NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @PSA_National ‏#Pharmacy News : New @jcu research shows the potentially life-saving #Closingthegap benefits of integrating pharmacists within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services

” There’s good evidence that pharmacists in our ACCHO health services improve patient health,”

NACCHO Director, Medicines Policy and Programs, Mike Stephens (Pictured above ) says the pharmacists would also educate staff and liaise with external stakeholders, including hospitals, to develop strategic plans for more effective medicine use.

Read all articles and or SUBSCRIBE to NACCHO Aboriginal and Pharmacy ALERTS

James Cook University, the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) have joined forces to explore this potential by way of a project which will aim to embed pharmacists in 22 Aboriginal community-controlled health services in Queensland, Victoria and the Northern Territory.

Funded by the Australian Government under the 6th Community Pharmacy Agreement, the pioneering project will see culturally trained pharmacists working with clinical staff and patients to improve medication use. The first project pharmacists commenced in July this year.

Research by JCU Associate Professor, General Practice and Rural Medicine, Sophia Couzos, says the project is vital because the inability of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic diseases to access pharmacist support may be placing lives at risk.

Dr Couzos said these patients often struggle with medication regimes – including treatment for life-threatening conditions like diabetes and cardio-vascular disease.

“There is a higher burden of chronic disease in the Aboriginal community, and these patients are likely to be prescribed multiple medicines, which also place them at greater risk of drug-related complications,” she says.

“Yet they have limited access to appropriate pharmacist advice across Australia, particularly in remote areas. We know that ‘drugs don’t work if patients don’t taken them’, so finding ways to optimise this is a vital health system improvement.”

The project pharmacists, located within the primary healthcare teams of Aboriginal health services, will assist individual patients to overcome obstacles, and prescribers to optimise medication choices.

“These pharmacists will be providing advice in a culturally safe environment for the patient, where they can feel at ease,” Dr Couzos says.

But the practice only occurs on an ad hoc basis in Australia. Despite this, there is no shortage of pharmacists keen to play frontline roles within Aboriginal health services, he maintained.

PSA manager, Health Sector Engagement, Shelley Crowther, says the peak body has been advocating for a number of years that pharmacists play an active role in improving medication management for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“There is a lot of evidence to support that medication misadventure results in cost to the health system,” she says.

“The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Healthcare estimates medication-related admissions to hospitals Australia-wide cost $1.2 billion annually.

“The discrepancies in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people give even greater weight to the importance of embedding pharmacists to reduce medication misadventure and improve medication management to try to achieve better health outcomes.”

Hannah Mann, a community pharmacist speaking on behalf of the Pharmacy Guild of Australia says that “There are many community pharmacists who already have experience working with Aboriginal community controlled health services, who have excellent relationships with them, and who are looking to further strengthen these ties between community pharmacy and health services to better the health outcomes of patients.”

The project is scheduled to run until early 2020 and JCU will measure the healthcare improvements in chronic disease sufferers supported by project pharmacists.

“If the quality of care improves, that will lead to health dollar savings down the track because we know that access to quality primary health care can prevent unnecessary hospitalisations,” Dr Couzos says.

“This project will give impetus to the Australian Government to explore how healthcare workforce innovation may enhance access to quality healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

Associate Professor Couzos is presenting a paper about the project at the Community Pharmacy Stakeholder Forum in Sydney on the 7th September 2018.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Pharmacy News : #ACCHO Pharmacy skills will help #closethegap in #heart disease

ACCHOs have a strong history in doing this effectively and appropriately for their communities,

Specifically, ACCHO-embedded non-dispensing pharmacists and community pharmacies have a role in identifying risk factors and encouraging heart health checks within the ACCHO communities.’

Deputy NACCHO CEO Dr Dawn Casey

With new research showing current cardiovascular disease screening guidelines are missing younger at-risk Aboriginal people, a leading Aboriginal health specialist has highlighted the role pharmacists can play in preventative cardiac care.

The statement Dr Dawn Casey comes following research finding up to half of older Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and that significant numbers of those in their 20s were also at risk.¹

Continued below

Read over 50 NACCHO Aboriginal Heart Health articles published over past 6 years

Read 8 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Pharmacy articles

Featured article 

 Read above report HERE : NACCHO Aboriginal Heart Health

From Australian Pharmacist 

Australian National University researchers found 1.1% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 18-24 year olds and 4.7% of 25-34 year olds were at high absolute primary risk of CVD. This is around the same as the proportion of non-Indigenous Australians aged 45-54 who are at high risk.¹

The study of 2820 people from a 2012-13 health survey² revealed many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are not aware of their risk and most not receiving currently recommended therapy to lower their cholesterol, and are hospitalised for coronary heart disease at a rate up to eight times higher than that of other Australians.¹

Australia’s national guidelines recommend all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples aged 35-74 have a heart check. But this new research found the high-risk category starts much earlier than this, and indicates the affected group needs to start receiving CVD checks earlier in life, the study authors said.

Dr Casey echoed the positive results of the study, allowing the entire ACCHS sector to better deliver preventative and holistic care.

‘ACCHOs have a strong history in doing this effectively and appropriately for their communities,’ she told Australian Pharmacist.

‘Specifically, ACCHO-embedded non-dispensing pharmacists and community pharmacies have a role in identifying risk factors and encouraging heart health checks within the ACCHO communities.’

‘Embedded ACCHO pharmacists can use their skills and knowledge work with a range of clinicians in the ACCHO to conduct holistic risk screening and overall management strategy.

NACCHO is currently actively advocating for enhanced integration of pharmacists into ACCHOs models of care.’

NACCHO and PSA are currently working as part of a broader team on two projects to enhance the broader roles that pharmacists’ skills and training can deliver – Integrating Pharmacists within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to improve Chronic Disease Management (IPAC) and Indigenous Medication Review Service (IMeRSe).

‘Pharmacists have a broad range of clinical skills and are often very suitable additions to multidisciplinary clinical teams, especially where chronic disease is prevalent and many medicines required,’ Dr Casey said.

‘Community pharmacists may identify risks within normal client care, for example through a pharmacy-based MedsCheck or an HMR. Where team-based care is working effectively, pharmacies and ACCHOs will liaise and work together to ensure care is optimised across these settings.

‘Pharmacists’ understanding of medicines also involves understanding how medical conditions and risk factors for these conditions apply. Unfortunately there is still sometimes a misconception across Australia that pharmacists really just supply medicines and manage retail businesses. Enhancing professional and clinical services is a key trend across the whole pharmacy sector and NACCHO is an active participant in these developments.’

PSA and NACCHO have collaboratively produced guidelines to support pharmacists caring for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people available at:

http://www.psa.org.au/wp-content/uploads/guide-to-providing-pharmacy-services-to-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-2014.pdf

References

1 Calabria B, Korda RJ, Lovett RW, Fernando P, Martin T, Malamoo L, Welsh J, Banks, E. Absolute cardiovascular disease risk and lipid-lowering therapy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Med J Aust 2018; 209 (1): 35-41. DOI: 10.5694/mja17.00897

Aboriginal Health and Pharmacy Press Release : NACCHO @jcu @PSA_National embark on a pioneering project to embed 22 pharmacists in Aboriginal community-controlled health services in QLD, VIC and the NT .

“There is a higher burden of chronic disease in the Aboriginal community, and these patients are likely to be prescribed multiple medicines, which also place them at greater risk of drug-related complications, Yet they have limited access to appropriate pharmacist advice across Australia, particularly in remote areas.

 There are many, many reasons behind why Aboriginal patients are more likely to have adherence problems than other Australians, There are socio-economic reasons, such as the cost of medicines and access to transport to fill prescriptions.

 There are patient reasons; a person may have a poor memory – and the more medicines they have to take, the more difficult it is to remember them all. Some patients are very fearful of medications. They’re worried that it might make them feel worse.

 There are also prescriber reasons; the medicine may not be right for the patient, or the patient may not have been prescribed necessary life-saving medicines.”

The inability of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic diseases to access quality pharmacist support may be placing lives at risk, according to a James Cook University medical researcher.

Associate Professor, General Practice and Rural Medicine, Sophia Couzos, said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients often struggled to follow medication regimes – including treatment for life-threatening conditions like diabetes and cardio-vascular disease.

Download the Press Release HERE

JCU Media – Pharmacy

 Read all previous NACCHO articles Aboriginal Health and Pharmacy HERE

JCU has joined forces with the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) to embark on a pioneering project to embed 22 pharmacists in Aboriginal community-controlled health services in Queensland, Victoria and the Northern Territory.

The Integrating Pharmacists within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to improve Chronic Disease Management (IPAC) project will see culturally-trained pharmacists working with both clinical staff and patients to address issues which lead to poor medication use, including under-utilisation and over-utilisation of drugs. These issues range from socio-economic obstacles through to fear.

The IPAC project pharmacists, located within the primary healthcare teams of Aboriginal health services, will be ideally placed to assist patients and prescribers.

“The IPAC pharmacists will be providing advice in a culturally safe environment for the patient, where they can feel at ease,” Dr Couzos pointed out.

NACCHO Director, Medicines Policy and Programs, Mike Stephens,pictured above )  said the pharmacists would also educate staff and liaise with external stakeholders, including hospitals, to develop strategic plans for more effective medicine use.

“There’s good evidence that pharmacists in health services improve patient health,” he said.

The United Kingdom is investing heavily in programs that place pharmacists in primary healthcare teams, according to Dr Couzos. But the practice only occurs on an ad hoc basis in Australia. Despite this, there was no shortage of pharmacists keen to play frontline roles within Aboriginal health services, she maintained.

“There are many pharmacists who have already had some experience working with Aboriginal community controlled health services, who have excellent relationships with them, and who have wanted to be part of the primary healthcare team,” she said.

PSA Manager, Health Sector Engagement, Shelley Crowther, said the peak national body for pharmacists had been advocating for a number of years that pharmacists play an active role in improving medication management for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“There is a lot of evidence to support that medication misadventure results in cost to the health system,” she said. “The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Healthcare estimates medication-related admissions to hospitals Australia-wide cost $1.2 billion annually.

“In terms of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, obviously the discrepancies in health outcomes for them give even greater weight to the importance of trying to reduce medication misadventure and improve medication management to try to achieve better health outcomes.”

The first IPAC pharmacists will begin work in June this year. JCU will evaluate the project, which is scheduled to run until early 2020. Among other elements, the evaluation will measure healthcare improvements in chronic disease sufferers who have been supported by a practice pharmacist.

“If the quality of care improves, that will lead to health dollar savings down the track because we know that access to quality primary health care can prevent unnecessary hospitalisations,” Dr Couzos said. “This project will give impetus to the Australian Government to explore how healthcare workforce innovation can enhance access to quality healthcare for Aboriginal people.”

 

 

 

 

 

Minister @KenWyattMP launches NACCHO @RACGP National guide for healthcare professionals to improve health of #Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients

 

All of our 6000 staff in 145 member services in 305 health settings across Australia will have access to this new and update edition of the National Guide. It’s a comprehensive edition for our clinicians and support staff that updates them all with current medical practice.

“NACCHO is committed to quality healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, and will work with all levels of government to ensure accessibility for all.”

NACCHO Chair John Singer said the updated National Guide would help governments improve health policy and lead initiatives that support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can Download the Guide via this LINK

A/Prof Peter O’Mara, NACCHO Chair John Singer Minister Ken Wyatt & RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel launch the National guide at Parliament house this morning

“Prevention is always better than cure. Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

Minister Ken Wyatt highlights what is new to the 3rd Edition of the National Guide-including FASD, lung cancer, young people lifecycle, family abuse & violence and supporting families to optimise child safety & wellbeing : Pic Lisa Whop SEE Full Press Release Part 2 Below

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) have joined forces to produce a guide that aims to improve the level of healthcare currently being delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and close the gap.

Chair of RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Associate Professor Peter O’Mara said the third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (the National Guide) is an important resource for all health professionals to deliver best practice healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

“The National Guide will support all healthcare providers, not just GPs, across Australia to improve prevention and early detection of disease and illness,” A/Prof O’Mara said.

“The prevention and early detection of disease and illness can improve people’s lives and increase their lifespans.

“The National Guide will support healthcare providers to feel more confident that they are looking for health issues in the right way.”

RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel said the RACGP is committed to tackling the health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

“The National Guide plays a vital role in closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health disparity,” Dr Seidel said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should have equal access to quality healthcare across Australia and the National guide is an essential part of ensuring these services are provided.

“GPs and other healthcare providers who implement the recommendations within the National Guide will play an integral role in reducing health disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, and ensuring culturally responsive and appropriate healthcare is always available.”

The updated third edition of the National Guide can be found on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website.

 

Free to download on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website:

http://www.racgp.org.au/national-guide/

and NACCHO

Part 2 Prevention and Early Diagnosis Focus for a Healthier Future

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians.

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, today launched the updated third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Prevention is always better than cure,” said Minister Wyatt. “Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

“The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.

“It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

The guide, which was first published in 2005, is a joint project between the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners RACGP).

“To give you some idea of the high regard in which it is held, the last edition was downloaded 645,000 times since its release in 2012,” said Minister Wyatt.

“The latest edition highlights the importance of individual, patient-centred care and has been developed to reflect local and regional needs.

“Integrating resources like the national guide across the whole health system plays a pivotal role in helping us meet our Closing the Gap targets.

“The Turnbull Government is committed to accelerating positive change and is investing in targeted activities that have delivered significant reductions in the burden of disease.

“Rates of heart disease, smoking and binge drinking are down. We are on track to achieve the child mortality target for 2018 and deaths associated with kidney and respiratory diseases have also reduced.”

The National Guide is funded under the Indigenous Australian’s Health Programme as part of a record $3.6 billion investment across four financial years.

The RACGP received $429,000 to review, update, publish and distribute the third edition, in hard copy and electronic formats.

The National Guide is available on the RACGP website or by contacting RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health on 1800 000 251 or aboriginalhealth@racgp.org.au.

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Features : @closethegapOZ #CTGV2020 #CloseTheGap Day 15 March and #IPAC EofI to trial a #pharmacist in your ACCHO health care team close 20 March @NRHAlliance #6rrhss #RuralHealth 11 April #AHCRA2018

Download the 2018 Aboriginal Health Save a dates 

NACCHO Save a date 2018 Calendar 13 march

Featured this week

1.Would your ACCHO health service like to trial a pharmacist in your health care team ?

Closing date for the Expressions of Interest is 20th March  2018

We are now seeking Expressions of Interest in the Integrating Pharmacists within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to improve Chronic Disease Management (IPAC) project.

This is a large project that will investigate if including a non-dispensing practice pharmacist as part of the primary health care team within Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHSs) leads to improvements in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Read all past NACCHO Pharmacy articles here

It will involve up to 22 ACCHSs invited to participate in the project from three jurisdictions- Queensland, Victoria, and the Northern Territory.  The project will provide funding and support for the pharmacist to be embedded within an ACCHS.

The project aims to benefit the ACCHS sector by providing the evidence-base to better support quality use of medicines through integrated care models.

The pharmacist will provide education and shared decision making for patients and staff on appropriate medicines for people with chronic conditions.

Having a culturally responsive pharmacist integrated into ACCHSs should enable the building of relationships and trust between pharmacists, patients, ACCHS staff and the community.

This should ultimately improve medicines use and health for ACCHS patients who agree to be part of this project.

The IPAC project is a partnership between the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA), James Cook University (College of Medicine and Dentistry) the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and its state Affiliates.

The Australian Government under the Pharmacy Trials Program of the 6th Community Pharmacy Agreement has funded the project.

Yours sincerely,

Pat Turner – NACCHO CEO

To express an interest please complete this quick scoping  survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/R5LD6JB

ACCHSs will be offered site agreements from April for gradual roll out of Pharmacists mid year

 Closing date for the Expressions of Interest is 20th March  2018

For further information please contact NACCHO IPAC Project Coordinators ipac@naccho.org.au

Alice Nugent 0439873723 and Fran Vaughan 0417826617

2. Close the Gap Day March 15, 2018

Everyone deserves the right to a healthy future and the opportunities this afford. We are very lucky to live in a rich country with a universal health system.

However, many of Australia’s First Peoples are denied the same access to healthcare that non-Indigenous Australians take for granted. Despite a decade of Government promises the gap in health and life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and other Australians is widening.

This National Close the Gap Day, we have an opportunity to send our governments a clear message that Australians value health equality as a fundamental right for all.

Read over 473 NACCHO Close the Gap Aboriginal Health articles published over last 6 years

On National Close the Gap Day we encourage you to host an activity in you workplace, home, community or school.

The aim? To bring people together, to share information — and most importantly — to take meaningful action in support of achieving Indigenous health equality by 2030.

How to get involved in National Close the Gap Day

If you register on or after March 9th it is unlikely you will receive your pack in time. But don’t worry, you can download all the resources online.

On National Close the Gap Day 2017, there were more than 1100 separate events held across the country from the tip of Cape York to Southern Tasmania, and from Rottnest Island in West Australia to towns along Australia’s east coast.

With events ranging from workplace morning teas, to sports days, school events and public events in hospitals and offices around the country — tens of thousands of people took part and made a difference.

Your actions can create lasting change. Be part of the generation who closes the gap.

What is Close the Gap?

Equal access to healthcare is a basic human right, and in Australia we expect it. So what if we told you that you can expect to die a decade earlier than your next-door neighbour? You wouldn’t accept it. No-one should.

But in reality, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People can expect to live 10 years less than non-Indigenous Australians. Learn more about why the health gap exists.

Working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is one of the critical success factors. With continued support from the public, we can ensure the Australian Government continues to work with Indigenous communities, recommit additional funding and invest in real partnerships.

Learn more about Close the Gap.

3.Close the Gap for Vision Conference Follow

 4. 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium to be held in Canberra, 11-12 April 2018.

The Symposium is shaping up to be a terrific event with exceptional speakers and topics and we hope to see many of you there.

 With only a month to go there is still time to register or book a table display.

Download 6RRHSSA4Flyer-6-3

 There are currently over 200 people registered and you can find full bios and abstracts on the Symposium website at www.ruralhealth.org.au/6rrhss

Download the program Rurand Remote Program March18

5.Australian Health Care Reform

Don’t miss meeting and discussing reform with these great experts and researchers. Register for the Summit today

More info HERE

MOU signed Day 1 #NACCHOagm2017 #Pharmacy Guild and NACCHO working together to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander healthy

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and the Pharmacy Guild of Australia have signed a Memorandum of Understanding focusing on the implementation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander pharmacy programs and trials.

NACCHO and the Guild said the MoU is built on the welcome initiatives already announced by the Government under the Sixth Community Pharmacy Agreement’s Pharmacy Trial Program (Tranche 1 and 2 projects), including improved medication management for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders through community pharmacist advice and culturally appropriate services.

The MoU strengthens the joint commitment between NACCHO and the Guild to work with Minister Hunt towards progressing enhancement in these areas.

The National President of the Pharmacy Guild, George Tambassis, said the MoU was an important step in improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities throughout Australia.

“Community pharmacies provide very accessible services and in remote and rural areas the community pharmacists may be the only health professional available.

Further developing and improving the delivery of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander programs provided through community pharmacies is a welcome boost in the delivery of healthcare to these communities,” he said.

Pat Turner CEO of NACCHO acknowledged the extensive effort and resources that both organisations contributed to improve medicine and pharmacy policy over the last 18 months for Aboriginal people. “We are delighted that the Guild and NACCHO will be working together with Minister Hunt to continue the Indigenous pharmacy programs and to adopt a number of recommendations that will improve accessibility to medicines for our people to help Close the Gap” she said.

Initiatives supported by the MoU include:

• Addressing Closing The Gap (CTG) prescription annotation issues to allow hospital prescribers and specialists to issue CTG prescriptions, community pharmacies to annotate scripts if patients are known to be eligible, and allowing all Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) to write CTG scripts.
• Linking CTG eligibility in a nationally accessible identifier, such as through clients’ Medicare numbers, and removing geographical constraints related to CTG.
• Allowing CTG prescriptions to be written by prescribers who have not completed the Practice Incentives Payment – Indigenous Health Incentive in some circumstances to improve medicines access.
• Removing the exemption of s100 highly specialised drugs from the CTG measure, such as clozapine and HIV medication.
• Funding of Dose Administration Aids (DAA) as part of the CTG PBS measure along the lines of the model already in place with the Department of Veterans’ Affairs.
• Establishment of a national consultative body to provide guidance on issues with the aim of improving pharmacy services and programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This measure would include looking at expanding Quality Use of Medicines services and ensuring that all ACCHOs (including remote) have access to the Quality Use of Medicines Maximised for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander People (QUMAX) program through partnerships with community pharmacies.
• Supporting a streamlined method for expanding the PBS listing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, for example through a national consultative body.
• Amendment of the Integrated Team Care program (ITC) national guidelines to ensure that ACCHOs receiving subsidised DAAs under the QUMAX program are not excluded from receiving funds for DAAs from the Integrated Team Care Program for clients who do not receive QUMAX DAA subsidy.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Pharmacy NEWS Download : With recent reforms ACCHO Pharmacists are playing a key role in closing the gap

‘There are a lot of different activities happening from ACCHO to ACCHO. The approach needs to be flexible and responsive to communities’ needs, as well as integrated into the holistic care models ACCHOs use, but the detail on what has the biggest health impact is unknown.

Current ACCHO pharmacist have shown an opportunity to bring players together and make medicines a team sport – this includes the pharmacist working the allied health, GPs, nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers (AWH) and a range of local community pharmacies, hospitals, PHNs and more to get the best results for their clients and community as a whole.’

Director of Medicines Policy and Program for the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Mike Stephens Pictured centre below

Pharmacists working in Aboriginal health Services (AHS), with the support of recent government reforms, are playing a key role in closing the gap and helping Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander patients navigate Australia’s complex health system.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Referendum, when the overwhelming majority of Australians voted to include Indigenous Australians in the Census and allow the Commonwealth to make laws for them.

Next year marks the tenth anniversary of the Closing the Gap program, established by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) in 2008 with the aim of eliminating the gap in health, education and employment disadvantages between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

In acknowledging of these important milestones, this year’s annual Closing the gap Prime Minister’s Report said : ‘While we celebrate the successes we cannot shy away from the stark reality that we are not seeing sufficient national progress on the Closing the Gap targets/ While many successes are being achieved locally, as a nation, we are only on track to meet one of the seven Closing the Gap targets this year.’

Download the 7 Page report HERE

Closing the Gap Pharmacists and Aboriginal Health

The health-related targets of halving the gap in child mortality and closing the gap in life expectancy are not on track.

Some of the targets will expire in 2018, so governments have’ agreed to work together with Indigenous leaders and communities, establishing opportunities for collaboration and partnerships.”

According to PSA CEO Dr Lance Emerson, ‘Aboriginal Australians are four times more likely to be hospitalised for chronic conditions compared with non-Indigenous Australians- and the life expectancy of Aboriginal people in this country is 10 years lower than non-Aboriginal people- and in fact below that of many developing countries such as Bangladesh’.

‘This reality is disgraceful in a rich country such as Australia, ‘Dr Emerson said. ‘Health professionals need to be doing all they can to work toward deeper understanding and meeting the needs of Aboriginal people, to support reconciliation and self-determination- and Aboriginal peoples ‘community control of services provided for Aboriginal people’.

The Government has implemented several programs to provide timely and affordable access to PBS medicines and Quality Use of Medicines (QUM) (listed opposite). However, the review of Pharmacy Remuneration and Regulation Interim Report noted in June that ’although they are related, these programs operate independently with differing eligibility criteria applied for each. This raises difficulties for both consumers in terms of access and for pharmacists and other health professionals with respect to administration.

‘In considering how pharmacy options may contribute to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, the Panel has questioned whether currently arrangements are sufficient and how might they be improved.

Integrating pharmacists

The Federal Government has committed to implementing reforms and investigating new funding models to help pharmacists continue to improve health outcomes of Indigenous patients.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #PSA17SYD Minister Hunt announces Aboriginal Health Services will be able to employ a pharmacist if a link with a community pharmacy is not available

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #PSA17Syd Part 2 of 2 Health Minister asks pharmacists to help Close the Gap

In his opening speech at PSA17 in Sydney in July, Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt announced a trial, funded through the Pharmacy Trial Program (PTP), to support AHSs to integrate pharmacists into their services.

The trial has strong stakeholder support amid growing evidence that pharmacists employed by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) can help increase patients’ life expectancy and health outcomes.

As a country, we will not have fully succeeded unless and until Indigenous health outcomes are the same as non-Indigenous health outcomes, ‘Mr Hunt said. ‘That’s our very simple shared goal.

‘We will work immediately to have Indigenous specific medication reviews available and we will fund and support that as part of tranche 1 to make sure they are culturally specific.

‘We want in these Aboriginal Health Services to ensure there’s a pharmacy presence. The first line there is to see if we can have a direct link and an offer to community pharmacists to participate, but where that’s not possible, the breakthrough agreement… is that the Aboriginal Health Services will be able to directly employ a pharmacist.’

This announcement follows the Review’s Interim Report recommendation to trial the ability for AHS’s to employ pharmacists and operate a pharmacy because ‘the current inability of an AHS to operate a community pharmacy poses a significant risk to patient health in some rural and remote areas.

The Panel presented the option that: ‘All levels of government should ensure that any existing rules that prevent an AHS from owning and operating a community pharmacy located at the AHS are removed.’ The Panel suggested that as a transition step, these changes should first be trialled in the Northern Territory.

PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson said having a culturally responsive pharmacist integrated within an AHS builds better relationships between patients and staff, leading to improved results in chronic disease management and QUM.

‘Integrating a non-dispensing pharmacist in an AHS has the potential to improve medication adherence, reduce chronic disease, reduce medication misadventure and decrease preventable medication related hospital admissions to deliver significant savings to the health system’, Dr Jackson said.

Director of Medicines Policy and Program for the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Mike Stephens welcomes the announcement of the trial.

‘We know from recent studies, including systematic reviews, that pharmacists delivering services within a practice setting can have a significant impact on health outcomes,’ Mr Stephens said. ‘While there is some level of role translatability between ACCHO and non-ACCHO sectors, we really dont’ know where the “sweet spots” are in terms of health outcomes, community demand and value for money when embedding pharmacists in ACCHOs.

‘There are a lot of different activities happening from ACCHO to ACCHO. The approach needs to be flexible and responsive to communities’ needs, as well as integrated into the holistic care models ACCHOs use, but the detail on what has the biggest health impact is unknown.

‘Current ACCHO pharmacist have shown an opportunity to bring players together and make medicines a team sport – this includes the pharmacist working the allied health, GPs, nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers (AWH) and a range of local community pharmacies, hospitals, PHNs and more to get the best results for their clients and community as a whole.’

Mr Stephens said some ACCHOs are also hiring intern pharmacist and pharmacy technicians, allowing pharmacists to focus more on clinical, education and practice-based activities that work well in a general practice setting.

These pioneers are also promoting the newer roles of pharmacists. I see a lot of pharmacists focusing on systems based activities like clinical governance, DUEs and audits, as well as working across teams in and outside of the organisation, such as improving transitional care with local hospitals.’

Mr Stephens said there had been ‘a lot of interest’ in the trial from NACCHO’s Members Services.

‘Research has shown that access and acceptability of pharmacy services could be improved.

Feedback from ACCHOs indicates the benefits of embedding pharmacists can be diverse, but may include improvements in clinical governance and prescribing practices, internal and external workflow, MMR uptake and relationships with community pharmacies’.

Sharing ideas

In recognition of the growing number of pharmacists working in ACCHOs, PSA and NACCHO launched the ACCHO Special Interest Group (SIG) at PSA17.

Dr Jackson said pharmacists working in ACCHOs had specific needs and skills and developing a SIG to support them will help drive the growth of this career path.

‘In many cases, pharmacists working in these positions are providing innovative and diverse services that have the potential to be informative and relevant to the evolution of pharmacy services and inter-professional care,’ Dr Jackson said.

The ACCHO SIG will allow PSA and NACCHO to foster collaboration, inform relevant policy and consult with ACCHO pharmacists about their needs. The ACCHO SIG will also support pharmacist participating in the Aboriginal health organisations trial.

Mr Stephens, who convened the ACCHO SIG, said the key aim was to share resources and ideas and give each other support in a relatively niche area.

‘I have learnt a lot from each of the participants and their input has definitely shaped my clinical practice and policy output. I hope the SIG can evolve organically as needs and issues develop.’

Mr Stephens said optimising medicines use for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has been an ongoing challenge.

‘Despite some great programs, policy and resources, Aboriginal PBS utilisation is still only about two thirds of non-Indigenous Australians’use. Most pharmacists would have heard of Closing the Gap prescriptions but how is that delivering outcomes ? How could it be improved ? We have responded to this question and more in a recent submission to the Review of Indigenous Pharmacy Programs. There is a real sense of goodwill from many industry players in this area at the moment.’

Mr Stephens said that, in addition to the SIG, a more informal network has been set up for any pharmacist or other health professional with an interest or expertise in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander medicine issues. NACCHO shares a monthly medicines bulletin with the network, including practical resources and links.

Mr Stephens describes his previous workplace, Danila Dilba Aboriginal Health Service in Darwin, as a dynamic multidisciplinary environment.

‘It opened my eyes to the details of how a large holistic health service works, and how general practice and other primary care services fit into that. I did everything from HMRs to pharmacy accounts, board briefings to Drug Use Evaluations (DUE) and clinical governance, GP education and much more. The team vibe was great and I had a lot of fun with colleagues from different disciplines and backgrounds.

‘The challenge was the complexity and nuances of community relationships and systems, and learning where your skills will work best. Engagement is critical and I saw some programs struggle because clients and employees were not driving the change.’ Mr Stephens is a strong believer in lifelong learning and found PSA’s Guide to providing pharmacy services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people invaluable.

‘It has a lot of detail but is applicable for pretty much all pharmacists across Australia, and it has some great case studies. It was developed by a range of organisations and people with lots of experience.

‘There’s never been time to upskill and get involved, with PSA’s support modules for Aboriginal Health Services Pharmacists, the ACCHO SIG and the network. NACCHO can also provide support for pharmacists looking to get involved.’

PSA provides CPD, training, practice support tools and recommended external resources to support AHS pharmacists. This includes an essential guide as well as guidance on networking and advancing within this career pathway.

Building rapport

Vanessa Bickerton MPS, a hospital pharmacist from Perth, previously worked at Wirraka Maya Health Service in South Hedland in the Pilbara region, 1600 kilometres north of Perth. She said it was a challenging but uniquely satisfying role.

‘Though it took some time to establish relationships and build rapport with patients, the pharmacy service was integral to the organisations,’ Ms Bickerton said.

As part of diverse team of doctors, nurses, AHWs, pharmacists and other allied health professionals worked closely with patients in communities that sometimes had limited access to medical care.

‘This included supply to even more remote nursing stations, such as Marble Bar, Nullagine and Yandeyarra- where due to geographical challenges the Royal Flying Doctor Service only visits once or twice a week,’ Ms Bickerton said.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

1.National : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations pharmacist Special Interest Group ( SIG )  launched

2.NT : Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service $2.4 million for culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services

3. WA : AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox speaks about cashless welfare cards

 4. WA  : Wrongful conviction shines light on lack of translators

 
 5. QLD Deadly Choices calls  for volunteers for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival

6. SA :  Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO promotes World Hepatitis Day.

7.VIC :  VAHS mob promotes Healthy Lifestyle message  at World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

8. QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council  Growing Deadly Families

9. NSW Redfern National Children’s Day Celebration

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

National : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations pharmacist Special Interest Group ( SIG )  launched

“For too long Aboriginal people have suffered shorter lifespans, been sicker and poorer than the average non-Indigenous Australian, however, highly trained pharmacists have a proven track record in delivering improved health outcomes when integrated into multidisciplinary practices,

“Strong international evidence supports pharmacists’ ability to improve a number of critical health outcomes, including significant reductions in blood pressure and cholesterol and improved diabetes control. A number of studies have also supported pharmacists’ cost-effectiveness.

Some ACCHOs have already shown leadership in the early adoption of pharmacists outside of any national programs or support structures. NACCHO and PSA are committed to supporting ACCHOs across Australia to meet the medicines needs in their communities by enhancing support for those wishing to embed a pharmacist into their service.”

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner said disparities in the health between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are confronting SEE Previous NACCHO post

Pictured above Mike Stephens Director of Medicines Programs and Policy in Cover Photo

See previous NACCHO Pharmacy posts

See previous NACCHO QUMAX posts

In recognition of the growing number of pharmacists working in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs), the peak national body for pharmacists, the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) has launched the ACCHO Special Interest Group (SIG).

The ACCHO SIG was launched on 30 July at PSA17 in Sydney during theAboriginal Health Service Pharmacist forum.

PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson said pharmacists working in ACCHOs have specific needs and skills and having a Special Interest Group with the primary role of supporting them will assist PSA to drive the growth of this career path.

“In many cases pharmacists working in these positions are providing innovative and diverse services that have the potential to be informative and relevant to the evolution of pharmacy services and inter-professional care.

“Consultation with these pharmacists and services about their needs is vital to ensure PSA and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) deliver relevant and meaningful benefits to PSA members and the wider pharmacy and health sectors,” Dr Jackson said.

A key role of the National ACCHO SIG Committee will be to provide up-to-date information to NACCHO and PSA on relevant issues that relate to both organisations.

This will include input on improvements to PSA’s professional development and practice support programs that benefit ACCHO pharmacists. The SIG will also provide NACCHO with input on pharmacy-related trends and practices that affect ACCHOs.

It is a joint committee to be run by PSA and NACCHO to foster collaboration, inform relevant policy and strengthen the relationships between these organisations with a shared commitment to embedding pharmacists in ACCHOs nationally.

PSA also welcomed the announcement of a trial to support Aboriginal health organisations to integrate pharmacists into their services.

The ACCHO SIG will support pharmacists participating in this trial.

Dr Jackson said having a culturally responsive pharmacist integrated within anAboriginal health service builds better relationships between patients and staff, leading to improved results in chronic disease management and Quality Use of Medicines.

 NT : Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service $2.4 million for culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services.

The Federal Government will provide up to $2.4 million for a tailored project to address family violence experienced by Indigenous women and children in Katherine.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said the funding formed part of the $25 million Indigenous-focused package under the Third Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

“I am pleased to announce this support for Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service, a local community service with specialist experience in supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families,” Minister Scullion said.

“The funding will deliver culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services.”

Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service CEO, Suzi Berto, said the project would provide intensive family-focused case management delivered within a trauma-informed framework to address behaviour often associated with domestic violence. It would also aim to break the cycle of domestic and family violence and child removals from families.

“Wurli welcomes this new program and would like to thank the Federal Government for selecting Wurli to take on this particular project,” Ms Berto said.

Minister Scullion said community-based, culturally-appropriate solutions were required to reduce the rate of family violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children.

“In total, $18.9 million will be invested in eight Indigenous community organisations across Australia to deliver a range of services, including trauma-informed therapeutic services for children, services for perpetrators to prevent future offending and intensive family-focused cased management.

“We have actively sought the views of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on how best to address family violence.

“Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service has been identified based on its expertise, as well as local needs in the community.

3. WA : AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox speaks about cashless welfare cards

” Targeting welfare is not, by itself, a panacea but it just might give Roebourne the circuit-breaker it needs to allow the state government to build a safe and resilient community.

There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the group did not support the “ill-conceived idea” that cashless welfare cards could turn the tide on child abuse.

FROM NEWS LTD

Paedophiles in Western Australia’s Pilbara region are allegedly using welfare payments to bribe children for sex, prompting the police commissioner to call for an expansion of the cashless welfare program.

But the Aboriginal Health Council of WA says the commissioner should be more concerned about policing in remote communities rather than advocating further disempowerment of indigenous people.

Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan said in an opinion piece in The West Australian newspaper on Tuesday that welfare cash was also being used for drugs, alcohol and gambling at Roebourne and surrounding Aboriginal communities.

He said in an area of about 1500 people, there were 184 known child sex abuse victims, with police charging 36 people with more than 300 offences since the operation began late last year, plus another 124 suspects.

Mr O’Callaghan, who will retire this month after 13 years as police commissioner, said that in 2014 the previous government noted 63 government and non-government providers delivering more than 200 services to Roebourne.

“Despite all of this effort, we have failed to protect the most vulnerable members of that community and have witnessed sufferers of abuse grow up and become offenders, and so the cycle continues,” he said.

“We often find children sexually abusing children.”

The commissioner said the problem was so widespread that some families had normalised it and he described the hopelessness as a “cancer quickly spreading throughout the community”.

“Given the longstanding issues in Roebourne, we ought now to be looking at more fundamental structural reform around welfare and income to reduce the opportunity for offending,” he said.

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the group did not support the “ill-conceived idea” that cashless welfare cards could turn the tide on child abuse.

“There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse,” she said.

“Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

Ms Nelson-Cox also said the commissioner’s admission that officers could not protect children in remote communities was gravely concerning.

Imagine if you were taken into custody to be questioned over a crime you did not commit in a language you could not even read and write in — and were then charged with murder.

4. WA  : Wrongful conviction shines light on lack of translators

It sounds like a third world travel nightmare.

But this actually happened in Australia to Gene Gibson, a shy young man from the tiny Gibson Desert community of Kiwirrkurra.

As reported ABC

While there were many complex factors which led Mr Gibson to being jailed for the manslaughter of Josh Warneke in 2014, after a conviction which was quashed earlier this year, it might never have ended up that way if he had a skilled interpreter to steer him through crucial meetings with police.

Mr Gibson’s first language is Pintupi, with Kukutja his second.

He has a limited understanding of English and his cognitive impairment makes it difficult for him to comprehend complex information.

Today the Court of Appeal outlined its reasons for quashing his conviction, explaining that Mr Gibson’s problems with language were one reason why “the plea was not attributable to a genuine consciousness of guilt”.

It gives many examples of how Mr Gibson often did not understand his own lawyer, who in turn could not understand what the interpreter was telling Mr Gibson about important matters like how to plead.

He was originally charged with murder but pleaded guilty to manslaughter after police interviews were deemed inadmissible for several reasons, including the lack of a qualified interpreter.

Stranger in your own land

Mr Gibson, like many Indigenous Australians who do not speak English as a first language, is somewhat like a foreigner in his own justice system.

It is something which concerns WA’s chief justice Wayne Martin.

Earlier this month, he told a conference of criminal lawyers in Bali that language was causing “significant disadvantage” for Indigenous people in the justice system, with WA’s translation services not reaching everyone who needed them.

“If we do not have properly resourced and effective interpreter services for Aboriginal people, then they will continue to fare badly in the criminal justice system,” he wrote in a submission to a Senate committee inquiry last year.

The interpretation and translation of Indigenous languages for the WA justice system is undoubtedly a niche industry.

There are about 45 Indigenous languages in the Kimberley, many of them considered highly endangered. Fewer than 600 people speak Pintupi, according to the Australian Indigenous Languages Database.

So not only do you have to find an interpreter who speaks Pintupi, but you also need someone who is trained to understand police and court proceedings, and relay them to a defendant.

It is a massive problem, according to Faith Baisden, the coordinator of First Languages, which helps Indigenous communities maintain their languages.

“Particularly in those small community groups we’re talking about, we’re not necessarily going to find someone who’s got the skill and the confidence to be trained. It takes really specialised training,” she said.

Another problem is that WA’s only Indigenous language interpreting service is struggling for funding.

The Kimberley Interpreting Service (KIS) is dependent on federal money after being stripped of funding by the WA Government in recent years.

But its chief executive Dee Lightfoot said she was hopeful of securing money from the new WA Government in September’s budget, with Treasurer Ben Wyatt writing to inform her he was reviewing her request.

She said Mr Gibson needed an interpreter to help him navigate the justice system from the very start

5. QLD Deadly Choices calls  for volunteers for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival

 

Volunteers aged 16+ years are needed for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival! More details are below! To register your interest please email admin@murrirugbyleague.com.au.

6. SA :  Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO promotes World Hepatitis Day. 

World Hepatitis Day. Nunkuwarrin Yunti provides treatment, Specialists, prevention, advocacy and information support for people with Hepatitis. Here is Jorge from our Harm Minimisation Team #showyourface

OR VIEW HERE

7.VIC :  VAHS mob promotes Healthy Lifestyle message  at World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

Check out our newest healthy lifestyle local sport champions!

These deadly women make up the Maal-Ya Indigenous Basketball team. They are off to Vancouver, Canada on Sunday to play in the World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

So proud to see these women represent their mobs and proudly display our Healthy Lifestyle Values: staying smoke free, healthy eating, active living, drinking water and being deadly role models!

With Georgia Bamblett, Courtney Alice, Thamar Atkinson, Montanna Hudson, Sophie Atkinson, Klarindah Hudson-Proctor, Edward Bryant, Tyler Atkinson and June Bamblett.

Good luck Maal-Ya! Can’t wait to hear how you go! Stay tuned to this page and Sports Carnival for updates throughout the week!

#StaySmokeFree #Gofor2and5 #DrinkWaterUMob

Sportcarnival VicHealth Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc

8. Apunipima Cape York Health Council  Growing Deadly Families

Apunipima Cape York Health Council Region Two Manager Johanna Neville and Maternal and Child Health Worker Florida Getawan will head to Brisbane today to deliver a presentation on the Baby One Program to the Queensland Clinical Senate’s Growing Deadly Families Forum.

Johanna and Florida will focus on the Baby One Program, an integral part of antenatal care in Cape York

‘Apunipima’s award winning, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander – led home visiting Baby One Program runs from pregnancy until the baby is 1000 days old,’ Florida said.

‘Baby Baskets – an integral feature of the Baby One Program – are provided to Families at key times during pregnancy and the postnatal period. The Baskets act as both an incentive to encourage families to engage with health care providers, as a catalyst for health education and as a means to provide essential items to families in Cape York.’

‘It’s well known that best practice care during pregnancy and baby’s early years has been proven to provide positive health outcomes. There is a still a gap in the maternal and child health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders compared to other Australians. It’s this gap we are trying to bridge with the Baby One Program which sees Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers visit families in their homes to deliver health care and health education.’

Florida Getawan helps deliver the Baby One Program in Cairns and Kowanyama and said home visiting makes the difference when it comes to mums getting care.

‘As a Maternal and Child Health Worker I spend time in Cairns and Kowanyama, educating pregnant women about healthy eating, what’s good and what’s not good for them during pregnancy such as the dangers of smoking, and safe sleeping for bubba,’ she explained. ‘I love doing home visits and yarning with mothers about healthy parenting and being a support person for them in their own space.

I love being there for families who are too shy to come to the clinic so if I can engage with them in their own environment, families feel safe to access health information I love watching mothers grow because I’ve had seven pregnancies myself and can relate to what they are going through and I’m able to develop a healthy relationship with them.’
Johanna and Florida will deliver their presentation at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre 10:50 am on Thursday 3 August 2017.

About the Growing Deadly Families Forum

The Queensland Clinical Senate – which provides clinical leadership by developing strategies to safeguard and promote the delivery of high quality, safe and sustainable patient care – is holding the Growing Deadly Families Forum which will focus on improving the health of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and families, through a healthier start to life.

The Forum runs from 3 – 4 August.

 

9. NSW Redfern National Children’s Day Celebration

AMS Redfern will be celebrating ‘National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day’ come along and share stories about the importance of staying connected to culture and having strong positive family relationships
Friday 4th August from 2:30 pm-4:30 pm
#BBQ will be provided
#Value our rights, Respect our Culture, Bring us home.
#Limited Giveaways

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #PSA17Syd Part 2 of 2 Health Minister asks pharmacists to help Close the Gap

“For too long Aboriginal people have suffered shorter lifespans, been sicker and poorer than the average non-Indigenous Australian, however, highly trained pharmacists have a proven track record in delivering improved health outcomes when integrated into multidisciplinary practices,” Ms Turner said.

“Strong international evidence supports pharmacists’ ability to improve a number of critical health outcomes, including significant reductions in blood pressure and cholesterol and improved diabetes control. A number of studies have also supported pharmacists’ cost-effectiveness.

Some ACCHOs have already shown leadership in the early adoption of pharmacists outside of any national programs or support structures. NACCHO and PSA are committed to supporting ACCHOs across Australia to meet the medicines needs in their communities by enhancing support for those wishing to embed a pharmacist into their service.”

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner said disparities in the health between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are confronting.

The Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) have welcomed the announcement of a trial to support Aboriginal health organisations to integrate pharmacists into their services.

The trial was announced today by the Federal Minister for Health Greg Hunt at PSA17, PSA’s national conference.

Both PSA and NACCHO thank the Minister for supporting this innovative project that will improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This practical new trial measure has strong stakeholder support and there is growing evidence pharmacists employed by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) can assist to increase the life expectancy and improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

PSA and NACCHO celebrate the Federal Government’s initiative to implement these important reforms and to further investigate the development of new funding models to help close the gap between the health outcomes of Aboriginal

PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson said having a culturally responsive pharmacist integrated within an Aboriginal Health Service (AHS) builds better relationships between patients and staff, leading to improved results in chronic disease management and Quality Use of Medicines.

“Integrating a non-dispensing pharmacist in an AHS has the potential to improve medication adherence, reduce chronic disease, reduce medication misadventure and decrease preventable medication-related hospital admissions to deliver significant savings to the health system,” Dr Jackson said.

“Additionally, pharmacists integrated within an AHS have a key role to play in assisting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients navigate Australia’s complex health system.”

“Local community pharmacies will be first approached to see if they are able to provide a pharmacist to work within the AHS according to service requirements of the AHS. If they are unable to or this is not accepted by the AHS in line with principles of self-determination, then the AHS may employ a pharmacist directly.”

A range of stakeholders, including the Pharmacy Guild of Australia, will be on the advisory group.

This trial has been funded through the 6th Community Pharmacy Agreement Pharmacy Trial Program. PSA and NACCHO wish to credit the Pharmacy Guild of Australia for supporting such an important initiative. This trial aims to improve equity of access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and further demonstrate the fundamental role that community pharmacists play in primary health care, strengthening the future for all pharmacists and contributing to a sustainable health system.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #PSA17SYD Minister Hunt announces Aboriginal Health Services will be able to employ a pharmacist if a link with a community pharmacy is not available

 ”  I have reached agreement with the PSA and Pharmacy Guild of Australia to allow Aboriginal health services to employ pharmacists if there were local areas problems in accessing pharmacy services. “

The Federal government is moving to give certainty to community pharmacy over location rules, Health Minister Greg Hunt said.

Rural and Indigenous health advocacy through the infrastructure of community pharmacy

 ” The standard of health care for rural areas should be equal to the standards available in metropolitan areas. The Pharmacy Guild of Australia (the Guild) is guided by the principle that all Australians have a right to equity and access to community pharmacy services.

The Guild represents pharmacists who are the proprietors of community pharmacies. Approximately 20% of the total 5,350 community pharmacies across Australia are located within Categories 2-6 of the Pharmacy Access/Remoteness Index of Australia (PhARIA). “

SEE WEBSITE

Speaking at PSA17 in Sydney today, Mr Hunt announced a raft of initiatives which he says will exemplify the “vital role” the profession plays in primary health care.

Reported by AJP

A key announcement is that the government will soon introduce legislation to remove the existing sunset clause on pharmacy location rules, a move that drew applause from the floor.

Mr Hunt said feedback from pharmacy owners on location rules was that:

“The threat of taking location rules away was a threat to their very existence” and had prompted the government to action.

Mr Hunt also announced he had reached agreement with the PSA and Pharmacy Guild of Australia to allow Aboriginal health services to employ pharmacists if there were local areas problems in accessing pharmacy services.

The Minister also provided details on recent 6CPA pharmacy trial announcements around asthma management and ensuring culture-specific medicine reviews in indigenous communities.

Funding would be provided for a pharmacist and consumer awareness campaign around biosimilar medicines, he also announced.