NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Illicit Drug Use : FREE eBook teaches and Informs Alcohol and Other Drug sector

The Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre (AODKC) this week launched a new eBook about illicit drug use.

The interactive electronic version is a powerful learning tool and is based on the 2016 Review of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

HealthInfoNet Director, Professor Neil Drew says ‘This is our second eBook as we continue to expand our suite of digital tools and new platforms to deliver knowledge and information to the sector.

The eBook is a tactile, sensory tool which provides multiple ways of utilising the latest technology to assist learning about this important topic. We received positive feedback from stakeholders to the first e book and know that there is a need for a resource of this kind.’

The eBook has been created for Apple devices such as iPads, iPhones, laptops and desktop computers.

It is free to download from iTunes and via the AODKC https://itunes.apple.com/au/book/illicit-drug-use/id1226941831?mt=11&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

Users can read it, listen to it, make notes and copy/paste content.

Embedded in the eBook are short films and links to the original source of references.

Once downloaded, the eBook can be accessed and used multiple times in any way that the user determines.

In addition, you can also access from the AODKC site, a short an animated infographic of the eBook which provides another learning opportunity.

Illicit drug use is an issue of concern to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians.

The purpose of the review is to provide a comprehensive synthesis of key information for people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health in Australia. The eBook is the review in another dynamic format.

NACCHO INFO

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Drug Strategy 2014-2019 (NATSIPDS) is a sub-strategy of the National Drug Strategy 2010-2015 (NDS). The NDS aims to build safe and healthy communities by minimising alcohol, tobacco and other drug related health, social and economic harms among individuals, families and communities.

Download

FINAL National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Drug Strategy 2014-2019

The overarching goal of the NATSIPDS is to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by preventing and reducing the harmful effects of alcohol and other drugs (AOD) on individuals, families, and their communities.

NACCHO Previous 170 posts Alcohol and other drugs

More information: The Knowledge Centre provides online access to a comprehensive collection of relevant, evidence-based, current and culturally appropriate alcohol and other drug (AOD) knowledge-support and decision-support materials and information that can be used in the prevention, identification and management of alcohol and other drug use in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre (AO

A yarning place, a workers portal and community portal are other key resources. The work of the Knowledge Centre is supported by a collaborative partnership with the three national alcohol and other drug research centres (the National Drug Research Institute, the National Centre for Education and Training

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Stroke : New Report : Regional and rural health divide : #stroke treatment a cruel lottery

 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are between two and three times as likely to have a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians which is why increasing stroke awareness is crucial.

Too many Australians couldn’t spot a stroke if it was happening right in front of them. We know that in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities this awareness is even lower. We want all Australians, regardless of where they live or what community they’re from, to learn the signs of stroke.”

Stroke Foundation and Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Project

“It can happen to anyone — stroke doesn’t discriminate against colour, it doesn’t discriminate against age “

Photo above Seith Fourmile, Indigenous stroke survivor campaigns for culture to aid in stroke recovery

Regional and rural communities are bearing the brunt of Australia’s stroke burden, according to an updated Stroke Foundation report released today.

Download the Report here : NSF1586_Postcode2017_web

Read over 60 plus NACCHO stroke Articles HERE

“No Postcode Untouched: Stroke in Australia 2017”, found 12 of the country’s top 20 hotspots for stroke incidence were located in regional Australia and people living in country areas were 19 percent more likely to suffer a stroke than those living in metropolitan areas.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said due to limited access to best practice treatment, regional Australians were also more likely to die or be left with a significant disability as a result a stroke.

“In 2017, Australians will suffer more than 56,000 strokes and many of these will be experienced by people living in regional Australia,’’ Ms McGowan said.

“Advancements in stroke treatment and care mean stroke is no longer a death sentence for many, however patient outcomes vary widely across the country depending on where people live.

“Stroke can be treated and it can be beaten. It is a tragedy that only a small percentage of Australian stroke patients are getting access to the latest treatments and ongoing specialist care that we know saves lives.”

See Video from the Project

Stroke Foundation Clinical Council Chair Associate Processor Bruce Campbell said Australian clinicians were leading the way internationally in advancements in acute stroke treatment, such as endovascular clot retrieval. However, the health system was not designed to support and deliver these innovations in treatment and care nationally.

“It is not fair that our health system forces patients into this cruel lottery,’’ A/Professor Campbell said.

“There are pockets of the country where targeted investment and coordination of services is resulting in improved outcomes for stroke patients.

“Consistent lack of stroke-specific funding and poor resourcing is costing us lives and money. For the most part, doctors and nurses are doing what they can in a system that is fragmented, under-resourced and overwhelmed.”

No Postcode Untouched: Stroke in Australia 2017 report and website uses data compiled and analysed by Deloitte Access Economics to reveal how big the stroke challenge is in each Australian federal electorate.

This data includes estimates of the number of strokes, survivors and the death rate, as well as those living with key stroke risk factors. It is an update of a Stroke Foundation report released in 2014.

The report shows the cities and towns where stroke is having its biggest impact and pinpoints future hotspots where there is an increased need for support.

Ms McGowan said stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in Australia, having a huge impact on the community and the economy. Media release

“Currently, there is one stroke in Australia every nine minutes, by 2050 – without action – this number is set to increase to one stroke every four minutes,’’ she said.

“Stroke doesn’t discriminate, it impacts people of all ages and while more people are surviving stroke, its impact on survivors and their families is far reaching.

“It doesn’t have to be this way. Federal and state governments have the opportunity to invest in proven measures to change the state of stroke in this country.”

In the wake of the report Stroke Foundation is calling for a funded national action plan to address the prevention and treatment of stroke, and support for stroke survivors living in the community.

Key elements include: A national action campaign to ensure every Australian household has someone who knows

Key elements include:

  •  A national action campaign to ensure every Australian household has someone who knows FAST – the signs of stroke and to call 000. Stroke is a time critical medical condition. Time saved in getting people to hospital and treatments = brain saved.

  •  Nationally coordinated telemedicine network – breaking down the barriers to acute stroke treatment.
  •  Ensuring all stroke patients have access to stroke unit care, and spend enough time on the stroke unit accessing the services and supports they need to live well after stroke.

The No Postcode Untouched:Stroke in Australia 2017 report was funded by an unrestricted educational grant from Boehringer Ingelheim.

Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek @HeartAust @CancerCouncilOz : Make sure you have a regular #ACCHO health check fellas !

 ” Heart disease was the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who experience and die from cardiovascular disease at much higher rates than other Australians.

When compared with other Australians, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were 1.3 times as likely to have cardiovascular disease, three times more likely to have a major coronary event, such as a heart attack and more than twice as likely to die in hospital from coronary heart disease.”

Aboriginal Chronic Care Officer with Northern NSW Local Health District, Anthony Franks speaking at the #MensHealthWeek Heart Foundation sponsored workshop in Grafton : Workshop photos Colin Cowell NACCHO media

Part 1 Heart Foundation Aboriginal Resources

We have a a variety of information sheets about heart conditions and risk factors for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

View and download the PDFs here, or call our Health Information Service on 1300 36 27 87 to order copies.

Part 2 For Cancer Council info see separate NACCHO Men’s Health promotion below

Let’s face it, your nuts don’t get a lot of love.

Give them a bit of a feel, it’s the polite thing to do. If something doesn’t feel right, go see an ACCHO  doctor. It’s an important step in detecting testicular cancer early

See info below or here

Pictured above Dave Ferguson from NACCHO Member Service  Bulgarr Ngaru AMS : Below some of the workshop participants with trainee doctors from Wollongong University experiencing Aboriginal health prevention

ABORIGINAL and Torres Strait Islander men are 19 times more likely to die from chronic rheumatic heart disease, so a series of workshops in Ballina and Grafton was held to raise awareness of the risk factors for heart disease among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men.

It’s all part of a program across Northern NSW for Men’s Health Week which will run from June 12-19.

The workshops provided a comfortable environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men to learn and ask questions about ways to reduce their chances of experiencing heart disease.

All workshop participants had to complete a health questionnaire and have a blood pressure test

“The idea of these workshops is to raise awareness around the different signs and symptoms of heart disease, and also around prevention and management of the disease,” Mr Franks said,

“This is a new, collaborative approach to addressing this issue, working together with existing avenues such as healthy lifestyle and exercise programs to assist participants to make the most of what they’ll be learning.”

At the workshops men will learn about the importance of heart health checks, stress reduction, quitting smoking and healthy eating from community health practitioners, hospital cardiac nurses, and other health practitioners in a culturally safe environment.

Examples of Men’s Health Week International

 

See Link or read below

What is testicular cancer?

Testicular cancer is the second most common cancer in young men (aged 18 to 39).1

The most common type is seminoma, which usually occurs in men aged between 25 and 50 years. The other main type is non-seminoma, which is more common in younger men, usually in their 20s.

In 2013, 721 new cases of testicular cancer were diagnosed in Australia. For Australian men, the risk of being diagnosed with testicular cancer by age 85 is 1 in 218. The rate of men diagnosed with testicular cancer has grown by more than 50% over the past 30 years, however the reason for this is not known.

The five-year survival rate for men diagnosed with testicular cancer is close to 98%.

In 2014, there were 23 deaths from testicular cancer.


Testicular cancer symptoms

Testicular cancer may cause no symptoms. The most common symptom is a painless swelling or a lump in a testicle.

Less common symptoms include:

  • feeling of heaviness in the scrotum
  • swelling or lump in the testicle
  • change in the size or shape of the testicle
  • feeling of unevenness
  • pain or ache in the lower abdomen, the testicle or scrotum
  • back pain
  • enlargement or tenderness of the breast tissue (due to hormones created by cancer cells).

Causes of testicular cancer

Some factors that may increase a man’s risk of testicular cancer include:

  • undescended testicle (when an infant)
  • family history (having a father or brother who has had testicular cancer).

There is no known link between testicular cancer and injury to the testicles, sporting strains, hot baths or wearing tight clothes.


Diagnosis for testicular cancer

Tests used to diagnose testicular cancer include:

  • ultrasound (to confirm the presence of a mass) and
  • blood tests for the tumour markers alpha-fetoprotein, beta human chorionic gonadotrophin and lactate dehydrogenase.

However, the only way to definitely diagnose testicular cancer is by surgical removal of the affected testicle. While many other types of cancers are diagnosed by biopsy (removing a small piece of tissue from the tumour), cutting into a testicle could spread the cancer to other parts of the body. Hence the whole testicle needs to be removed if cancer is strongly suspected.


Treatment for testicular cancer

Staging

In addition to the results of the diagnostic tests above, a chest X-ray and CT scans of the chest, abdomen and pelvis are done to determine whether and how far the cancer has spread.

Stage 1 means the cancer is found only in the testicle, stage 2 means it has spread to the lymph nodes in the abdomen or pelvis, and stage 3 means the cancer has spread beyond the lymph nodes to other areas of the body such as the lungs and liver.

If the cancer is found only in the testicle (stage 1), removal of the testicle (orchidectomy) may be the only treatment needed. If the cancer has spread beyond the testicle, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy may be used as well.

Treatment team

Depending on your treatment, your treatment team may include a number of the following professionals:

  • GP who looks after your general health and coordinates specialist treatment
  • urologist who specialises in the treatment of diseases of the urinary system and male reproductive system
  • medical oncologist who prescribes chemotherapy treatment
  • radiation oncologist who prescribes radiation therapy
  • cancer nurses
  • endocrinologist who specialises in diagnoses and treatment of disorders of the endocrine system. For men who have had both testicles removed, this will include testosterone replacement
  • other health professionals such as dietitians, social workers and physiotherapists.

Palliative care

In some cases of testicular cancer, your medical team may talk to you about palliative care. Palliative care aims to improve your quality of life by alleviating symptoms of cancer.

As well as slowing the spread of testicular cancer, palliative treatment can relieve pain and help manage other symptoms. Treatment may include radiotherapy, chemotherapy or other drug therapies.


Screening for testicular cancer

There is no routine screening test for testicular cancer. While it is important to get to know the regular look and feel of your testicles and let your doctor know if you notice anything unusual, there is little evidence to suggest that testicular self-examination detects cancer earlier or improves outcomes.

 


Prognosis for testicular cancer

Prognosis means the expected outcome of a disease. An individual’s prognosis depends on the type and stage of cancer as well as their age and general health at the time of diagnosis. You may wish to discuss your prognosis and treatment options with your doctor, but it is not possible for any doctor to predict the exact course of your disease.

All testicular cancers can be treated and most testicular cancers are successfully treated.


Preventing testicular cancer

There are no proven measures to prevent testicular cancer.


Source

Understanding Testicular Cancer, Cancer Council Australia © 2016. Last medical review of source booklet: September 2016.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) 2017. Cancer in Australia 2017. Cancer series no. 101. Cat. no. CAN 100. Canberra: AIHW.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. ACIM (Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality) Books. Canberra: AIHW.

1) Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, which is the most commonly diagnosed cancer according to general practice and hospitals data, however there is no reporting of cases to cancer registries.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories from #ACT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD #NT #TAS @KenWyattMP

1.Winnunga ACCHO elders garden has healthy future for community

2. SA : Nathan Krakouer  no more bad choices now Deadly Choices

3.1 The new Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Council will bring together six different ACCHO’s  across North East Victoria

3.2 VAHS hosts Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima 

4.AHCWA calls for “ICE “ intervention and prevention ACTION

5.1 NSW 60 Students graduate AHMRC Aboriginal Health College

 5. 2 NSW Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking program hits the road.

 6.QLD ‘No Smokes’ one-day training 

7. NT Uncle Jimmy and NT ACCHO’S helps to stop Trachoma

8.Tasmania Culture Centre employment assistance service

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media     Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.Winnunga ACCHO elders garden has healthy future for community

When you think of a garden and gardening, most of us wouldn’t think of it as a gift of life. But for 74 year old Uncle Brian Demery this is exactly what it did for him. ‘I went to Winnunga coz I was sick but when I went to Winnunga a new chapter of my life was opened. Winnunga just cares, not only about me but about lots of our Elders’ Uncle Brian said.

Twelve years ago Uncle Brian and his late wife, who passed away 11 years ago, operated a community garden but when the funding stopped, the couple found themselves struggling to keep it going due to the ongoing costs.

‘I was speaking to Julie Tongs at Winnunga. I told her, what had happened and how I was paying for it out of my own pocket. Julie said ‘how can we help you’, Uncle Brian explained. ‘I couldn’t do it without Winnunga. It’s expensive with the seeds and punnets’ he added.

From humble beginnings in its current Queanbeyan location, the Winnunga Elders Garden became what it is today – a thriving community garden with a variety of seasonal vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, peas, beans, capsicum, lettuce, corn, turnips, chilli’s and some grapes.

The Ngemba Elder from Bourke said although it’s a lot of hard work taking care of 10 large garden beds, a green house, a number of sleepers and five trellises, he said it gives him a purpose, a reason to get up each morning. ‘I just love it, it’s satisfying. You just feel good within yourself. If you don’t do anything, you get bored, you drink, you do bad stuff but this keeps you on track. It’s also good exercise’ Uncle Brian explained.

Uncle Brian who works in the garden two hours a day and for four to five hours on a Saturday and Sunday was keen to describe the feeling he gets from seeing the plants grow. ‘You put the seeds in and wait to see it grow, see it sprout. Every day, it’s exciting. You then get to pick it and taste it’ he said.

Those who know the keen golfer, father of two, a grand-father and great-grandfather, can’t speak highly enough of his character. One of these people is Ian Bateman, Manager of Winnunga’s Social Health Team. ‘Uncle Brian is not only a great role model but also an interesting character with a great sense of humour. He brings a lot of knowledge and passion and we couldn’t think of a better person for the garden. It’s also good to see someone his age still being so active. He gives back to the community’ Mr Bateman said.

The Elders Garden has had a significant impact on the community.

‘I do up vegetable packages for families and Elders. There are about 15 families with kids, we give to. I like helping these families and Elders as they are battling to make ends meet, it saves them money’ Uncle Brian said. Mr Bateman also echoed Uncle Brian’s thoughts on the important role of the garden. ‘It’s a big benefit to the community. There are people struggling especially our Elders and pensioners. A lot of the pensioners are supporting extended families with serious social issues. So the garden and its produce are of a great benefit to the community’ Mr Bateman explained.

Uncle Brian also added ‘People are so grateful. For me, it’s mainly for the kids. Everything I grow isn’t sprayed, no pesticides, it’s all organic. This way, they get fresh vegetables, it encourages the kids to eat vegetables’ he said. Uncle Brian said although he is getting on in age, he still plans to keep working the garden for a little longer but welcomes any volunteers to help him out.

‘I reckon I’ve got two years left in me to keep doing this. It’s getting hard but I’ll still do it. I’d love to hear from any Koori fellas who’d like to help out. They could start out with one garden bed, I’ll help. I’ll give them the seeds’ he said.

If you would like to assist with the Winnunga AHS Elders Garden, please contact the Social Health Team at Winnunga on 02 6284 6222.

2. SA : Nathan Krakouer  no more bad choices now Deadly Choices

Port Adelaide Power journeyman Nathan Krakouer opens up on bad choices that almost ended his life READ Story Here

Nathan Krakouer speaks out about his past choices and how he turned his life around. Now Nathan wants to help others by using his lessons from binge drinking and drugs to advise indigenous youth to not go down the path he did.

Power signs on to boost health care

PORT Adelaide will have its indigenous players — such as Nathan Krakouer — become powerful role models in Aboriginal communities to promote better health.

And Power chief executive Keith Thomas explains the bold move from “the core business of football” as part of the Port Adelaide Football Club taking on greater responsibility with indigenous issues.

“We have a role to play in Aboriginal health care,” said Thomas, who this week challenged the AFL and its clubs to broaden the indigenous agenda beyond a celebration of Aboriginal culture with the Sir Doug Nicholls Round.

Port Adelaide yesterday signed an agreement with the Aboriginal Health Council of SA to be part of the “Deadly Choices” program that will encourage indigenous communities to have health checks.

The Deadly Choices program aims to advise indigenous youth the impact of poor lifestyle decisions by empowering them to make healthy decisions for themselves and their families.

The Deadly Choices team from Queensland were in Adelaide last week to bump heads with us before the big launch day on July 1st.

(L-R) Thomas Gilles, Ian Lacey, Wade Thompson, Trent Wingard, Nathan Appo, Marlon Motlop

Deadly Choices is a school-led, 8-week health and lifestyle program will encourage young people make the right choices to look after their own health.

And if they complete the health check at one of our member clinics, they will be able to win the Deadly Choices Guernsey.

Our member clinics are at Pipalyatjara, Amata, Umuwa, Fregon, Ernabella, Mimili, Indulkana.

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3.1 The new Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Council will bring together six different ACCHO’s  across North East Victoria

Six Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations will collaborate with Murray PHN to help improve access to health services and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our area.

They will form the newly-established Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Council, committed to improving indigenous health outcomes in the region, in line with the operational principles of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

Matt Jones, CEO of Murray PHN, said the organisation was the first Primary Health Network in Australia to establish an Indigenous Health Advisory Council.

“Our goal is to ensure that primary health services and the health service system across the Murray PHN catchment area are responsive to the needs of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities,” Mr Jones said.

“This is part of wider efforts to close the gap in life expectancy and health outcomes in the Indigenous population.

“As a representative voice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our region, the Indigenous Health Advisory Council will allow for the authentic participation of indigenous people in designing and developing models of care,” he said.

The Murray PHN Advisory Council membership will consist of:

  • Albury Wodonga Aboriginal Health Service (AWAHS)
  •  Bendigo and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BDAC)
  •  Mallee District Aboriginal Service (MDAS)
  •  Mungabereena Aboriginal Corporation
  •  Murray Valley Aboriginal Cooperative (MVAC)
  •  Njernda Aboriginal Corporation
  •  Murray PHN

Improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is one of the key health priorities for the region. Murray PHN has more than 14,800 people who identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (14,800+), and whose health status continues to be considerably lower than the wider population.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience a burden of disease two-and-a-half times that of other Australians, with 70 per cent of the health gap due to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, chronic respiratory disease, chronic kidney disease and mental health issues.

The Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Committee will meet quarterly.

3. VAHS hosts Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima 

 

“What inspires me and what I’m taking away is the love, I always have faith In community. Its powerful and has touched my heart and I’m taking that away with me.

I felt the love of community in this building and in this work, faith/belief in community, past present and future, I felt that within myself powerful. 

Oxfam fights alongside Indigenous communities. The power is in the love of community.”

After hearing Gary Foley’s  powerful recount of the rich and proud history of VAHS , Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima made this statement to the VAHS board, staff and community.

Thank you to Uncle Bill Nicholson, Aunty Janice Austin, Gary Foley, Jimmy Peters and the Board, Uncle Phil Ah Wanh, and Ngarra, Justin and the Oxfam team for making today happen.

4.AHCWA calls for “ICE “ intervention and prevention ACTION

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia has called for better access to early intervention and prevention programs to help address increasing methamphetamine (ice) use in regional WA. AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson Cox said “beggared belief” that there had not been any significant investment into grassroots community intervention programs despite ice use continuing to increase over the past decade.

“It is frustrating that despite several state and federal strategies highlighting the need to increase investment in community-led and culturally appropriate early intervention prevention, treatment and support services, we are yet to see any significant amounts of funding directed to our sector and other Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, “she said.

Ms Nelson Cox said there had been a concerning shift with ice use overtaking excessive alcohol use in some communities, resulting in services being unprepared and lacking the appropriate programs and services to provide care to those using the illicit drug.

“There is a growing presence of illicit drugs in the regions,” she said.

“While there is evidence that alcohol use is still higher than methamphetamine use, from the Aboriginal community perspective we are certainly seeing methamphetamine use becoming just as significant as alcohol use.

“Our people are crying out for help. They want community-led solutions and want to work with government departments but all they are getting is lip service.”

Ms Nelson Cox said there was no conclusive evidence that cashless welfare cards had made any impact in minimising drug use.

“Our Elders are gravely concerned about the impact of the cashless welfare card. There is no significant evidence to suggest that cashless welfare cards lead to any reduction in drug use in our regional communities”, she said.

“What we have seen in certain towns is an increase around elder abuse, black market trades of the cards for cash, reports of prostitution and a rapid rise in crime.

“Regional communities are trying to take practical approaches and strategies to deal with this problem.

“Penalising people through their Centrelink payments is not the solution. This approach will not deal with the crux of the problem. It will not empower our people and we are also yet to see investment into additional support services as was promised with its introduction.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal health services currently members.

5.1 NSW 60 Students graduate AHMRC Aboriginal Health College

 

A big day for 60 Students graduating today from courses at the AHNMRC Aboriginal Health College. Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands

Congratulations Aboriginal Health College 2017 graduates. Equals more Aboriginal health workers & culturally appropriate care

5.2 NSW Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking program hits the road.

Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking program hit the road last week with the help of some familiar faces.

We ran a workshop with the students to educate them about smoking and the effects the habit can have.

We would like to say a big thank you to our special guests for the day who were on hand to share some important messaging – George Rose, Samantha Harris, Latrell Mitchell, Connor Watson and Will Smith.

 6.QLD ‘No Smokes’ one-day training 
 

Please see the attached invitation to ‘No Smokes’ one-day training which will be delivered at Apunipima Cairns office on Thursday 15 June 2017 from 9.00am to 3.30pm.

The training provides an introduction to the ‘No Smokes’ resources, which include a variety of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific tools, as well as resources to inform people of the dangers of smoking and to assist them to quit.

The main resource used with the training will be a flipchart, which can be viewed here: http://nosmokes.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/TobaccoFlipchart_Sept2012_A4.pdf

The training is FREE and lunch and morning tea will be provided.

Please RSVP to Nina Nichols nina.nichols@apunipima.org.au or Kelly Franklin kelly.franklin@nintione.com.au.

7. NT Uncle Jimmy and NT ACCHO’S helps to stop Trachoma

 

Day one of the Barkly Desert Culture tour in Tennant Creek…For the past three years local artists the E town Boyz, Hill Boyz and The Sand Hill Women have been making inspirational music under the mentorship of Monkey Marc, Beatrice Lewis and Sean Spencer with support of the Barkly Shire Council.

The artists have collaborated to write and perform a great song to make their community aware of Trachoma and how to stop it.

Here is a sneak preview of the song and video that we will share with you all very soon.

OR WATCH VIDEO HERE

The tour goes to Elliott tomorrow, then Alpurrulam, Ampilatawatja, Ali Curung, Alparra and a big finale concert in Alice Springs on June 16th. Clean Faces, Strong Eyes Indigenous Eyehealth Caama Alice Springs CAAMA Music See Desert Hip Hop for all tour dates…..

8.Tasmania Culture Centre employment assistance service

“Interested in these jobs at IBIS Styles Hobart, or other jobs coming up?

Not sure how to apply?

Come along to the Aboriginal Health Service this Friday June 9 from 10.30 am to get some tips and help with updating your resume, writing your application and get some interview tips.

Let Sally know if you are interested in attending.. hobart@tacinc.com.au or ring 62340700”

Aboriginal Health : Second Atlas of Healthcare Variation highlights higher Aboriginal hospitalisation rates for all 18 clinical conditions

 

“The report, compiled by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, shows us that high hospitalisation rates often point to inadequate primary care in the community, leading to higher rates of potentially preventative hospitalization

The most disturbing example of this  has been the higher hospitalisation rates for all of the 18 clinical conditions surveyed experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, people living in areas of relative socioeconomic disadvantage and those living in remote areas.

 Chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson who is a member of the Atlas Advisory Group.

 “Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Please note

  • Features of the second Atlas include: Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status

DOWNLOAD Key-findings-and-recommendations

Mr Martin Bowles Secretary Dept of Health  launches the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation

A new report showing dramatic differences in treatment rates around Australia signals a pressing need for reforms to ensure equitable access to appropriate health care for all Australians, the Consumers Health Forum, says.

“A seven-fold difference in hospitalisation for heart failure and a 15-fold difference for a serious chronic respiratory disease depending on place of residence, are among many findings of substantial variations in treatment rates in Australia revealed in the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation,” the chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson, said.

“While there are a variety of factors contributing to these differences,  the variation in health and treatment outcomes is, as the report states, an ‘alarm bell’ that should make us stop and investigate whether appropriate care is being delivered.

“These findings show that recommended care for chronic diseases is not always provided.  Even with the significant funding provided through Medicare to better coordinate primary care for people with chronic and complex conditions, fragmented health services contribute to suboptimal management, as the report states.

“We support the report’s recommendation for a stronger primary health system that would provide a clinical ‘home base’ for coordination of patient care and in which patients and carers are activated to develop their knowledge and confidence to manage their health with the aid of a healthcare team.

“The Atlas provides further robust reasons for federal, state and territory governments to act on the demonstrated need for a more effective primary health system that will ensure better and more cost effective care for all Australians.

“The Atlas also examined  variations in women’s health care, and its findings included a seven-fold difference in rates of hysterectomy and  21-fold  difference in rates of endometrial ablation.  The report states that rates of hysterectomy and caesarean sections in Australia are higher than reported rates in other developed nations.  These results highlight the need for continuing support and information on women’s health issues,” Mr Lawson said.

The Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation (second Atlas) paints a picture of marked variation in the use of 18 clinical areas (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications) across Australia.

This Atlas, the second to be released by the Commission, illuminates variation by mapping use of health care according to where people live.  As well, this Atlas identifies specific achievable actions for exploration and quality improvement.

The second Atlas includes interventions not covered in the first Atlas, such as hospitalisations for chronic diseases and caesarean section in younger women. It also builds on the findings from the first Atlas – for example, examining hysterectomy and endometrial ablation separately, and examining rates of cataract surgery using a different dataset.

Priority areas for investigation and action arising from the second Atlas include use of:

  • Hysterectomy and endometrial ablation
  • Chronic conditions (COPD, diabetes complications)
  • Knee replacement.

Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Healthcare Variation – what does it tell us

Some variation is expected and associated with need-related factors such as underlying differences in the health of specific populations, or personal preferences. However, the weight of evidence in Australia and internationally suggests that much of the variation documented in the Atlas is likely to be unwarranted. Understanding this variation is critical to improving the quality, value and appropriateness of health care.

View the second Atlas

The second Atlas, released in June 2017, examined four clinical themes: chronic disease and infection – potentially preventable hospitalisations, cardiovascular, women’s health and maternity, and surgical interventions.

Key findings and recommendations for action are available here.

View the maps and download the data using the interactive platform.

What does the Atlas measure?

The second Atlas shows rates of use of healthcare interventions (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications,) in geographical areas across Australia.  The rate is then age and sex standardised to allow comparisons between populations with different age and sex structures. All rates are based on the patient’s place of residence, not the location of the hospital or health service.

The second Atlas uses data from national databases to explore variation across different healthcare settings. These included the National Hospital Morbidity Database and the AIHW National Perinatal Data Collection.

Who has developed the second Atlas?

The Commission worked with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) on the second Atlas.

The Commission consulted widely with the Australian government, state and territory governments, specialist medical colleges, clinicians and consumer representatives to develop the second Atlas.

Features of the second Atlas include:

  • Greater involvement of clinicians during all stages of development
  • Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status
  • Analysis of data by patient funding status (public or private).

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Chronic disease and infection: potentially preventable hospitalisations

1.1 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
1.2 Heart failure
1.3 Cellulitis
1.4 Kidney and urinary tract infections
1.5 Diabetes complications

Chapter 2 Cardiovascular conditions

2.1 Acute myocardial infarction admissions
2.2 Atrial fibrillation

Chapter 3 Women’s health and maternity

3.1 Hysterectomy
3.2 Endometrial ablation
3.3 Cervical loop excision or cervical laser ablation
3.4 Caesarean section, ages 20 to 34 years
3.5 Third- and fourth-degree perineal tear

Chapter 4 Surgical interventions

4.1 Knee replacement
4.2 Lumbar spinal decompression
4.3 Lumbar spinal fusion
4.4 Laparoscopic cholecystectomy
4.5 Appendicectomy
4.6 Cataract surgery
Technical Supplement
About the Atlas
Glossary

Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation data set specifications are available at http://meteor.aihw.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/674758

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Mental Health : Download report “Mental health in remote and rural communities “

 ” The poorer mental health of remote and rural Indigenous Australians is also impacted by the social determinants of Indigenous health, which are well recognised nationally and internationally.

These relate to the loss of language and connection to the land, environmental deprivation, spiritual, emotional and mental disconnectedness, a lack of cultural respect, lack of opportunities for self-determination, poor educational attainment, reduced opportunities for employment, poor housing, and negative interactions with government systems

The relationship of remoteness to health is particularly important for Indigenous Australians, who are overrepresented in remote and rural Australia (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2014a).

The National Mental Health Commission (2014a, p. 19) identified that “the mental health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are significantly higher than those of other Australians.”

Photo above

“ The women of Inkawenyerre, a small settlement in the Utopia community four hours by road north of Alice Springs, regularly take part in a different kind of mental health therapy, known as ‘narrative therapy.’

Narrative therapy taps into the centuries-old tradition among Aboriginal people of story-telling and expression through art. At the family Urapuntja Clinic, both women and children take part in narrative therapy.

They recreate what is commonly seen on any given evening in an Aboriginal community—people sitting around the fire, relating to one another and telling stories.

The activity is enjoyable for participants with group members often laughing and supporting one another as they tell stories and work on their painting—all while promoting good mental health living practice,”

Lynne Henderson, former RFDS Central Operations mental health clinician.

“People who live in the country get less access to care. And they become sicker,”

To increase the access to care, the RFDS said it needed a massive increase in funding. Country Australians see mental health professionals at only a fifth the rate of those who live in the city,

So there should be a five-fold increase in access to mental health care for country Australians.”

RFDS CEO Martin Laverty see story Part 2 below

Mental health in remote and rural communities

Mental health disorders are not more common in rural and regional Australia than they are in Australia’s cities, according to a new report from the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS), but they are a lot harder to treat.

The report, Mental Health in Remote and Rural Communities, found about one in five remote and rural Australians — 960,000 people — experience mental illness.

Download the report HERE

RN031_Mental_Health_D5

But a combination of lack of access to facilities, social stigma, and cultural barriers present challenges to getting people the help they need.

AHCRA believes that’s something that everyone should be concerned about, with access to care regardless of location.

 

Part 1  Indigenous mental health and suicide

Data from the 2011 Australian Census demonstrated that 669,881 Australians, or 3% of the population, identified as Indigenous (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013b), and that 142,900 Indigenous Australians, or 21% of the Indigenous population, lived in remote and very remote areas (Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, 2014).

Around 45% of people in very remote Australia (91,600 people), and 16% of people in remote Australia (51,300 people) were Indigenous (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013b; Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, 2014).

In 2011–2012 around one-third (30%) of Indigenous adults reported high or very high levels of psychological distress—almost three times the rate for non-Indigenous Australians (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2014).

In 2008–2012, in NSW, Queensland (Qld), WA, SA and the NT, there were 347 Indigenous deaths11 from mental health-related conditions (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare,

2015a). Specifically, age-standardised death data demonstrated that Indigenous Australians (49 per 100,000 population) were 1.2 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (40 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). Age-standardised deaths from mental and behavioural disorders increased with increasing age in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in 2008–2012.

Very few Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians under the age of 35 years died as result of mental and behavioural disorders in 2008–2012. However, Indigenous Australians aged 35 years or older were more likely to die from mental and behavioural disorders than non-Indigenous

Australians in 2008–2012. Specifically, Indigenous Australians (7.2 per 100,000 population) aged 35–44 years were 5.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (1.3 per 1200,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and

Welfare, 2015a). In 2008–2012, Indigenous Australians (14.7 per 100,000 population) aged 45–54 years were 4.9 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (3.0 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

In 2008–2012, Indigenous Australians (18.3 per 100,000 population) aged 55–64 years were 2.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (6.9 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). In 2008–2012,

Indigenous Australians (91.2 per 100,000 population) aged 65–74 years were 2.9 times as likely

as non-Indigenous Australians (31.3 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

Further exploration of death data from mental and behavioural disorders illustrates the significant impact of psychoactive substance use (ICD-10-AM codes F10–F19) on Indigenous mortality (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). In 2008–2012, 29.1% of Indigenous deaths due to mental and behavioural disorders were the result of psychoactive substance use, such as alcohol, opioids, cannabinoids, sedative hypnotics, cocaine, other stimulants such as caffeine, hallucinogens, tobacco, volatile solvents, or multiple drug use. During this period, Indigenous Australians (7.3 per 100,000 populations) were 4.8 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to die as a result of psychoactive substance use (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

Similarly, in 2006–2010, there were 312 Indigenous deaths from mental health-related conditions (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013a). Indigenous Australians living in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT were 1.5 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to die from mental and behavioural disorders in 2006–2010 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013a).

11 Deaths from mental and behavioural disorders do not include deaths from intentional self-harm (suicide). Intentional self-harm is coded under ICD-10-AM Chapter 19—Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes.

Age-standardised death data demonstrated that Indigenous males (49 per 100,000 population) were 1.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous males to die from mental and behavioural disorders. Indigenous females were 1.3 times as likely as non-Indigenous females to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013a).

The greater number of deaths from mental and behavioural disorders with age may also represent the impact of conditions associated with ageing, such as dementia. For example, in 2014, Indigenous Australians (50.7 per 100,000 population) in NSW, Qld, SA, WA and the NT were 1.1 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (45.3 per 100,000 population) to die from dementia (including Alzheimer disease) (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016a).

In 2014–2015, Indigenous Australians (28.3 per 1,000 population) were 1.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (16.3 per 1,000 population) to be hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016a).

In 2011–2013, 4.2% of Indigenous hospitalisations were for mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). Age-standardised data demonstrated that Indigenous Australians (27.7 per 1,000 population) were twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (14.2 per 1,000 population) to be hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders in 2011–2013 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

In 2008–2009, Indigenous young people aged 12–24 years (2,535 per 100,000 population) were three times as likely to be hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders than non-Indigenous young people (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2011).

 

The leading causes of hospitalisation for mental and behavioural disorders amongst Indigenous young people were schizophrenia (306 per 100,000 population), alcohol misuse (348 per 100,000 population) and reactions to severe stress (266 per 100,000 population) (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2011).

A preliminary clinical survey of 170 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in Cape York and the Torres Strait, aged 17–65 years, with a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, was undertaken to describe the prevalence and characteristics of psychotic disorders in this population (Hunter, Gynther, Anderson, Onnis, Groves, & Nelson, 2011).

Researchers found that: 62% of the sample had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 24% had substance-related psychoses, 8% had affective psychoses, 3% had organic psychoses and 3% had brief reactive psychoses; Indigenous Australians aged 30–39 years were overrepresented in the psychosis sample compared to their representation in the population (37% of sample versus 29% of population) with slightly lower proportions in the 15–29 years and 40 years and older age groups; almost three-quarters (73%) of the sample were male (versus 51% for the Indigenous population as a whole); Aboriginal males (63% in the sample compared to 46% for the region as a whole) were overrepresented; a higher proportion of males (42%) than females (5%), and Aboriginal (44%) than Torres Strait Islander patients (10%) had a lifetime history of incarceration; comorbid intellectual disability was identified for 27% of patients, with a higher proportion for males compared to females (29% versus 20%) and Aboriginal compared to Torres Strait Islander patients (38% versus 7%); and alcohol misuse (47%) and cannabis use (52%) were believed to have had a major role in the onset of psychosis (Hunter et al., 2011).

In 2015, Indigenous Australians (25.5 deaths per 100,000 population) in Qld, SA, NT, NSW and WA were twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (12.5 deaths per 100,000 population) to die from suicide (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016b). In their spatial analysis of suicide, Cheung et al. (2012) concluded that higher rates of suicide in the NT and in some remote areas could be explained by the large numbers of Indigenous Australians living in these areas, who demonstrate higher levels of suicide compared with the general population.

The poorer mental health of remote and rural Indigenous Australians is also impacted by the social determinants of Indigenous health, which are well recognised nationally and internationally.

These relate to the loss of language and connection to the land, environmental deprivation, spiritual, emotional and mental disconnectedness, a lack of cultural respect, lack of opportunities for self-determination, poor educational attainment, reduced opportunities for employment, poor housing, and negative interactions with government systems

Part 2 Flying Doctors fight barriers to treat mental illness in rural Australia

Source ABC

Like so many in the bush, Brendan Cullen has a lot on his plate.

He manages a 40,000-hectare property south of Broken Hill. There are 8,000 sheep to keep track of. And that’s just a fraction of the number he looked after previously at another station.

A few years ago, the mustering, the maintenance, juggling bills and family — it all caught up to him.

“You just bottle stuff up. And sometimes you can’t find an out,” he said.

“In the bush you have a lot of time by yourself.”

He spent a lot of that time thinking about his problems. But Mr Cullen was lucky.

He heard about a mental health clinic being run by the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) in a nearby community and decided to go along.

“Catching up with one of the mental health nurses gave me the tools to be able to work out how I go about living a day-to-day life,” he said.

“My life’s a hell of a lot easier now than what it used to be.”

Mental health disorders are not more common in rural and regional Australia than they are in Australia’s cities, according to a new report from the RFDS, but they are a lot harder to treat.

The report, Mental Health in Remote and Rural Communities, found about one in five remote and rural Australians — 960,000 people — experience mental illness.

But a combination of lack of access to facilities, social stigma, and cultural barriers present challenges to getting people the help they need.

“People who live in the country get less access to care. And they become sicker,” RFDS CEO Martin Laverty said.

To increase the access to care, the RFDS said it needed a massive increase in funding.

“Country Australians see mental health professionals at only a fifth the rate of those who live in the city,” Mr Laverty said.

“So there should be a five-fold increase in access to mental health care for country Australians.”

The impact of distance and isolation when it comes to treating mental disorders can be seen in suicide rates. In remote Australia, the rate is nearly twice what it is in major metropolitan areas — 19.6 deaths per 100,000 people.

The suicide rate is even greater in very remote communities.

If you or anyone you know needs help:

The RFDS has responded by increasing its mental health outreach. In communities like Menindee, about an hour’s drive from Broken Hill in the far west of New South Wales, a mental health nurse is on call once a fortnight.

“I have needed them in the past. I got down to rock bottom at one stage. Even now I appreciate that support,” Menindee resident Margot Muscat said.

Ms Muscat plays an active role in the remote community. But she has also felt pressure in the past to manage that role, her work, and family commitments.

Mental health counselling has given her a valuable outlet.

“Just to know that I wasn’t alone. And that you don’t have to take the drastic step of suiciding, so to speak,” Ms Muscat said.

Some the RFDS’s mental health counselling is done over the airwaves. From its regional base in Broken Hill, mental health nurse Glynis Thorp counsels patients over the phone. Often calls are simply people checking in.

“It’s critically important…often there might only be two people on the property. So no one to talk to maybe,” she said.

“We might get out to a clinic every fortnight, but we might have follow up phone calls to check how people are going. For myself it’s probably a ratio of four to one.”

The RFDS report reveals every year hundreds of serious mental illness incidents require airplanes to be dispatched to remote areas to fly patients out for treatment.

Over three years from July 2013 the RFDS conducted 2,567 ‘aeromedical retrievals’.

The leading causes for evacuation flights due to mental disorder are

The RFDS also uses airplanes to carry its mental health nurses to very remote areas. On a typical day in Broken Hill, the medical team takes off just after dawn to head to three communities hundreds of kilometres away: Wilcania, White Cliffs and Tilpa.

In the opal mining town of White Cliffs, the mental health nurse sees patients at the local clinic. One is “Jane”, who doesn’t want her full name used.

“Without them, we would really be lost here,” she said.

Jane has been counselled by the RFDS and was recently directed to mental health treatment in Broken Hill. But she’s still reluctant to talk openly in town about the help she’s getting.

“In a small community it’s not wise to talk to other people in town,” she said. “And mental health, it does carry a stigma.”

Back on his station south of Broken Hill, Mr Cullen believes that stigma over mental health is slowly changing in the bush.

“People get wind that someone’s had a mental health problem, people talk now. As opposed to, let’s go back five years even, 10 years. It was a closed book,” he said.

“With these clinics, once upon a time you might have had a dental nurse, a doctor, and the like.

“But now you have a mental health nurse…And these clinics are close by. So you’re able to go to them. They come to you.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Smoking : #Deadly #WorldNoTobaccoDay Good News Stories from our #ACCHOs

This week we feature Deadly Good NEWS Stories from #WNTD events at our Affiliates and 302 ACCHO clinics yesterday

Intro from Matthew Cook NACCHO Chair, Videos from  David Gillespie Rural Health Minister and Tom Calma

1.New South Wales

2.Victoria

3.Queensland

4.Western Australia

5.South Australia

6.Tasmania

7.Northern Territory

8. Canberra ACT

If you have an event you want added send

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

 nacchonews@naccho.org.au

Watch Video David Gillespie

National ACCHO Launch See 8 Canberra for more photographs

Federal Minster for Indigenous Health and Minister for Aged Care, the Hon. Ken Wyatt AM (4th from right) attended the 2017 World No Tobacco Day function at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service in Narrabundah, ACT.

He is pictured with the Winnunga CEO, Julie Tongs, OAM (to his left), the Winnunga team, and Prof Tom Calma, AO, National Coordinator, Tackling Indigenous Smoking, and Ngambri – Ngunnawal Elder, Aunty Louise Brown who gave the Welcome to Country (2nd and 3rd from left).

Watch Video Tom Calma

1.New South Wales

Today is WORLD NO TOBACCO DAY!! #dontquitqutting Yerin is working with community to reduce smoking! Come in and see our wellbeing team and join our #dontquitquittingteam

Yerin Facebook Page

2.Victoria

SO good to hear Aunty Rieo Ellis, Jimi Peters and Rhee Kennedy share with us this morning about their quitting journeys as we celebrated World No Tobacco Day!

As Aunty Rieo says, never quit quitting! If you would like to have a yarn with someone about quitting smoking, you can call the Aboriginal Quitline right now on 137848.

You can also talk to someone like your doctor, health worker, pharmacist or a tobacco cessation specialist!

Did you know that VAHS has two wonderful quit specialists that hang out at VAHS Preston regularly? Margot and Christine from Darebin Community Health and Merri Health are the experts in the game and a great resource. Come and meet them!

Really excited for everyone that has made today the day they throw it away. You’ve got this and we’re all here to support you!

“Never quit quitting!”

Aunty Rieo Ellis shared her Quitting Journey with us today at our World No Tobacco Day morning tea.

Thank you for sharing your story with us Aunty Rieo and for being a great encourager of anyone thinking about giving up smoking. You’re an inspiration!

WATCH VIDEO HERE

If you would like to talk to someone about quitting smoking you can call the Aboriginal Quitline on 137848. Or you could book in to see your doctor or health worker to talk about the options that you have for support. You can call the VAHS Medical reception on 9419 3000 to make an appointment.

Go on, make today the day you give it away!

3.Queensland

Cairns Staff celebrate those who have quit smokes and those who are trying to quit smokes.

If you want to quit you have our support! Have a yarn to your local Health Worker.

#WNTD2017 #DMSYS #Tacklingindigenoussmoking #TooDeadly #HealthyCommunities #Healthystaff

What’s Your Story, Cape York?

Sean has signed up 3 community members 2 our Deadly Smoke Free Pledge, this will see 15 people benefit

What a deadly day for our team out in community today Tackling Tobacco. Nothing better seeing our community taking control of their health.

Sue from Gold Coast just signed the Smoke-free Pledge and completed a quick lung health check

4.Western Australia

Today is World No Tobacco Day, highlighting the health and additional risks associated with tobacco use, and advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption.

More info pictures here

The theme for World No Tobacco Day 2017 is “Tobacco – a threat to development.”

AHCWA’s Tobacco Action team, in conjunction with the Health Promotion team at Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) set up a display and ran activities at DHYS’s East Perth Clinic to promote awareness and the benefits of quitting smoking.

Port Headland WA

5.South Australia

Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

Facebook Page

Here’s a message from former Tennis World number 1 Evonne Goolagong Cawley “Please be safe and don’t smoke”. If you would like to find out more visit http://www.evonnegoolagongfoundation.org.au/

6.Tasmania

7.Northern Territory

 

 

Tennant Creek and the Barkly Region’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking team from Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation in the NT had a deadly day out yesterday in support of World No Tobacco Day.
 
Locals and organisations from in and around Tennant Creek come down to show their support of Tackling Indigenous Smoking. The Public Health team was also present to ensure a holistic approach was presented such as our dietician and nutritionist with a healthy feed for all with nutritional salads and meat options in tasty wraps.

The Grow Well team supporting mums and bubs program had a yarning tent and lots of give aways. Anyinginyi Health’s Clinical Diabetes Nurse was present throughout the day taking blood pressure levels and sugar/glucose checks and of course the TIS team was actively voicing health promotion and awareness to community around the dangers of smoking, passive smoking, the expenses of smoking and ways of quitting/cutting down. We had a smoke-a-lizer to test the levels of carbon monoxide of individual’s even non-smokers, conducting smoke-a-lizer tests on non-smokers showed a great example of how second-hand smoke effect and still makes its way into someones lungs, we had great conversations and engagement as to how to prevent second hand smoke effecting families.
Having such a great outcome makes our TIS and Public Health teams motivated to create more health promotional materials and awareness to the Barkly Region!
 

Watch video here

It was so exciting to see everyone together in Nhulunbuy for #WNTD2017, bukmak rrambangi, addressing this important issue.

Aboriginal people in remote regions suffer from the highest smoking rates in the country. Smoking in East Arnhem is estimated to be anywhere between 67% and 80% of the adult population. It is really important that we all get behind reducing these rates! Miwatj Health, Nhulunbuy Corp & Cancer Council NT

 

Julie Gapalathana, Rarrtji Mel Herdman, Burrkitj (Boogie) Ngurruwutthun & Glen Gurruwiwi – Tackling Indigenous Smoking team #WNTD2017 — in Nhulunbuy, Northern Territory

8. Canberra ACT

Federal Minster for Indigenous Health and Minister for Aged Care, the Hon. Ken Wyatt AM attended the 2017 World No Tobacco Day function at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service in Narrabundah, ACT.

Above :  congratulates the Winnunga Tackling Indigenous Smoking Team: Chanel Webb, Perri Chapman and Caitlin Towart

© Geoff Bagnall

Prof. Tom Calma, AO, National Coordinator, Tackling Indigenous Smoking addresses the gathering.

Winnunga CEO, Julie Tongs, OAM shows Federal Minster for Indigenous Health and Minister for Aged Care, the Hon. Ken Wyatt AM the universal room, which houses optometry and the Otitis Media Programme (Ear health).

Federal Minster for Indigenous Health and Minister for Aged Care, the Hon. Ken Wyatt AM congratulates Beth Sturgess, Executive Assistant to the CEO, Winnunga Nimmityjah, on 293 days, 13 hours and 25 minutes of successful quitting (but who’s counting?).

As of World No Tobacco Day, 2017, Beth’s Drop It app calculates that in that time she has NOT smoked 7,338 cigarettes, saving her $5,870.40.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #NRW2017 : Major report released : Download Aboriginal Health Performance Framework Report 2017

 

 ” The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report shows some positive results in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people but the harsh reality is that there is still a long way to go.

“While the government continues to invest substantially and works closely with communities in a wide range of Indigenous health programs and interventions that aim to improve Indigenous health and wellbeing, considerable challenges remain.

“Addressing these challenges requires a whole of health system response and a concerted effort from all levels of government.”

A major report that documents progress towards better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, was launched today by the Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt.

DOWNLOAD REPORT HERE 2017-AIHW health-performance-framework-report

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report is available at http://www.dpmc.gov.au/hpf

The AIHW associated online tables and data visualisation tool are available at:
http://www.aihw.gov.au/indigenous-data/health-performance-framework/

Minister Wyatt said areas of improvement highlighted in the report include:

  •        decreases in deaths caused by circulatory disease (the most common   cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people);
  •        decreases in deaths caused by kidney disease;
  •        a decrease in smoking rates, including smoking during pregnancy;
  •        a decrease in drinking at risky levels;
  •        a narrowing of the gap in Year 12 or equivalent attainment rate; and
  •        increases in the number of health assessments and chronic disease management services claimed through Medicare.

Areas of concern include:

  •        a widening of the gap for deaths related to selected chronic diseases, particularly cancer and end-stage kidney disease;
  •        a continuing higher burden of disease among First Australians (2.3 times the non-Indigenous rate);
  •        a significant increase in Indigenous suicide rates;
  •        high rates of people who are overweight or obese;
  •        high rates of disability;
  •        high levels of undiagnosed high blood pressure;
  •        high blood sugar levels among those diagnosed with diabetes (indicating the condition is not well managed);
  •        high rates of discharge from hospital against medical advice; and
  •        lower access to procedures in hospitals.

“We have the evidence and it is now up to all of us in this sector and beyond to continue to make inroads in Indigenous health matters,” Minister Wyatt said.

“We also have to make sure that where gains have been made, that we build on these very encouraging results.

“Our universal health system is a source of national pride but it will only be truly universal if we can close the gap on Indigenous health.”

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said the Coalition Government was working with state and territory governments and communities across the country to improve outcomes in areas such as housing, community safety, education and employment that in turn will help to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“This is work that cuts across all portfolios and all levels of governments and will contribute to improving the overall health and wellbeing of individual Indigenous people, as well as their families and communities,” Minister Scullion said.

The 2017 report has been prepared by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet under the auspices of the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council (AHMAC). The report was produced in close consultation with the Department of Health, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), states and territories, the Australian Bureau of Statistics and non-government stakeholders.

It also provides comprehensive analysis on the key issues of relevance to the Indigenous Advancement Strategy including education, employment, community safety, mothers and babies, housing and juvenile justice.

“This report is accompanied by a dynamic data visualisation tool and online data tables covering a wide range of data for each measure produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare,” Minister Wyatt said.

“This tool will make the report more accessible and assist users to explore the data and create charts for each measure in the HPF.”

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report is available at http://www.dpmc.gov.au/hpf

The AIHW associated online tables and data visualisation tool are available at:
http://www.aihw.gov.au/indigenous-data/health-performance-framework/

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #NRW2017 @KenWyattMP honoured with portrait unveiled at Parliament House by PM

 

” But Ken, you are also the first Aboriginal Australian to be a member of an Australian government.

Again, that is long overdue. But it is one of the steps that our Government has taken, my Government has taken, to advance the voice of Aboriginal Australians, First Australians, in our Parliament, in our nation’s affairs.

You bring with it an extraordinary personal quality

Secondly we are commissioning two additional portraits.

Firstly, one of former Senator Nova Peris, who was the first Indigenous woman to serve in the Senate.

Also the Honourable Linda Burney, the first Indigenous woman to serve in the House of Representatives.”

PRIME MINISTER Malcolm Turnbull

 ” First Indigenous member of the House of representatives and first Indigenous minister

Ken Wyatt was born at the Roelands Mission Farm, near Bunbury in Western Australia (WA) and is the eldest of ten children

See full Bio Hon Ken Wyatt’ MP’s Below

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull with Indigenous MPs Pat Dodson, Linda Burney and Ken Wyatt. Photos: Alex Ellinghausen

PRIME MINISTER Malcolm Turnbull speech at unveiling

Yanggu gulanyin ngalawiri, dhunayi, Ngunnawal dhawra. Wanggarralijinyin mariny bulan bugarabang.

We are on the lands of the Ngunnawal people and we acknowledge that and we acknowledge their elders past and present.

I want to thank Aunty Matilda for that characteristic Welcome to Country, and the presence of little Evie.

It says a lot you know – come here Ken, I’m going to give this old guy a hug and then we will be crying into our teacups – look, it says a lot about us Australians that we can celebrate such a wonderful, historic occasion as this.

Celebrate this unveiling of this portrait and do so with good humour, with love, with affection, with no rancour.

Aunty Matilda who, as she said, had an appointment she had to head off and with her red coat and her wit, she set us all on the right track.

So Ken, thank you so much for everything that you do. Mary, thank you for painting this portrait. Thank you for revealing what we all know, that Anna lights Ken up. You were there, you were there. Was he being a bit stiff and shy? Then Anna came closer and that spark, that got him going. Fantastic.

Ken, you have followed 39 years after Neville Bonner. I should say that Neville Bonner’s great-niece Jo Lindgren sends her love to you and to Anna and to everyone here today; another Aboriginal Australian who was a member of the Senate until recently.

But Ken was the first Aboriginal man to be elected to the House of Representatives and as Bill said, over 1000 Australians have been elected before him. Too many. But now he’s joined by Linda Burney, the first woman and, of course, following in Neville’s footsteps in the Senate we’ve had many others; Aden Ridgeway you mentioned, Nova Peris  – who of course is here and I will have more to say about her in a moment –  Jo Lindgren and of course now Malarndirri McCarthy, Pat Dodson and Jacqui Lambie.

But Ken, you are also the first Aboriginal Australian to be a member of an Australian government. Again, that is long overdue. But it is one of the steps that our Government has taken, my Government has taken, to advance the voice of Aboriginal Australians, First Australians, in our Parliament, in our nation’s affairs.

You bring with it an extraordinary personal quality. Ken has, the New Zealanders would call – it’s a Maori word, it’s almost untranslatable – they would call it ‘mana’. Ken has a presence, a life-force, a calm, an aura. I’m not getting new-age here Ken don’t worry. But you have got a presence and a calm and a wisdom that all of us are inspired by. Even our political opponents, as you can see.

So it is wonderful to be here with you; I want to thank you very much for your service. You have advanced that cause of reconciliation so much, simply by your advocacy, your presence, the love that you show. The way that you represent the people of Hasluck, the people of Australia that you represent too. You embody here, Buka and all, the oldest continuous human culture on our planet.

So I want, before we go to announce, to unveil the portrait, I want to make another announcement. That is, that we are commissioning two additional portraits.

Firstly, one of former Senator Nova Peris, who was the first Indigenous woman to serve in the Senate.

Also the Honourable Linda Burney, the first Indigenous woman to serve in the House of Representatives.

Ladies and gentlemen, they will join Ken and Neville Bonner. That demonstrates the continuity of that historical collection that the Presiding Officer spoke of.

So congratulations, Mary, on your painting. It’s a hard task portrait painting, capturing that mana. But you have done that and so Ken, I think it is up to us now to unveil you, if not to hang you.

That will be done by the Parliamentary staff of whom you have spoken so warmly, but I’ll hang you with affection.

The Hon Ken Wyatt Am MP

  1. Bunbury, western Australia

Noongar, Yamatji, wongi peoples

Member for Hasluck (2010-present)

Liberal Party of Australia

First Indigenous member of the House of representatives and first Indigenous minister

Ken Wyatt was born at the Roelands Mission Farm, near Bunbury in Western Australia (WA) and is the eldest of ten children. After moving to the remote town of Nannine, the family settled in Corrigin, 229 km south east of Perth, where he attended school.

Wyatt trained as a teacher and taught in primary schools between 1973 and 1986 before moving into the education policy sector. His extensive work in training and mentoring young people was recognised in 1996 when he was awarded the Order of Australia.

Between 1996 and 2010, he served the public in many capacities, including as Director of Aboriginal Education with the WA Department of Education, District Director for the Swan Education District, Director for Aboriginal Health with the New South Wales (NSW) Department of Health and, later, as Director for Aboriginal Health with WA Department of Health.

In 2010, Wyatt successfully stood for the Liberal Party in the WA seat of Hasluck, becoming the first Indigenous Australian to be elected to the House of Representatives.

For the opening of parliament on 28 September 2010, Aboriginal leaders held a traditional welcoming ceremony for Wyatt outside Parliament House and Noongar elders presented Wyatt with a ceremonial cloak made of kangaroo hide, a bookha, which he wore as he took the oath of office.

He gave his first speech in the House of representatives chamber on 28 September 2010 wearing the bookha and it is depicted in his official portrait for the Historic Memorials Collection.

In 2015, he became the first Indigenous member of the Federal Executive following his appointment as Assistant Minister for Health. On being appointed Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health in 2016, he also became the first Indigenous minister to serve in the Australian federal parliament.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce #NRW2017 : @RoyalFlyingDoc Strengthening Indigenous health workforce will help #ClosetheGap

“Cultural safety and removal of racism in health care can be achieved by supporting Indigenous health care students and graduates to become the health system leaders of tomorrow.”

Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia (RFDS) CEO Martin Laverty

Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt, yesterday  launched a new partnership of the RFDS with

  • The Australian Indigenous Doctors Association (AIDA),
  • The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses  and Midwives (CATSINaM),
  • Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA)

to deliver the RFDS Indigenous Health Scholarship Scheme.
RFDS scholarships will support Indigenous students undertaking remote or rural clinical placements in medicine, nursing, midwifery and allied health.

Minister Wyatt announced  the first recipients as:

• Ms Amanda Robinson, for medicine;
• Mr Tim Haynes, for medicine;
• Amanda Bailey, for allied health;
• Amy Thompson, for nursing/midwifery;
• Jennifer Mairu, for allied health.

Tim, member of AIDA receiving his scholarship. Tim is heading to Cairns, Alice and Broken Hill.

AIDA CEO Craig Dukes said “The RFDS Indigenous health scholarship provides great opportunities for AIDA members to undertake placement in rural and remote areas.

On behalf of AIDA I congratulate recipients, Ms Amanda Robinson and Mr Tim Haynes and thank the RFDS for their continued support towards career opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors. This experience for Ms Robinson and Mr Haynes contributes not only towards their own professional development, and to the broader goal we all share to create a culturally safe health care system.”

CATSINaM CEO Janine Mohamed said “We would like to thank the RFDS for the funding to not only assist with the implementation of their Reconciliation Action Plan, but also to help us grow the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nursing and midwifery professions. The clinical placement experience will afford the students with insight into what it means to live and work in rural and remote Australia, which we hope is a direction they pursue once they graduate.”

Amanda, member of IAHA receiving her scholarship. Amanda moves from nursing into OT, congratulations

IAHA CEO Donna Murray said “The RFDS scholarships will provide much needed support for allied health students to undertake a rural or remote clinical placement which is critical for developing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce. This is also an important step in further supporting locally driven workforce development models that provide culturally safe and responsive allied health services with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”