NACCHO Aboriginal Healthy Futures #closethegap #socialdeterminants @pmc_gov_au Debate : Where to from here?

 

” Federal Indigenous affairs bureaucrats have released a draft of their new evaluation framework, eight months after the Commonwealth committed $40 million over four years to evaluate policies in the portfolio and put a highly regarded university professor in the driving seat.

The draft sets out processes to look more objectively at national policies to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and contribute to Closing the Gap, which have been led by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet for the past few years.”This is intended to align with the role of the Productivity Commission in overseeing the development and implementation of a whole of government evaluation strategy of policies and programs that effect Indigenous Australians,”

PM&C sets high standards for Indigenous affairs evaluation see PART 1 Below

 ”  It’s been widely known for fifty years that the health of Aboriginal people lags far behind that of other Australians. Despite that and the expenditure of billions of taxpayers’ dollars, serious gaps persist between Indigenous versus non-Indigenous health and wellbeing.

There is compelling evidence that social factors are potent determinants of the health of populations. In the simplest of terms these are (a) social disadvantage, and (b) the relationship of Indigenous Australians to mainstream society. Associated with these are basic issues already mentioned; these include education, housing standards, employment and socio-economic status. These must be addressed if health disadvantages are to be overcome. Until this happens the poor health outcomes of Indigenous Australians will persist.

It’s easy to identify medical problems, perhaps because they can be classified and measured. It is tempting then to decide that these problems are ‘medical’ and, therefore, should respond to ‘medical’ interventions or approaches in isolation. This is dangerously misleading.

It’s time for clinicians to realise and publicly acknowledge that most of the important issues which determine the health status of Indigenous people have ‘non-medical’ roots and need vigorous ‘non-medical’ approaches in order to be corrected.

 MICHAEL GRACEY. Aboriginal health: An embarrassing decades-long saga See Part 2 Below

Part 1

Around the same time as the new evaluation funding was announced, Malcolm Turnbull sought out indigenous health expert Ian Anderson to take over as deputy secretary leading the PM&C indigenous affairs group, which is also the only group within the central department overseen by an associate secretary, Andrew Tongue.

FROM The Mandarin

Anderson’s first major task was a review of the Closing the Gap target framework, which focuses attention on particular indicators of disadvantage. A few months into the job he set out some of his thoughts in a public speech at a special event marking 50 years since the referendum that effectively created this area of federal policy.

The framework notes good evaluation is “planned from the start, and provides feedback along the way” (referencing the audit office’s 2014 better practice guide to public sector governance).

“Good evaluation is systematic, defensible, credible and unbiased. It is respectful of diverse voices and world-views.

“Evaluation is distinct from but related to monitoring and performance reviews. Evaluation may use data gathered in monitoring as one source of evidence, while information obtained through monitoring and performance reviews may help inform evaluation priorities.”

The credibility of future evaluations depends on demonstrating their independence. To this end, the framework says a new external advisory committee, membership so far unknown, will “support transparency and ensure the conduct and prioritisation of evaluations is independent and impartial” by overseeing how the new framework is applied, checking the annual evaluation plan and with “ongoing advice, quality assurance and review”.

A “commitment to transparency” is also included. The committee will publish “all high priority evaluations” and reviews of them. Others will be randomly reviewed and summarised in an annual report.

“At the three year mark an independent meta-review of IAG evaluations will be undertaken to assess the extent to which the Framework has achieved its aims for greater capability, integration and use of robust evaluation evidence against the standards described under each of the best practice principles.”

All the actual evaluation reports will be published as well, at least in summary form, including “where ethical confidentiality concerns or commercial in confidence requirements” apply. Indigenous communities that have participated in evaluations will get to see the results too and additional “knowledge translation” efforts are proposed:

“Evaluation findings will be of interest to communities and service providers implementing programs as well as government decision-makers. Evaluation activities under the Framework will be designed to support service providers in gaining feedback about innovative approaches to program implementation and practical strategies for achieving positive outcomes across a range of community settings.”

The draft framework says it aims to:

  • generate high quality evidence that is used to inform decision making,
  • strengthen Indigenous leadership in evaluation,
  • build capability by fostering a collaborative culture of evaluative thinking and continuous learning across the IAG and more broadly across communities and organisations, and
  • place collaboration and ethical ways of doing high quality evaluation at the forefront of evaluation practice in order to inform decision making.

Higher quality evaluation that is “ethical, inclusive and focused on improving outcomes” is more likely to have impact, the draft points out. “It aims to pursue consistent standards of evaluation of Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) programs but not impose a ‘one-size-fits-all’ model of evaluation.”

The guide calls for best-practice evaluation to be “integrated into the cycles of policy and community decision-making” in a way that is “collaborative, timely and culturally inclusive.”

“Our approach to evaluation, as outlined in this Framework, reflects a strong commitment to working with Indigenous Australians.

“Our collaborative efforts centre on recognising the strengths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, communities and cultures.

“Fostering leadership and bringing the diverse perspectives of Indigenous Australians into evaluation processes helps ensure the relevance, credibility and usefulness of evaluation findings. In evaluation, this means we value the involvement of Indigenous Australian evaluators in conducting all forms of evaluation, particularly using participatory methods that grow our mutual understanding.”

Indigenous Advancement Strategy evaluations will look at how well programs meet three criteria:

Do they build on strengths to make a positive contribution to the lives of current and future generations of Indigenous Australians?

Are they designed and delivered in collaboration with Indigenous Australians, ensuring diverse voices are heard and respected?

Do they demonstrate cultural respect towards Indigenous Australians?

Four elements of good evaluation

The draft framework lists four elements of good evaluations — they are robust, relevant, credible and appropriate, which is to say they are “fit for purpose” and done in a timely fashion — and explains in detail how each of these ideals is to be achieved in Indigenous affairs through higher standards.

“Evaluation needs to be integrated into the feedback cycles of policy, program design and evidence-informed decision-making,” explains a chapter on relevance. “Evaluation feedback cycles can provide insights to service providers and communities to enhance the evidence available to support positive change. This can occur at many points in the cycle.”

While not being too prescriptive, the framework aims to set a high standard for the evidence that is used to judge the impact of programs.

“A range of evaluation methodologies can be used to undertake impact evaluation. Evaluations under the Framework will range in scope, scale, and in the kinds of questions they ask. Measuring long-term impact is challenging but important. We need to identify markers of progress that are linked by evidence to the desired outcomes.

“The transferability of evaluation findings are critical to ensure relevant and useful knowledge is generated under the Framework. High quality impact evaluations use appropriate methods and draw upon a range of data sources both qualitative and quantitative.

“Evaluation design should utilise methodologies that produce rigorous evidence and make full use of participatory methods. Use of participatory approaches to evaluation is one example of demonstrating the core values of the Framework in practice.”

Perhaps the moves to take a more academic approach at the federal level will allow for more open discussion of what works, in a portfolio where this year the minister has seen fit to publicly attack researchers in the field, and blast the independent audit office for doing its job instead of helping him attack the opposition.

Part 2 :  Aboriginal health: An embarrassing decades-long saga

It’s been widely known for fifty years that the health of Aboriginal people lags far behind that of other Australians. Despite that and the expenditure of billions of taxpayers’ dollars, serious gaps persist between Indigenous versus non-Indigenous health and wellbeing.

Recognition of an Aboriginal Health Problem

When these inequities were recognised in the 1960s the very high rates of Aboriginal childhood malnutrition and infections and high death rates of infants and young children brought home the unpalatable fact that Australia had a so-called ‘Third World’ health problem. This is a feature of poverty-stricken nations. This was clearly unacceptable in our otherwise affluent and healthy country. There was a public outcry which stirred the federal government into attempts to remedy this embarrassing state of affairs.

In 1979 the Commonwealth Parliamentary Committee on Aboriginal Affairs found that . . .

‘the appalling state of Aboriginal health’ . . . ‘can be largely attributed to the unsatisfactory environmental conditions in which Aboriginals live, to their low socio-economic status in the Australian community, and to the failure of health authorities to give sufficient attention to the special needs of Aboriginals and to take proper account of their social and cultural beliefs and practices’ . . .

The Committee criticised governments for their lack of recognition of these factors and commented on the need for Aboriginal people to be much more closely involved in all stages of planning and delivering their own health care. Notwithstanding some improvements in Indigenous health which occurred over the almost forty years that followed, many of that Committee’s findings and criticisms are still valid.

Efforts to Improve Indigenous Health

In 1981 a $50 million Aboriginal Health Improvement Program was launched with the aim of upgrading environmental health standards, such as better housing and community and family hygiene conditions. Government funds were allocated and State and Territory health departments implemented strategies and programs and deployed clinical and allied staff in order to achieve better Indigenous health.

An important objective was to provide more accessible services for Indigenous people. Some positive health gains followed; for example, better pregnancy outcomes, fewer maternal deaths, fewer infant and young child infections, suppression of vaccine-preventable illnesses through immunisation, and lower infant death rates.

This should have helped Indigenous youngsters to negotiate the rough ride through early life that would otherwise have been their lot. However, health and disease statistics for Indigenous Australians generally stayed well behind those of other citizens in the years that followed.

Strategies to ‘Close the Gap’

The persisting poor standards of Indigenous health prompted the Federal Government in 2008 to ‘Close the Gap’ for Indigenous Australians in a range of health outcomes and other facets of life and wellbeing so that they and other Australians would have ‘equal life chances’. The then Prime Minister Rudd anticipated within a decade halving the widening gap in literacy, numeracy and employment opportunities for Indigenous people. The Statement of Intent also anticipated better opportunities for Indigenous children so that within a decade . . . “the appalling gap in infant mortality rates between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children would be halved and, within a generation, the equally appalling 17-year life gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous when it comes to overall life expectancy” . . .  would be gone.

These aspirations seemed commendable and were well received by the public. However, their feasibility was questioned soon after they were announced. The target of closing the gap in life expectancy was said to be “probably unattainable” and the capacity to extinguish the risk of chronic diseases (like heart disease, diabetes and kidney disease) and related deaths was considered publicly by a renowned medical expert to be “implausible” in the 22-year timetable set out by the government. This is pertinent because those chronic diseases are the main contributor to the discrepancy in Indigenous versus non-Indigenous deaths. Those reservations were well founded.

Obstructions to Closing the Gap

Indigenous Australians now have very high rates of chronic diseases, as already mentioned. These are aggravated by smoking- and drug-related disorders. These conditions are long-term and have permanent complications, such as visual loss or blindness, or severe limitations on mobility. These cannot be reversed and, therefore, restrict prospects for longevity. In many Aboriginal communities a third or half of adults 35 years or over have one or more of these problems. Nationally, these diseases and accidental or intentional injuries, including suicide and homicide, are several times more prevalent in Indigenous Australians than in the total Australian population.

This well-documented and widespread heavy burden of illnesses, disabilities and related excess premature deaths among Indigenous Australians makes it virtually impossible to remove, within a generation, the inequalities between this pattern and the better outcomes which prevail in the rest of the population. This is made more difficult because some of these problems are trans-generational and can have their origins during intra-uterine development.

There are practical impediments in bringing better health to the Indigenous population. Inadequate access and maldistribution of facilities, personnel and services can be serious drawbacks, particularly in rural and remote areas. Of course, improving access to services does not necessarily lead to their appropriate utilisation.

And compliance with treatments and follow-up supervision and medications can be problematic. Similarly, altering health knowledge and modifying risky personal lifestyles are difficult among many people whether they are Indigenous or not. There have also been serious problems with management and governance of clinical services for Indigenous people whether they are Indigenous-specific or mainstream services.

This has tended to weaken their impact on health service delivery and waste limited financial and other resources. Collectively, all of these factors have diluted the much-needed positive outcomes of efforts to close the gaps in Aboriginal health standards and statistics.

Indigenous Health: the current situation

Some indicators of the current situation are revealing: death rates of Indigenous children under five years are more than double the national rates; their low birth weight rate is about double the overall national rate; hospitalisation rates are almost three times the national rates; hospital admission rates for potentially preventable conditions are almost four times higher; deaths from complications of diabetes at 35 to 55 years are approximately twenty times higher; and dementia rates are about five time higher than in non-Indigenous Australians and the  condition starts earlier in life. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare estimated that among Indigenous Australians born from 2010 to 2012 life expectancy would be about nine to ten years shorter than for other Australians. These indicators of health status, illness patterns and life expectancy are disgraceful and require urgent attention.

Where to from here?

 The targets set to be met by the Close the Gap Strategy are reported publicly each year. Regrettably, the goals are falling short in many of the government’s nominated areas. These include several of the health-related areas which have been mentioned.
Tellingly, the targets are not being met in many other facets of Indigenous life which have significant impacts on physical, emotional and mental health and wellbeing.

These include, for example, early childhood schooling rates, closing the gaps in literacy and numeracy for older Indigenous schoolchildren, achieving equity in employment rates and the economic benefits which should follow, having Indigenous people housed in adequate and hygienic living conditions, and being more engaged with the wider Australian community in various day-to-day activities. These failures have been publicly acknowledged by successive Prime Ministers including Abbott and Turnbull.
In the health arena itself there is a need for closer cooperation and collaboration between the three main sectors which provide curative and health promotion activities for Indigenous people. These sectors are: (a) mainstream services provided by governments; (b) Indigenous-specific services from Aboriginal or Indigenous Health or Medical Services; and (c) privately funded clinical and allied services. There is often overlapping of these sectors and, sometimes, issues of territoriality which detract from their effectiveness and, potentially, add to the financial costs involved.
As mentioned by that Parliamentary Committee as far back as 1979, there is a pressing need for more Indigenous involvement and responsibility for decision-making and delivery of their own health services. Although this is improving slowly, there is a long way to go before those people who need the services have the power to help control their own future health. This is particularly so in remote areas where local communities and their committees are often sidelined from this important function.

Social Dimensions which affect Health

There is compelling evidence that social factors are potent determinants of the health of populations.

In the simplest of terms these are (a) social disadvantage, and (b) the relationship of Indigenous Australians to mainstream society. Associated with these are basic issues already mentioned; these include education, housing standards, employment and socio-economic status.

These must be addressed if health disadvantages are to be overcome. Until this happens the poor health outcomes of Indigenous Australians will persist.

It’s easy to identify medical problems, perhaps because they can be classified and measured. It is tempting then to decide that these problems are ‘medical’ and, therefore, should respond to ‘medical’ interventions or approaches in isolation. This is dangerously misleading. It’s time for clinicians to realise and publicly acknowledge that most of the important issues which determine the health status of Indigenous people have ‘non-medical’ roots and need vigorous ‘non-medical’ approaches in order to be corrected. This means, of course, that non-medical sectors of governments must accept more responsibility and become more actively involved in issues which ultimately determine the health of populations which they are expected to serve. This will require a major shift in thinking within Federal and State governments and bureaucracies and wider acceptance among the Australian community.

The challenges are daunting but the need is urgent. Surely it is within our collective capabilities to turn around this sad and long-standing saga into a success story.

Michael Gracey AO is a paediatrician who has worked with Indigenous children, their families and communities for more than forty years. He was Australia’s first Professor of Aboriginal Health and for many years was Principal Medical Adviser on Aboriginal Health to the Western Australian Department of Health. He is a former President of the International Paediatric Association.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #SaveADates : #NACCHOagm2017 Only 28 days to go : Download 12 Page Draft Program

 

4- 5 October Aboriginal Male Health #OchreDay2017 Darwin NT

9- 10 October  : Indigenous Affairs and Public Administration Conference : Can’t we do better?

10 October  : CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

11-12 October 3rd Annual Ngar-wu Wanyarra Aboriginal Health Conference

18 -20 October  : 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

20 October : ‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference

18- 20 October First 1000 Days Summit

26-27 October  :Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

31 October2 Nov  :NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

15 November  One Day NATSIHWA Workshop SA Forum

14- 15 November  : 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

15 -18 November  :National Conference on Incontinence Scholarship Opportunity close 1 September

27-30 November  :Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

14 December Shepparton  One Day NATSIHWA Workshop VIC Forum

11-12 April 2018  :6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium  Canberra call for extracts

If you have a Conference, Workshop Funding opportunity or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Social  Media

mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

ONLY 28 DAYS To Go

      Register /Download full 12 Page draft program HERE

NACCHO 2017 Members Conference and AGM Draft

NACCHO CONFERENCE WEBSITE

 4- 5 October Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day Darwin NT  

2017 Ochre Day follow on Twitter #OchreDay2017

Where: Darwin
Starts tomorrow : 4th & 5th October 2017

This year NACCHO is pleased to announce the annual NACCHO Ochre Day will be held in Darwin

Beginning in 2013, Ochre Day is an important NACCHO Aboriginal male health initiative. Aboriginal males have arguably the worst health outcomes of any population group in Australia.

NACCHO has long recognised the importance of addressing Aboriginal male health as part of Close the Gap by 2030.

9- 10 October Indigenous Affairs and Public Administration Conference : Can’t we do better?

This year marks 50 years since the 1967 referendum resulted in the Commonwealth gaining national responsibilities for the administration of Indigenous affairs. This is a shared responsibility with state and territory administrations.

Website

ANZSOG and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet are providing travel support and waiving conference fees for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community leaders and public servants attending the conference from remote locations.

To enquire about your eligibility, please contact conference2017@anzsog.edu.au

In partnership, the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (DPMC), the University of Sydney, and the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG) are holding an international conference that questions the impact of the past 50 years of public administration and raise issues for the next 50 years in this important nation building area.

DPMC is seeking to build and foster a public canon of knowledge to open the history of Indigenous policy and administrative practice to greater scrutiny and discussion.

The Indigenous Affairs and Public Administration Conference will be attended by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives, other Indigenous peoples, public servants from state and federal governments, and the academic community.

 The conference will feature a range of guest presenters, including Australia’s Chris Sarra, Andrea Mason and Martin Nakata, New Zealand’s Arapata Hakiwai and Geraint Martin, as well as other international speakers.

The deliberations and discussions of the conference will feed into a final report that will be used to guide Federal government policy formation at a series of roundtables in late 2017 and early 2018.

REGISTER

2017 Indigenous Affairs and Public Administration Conference

October 9-10
The Refectory, University of Sydney

October 9, 6:00pm – 9:30pm: Pre-conference dinner
October 10, 8:30am – 5:00pm: Conference

Cost:

Early bird tickets (until September 1): $150
Regular tickets: $250
Full time PhD student concession tickets: $25

Register Here

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

catsinam

Contact info for CATSINAM

11-12 October 3rd Annual Ngar-wu Wanyarra Aboriginal Health Conference

3rd Annual Ngar-wu Wanyarra Aboriginal Health Conference

The Ngar-wu Wanyarra Aboriginal Health conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

The conference will include evidence based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal health and wellbeing.

In 2016 the Ngar-wu Wanyarra Aboriginal Health conference attracted over 130 delegates from across the community and state.

Please register online by midday Thursday 5th October, 2017.

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

We are pleased to announce the 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference will be held at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa in Broome, Western Australia, from 18 to 20 October 2017.

THE FUTURE OF REMOTE HEALTH AND THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY

Since the organisation’s inception in 1982 this event has served to create an opportunity for likeminded remote and isolated health individuals who can network, connect and share.

It serves as both a professional and social resource for the Remote and Isolated Health Workforce of Australia.

We aim to offer an environment that will foster new ideas, promote collegiate relationships, provide opportunities for professional development and celebrate remote health practice.

Conference Website

18- 20 October First 1000 Days Summit

 

The First 1000 Days Australia Summit is a three-day event that will bring together Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders, researchers, community members, front- line workers and policy makers involved in areas relevant to the work of First 1000 Days Australia. Lectures, panel discussions and workshops will address topics such as caring and parenting, infant and child development, family strengthening, implementation and translation, as well as a number of other areas.

The theme for the Summit is ‘Celebrating our leadership, strengthening our families’. We invite interested presenters to submit abstracts for oral presentations, workshops and posters that align with the aims, principles and research areas of First 1000 Days Australia, and of First 1,000 Days international.

20 October : ‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference 


‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference

RMA Presidents’ Breakfast
Friday 20 October 2017
Pullman Albert Park, Melbourne


www.ruralmedicineaustralia.com.au

Australia’s most influential health leaders will discuss critical health policy issues in a key Presidents’ Breakfast forum at the Rural Medicine Australia 2017 conference, to be held in Melbourne in October.Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), will host the forum and will be joined on the panel by Associate Professor Ruth Stewart, President of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM); Dr Bastian Seidel, President of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP); and Dr Tony Bartone, Vice President of the Australian Medical Association (AMA).

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

‘Translation at the Centre’ An educational symposium

Alice Springs Convention Centre, Alice Springs

This year the Symposium will look at research translation as well as the latest on diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.  The event will be run over a day and a half.
The Educational Symposium will feature a combination of relevant plenary presentations from renowned scientists and clinicians plus practical workshops.

Registration is free but essential.

Please contact the symposium coordinator on 1300 728 900 (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) or via email at events@baker.edu.au  

31 October2 NovNACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

We welcome you to attend the 2017 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference.

Download the 12 page PDF Draft Program as at 26 September

NACCHO 2017 Members Conference and AGM Draft

On the new NACCHO Conference Website  you find links to

1.Registrations now open

2. Booking Your Accommodation

3. Book Your Flights

4. Expressions of Interest Speakers, case studies and table top presentations Close

5. Social Program

6.Conferences Partnership Sponsorship Opportunities

7.NACCHO Conference HELP Contacts

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Where :Hyatt Hotel Canberra

Dates :Members’ Conference: 31 October – 1 November 2017
Annual General Meeting: 2 November 2017

CLICK HERE

15 November  One Day NATSIHWA Workshop SA Forum

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) 

Join the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) for a one day CPD networking workshop focussed on current workforce development opportunities.

Upskill and strengthen your skill level in a specialised area and find out what is happening through program development, education and funding opportunities.

Hear from organisations such as: PHN Primary Heath Network, CranaPlus, Autism QLD, Rheumatic Heart, PEPA Program of Experience in the Palliative Approach, Diabetes Australia, IBA Indigenous Business Australia, HESTA Superannuation, 1800 RESPECT, Hearing Australia and more to be annuonced in the coming months (tailored for your specific region).

Register HERE

14-15 November : 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the Lowitja Institute, Australia’s national institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, are proud to be co-hosting the 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

This partnership indicates an alignment of priorities and a strong commitment from our two institutions to deliver a measurable, positive impact on the health and wellbeing of Australia’s First Peoples.

Under the theme “The Butterfly Effect: Translating Knowledge into Action for Positive Change”, the Symposium will be an opportunity to bring relevant expertise to the business of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research translation and put forward Indigenous perspectives that inform the most effective policies and programs. It will also be a forum to share knowledge of what successful research looks like at community level and what the key elements of success are.

We look forward to the participation of delegates with community, research and policy expertise, including outstanding keynote speakers Dr Carrie Bourassa (Canada) and Sir Mason Durie (New Zealand). We are confident that through our joint commitment to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, the Symposium will make a significant contribution to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, families and individuals. This commitment also signals the importance of working together as equal partners, Indigenous and non-Indigenous.

More info HERE

15 -18 November :National Conference on Incontinence Scholarship Opportunity

The Continence Foundation of Australia is offering 10 scholarships to support health professionals to attend the 26th National Conference on Incontinence. The conference will be held in Sydney on 15-18 November 2017.  The conference program and registration brochure can be found here.
This scholarship program is open to registered nurses and physiotherapists with an interest in continence care working in rural and remote areas of Australia. The scholarship includes full conference registration, including clinical workshops and social events, flights and accommodation. The top applicant also has the opportunity to participate in a placement at a Sydney continence clinic. Previous unsuccessful applicants are encouraged to apply.
Applications closed Friday 1 September.
Applications are being taken online. Click here to find out more and to apply.  

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

iaha

Abstracts for the IAHA 2017 National Conference are now open!

We are calling for abstracts for concurrent oral presentations and workshops under the following streams:
– Care
– Cultures
– Connection

For abstract more information visit the IAHA Conference website at: https://iahaconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

14 December Shepparton  One Day NATSIHWA Workshop VIC Forum

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) 

Join the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) for a one day CPD networking workshop focussed on current workforce development opportunities.

Upskill and strengthen your skill level in a specialised area and find out what is happening through program development, education and funding opportunities.

Hear from organisations such as: PHN Primary Heath Network, CranaPlus, Autism QLD, Rheumatic Heart, PEPA Program of Experience in the Palliative Approach, Diabetes Australia, IBA Indigenous Business Australia, HESTA Superannuation, 1800 RESPECT, Hearing Australia and more to be annuonced in the coming months (tailored for your specific region).

Register HERE

11-12 April 2018 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium  Canberra call for extracts

About the Symposium

Drawing upon a tradition which commenced with the first rural and remote health scientific conference ‘Infront Outback’ held in Toowoomba in 1992, the 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium will be held in Canberra, 11-12 April 2018.

The Symposium will celebrate 20 years since the establishment of the first university department of rural health in 1997 and will highlight the research and knowledge that followed this innovation.

Outback Infront will celebrate the leadership that has emerged from the rural and remote health research community, while at the same time, support early career academics and the next generation of rural health researchers.

The Symposium will focus on rural and remote health research that informs strategic health policy and health service challenges in rural and remote Australia.

The Symposium will provide an opportunity to share and develop research that seeks to understand and deliver innovative change through building evidence that has the potential to transform health outcomes and service delivery.

Who should attend

The Symposium program will be designed to engage academics, policy makers, expert researchers in rural and remote health and clinician-researchers, as well as emerging and early career researchers.

It will also be relevant to policy makers, university departments of rural health, rural clinical schools, research collaborations and bodies, rural workforce organisations and health services delivery networks and providers.

Program

As well as key presentations from respected researchers in rural and remote health the Symposium will also feature Rogano presentations (scholarly debate on a current research project that answer “how to” questions and encourage scholarly thinking and debate) and a return of the popular Lightning Talk presentations to support early career academics and the next generation of rural health researchers.

Abstracts are now being sought for general presentations, Lightning talks and Rogano presentations

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Top 40 plus #jobalerts Inc CEO @ahmrc @IUIH_ @CAACongress @Walgett_AMS #Durri #Gidgee

  This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1-10 Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service (Durri ACMS)

11. Walgett ACCHO HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER

12 -15  : Gidgee Healing Mt Isa

12.Position Title: Mental Health Professional

13. Position Title: Physiotherapist

14 : Position Title: Podiatrist

15. Position Title:  Psychologist

16. Miwatj Health NT Senior Social and Emotional Well Being Therapeutic Clinician

17 . Wuchopperen Health Service Cairns  : CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

18. Congress Alice Springs Chief Operating Officer at the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre (CAAHSC)

19. Congress Alice Springs : WOMENS HEALTH NURSE

20 : Wurli-Wurlinjang Health NT 6 positions

20.Wurli-Wurlinjang Family Partnership Program (WWFPP) – Various Positions

21.Program Coordinator _ Strong Indigenous Families (FDV)

22.Strong Indigenous Families. Positions include: Counsellors/ Therapists, Case Managers & Community Engagement Support Officers (FDV)

23 .Mental Health Professionals

24.Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner

25.General Practitioner

26 . National Health and Medical Research Council 2017 – 2018 Indigenous Internship program

 27 – 37 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

38 .Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW  CEO

39. GP Vacancies: Full time and Part time Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation Grafton and Casino

40 . Office Practice Manager : Port Augusta, SA Pika Wiya Health Service

41. Senior Rural Medical Practitioner : Port Augusta, SA: Pika Wiya Health Service

 

VIEW Hundreds of Jobs on the NACCHO Jobalerts

 

 

  Register or more INFO

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1-10 Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service (Durri ACMS)

The Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service (Durri ACMS) was established in 1976. The name Durri means “to grow in good health” and was bestowed upon the organisation by members of the local Aboriginal community.

Located in Kempsey, approximately half way between the cities of Brisbane and Sydney. Durri is on the traditional land of the Dunghutti peo

Durri’s vision is to achieve and maintain better health and wellbeing outcomes for our Aboriginal people and communities.

Durri aims to be an employer of choice in Aboriginal health, supporting a skilled and flexible workforce.

Durri is a great place to work – a family friendly and culturally sensitive work environment that values people.

If you have a passion for indigenous health and are committed to closing the gap, then why not join us?

Website LINK

 Application package Child & Family Nurse – Nambucca Application package Child & Family Nurse – Nambucca.pdf
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Application package AHW - Bowraville.pdf Application package AHW – Bowraville.pdf
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11. Walgett ACCHO HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER

  • SENIOR LEADERSHIP / HR MANAGER OPPORTUNITY 
  • WALGETT & BREWARRINA District & COMMUNITY, Nthn-NSW 
  • ESTABLISHED, SUCCESSFUL & HIGHLY RESPECTED ACCHS TEAM

Download this Job info

OUR ORGANISATION

The WALGETT Aboriginal Medical Service (‘WAMS’) and the BREWARRINA Aboriginal Health Service Limited (‘BAHSL’) are highly respected and established Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, fully committed to providing accessible, practical, culturally appropriate and confidential Health services in Walgett, Brewarrina and surrounding communities.THE OPPORTUNITY

We are looking for a motivated, experienced and suitably qualified individual to join our senior management team, and fulfil the key role of HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER.

Reporting directly to the Chief Executive Officer, the HR Manager oversees and facilitates all Human Resource and Employee Relations activities of the organisation, including  providing timely, practical advice and ongoing strategic support on all employee initiatives, programs and/or workplace issues.

As a key member of the Senior Management Team, the HR Manager is responsible for ensuring HR practices align with strategic business plans for the organisation. This opportunity represents a rewarding and fulfilling opportunity to join our established team, already highly regarded for making a real difference in our local communities. Highly competitive remuneration (including salary packaging), plus local Accommodation options are also available.

CONTACT / INFO / APPLY

Jon Mathias (MJSP)

Email jon@mjsp.com.au

Phone # 07 3839 1233

12 -15  : Gidgee Healing Mt Isa

Gidgee Healing is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service dedicated to making a long-term positive impact on the health and well being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.

Based in Mt Isa, we provide a broad range of high-quality Primary Health Care services across the Mt Isa, North West and Lower Gulf regions of Queensland.

Our multi-disciplinary team comprises GPs, Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Practitioners/Workers, Midwives, visiting Allied Health professionals and Medical Specialists and a range of other Workers that support our holistic approach to service delivery.

Gidgee Healing values community participation when planning and delivering our services, to ensure we are meeting the health and wellbeing needs of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

With a service footprint of approximately 640,000 km2, Gidgee Healing has the largest land area of all Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in Queensland.

Website

12.Position Title: Mental Health Professional

Employment Status:                    Full time

Salary Range:                              Pending qualification and years of experience (base salary $71,895 – $85,800), 5 weeks annual leave (17.5% leave loading), professional development allowance, superannuation, salary packaging available

Reports to:                                  Allied Health Team Leader – Senior

Positions supervised:                 Nil

Location:                                     Mount Isa – will require some travel to other remote communities across the North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria region

Download PD_ Mental Health Professional_Allied Health PD July 2017_v1

13. Position Title: Physiotherapist

Employment Status:                    Full time

Salary Range:                              Pending qualification and years of experience (base salary $71,895 – $85,800), 5 weeks annual leave (17.5% leave loading), professional development allowance, superannuation, salary packaging available

Reports to:                                  Allied Health Team Leader – Senior

Positions supervised:                 Assist with supervision AHA

Location:                                     Mount Isa – will require some travel to other remote communities across the North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria region

Download PD_ Physiotherapist_Allied Health PD July 2017_v2

14 : Position Title: Podiatrist

Employment Status:                    Full time

Salary Range:                              Pending qualification and years of experience (base salary $71,895 – $85,800), 5 weeks annual leave (17.5% leave loading), professional development allowance, superannuation, salary packaging available

Reports to:                                  Allied Health Team Leader – Senior

Positions supervised:                 Assist with supervision AHA

Location:                                     Mount Isa – will require some travel to other remote communities across the North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria region

Download

PD_ Podiatrist_Allied Health PD July 2017_v1

15. Position Title:  Psychologist

Employment Status:                    Full time

Salary Range:                              Pending qualification and years of experience (base salary $79,000 – $95,000), 5 weeks annual leave (17.5% leave loading), professional development allowance, superannuation, salary packaging available

Reports to:                                  Allied Health Team Leader – Senior

Positions supervised:                 Nil

Location:                                     Mount Isa – will require some travel to other remote communities across the North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria region

Download : PD_ Psychologist – Child Youth_Allied Health PD July 2017_v1

16. Miwatj Health NT Senior Social and Emotional Well Being Therapeutic Clinician 

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is the regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Miwatj Health aims to improve access to integrated, culturally responsive and safe mental health and drug and alcohol services that holistically meet the social and emotional well being and mental health needs of the population in the East Arnhem region.  We  are seeking enthusiastic, dedicated and an appropriately qualified senior therapeutic clinician to fill a role within our organisation.

Our Values

  • Compassion care and respect for our clients and staff and pride in the results of our work.
  • Cultural integrity and safety, while recognising cultural and individual differences.
  • Driven by evidence-based practice.
  • Accountability and transparency.
  • Continual capacity building of our organisation and community.

In this role you will be responsible for working collaboratively with members of the Social and Emotional Well Being (SEWB) team, and the Manager, Mental Health to contribute to the development and delivery of the Miwatj SEWB model.

Key Responsibilities include;

  • Demonstrated experience in working in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations or environments and fully embrace the concept of Aboriginal Community Control
  • Experience in delivering (culturally adapted) Focused Psychological Strategies to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Deliver culturally adapted evidence based therapeutic interventions that value and build upon traditional indigenous knowledge
  • Contribute to a coordinated approach for the prevention, assessment, early intervention, referral and shared care arrangements for common mental and behavioral disorders, including alcohol and drug use disorders
  • Develop and articulate a Miwatj SEWB Model that includes the promotion of strong SEWB, screening, self-referral and early intervention for common mental health disorders (including alcohol and drug use disorders) as part of comprehensive primary health care. This includes the development of mental health care plans, clinical pathways, case management, and clear referral pathways and processes
  • Develop clinical governance structures and processes to support the delivery of culturally-adapted evidence-based therapeutic interventions to address common mental health disorders, including alcohol and drug use disorders, as part of comprehensive primary health care
  • Ensure Therapeutic Work complements and works in an integrated way with the existing medical and social/cultural support streams of care
  • Effectively manage a team of two clinicians to deliver, articulate and promote the SEWB Miwatj Model

To apply for this role you must be either a registered Clinical Psychologist, Registered Psychologist, Mental Health experienced Social Worker, or Mental Health experienced Occupational Therapist and be eligible to work in Australia.

For further details please refer to the Job Description.

This is a full time position with benefits and an attractive salary commensurate with experience. The position is Darwin based and will involve regular travel throughout the Miwatj region (locally based and subsidised accommodation may be negotiated).

Applications close 11 October 2017.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are encouraged to apply.

17. Wuchopperen Health Service Cairns  : CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

• Focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

• Primary and Allied Health Care – Established Services

• Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation

• Cairns and Outreach Locations

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited is a community controlled organisation delivering holistic primary and allied health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Cairns and surrounding districts. Wuchopperen Health Service’s vision of improving quality of life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples underlines our commitment to providing high quality, safe and coordinated care for our people.

Wuchopperen is seeking a motivated and appropriately experienced CEO to deliver inspirational leadership and continue to drive our strategic aims to fully develop our organisations potential, enhance our capability and continue to expand the key role we already play within our community, now and into the future.

Reporting directly to the Board of Directors, the successful applicant will oversee an established organisational structure comprising of Clinic, Allied Health, Community and Mental Health Services, a Child and Family Centre along with Corporate Support.

The CEO will provide clear direction in the effective coordination of our various health services and programs, and funding related activity. In addition, the CEO will be responsible for facilitating corporate governance responsibilities and working closely with and alongside the Board, and providing oversight of Wuchopperen’s ongoing strict adherence to relevant Accreditation and Funding compliance standards.

This role presents an outstanding opportunity for a suitably inspired and credentialed Indigenous professional, to oversee the ongoing success and continual improvement of our organisation in accepting responsibility for the following key areas: Board Governance, Compliance and Coordination

• Leadership and Management of the Executive Team

• Strategic Management and Planning within a Competitive Health Market

• Budget, Finance, Risk Assessment and Funding

• Representation and Advocacy of Wuchopperen

• Local, Regional and National Stakeholder Engagement

• Business Development and Revenue Enhancement

Please submit your application, including a cover letter and resume, to Jenny Hall at jenny@mjsp.com.au.

 

18. Congress Alice Springs Chief Operating Officer at the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre (CAAHSC)

  • Base salary: $158,554 – $183,085 (p.a)
  • Total effective package: $188, 192 – $220,310 (p.a)
  • Full-Time Maximum Term 3 year contract

The Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre (CAAHSC) is a partnership of 12 organisations from across the Territory including the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress), to establish a health research centre. The CAAHSC is a construct around innovation in regional health that brings together Aboriginal health services, the Alice Springs hospital and leading research and education institutions under a virtual centre of excellence. The centre has a focus on Aboriginal health, remote health and primary health care in a regional context, with another key focus to translate research into outcomes on the ground. The CAAHSC is an exciting collaborative, and it will be at the forefront of some incredible research and Congress is the leading partner.

The Centre is one of only two consortia nationally to be recognised as a Centre for Innovation in Regional Health (CIRH) by Australia’s peak funding body for medical research, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).

The Centre is seeking a Chief Operating Officer who is interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

The Chief Operating Officer provides direct strategic and governance support to the Executive Committee of the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre (CAAHSC) and manages the day to day operations of the CAAHSC.

Alice Springs offers a unique lifestyle in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere in the heart of Australia. It is within easy reach of Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Watarrka (Kings Canyon) and a host of other world heritage sites.

As well as a wonderful lifestyle and rewarding work, Congress offers the following:

  • Competitive salaries
  • Six (6) weeks annual leave
  • 9.5% superannuation
  • Generous salary packaging
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Family friendly conditions
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)
  • District allowance

For more information on the position please contact Chief Medical Officer – Public Health, Dr John Boffa (08) 8951 4401 or 0418 812 141 or email john.boffa@caac.org.au.

Application close: MONDAY 2 OCTOBER 2017.

*Total effective package includes: base salary, district allowance, superannuation, leave loading, and estimated tax saving from salary packaging options.

Contact Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or vacancy@caac.org.au for more information

To apply for this job go to: http://www.caac.org.au/hr& enter ref code: 3748736.

19. Congress Alice Springs : WOMENS HEALTH NURSE

Full-time, Fixed Term 2 Year Contract based in SANTA TERESA

  • Base Salary: $98,982 – $106,314 (p.a)
  • Total Effective Package: $121,757 – $129,934 (p.a)*
  • Female Identified Position

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 40 years’ experience providing comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal people living in Central Australia. Congress is seeking a Women’s Health Nurse who is interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

The Women’s Health Nurse works within a multi discipline team to provide culturally appropriate women’s health services and health promotions to Aboriginal women and children 0 – 8 weeks of age living in Santa Teresa.

This position participates in the after hour on call roster for medical emergencies. All after hour call outs are accompanied.

Central Australia offers a unique lifestyle in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere in the heart of Australia. It is within easy reach of Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Watarrka (Kings Canyon) and a host of other world heritage sites.

As well as a wonderful lifestyle and rewarding work, Congress offers the following:

  • Competitive salaries
  • Six (6) weeks annual leave
  • 9.5% superannuation
  • Generous salary packaging
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Family friendly conditions
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)
  • District allowance and Remote Benefits

For more information on the position contact Clinic Manager Jason King on (08) 8956 0911 and Jason.King@caac.org.au

Applications close: SUNDAY 1 OCTOBER 2017

*Total effective package includes: base salary, district allowance, superannuation, leave loading, and estimated tax saving from salary packaging options.

Contact Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or mailto:vacancy@caac.org.aufor more information. Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

For more information about jobs at Congress visit www.caac.org.au

To apply for this job go to: http://www.caac.org.au/hr & enter ref code: 3736373.

 

Identified Position is under Section 9A of the NSW Anti-Discrimination Act 1977. Job Applications close 20 September 2017

 

20-25  : Wurli-Wurlinjang Health NT 6 positions

If you are considering applying for a position with us, we encourage you in the first instance to review the position profile of the vacancy you are interested in. This will assist you in understanding the role you are interested in and will provide details in relation to the position responsibilities and other criteria applicants should consider addressing in their application.

All applications must contain the following as a minimum:

  • completed employment application form
  • current resume or curriculum vitae (CV)
  • a cover letter which provides a clear and concise overview of your ability to meet the requirements of the role.
  • a minimum of two referees (names, positions and telephone contact number) preferably one current and one past supervisor

Note: Applications who are successful must have the ability to satisfactorily complete a Criminal History Check and obtain a Working with Children Card.

Applications may be forwarded using our online Employment Application Form OR by emailing the Human Resources team at hr@nullwurli.org.au

View all details of these Wurli current vacancies HERE

20.Wurli-Wurlinjang Family Partnership Program (WWFPP) – Various Positions

21.Program Coordinator _ Strong Indigenous Families (FDV)

22.Strong Indigenous Families. Positions include: Counsellors/ Therapists, Case Managers & Community Engagement Support Officers (FDV)

23.Mental Health Professionals

24.Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner

25.General Practitioner

 

 

26. National Health and Medical Research Council 2017 – 2018 Indigenous Internship program

 
 
National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) is pleased to invite eligible applicants to apply to the Indigenous Internship program.
The Indigenous Internship program provides a wide range of opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to gain insight into the work of the NHMRC, as well as to enhance their educational experience through practical work experience.
An internship with the NHMRC provides:
·         exposure to government processes and requirements in relation to funding health and medical research
·         experience in developing guidelines, identifying and promoting resolution of ethical issues
·         exposure to mechanisms and challenges of disseminating and increasing uptake of knowledge
·         better understanding of the rationale for, and demands of, public administration and accountability
A limited number of paid placements for internships are available in our Canberra and Melbourne offices.
 
Eligibility
To be eligible you must be:  enrolled in an Undergraduate or Postgraduate degree in a health or medical research related field; able to work independently and as part of a team; and can provide evidence to confirm that you are of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent.
 
Applications for the 2017-18 Indigenous Internship Program close on Friday 29 September 2017.
To find out more please see our Indigenous Internship Information, which details eligibility and selection, as well as the terms and conditions of the program.
If you have any questions, please contact the Indigenous Employment Coordinator TJ Oberleuter on 02 6217 9530.

27 – 37 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

IUIH and its members are constantly looking for healthcare workers, GP’s, allied health professionals, medical and health related students to fill short or long term vacancies within their growing operations.Current job opportunities are listed below:

Website HERE

+ Team Leader – Home Support (Hervey Bay) Full Time On going + Manager, Family Wellbeing Services + Business Intelligence Analyst / Developer + Regional Optometrist + Registered Nurse – Full Time Ongoing + Exercise Physiologist, Full Time On going Based at Windsor + Exercise Physiologist – Hervey Bay / Cherbourg – Full time, Fixed Term + Indigenous Outreach Worker (CTG) Bundaberg Full Time Fixed Term

38 .Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW  CEO

Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW is currently seeking a motivated and highly experienced CEO to lead AH&MRC to a new level of sustainable growth and success.

Working directly with the Board of directors, AH&MRC’s personnel and funding bodies, this role will suit a candidate who has experience working within the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS), has a strong commitment to serving the interests of indigenous people and is a motivational leader with a focus on strategic planning.

The purpose of the AH&MRC is to lead the Aboriginal Health Agenda in NSW for improved policies, programs, service and practices.  Ensure that Aboriginal knowledge informs decision-making processes and support, strengthen Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to build sustainability within the Health Sector.

This is an Identified Position. 

Essential Criteria:

  1. Demonstrated experience working in a CEO capacity including the functions of a Company Secretary or as an Executive/Senior Manager in Aboriginal health sector or public health of no less than 5 years.
  2. This vacancy is an identified Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander recruitment under Part 22, section 22.9 of the AH&MRC Constitution. Applicants for this role must satisfy the Aboriginality criteria. Aboriginality is defined by decent through parentage, identification as being Aboriginal and being accepted in the community as such. In your response to this criteria, you will need to provide information on how you satisfy the Aboriginality criteria.
  3. Demonstrated track record of successful leadership and experience working with board of directors identifying areas of risk and opportunities for growth.
  4. Demonstrated experience of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector as well as health issues, including social determinants affecting Aboriginal peoples’ health status in contemporary Australian society.
  5. A decisive leader, capable of making efficient and effective decisions to positively affect organisational success and highly committed to promoting the welfare of the workplace from a financial, cultural and competitive market policy environment.
  6. Demonstrated experience in networking/liaising with the Aboriginal community, ACCHSs, government departments and non-Government organisations.
  7. Excellent written communication skills that demonstrate your ability to prepare and present reports, briefs and general routine correspondence.
  8. A policy response exercise.

How to Apply:

To receive a copy of the Recruitment Information Package for more information and the selection criteria, please contact HR via email or telephone.

Please send your completed application as per instructions in the Recruitment Information Kit to the HR Department either via post or email.

The selection criteria must be addressed for your application to be considered. 

For a confidential conversation please contact Human Resources (Gordana Agic) on (02) 9212 4777 or mailto:gagic@ahmrc.org.au

39. GP Vacancies: Full time and Part time Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation Grafton and Casino

Are you a General Practitioner who has thought about being part of the effort to close the gap in Indigenous health outcomes??

Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (BNMAC) is a Community Controlled Aboriginal Health Service situated in Grafton and Casino, providing a full range of general practice services and Primary Health Care to the Community members of the Clarence and Richmond Valley’s.

BNMAC is recruiting General Practitioners to be based in Casino, NSW. Full time (35 hours per week) and part time options available with no on-call requirements.

The salary package may be negotiated as either wages or a combination of wages and percentage of receipted income. Staff members of BNMAC are eligible to access salary sacrifice.

The General Practitioner is required to provide culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care services to clients of BNMAC.

Minimum Credentialing criteria for GP’s:

  1. Bachelor of Medicine or an Australian/Overseas equivalent recognised by the Australian Medical Council
  2. Current unrestricted registration as a General Practitioner with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA).
  3. Hold relevant professional indemnity insurance
  4. Evidence of Fellowship of Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) or Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) or vocational registration.
  5. Evidence of completion of previous triennium requirements and active participation in continuous education recognised by the RACGP Quality Assurance and Continuous Professional Development (QA & CDP) or ACRRM Professional Development Program (PDP).
  6. Details of all past and continuing health care related employment and particularly that in General Practice.

Appointment is subject to a current Drivers Licence and a NSW Working with Children’s Check clearance. Further information on the Working with Children Check is available at http://www.kidsguardian.nsw.gov.au/Working-with-children/working-with-children-check

Clinical:

  1. Provide holistic approaches to health that include case conferencing and care planning for patients with chronic diseases.
  2. Be responsible to the Chief Executive Officer for provision of General Practitioner services to Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation clients.
  3. Attend outreach visits when required under the instruction of the Executive Officer and in conjunction with a local Aboriginal Health Worker.
  4. Work collaboratively and co-operatively with a range of other health providers within the organisation and the Aboriginal community.
  5. In collaboration with other staff members, develop and undertake programs and tasks appropriate to family medicine, preventive medicine and primary care in the community and health education, incorporating the following:
  • Health assessments of children and adults
  • Chronic disease care plans
  • Women and men’s issues
  • Otitis Media and seasonal infections in both children and adults
  • Ante natal and post natal care
  • Diabetes management and other vascular health issues, perform ECGs
  • Treatment of minor lacerations
  • Geriatric and mental health
  • Arranging specialist services for clients as required and ensuring that these services are recorded.
  • Examining, diagnosing and developing treatment plans for patients
  • Treating the medical needs of both emergency and general patients to an optimum level without discrimination or bias
  • Understanding the practice principles of Infection Control
  • Ensuring, promoting and motivating patients in the general area of health, and contributing to community health.
  • Providing clinical leadership for staff in relation to meeting the health needs of the local Aboriginal community.
  • Medical consultations with clients of BNMAC are to be undertaken with due consideration of cultural respect and sensitivity.
  • Participation in Healthy for Life Program activities, Nutrition Program and other programs run by BNMAC staff.

Additional duties required:

  • Provision of in-service education to staff members as required
  • Participation in general staff and clinical staff meetings
  • Participation in accreditation and quality assurance activities undertaken by BNMAC.
  • Participate in Asbestos health screening activities
  • Abide by BNMAC policies and procedures
  • Work within the applicable NSW Work Health and Safety Guidelines
  • Advise the Chief Executive Officer of any local health needs and special programs to address these.
  • Establish liaison with local health agencies and personnel; attend meetings relevant to health needs of the Aboriginal Community as directed.
  • Utilise the client management software system and other associated systems to identify care needs, initiate recalls and care plans and ensure that client records are maintained accurately and meet all legal obligations.
  • Experience or interest in Indigenous Primary Health would be beneficial.
  • Provide clear advice to administration about Medicare items for claiming.

For further information please contact:

Mr Scott Monaghan 02 6644 3500

Please send applications attention Scott Monaghan at info@bnmac.com.au

40 . Office Practice Manager : Port Augusta, SA Pika Wiya Health Service

Link to apply: http://applynow.net.au/jobs/92120

About the Organisation

Established in the early 1970’s, Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation provides culturally appropriate, comprehensive primary health care services, social support and training to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The organisation operates from its premises in Port Augusta and also has clinics at Davenport, Copley and Nepabunna communities. Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation also provides services to the communities of Quorn, Hawker, Marree, Lyndhurst and Beltana.

About the Opportunity

Pika Wiya Aboriginal Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (Pika Wiya) now has a full-time opportunity for an experienced Office Practice Manager to join their team in Port Augusta, SA.

In this role, you will be primarily responsible for the provision of specialised clerical, patient transport, and administrative services within the clinical/administrative team.

You will also work closely with the clinic supervisor, medical practitioners, and other organisations to ensure accurate medical claiming and billing and to organise placements.

To be successful in this role, you must have demonstrated experience in a similar position, training in Communicare, and a tertiary qualification in Business Administration or equivalent.

You will be an effective leader with the ability to nurture a team environment and conduct day-to-day business within the practice using tact, diplomacy, and empathy for others. As such, you will display exceptional interpersonal and communication skills and have the ability to work under pressure.

It is crucial to this role that you have previously worked in an Aboriginal organisation or community or have an understanding of appropriate cultural practices.

About the Benefits

In return for your hard work and dedication, you will be rewarded with a competitive salary circa $68,129 – $71,278 (commensurate with skills and experience) plus super and generous salary sacrificing benefits.

You will also receive access to a mobile phone and study leave options!

 41. Senior Rural Medical Practitioner : Port Augusta, SA: Pika Wiya Health Service

Link to apply: http://applynow.net.au/jobs/89148

About the Organisation

Established in the early 1970’s, Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation provides culturally appropriate, comprehensive primary health care services, social support and training to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The organisation operates from its premises in Port Augusta and also has clinics at Davenport, Copley and Nepabunna communities. Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation also provides services to the communities of Quorn, Hawker, Marree, Lyndhurst and Beltana.

About the Opportunity

Pika Wiya Aboriginal Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (Pika Wiya) now has a full-time opportunity for a Senior Rural Medical Practitioner to join their team in Port Augusta, SA.

Reporting to the Medical Director, you will be responsible for the provision of high-level primary health care, ensuring continuity care for individuals, and for prevention programs for the population.

This will be done primarily through the Port Augusta clinic (bulk-billing clinic) – servicing a combination of booked and walk in clients – and also by visiting a remote clinic once a month.

To be successful in this position, you will hold an AHPRA recognised medical degree including general or specialist registration and a Medicare Australia Provider Number.

You will also have demonstrated experience working in a medical practice and have the ability to provide high-quality clinical skills in a rural general practice. Additionally, you must have a good knowledge of the Australian health system and the Medicare billing system.

It is crucial to this role that you have a good understanding of Aboriginal community and health and be willing to involve yourself in the community.

About the Benefits

In return for your hard work and dedication, you will be rewarded with an attractive base salary of $225,000 plus super.

You will also be eligible generous salary packaging, up to$16,000 through Maxxia, to increase your take home pay!

Pika Wiya is also willing to negotiate relocation assistance and accommodation subsidies for the right candidate.

Make a real difference to the health and well-being of a vibrant community – Apply Now! 

 

 

Email jon@mjsp.com.au

Phone # 07 3839 1233

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Training News: Congress #ACCHO Alice Springs wins major Training Large Employer of the Year Award

“Receiving this award is great recognition of what can be achieved through the combination of a Workforce Engagement and Development Plan, a dedicated Leadership team and an Aboriginal Staff Advisory Committee.

With a workforce of 399 staff and over 50% Aboriginal employment, training is critical to achieving Congress’ strategic objectives through building a skilled workforce that has appropriate clinical and non-clinical skills to deliver culturally‑safe and responsive health care to Aboriginal people .

Accredited and non-accredited training remains a commitment across our entire workforce, establishing an Aboriginal workforce is critical to closing the gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal people and Congress strategic plan. “

Chief Executive Officer, Donna Ah Chee. ( See NACCHO TV Interview HERE )

Photo above  : Tracey Donnellan Brand : General Manager Health Services Division CACC accepting the award in Darwin

Congress is thrilled to be named 2017 Large Employer of the Year at the NT Training Awards.

The Large Employer of the Year Award recognises organisations with a workforce of  200+ employees that has achieved excellence in the provision of nationally recognised training to its employees.

Congress has a proud 43 year history of providing comprehensive Aboriginal community controlled health care to over 15,000 Aboriginal people in Alice Springs and across six remote Aboriginal communities in Central Australia.

For more info about CAAC download cphc-congress-final-report

The Congress Workforce Engagement and Development Plan was precipitated by the Congress Board of Directors establishing a benchmark of 60% Aboriginal employment.  The Plan builds on a number of innovative strategies to support Aboriginal people to gain employment and qualifications and to build on our existing workforce including:

  • A cadetship program that supports Aboriginal people to attain undergraduate tertiary qualifications in a health, early childhood or commerce field.
  • A traineeship program employing trainees across a number of health, early childhood and administrative positions, providing on the job and accredited Certificate IV training and career in Congress.
  • An Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) focused traineeship program with 13 AHP trainees progressing towards Certificate IV in Aboriginal Primary Health Care with a pathway to an AHP career in Congress.
  • A Diploma of Leadership and Management program focused on supporting Aboriginal staff into management positions.
  • Provision of nationally accredited mentoring set skill set for Managers and mentors.
  • 63 staff currently actively engaged in training from Certificate III to post graduate qualifications, with the predominate focus on investing in our Aboriginal workforce.
  • Strategic focus on Professional Development, training and study across our entire workforce with generous paid leave available to staff.

Accredited and non-accredited training remains a commitment across our entire workforce, establishing an Aboriginal workforce is critical to closing the gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal people and Congress strategic plan” said Chief Executive Officer, Donna Ah Chee.

Congress acknowledges our training partners, Central Australian Remote Health Development Service and Batchelor Institute.

Congress delivers comprehensive health care across 13 Health Services in Alice Springs and six remote Aboriginal communities in Central Australia

Part 2 Congress Education & Training Service

What do we do?

Our Education and Training Service provides a range of education and training opportunities to Aboriginal people interested in pursuing a rewarding and meaningful career in Aboriginal health.

  • Traineeships
  • Cadetships
  • HLT40213 Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice

Traineeships

Congress traineeships are offered to Aboriginal school leavers seeking work experience and/or Aboriginal people looking to return to work and or a career change, who are interested in building career in the field of Aboriginal health or related administrative and corporate service.

Congress traineeships provide full-time employment for 12-18 months (role dependant) leading to a nationally accredited qualification (Certificate III or IV) on completion.

Cadetships

Congress offers cadetships to Aboriginal people who are undertaking full-time study at university in a health, social services or business administrative field and who are seeking on the job training in their field.

Cadetships are offered on a fixed-term basis for the duration of the university course length.

Cadetships include:

  • full-time study on campus;
  • 12 weeks full-time per year paid Congress placement;
  • mentoring and coaching with Congress professional;
  • allowance for text books/equipment;
  • weekly allowance paid for study periods; and
  • allowance for accommodation and travel costs.

Course fees and HELP fees are the responsibility of the cadet.

AHPs

Congress works in partnership with Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education (BIITE) to provide accredited training to Congress students and trainees, specifically the HLT40213 Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice course.

The training component is delivered by BITE through its workshop program based at the Desert Peoples Centre (DPC) in Alice Springs.

Congress supports this training through students undertaking clinical practice within their own services. Congress will also accept other BIITE students on clinical placement and will share with BIITE resources to provide access to the Communicare system.

For more information regarding the HLT40213 Certificate IV visit the BIITE website here.

How to apply:

For more information on available positions, eligibility and how to apply visit the Jobs page or email vacancy@caac.org.au.

Opening hours

Mon – Fri  8.30am – 5pm

Contact Details

Human Resources
(08) 8959 4771

Traineeships and Cadetships – Training & Development Coordinator
(08) 8959 4771

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Obesity : Download #TippingtheScales Report Leading health orgs set out 8 urgent actions for Federal Government

“Sixty-three per cent of Australian adults and 27 per cent of our children are overweight or obese.

This is not surprising when you look at our environment – our kids are bombarded with advertising for junk food, high-sugar drinks are cheaper than water, and sugar and saturated fat are hiding in so-called ‘healthy’ foods. Making a healthy choice has never been more difficult.

The annual cost of overweight and obesity in Australia in 2011-12 was estimated to be $8.6 billion in direct and indirect costs such as GP services, hospital care, absenteeism and government subsidies.1 “

 OPC Executive Manager Jane Martin 

Download the report HERE  tipping-the-scales

Read over 30 + NACCHO Obesity articles published last 5 years

Read over 30+ NACCHO Nutrition and Healthy foods published last 5 years

Thirty-four leading community, public health, medical and academic groups have today united for the first time to call for urgent Federal Government action to address Australia’s serious obesity problem.

In the ground-breaking new action plan, Tipping the Scales, the agencies identify eight clear, practical, evidence-based actions the Australian Federal Government must take to reduce the enormous strain excess weight and poor diets are having on the nation’s physical and economic health.

Led by the Obesity Policy Coalition (OPC) and Deakin University’s Global Obesity Centre (GLOBE), Tipping the Scales draws on national and international recommendations to highlight where action is required. Areas include:

  1. Time-based restrictions on TV junk food advertising to kids
  2. Set clear food reformulation targets
  3. Make the Health Star Rating mandatory by July 2019
  4. Develop a national active transport strategy
  5. Fund weight-related public education campaigns
  6. Introduce a 20% health levy on sugary drinks
  7. Establish a national obesity taskforce
  8. Develop and monitor national diet, physical activity and weight guidelines.

OPC Executive Manager Jane Martin said the eight definitive policy actions in Tipping the Scales addressed the elements of Australia’s environment which set individuals and families up for unhealthy lifestyles, rather than just focusing on treating the poor health outcomes associated with obesity.

Watch video HERE : How does junk food marketing influence kids

“Sixty-three per cent of Australian adults and 27 per cent of our children are overweight or obese. This is not surprising when you look at our environment – our kids are bombarded with advertising for junk food, high-sugar drinks are cheaper than water, and sugar and saturated fat are hiding in so-called ‘healthy’ foods. Making a healthy choice has never been more difficult,” Ms Martin said.

“The annual cost of overweight and obesity in Australia in 2011-12 was estimated to be $8.6 billion in direct and indirect costs such as GP services, hospital care, absenteeism and government subsidies.1 But Australia still has no strategy to tackle our obesity problem. It just doesn’t make sense.

“Without action, the costs of obesity and poor diet to society will only continue to spiral upwards. The policies we have set out to tackle obesity therefore aim to not only reduce morbidity and mortality, but also improve wellbeing, bring vital benefits to the economy and set Australians up for a healthier future.”

Professor of Epidemiology and Equity in Public Health at Deakin University, Anna Peeters, said the 34 groups behind the report were refusing to let governments simply sit back and watch as growing numbers of Australians developed life-threatening weight and diet-related health problems.

“For too long we have been sitting and waiting for obesity to somehow fix itself. In the obesogenic environment in which we live, this is not going to happen. In fact, if current trends continue, there will be approximately 1.75 million deaths in people over the age of 20 years caused by diseases linked to overweight and obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer heart disease, between 2011-20501,” Professor Peeters said.

“Obesity poses such an immense threat to Australia’s physical and economic health that it needs its own, standalone prevention strategy if progress is to be made. There are policies which have been proven to work in other parts of the world and have the potential to work here, but they need to be implemented as part of a comprehensive approach by governments. And they need to be implemented now.

“More than thirty leading organisations have agreed on eight priorities needed to tackle obesity in Australia. We would like to work with the Federal Government to tackle this urgent issue and integrate these actions as part of a long-term coordinated approach.”

In addition to the costs to society, the burden of obesity is felt acutely by individuals and their families.

As a Professor of Women’s Health at Monash University and a physician, Professor Helena Teede sees mothers struggle daily with trying to achieve and sustain healthy lifestyles for themselves and their families, while having to deal with the adverse impact of unhealthy weight, especially during pregnancy.

“As a mother’s weight before pregnancy increases, so does the substantive health risk to both the mother and baby. Excess weight gain during pregnancy further adds to these risks and is a key driver of infertility, long-term obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes, while for the child, their risk of becoming overweight or obese and developing chronic diseases in later life greatly increases,” Professor Teede said.

“The women I see are generally desperate for help to improve their lifestyle and that of their families. They want to set themselves and their families up for healthy, long lives.

“Currently, there is a lot of blame placed on individuals with unhealthy diets and lifestyles seen as being due to individual and family discipline. Women from all backgrounds and walks of life struggle with little or no support to achieve this. It is vital that we as a community progress beyond placing all responsibility on the individual and work towards creating a policy context and a society that supports healthy choices and tips the scales towards obesity prevention to give Australian families a healthy start to life.”

The calls to action outlined in Tipping the Scales are endorsed by the following organisations: Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance (which includes the Heart Foundation, Cancer Council Australia, Kidney Health Australia, Diabetes Australia and the Stroke Foundation), Australian Health Policy Collaboration (AHPC), Australian Medical Students’ Association (AMSA), Australian & New Zealand Obesity Society (ANZOS), Australasian Society of Lifestyle Medicine, Baker Heart & Diabetes Institute, CHOICE, Consumers Health Forum of Australia, Deakin University’s Global Obesity Centre (GLOBE), Institute For Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), Monash Centre for Health, Research and Implementation (MCHRI), LiveLighter, Menzies School of Health Research, The University of Melbourne’s Melbourne School of Population & Global Health, Melbourne Children’s (which includes The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne), the National Rural Health Alliance Inc, Nutrition Australia, Obesity Australia, Obesity Policy Coalition, Obesity Surgery Society of Australia & New Zealand, Parents’ Voice, Public Health Association of Australia and Sugar By Half.

Download the Tipping the Scales action plan and snapshot at opc.org.au/tippingthescales


1. Obesity Australia. Obesity: Its impact on Australia and a case for action. No time to Weight 2. Sydney, 2015.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : 2016 CENSUS of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders launched

In 2016, there were 649,171 people identified as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin in the Census.

Of these people, 91% (590,056 people) were of Aboriginal origin only, 5% (32,345 people) were of Torres Strait Islander origin only and 4% (26,767 people) identified as being of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin.

See Full ABS Data here

 ” The number of Aboriginal Australians living in NSW and Victoria has doubled since 2001, figures released by the Bureau of Statistics show, far outpacing the growth in the non-Indigenous population of both states.

In NSW, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders has increased from 120,000 in 2001 to 216,000 in 2016 while in Victoria the numbers have almost doubled from 25,000 to 47,000. ”

See Part 2 below for Article in full Census 2016: Indigenous population in NSW and Victoria doubles

These proportions have changed very little in the last ten year period (see Data Cube 3, Table 3b).

In the Northern Territory, just under 25% of the population identified as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin in the 2016 Census. In all other jurisdictions, 5% or less of the population were of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin. Victoria had the lowest proportion at 0.8% of the state total.

When a response to the Indigenous status question in the Census was not provided, a response of ‘not stated’ is recorded. When these people are excluded from the total population, the proportion of those identifying as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander increases slightly (between 0.1 and 0.3 percentage points) in all states and territories, with the exception of the Northern Territory which increases by 2.8 percentage points (see Data Cube 3, Table 3a).

 

Census Counts(a) by Indigenous status — State/Territory, 2016


Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander
Non-Indigenous
Not stated
Total
Aboriginal
and TSI

State/Territory
Count of Persons
Proportion of Persons (%)
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Proportion of Persons (%)

New South Wales
216 176
33.3
6 826 286
437 762
7 480 228
2.9
Victoria
47 788
7.4
5 532 275
346 563
5 926 624
0.8
Queensland
186 482
28.7
4 211 020
305 685
4 703 193
4.0
South Australia
34 184
5.3
1 557 001
85 464
1 676 653
2.0
Western Australia
75 978
11.7
2 237 541
160 891
2 474 410
3.1
Tasmania
23 572
3.6
455 137
31 255
509 965
4.6
Northern Territory
58 248
9.0
147 327
23 257
228 833
25.5
Australian Capital Territory
6 508
1.0
370 748
20 143
397 397
1.6

Total Australia(b)
649 171
100.0
21 341 231
1 411 491
23 401 892
2.8

(a) Usual residence, excludes overseas visitors.
(b) Includes Other Territories, comprising Jervis Bay Territory, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Christmas Island and Norfolk Island, Migratory-Offshore-Shipping, and No Usual Address.
Note: Please note that there are small random adjustments made to all cell values to protect the confidentiality of data. These adjustments may cause the sum of rows or columns to differ by small amounts from table totals. For further information see Census of Population and Housing: Census Dictionary, 2016 (cat. no. 2901.0).

CAPITAL CITIES AND REST OF STATE

In the 2016 Census, just over one-third (35%) of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population lived in Capital City areas. States with relatively high proportions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Capital Cities include South Australia (54%) and Victoria (50%). In contrast, 78% of the population who identified as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin in the Northern Territory lived outside the Capital City area. Likewise, in Queensland, 71% of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population lived outside of the Capital City area.

Census Counts(a) by Indigenous Status — Capital City and Rest of State, 2016


Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander
Non-Indigenous
Not stated
Total
Proportion of
Persons

Capital City/Rest of State
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Proportion of Persons (%)

New South Wales (NSW)
Greater Sydney
70 135
4 493 490
260 364
4 823 991
32.4
Rest of State
145 189
2 322 911
175 436
2 643 536
67.2
No Usual Address
839
9 528
1 916
12 288
0.4
Total NSW
216 176
6 826 286
437 762
7 480 228
100
Victoria (Vic)
Greater Melbourne
24 062
4 215 761
245 390
4 485 211
50.4
Rest of State
23 444
1 310 270
100 103
1 433 818
49.1
No Usual Address
279
6 219
1 069
7 565
0.6
Total Vic
47 788
5 532 275
346 563
5 926 624
100
Queensland (Qld)
Greater Brisbane
54 158
2 093 128
123 517
2 270 800
29.0
Rest of State
131 520
2 107 878
180 324
2 419 724
70.5
No Usual Address
799
9 886
1 827
12 510
0.4
Total Qld
186 482
4 211 020
305 685
4 703 193
100
South Australia (SA)
Greater Adelaide
18 403
1 216 624
60 689
1 295 714
53.8
Rest of State
15 530
338 096
24 445
378 074
45.4
No Usual Address
249
2 279
328
2 863
0.7
Total SA
34 184
1 557 001
85 464
1 676 653
100
Western Australia (WA)
Greater Perth
31 214
1 801 031
111 612
1 943 858
41.1
Rest of State
44 169
431 657
48 341
524 167
58.1
No Usual Address
587
4 497
867
5 950
0.8
Total WA
75 978
2 237 541
160 891
2 474 410
100
Tasmania (Tas)
Greater Hobart
8 534
201 462
12 351
222 356
36.2
Rest of State
14 983
252 850
18 791
286 627
63.6
No Usual Address
55
755
104
912
0.2
Total Tas
23 572
455 137
31 255
509 965
100
Northern Territory (NT)
Greater Darwin
11 960
110 004
14 862
136 828
20.5
Rest of Territory
45 590
35 862
7 998
89 443
78.3
No Usual Address
696
1 402
387
2 489
1.2
Total NT
58 248
147 327
23 257
228 833
100
Australian Capital Territory (ACT)
Australian Capital Territory
6 476
370 297
20 084
396 857
99.5
No Usual Address
33
454
62
538
0.5
Total ACT
6 508
370 748
20 143
397 397
100

Total Australia(b)
649 171
21 341 231
1 411 491
23 401 892

(a) Usual residence, excludes overseas visitors.
(b) Includes Other Territories, comprising Jervis Bay Territory, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Christmas Island and Norfolk Island, and Migratory-Offshore-Shipping, and No Usual Address.
Note: Please note that there are small random adjustments made to all cell values to protect the confidentiality of data. These adjustments may cause the sum of rows or columns to differ by small amounts from table totals. For further information see Census of Population and Housing: Census Dictionary, 2016 (cat. no. 2901.0).

AGE PROFILE

In the 2016 Census, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population had a younger age distribution than the non-Indigenous population, reflecting higher fertility and lower life expectancy – a trend consistent with 2011 Census results. In 2016, the median age (the age at which half the population is older and half the population is younger) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was 23 years (up from 21 years in 2011), compared with 38 years for non-Indigenous people (up from 37 years in 2011). The Northern Territory had the highest median age for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in both 2011 and 2016 (23 years and 25 years respectively). In 2016, New South Wales and Queensland had the lowest median age (22 years). For 2011 age profiles, see Census of Population and Housing – Counts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, 2011 (cat. no. 2075.0).

Nationally, just over one-third of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people counted in the 2016 Census were under 15 years of age (34%), while 5% were aged 65 years and over. The age profile of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait population varied only slightly between the states and territories. Queensland had the highest proportion of children aged under 15 years (35%). Tasmania had the highest proportion of older persons aged 65 years and over (6%).

Census Counts(a) — Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by State/Territory and Age, 2016


Total Persons
Persons aged 0-14 years
Persons aged 15-64 years
Persons aged 65 years and over
Median age

State/Territory
Count of Persons
Proportion of Persons (%)
Proportion of Persons (%)
Proportion of Persons (%)
Years

New South Wales
216 176
34.4
60.3
5.4
22
Victoria
47 788
33.3
61.5
5.3
23
Queensland
186 482
35.4
60.2
4.4
22
South Australia
34 184
33.4
62.0
4.6
23
Western Australia
75 978
33.4
62.4
4.2
23
Tasmania
23 572
33.0
60.8
6.2
24
Northern Territory
58 248
30.0
66.2
3.8
25
Australian Capital Territory
6 508
31.2
65.5
3.1
23

Total Australia(b)
649 171
34.0
61.3
4.8
23

(a) Usual residence, excludes overseas visitors.
(b) Includes Other Territories, comprising Jervis Bay Territory, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Christmas Island and Norfolk Island, and Migratory-Offshore-Shipping, and No Usual Address.
Note: Please note that there are small random adjustments made to all cell values to protect the confidentiality of data. These adjustments may cause the sum of rows or columns to differ by small amounts from table totals. For further information see Census of Population and Housing: Census Dictionary, 2016 (cat. no. 2901.0).

Part2 : Census 2016: Indigenous population in NSW and Victoria doubles

The number of Aboriginal Australians living in NSW and Victoria has doubled since 2001, figures released by the Bureau of Statistics show, far outpacing the growth in the non-Indigenous population of both states.

Originally published HERE

In NSW, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders has increased from 120,000 in 2001 to 216,000 in 2016 while in Victoria the numbers have almost doubled from 25,000 to 47,000.

The Indigenous population is growing – rapidly,” Australian National University associate professor Nicholas Biddle and research fellow Francis Markham told the ANU’s Centre for Economic Policy Research on Friday.

Over the same period the non-indigenous population has grown by between 15 and 20 per cent in NSW and Victoria.

“Apart from the higher fertility rate of Indigenous Australians there is pretty strong evidence for there being a larger number of people who previously weren’t being counted,” said Dr Biddle.

“Part of it is the census getting better at counting the population, and part of it is people being more comfortable identifying themselves to a census collector.”

Nationally, there are now 650,000 Indigenous Australians, according to the updated 2016 Census figures released by the bureau on Thursday, which also show the suburbs with the highest and lowest proportion of Aboriginal residents.

In NSW, the lower North-Shore has just 0.2 per cent of residents identifying as Aboriginal compared to the state average of 1.4 per cent. In Sydney’s east, at 6.6 per cent, La Perouse has the highest rate among Indigenous areas identified in the Sydney city region.

In Victoria, the Melbourne areas of Bayside and Glen Eira have the lowest proportion of Aboriginal residents at 0.2 per cent. The Mornington Peninsula has the Melbourne area’s highest at 1.3 per cent.

While more Aboriginal Australians are moving to urban areas, the majority are staying on city fringes. There are now more than 9000 Indigenous Australians in Blacktown in Sydney’s west and more than 2800 located across Northcote, Preston and Whittlesea in Melbourne.

Dr Biddle said these areas also have high rates of mixed parentage, where Indigenous males and females have a non-indigenous partner causing the rate of the population that identifies as Aboriginal to increase.

“That is kind of what you expect if you have a population that makes up 1 or 2 per cent. The chances of your partner having the same ethnicity as you is relatively low.”

The number of people identifying as Indigenous has significant implications for government policy. The Commonwealth Grants Commission allocates a small share of more than $50 billion in GST revenue to states for Indigenous funding on the basis of the census figures.

Nikita Rotumah and Ben Clark work at one of the few remaining Aboriginal youth outreach centre in the Melbourne city area.

“All the services are under resourced,” said their manager Troy Austin, who has run the Aboriginal Youth Sport and Recreation Co-Operative in Fitzroy for the past three years.

“A lot of the organisations have moved out of the inner city as the community goes out to where housing is more affordable.”

He said while more and more people are identifying as Indigenous that has not translated to greater resources.

“People are becoming more aware of the number of services that you have to have your Aboriginality confirmation for,” he said. “Maybe someone who wasn’t getting services before can now get them.”

“There was a period where it was safer for someone to not poke your head up and say you were Aboriginal, now there is a lot more pride and also a lot more awareness,” he said. “That’s a good thing.”

NACCHO @TheAHCWA Aboriginal Health and the Cashless Welfare card debate

 

 ” Graphic video footage played recently to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and other influential politicians cuts to the core. It is horrific, sickening and gut-wrenching, and would affect any compassionate human being.

But the intent behind the carefully edited emotive video – further pushing a ( Cashless Welfare ) card to supposedly tackle every imaginable social problem in vulnerable communities – is ill-conceived and ideologically driven.

Michelle Nelson-Cox Chair  : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia press release Opinion piece (part 2 Below )

 

 ” We need to recognise that the best way of dealing with problems is with respect, working together, and focussed on commonly agreed goals. We do not need a new generation of community members under the control of those who want to use punitive measures to coerce and control them. When has this approach ever been shown to work?

We need to ask why we are not doing it differently, treating the very causes of the dislocation and alienation of our communities — facing up to and turning around the hopelessness and despair that beleaguers them.

The Rural Doctors have made it clear when they said: “Those that do have problems will not be helped by measures that feel punitive, such as switching them to a cashless debit card, rather than payments. Tough love is rarely successful in treating substance abuse – particularly when it’s from the Government.”

I support the Rural Doctors and our community organisations working with families dealing with these issues. This is where we have to take this debate.”

Shadow assistant minister for Indigenous affairs and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Senator for Western Australia, Patrick Dodson responds to article portraying the state as a ‘war zone’ .Full article HERE

” Senator Rachel Siewert has criticised a new video campaign showing graphic depictions of violence in Indigenous communities as shock tactics designed to scare the Federal Government into rolling out more cashless welfare cards in remote Western Australia.

Using violent imagery then offering a one-dimensional, paternalistic and previously failed approach to a complex problem shows that Andrew Forrest is more concerned about furthering his ideologies than looking at what works.

“I share concerns about disadvantage and agree we need to be addressing severe disadvantage in communities like Port Hedland. We need a multifaceted approach including addressing alcohol supply, drug and alcohol services, and wrap around services driven by the community.

“I agree we do need to be investing in communities but in approaches that work ‘ Senator Rachel Siewert

Read Senator Rachel Siewert full press release part 4 below

Mining magnate Andrew Forrest and local leaders from the East Kimberley region, last week launched #timetoact an online anti-violence campaign in the nation’s capital. It features a video that shows disturbing scene of violence.”

Watch video HERE

” The concerted push by outgoing WA Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan that the cashless welfare system should be expanded to somehow protect children from sexual abuse, particularly in the north-west town of Roebourne, is fundamentally flawed.

There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

Instead, greater investment is needed in programs that address social determinants and build strong families and communities.

Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.

AHCWA does not support simplistic apparent solutions imposed from outside Aboriginal communities. Rather, it advocates for greater investment in community designed and driven programs to build strong families and communities.

Our sector has been delivering positive outcomes in Aboriginal health for more than 40 years, but in that time we have often dealt with the unintended negative consequences of whatever “silver bullet” solution is politically fashionable at the time.

Extracts from Michelle Nelson-Cox Chair  : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia press release (part 1and 2 below)

 

Elder Ted Carlton with a card

Part 1 : AHCWA rejects Karl O’Callaghan’s call to expand cashless welfare

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia has challenged outgoing Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan to look in his own backyard and adequately police remote communities rather than advocate for greater disempowerment of indigenous Australians.

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox today rejected calls by Mr O’Callaghan, whose contract ends on August 15 after 13 years at the helm of WA Police, for an urgent expansion of the cashless welfare system to combat child sex crimes in regional WA.

“The cashless welfare card is not a panacea to complex social problems,” Ms Nelson-Cox said.

“While AHCWA supports the government’s commitment to improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal people and prevent child sexual abuse, we do not support the ill-conceived idea that cashless welfare cards can turn the tide on the abhorrent abuse of children.

“There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

“Instead, greater investment is needed in programs that address social determinants and build strong families and communities.

“Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

Ms Nelson-Cox said Mr O’Callaghan’s admissions in The West Australian newspaper that his officers could not protect children in remote communities was gravely concerning.

“At what point does the buck stop with police and governments to keep communities safe? Over the past 13 years, how have the high instances of sexual abuse not have been addressed earlier?” she said.

“There is a large police presence in Roebourne, and admissions by Karl O’Callaghan that ‘police were not capable of protecting children in those communities’ and ‘neither the police nor government can guarantee protection of these children’ shows a lack of commitment to work with communities to effectively address these issues.

“The reality is there are a huge number of people very unhappy with the way they have been affected by the cashless welfare system imposed by the Federal Government.

“If anything, this is a failure of policing in the Roebourne area to address these crimes.

“The cashless welfare card does not need to be expanded. The solution does not lie in the disempowerment of Aboriginal people, but rather additional police resources and a greater commitment to stamp out these shocking and abhorrent crimes.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) currently engaged as members.

Part 2 : AHCWA rejects Karl O’Callaghan’s call to expand cashless welfare

 

Graphic video footage played recentlt to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and other influential politicians cuts to the core. It is horrific, sickening and gut-wrenching, and would affect any compassionate human being.

But the intent behind the carefully edited emotive video – further pushing a card to supposedly tackle every imaginable social problem in vulnerable communities – is ill-conceived and ideologically driven.

The concerted push by outgoing WA Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan that the cashless welfare system should be expanded to somehow protect children from sexual abuse, particularly in the north-west town of Roebourne, is fundamentally flawed.

The belief that the cashless welfare card can prevent child sexual abuse is based on nothing more than a distorted perception that quarantining income will address all social problems in remote Aboriginal communities.

To date, there has been no conclusive evidence that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or sexual abuse.

In fact, the most comprehensive review of income management in the Northern Territory has proven that this strategy will not work and will likely only create further dependence.

WA communities like Roebourne do not need the next new idea imposed by white people who live elsewhere.

Instead, they need to work with Aboriginal people and support under resourced local initiatives already being worked on.

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) currently engaged as members.

AHCWA does not support simplistic apparent solutions imposed from outside Aboriginal communities. Rather, it advocates for greater investment in community designed and driven programs to build strong families and communities.

Our sector has been delivering positive outcomes in Aboriginal health for more than 40 years, but in that time we have often dealt with the unintended negative consequences of whatever “silver bullet” solution is politically fashionable at the time. These days, the cashless welfare card is seen as the quick fix.

The cashless welfare card has been delivered as part of a Cashless Debit Card Trial (CDCT), a program developed to reduce the harm associated with alcohol consumption, illicit drug use and gambling in Ceduna in South Australia and the East Kimberley in WA (Kununurra and Wyndham).

The trial began in early 2016, when participants were issued a debit card which could not be used to buy alcohol, gambling products or to withdraw cash.

The system quarantines 80 per cent of income support payments into a restricted account linked to the card, with the remainder of these payments accessible through a normal, unrestricted bank account.

Remarkably, and perhaps unsurprisingly, an evaluation of the current trial showed that the majority of people using the card, and their families, did not report gambling, using illicit drugs, or consuming alcohol in excess.

To put it simply, this trial has been socially disempowering for a huge number of community members. Strong resistance and opposition has been made clear at public meetings, strikes and petitions.

Admissions by Karl O’Callaghan in the video shown to the PM that “police can’t save them” shows a lack of commitment to work with communities to effectively address these issues.

If anything, his comments reflect a failure of policing in the Roebourne area to address these crimes and protect the town’s most vulnerable people.

We support any commitment to improve the safety and health of Aboriginal people, particularly children, in WA and turn the tide on the appalling abuse of our youngsters, but the answer is not an expansion of the cashless welfare card.

The solution does not lie in the disempowerment of Aboriginal people, which has been an ongoing tactic by governments. Instead it lies in additional police resources and a genuine commitment to work with communities to stamp out these shocking and abhorrent crimes.

We agree it is time to act – it is time for the police to act.

“Using violent imagery then offering a one-dimensional, paternalistic and previously failed approach to a complex problem shows that Andrew Forrest is more concerned about furthering his ideologies than looking at what works,” Senator Siewert said today.

“I share concerns about disadvantage and agree we need to be addressing severe disadvantage in communities like Port Hedland. We need a multifaceted approach including addressing alcohol supply, drug and alcohol services, and wrap around services driven by the community.”

Part 3  :  Graphic video campaign pushing for welfare card slammed as ‘one dimensional’  

Continued from opening                                

Mr Forrest was joined yesterday by Jean O’Reerie, Aboriginal Education Worker from Wyndham in East Kimberley- a Cashless Debit Card trial site, her colleague, local Bianca Crake, and the Mayor of Port Hedland, Mr Camillo Blanko.

Mr Forrest claims that the government’s current system to stop drug and alcohol fuelled violence against children in the Pilbara and East Kimberley region isn’t working.

Linking what he described as horrific child abuse to alcohol and drug use, Mr Forrest is pushing for the Cashless Welfare Card to be introduced into more West Australian communities.

“Elders of communities, mayors of major towns are standing up and saying enough is enough. We need the system to change. What we have had is not enough. It’s delivering our children into hell and they have to be protected,” he told a media conference yesterday.

Mr Forrest yesterday brough elders and civic leaders, from Western Australia and South Australia, to meet personally with the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, the leader of the opposition Bill Shorten and his deputy leader Tanya Plibersek.

Figures from the West Australian Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan’s department claimed that one in three children are being abused, in a town of 500 children – 158 were sexually assaulted, 36 men face 300 charges of child abuse and in another town six children committed suicide in six months. It was not specified whether the children affected were Indigenous or Non- Indigenous.

Jean O’Reerie an Aboriginal Education Worker from Wyndham in the East Kimberley was emotional as she described the situation in her community.

“We need help, we need the government to intervene and help us out as community leaders. We can’t do it on our own. We need change for our community, our kids are hurting,” she said.

“We, the grassroots people, live with it every day. The hurt, the suffering, and the abuse.”

Part 4 : Trying to scare people into supporting the cashless card a worrying ramp up of Andrew Forrest’s campaign: Senator Rachel Siewert

Andrew Forrest is trying to use similar shock tactics to those of the previous Howard Government to scare people into supporting the cashless welfare card, Australian Greens Senator Rachel Siewert said last week

“We are seeing a worrying ramp up of Andrew Forrest’s cashless welfare card campaign that uses children, violence and fear just like the Howard Government did in 2007 over the NT Intervention.

“The Howard Government did this to justify the Northern Territory Intervention to impose income management and the Basics Card, at the time the Little Children are Sacred report was used to scare people into supporting income management.

“The final evaluation of the NT Intervention shows that it met none of its objectives. Ten years on we are still seeing the number of children going into out of home care increasing and appalling disadvantage persists.

Using violent imagery then offering a one-dimensional, paternalistic and previously failed approach to a complex problem shows that Andrew Forrest is more concerned about furthering his ideologies than looking at what works.

“I share concerns about disadvantage and agree we need to be addressing severe disadvantage in communities like Port Hedland. We need a multifaceted approach including addressing alcohol supply, drug and alcohol services, and wrap around services driven by the community.

“I agree we do need to be investing in communities but in approaches that work. The Government invested over $1.2 billion in the NT Intervention which met none of its objectives. We should stop wasting money on income management style approaches and start looking at real solutions that work”.

 

NACCHO This weeks top Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts : #Aboriginal Health Workers #Dental #Pharmacy #Doctors #TacklingSmoking

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

2. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

3.Aboriginal Program Project Officer Cancer Council Victoria Closes 14  August

4.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

5. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

6- 7 Congress Senior Policy Officer and Media Communications Officer

8.Pharmacist – FIFO to Maningrida – Arnhem Land

9. ATSICHS Dental Services Brisbane : Oral Health Therapist

10.Tackling Indigenous Smoking Support Officer (OVAHS) close 16 August

11. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

12.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

13.Senior Research Fellow, CREATE Adelaide

14.Employment at Miwatj Health NT

15.Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program added 10 August

  Register or more INFO

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

For over 30 years, Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service has provided essential and culturally appropriate medical, preventive, allied and oral health services to Aboriginal communities.  Located in the Macleay and Nambucca valleys on the Mid North Coast of NSW.  Durri is committed to making health care and education accessible to improve the health status and wellbeing of our community.

An exciting opportunity has arisen for a Aboriginal Health Worker with an interest in the area of Drug & Alcohol to join the passionate team at our Nambucca Heads clinic site.

This challenging role would suit an experienced and motivated Aboriginal Health Worker with a desire to achieve positive outcomes in indigenous health.  You will work with a dedicated team of healthcare professionals.

The successful candidate will enjoy beautiful beaches, World Heritage Rainforest, and relaxed lifestyle of the mid north coast whilst making a real difference in the community.

Benefits include 9.5% super, attractive salary sacrifice, training and access to an employee assistance program.

To apply to to our website:  www.durri.org.au, download a copy of the Application Pack and submit this along with your resume not exceeding 4 pages, and your submission for each of the selection criteria to: hr@durri.org.au, or mail to:

Application

Chief Operations Officer

Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Services

PO Box 136

Kempsey  NSW 2440

Applications close: 21 August 2017 at 5.00 pm 

Applicants must have a current Police and Working with Children Check Clearance and Confirmation of Aboriginality.

Pursuant to Section 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) Australian Aboriginality is a genuine occupational qualification for this position.

Applications that do not attach a completed selection criteria submission will not be considered. 

Contact: Paula 02 65602360

2. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

The Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service is a fast growing and innovative health service that aims to provide the local Aboriginal community with culturally appropriate, high quality care. The following position is now available:-

Aboriginal Health Worker
Part Time 22.8 hours per week (Ongoing)

The successful applicant will be part of a service aimed at providing intensive case work and direct support to Aboriginal people.  You will facilitate clinical assessments, work in partnership with the clinical practice, and provide cultural expertise to ensure the provision of holistic and culturally appropriate health care. You will also assist Aboriginal people to access appropriate primary care services, and liaise with internal and external practitioners to assist in the delivery of culturally appropriate services. You will work in North Geelong and also in Colac.   Qualifications as an Aboriginal Health Worker are desirable or a willingness to undertake study to achieve the qualification.

This is an identified position, open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants only.

If you have extensive experience in related areas of work and a solid understanding of the issues confronting Aboriginal communities then we want to hear from you.

A Position Description is available from www.wathaurong.org.au

A police check, Working with Children Card and a driving license are required for all positions.

Applications to be sent to Human Resources preferably via email jobs@wathaurong.org.au or post to Wathaurong Aboriginal Cooperative, PO Box 402, North Geelong 3215.  Applications that fail to answer the key selection criteria will not be considered.

Closing date for these positions is 20 August 2017

Wathaurong is a Child Safe organisation

Wathaurong is a smoke free workplace

3.Aboriginal Program Project Officer Cancer Council Victoria Closes 14  August

 
 
Description of position:
Cancer Council Victoria is looking for an Aboriginal Programs Project Officer to join the Screening, Early Detection and Immunisation Program.
The successful applicant will work in partnership with stakeholders to deliver community-based projects, support the implementation of innovative media and communications activities and engage with the workforce sector to support participation in cancer screening, early detection and immunisation programs and reduce the impact of cancer in the Victorian Aboriginal community.
This is a part-time (0.6 or 0.8 FTE) fixed term position until March 2018.
Applications for this role close at the end of the day on Monday 14th August.
Cancer Council Victoria has a Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan and is strategically working to help Close the Gap.
 
 

4.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Salary: Level B $98,775 – $117,290 p.a. plus 9.5% superannuation or Level C $120,993 – $139,510 p.a. plus 9.5%superannuation

Indigenous Eye Health in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne has developed and is supporting implementation of the Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision. The work is of national and international significance and is demonstrating effective translational research through the systematic implementation of evidenced-based, sustainable public health reform in Indigenous eye health.

You will support the regional implementation of The Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision from a health system perspective and contribute to and lead improvements in Indigenous eye health across Australia. As part of a small, strategic and responsive team, you will collaborate with stakeholders within regions, jurisdictions and nationally to implement the Roadmap recommendations and provide technical advice and support. You will contribute to Roadmap advocacy and support submission of national and international peer reviewed publications and be actively involved in conference and meeting presentations.

To be successful in the position, you must have:
-Leadership experience or demonstrated potential for leadership and engagement in research or health systems
-Demonstrated understanding and knowledge of key issues related to Indigenous health
-Demonstrated experience working, communicating and engaging effectively with Indigenous communities
-Demonstrated capacity to maintain and contribute to industry partnerships and collaborations with a broad range of stakeholders.

This could be the next great step in your career. In addition, you will have access to many benefits enjoyed by our staff. To learn more about the benefits and working at the University, see http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/working/benefits and http://joining.unimelb.edu.au

This is a re-advertised position. Previous applicants need not re-apply.

Close date: 3 Sep 2017

Position Description and Selection Criteria

Download File 0043281_REVISED_Level B or C_July 2017.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/search/info/selection-criteria

5. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this exciting role.

The AMA

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) is the most influential membership organisation representing registered medical practitioners and medical students of Australia.

The AMA exists to promote and protect the professional interests of doctors and the health care needs of patients and communities.

The Federal Secretariat of the AMA contributes to the achievement of this Mission through reinforcing the AMA’s peak status in the development and implementation of health policy and identifying and acting upon the main issues affecting members.

The Federal Secretariat also delivers relevant member services and works with members directly to grow and value membership of the AMA.

Public Health

The AMA’s Public Health team is responsible for the AMA’s work on population and community health issues, including prevention, substance abuse, child and youth health and Indigenous health. The Secretariat assists in developing the AMA’s policies and political advocacy on Public Health issues of national importance.

The Role 

The Policy Adviser (maternity leave cover, part-time) will provide high level policy and strategic advice to the AMA President on Indigenous health issues. The Policy Adviser will write policy responses and take a lead in the development of AMA policy on all Indigenous health issues.

The Policy Adviser will develop policy positions for consideration by the Task Force on Indigenous Health and resolutions informed by research and input from within the AMA and when required from other medical organisations and health stakeholders.

The Policy Adviser will take a lead in the development of strategies to advocate AMA policies and prepare written material to support AMA campaigns and advocacy on Indigenous health.

The Policy Adviser will manage the AMA Indigenous Medical Scholarship and coordinate support for scholarship recipients, and will also coordinate the production of the AMA’s annual Report Card on Indigenous Health,

The Policy Adviser will provide secretariat support for the AMA Taskforce on Indigenous Health, represent the AMA at meetings and on external committees such as the Close the Gap Campaign Steering Committee.

Selection Criteria

  • demonstrated experience in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the ability to communicate in a culturally sensitive manner
  • knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health issues
  • experience working as a Policy Adviser or similar type of role on Indigenous health issues;
  • established networks in the Indigenous health sector;
  • relevant qualifications or a combination of qualifications and experience relevant to the role;
  • demonstrated ability to contribute to policy development;
  • an ability to identify relevant issues and to collate and present information to substantiate policy advice;
  • demonstrated ability to work independently, using initiative to solve problems and produce high quality accurate work with a minimum of supervision and under tight deadlines;
  • excellent communication skills both written and verbal;
  • the ability to liaise effectively and build collaborative working relationships with stakeholders;
  • demonstrated ability to work effectively as part of a small team, including the ability to supervise staff;
  • experience in using modern computer software and office systems to analyse data, produce documents dealing with complex issues, and maintain accurate records;
  • an enthusiastic and flexible approach.

To apply for this role please submit a cover letter and an up to date resume via SEEK. For further information or for a confidential discussion in respect of this role please contact Alyce on 02 6270 5482. Remuneration for this role will be determined after assessment of relevant skills, experience and qualifications.

Closing Date for Applications – Tuesday 22 August 2017 – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

APPLY HERE

6- 7 Congress Senior Policy Officer and Media Communications Officer

Work for Congress! Congress is currently seeking a Senior Policy Officer, Media Communications Officer to work full-time at our new headquarters in Canberra.

Check out the job descriptions below and apply today

3.Media and Communications Officer

Apply HERE

4.Senior Policy Officer

Apply HERE

8.Pharmacist – FIFO to Maningrida – Arnhem Land

We are seeking an enthusiastic professional pharmacist passionate about providing quality services to the people of Maningrida in western Arnhem Land. This onsite position presents unique and rewarding challenges as part of the primary health care team.

About the Role

The position is full-time (40 hours per week) providing direct dispensing and counselling about medicines to clients of the Aboriginal Health service.

  • The pharmacist also acts as advisor to medical, nursing and allied health staff including Aboriginal staff on the safe and effective use of medicines in the community.
  • Dose administration aid packing is minimal as this is co-ordinated offsite

Skills and Requirements

  • A degree in pharmacy and registration as a pharmacist with the Australian Health Professional Registration Authority is essential
  • Experience and high level of performance in clinical pharmacy.
  • Demonstrated ability, or willingness to acquire the ability, to interact with Aboriginal people in a sensitive and culturally safe way.
  • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively in a multidisciplinary health care team
  • Ability to plan, negotiate and implement changes to day to day practice to ensure the highest standard of care possible to clients of the service.

Benefits

There is potential to increase the impact of clinical services for the people of Maningrida for the innovative person who can develop professional services to suit the population and the health service.

Other benefits include

  • Generous salary including remote living and relocation allowances
  • Conditions are negotiable and can be by fly in fly out from Darwin or living in the community
  • Professional support and mentoring is available from the co-ordinating pharmacy in Darwin

For further information please contact

Shelley Forester Ph: 0412700560

Email: shelley.forester@udcp.com.au

  • Applicants are required to provide a current CV and contact details for at least two referees.
  • Applicants are asked to submit a one page summary of how they meet the above criteria.

9. ATSICHS Dental Services Brisbane : Oral Health Therapist

Position Title
Oral Health Therapist
Department/Team
Department/Team Dental
Location
ATSICHS Dental Services
Salary Range
$70,835 – $80,508 base salary, plus Superannuation
Employment Status
12 month contract role with view to permanency
Reports To
Dental Services Manager
Direct Reports
Nil

Organisational History and Structure      

ATSICHS Brisbane is a not-for-profit community owned health and human services organisation delivering on the unique health and wellbeing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in greater Brisbane and Logan. We are the largest, most comprehensive Aboriginal Medical Health Service in Queensland, and Australia’s second oldest. We are determined to create a flourishing future and lasting legacy for our people and our community.

Our services include medical and dental clinics, mums and bubs programs, an aged care facility, family and child safety services, foster and kinship care, social and emotional wellbeing services, kindergarten programs and a youth service.

We have five core values which shape the way that we work:

  • Community
  • Respect
  • Collaboration
  • Quality
  • Accountability

Our vision for the future is that we are world leaders in Indigenous health and social support services provided in an urban setting. To do this we are focussing on four strategic priorities:

  1. Work smarter, work together
  2. Ensure easy to access services for every stage of life
  3. Champion healthy individuals and thriving families
  4. Build a strong and sustainable organisation.

Position Outline               

As a key member of the ATSICHS Brisbane team, the Oral Health Therapist is expected to personally contribute to the shaping and achievement of ATSICHS vision and goals. The Oral Health Therapist will provide three (3) key functions:

Supports dental care delivery:

Supports dental care delivery by providing general and emergency oral health care to Murri School Students as well as other eligible clients; diagnosing dental decay and gum diseases, provide dental examinations, cleaning, scaling and extracting, taking X-Rays and impressions for mouthguards, and brining complex dental items to the attention of Dentist. Educates students and patients by giving oral hygiene, plaque control, and postoperative instructions. Assist in encouraging students and patients to make an active change to their oral care with the aid of ATSICHS approved oral health educational material.

Operates within CQI and clinical governance framework:

Oral Health Therapists support processes that ensure the delivery of dental care is performed within the highest quality. Included activities involve CQI, contributing to policy implementation, audits and reporting of clinical incidents.

Actively contributes in developing a flourishing team:

Support fellow staff in a team environment to build collegiality and a sense of belongingness within the team and ATSICHS family. Staff will actively participate in team activities and contribute to a flourishing workplace culture that promotes the ethos and values of ATSICHS Brisbane as a long standing Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation.

Skills, Competencies, Qualifications, Education and Experience

Essential:

  • Certificate, Diploma or Degree in Oral Health Therapy and be eligible to register with AHPRA
  • Hold a current radiation licence
  • Demonstrated experience that demonstrates practical skills and knowledge in the provision of dental care to clients
  • Demonstrated ability to meet targets and performance outcomes
  • Ability to support a continuous improvement model for achieving outcomes
  • Proven ability to prioritise workload and meet deadlines
  • Effective communication skills – both in writing ad verbal
  • Working with Children’s Card (Blue Card) or be eligible to apply.

Desirable, but not mandatory:

  • Previous experience working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Knowledge of EXACT

How to Apply    

Applications can only be submitted through seek link

Applications must be submitted before 14th August 2017

ATSICHS HR on 07 3240 8900

APPLY HERE

10.Tackling Indigenous Smoking Support Officer (OVAHS) close 16 August

11. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

To find out more, visit http://www.cmsac.com.au/about-us/

About the Opportunity

Exciting opportunities exist for 2 Full-Time, experienced and passionate Aboriginal Health Workers / Practitioners to join the CMSAC team.

Reporting directly to the Senior Registered Nurse, the Aboriginal Health Worker will be responsible for providing supportive, effective and efficient Primary Health Care services to clients in the clinic and within the community.

As an Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner, your responsibilities will include (but not limited to):

  • Work with members of the clinical team to deliver Primary Health services to clients
  • In collaboration with the multidisciplinary team, conduct health checks on clients
  • Using the Therapeutic Guidelines, perform consultations with clinic clients, including listening to their story, providing a basic physical examination and consulting with more experienced clinical staff as necessary, and to advise on the treatment and management of a client’s health problems
  • Assist the Senior Registered Nurse and Program Nurses to address areas of improvement
  • Provide education to clients and families on health care and health promotion
  • Demonstrate leadership in maintaining infection control principles
  • Have an understanding of CMSAC reporting requirements

About You

The successful applicant will have a demonstrated ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. You will have a sound understanding of the unique issues impacting the health of Aboriginal peoples whilst have experience in the provision of health promotion programs.

In addition to the above, the successful applicant will possess:

  • Certificate IV Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice
  • Current Apply First Aid certificate, or willingness to obtain
  • Current, unencumbered C-Class Manual Drivers Licence
  • Working with Children Check and a National Police Clearance, or willingness to obtain
  • The ability to pass a pre-employment drug and alcohol test

About the Benefits

CMSAC is dedicated to recognising and rewarding dedication. As such, you will enjoy an attractive remuneration package including salary sacrificing options!

In addition:

  • CMSAC will negotiate relocation assistance with the right candidate
  • You’ll enjoy a fantastic work/life balance, with Monday – Friday hours, 8:30am – 5.00pm and 5 weeks annual leave!

Applications close Monday 21 August at 5pm.

APPLY FOR THIS JOB

12.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

The Role
Cornerstone Medical are seeking Vocationally Registered Doctor for an exciting permanent position within an Aboriginal Medical Service in the NT. You be will be responsible for providing holistic primary health care services alongside an experienced team of Registered Nurses and visiting specialists.The Centre
You will work alongside an experienced team of 1 additional GP, 14 nurses, allied health workers, and an experienced support team. The hours of work are 5pmwith no on call or after hours. There is a pharmacy onsite, numerous health programs and visiting specialists weekly.The location
You will be located on the beautiful and untouched coastline of NT; right on the coast. This is an is an indigenous community in one of the largest most remote towns of Australia’s Northern Territory. The renowned fishing town is the major service centre for the population of 2,300 as well as more than 30 outstations or homelands, with a school, health clinic, multiple food outlets, two supermarkets, service station, arts centre, créche and a tarmac airport with daily commercial flights to Darwin.The Criteria 
To be eligible for this position you must meet the following criteria:

  • MBBS
  • Vocational AHPRA registration
  • Interest in indigenous health, Chronic Disease and remote GP work

The Package
On appointment for this position, you will be offered:

  • OTE $240-350,000 per annum including
  • Free Accommodation and full relocation assistance
  • Quarterly return flights to Darwin with accommodation
  • Yearly retention allowance lump sum $35,000
  • Salary sacrificing up to $30,000
  • Professional development allowance and Attraction allowance
  • 4 return trips to Darwin per annum incl accommodation
  • House, vehicle, laptop and phone
  • Indemnity insurance reimbursed
This really is a fantastic opportunity to expand your career in Indigenous Health as a part of a supportive and community focused organisation.  For more information on this or other exciting opportunities please phone Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe today on 07 3171 2929 or email aoife@cmr.com.au
Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe
07 3171 2929

13.Senior Research Fellow, CREATE Adelaide

SAHMRI146
FTC – Full-time Contract
SAHMRI North Terrace

Applications close Friday 11, August 2017

12 Month Contract

Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit

The Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Chronic Disease Knowledge Translation and Exchange (CREATE)

At the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), we are committed to achieving innovative, ground-breaking health and medical research that fundamentally improves the quality of life for all people.

The Aboriginal Research Unit (Wardliparingga  Unit) within SAHMRI conducts health and well-being research that is of direct relevance to, and in partnership with, Aboriginal people in South Australia. Our research is focused on the significant difference between the health status and life opportunities available to Aboriginal people and other Australians. Our research is broad in nature, including epidemiology, health services research, evaluation and clinical trials.

The Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Chronic Disease Knowledge Translation and Exchange (CREATE) focuses on translating research to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, with particular focus on the prevention, treatment and management of chronic diseases. The Centre is a collaborative enterprise between The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), the Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit, SAHMRI; The Joanna Briggs Institute, University of Adelaide, and The School of Public Health, University of Adelaide.

The aim of CREATE is to assist the Aboriginal health sector to use existing knowledge (published and unpublished) on best practice chronic disease prevention and treatment as well as service delivery models to improve the coverage and appropriateness of their services and care.

CREATE is guided by a Leadership Group comprising of senior representatives from Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations around Australia.

The Senior Research Fellow, CREATE will provide academic and operational leadership to the CREATE team, acting as a conduit between the CREATE Chief Investigators and the Adelaide based research and administration team. The position has the responsibility for day to day oversight and support of specified research projects and staff, providing expertise and supervision as required.

The Senior Research Fellow, CREATE is broadly responsible for the achievement of a range of determined project outcomes, and is required to apply high level qualitative analytical skills and demonstrated excellence in written and verbal communication. Dissemination strategies will require CREATE findings are published within peer-reviewed journals and to translate these findings to stakeholders with influence on Aboriginal health policy and practice.

SAHMRI has a strong commitment to employment Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into these roles. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are therefore strongly encouraged to apply.

Everything we do is underpinned by our core values and our institute is dedicated to grow a culture that pursues, enables and demands research excellence. We’re proud of the work we do and work hard as a team to make a positive difference to the community.  Excellence, Innovation, Courage, Integrity and Teamwork are what help us achieve our goals. If these are also your qualities and goals, apply today.

For a copy of the position description please click here

Applications close: 11 August 2017

APPLY HERE

14.Employment at Miwatj Health NT

Miwatj Health offers a wide range of employment opportunities for health and other professionals, in a unique primary healthcare environment.

We offer satisfying career paths for doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Practitioners, allied health staff, public/population health practitioners, health informatics specialists, administrative, financial and management personnel.

If you are suitably qualified and are looking for a rewarding and challenging experience in one of the most diverse, beautiful and interesting regions of Australia, we invite you to apply for any of the current vacancies listed below.

All applications for current vacancies must include:

  • a current Resumé,
  • names and contact details of at least two referees, at least one of whom must be a employment referee.

We encourage applications from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly those with links to and knowledge of local communities in the region.

Separately from the list of current vacancies, you may also submit a general expression of interest, with a current Resume, and we shall retain it on file for future reference if an appropriate vacancy arises.

Miwatj strongly prefers that all applications and expressions of interest submit your application via our recruitment platform by clicking the link below.

You may contact HR via recruitment@miwatj.com.au. However, if that is not possible, EOI or resume may be mailed or faxed, to arrive by the closing date, to:
Miwatj Health – Human Resources Department
PO Box 519
Nhulunbuy NT 0881
Fax number (08) 8987 1670

See Website for all details and APPLY

https://miwatj.applynow.net.au/

Two New Vacancies are available within the Link Up Program.

Both positions are 12 month Contract position that may be extended subject to funding.

Link Up Caseworker:   (Click for more information)

Link Up Counsellor: (Click for more information)

Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program is funded by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (Federal), and also receives reunion funding from the Department of Premier & Cabinet, Aboriginal Affairs & Reconciliation (State).

Link Up provides family tracing, reunion and counselling services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their families who have been separated under the past policies and practices of the Australian Government. Assistance is also provided to people over the age of 18 years who have been adopted, fostered or raised in institutions.

For more information about Link Up (Click here)

Please feel free to communicate this opportunity through your networks.

Applications close – COB Monday 14th August 2017.

 

 

Aboriginal Health #Garma2017 : #Makarrata ,canoes and the #UluruStatement @TurnbullMalcolm @billshortenmp Full Speech transcripts

 ” Djapiri said Bill and I are in the same canoe and on this issue we certainly are – but we are not alone, we are not alone in the canoe. We are in the same canoe with all of you as well and we need to steer it wisely to achieve our goal, to achieve that goal of Makarrata.

Beyond Constitutional Recognition, that work continues every day. I reflect on the Makarrata discussion of the late 70’s and 80’s. A list of demands was sent to the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs in 1981. It called for rights to land and resources, compensation, the creation of Aboriginal schools, medical centres and an Aboriginal bank.

Despite a final agreement not being reached at the time, we have achieved some of the policies called for. The Commonwealth provided $433 million to 137 Aboriginal Medical Services across the country last financial year.

As Prime Minister I will continue to do all I can to ensure that being an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian means to be successful, to achieve, to have big dreams and high hopes, and to draw strength from your identity as an Indigenous person in this great country.

That’s why, as we renegotiate the Closing the Gap targets with the various state and territory jurisdictions later this year, my Government has insisted on a strengths based approach.

Indigenous people are not a problem to be solved.

You are our fellow Australians. Your cultures are a gift to our nation.”

Selected extracts from the full Prime Minister Speech 5 August Garma see Part 2 Full Speech

Download full copy Garma 2017 PM full Speech

” Djapirri said, she told me of a dream of a canoe, paddled by the Prime Minister and myself.

That in itself is an arresting image. Two captains. But in all seriousness, we appreciated I think the power of that illusion, the power of that dream.

Here at Garma, on the lands of the Gumatj, we gather to talk about a Yolngu word. Makarrata.

It is not just now a Yolngu word – I put it to you it’s a national test.

Coming together, after a struggle.

And for the first Australians, it has been a very long struggle indeed.

– A struggle against dispossession and discrimination, exclusion and inequality.

– A struggle against violence and poverty, disease and diminished opportunity.

– A struggle for better health, for better housing, for safer communities, more jobs, for longer lives.

– A struggle against injustice and racism: from the sporting field to the courts of our land.

Above all, a struggle for a better future for their children: a struggle to be counted, to be heard, to be recognised.

At Uluru, you gave us the statement from the heart.

A call for:

– A voice enshrined in the Constitution

– A declaration to be passed by all parliaments, acknowledging the unique place of the first nations in Australian history, their culture, their connection.

And a Makarrata Commission to oversee a process of agreement-making and truth-telling.

All three of these objectives speak to the long-held and legitimate aspirations of our First Australians:

– A proper acknowledgment of Aboriginal histories and the dispossession that followed upon the arrival of the Europeans

– A bigger say in the issues which affect you – no more ‘solutions’ imposed without consultation or consent

And a more lasting settlement, a new way forward, a new pathway including through treaties.

These ideas are not new – but the Uluru statement did articulate these with new clarity, a new passion, a new sense of truth and purpose “

Selected extracts The Hon Bill Shorten speech  Garma 5 August 2017 see in full Part 3 Below

Download full speech Garma 2017 PM full Speech

Part 1 Media Coverage

View NITV Media coverage

When it comes to Aboriginal constitutional reform, picture Malcolm Turnbull and Bill Shorten sitting in a canoe – and the opposition leader thinks he’s the only one paddling.

The Labor leader has backed a referendum question on an indigenous voice to parliament, while the prime minister has failed to commit bipartisan support.

The two politicians are moving together downstream, struggling to balance the boat to achieve reconciliation, Gumatj leader Djapirri Mununggirritj has told Garma Festival in northeast Arnhem Land.

Mr Shorten called it an “arresting image” but said he was disappointed Mr Turnbull dismissed his end of year referendum question deadline as “very ambitious”.

“We support a declaration by all parliaments, we support a truth telling commission, we are not confronted by the notion of treaties with our first Australians,” he said.

Mr Turnbull acknowledged many Aboriginal leaders were disappointed the government didn’t give “instant fulfilment” to the Referendum Council’s recommendations.

He described the Yolgnu elder’s canoe analogy as apt, saying his cabinet will give the matter careful consideration to keep the aspiration of Makarrata, or coming together after a struggle, from capsizing.

An “all or nothing approach” to constitutional change risks rocking the boat, resulting in a failed referendum, and Mr Turnbull called for time to develop a winnable question to put to Australian voters.

“We are not alone in the canoe, we are in the canoe with all of you and we need to steer it wisely to achieve that goal of Makarrata,” he said.

Mr Turnbull said there’s still many practical questions about what shape the advisory body would take, whether it would be elected or appointed and how it would affect Aboriginal people around the country.

Specifically, he questioned what impact the voice to parliament would have on issues like child protection and justice, which are largely the legislative domain of state and territory governments.

But Mr Shorten said debate over Aboriginal recognition in the nation’s founding document has dragged on for the past decade.

“I can lead Mr Turnbull and the Liberal party to water but I can’t make them drink,” he said.

Having led the failed 1999 republic referendum campaign, Mr Turnbull warned that Australians are “constitutionally conservative”, with just eight out of 44 successful since federation.

But Mr Shorten said “Aboriginal Australians do not need a balanda [white person] lecture about the difficulty of changing the constitution”.

Mr Shorten’s proposal of a joint parliamentary committee to finalise a referendum question has been met with cynicism by indigenous leaders.

The Above AAP

 

 Part 2 PRIME MINISTER Garma SPEECH :

Ngarra buku-wurrpan bukmak nah! Nhuma’lanah.

Ngarra Prime Minister numalagu djal Ngarra yurru wanganharra’wu nhumalangu bukmak’gu marrigithirri.

Ngarra ga nhungu dharok ga manikay’ ngali djaka wanga’wu yirralka.

I acknowledge and pay respect to your country, and your elders.

As Prime Minister, I’m here to talk to you and learn from you.

I acknowledge and respect your language, your song lines, your dances, your culture, your caring for country, and your estates.

I pay my respects to the Gumatj people and traditional owners past, present and future, on whose land we are gathered.

I also acknowledge other Yolngu people, First Peoples from across the country and balanda here today including Bill Shorten, Nigel Scullion and all other Parliamentary colleagues but above all I acknowledge our Parliamentary colleagues, Indigenous Parliamentary colleagues. Truly, voices of First Australians in the Parliament. Thank you for being here today and for the wisdom you give us, you together with my dear friend Ken, so much wisdom in the Parliament.

I offer my deep respect and gratitude to the Chairman of the Yothu Yindi Foundation, Dr Galarrwuy Yunupingu for hosting Lucy and me with your family. It was lovely to camp here last night and the last music was beautiful, serene and like a lullaby sending us all off to our dreams. Thank you. Emily was the last singer – beautiful.  And of course we woke here to the beautiful sounds of Gulkala.

I again as I did yesterday extend our deep condolences to the family of Dr G Yunupingu at this very sad time. He brought the Yolngu language to the people of Australia and his music will be with us forever.

I’ve come here to North East Arnhem Land to learn, participate respectfully and can I thank everyone so far I’ve had the chance to talk with. I am filled with optimism about our future together as a reconciled Australia.

Last month scientists and researchers revealed new evidence that our First Australians have been here in this land for 65,000 years.

These findings show that Indigenous people were living at the Madjedbebe rock shelter in Mirarr Country, at Kakadu east of Darwin, 18,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Among the middens, rock paintings, remains, plants and ochre, was the world’s oldest-known ground-edge axe head.

These findings place Australia on centre stage in the story of human origin, including mankind’s first long-distance maritime voyage – from Southeast Asia to the Australian continent.

Our First Peoples are shown as artistically, as technologically advanced, and at the cutting edge of technology in every respect.

Importantly, they confirm what Aboriginal people have always known and we have known – that your connection, your intimate connection to the land and sea are deep, abiding, ancient, and yet modern.

This news is a point of great pride for our nation. We rejoice in it, as we celebrate your Indigenous cultures and heritage as our culture and heritage – uniquely Australian.

As Galarrwuy said yesterday as he spoke in Yolngu, he said: “I am speaking in Australian.” Sharing, what a generosity, what a love, what a bigness he showed there as he does throughout his life and his leadership.

I want to pay tribute to the work of so many of you here today, who are leading the healing in communities, building bridges between the old and new, and looking for ways to ensure families and communities are not just surviving, but thriving.

Particularly the Indigenous leaders who every day wear many hats, walk in both worlds, and yet give tirelessly for their families and their communities. You often carry a very heavy load, and we thank you.

Where western astronomers look up at the sky and look for the light, Yolngu astronomers look also deep into the dark, using the black space to uncover further information, to unravel further mysteries.

So while we are both looking at the night sky, we are often looking at different parts. And yet through mutual respect, sharing of knowledge and an openness to learning, together we can see and appreciate the whole sky.

Those same principles are guiding us toward Constitutional Recognition.

The final Referendum Council report was delivered, as you know, on the 30th of June. Bill Shorten and I were briefed by the Referendum Council two weeks ago. The report was a long time coming and I know some would like an instant fulfillment of its recommendations.

Let me say, I respect deeply the work of the Referendum Council and all of those who contributed to it, and I respect it by considering it very carefully and the Government is doing so, in the first instance with my colleagues, including Ken Wyatt the first Indigenous Australian to be a Federal Minister, and together we consider it with our Cabinet. That is our way, that is our process, that is how we give respect to serious recommendations on serious matters.

And I do look forward to working closely and in a bipartisan way with the Opposition as we have done to date.

Djapiri said Bill and I are in the same canoe and on this issue we certainly are – but we are not alone, we are not alone in the canoe. We are in the same canoe with all of you as well and we need to steer it wisely to achieve our goal, to achieve that goal of Makarrata. Thank you again Galarrwuy for that word.

We share a sense of the significance of words. I love words and language. There is a great definition. What is the difference between poetry and prose? The best definition of poetry that I have ever found is that which cannot be translated, it can only be felt.

The Referendum Council’s report as Marcia reminded us is the fourth major report since that time and it adds immensely to the depth of knowledge. It gave us the Uluru Statement from the Heart, and I congratulate all those who attended on reaching an agreement. That was no small task.

It tells us that the priority for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is to resolve the powerlessness and lack of self-determination experienced – not by all, but certainly by too many.

I have been discussing it with leaders, the leaders of our First Australians and will continue to do so as we develop the next steps.

But there are still many questions:

What would the practical expression of the voice look like? What would the voice look like here for the Yolngu people? What would it look like for the people of Western Sydney, who are the largest population of Aboriginal peoples in Australia?

Is our highest aspiration to have Indigenous people outside the Parliament, providing advice to the Parliament? Or is it to have as many Indigenous voices, elected, within our Parliament?

What impact would the voice have on issues like child protection and justice, where the legislation and responsibility largely rest with state and territory governments?

These are important questions that require careful consideration. But the answers are not beyond us.

And I acknowledge that Indigenous Australians want deeper engagement with government and their fellow Australians, and to be much better consulted, and represented in the political, social and economic life of this nation.

We can’t be weighed down by the past, but we can learn from it.

Australians are constitutionally conservative. The bar is surmountable, you can get over it but it is a high bar. That’s why the Constitution has often been described as a frozen document.

Now many people talk about referendums, very few have experienced leading a campaign. The 1999 campaign for a Republic – believe me, now, one of the few subjects on which I have special knowledge – the 1999 campaign for a Republic has given me a very keen insight into what it will take to win, how hard it is to win, how much harder is the road for the advocate for change than that of those who resist change. I offer this experience today in the hope that together, we can achieve a different outcome to 1999. A successful referendum.

Compulsory voting has many benefits, but one negative aspect is that those who for one reason or another are not interested in an issue or familiar with it, are much more likely to vote no – it reinforces an already conservative constitutional context.

Another critical difference today is the rise of social media, which has changed the nature of media dramatically, in a decade or two we have a media environment which is no longer curated by editors and producers – but freewheeling, viral and unconstrained.

The question posed in a referendum must have minimal opposition and be clearly understood.

A vital ingredient of success is popular ownership. After all, the Constitution does not belong to the Government, or the Parliament, or the Judges. It belongs to the people.

It is Parliament’s duty to propose changes to the Constitution but the Constitution cannot be changed by Parliament. Only the Australian people can do that.

No political deal, no cross party compromise, no leaders’ handshake can deliver constitutional change.

Bipartisanship is a necessary but far from a sufficient condition of successful constitutional reform.

To date, again as Marcia described much of the discussion has been about removing the racially discriminatory provisions in the Constitution and recognising our First Australians in our nation’s founding document.

However, the Referendum Council has told us that a voice to Parliament is the only option they advise us to put to the Australian people. We have heard this, and we will work with you to find a way forward.

Though not a new concept, the voice is relatively new to the national conversation about constitutional change.

To win, we must all work together to build a high level of interest and familiarity with the concept of a voice, and how this would be different, or the same, as iterations of the past like the National Aboriginal Conference or the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission.

We also need to look to the experience of other countries, as we seek to develop the best model for Australia.

The historic 1967 Referendum was the most successful in our history because of its simplicity and clarity. The injustices were clearly laid out – Indigenous people were not enjoying the rights and freedoms of other citizens. The question was clearly understood – that the Commonwealth needed to have powers to make laws for Indigenous Australians. And the answer seemed obvious – vote yes to ensure the Commonwealth gave Indigenous people equal rights.

To succeed this time around, we need to develop enough detail so that the problem, the solution and therefore the question at the ballot box are simple, easily understood and overwhelmingly embraced.

One of the toughest lessons I learnt from the Referendum campaign of ‘99 was that an ‘all or nothing’ approach sometimes results in nothing. During the campaign, those who disagreed with the model that was proposed urged a “no” vote, arguing that we could all vote for a different Republic model in a few years. I warned that a “no” vote meant no republic for a very long time.

Now, regrettably, my prediction 18 years ago was correct. We must avoid a rejection at a referendum if we want to avoid setting Makarrata reconciliation back.

We recognise that the Uluru statement is powerful because it comes from an Indigenous-designed and led process. And because it comes from the heart, we must accept that it is grounded in wisdom and truth.

It is both a lament and a yearning. It is poetry.

The challenge now is to turn this poetry that speaks so eloquently of your aspiration into prose that will enable its realisation and be embraced by all Australians.

This is hard and complex work. And we need to take care of each other as we continue on this journey. We need to take care of each other in the canoe, lest we tip out of it.

Yesterday afternoon was a powerful show of humanity. As we stood together holding hands – Indigenous and non-Indigenous people – we stood together as Australians. As equals.

And we will have the best chance of success by working together. This cannot be a take it or leave it proposal. We have to come to the table and negotiate in good faith, and I am committed to working with you to find a way forward.

Galarrwuy – you gave us your fire words yesterday, thank you again. We will draw on them as we look to light the path forward for our nation.

And when considering how to do that, we are inspired by the success of the Uluru process. The statement that emerged from Uluru was designed and led by Indigenous Australians and the next steps should be too.

To go to a referendum there must be an understanding between all parties that the proposal will meet the expectations of the very people it claims it will represent.

Now we have five Aboriginal members of our Parliament. They will be vital in shaping and shepherding any legislation through the Parliament. They too are bridge builders, walking in both worlds, and their contribution to the Parliament enriches us all.

The Australian Parliament and the nation’s people – Indigenous and non-Indigenous – must be engaged as we work together to find the maximum possible overlap between what Indigenous people are seeking, what the Australian community overall will embrace and what the Parliament will authorise.

I have been learning that the word Makarrata means the ‘coming together after a struggle’— Galarrwuy told us a beautiful story this morning about a Makarrata here in this country. And a Makarrata is seen as necessary, naturally, if we are to continue our path to reconciliation.

But just like the night sky, reconciliation means different things to different people. This complexity convinces me that our nation cannot be reconciled in one step, in one great leap. We will only be reconciled when we take a number of actions, both practical and symbolic.

Beyond Constitutional Recognition, that work continues every day. I reflect on the Makarrata discussion of the late 70’s and 80’s. A list of demands was sent to the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs in 1981. It called for rights to land and resources, compensation, the creation of Aboriginal schools, medical centres and an Aboriginal bank.

Despite a final agreement not being reached at the time, we have achieved some of the policies called for. The Commonwealth provided $433 million to 137 Aboriginal Medical Services across the country last financial year. Indigenous Business Australia provides low interest loans to help Indigenous Australians secure economic opportunities including home ownership with 544 new housing loans made last year. The Aboriginal Benefits Account supports Northern Territory Land Councils and provides grants for the benefit of Aboriginal people living in the Territory.

We now spend $4.9 billion on the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

And we are empowering communities through our Indigenous Procurement policy.

I am pleased to announce today the Commonwealth has officially surpassed half a billion dollars in spending with Indigenous businesses all over Australia. I am looking forward to sharing the full two-year results in October. This is a spectacular increase from just $6.2 million being won by Indigenous businesses only a few years ago under former policies.

Since 2008 the Commonwealth has been helping improve remote housing and bring down rates of overcrowding, with $5.4 billion to build thousands of better homes over ten years.

And the land is returning to its traditional owners.

More than 2.5 million square kilometres of land, or about 34 per cent of Australia’s land mass is today recognised under Native Title. Another 24 per cent is covered by registered claims and by 2025, our ambition is to finalise all current Native Title claims.

So we are standing here on Aboriginal land – land that has been rightfully acknowledged as yours and returned to you. And we are standing here near the birthplace of the land rights movement. A movement of which the Yolngu people were at the forefront.

As a nation we’ve come a long way.

In the Northern Territory, more than 50 per cent of the land is now Aboriginal land, recognised as Aboriginal land.

Just like the land at Kenbi which, on behalf of our nation, I returned to the traditional owners, the Larrakia people last year.

Earlier this year I appointed June Oscar AO, who has been acknowledged earlier, as the first female Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, who has agreed to report on the issues affecting Indigenous women and girls’ success and safety.

And all of that work contributes to a better future for our First Australians.

But there is much more to be done in not just what we do, but how we do it – as we work with our First Australians. We are doing things with our First Australians, not to them.

Now Galarrwuy – I have read and read again your essay Rom Watungu. It too is a story from the heart, of your father, of his life and when his time came, how he handed his authority to you, the embodiment of continuity, the bearer of a name that means “the rock that stands against time”

But rocks that stand against time, ancient cultures and lore, these are the strong foundations on which new achievements are built, from which new horizons can be seen – the tallest towers are built on the oldest rocks.

You, Galarrwuy, ask Australians to let Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders breathe and be free, be who you are and ask that we see your songs and languages, the land and the ceremonies as a gift.

As Prime Minister I will continue to do all I can to ensure that being an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian means to be successful, to achieve, to have big dreams and high hopes, and to draw strength from your identity as an Indigenous person in this great country.

That’s why, as we renegotiate the Closing the Gap targets with the various state and territory jurisdictions later this year, my Government has insisted on a strengths based approach. Indigenous people are not a problem to be solved. You are our fellow Australians. Your cultures are a gift to our nation.

There’s so much more work to be done.

But in doing so, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and all Australians, continue to connect with pride and optimism – with mabu liyan, in Pat’s language from the Yawuru people – the wellbeing that comes with a reconciled harmony with you, our First Australians, our shared history truthfully told and a deeper understanding of the most ancient human cultures on earth, and the First Australians to whom we have so much to thank for sharing them with us.

Thank you so much.

Part 3 Opposition Leader’s Garma Speech

Good morning everybody.

I’d like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land upon which we meet, I pay my respects to elders both past and present.

I recognise that I stand on what is, was and always will be Aboriginal land.

I acknowledge the Prime Minister and his wife Lucy.

I wish to thank Gallarwuy and the Gumatj for hosting us – and on behalf of my Labor team who are here, Senator Pat Dodson, Senator Malarndirri McCarthy, the Hon Linda Burney, the Hon Kyam Maher, supported also by local Members of Parliament the Hon Warren Snowden and Luke Gosling, and Territory Minister Eva Lawler.

We are very grateful to be part of this gathering.

Also Clementine my daughter asked me to thank you for letting her join in the bunggul yesterday afternoon, she loved it.

At the opening yesterday, we were privileged, all of us, to be at a powerful ceremony, where we remembered Dr G Yunupingu, a man who was born blind – but helped Australians see.

From his island, his words and his music touched the world.

But I also understand that the words of our host were about setting us a test, reminding all of us privileged to be here that there is serious business to be done.

Here at Garma, on the lands of the Gumatj, we gather to talk about a Yolngu word. Makarrata.

It is not just now a Yolngu word – I put it to you it’s a national test.

Coming together, after a struggle.

And for the first Australians, it has been a very long struggle indeed.

– A struggle against dispossession and discrimination, exclusion and inequality.

– A struggle against violence and poverty, disease and diminished opportunity.

– A struggle for better health, for better housing, for safer communities, more jobs, for longer lives.

– A struggle against injustice and racism: from the sporting field to the courts of our land.

Above all, a struggle for a better future for their children: a struggle to be counted, to be heard, to be recognised.

In 2015, the Referendum Council was created with a very clear mission.

To consult on what form Constitutional Recognition should take – how it should work.

To listen to Aboriginal people and to be guided by their aspirations.

And to finally give them a say in a document from which too long they been excluded.

Since then, thousands of the first Australians have explained to the rest us what

Recognition means – for all of us, for our children and indeed for all of our futures.

We asked for your views, we sought your counsel – and, in large numbers, it was answered.

At Uluru, you gave us the statement from the heart.

A call for:

– A voice enshrined in the Constitution

– A declaration to be passed by all parliaments, acknowledging the unique place of the first nations in Australian history, their culture, their connection.

– And a Makarrata Commission to oversee a process of agreement-making and truth-telling.

All three of these objectives speak to the long-held and legitimate aspirations of our

First Australians:

– A proper acknowledgment of Aboriginal histories and the dispossession that

followed upon the arrival of the Europeans

– A bigger say in the issues which affect you – no more ‘solutions’ imposed without consultation or consent

– And a more lasting settlement, a new way forward, a new pathway including through treaties.

These ideas are not new – but the Uluru statement did articulate these with new clarity, a new passion, a new sense of truth and purpose.

And let me speak truthfully on behalf of Labor, the Opposition.

I cannot be any more clear than this: Labor supports a voice for Aboriginal people in our Constitution, we support a declaration by all parliaments, we support a truth-telling commission.

We are not confronted by the notion of treaties with our first Australians.

For us the question is not whether we do these things, the question is not if we should do these things but when and how.

The Parliament needs to be engaged.

The Parliament needs to be engaged now.

The Parliament needs to start the process of engaging with the people of Australia now.

It does not come as a surprise to me, that following upon a report of the

Referendum Council, the Parliament’s next step must be to consider this report.

And in doing so, we must carry its message from the heart of Australia into our hearts as parliamentarians. With optimism, with understanding, not with a desire to find what is wrong, but to find the desire to make these concepts work in the interests of all.

If we were all gathered here now, back in 1891 and 1894 and 1897 to write the Constitution, we would never dream of excluding Aboriginal people from the Census.

But in 1901, they did.

If we were starting the Constitution from scratch, we would not diminish the independence of Aboriginal people – with racist powers.

But in 1901, they did.

And if we were starting on an empty piece of paper, we would, without question, recognise the First Australians’ right to a genuine, empowered voice in the decisions that govern their lives.

Now as you know, we cannot unmake history. We do not get the change to start all over again – but it doesn’t mean that we are forever chained to the prejudices of the past.

The Prime Minister’s observations though are correct about the difficulties of constitutional change. But I ask also that we cannot let the failure of 1999 govern our future on this question.

Voting for a constitutional voice is our chance to bring our Constitution home, to make it better, more equal and more Australian.

A document that doesn’t just pay respect to the weight of a foreign crown, but also recognises the power and value of the world’s oldest living culture, recognises that

Aboriginal people were here first.

And of course, let us reject those who say that symbolic change is irrelevant because dealing with these questions does not mean walking away from the real problems of inequality and disadvantage.

– Talking about enshrining a voice does not reduce our determination to eradicate family violence

– It doesn’t stop us creating good local jobs, training apprentices, treating trachoma or supporting rangers on country.

– It doesn’t distract us from the crisis in out-of-home care, youth suicide or the shocking, growing number of Aboriginal people incarcerated for not much better reason than the colour of their skin.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples don’t have to choose between historical justice and real justice, you don’t have to choose between equality in society and equality in the Constitution – you have an equal right to both.

The Uluru Statement has given us a map of the way forward – and today I finally want to talk about how we follow it, how we take the next step.

Not the obstacles ahead, not the problems, real as they are.

Aboriginal Australians don’t need a balanda lecture about the difficulty of changing the Constitution, our inspiration friends, should not be the 1999 referendum, it should be the 1967 referendum.

You have lived that struggle, every day.

Let me be very clear. In my study of our history, in my experience, nothing has ever been given to Aboriginal people – everything that is obtained has been fought for, has been argued for, has been won and built by Aboriginal people.

Think of the Freedom Riders

Think of the Bark Petition, which Gallarwuy was witness to

Think of the Gurindji at Wave Hill

Eddie Mabo and his fight for justice

Nothing was ever sorted by simply waiting until someone came along said let me do it for you. It is not the way the world is organised.

Every bit of progress has been driven by pride, by persistence by that stubborn refusal to not take no for an answer when it comes to the pursuit of equality.

Now making the case for change and encouraging Australians to vote yes for a recognition, reconciliation, and truth – this is not easy.

But before we can do that we surely must agree on the referendum question that has to be the long overdue next step.

I have written to our Prime Minister, we’ve proposed a joint parliamentary committee – which they’re taking on board, having a look at – to be made up of Government, the Opposition and crossbench MPs – to work with Aboriginal leaders right across Australia.

This committee will have two key responsibilities.

One – advising the Parliament on how to set-up a Makarrata Commission and create a framework for truth-telling and agreement making, including treaties.

Two – what would a voice look like. Whilst there are many questions, none of these are insurmountable.

And three, as a matter of overdue recognition – to endeavour to finalise a referendum question in a timely fashion. There’s no reason why that couldn’t be done by the end of this year.

The issues have been traversed for a decade.

Now friends this is not a committee for the sake of a committee, it’s not another mechanism for delay. It is the necessary process of engagement of the Parliament.

But we have had ten years plus of good intentions, but it is time now perhaps, for more action.

The Parliament does have a key role to play here, in setting the question.

The Parliament could agree on the question this year if we all work together so that the people could vote not long after that.

Voting to enshrine a voice in a standalone Referendum – free from the shadow of an election, or the politics of other questions.

It may seem very hard to imagine, it may seem very hard to contemplate.

But it is possible to imagine a great day, a unifying day, a famous victory, a Makaratta for all.

As I said yesterday, we’ve heard plenty of speeches, there are many fine words… but perhaps people have a right to be impatient after ten years – indeed after 117 years.

So the test I set isn’t what we say here, in this beautiful place.

It’s what we do when we leave.

It’s the honesty of admitting that after the event, what is it that we do.

The test I set for myself is can I come here at future Garmas and look you in the eye and say I have done everything I can, because if I cannot say to you that I have done everything I that I can, then I can’t be truthful with my heart.

Yesterday Gallarwuy spoke with a tongue of fire, he told a powerful truth.

He said that for more than two centuries we had been two peoples – living side-by-side, but not united.

I think that is the challenge for politics too.

Djapirri who just spoke up before me, she’s talked about hope. There is the hope that you refer to, you have the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition. We are here side-by-side, and now we need to be united, not to kick the can down the road, but united on a process that says this parliament will respect what we have heard from Aboriginal people.

Not just at Uluru, but for decades.

In 1967, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were counted. In 2017, you are being heard.

There is no reason why we can’t enshrine a voice for Aboriginal people in our Constitution.

Djapirri said, she told me of a dream of a canoe, paddled by the Prime Minister and myself. That in itself is an arresting image. Two captains. But in all seriousness, we appreciated I think the power of that illusion, the power of that dream.

My party is ready.

I think Australia is ready.

The fine words that we heard at the opening yesterday, they remind me of the fire dreaming symbol, which is in the front of the Parliament of Australia.

Fire.

That fire dreaming symbol is from central Australia but it is connected isn’t it, by the word of Djapirri yesterday.

Again, that spirit of fire it is a gift from Indigenous people to all Australians and I sincerely will endeavor to make sure that spirit of fire infuses our Parliament.