.7

17.4

22.0

Exceeded 2009 NHMRC single occasion risk guidelines, people 18+, crude %, 2014-15 (a)

42.7

48.5

46

MC

IR

OR

R/VR

Abstainer/ex-drinker, crude %, 14+, 2013 (c)

23.1

18.9

20.5

17.5

Low lifetime risk, crude %, 14+, 2013 (c)

60.2

62

56.9

47.6

High lifetime risk, crude %, 14+, 2013 (c)

16.7

19.1

22.6

34.9

low single occasion risk, crude %, 14+, 2013 (c)

40.4

41.8

38.1

30.8

Single occasion risk less than weekly, crude %, 14+, 2013 (c)

23.5

24.4

23.6

22.8

Single occasion risk at least weekly, crude %, 14+, 2013 (c)

13

14.9

17.8

28.9

Sources:

Table 6: Alcohol consumption against 2009 NHMRC guidelines, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 15+ years, by Remoteness 2012-13

MC

IR

OR

R

VR

Percent

Exceeded lifetime risk guidelines

18.0

18.7

18.2

22.5

14.3

Exceeded single occasion risk guidelines

56.7

57.4

50.7

59.0

41.4

Source: http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4727.0.55.0012012-13?OpenDocument Table 2 (sighted 12/7/17)

The figures in Table 6 are not strictly comparable with those for the total population in Table 5, because  Table 6 refers to people who are 15 years and older, while Table 5 refers to people who are 18 years and older.

The percentage of the 15+ ATSI population exceeding 2009 NHMRC Lifetime risk guidelines is around 15-20% with little apparent inter-regional variation, compared with, for the total population 18+,  16% in Major cities, increasing to 23% in Outer regional/remote areas.

The percentage of the 15+ ATSI population exceeding the 2009 single occasion risk guidelines is around 50-60%, and around 40% in Very remote areas, compared with, for the total population 18+,  40-50% in Major cities, rural and regional areas.

Alcohol trends

Table 7: Type of alcohol use and treatment for alcohol, by remoteness area (per 1,000 population)

MC

IR

OR

R/VR

single occasion risk (monthly) 2004

287

304

321

370

2007

285

292

312

437

2010

274

312

329

413

2013

250

273

315

422

lifetime risk 2004

200

215

234

262

2007

199

210

238

314

2010

189

225

251

310

2013

167

191

226

349

very high risk – yearly 2004

167

185

206

243

2007

172

183

206

288

2010

161

183

218

266

2013

151

166

194

258

very high risk – monthly 2004

77

84

104

130

2007

78

89

100

153

2010

79

94

113

154

2013

70

70

100

170

very high risk – weekly 2004

21

27

41

38

2007

24

28

24

50

2010

37

43

54

78

2013

27

28

38

70

Closed treatment episodes 2004–05

61

72

60

58

2007–08

76

84

80

129

2010–11

69

96

87

135

2013–14

68

79

93

155

Source: NDSHS,  http://www.aihw.gov.au/alcohol-and-other-drugs/data/  alcohol -supplementary data tables, Table S18

Notes:
Single occasion risk (monthly): Had more than 4 standard drinks at least once a month
Lifetime risk: On average, had more than 2 standard drinks per day
Very high risk (yearly): Had more than 10 standard drinks at least once a year
Very high risk (monthly): Had more than 10 standard drinks at least once a month
Very high risk (weekly): Had more than 10 standard drinks at least once a week

There is a clear increase in the prevalence of people who drink alcohol in such a way as to increase their single occasion risk (eg from car accident, assault, fall, etc) and their lifetime risk (eg from chronic disease – liver disease, dementia, cancer etc) as remoteness increases.

In 2013, single occasion risk ranged from 25% of people 14 years or older in major cities to 42% of people in remote areas, while lifetime risk increased from 17% in major cities to 35% in remote areas.

In 2013, The prevalence of people who drank more than 10 standard drinks in one sitting at least once per week, increased from just under 3% in Major cities to 7% in remote areas.

In 2013-14, there were just under 70 closed treatment episodes per 1,000 people living in Major cities, increasing to around 80 and 90 per 1,000 population in Inner and Outer regional areas, to 155 per 1,000 people living in remote Australia.

 

Illicit drug use 2013

Table 8: Illicit drug use, “recent users” 14+, 2013

MC IR OR remote

Crude percent

Cannabis

9.8

10.0

12.0

13.6

Ecstasy

2.9

1.5

1.6

*1.8

Meth/amphetamine

2.1

1.6

2.0

*4.4

Cocaine

2.6

0.8

*1.1

*2.5

Any illicit drug

14.9

14.1

16.7

18.7

Source: AIHW National Drug Strategy Household Survey, 2013. http://www.aihw.gov.au/alcohol-and-other-drugs/data/  Illicit drug use (supplementary) tables S5.6, S5.11, S5.17, S5.21, S5.26.

Note: * indicates large standard error (therefore some degree of uncertainty)

Illicit drug use appears to be higher in Outer regional and remote areas compared with Major cities and Inner regional areas, in large part due to higher rates of cannabis use in these areas, but with apparent lower use of ecstasy and cocaine in regional areas compared with Major cities.

 

Physical activity

Table 9: Physical inactivity, people 18+, 2014-15

MC

IR

OR/Remote

Percentage of people aged 18+ who undertook no or low exercise in the previous week (crude) (a)

64.3

70.1

72.4

Percentage of people aged 18+ who undertook no or low exercise in the previous week (age standardised) (b)

64.8

68.6

71

Sources:
(a) ABS NHS (http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4364.0.55.0012014-15?OpenDocument Table 6.3)
(b) PHIDU (ABS NHS data) (http://phidu.torrens.edu.au/social-health-atlases/data#social-health-atlas-of-australia-remoteness-areas) sighted 18/7/2017

Note that level of exercise is based on exercise undertaken for fitness, sport or recreation in the last week.

Physical inactivity appears to be more prevalent with remoteness, increasing from 65% of people in Major cities to 71% in Outer regional/remote areas.

Table 10: Average daily steps, 2011-12

MC

IR

OR/Rem

Average daily steps, 18+ years, 2011-12 (a)

7,393

7,388

7,527

Average daily steps, 5-17years, 2011-12 (b)

9,097

9,266

9,160

Sources:

In 2011-12, adults living in Outer regional/Remote areas took slightly more steps than those living in Major cities or Inner regional areas, while the number of steps taken by children and adolescents in regional/Remote areas was slightly greater compared with those in Major cities.

Table 11: Average time spent on physical activity and sedentary behaviour by persons aged 18+, 2011-12

MC

IR

OR/Remote

Australia

Hours

Physical activity(a)

3.9

3.4

3.9

3.8

Sedentary behaviour (leisure only)(b)

29.3

28.0

27.9

28.9

Sedentary behaviour (leisure and work)(b)

40.2

35.2

36.0

38.8

Notes:
(a) Includes walking for transport/fitness, moderate and vigorous physical activity.
(b) Sedentary is defined as sitting or lying down for activities.

Source: ABS 2011-12 Australian Health Survey (Physical activity) http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4364.0.55.0042011-12?OpenDocument  Table 5.1

Adults living in Inner regional and Outer regional/Remote areas were about as likely as (or very slightly less likely than) those in Major cities to be sedentary in their leisure time, but appeared to be slightly less likely to be sedentary overall (ie their work involved a greater level of physical activity).

Table 12: Whether children aged 2-17 years met physical and screen-based activity recommendations, 2011-12

MC

IR

OR/Rem

Crude percentage

Met physical activity recommendation on all 7 days(a)(b)

27.5

34.3

34.2

Met screen-based activity recommendation on all 7 days(b)(c)

28.0

29.7

31.0

Met physical activity and screen-based recommendations on all 7 days (a)(b)(c)

9.7

10.9

14.2

Notes:
(a) The physical activity recommendation for children 2–4 years is 180 minutes or more per day, for children 5-17 years it is 60 minutes or more per day. See Physical activity recommendation in Glossary.
(b) In 7 days prior to interview.
(c) The screen-based recommendation for children 2–4 years is no more than 60 minutes per day, for children 5-17 years it is no more than 2 hours per day for entertainment purposes.

Source:
ABS 2011-12 Australian Health Survey (Physical activity) http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4364.0.55.0042011-12?OpenDocument  Table 14.3

Children in rural and regional Australia appeared more likely (34% vs 28%) to meet physical activity recommendations and slightly more likely (30%vs 28%) to meet screen-based activity recommendations than their Major cities counterparts.

 

Fruit and vegetable consumption

Table 13: Fruit and vegetable consumption, people 18+ years, by remoteness, 2014-15

MC

IR

OR/Remote

Crude Percentage

Inadequate fruit consumption(a)

50.0

50.6

51.2

Inadequate fruit consumption(b)

50.4

48.3

48.0

Inadequate vegetable consumption(a)

93.4

93.5

89.3

Inadequate vegetable consumption(b)

n.p.

n.p.

n.p.

Sources:
(a) ABS NHS (http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4364.0.55.0012014-15?OpenDocument Table 6.3)
(b) PHIDU (ABS NHS data) (http://phidu.torrens.edu.au/social-health-atlases/data#social-health-atlas-of-australia-remoteness-areas) sighted 18/7/2017

Note that adequacy of consumption is based on comparison with 2013 NHMRC guidelines.

Half of adult Australians eat insufficient fruit, with little clear difference between major cities and regional/rural areas.

Around 90% of adult Australians ate insufficient vegetables, with little clear difference between major cities and regional/rural areas.

Table 14: Fruit and vegetable consumption, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 15+ years, 2012-13

MC

IR

OR

R

VR

Crude Percent

Inadequate daily fruit consumption (2013 NHMRC Guidelines)

59.0

60.6

56.9

54.9

49.1

Inadequate daily fruit consumption (2003 NHMRC Guidelines)

62.1

63.6

59.8

58.3

51.6

Inadequate daily vegetables consumption (2013 NHMRC Guidelines)

95.9

93.5

93.6

94.5

97.9

Inadequate daily vegetables consumption (2003 NHMRC Guidelines)

93.8

90.6

90.5

91.2

96.1

Source: http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4727.0.55.0012012-13?OpenDocument Table 2 (sighted 12/7/17)

Roughly 60% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians 15+ in Major cities and regional/rural areas have inadequate fruit intake, closer to 50% in remote areas (compared with around 50% of all Australians 18+ in major cities and regional/rural areas).

Roughly 95% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians 15+ in Major cities and regional/rural areas have inadequate vegetable intake, perhaps higher (98%) in Very remote areas (compared with around 90%-94% of all Australians 18+ in major cities and regional/rural areas).

 

 

Overweight and Obesity

Table 15: Overweight and Obesity, people 18+ years, by remoteness, 2014-15

MC

IR

OR/Remote

Crude Percentage

Persons, overweight/obese (a)

61.1

69.2

69.2

Age standardised percentage

Males overweight (b)

43.8

41.1

34.3

Males obese (b)

25.8

33.1

38.2

Females overweight (b)

28.9

28.3

30.1

Females obese (b)

25.0

32.4

33.7

People  overweight (b)

36.2

34.4

31.4

People obese (b)

25.4

32.6

35.8

Sources:
(a) ABS NHS (http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4364.0.55.0012014-15?OpenDocument Table 6.3)
(b) ABS NHS http://phidu.torrens.edu.au/social-health-atlases/data#social-health-atlas-of-australia-remoteness-areas

Adults in rural/regional areas are more likely to be overweight or obese than people in Major cities (69% vs 61%).

However, there were inter-regional BMI and gender differences:

  • Compared with those in Major cities, males in Inner regional and especially Outer-regional areas were less likely to be overweight (41% and 34%, vs 44%) but much more likely to be obese (33% and 38% vs 26%).
  • Compared with those in Major cities, females in Inner regional and Outer-regional areas were about as likely to be overweight (~29%) but much more likely to be obese (~33% vs 25%).

 

Table 16: Overweight and Obesity, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 15+ years, 2012-13

MC

IR

OR

R

VR

Crude Percent

Overweight

27.5

28.8

30.1

32.5

26.4

Obese

37.9

41.3

36.2

33.1

32.3

Overweight/obese

65.4

70.1

66.2

65.6

58.8

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in rural/regional and Remote areas (29%-33%) were a little more likely to be overweight than those in Major cities (28%), with those in Very Remote areas (26%) least likely to be overweight.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Inner regional areas (41%) were more likely to be obese than those in Major cities (38%), but those in Outer regional (36%) and remote areas (~33%) were less likely to be obese.

Overall, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Inner Regional areas were most likely to be overweight/obese (70%), those in Major cities, Outer Regional and Remote areas were less likely to be overweight/obese (~66%), while those in Very Remote areas were the least likely to be overweight/obese (59%).

These figures compare with 61% – the prevalence of overweight/obesity for (predominantly non-Indigenous) people living in Major cities.

 

High blood pressure

Table 17: High blood pressure, people 18+, by Remoteness, 2014-15

MC

IR

OR/Remote

Percentage

Crude % (a)

21.9

27.1

24

Age standardised % (b)

22.7

24.6

22.1

Sources:

(a) ABS NHS (http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4364.0.55.0012014-15?OpenDocument Table 6.3)
(b) ABS NHS http://phidu.torrens.edu.au/social-health-atlases/data#social-health-atlas-of-australia-remoteness-areas

Age for age, people in rural/regional Australia appeared to be as likely, or very slightly more likely to have high blood pressure than their counterparts in Major cities (~23% vs ~24%). However, because people in rural/regional areas are older (on average), the prevalence of people with high blood pressure is higher (~26% vs 22%) than

Updated 31/07/2017
To view archived Risk Factors click here

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Smoking : Download Tackling Indigenous Smoking Program prelim. evaluation report

 ” The overall goal of the national Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) program is to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through local population specific efforts to reduce harm from tobacco.

The purpose of this preliminary report is to provide a mid-term evaluation of progress to date in implementing the first year of the three year (2015-2018) TIS program.

The TIS programme with a budget of $116.8 million over 3 years ($35.3 million in 2015-16; $37.5 million in 2016-17 and $44 million in 2017-18) was announced by the Government, on 29 May 2015.”

Download 133 page PDF report Here :

NACCHO Download Dept Health Tackling Indigenous Smoking Evaluation June 2017

The report found the program is operating effectively, using proven approaches to change smoking behaviours, and delivering evidence-based local tobacco health promotion activities. I am pleased the report recommends it continues,

Smoking is the most preventable cause of disease and early death among Aboriginal people and accounts for almost one-quarter of the difference in average health outcomes between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

“The program provides grants in 37 urban, rural, regional and remote areas to assist local communities to develop localised anti-smoking campaigns

Minister Ken Wyatt

Read over 100 plus NACCHO articles published in past 5 years

This mid-term evaluation looks at progress to date of the TIS program, particularly in terms of regional grants delivering localised Indigenous tobacco interventions.

Source of intro

See list all 35 Recipients below

It does not look at long-term impact in relation to a reduction of smoking rates at a national level.

Findings focus on (see in full below 1-9)

  • the shift to TIS
  • community engagement and partnerships
  • localised health promotion
  • access to quit support
  • contribution to evidence base
  • National Best Practice Unit and TIS portal
  • governance and communications.

A number of key recommendations emerging from the evaluation are included in the report.(see Below Part 2)

Findings

1. Shift to TIS

Since the implementation of the TIS program, all grant recipients are primarily focused on planning for, and/or delivering, targeted and tailored activities that directly address reduction of smoking prevalence within communities.

For some grant recipients, broader health promotion activities without a clear link to tobacco reduction have dropped off significantly as a result of the shift to TIS, whilst for others the integration of healthy lifestyle and tobacco control strategies has been successful. There are varying degrees of clarity among grant recipients about the extent to which there is flexibility to tap into healthy lifestyle activities under the new guidelines.

2.Community engagement and partnerships

Community engagement and involvement in the design and planning of localised TIS programs is a key priority for grant recipients, and a key indicator of successful TIS activities.

While challenges were identified in terms of handling competing priorities in community, adhering to cultural protocols, and the change in focus of the TIS program and uncertainty about ongoing funding, in the main, grant recipients have demonstrated substantial progress in involving community in design and planning and garnering support for TIS activities.

This is evidenced by the popularity of community events hosted/attended by the TIS team and the proactivity of local community and Elders in advocating for tobacco control.

The success of the TIS program and the capacity for grant recipients to operate as a multi-level population health program in their region is highly dependent upon the quality and reach of partnerships between grant recipients and other agencies/organisations.

Whilst challenges to regional collaborations were reported, overall there has been a noticeable increase in the reporting of grant recipient collaboration and partnerships, representing an important shift to both a wider regional focus and wider community approach to tobacco reduction.

3.Localised health promotion

At the local level, a range of multi-component health promotion activities around tobacco control are being undertaken by grant recipients, in collaboration with external stakeholders. Local partnerships are crucial to the successful implementation of localised health promotion activities through facilitating access to priority populations, supporting capacity-building and enabling a broader population reach to achieve awareness and understanding of the health impacts of smoking and quitting pathways. viii

Increased levels of community support and ownership for local solutions to tackling Indigenous smoking are being seen across the TIS sites.

4.Community education

Community education, is being undertaken by all grant recipients. This manifests in a range of ways, including health promotion activities at community/sporting events, drama shows and comedy and social marketing.

The involvement of local champions and Elders in local education and awareness raising events and activities is recognised as central to tobacco control messages resonating with target audiences.

It has also been recognised that targeting priority groups, such as young people and pregnant women, requires the adaptation of messages so that they resonate with those groups.

Grant recipients are partnering with key local organisations (e.g. schools, other AMS etc.) to overcome some of the challenges around access to these priority groups.

Many grant recipients have established or showed progress in establishing social marketing campaigns to supplement other health promotion activities. Campaigns are developed largely through a strength-based approach, with ‘local faces and local places’ taking precedence. Grant recipients have acknowledged the challenges in measuring the impact of social marketing campaigns although some are demonstrating a commitment to collecting data on awareness, and influences on motivations and attempts to quit.

5.Smoke-free environments

An area that has been recognised by grant recipients as requiring attention is the promotion and establishment of smoke-free environments, particularly in rural and remote locations. Modelling smoke-free environments within the grant recipients’ own workplace is one way in which this issue is being addressed, with some evidence of success.

Challenges to the implementation of smoke-free workplaces include getting support from senior leaders or Board members who smoke, and organisations where tobacco control is not the main priority. Monitoring the compliance of smoke-free environments presented an additional challenge to grant recipients. Some external organisations have requested support to become smoke-free, and successful examples of smoke-free environments including smoke-free community events are evident.

Shifting attitudes around second-hand smoke (e.g. smoking indoors and in cars) and some evidence of behaviour change were reported by grant recipients and community members.

6.Access to quit support

TIS funded organisations are encouraged to take a systems approach to activity planning. The TIS program is part of a larger preventive health care system, all connected in different ways such as through referral pathways, and client appointments.

A key component of the TIS program is therefore enhancement of referral pathways and promoting access to quit support. Grant recipients have developed a range of opportunities for community members to achieve smoking cessation, with referral pathways having been established in two key areas: clinic-based referrals within their organisation and referrals made during localised TIS health promotion activities.

For some, successful referral pathways are dependent upon grant recipients partnering with external organisations.

Improving access to culturally appropriate support to quit has been a key focus of the grant recipients over the past 12 months.

Quitline enhancements are a component of the TIS program and data suggests that referrals to Quitline are higher in urban and some rural areas. Continuing to build strong partnerships between grant recipients and Quitline will be key to increasing referrals from local TIS programs into Quitline where appropriate.

Another key focus for grant recipients has been in increasing the skills of TIS workers and other professionals in contact with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to provide smoking cessation education and brief interventions. Quits kills training, and other smoking cessation education programs, have been accessed to support this goal.

7.Contributions to evidence base

The shift to delivering activities based in evidence and focusing more on outcomes than outputs has been welcomed by grant recipients, in the main, and has provided greater direction for activities and a goal to work towards.

A range of activities were undertaken by grant recipients to develop or strengthen their evidence base and work towards measurable outcomes. Collecting data remained challenging for some remote grant recipients operating in contexts with low literacy levels and where English is not the first language. Health service grant recipients wanting to collect population level data was also challenging when services are operating on different databases within a region and where there was an unwillingness to share data.

Overall, grant recipients expressed a willingness to focus on outcomes, and the confidence and capability to obtain data, although interpreting and reporting on data was presented as a challenge.

8.National Best Practice Unit and TIS portal

Advice and guidance around monitoring, measuring and further improving local TIS programs is provided to grant recipients through the NBPU TIS. Grant recipients have indicated that they value the support and advice provided through the NBPU TIS and this has aided in building their confidence and capacity to undertake monitoring and evaluation activities.

Some grant recipients reported that an additional level of support from NBPU TIS was needed. Resistance to change is common in any business when new processes are set in place. NBPU TIS therefore expected, and has witnessed, some resistance to this change. However, it continues to engage with grant recipients and support significant processes of change, not just reporting and compliance.

Another component of the work of the NBPU TIS is the development and ongoing maintenance and improvement of the Tackling Indigenous Smoking Resource and Information Centre (TISRIC) and its home, the TIS Portal (hosted by Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet).

Information and resources to support grant recipients in planning, monitoring, and evaluating activities, as well as information on workforce development is provided through the TIS Portal.

In addition, the Portal hosts an online forum (TIS Yarning Place) that enables grant recipients from across the country to share information and ask questions. Evaluation findings suggest that, whilst grant recipients are utilising the TIS Portal, some grant recipients have identified opportunities to enhance the useability of the TIS Portal.

9.Governance and communications

Various components of support are provided to grant recipients by the department and the NBPU TIS regarding the new focus and priorities and expectations of the TIS program.

To ensure consistent program messaging, and to enhance performance reporting, a range of initiatives were undertaken in the latter half of 2016 to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the various ‘players’ in the national TIS program.

The loss of experienced staff due to funding uncertainty has represented a significant challenge for several grant recipients in their planning and implementing activities.

Particularly in remote areas, recruitment has been an issue for many grant recipients due to the mix of skills demanded of TIS staff. Grant recipients report continued issues attracting and retaining staff with only short term contracts under the new TIS program.

Despite these concerns, indications are that providing grant recipients are given sufficient time and support to execute their Action Plans, they are on track for achieving stated tobacco reduction outcomes. The key risk to this is workforce stability, which would be mitigated by timely advice about the outcome of ongoing funding arrangements.

A number of key recommendations have emerged out of the evaluation findings:

Overall recommendations

1. Department: The TIS program in its current form should be continued, with a move away from short-term funding cycles.

2. Department: Provide immediate advice about the funding of TIS from June 2017 to end of current funding cycle.

Shift to TIS

3. Department: Provide clarity around what is allowable in relation to healthy lifestyle activities within the current iteration of the TIS program  Community engagement and partnerships

4. Grant recipients: Continue to broker partnerships and leverage relationships.

5. NBPU TIS: Continue to build capability of grant recipients to broker partnerships and leverage relationships through the distribution and promotion of relevant resources.

Community education and awareness

6. Grant recipients: Continue to identify and prioritise key groups, especially pregnant women.

7. Grant recipients: Ensure evidence-based best practice community education models (including monitoring and evaluation approaches) are sought and adopted where appropriate.

8. NBPU TIS: Ensure the evidence-based best practice community education models (including monitoring and evaluation approaches) are available, particularly for priority target groups such as pregnant women and activities around social marketing.

Smoke-free environments

9. Grant recipients: Continue to explore implementing smoke-free workplaces and enhance support for smoke-free public spaces.

10. National Coordinator: Lead a dialogue between regional leaders, including CEOs, Board members of TIS and non-TIS funded organisations around establishing smoke-free environments.

Access to quitting support

11. Grant recipients: Continue to strengthen partnerships with Quitline and other quit support structures where appropriate.  Contribution to larger evidence base

12. Grant recipients: Build on routine and existing data sources to reduce data collection burden.

National support

13. Grant recipients: Continue to seek feedback from NBPU TIS regarding M&E activities where required.

14. NBPU TIS: Continue to respond to feedback from GRs around M&E needs and TIS portal content and use ability.

15. Department: Articulate the role of the National coordinator  in the context that the program has evolved and as such his role has evolved. Governance and communication

16. Department: Provide greater clarification of TIS funding parameters, especially in terms of incorporation of healthy lifestyle activities and one-on-one smoking cessation support.

The Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) regional tobacco control grants aim to improve the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through population health activities to reduce tobacco use. It is an initiative of the Australian Government Department of Health (DoH).

At the end of 2015, a number of organisations were notified of their success in gaining a TIS grant for culturally appropriate tobacco cessation programs. The grants were awarded to a variety of service providers across the nation.

The 35 organisations that have commenced their programs are:

With the program funding provided until 2018, the successful organisations will work towards the intended outcomes of the TIS programme, including:

  • encouraging community involvement in and support for local tobacco control activities
  • increasing community understanding of the dangers of smoking and chewing tobacco
  • improving knowledge, skills and a better understanding of the health impacts of smoking.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Events / Workshops #SaveADate #NACCHOAgm17 @IAHA_National @AIDAAustralia

4 August : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s day

7 August Victorian Aboriginal Health Education Conference

8-9 August 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis Alaska in August 2017

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

20-23 September AIDA Conference 2017

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra Details to be released soon (July 2017)

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

If you have a Conference, Workshop Funding opportunity or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media

mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

Developed in consultation with NACCHO and produced by the Mental Health Professionals’ Network a federally funded initiative

Join our interdisciplinary panel as we explore a collaborative approach to reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services.

The webinar format will include a facilitated question and answer session between panel members exploring key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities.

The panel will discuss strategies to enhance cultural awareness and develop responsive services for Indigenous communities affected by incarceration. Strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing of individuals will also be explored.

When: Wednesday 13th September, 2017

Time: 4.30pm – 5.45pm (AEST)

Where: Online – via your computer, tablet or mobile

Cost: Free

Panel:

  • Dr Mark Wenitong (Medical Advisor based in QLD)
  • Dr Marshall Watson (Psychiatrist based in SA)
  • Dr Jeffrey Nelson (Clinical Psychologist based in QLD)
  • Julie Tongs (OAM) (CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service – Narrabundah ACT)

Facilitator:

  • Dr Mary Emeleus (General Practitioner and Psychotherapist based in QLD)

Read more about our panel.

Learning Outcomes:

Through an exploration of incarceration, the webinar will provide participants with the opportunity to:

  • Describe key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities
  • Develop strategies to enhance culturally aware and responsive services for Indigenous people and communities affected by incarceration
  • Identify strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing

Before the webinar:

Register HERE

4 August each year, Children’s Day

SNAICC has announced the theme for this year’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s day

Held on 4 August each year, Children’s Day has been celebrated across the country since 1988 and is Australia’s largest national day to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

The theme for Children’s Day 2017 is Value Our Rights, Respect Our Culture, Bring Us Home which recognises the 20th anniversary of the Bringing them Home Report and the many benefits our children experience when they are raised with strong connections to family and culture.

The ‘Children’s Day’ website is now open

7 August Victorian Aboriginal Health Education Conference

See above for registration links

8-9 August 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis Alaska USA

2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis in Anchorage Alaska in August 2017 after the 1st which was held in Alice Springs in 2014.

Download Brochure Save the date – World Indigenous Hepatitis Conference Final
Further details are available at https://www.wipcvh2017.org/

20-23 September AIDA Conference 2017

The AIDA Conference in 2017 will celebrate 20 years since the inception of AIDA. Through the theme Family. Unity. Success. 20 years strong we will reflect on the successes that have been achieved over the last 20 years by being a family and being united. We will also look to the future for AIDA and consider how being a united family will help us achieve all the work that still needs to be done in growing our Indigenous medical students, doctors, medical academics and specialists and achieving better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This conference will be an opportunity to bring together our members, guests, speakers and partners from across the sector to share in the reflection on the past and considerations for the future. The conference will also provide a platform to share our individual stories, experiences and achievements in a culturally safe environment.

Conference website

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

catsinam

Contact info for CATSINAM

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

We are pleased to announce the 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference will be held at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa in Broome, Western Australia, from 18 to 20 October 2017.

THE FUTURE OF REMOTE HEALTH AND THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY

Since the organisation’s inception in 1982 this event has served to create an opportunity for likeminded remote and isolated health individuals who can network, connect and share.

It serves as both a professional and social resource for the Remote and Isolated Health Workforce of Australia.

We aim to offer an environment that will foster new ideas, promote collegiate relationships, provide opportunities for professional development and celebrate remote health practice.

Conference Website

 

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

‘Translation at the Centre’ An educational symposium

Alice Springs Convention Centre, Alice Springs

This year the Symposium will look at research translation as well as the latest on diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.  The event will be run over a day and a half.
The Educational Symposium will feature a combination of relevant plenary presentations from renowned scientists and clinicians plus practical workshops.

Registration is free but essential.

Please contact the symposium coordinator on 1300 728 900 (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) or via email at events@baker.edu.au  

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

Details to be released

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

iaha

Abstracts for the IAHA 2017 National Conference are now open!

We are calling for abstracts for concurrent oral presentations and workshops under the following streams:
– Care
– Cultures
– Connection

For abstract more information visit the IAHA Conference website at: https://iahaconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

NACCHO #Top10 Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts : Dep Medical Director #Nursing # Policy #Environmental #health

1.Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd  : Deputy Medical Director (KAMS) – Close 31 July

2. Bega Garnbirringu Health Services ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH WORKER

3-4 . Nunkuwarrin Yunti SA : Vacancy for 2x Counsellor/Narrative Therapist positions – Close 17 July

5. Policy Officer NATSIHWA -Close 14 July

6.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Tackling Tobacco Care Coordinator – 14 July

7.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Child Health Nurse – 24 July

8. Nunkuwarrin Yunti Community Midwife – 24 July

9-10. Two positions at the Healing Foundation – 21 July

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd  : Deputy Medical Director (KAMS) – Identified Position

Job No: 90703
Location: Broome, WA
Employment Status: Full-time
Closing Date: 31 Jul 2017
  • Do you want to really make a difference in your career?
  • Take on this rewarding management role with the region’s leading provider of Aboriginal health services!
  • Attractive remuneration circa $230,000 base, PLUS district allowance AND accommodation allowances!

About the Organisation

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services LTD (KAMS) is a well-established regional Aboriginal community controlled health service, founded in 1986, which provides centralised advocacy and resource support for 6 independent member services, as well as providing direct clinical services in a further 6 remote Aboriginal communities across the region.

KAMS has successfully delivered high-quality, accessible comprehensive primary health care services over its 30 years of operation and has provided innovation and national leadership in areas such as health information management and evidence-based best practice in primary health care.

About Broome

Broome is located 2,240km north of Perth and has a permanent population of 14,436. Broome promotes a relaxed and easy-going lifestyle, with nearby shopping centres, Sunday markets as well as a broad range of restaurants and entertainment options. It is founded on the traditional lands of the Yaruwu people and is rich in history, culture and beautiful surrounds.

Broome has a deep history in the pearling industry, spanning back to the 1800’s, with memorials throughout the town to commemorate those lost in the early years of pearling. Cable Beach is also a must-see, being named in honour of the Java-to-Australia undersea telegraph cable that reaches shore there. You can explore its beautiful scenery with a bit of 4WDing at low tide, or you can even take a camel ride every day at sunset!

Roebuck Bay is known as one of the most beautiful beaches that surround Broome, with its “Staircase to the moon” phenomenon drawing food and craft markets each time it occurs. The combination of a receding tide and rising moon create a natural phenomenon that can only be described as breath-taking.

About the Opportunity

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd (KAMS) now has a rewarding opportunity for a full-time Deputy Medical Director to join their team in Broome, WA.

Please note: Due to the nature of this role, applicants are required to be of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent. This is a genuine occupational requirement for this position, which is exempt under Section 14 of the Anti-discrimination Act.

Reporting to the Medical Director, you’ll be responsible for providing comprehensive primary health care in line with accepted best practice standards.

Some of your key duties will include (but will not be limited to):

  • Assisting in the development and maintenance of high quality health services, ensuring continuous monitoring, quality improvement and innovation in the delivery of comprehensive primary health services;
  • Supporting the education, training and on-site up-skilling of the KAMS primary health care workforce;
  • Acting as a cultural champion for health services in the Kimberley;
  • Leading and participating in clinical audit activities in KAMS and member services
  • Assisting the Kimberley Renal Service with medical cover; and
  • Assisting the Medical Director when required.

To be successful you will need:

  • FRACGP, FACRRM or equivalent, with eligibility for medical registration in WA;
  • Significant experience in the delivery of general practice / primary heath care;
  • The ability to act as an effective member of a multidisciplinary health team;
  • Experience in working effectively with Aboriginal people;
  • The competency required to manage emergencies in a remote setting; and
  • A commitment to the philosophy and practice of Aboriginal Community Control.

KAMS are looking for candidates with well-developed interpersonal and communication skills, along with the ability to maintain client confidentially at all times within and outside the workplace. You will have experience working within an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation or an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Community Organisation and a strong interest in developing the skills required to lead an Aboriginal Health Organisation.

A ‘C’ Class Driver’s License, Federal Police Clearance, Working with Children Clearance, and willingness to travel often by 4WD vehicles and light aircrafts will be required.

To download a full position description, please click here.

About the Benefits

If you are looking for a change of routine, a change of lifestyle or a new adventure, this is the role for you. You will see and experience more of Australia’s real outback than most people ever will – and get paid to do it!

KAMS is an organisation that truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. In addition, staff development programs are not only encouraged but are often paid for by KAMS. This is a highly attractive opportunity for someone with a desire to develop their professional knowledge and experience in the area of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health!

While you will face diverse new challenges in this role, you will also enjoy an attractive remuneration circa $230,000 + super. 

There is also a wide range of additional benefits for the role including:

  • On call allowance – 10% of base salary;
  • District allowances – $2,920 single $5,840 double p.a;
  • Electricity allowance $1,440
  • Accommodation allowance $13,000;
  • Mobile phone allowance $100 per month;
  • 6 weeks’ annual leave & 2 weeks’ study leave;
  • Annual Airfares to the value of $1,285 pa (after 12 months of employment).

Don’t miss this exciting and rewarding opportunity to have a positive impact on the health outcomes of Indigenous communities in the spectacular Kimberley region – Apply Now!

Please note: Candidates must respond to the questions below and attach a current resume to be considered.

Apply HERE

2. Bega Garnbirringu Health Services ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH WORKER

The primary purpose of this position is to assist in the development and delivery of Environmental Health education programs, and to undertake Environmental Health tasks with clients and outlying Communities including but not limited to: pest control, dog control, yard/community clean ups, preventative health promotion and other tasks as required.

The successful application must possess a qualification in Environmental Health, a current driver’s licence, current police certificate and the ability to travel on outreach is essential.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants are strongly encouraged to apply.

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation based in Kalgoorlie. Bega has a strong commitment to providing culturally appropriate and sustainable service delivery. We are rapidly becoming renowned as an employer of choice due to our positive work environment and very attractive terms and conditions. These include a 35-hour week, up to 5 weeks’ leave, salary sacrifice options, professional development opportunities and onsite childcare facilities.

A detailed position description can be downloaded from our website http://www.bega.org.aurequested via emailmailto:recruitment@bega.org.au or by calling the Human Resource Officer on 08 9022 5500.

Applications close 4.00pm, Friday, 21 July 2017

3- 4 : Nunkuwarrin Yunti SA : Vacancy for 2x Counsellor/Narrative Therapist positions

Click here for link for more information

1x Counsellor/ Narrative Therapist – Harm Minimisation

This position is located within the Harm Minimisation Team. The Team aims to build healthy Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities by minimising the harm that substance misuse has on individuals, families and communities inclusive of responding to people who inject drugs and reducing the transmission of Blood Borne Viruses.

The purpose of this position is to reduce AOD related harms to individuals and their families by conducting assessments and providing a range of counselling interventions to assist clients and their family members to change harmful behaviours and increase their capacity to effectively manage the problems they are experiencing associated with AOD use and promote recovery.

Enquires to Trish Hickey – trishh@nunku.org.au

1x Counsellor/ Narrative Therapist – Mental Health Recovery

This position is located within the Mental Health Recovery Team and will be based in Nunkuwarrin Yunti offices at Christies Beach and Wakefield Street, Adelaide.

The Mental Health Recovery team provides counselling and support services which assist people to better manage a wide range of issues including grief & loss, depression, trauma, family and/or relationship matters, and any other issues which impact on psychological, social and emotional well-being.

The program also provides holistic, culturally appropriate case work. Narrative Therapists provide support, counselling and education to clients referred through the Primary Health Network, peer agencies, Nunkuwarrin Yunti or other sources of referral.

Enquires to Claire Fleckner, Team Manager – Mental Health Recovery team clairef@nunku.org.au

Applications closes COB 17th July 2017.

Please send applications to Jynaya  jynayam@nunku.org.au

5. Policy Officer NATSIHWA

Award:                      NATSIHWA Enterprise Bargaining Award

Level:                        (pro-rata $110,004)

Appointment:       Contract to June 2018, extension subject to funding

Position Hours:     30.4 hrs per week (4xdays) permanent part-time

Updated:                 6/6/2017

Job specification

Position summary

The Policy Officer coordinates and undertakes policy development, providing analysis/review and advice, to support Organisational and/or Government policy initiatives and commitments.

Broadly, the position:

  • undertakes research and analysis, reviewing alternatives in relation to policy deliverables, to contribute to the policy process and to inform decision making;
  • provides a range of project management and support services, including preparation of discussion papers, briefs, submissions, progress and annual reports;
  • contributes to the development and delivery of policy initiatives whilst preparing and reviewing policy advice to ensure alignment with NATSIHWA’s policy and strategic directions and priorities;
  • undertakes communication with key stakeholders and coordinates working groups, committee meetings, and stakeholder consultations to support engagement as well as policy development and implementation;
  • collates information for reporting, monitoring and evaluation purposes to contribute to the achievement of policy outcomes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners on a national basis.

The position will work closely and in partnership with other national peak bodies, RTO’s and relevant external stakeholders to progress NATSIHWA priorities, including to enable, attract and retain growth in a sustainability Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners workforce.

Line management

The Policy Officer reports directly to the Chief Executive Officer.

Special conditions

  • This is a Canberra-based position Primary responsibilities include;
  1. On behalf of the CEO and membership, interpret National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan and other relevant documents and develop policy responses as required.
  2. Identify and pursue opportunities for cooperation and collaboration with relevant stakeholders on initiatives aligned with NATSIHWA priorities.
  3. Assist with implementation of advocacy and promotion strategies in line with NATSIHWA priorities.
  4. Represent NATSIHWA on external working groups, committees, forums or events as delegated, and report on the outcomes.
  5. Support the development and implementation of the NATSIHWA three-year Strategic Plan, Annual Activity Plan, Annual Report and Evaluation Strategies.
  6. Support the development and implementation of the NATSIHWA Communication Strategy.
  7. Assist in identifying and implementing self-generating funding initiatives to support NATSIHWA’s sustainability into the future.

Person specification

  • Demonstrated ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting cultural values and ways of doing business.
  • Demonstrated ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing, to a wide range of audiences on a range of sensitive and complex issues, especially with regard to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • The ability to interpret and identify key information within policy and other relevant publications relevant to the sector and its members.
  • Demonstrated ability to communicate effectively with various audiences and across a range of approaches.
  • Demonstrated ability to work as a member of a team, identify performance outcomes, plan activities and set priorities to achieve agreed objectives and meet timelines.
  • Demonstrated ability to appropriately exercise initiative and judgement, and recognise, mitigate and resolve conflict.
  • As part of a small, dynamic team have the ability to think independently to influence change for the sector.
  • Proven ability to work independently under broad direction.

Experience

  • Experience in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, organisations and communities in the health sector.
  • Experience in the use of information technology, including word processing packages, electronic mail, databases, spread-sheets and PowerPoint presentations.Closing date: 14/7/2017
  • To apply please contact sao@natsihwa.org.au for a position description

6.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Tackling Tobacco Care Coordinator

Join Us to Further Reduce Smoking in the Aboriginal Community

  • Become part of a successful team improving health outcomes for Aboriginal communities in Adelaide
  • Provide culturally smoking cessation support making a positive difference to people’s lives
  • Competitive remuneration HSL 4 plus salary sacrifice options

About the Organisation

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia, providing a range of health care and community support services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

First incorporated in 1971, Nunkuwarrin Yunti has grown from a welfare agency with three employees to a multi-faceted organisation with over 100 staff who deliver a diverse range of health care and community support services.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and improve the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and to advance their social, cultural, and economic status. The Organisation places a strong focus on a client-centered approach to the delivery of services, and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for clients.

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti has an exciting opportunity for a Tobacco Care Coordinator to join their team in Adelaide on a full-time basis, as part of our Tackling Tobacco program. The initial position is up to December 2017, as the role is subject to ongoing funding. The program has been undertaken since 2010.

With the support of the Tackling Tobacco team this position will utilise approaches to provide effective and evidence based tobacco screening, assessment, quit support and referral programs to clients, staff, and community members who use tobacco. The position will be responsible for supporting health services to talk with clients about smoking and readiness to quit, develop/review clinical guidelines, organise/deliver training to staff, coordinating/ responding to referrals received and ensuring follow up with clients is conducted as per the program plan.

Under direction the primary role of the Tackling Tobacco Care Coordinator is to:

  •  Participate in the planning, development, implementation and promotion of services through the establishment of appropriate plans to ensure services are delivered in a culturally safe manner
  • Utilise tailored approaches to provide expert advice and support to individuals and groups that promotes the harms of smoking, tobacco cessation techniques and Nicotine replacement therapies.
  • Initiate relationships with other service providers to support referrals and referral pathways
  • Coordinate and ensure scheduled follow up is provided to referrals received into the program
  • Coordinate, deliver and undertake community education programs and activities
  • Contribute to policy and procedure development related to tobacco interventions
  • Provide support to lower level staff within the tobacco program as required, particularly in the delegation and scheduling of client follow ups.
  • Work collaboratively with other community support and health teams on a daily basis to ensure quality services are delivered to clients

Please include your CV and a cover letter (no more than 2 pages) addressing the following 3 questions:

  1. What skills, strengths and experience would you bring to the role? Please also comment on your knowledge and understanding relating to Tobacco use within the Adelaide Metropolitan Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community.
  2. Please outline your experience in working with Aboriginal clients regarding their smoking behaviour and how you would work with individuals to encourage them to stop smoking?
  3. This position is responsible for ensuring a high number of referrals are made to the Tobacco program. Please outline what strategies you would implement for both internal and external stakeholders to ensure that this is achieved?

For a Copy of the Job Description Click Here

Further information:  Contact Andrew Schultz, Team Manager – Population Health (Tobacco) – 8406 1600

 Written Application and Current CV to be lodged to Human Resource Administration Officer – Ms Jynaya Smith (jynayam@nunku.org.au) by 5:00pm Friday 14th July 2017.

 

 

7.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Child Health Nurse

Opportunity to make a difference and support optimal outcomes for Aboriginal children and families

  • Ongoing, part time position 0.4FTE
  • Attractive Remuneration package
  • Starting salary $69,362 Pro Rata + Super + access to Salary sacrifice

About Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and wellbeing of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and to advance their social, cultural and economic status.

The Organisation places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients.

About the Role

The Child Health Nurse is located in the MCH Team in the Women Children and Family Health Unit.

The Unit aims to support safe nurturing environments for pregnant women, infants and children, increase uptake and utilisation of services with an emphasis on early intervention and prevention, provide streamlined coordinated care and positive experiences for clients to encourage continued engagement with services.

For infants and young children aged 0-5 the focus of services is on physical health, cognitive, psychosocial and behavioural development to improve the health of Aboriginal children.

The primary role of the Child Health Nurse is to:

  • Provide proficient infant child and family nursing services in accordance with best practice standards and guidelines
  • Plan, implement and coordinate appropriate service delivery options including those of other disciplines or agencies as required to meet infant and child health care needs
  • Provide day-to-day supervision of care within the team and act to resolve local and/or immediate nursing care or service delivery problems
  • Demonstrate and promote an approach to practice that supports the implementation and maintenance of systems to protect clients and staff
  • Integrate theoretical knowledge, evidence from a range of sources and own experience to devise and achieve agreed client care outcomes
  • Engage in continuous quality improvement and change management processes
  • Contribute to effective multi-disciplinary teams, communication processes and staff development
  • Liaise with external agencies as necessaryClick here to download the (Application Form)The Child Health Nurse is required to be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Registration Authority (AHPRA) Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia and have a minimum of three years of demonstrated vocational experience in a Primary Health Care setting consistent with the position’s role and responsibilities.

Applications to include completed Application Form, Resume and Covering Letter including brief statements against the following 4 points:

About You

Click here to download the (J&P)

  1. Your experience in child and family health within a comprehensive primary health care context
  2. Your experience of working effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander co-workers, clients and communities
  3. Your knowledge and understanding of issues which may impact on Aboriginal maternal child and family wellbeing
  4. Why you think you would be the best person for the role

Further information: Contact Clare Levy, MCH Coordinator clarel@nunku.org.au Telephone 0419140170 or 8406 1600

Applications to: Ms Jynaya Smith, Human Resource Administration Officer jynayam@nunku.org.au

 Note – current driver’s license and National Police Check required prior to employment

ABORIGINAL PEOPLE ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY

APPLICATIONS CLOSE DATE – COB MONDAY 24th JULY 2017

8. Nunkuwarrin Yunti Community Midwife

Opportunity to make a difference and support optimal outcomes for pregnant women and Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islander babies

  • Ongoing, Full time position
  • Attractive Remuneration package
  • Starting salary $69,362 + Super + access to Salary sacrifice

About Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and wellbeing of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and to advance their social, cultural and economic status. The Organisation places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients.

About the Role

Working as part of a multidisciplinary team of highly skilled health professionals, you’ll have the opportunity to provide a wrap around, holistic service for your clients. The Community Midwife is located in the MCH Team in the Women Children and Family Health Unit. The Unit aims to support safe nurturing environments for pregnant women, infants and children, increase uptake and utilisation of services with an emphasis on early intervention and prevention, provide streamlined coordinated care and positive experiences for clients to encourage continued engagement with services.

The primary role of the Community Midwife is to:   

  • Facilitate the provision of a coordinated, safe and effective antenatal and postnatal care, health counselling and primary health care to women and their families, in partnership with the Aboriginal Health Workers and Aboriginal Health Practitioners, GPs and staff in birthing hospitals
  • Provide support to clients and families, through assessment and appropriate referrals to internal and external service providers
  • Coordinate and participate in home visiting where appropriate
  • Develop and implement culturally appropriate antenatal groups
  • In partnership with Aboriginal Health Workers and Aboriginal Health Practitioners develop and maintain suitable, evidence based, health promotion and information resources for pregnant women and their families.
  • Contribute to quality management systems and continuous improvement processes

Click here to download the (J&P)

Click here to download the (Application Form)

About You

The Community Midwife is required to be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Registration Authority (AHPRA) Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia and have a minimum of three years of demonstrated vocational experience in a Primary Health Care setting consistent with the position’s role and responsibilities.

Applications to include completed Application Form, Resume and Covering Letter including brief statements against the following 4 points:

  1.  Your experience in delivery of antenatal and postnatal care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women within a comprehensive primary health care context
  2. Your experience of working effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander co-workers, clients and communities
  3. Your knowledge and understanding of issues which may impact on Aboriginal maternal child and family wellbeing
  4. Why you think you would be the best person for the role

Further information: Contact Clare Levy, MCH Coordinator clarel@nunku.org.au Telephone 0419140170 or 8406 1600

Applications to: Ms Jynaya Smith, Human Resource Administration Officer jynayam@nunku.org.au

 Note – current driver’s license and National Police Check required prior to employment

ABORIGINAL PEOPLE ARE ENCOURAGED MONDAY 24TH JULY 2017

9-10 : Two positions at the Healing Foundation

 Please share

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News : Indigenous Health Minister @KenWyattMP visits , promotes and engages with our ACCHO’s during #NAIDOC2017 week

 

 “ This week, celebrating and acknowledging the power of our languages, the importance of language, but even where we’ve think we’ve lost languages I’m often surprised with the older people within our communities who can still speak the language.

And in my own country there are people teaching Noongar language and reviving the veracity of the language. Now language often is an identifier of who we are and what country we’re associated with.

NAIDOC Week is about celebrating, enjoying ourselves within our community, having fun, but also reflecting. 

Alice Springs : Ken Wyatt being interviewed by Kyle Dowling from CAAMA radio about Congress ACCHO Alice Springs and  the 11 organisations partnering in the new Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre SEE PART 3 Below

Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 : New Aboriginal-led collaboration has world-class focus on boosting remote Aboriginal health

Victoria / VACCHO / VAHS

APY LANDS

Kowanyama /Cairns QLD  :

“I am closely involved with the Darwin and Kimberley suicide prevention trials, part of the Federal Government’s $192 million commitment to addressing regional mental health issues,

“What we learn from those sites, which have acute suicide rates, will be made available as appropriate for North Queensland, in close collaboration with local communities.”

Mr Wyatt, in was Cairns  speaking at the myPHN Conference (see Part 3 for PHN Press Release ) said close engagement with the community and respecting locally endorsed solutions to guard against suicide was the way forward

Part 1  : Minister rolls out mental health action plan for Kowanyama

FINDINGS from suicide prevention trials being carried out in Western Australia will be implemented in the Far North to help lower the rising suicide rate in indigenous communities.

From The Cairns Post

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt says he is “very concerned” about reports of the suicide rates in the region’s remote indigenous population growing to become one of the highest in the world.

The Weekend Post has reported concerns by community leaders at Kowanyama that the mental health crisis was sparked by the tragedy in the community in October, when a vehicle rammed into a house full of mourners, resulting in one death and 25 people being serious injured.

There had been more than 20 suicides or attempts at Kowanyama, which has a population of about 1200, since the ­October tragedy.

Mr Wyatt, was Cairns  speaking at the myPHN Conference, said close engagement with the community and respecting locally endorsed solutions to guard against suicide was the way forward.

“I am closely involved with the Darwin and Kimberley suicide prevention trials, part of the Federal Government’s $192 million commitment to addressing regional mental health issues,” he said.

“What we learn from those sites, which have acute suicide rates, will be made available as appropriate for North Queensland, in close collaboration with local communities.”

An experienced social work has been flown into Kowanyama to join a mental health clinical nurse consultant who travels to the remote Cape York community for four-day visits.

Mr Wyatt said further emergency action was underway with the federally-funded Northern Queensland Primary Health Network working with the Royal Flying Doctor Service to expand mental health services at Kowanyama.

“This additional commitment has already ensured an extra clinician for the community, to provide support and targeted suicide prevention activities with this full-time position starting on Tuesday, July 11,” he said.

If you or someone you know needs assistance please call Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14.

Cairns Apunipima

 Part 2  : Working with communities to deliver better health is our primary aim
The nation’s Primary Health Networks (PHNs) are being encouraged to work closely with communities to tackle health challenges and improve the wellbeing of all Australians.
Aged Care Minister and Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt said he hoped opening the 2nd annual myPHN Conference in Cairns today would help guide a new era in effective and efficient care.
 
This year’s conference theme of ‘Transforming Healthcare Together’ challenges current beliefs on the best ways to improve patient outcomes,” said Minister Wyatt.
“PHNs are leading the charge in this space. After undertaking detailed analysis of their regions’ specific health needs, they are now commissioning services to fill these gaps.
 
“These range from building the capacity of General Practitioners (GPs) and tackling mental health, chronic conditions and obesity, to engaging with consumers in disease prevention.
The Minister said the first stage of the national trial of Health Care Homes was another example of the fresh approach to the care of people with complex conditions.
“Participating GPs and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services will work closely with patients and specialists, pharmacists and allied health care to empower patients to take an active role in health improvements,” he said.
 
Minister Wyatt said primary health providers had a vital role in helping improve Indigenous health and that of older Australians.
“Despite the progress we’ve made to date, Indigenous people still have a shorter life expectancy and are more likely to develop chronic conditions such as diabetes  kidney and cardiovascular diseases than non-Indigenous Australians,” Minister Wyatt said.
 
We have to do better, and primary health professionals are well placed to develop innovative new programs that can make a real difference.”
A good example is the Northern Queensland PHN workforce investment, including funding more than 100 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to become qualified indigenous health workers. 
 
The conference also focuses on how social and cultural influences can effect  health outcomes, promising new hope for closing the life expectancy gap for Indigenous Peoples.
 
Innovation and new thinking will help deliver a stronger health and aged care system,” said Minister Wyatt.
 
“Learning from the experiences of other communities and nations will also keep older Australians healthier for longer, and give them more flexibility on when and how they access care as they age.
“Better health is a partnership between governments, the health sector, and the consumer. Greater collaboration and new models of care promise positive outcomes.”

Part 3 Transcript of Interview on CAAMA Radio with Kyle Dowling on 5 July 2017

Ken Wyatt:What I like about the centre is that it is an alliance of organisations that have been heavily involved in research around many of the health issues impacting on our people. But what’s more important significant is that Congress is the lead agency or the lead player in all of this and having that Aboriginal leadership working so closely with the expertise and knowledge and skills and capability of research is fantastic.

Kyle Dowling: Ken Wyatt, the Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care, recently congratulated the 11 organisations partnering in the new Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre.

Ken Wyatt: Any of us have the capability and capacity to take leading voices. It’s whether we have the confidence and courage to do it at times. And I think Congress has really set a framework for showing that they are leaders. That they are prepared to go and fight for the things they believe in, but equally they work very closely with people who’ve got a like-minded thinking who want to make a difference.

I think the other part that is important in this is their voices are also about translating research into real change on the ground in the community with families. And that’s an important translation of research into practice. And they’ve been around a long time so their knowledge of the health of people within the area, but not only the area, but nationally has been well-based on being involved with the community, listening to community, but treating community for the range of illnesses that they’ve seen over the years. So I want to complement them on their vision, but also being a leader to demonstrate that our voices do count. That they are important.

Kyle Dowling: : So Ken, can you just talk to us about the actual role of the Central Australia Academic Health Centre and the importance of the collaboration between Aboriginal community-controlled health services and leading medical researchers.

Ken Wyatt:What’s important about the centre is that it’s now recognised as a centre of excellence for research. That means it gives them access to Commonwealth funding out of the Futures Research Fund, but also NHMRC funding as well. They’re also recognised as being of a national standing in the quality of what they are capable of doing, but the team they have within that alliance. So you’re really saying that you- you’ve brought together this incredible group of skills, resources and thinking that will be used to tackle some of those complex issues on the ground.

Yesterday, Alan Cass talked about renal disease and the work that affected him into making the decision to look at the whole issue of progression to dialysis and what we still need to do. And he talked about some of the alarming figures here that- when you think about the number of Aboriginal people within the Territory- those figures are extremely high. So we’ve got to do something about it and that’s what he’s talking about when he is involved in this collaborative centre.

Kyle Dowling: Why Central Australia? Why was this area the right place for the centre?

Ken Wyatt: Look, I think it’s just natural to expect it to be here because you’ve got an incredible organisation like Congress. You have Aboriginal leadership here whose thinking and whose passion for making a difference for people here and across Australia. But you’ve also got these incredible alliances with Flinders Uni, Baker IDI, and there’s other collaborative members of that group who are also deliverers of services. And if we think of the history of the Territory, there have been some outstanding individuals that have been involved. So you only have to look at the Menzies Research Centre, the work that they have done. It’s a natural fix and it’s a good mix of bringing some incredible people together to work on these issues.

Kyle Dowling: Now the partners in the CAAHSC have identified research priorities. Can you touch on a little bit of those?

Ken Wyatt: The five areas that they have identified are good, but the one that excites me is the whole issue of workforce and development of capacity. But developing of capacity for Aboriginal research- there was a young woman I met yesterday who has become a researcher and her passion for that work now is growing. It’s- and she becomes an example for others that research is an important area and that I can do it, so can you. And that workforce capacity also means that they will be looking at, not only what’s needed today, but the type of skills we’ll need for tomorrow and the future. And aged care is in that mix.

I had a good meeting with Congress this morning about older people who live in this area that I need to have a look at the issues around their needs, but equally be made aware of the number of older people now living in community and what we have to do for them.

Kyle Dowling: Now, Central Research has been dubbed a hub of hope for Indigenous health. How would you describe Central Research as in fact being a hub of help for Indigenous hope.

Ken Wyatt: That whole hub of hope I see in an optimistic sense. I see it as a group of people believing what they do, but then wanting to turn that into having access to further work they have to do to find and identify reasons. And I use the term causes of the cause.

So what are the causes that cause an illness or what are the causes that cause renal failure. And then to look at how do we go upstream and prevent that from happening. So if it’s skin diseases, if it’s other factors that result in kidney failure, then how do we address and tackle those. But equally what they’ll be looking at is what treatment can we provide and what treatment can we also think about providing at the local community level because the problem with dialysis is that you really need to live with the chairs are that provide you with that life-saving support. But ultimately if we can find a cure for kidney failure then that makes it far more expecting of pushing out life, but also preventing kidney failure and giving people in any individual hope for a future, hope for a longer life because the point I want to make is that every person we lose out of our community is a history book.

We never write our histories, we never write our stories on paper. We only learn in transmission in conversation, art, the stories we tell dance. Now when we take one of those people out, that’s the end of that story. We can never go back and re-read it, and that’s why that the work that this centre does is critical in keeping people alive longer because young people like you will need the knowledge of the stories, but also the history and every aspect that gives us what is important spiritually, culturally, but as an identity as an individual within our community.

Kyle Dowling: Before I do let you go, I did just want to get a quick message from you. It is NAIDOC Week. Your message to everyone across the country on NAIDOC weekend, what NAIDOC means to you as an Aboriginal person?

Ken Wyatt: This week, celebrating and acknowledging the power of our languages, the importance of language, but even where we’ve think we’ve lost languages I’m often surprised with the older people within our communities who can still speak the language. And in my own country there are people teaching Noongar language and reviving the veracity of the language. Now language often is an identifier of who we are and what country we’re associated with.

NAIDOC Week is about celebrating, enjoying ourselves within our community, having fun, but also reflecting.

Kyle Dowling: Yes, well on that note, Ken thank you for taking out your time to have a chat with us here on CAAMA Radio and thank you for tuning in.

That’s going to be it for Strong Voices today. Thank you for tuning in. I hope you enjoyed the program. Make sure you check out our CAAMA webpage. It’s caama.com.au. Make sure you check out our social media as well -our Facebook and Twitter. And we’ll be back the same time tomorrow.

Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 Week : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #SA #NT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD #Act #Tas

Intro : History of NAIDOC Week

1.NSW :Coffs Harbour NAIDOC Our Languages Matter – Garla ngarraangiya ngiyambandiya ngawaawa – is the theme for this year

 2.VIC : Smoking ceremony and afternoon tea at VACCHO Celebrating NAIDOC Week.

3.1 QLD New ATSICHS clinic opens NAIDOC week at Loganlea reminds us of those champions in Indigenous health who blazed the trail

3.2 QLD : Carbal ACCHO  leads the way for Indigenous health NAIDOC WEEK

 3.3 Apunipima ACCHO at Laura Dance Festival Cape York Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4.1 W.A New program announced in NAIDOC Week to improve social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people in regional WA

4.2 WA : Sistagirls wearing  NAIDOC design hoodies in Warburton WA Tackling Indigenous Smoking

5. SA Sharon Bilney ACCHO Nurse celebrate and acknowledges NAIDOC Week

6.1 NT : ABC TV Q and A broadcasts from Alice Springs for NAIDOC week

6.2 Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt visits Congress Alice Springs for NAIDOC week

7. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service judges choice in NAIDOC damper bake off

8. Tas :  Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (TAC) praised by Premier in NAIDOC week for reviving palawa kani, the Tasmanian Aboriginal language                           

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

History of NAIDOC Week

Photo above national launch of NAIDOC week in Cairns

NAIDOC poster  photo in banner Janette Milera🖤🧡

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News : 10 Winners profiles National #NAIDOC2017 Awards

Download and print the NAIDOC History Timeline (PDF version)

1920 – 1930

Before the 1920s, Aboriginal rights groups boycotted Australia Day (26 January) in protest against the status and treatment of Indigenous Australians. By the 1920s, they were increasingly aware that the broader Australian public were largely ignorant of the boycotts. If the movement were to make progress, it would need to be active.

Several organisations emerged to fill this role, particularly the Australian Aborigines Progressive Association (AAPA) in 1924 and the Australian Aborigines League (AAL) in 1932. Their efforts were largely overlooked, and due to police harassment, the AAPA abandoned their work in 1927.

In 1935, William Cooper, founder of the AAL, drafted a petition to send to King George V, asking for special Aboriginal electorates in Federal Parliament. The Australian Government believed that the petition fell outside its constitutional responsibilities.

1938

On Australia Day, 1938, protestors marched through the streets of Sydney, followed by a congress attended by over a thousand people. One of the first major civil rights gatherings in the world, it was known as the Day of Mourning.

Following the congress, a deputation led by William Cooper presented Prime Minister Joseph Lyons with a proposed national policy for Aboriginal people. This was again rejected because the Government did not hold constitutional powers in relation to Aboriginal people.

After the Day of Mourning, there was a growing feeling that it should be a regular event. In 1939 William Cooper wrote to the National Missionary Council of Australia to seek their assistance in supporting and promoting an annual event.

1940 – 1955

From 1940 until 1955, the Day of Mourning was held annually on the Sunday before Australia Day and was known as Aborigines Day. In 1955 Aborigines Day was shifted to the first Sunday in July after it was decided the day should become not simply a protest day but also a celebration of Aboriginal culture.

1956 – 1990

Major Aboriginal organisations, state and federal governments, and a number of church groups all supported the formation of, the National Aborigines Day Observance Committee (NADOC). At the same time, the second Sunday in July became a day of remembrance for Aboriginal people and their heritage.

In 1972, the Department of Aboriginal Affairs was formed, as a major outcome of the 1967 referendum.

In 1974, the NADOC committee was composed entirely of Aboriginal members for the first time. The following year, it was decided that the event should cover a week, from the first to second Sunday in July.

In 1984, NADOC asked that National Aborigines Day be made a national public holiday, to help celebrate and recognise the rich cultural history that makes Australia unique. While this has not happened, other groups have echoed the call.

1991 – Present

With a growing awareness of the distinct cultural histories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, NADOC was expanded to recognise Torres Strait Islander people and culture. The committee then became known as the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC). This new name has become the title for the whole week, not just the day. Each year, a theme is chosen to reflect the important issues and events for NAIDOC Week.

During the mid-1990s, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) took over the management of NAIDOC until ATSIC was disbanded in 2004-05.

There were interim arrangements in 2005. Since then a National NAIDOC Committee, until recently chaired by former Senator Aden Ridgeway, has made key decisions on national celebrations each year. The National NAIDOC Committee has representatives from most Australian states and territories.

Since 2008, Anne Martin and Ben Mitchell have been serving as co-chairs of the National NAIDOC Committee.

NAIDOC Week posters from 1972 to the present see link here

National NAIDOC Posters are available for public use to help you celebrate NAIDOC Week

1.NSW :Coffs Harbour NAIDOC Our Languages Matter – Garla ngarraangiya ngiyambandiya ngawaawa – is the theme for this year

The NAIDOC Ready Mob Road Show Kempsey , Port Macquarie and Coffs Harbour

Aboriginal Health Services aim to be the peak providers of high quality, culturally appropriate holistic primary health and related care services throughout the Mid North Coast.

The services operate from Monday to Friday and provide access to General Practitioners, Aboriginal Health Workers, various medical specialists and allied health professionals.

The following Aboriginal Medical Services provide services to communities within the boundaries of the Mid North Coast Local Health District. Please contact them directly for further information:

02 6652 0800 Galambila Aboriginal Medical Service, Coffs Harbour

02 6560 2300 Durri Aboriginal Health Service Inc, Kempsey

02 6958 6800 Darrimba Maarra, Nambucca

02 6589 4000 Werin Aboriginal Corporation Medical Clinic, Port Macquarie

 2.VIC : Smoking ceremony and afternoon tea at VACCHO Celebrating NAIDOC Week.Photos Eddie Moore
 
Flag raising Federation Square
3.1 QLD New ATSICHS clinic opens NAIDOC week at Loganlea reminds us of those champions in Indigenous health who blazed the trail

 As NAIDOC Week is celebrated nationwide, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in Loganlea can also celebrate access to health treatment closer to home with the opening of a new primary healthcare clinic.

The new clinic, which Health and Ambulance Services Minister Cameron Dick opened today, received more than $900,000 in funding from the Palaszczuk Government.

Mr Dick said the facility was a step in the right direction in addressing the healthcare needs of the local community.

“The large and growing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in the Logan area has increased demand for culturally appropriate and accessible health services,” Mr Dick said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service (ATSICHS) Brisbane’s new Loganlea Clinic provides community based patient care, allowing for conditions, such as chronic disease, to be managed close to home and within a community setting.

“Spending less time in a hospital is always a better outcome for everyone, and eases the demand on resources for the hospitals in the area.”

Under the Making Tracks Investment Strategy 2015-2018, Queensland Health provided about $920,000 to ATSICHS Brisbane to establish the Loganlea clinic with the help of the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH).

Mr Dick said investing in evidence-based multidisciplinary services for Indigenous Queenslanders was a key aspect of the Palaszczuk Government’s strategy.

“In addition, ATSICHS Brisbane currently receives $1 million annually to deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate primary healthcare services at their Woodridge clinic and $220,000 to employ two child health workers at their Northgate clinic,” he said.

Member for Waterford and Minister for Communities Shannon Fentiman said it was great that the clinic could be opened during NAIDOC Week.

“The Palaszczuk Government is investing more than $200 million over three years into services and programs targeted at closing the health gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous people in Queensland,” Ms Fentiman said.

“Our goal is to close the life expectancy gap by 2033 and halve the child mortality gap by 2018.

“Partnering with community-based organisations to provide accessible and efficient primary healthcare services will go a long way to achieving this.”

ATSICHS Brisbane is a not-for-profit community owned health and human services organisation, now with seven medical clinics across greater Brisbane and Logan.

“The Loganlea community will benefit greatly from this clinic, which will have a tangible impact on the health and wellbeing of our clients and the strength of our community,” ATSICHS Brisbane CEO Jody Currie said.

“This week as we celebrate NAIDOC, our hope is that our people and our community, not just in Logan but across the state can say: I make good choices and decisions about my health and wellbeing and get the treatment and care that is best for me and my life. This can happen through clinics such as these.

“Together with the IUIH we are determined to advance the Indigenous healthcare sector, delivering positive and practical responses to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing needs.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson said the clinic would meet the increased demand, with the release of the 2016 Census

3.2 Carbal ACCHO  leads the way for Indigenous health NAIDOC WEEK

AS NAIDOC Week 2017 swings into celebration, Carbal Medical Centre in Warwick is at the front-line, keeping our indigenous community fighting fit.

PHOTO : CHECK-UP: Carbal Medical Centre’s doctor Christine Tran checks out Ethan Appleby while Rebecca Appleby looks

Clinic manager Kerry Stewart said Carbal was a one-stop shop for indigenous health in Warwick.

“We look after it all here, all health concerns, be they physical, mental, emotional and social,” Mrs Stewart said

She said the main health concern among Warwick’s indigenous population was chronic disease.

“This is something we see a lot of – diabetes, cancer, respiratory problems and renal failure are the main issues,” she said.

“To help we have a large team of doctors, nurses, allied health and Aboriginal health workers, indigenous team care co-ordinators, who can assist with support, care and comfort.

“We also have a worker whose job is to tackle indigenous smoking.

“With funding we receive we’re able to pay for things like sleep apnoea machines, mobility aids, blood sugar monitors, nebulisers, items that help keep our patients healthy. We also provide transport and accommo- dation services for those who need them to assist patients to get to appoint- ments in Warwick and further afield.”

Carbal Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Services chief executive officer Brian Hewitt said under the Closing the Gap initiative the Federal Government decided in 2006 the best way to approach indigenous health was by starting community indigenous health centres.

“So various Aboriginal Medical Services were developed and Carbal has been hugely successful, so much so we became a company 12 months ago,” Mr Hewitt said.

“We run five clinics, employing 80 staff that encompass Toowoomba, Warwick, Stanthorpe and Goondiwindi. We look after about 6000 clients, 5000 who identify as indigenous.”

 3.3 Apunipima ACCHO at Laura Dance Festival Cape York Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4.1 W.A New program announced in NAIDOC Week to improve social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people in regional WA

New Aboriginal family wellbeing training will be prioritised across the Kimberley, Pilbara and Goldfields regions, in a West Australian first to address social and emotional health risks in indigenous communities.

The Aboriginal Health Council of WA welcomed today’s State Government announcement to contribute $1 million over two years towards the pilot Aboriginal Family Wellbeing project to help prevent self-harm and suicide in the regions by strengthening families.

The project includes an accredited six-month Certificate II training program, which will be delivered jointly by the WA Mental Health Commission, AHCWA and the 22 Aboriginal Medical Services across the state.

AHCWA Chairperson Michelle Nelson Cox said the initiative would ensure all Aboriginal Medical Services in WA had at least one key staff member skilled in delivering the program.

“This is about building the skills and confidence of our social and emotional wellbeing teams across all Aboriginal Medical Services so they can identify communities where there is real need to strengthen family wellbeing and, in turn, self-harm and suicide prevention strategies,” Ms Nelson Cox said.

“Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in Aboriginal communities.

“Statistics show that the suicide rate for indigenous Australians is almost twice the rate for non-indigenous Australians. And concerningly, the suicide rate of our young people aged 15 to 19 is five times as high as non-indigenous Australians.”

At least six trainers will be educated in the program in the first year, with a focus on the Kimberley, Pilbara and Goldfields regions. Other services and regions will be invited to participate in the second year.

“This is the first time that this training has been delivered in WA and we feel proud to have built a partnership with the Mental Health Commission to share this important initiative,” Ms Nelson Cox said.

“Until now, there has been a lack of specific Aboriginal family wellbeing training. We hope that by providing this new program it will lead to more and more trainers in the regions and real health benefits to our communities.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) currently engaged as members.

4.2 WA : Sistagirls wearing  NAIDOC design hoodies in Warburton WA Tackling Indigenous Smoking

5. SA Sharon Bilney ACCHO Nurse celebrate and acknowledges NAIDOC Week

“Deciding to become a nurse is a decision that I’ve never regretted,

It’s a career that you can have around children and I’ve loved the opportunities that have come with it as well – I loved that I’ve worked in a hospital setting but also been able to lecture and have the chance to mentor and support young Aboriginal students on their path into nursing.”

The mother of four, who is Manager of Client Services for Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service, began her early career working at Port Lincoln Hospital.

Going home with the feeling that she’d made a difference in someone’s life that day is what Sharon Bilney says is the best part of being a nurse.

“When I was working at the hospital, it was just so nice to feel as though I’d made a difference,whether it was to an Aboriginal patient that day or educating a non-Aboriginal person about Aboriginal culture,” Ms Bilney, who belongs to the Kokatha family group, said.She also had a two-year stint lecturing in nursing at TAFE South Australia’s Port Lincoln Campus.

Ms Bilney is speaking about her nursing career to help highlight NAIDOC Week, which runs from Sunday, July 2-9, and is urging young Indigenous people to explore nursing as a career option.

The theme for this year’s NAIDOC Week is Our Languages Matter.

“I highly recommend nursing. Even if you don’t want to work in a hospital, the possibilities and options are endless. Take every opportunity that comes your way,” Ms Bilney said.

“NAIDOC week is an important week to celebrate our history and culture. If not for anything else, it is just a wonderful opportunity to recognise our people for one week.”

Ms Bilney said the best thing she had ever done was switch from her previous career in office work to nursing.

“Once I knew that I would be able to study at home part-time while I still had my youngest little boy at home with me, I thought the opportunity was just amazing,” she said.

“Once I was enrolled, I just wanted to focus on getting through the next five years of study and really achieve that goal of becoming a nurse.”

In her final year of study, Ms Bilney received the Federal Government-funded Rural and Remote Undergraduate scholarship, through the Australian College of Nursing (ACN). ACN Chief Executive Officer, Adjunct Professor Kylie Ward FACN, said Ms Bilney was a perfect example of how diverse a career in nursing could be, and how it could be explored at different stages in life.

“Sharon was a mum at home caring for her young son when an opportunity came her way to be able to study nursing,” Adjunct Professor Ward said.

“On completing her studies, she has had the opportunity to work in a hospital and experience theatre work, accident and emergency, the surgical and medical wards and has also had the chance to work in palliative care and mental health.

“She has also lectured in nursing and been able to mentor young Indigenous students and is now leading the way in providing health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Port Lincoln.”

6.1 NT : ABC TV Q and A broadcasts from Alice Springs for NAIDOC week

Features William Tilmouth Chair of Congress ACCHO

 

6.2 Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt visits Congress Alice Springs for NAIDOC week

  Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 : New Aboriginal-led collaboration has world-class focus on boosting remote Aboriginal health

7. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service judges choice in NAIDOC damper bake off

It was made with love, hope and a bit of glitter.

A dozen teams battled it out in a damper cook-off at the Aboriginal Tent Embassy on Tuesday as part of National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee week celebrations.

The Glamper Damper Campers represented Reconciliation Australia and were the overall winners. The team created a unique damper, which they described as being made with love, hope and glitter. The three-cheese damper also featured pumpkin, spinach and buttermilk – which they said was the secret ingredient.

Damper, also known as bush bread or seedcake, was originally made from flour of ground seeds, grains, legumes, roots or nuts. But the introduction of pre-milled white flour and white sugar has mostly replaced the use of native ingredients to make the damper.

Competition judge and Ngunnawal man Richie Allan, of the Traditional Owners Aboriginal Corporation, said the competitors were judged on a number of criteria, including taste, flavour, texture and creativity.

“The boys went a bit fancy on all the criteria, looks like MKR or something,” Mr Allan said, laughing.

Next year’s competition might go back to the “old ways” of baking damper, where contestants have to grind seeds to make their own flour, he said.Joining Mr Allan on the judging panel were Reconciliation Australia deputy chief executive officer Karen Mundine and event organiser Derek Hardman.

There were winners in four categories:

  • Judge’s choice – Mozzarella, ham and chive, created by Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service.
  • Best flavour – Nutella centre, created by Indigenous Business Australia.
  • Encouragement award – Choc chip, created by Lynley, 5, and Kennedy, 8.
  • Reconciliation Australia NAIDOC overall winner – Pumpkin, three cheese and spinach created by the Glamper Damper Campers from Reconciliation Australia.

Reconciliation Australia organised the event and had two teams competing. The other teams were made up of people from various organisations and public service departments, including the ACT Health Directorate and the ACT Finance Directorate.

Reconciliation Australia chief executive officer Justin Mohamed said the aim of the event was to focus on “sharing culture, having relationships, talking [and] getting to know each other better”.

The event was a first for the organisation and Mohamed said he enjoyed being out of the boardroom and around the campfire.

Information on other NAIDOC events happening this week can be found here.

8. Tas :  Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (TAC) praised by Premier in NAIDOC week for reviving palawa kani, the Tasmanian Aboriginal language.

June Sculthorpe is passionate about palawa kani.

In the 1990s she was one of the first people to work on a program to revive the Tasmanian Aboriginal language, alongside linguist Terry Crowley at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies.

Palawa kani words to learn

  • ya — Hello
  • lakapawa nina — See you
  • mina — I, me
  • nina — You
  • ya pulingina — Welcome
  • nina nayri? — How are you going?
  • mina nayri — I’m well
  • lutruwita — Tasmania

They used as their base written documents from early explorers who had transcribed Aboriginal words.

Professor Crowley also had some recordings of the language being spoken, and it turned out those recordings had a connection to Ms Sculthorpe.

“As he played that [recording], I knew the lady who had spoken to it,” she said.

“Her name was Dot Heffernan who was Fanny Cochrane Smith’s grandchild.”

Ms Sculthorpe is also a descendant of Fanny Cochrane Smith, who famously recorded Aboriginal songs on wax cylinders in the 1800s.

“I had never known that the language had been passed down in our family,” she said.

Hearing a voice she knew say “tapilti ningina mumara prupari patrula” (go and get a log and put it on the fire) was a life-changing moment for Ms Sculthorpe.

“I’d never known that those words had been used in Tasmania in my family and it was very moving. That was the beginning of my involvement with palawa kani.”

Ms Sculthorpe has built up knowledge of palawa kani to the point where the community can now relearn and reclaim their words and culture.

“Because our culture had been so taken away from us, we want to learn the language, we want our community to learn the language,” she said.

WATCH VIDEO HERE

 

  

 

         

Introducing dual place names for landmarks such as kunanyi/Mount Wellington has slowly seen palawa kani introduced to the whole of Tasmania.

“As we learn it more, it’s good to hear people … to be using the place names and basic greetings,” Ms Sculthorpe said.

“We’re in Tasmania and these are Tasmanian places and it just sort of connects us more to the long history of people living in Tasmania.”

During this year’s NAIDOC Week, Ms Sculthorpe has read the weather forecast each morning in palawa kani on ABC Radio Hobart Breakfast.

“It was a good way to learn, by being forced to go down and read the weather,” she said.

“Because we have all those words for hot and cold, sunny and cloudy, icy and foggy, and the language program puts all those words around here on a poster to try to get people to read them.

“But unless you actually have to use them every day it is hard to remember them.”

Tasmanian Premier Will Hodgman said NAIDOC Week served as an “an important reminder of the need for continued, concerted efforts towards reconciliation”.

He acknowledged the work of the Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (TAC) for its efforts researching and reviving traditional languages, particularly palawa kani, the Tasmanian Aboriginal language.

“Using palawa kani, 13 geographical features and places have now been given traditional language names, including Hobart’s mountain kunanyi/Mount Wellington,” he said.

It is estimated about 250 distinct Indigenous language groups once existed in Australia and most would have had several dialects, so the total number of language varieties is likely to be far more.

Tasmanian school students have joined in song and movement as part of their 2017 NAIDOC week celebrations, recognising the history, culture and achievements of Indigenous peoples.

The week’s theme of Our Languages Matter is focused on the importance, richness and resilience of Indigenous language, highlighting the role language plays in cultural identity and linking people to their land and water.

It also explores the way in which Indigenous history, spirituality and rites are shared through both story and song.

Moonah Primary School students celebrate NAIDOC

Aboriginal students from Moonah Primary School formed a NAIDOC committee and hosted a whole school assembly to mark the week.

They asked the school community to wear red, yellow and black in tribute to the Aboriginal flag.

“Every colour on the flag has its own meaning and representation,” Grade 6 student Heidi Farnell explained.

“The yellow circle in the middle represents the sun [which] is our protector and giver of life,” Grade 5 student Matilda Hopper said.

They told the audience the flag was designed to bring the Aboriginal community together in a bid for land rights.

“But today it represents more than that,” Caleb said.

“It is a widely recognised symbol of the unity and identity of my Aboriginal people.”School principal Kathy Morgan said it was a valuable experience for all students but especially those in the NAIDOC committee.

“They’ve just loved it. To start off with they were in awe of having this responsibility,” she said.

“They felt really special.”According to the national NAIDOC committee, there are now only about 120 languages still spoken, with many “at risk of being lost as elders pass on”.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Why the @NRHAlliance needs a new Rural and Remote Health Strategy

 

” The National Rural Health Alliance has been leading advocacy to the Government that it is time to develop a new Rural and Remote Health Strategy, together with a fully funded Implementation Plan. 

In developing its thoughts on the need for a new Strategy and its contents, the Alliance is developing a series of discussion papers, with the first now available – considering the reasons why we need a new Strategy and what has been achieved under the 2011-12 Strategy.”

This paper has been prepared to stimulate discussion on an issue of importance to rural and remote health.

The views and opinions in the paper do not necessarily represent those of the National Rural Health Alliance or any of its Member Bodies.

For  The National Rural Health Alliance’s new own Strategic Plan just released and spanning  the period 1 July 2017 – 30 June 2019

The Alliance intends to focus on seven priority areas including: Improving the health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples;

 See background 2 below

Download 19 page PDF   need-new-rr-health-strategy

How submit comments

Comments on the paper can be directed to

nrha@ruralhealth.org.au .

A new strategy and plan ?

There is no point in continuing to reference a Framework that is not in use and that is deeply flawed (see background 1 below and in download ) . Whatever document replaces the Framework, it must include outcome measures and set indicators to measure progress against the most pressing needs.

And there must be annual reporting against those outcomes to enable jurisdictions to consider how they are progressing and fine tune their responses as necessary.

Ideally, a new National Rural and Remote Health Strategy should be developed with stakeholder input and introduced with a fully funded Implementation and Evaluation plan.

This should include, but not be restricted to, a rural and remote workforce plan – as pointed out throughout this report, the solutions needed to bridge the divide in the health and wellbeing of the city and the bush deserves and requires far more.

We need concrete, on-the-ground actions, which make a positive difference in the lives of individuals, families and communities in rural and remote Australia.

The Alliance has been an active participant and co-signatory in the development of previous strategies and plans, and stands ready to fulfil that role again.

We must learn from the past and strive to address the inequity of health outcomes that are experienced by the seven million people living outside Australia’s major cities

Background 1 of 2

The National Strategic Framework for Rural and Remote Health (the Framework) was developed through the Rural Health Standing Committee, a committee of the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council, and agreed by the Standing Council on Health, the committee of Ministers of Health, in late 2011. It was launched in 2012. The Framework was developed through a consultative process that included significant input from the National Rural Health Alliance (the Alliance) and other rural and remote health stakeholders, including State and Territory governments.

While the Framework can be accessed through the Department of Health website, it is not in use. No reporting has ever been undertaken to present an update on progress, recognition of the range of policies and programs implemented by Commonwealth, State or Territory Governments to address the goals of the Framework, or to examine the effectiveness of the Framework in addressing those goals.

Further, the health workforce strategy developed as a companion document to the Framework – National Health Workforce Innovation and Reform Strategic Framework for Action 2011–2015 – is also no longer in use, having been archived when the Health Workforce Agency was disbanded in 2014.

At the time, the Alliance called for a National Rural and Remote Health Plan to be developed to operationalise the Framework, but this never eventuated.

The role of a comprehensive Framework to guide and direct better health outcomes in rural and remote communities is critical. Where players from communities, jurisdictional and private health providers and federally-funded organisations come together to meet the challenges of delivering health services in rural and remote communities, it must be through a shared understanding of the issues and a clear vision for the future.

At the outset, the Framework acknowledged that the people who live in rural and remote Australia “tend to have lower life expectancy, higher rates of disease and injury, and poorer access to and use of health services than people living in Major cities”.

Drawing on the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare publication Australia’s Health 2010, the Framework identified key areas of concern with regard to the health of people in rural and remote communities, particularly:

  •  higher mortality rates and lower life expectancy;
  •  higher road injury and fatality rates;
  •  higher reported rates of high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity;
  •  higher death rates from chronic disease;
  •  higher prevalence of mental health problems;
  •  higher rates of alcohol abuse and smoking;
  •  poorer dental health;
  •  higher incidence of poor ante-natal and post-natal health; and
  •  higher incidence of babies born with low birth weight to mothers (in very remote areas).

The Framework does not include data quantifying these concerns. In referring back to Australia’s Health 2010, the data used to describe the health of people in rural and remote Australia is from 2004-2006 – it was already up to six years old at the time the Framework based on it was launched. It is very difficult to plan appropriately to address inequality when data is this out of date.

Perhaps the biggest gap in the Framework is that it does not link the inequities it identifies in rural and remote health generally to the five goals it develops. While this is largely due to a lack of narrative, what this lack of narrative does is lose the unifying rationale for the five goals and how they will work together to make a difference to the inequities identified in the Framework. If this was simply a lack of a coherent narrative to drive the needed policy responses, it may be excusable. But unfortunately, the lack of this coherent narrative has resulted in:

  •  lack of recognition of the need for baseline indicators against which progress can be measured and reviewed;
  •  loss of the connectedness of the goals – at the Commonwealth level we now see rural health reduced to workforce policy responses without a clear understanding of how those responses will actually lead to improvements in health outcomes and the range of health inequities in rural and remote communities; and
  •  undermining one of the most crucial needs underpinning the Framework as a whole – the need for quality and TIMELY data. The lack of good quality, current, data is apparent as soon as you begin to seek answers to the question “what has the Framework achieved?”

In developing this Discussion paper, the Alliance is seeking to undertake a high level, selective assessment using publicly available data to ascertain to what extent progress is being made in addressing health concerns and inequities in rural and remote Australia, referencing back to the goals and outcomes set out in the Framework.

Where related specific programs stemming from the Framework can be identified and their outcomes assessed, this will be included in the discussion. Given there are nine specific issues identified in the Framework and set out in dot point format above, the Alliance will seek information on only three to discuss whether any change in outcomes following the implementation of the Framework can be assessed accurately, and if so, what outcomes were achieved.

Background 2 of 2

The National Rural Health Alliance’s new Strategic Plan has been released and spans the period 1 July 2017 – 30 June 2019.

Download PDF Copy NRHA_Strategic-Plan

It is a high-level document to set directions, priorities and key areas of activities over the coming two years.  It also includes measures of success and effectiveness, identified as process, impact and health outcomes.

The Alliance intends to focus on seven priority areas including:

  • Unlocking the economic and social potential of the 7 million people living in rural and remote Australia;
  • Improving the health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples;
  • Integrating teaching, training, research and development to attract and retain the right workforce;
  • Strengthen prevention, early intervention and primary health care;
  • Developing  place-based, community and individualised local approaches to respond to community needs;
  • Reducing the higher burden of mental ill-health, suicide and suicide attempts; and
  • Securing long-term, sustainable funding  to extend our core work.

These seven priority areas have been strongly influenced by the recommendations coming out of the recent 14th National Rural Health Conference held in Cairns.  Further, these are all areas in which the Alliance believes further efforts and advocacy is required to improve the health and wellbeing of people living in rural and remote Australia.

A common link across all these priority areas is the need for a National Rural and Remote Strategy and associated Implementation Plan. The Alliance will work with members and other stakeholders in the pursuit of such a Strategy and Plan.

The Alliance is currently developing a workplan that will guide specific work streams.