NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Delivery to @DaveGillespie of #RuralHealthConf priority delegate recommendations

 

 ” Rural and regional Australians have higher rates of major diseases including heart disease and stroke, chronic lung conditions, diabetes, asthma, and arthritis.

We also have a persistent and disturbingly large gap in health outcomes and life expectancy, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians “

Minister Gillespie said Australia’s long life expectancy and good average health outcomes disguised unacceptable differences between population groups and communities, particularly in rural Australia : See Full Response press release from Minister below

After four action-packed days, the 14th National Rural Health Conference with its theme of ‘A World of Rural Health’, has concluded with the delivery of the priority recommendations to emerge from the event to Assistant Minister for Health, David Gillespie.

According to CEO of the NRHA, David Butt, “the Conference provided an excellent opportunity for learning and sharing the evidence of what works in rural and remote health.

“People who live and work in rural and remote Australia have the knowledge about what works and what needs to change to improve health and wellbeing.

“Very importantly, through the conference they have identified key recommendations for health systems reform, to improve the health and wellbeing of the seven million people who live in rural and remote Australia,” Mr Butt said.

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AUSTRALIA LEADS IN INNOVATION FOR RURAL HEALTH

Press Release

The Coalition Government’s innovative reforms to improve the health of rural, regional and remote communities were today showcased to the 14th World Rural Health Conference.

In his opening address to the conference in Cairns, Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie, outlined a series of major changes to improve rural health which will start or bed down over the coming year.

These included:

  •  legislation to establish the first independent National Rural Health Commissioner;
  •  pathways to recognise rural GPs as “Rural Generalists”;
  •  Primary Health Networks across Australia commission health services to ensure that local health needs are met;
  •  federally funded mental health services including suicide prevention and drug and alcohol rehabilitation now managed at the regional level by PHNs;
  •  200 general practices and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services will soon start providing Health Care Home services, to coordinate care for people with chronic conditions.

Minister Gillespie said Australia’s long life expectancy and good average health outcomes disguised unacceptable differences between population groups and communities, particularly in rural Australia.

Rural and regional Australians have higher rates of major diseases including heart disease and stroke, chronic lung conditions, diabetes, asthma, and arthritis.

“We also have a persistent and disturbingly large gap in health outcomes and life expectancy, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians,” he said.

Minister Gillespie also represented the Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, at the National Rural Health Alliance Conference held as part of the World of Rural Health event.

“I know that it takes determination, resilience and flexibility to provide the care that your patients need, without the resources available to your counterparts in the cities,” Minister Gillespie said.

“The Prime Minister shares my passion – your passion – for rural Australia.

“Like you, and me, he believes that Australians have a right to high quality, affordable and accessible health care, wherever they live and whatever their circumstances.

“Meeting the needs of rural families and communities is one of the top priorities in the long term national health plan.”

Smile: $11m reduces gap in rural and remote dental services

Press Release 2

People living and working in rural and remote Australia will now have access to dental services that were previously unavailable.

Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie, said today that the Coalition Government is providing $11 million to the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) to provide dental services.

“The Royal Flying Doctor Service is well-placed to provide these essential mobile outreach dental services in rural and remote Australia,” Minister Gillespie said.

“Where there is an identified market failure and there are gaps in services, it is important that the Government steps in to provide assistance. Today we deliver on our election commitment to ensure people outside our major cities have better access to high quality dental services.”

The Government provides funding to the RFDS under the RFDS Program, which aims to ensure access to essential emergency aeromedical and other primary health care services in rural and remote areas of Australia.

“The Flying Doctor welcomes this new funding for dental services in rural and remote Australia,” RFDS of Australia CEO, Martin Laverty, said.

“There are only one third the dentists in remote areas, with 72 dentists per 100,000 people in major cities, and less than 23 per 100,000 people in remote areas.”

“The research statistics are compelling, with more than one-third of remote area residents living with untreated decay. Essentially, when people from remote areas visit the dentist, they are more likely to require acute intervention – 1 in 3 had a tooth extraction in a year, compared with less than 1 in 10 in metropolitan areas.”

“This funding from the Federal Government will enable the Flying Doctor to expand its dental outreach program to start tackling the disparity that exists between city and the bush – and for that we are very, very thankful”.

On 28 June 2016, the Government announced it would continue to support the RFDS by extending its contract for continued delivery of aeromedical services until 30 June 2020.

The announcement included a commitment of an additional $11 million over two years for the RFDS to expand its existing non-Commonwealth funded dental services for the period 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2019.

Labor Party Response

Labor supports the development of a national rural health strategy and associated implementation plan, as part of ensuring there is clear and targeted action towards closing the gap in health outcomes between Australians living in rural areas and their metropolitan peers. 

Shadow Minister for Health Catherine King announced Labor’s support for a strategy at the National Rural Health Conference in Cairns, calling on the Government to join in bipartisan support.

“The impact of inequity on health and recognising the challenges that some groups face which require more targeted support – including rural and remote Australians – was a clear theme to emerge from Labor’s National Health Summit in March,” Ms King said

“We think that a national rural health strategy is an important step to ensuring we have a defined roadmap to improving health outcomes for Australians living outside our big cities and I hope the Government follows our lead.”

Shadow Assistant Minister for Medicare, Tony Zappia, said while Labor welcomes the implementation of the National Rural Health Commissioner, this single role will not be a cure-all.

“The National Rural Health Commissioner would aid in the implementation of a national rural health strategy, but we still need to have an understanding of where we are going, and what we are trying to achieve in rural heath,” Mr Zappia said.

“A national rural health strategy would help achieve this goal of all levels of Government working more closely together, to reduce fragmentation and duplication.”

Opportunity to support a special edition #HealthElection16 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Newspaper PUBLISH DATE June 29

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Response to our NACCHO Aboriginal Health Newspaper from our members, community, stakeholders and Government  has been nothing short of sensational over the past 3 years , with feedback from around the country suggesting we really kicked a few positive goals for Aboriginal health.

NACCHO is the national peak body for Aboriginal health. It is entrusted to represent the needs and interests of Aboriginal health on behalf of its members in the national arena.

NACCHO has and continues to be a living embodiment of the aspirations of Aboriginal people

10 good reasons to advertise in the NACCHO Aboriginal Health Newspaper :

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  10. Support NACCHO vision to Close the Gap

Our media partner Koori Mail Turns 25 this week

The Koori Mail is an Australian media institution, 100% owned and controlled by Aboriginal people. The fortnightly newspaper circulates all states and covers the issues that matter the most to black Australians. 25 years since its first print, the Indigenous paper is still breaking ground for Indigenous journalism.

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NACCHO #healthelection16 : Client contacts at Aboriginal health organisations continue to increase

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Australian Government-funded primary health care organisations saw around 435,000 individual clients through over 3.5 million episodes of care, an average of 8.2 episodes of care per client, in 2014-15, according to a report released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT AIHW Aboriginal Health Organisations May 2016

The report, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: Online services report-key results 2014-15 includes information from 278 organisations across Australia providing health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Seventy-three per cent of these organisations (203) provided primary health-care services and 68% (138) of these were Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.

‘The health services and activities provided by these organisations play an important role in delivering health care to Indigenous people,’ said AIHW spokesperson Dr Fadwa Al-Yaman.

‘This includes clinical care, health promotion, child and maternal health, social and emotional wellbeing support and substance-use prevention’.

In 2014-15, most organisations (220) provided maternal and child health services, with 7,400 Indigenous women accessing antenatal services through 34,100 visits. Around 22,100 health checks for Indigenous children aged 0-4 years were conducted.

Social and emotional wellbeing services-counselling, family tracing and reunion support services-were provided by 97 organisations employing 221 counsellors, a 17% increase in counsellors compared with 2013-14.

Substance-use services were offered at 67 organisations, and saw 25,200 clients through 151,000 episodes of care, an average of 6 episodes of care per client.

Compared with 2013-14, the number of client contacts increased by 9% while client numbers increased by 4%. Over time, the average number of contacts per client per year has increased from 7.7 in 2008-09 to 11.6 in 2014-15.

There were 4,454 health staff employed in primary health care organisations and 2,905 other staff. Just over half (53%) of all staff were Indigenous. The most common health workers were nurses and midwives (15%), followed by Aboriginal health workers (11%) and doctors (6%).

‘Staffing varied by location, with 39% of nurses and midwives employed in Very remote areas and 31% of Aboriginal health workers employed in Outer regional areas,’ said Dr Al-Yaman.

Client contacts by nurses and midwives represented 50% of all client contacts in Very remote areas compared with 29% nationally.

The AIHW is a major national agency set up by the Australian Government to provide reliable, regular and relevant information and statistics on Australia’s health and welfare.

This seventh national report presents information from 278 organisations across Australia, funded by the Australian Government to provide one or more of the following health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: primary health care, maternal and child health care, social and emotional wellbeing services, and substance-use services. These organisations participated in the 2014–15 Online Services Report data collection. Information is presented on the characteristics of these organisations, the health services and activities provided to clients and staffing levels. Other information presented includes client numbers, client contacts and episodes of care, and service gaps and challenges.

Primary health client contacts increased

  • In 2014–15, 203 of the organisations (73%) were funded to provide primary health-care services and many of these were Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (138 or 68%).
  • These organisations employed 7,359 full-time equivalent staff and just over half (53%) were Indigenous, a similar proportion to 2013–14 (53%). The workforce was made up of 4,454 health staff (61%) and 2,905 other staff (39%). Nurses and midwives were the most common type of health worker, representing 15% of employed staff. This was followed by Aboriginal health workers (11%) and doctors (6%). However, the relative proportions of these varied by remoteness area, with more nurses and midwives being employed in Very remote areas (39%) and more Aboriginal health workers in Outer regional areas (31%).
  • Health staff provided primary health-care services to around 434,600 clients through 5.0 million client contacts. Since 2013–14, client contacts increased by 9%. Although the number of staff per 1,000 clients was similar to 2013–14 (18 per 1,000 clients), the number of contacts per client showed a small increase and continued an upward trend in average contacts per client overtime, which has gone from 7.7 in 2008–09 to 11.6 in 2014–15.

An average of nearly 5 antenatal visits per woman

In 2014–15, 220 of the organisations (79%) provided maternal and child health services, either through primary health or New Directions funding. Around 34,100 antenatal visits were reported for 7,400 Indigenous women, an average of 4.6 visits per woman. Around 22,100 child health checks were conducted for Indigenous children aged 0–4 years.

More social and emotional wellbeing counsellors

In 2014–15, 97 of the organisations (35%) were funded to provide social and emotional wellbeing services. They employed 221 counsellors, an increase of 17% compared with 2013–14. Around 60% of counsellors were Indigenous, a similar proportion to 2013–14 (62%). Services were provided to around 21,100 clients through 100,200 client contacts.

Amphetamines seen as an important substance-use issue

In 2014–15, 67 of the organisations (24%) were funded to provide substance-use services. They saw around 25,200 clients through 151,000 episodes of care. Most episodes of care (89%) were for non-residential or after-care services. The proportion of these organisations that reported amphetamines as one of their most important issues in terms of staff time and organisational resources increased from 45% in 2013–14 to 70% in 2014–15.

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NACCHO #Aboriginal Health Special Feature : 20 Indigenous health research papers

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” This study aimed to examine the accuracy of patient self-reported screening status for diabetes, high cholesterol and cervical cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients when compared with pathology records.

The study was undertaken in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS). ACCHSs are culturally competent primary health care services and represent self-determination in the provision of health care. They are ideal settings for delivering prevention activities to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

From Insights into nutritionists’ practices and experiences in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health is the Journal of the Public Health Association of Australia and is published six times a year, in February, April, June, August, October and December

The current issue features Indigenous health 20 research papers

1.Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health: accuracy of patient self-report of screening for diabetes, high cholesterol and cervical cancer

Chronic diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer account for the majority of excess deaths and diseases among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, despite being largely preventable.1 Prevention activities such as regular screening are likely to produce significant health gains.2 To achieve these gains clinicians need appropriate, valid and reliable measures of a patient’s screening history.

Patient self-report is often used by clinicians as a quick and inexpensive way to obtain information about a patient’s screening status. Self-report is also used to determine the effectiveness of interventions intended to increase screening rates. The accuracy of self-report is therefore critical. Research studies in non-Indigenous primary care settings,3–11 including Australia,12–15 have shown that relying on self-report can result in significant under-estimation of the proportion of people who require screening. Under-estimating the time period since a patient’s last screening has been reported, especially among minority populations16,17 including indigenous native American women.18 Studies have also found that self-reported population survey data often under-estimates the prevalence of screening, particularly among marginalised population groups.9,10,19,20

Few published studies have investigated the validity of self-reported health issues among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. One study found self-reported information under-estimated the smoking status of pregnant Indigenous women,21 and another found a modest correlation between self-report and measured physical activity among Aboriginal children.22

This study aimed to examine the accuracy of patient self-reported screening status for diabetes, high cholesterol and cervical cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients when compared with pathology records. The study was undertaken in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS). ACCHSs are culturally competent primary health care services and represent self-determination in the provision of health care. They are ideal settings for delivering prevention activities to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

2.Insights into nutritionists’ practices and experiences in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

Access to and adequate intake of a range of foods to meet the body’s energy and nutrient requirements is a universal cornerstone of good health and wellbeing. Among Aboriginal Australians, nutrition plays a significant direct and indirect role in suboptimal growth and development in children and the excessive burden of preventable chronic disease in adults.1,2 Public health nutrition is an integral part of population health that seeks to promote optimal nutrition status and good health, and prevent illness and associated economic and social costs of disease.3–5

For more than 20 years, public health and community nutritionists have worked in the Northern Territory (NT) within remote Aboriginal communities, both within the government public health sector and non-government organisations, such as Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations. The term ‘public health nutritionist’ refers to practitioners working in population approaches to public health nutrition.

In the remote Aboriginal context, stakeholders within the food landscape can include remote community stores/shops, schools, childcare, aged-care facilities and health centres, community groups, Aboriginal health workers (AHWs) and families and individuals.6 Within these settings, nutritionists ideally work with and through local community members, including AHWs, to jointly address expressed food and nutrition-related priorities. For these reasons, the terms ‘community nutritionist’ and ‘public health nutritionist’ have been used interchangeably. The term ‘dietitian’ tends to refer to practitioners focusing on clinical and individual aspects of nutritional health. Increasingly, dietetic qualifications are mandatory for nutritionists working with remote Aboriginal communities, as many practitioners also provide a clinical service.

In remote Aboriginal communities, nutritionists perform numerous functions calling for a wide range of competencies that require social, communication and relationship building skills3 and cultural adeptness, including a culturally competent7 and culturally safe approach.8 The call for nutrition practitioners, and their training and employment structures, to move towards broader sociological9 and critical10 approaches appears especially relevant in a cross-cultural world where food permeates many aspects of life. This also supports the internationally agreed notion of ‘health’ that recognises the existence of various cultural and world views, and the imperative of supporting the layers of social and ecological factors that underpin one’s state of health by addressing healthcare at multiple levels.11 Across all these skills and levels, one universal and fundamental element is communication. All health workers in cross-cultural settings must communicate across social and cultural world views. Clear health communication is vital to assist with understanding and to empower individuals and groups to make informed decisions.12,13 Community empowerment is one key element of successful community nutrition interventions.14 Nutritionists working in remote Aboriginal communities ideally engage with a range of community stakeholders, including Aboriginal health and local community workers.

Remote health staff and health services speak of numerous challenges in providing remote health services and the complexities of delivering primary and health promotion services.15–19 While high staff turnover is a considerable issue,17 little is understood of the challenges facing nutrition practitioners especially in this cross-cultural context.20,21 We used a qualitative methodology to explore communication methods, education practices and approaches, perceived challenges and the potential role of nutritionists. The study aimed to support nutritionists working in remote Aboriginal communities and inform ongoing efforts to create supportive environments that promote nutritional health and effective communication and facilitate behaviour change.

3.Legally invisible: stewardship for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health

4. The comparative cost of food and beverages at remote Indigenous communities, Northern Territory, Australia (pages S21–S26)

5. Use of electronic visual recording to aid assessment of dietary intake of Australian Aboriginal children living in remote communities

6. Bundap Marram Durn Durn: Engagement with Aboriginal women experiencing comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions

7.The economic feasibility of price discounts to improve diet in Australian Aboriginal remote communities

8. Trachoma in remote Indigenous Australia: a review and public health perspective

9. The value of partnerships: lessons from a multi-site evaluation of a national social and emotional wellbeing program for Indigenous youth

10.Hypertension: high prevalence and a positive association with obesity among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in far north Queensland

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NACCHO #closethegap Suicide: Lifeline calls for specialist hotline to address high Indigenous suicide rates

 

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“There are some communities out there were there are a multitude of both state and federal services and showing very little for all the effort and the money,”

“The question is why? And I think part of the answer is that there needs to be much more involvement of Aboriginal people through governance structures that are appropriate to have a say how those resources are used.

“It’s important because many Aboriginal people will not be comfortable ringing a general service and speaking to a non-Aboriginal person.

“There needs to be, and I have seen this over my almost 40 years now in Aboriginal affairs, a specific service that is culturally appropriate.”

New South Wales parliamentarian and former state Labor leader Linda Burney said the Federal Government should seriously consider the proposal.

Ms Burney, who is a Wiradjuri woman and will be making a tilt at federal politics in the upcoming election, said a national, Aboriginal-led initiative was needed to address many of the issues surrounding mental health and disadvantage.

“Child suicide was a growing problem in indigenous communities. Children’s exposure to family violence was a “major contributor” to the mental health of young people.  services needed more funding for mental health, with remote communities having limited access through Aboriginal Medical Services and the Royal Flying Doctor Service. 

“We must be delivering services to the people, not (forcing) them to come to the services because Aboriginal people in remote communities are on the lowest incomes in the country.”

Sandy Davies, the deputy chairman of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation :Picture above : Indigenous children up to 14 years were nine times more likely to kill themselves than non-indigenous children

Crisis support service Lifeline is calling for the Commonwealth to support an Aboriginal-specific arm of the hotline, to tackle the high rates of suicide in Aboriginal communities.

Lifeline Central West, which covers about one third of New South Wales, has proposed establishing a national call centre in the central west city of Dubbo run by Aboriginal counsellors.

It has written a letter to the Federal Minister for Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion, asking for financial support for the so-called YarnUp Confidential service.

It was hoped the call centre would take up to 70,000 calls per year and create 118 new Aboriginal jobs in Dubbo, costing about $10 million to run annually.

Australian Bureau of Statistics figures released this week showed suicide rates among Indigenous people were about twice those of non-Indigenous people.

Lifeline Central West executive director Alex Ferguson said the rates would only continue to rise unless the Commonwealth took urgent action.

Mr Ferguson said while similar services were run locally in some communities, there was a need for a unified service based on the Lifeline model.

“Look at the scorecard and I think you’ll find their policies are either misdirected or failing,” Mr Ferguson said.

“At the moment we don’t have dialogue and we need to have a dialogue within the Aboriginal community and the broader regional communities.

“The idea is simply to put an Aboriginal feeling, a wash, a spirit through the Lifeline model, so that we can actually have Aboriginals working with Aboriginals under a properly trained and structured environment.”

‘They don’t trust us, in many cases they don’t like us’

Mr Ferguson said many Aboriginal people did not feel comfortable conveying their concerns to non-Indigenous counsellors.

“They don’t trust us, in many cases they don’t like us, and that’s why the YarnUp model is based on Aboriginals working with Aboriginals, but doing it in a very structured way, which is the Lifeline training and telephony model,” Mr Ferguson said.

Mr Ferguson said there had been an “uninspiring” response from the Government, and was disappointed it had not offered an alternative solution.

“Nobody has put up anything else to either push YarnUp our of the way and or has actually ever criticised the content of YarnUp,” Mr Ferguson said.

“By the time you keep going around this sort of ‘it’s not in my backyard’ type argument, there is the continual flow of death and the resultant trauma in the community.”

The Federal Member for Parkes Mark Coulton said the broadly supported the model and will next week lobby the Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion for a trial.

But he said many local organisations were already doing similar work and there was a risk of duplicating services.

“I was in Bourke a couple weeks ago and there was another group there that has got a mental health program for school-aged students,” Mr Coulton said.

“This is not an empty field, there are a lot of people out there in this space.

“But I think the Lifeline model has worked well and I think to extend that into a specialised service for Aboriginal people will be I think a worthwhile exercise.”

Need for national, culturally appropriate approach

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NACCHO Telehealth News Alert : NT Telehealth community trial has saved time, money and improved access to care

 

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“Telstra has worked with NT Health and the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) to pilot the NTCS with the Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation in Tennant Creek and the Santa Teresa Health Centre near Alice Springs. This has provided the clinics with dedicated services that connect into NT Health’s existing telehealth network.”

An independent evaluation of the Northern Territory’s telehealth trial has recommended that the project continue and that the telehealth network be developed further until the services are embedded into routine practice.

The NT Department of Health began the trial in June 2014 to provide telehealth services to clinics in the Katherine, Barkly and Central Australian regions from hospital specialists in Alice Springs, Katherine and Darwin.

Specialist appointments available include cardiac, orthopaedic, haemotology, oncology, dermatology and urology, with specialists burns services now being provided by SA Health.

In October 2014, the NT government signed a contract with Telstra Health to improve the network infrastructure as part of the wider National Telehealth Connection Service.

Telstra has worked with NT Health and the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) to pilot the NTCS with the Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation in Tennant Creek and the Santa Teresa Health Centre near Alice Springs. This has provided the clinics with dedicated services that connect into NT Health’s existing telehealth network.

Figures released today as part of the evaluation show that telehealth consultations have grown from about 200 a year to more than 1000 and have delivered savings of more than $1.1 million in travel costs.

Telehealth attendances in Tennant Creek had grown from 62 in 2013-14 to 519 in the trial period of July 2014 to September 2015, an increase of 737 per cent.

In Alice Springs, they have grown from 33 to 192, and from 100 to 331 in Katherine.

NT Chief Minister Adam Giles said the program had also reduced did not attend rates.

“This is a fantastic achievement and demonstrates that telehealth is delivering better health outcomes in regional and remote communities and reducing the need for patients to travel long distances to access health services,” Mr Giles said in a statement.

“It’s also helped reduce costs to the Patient Travel Assistance Scheme budget with savings estimated of at least $1.189 million on travel costs alone, while the rate of patients not attending their appointments was substantially lower than for standard hospital outpatient clinics.”

Health Minister John Elferink said an evaluation report into the telehealth trial had recommended the project continue and that the telehealth network be developed further until the services are embedded into routine practice.

“Telehealth services clearly have an important and growing role to play in ensuring more Territorians get more access to the health care they need,” he said.

“The government will now consider the recommendations of the evaluation report and look at what resources and training we need to provide to extend the use of telehealth services in the Territory.”

Trial project leader Sam Goodwin, acting executive director of medical and clinical services at the Alice Springs Hospital, said telehealth was good for patients and health professionals, and was delivering efficiencies for the health system.

“Clinicians on the frontline have summarised the telehealth pilot very nicely,” Dr Goodwin said. “’It is not often you can say that you have saved money and everyone has got really good health care for that saving, and you are not losing anything – usually when you make savings of money you have lost something’.”

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 Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Close the Gap Campaign for the governments of Australia to commit to achieving equality  for Indigenous people in the areas of health and  life expectancy within 25 years.”

Next publication date 6 April 2016

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Response to this NACCHO media initiative has been nothing short of sensational over the past 3 years , with feedback from around the country suggesting we really kicked a few positive goals for national Aboriginal health.

Thanks to all our supporters, most especially our advertisers, NACCHO’S Aboriginal Health News is here to stay.

NACCHO 10 th Anniversary Close the Gap invitation to host travelling photographic exhibition

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Aboriginal Health in Aboriginal Hands for Healthy Futures Exhibition and travelling road show 2016

Invitation to:

NACCHO Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation members

NACCHO Affiliates

NACCHO Stakeholders

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies

National Peak body Health organisations

Research groups

NACCHO partners and supporters

Find out how you can host this exhibition March -December 2016

 –see application below

Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Close the Gap Campaign for the governments of Australia to commit to achieving equality  for Indigenous people in the areas of health and  life expectancy within 25 years.

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) in partnership with Wayne Quilliam Photography has developed a visual narrative that has been created to foster awareness, exploration and understanding of Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands.

Our exhibition of 20 + photographic images, melded with a series of video interviews embedded within the images will stimulate individual thinking and dialogue relating to the 10th anniversary of ‘Close the Gap’ campaign celebrated in March 2016.

The exhibition will launched at Parliament House on 17 th March National Close the Gap Day

The series of interviews will engage and educate the viewer with valuable insight into the personal and professional health journeys of ACCHO board members, CEO’s, medical staff, Aboriginal Health Workers, Health Promotion Teams and community members.

This project has been developed to allow Aboriginal people across the country to share their views, dreams, aspirations and thoughts relating to the importance of Aboriginal Health In Aboriginal Hands for healthy futures.

And in an election year to showcase the why investment in the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health is vitally important to Close the GAP

Background

In May 2015 NACCHO engaged a production team to record and edit interviews with Aboriginal health leaders and community members in approx. 20 urban, rural and remote member locations throughout all states and territories of Australia. At each site NACCHO will be producing a summary 30 minute (approx.) video featuring interviews with the board, CEO, medical, Aboriginal Health Workers, Health Promotion Teams and community members.

Wayne Quilliam award winning Aboriginal photographer was appointed Creative Director to record videos and still photographs with Yale MacGillivray a young Aboriginal woman appointed Managing Editor for the project. The original pilot and Redfern AMS was produced by NITV

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All 300 (approx.) full interviews will be available for viewing on NACCHO TV YouTube channel and website (subject to members and interviewee approval) and videos and photographs will be available to each NACCHO participating member service for websites and community CDS etc.

Once edited down into a 30 minute format all 20 episodes will be made available to NITV and other Aboriginal media groups for broadcast and other projects  All Interviews footage will also be available for specialist educational video compilations for governance, management, doctors, Aboriginal Health Worker etc.

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Proposed Close the Gap 10th Anniversary National Aboriginal Healthly Futures photography and video Exhibition roadshow 2016

It is proposed to develop a travelling interactive roadshow consisting of approx. 20 images from the series to achieve the following objectives:

Healthy Futures Videos will highlight how investing in NACCHO the national authority in comprehensive Aboriginal primary health care and its 150 members will lead to generational change and Close the Gap

In our Healthy Futures Videos interviews with ACCHO chairs, board members CEOs Management Doctors Dentists, chemists Aboriginal Health Workers/Allied Health workers and health promotional teams they will highlight how our national Aboriginal health leaders’ play an important role in ensuring Aboriginal health remains in Aboriginal hands thru our vast network of these Aboriginal community controlled health organisations.

Healthy Futures Videos will highlight success stories that our Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) are making towards Closing the Gap targets and key priorities in areas such Early Childhood development

Healthy Futures Videos will illustrate how keeping our people well and on the road to good health through our ACCHOs is a key principle objective of NACCHO and all our members.

Healthy Futures Videos will highlight how we achieve this is by working in collaboration with our national partners and stakeholders to address the expansion of our health services and to meet the growing health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in urban, rural and remote Australia.

Front Page Postive picThe Exhibition

Using QR codes these images will link to interviews thru your phone or Ipad.

The CTG exhibition will be launched at Parliament House Canberra on the Anniversary 17  March and then make the portable exhibition available to participating members and affiliates to hold their own state based events. The exhibition will also be offered to other major Aboriginal and Health conferences who wish to celebrate Aboriginal Health and Close the Gap.

Alicia Hari a Health Promotion Officer and Lucretius Willett a Healthy Lifestyle Officer at the Gurriny Yealamuca Health Service in Yarrabah FNQ are just two of the approx.300 board , staff and community in 20 urban, regional and remote NACCHO member organisations being interviewed for our “ Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands for healthy futures “ video series and 2016 photographic exhibition road show

OR CONTACT

Colin Cowell Project consultant TEL 0401 331 215 Email

 Submit your “Expression of Interest ” to host the exhibition in 2016

naccho-home-nov2015

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Overview of Australian Indigenous health status released

WADEYE ABORIGINAL CLINIC NT

The Overview of Australian Indigenous health status 2014 (Overview) has been released providing a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

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DOWNLOAD the REPORT HERE overview_of_indigenous_health_2014

The Overview shows that the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continues to improve slowly.

The Overview confirms that there have been declines in infant mortality rates and an increase in life expectancy. There have also been improvements in a number of areas contributing to health status such as increased immunisation coverage and a slight decrease in the prevalence of tobacco use among Indigenous people.

The Overview is an important part of the HealthInfoNet‘s translation research, which contributes to ‘closing the gap’ in health between Indigenous and other Australians by making research and other knowledge available in a form that is easily understood and readily accessible to both practitioners and policy makers.

View Website for report info

HealthInfoNet Director, Professor Neil Drew, said ‘The Overview is our flagship publication and has proved to be a valuable resource for a very wide range of health professionals, policy makers and others working in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health sector.

The Overview provides an accurate, evidence based summary of many health conditions in a form that makes it easy for time poor professionals to keep up to date with the current health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people throughout Australia.

This year, as part of our ongoing commitment to quality improvement we have made some important changes, including a statement on the appropriate use of terminology and a commitment to enhancing a strengths based approach to understanding health issues

Key facts

Population

  • At 30 June 2014, the estimated Australian Indigenous population was 713,600 people.
  • For 2014, it was estimated that NSW had the highest number of Indigenous people (220,902 people, 31% of the total Indigenous population).
  • For 2014, it was estimated that the NT had the highest proportion of Indigenous people in its population (30% of the NT population were Indigenous).
  • In 2011, around 33% of Indigenous people lived in a capital city.
  • There was a 21% increase in the number of Indigenous people counted in the 2011 Census compared with the 2006 Census.
  • The Indigenous population is much younger than the non-Indigenous population.

Births and pregnancy outcome

  • In 2013, there were 18,368 births registered in Australia with one or both parents identified as Indigenous (6% of all births registered).
  • In 2013, Indigenous mothers were younger than non-Indigenous mothers; the median age was 24.9 years for Indigenous mothers and 30.8 years for all mothers.
  • In 2013, total fertility rates were 2,344 births per 1,000 for Indigenous women and 1,882 per 1,000 for all women.
  • In 2012, the average birthweight of babies born to Indigenous mothers was 3,211 grams compared with 3,373 grams for babies born to non-Indigenous mothers.
  • In 2012, the proportion of low birthweight babies born to Indigenous women was twice that of non-Indigenous women (11.8% compared with 6.2%).

Mortality

  • In 2006-2010, the age-standardised death rate for Indigenous people was 1.9 times the rate for non-Indigenous people.
  • Between 1991 and 2010, there was a 33% reduction in the death rates for Indigenous people in WA, SA and the NT.
  • For Indigenous people born 2010-2012, life expectancy was estimated to be 69.1 years for males and 73.7 years for females, around 10-11 years less than the estimates for non-Indigenous males and females.
  • In 2008-2012, age-specific death rates were higher for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people across all age-groups, and were much higher in the young and middle adult years.
  • For 2010-2012, the infant mortality rate was higher for Indigenous infants than for non-Indigenous infants; the rate for Indigenous infants was highest in the NT.
  • From 1998 to 2012, there were significant declines in infant mortality rates for Indigenous infants.
  • For 2012, the leading causes of death among Indigenous people were cardiovascular disease, neoplasms (almost entirely cancers), and injury.
  • In 2006-2010, for direct maternal deaths the rate ratio was almost 4 times higher for Indigenous women than for non-Indigenous women.

Hospitalisation

  • In 2012-13, 4.0% of all hospitalisations were of Indigenous people.
  • In 2012-13, the age-standardised separation rate for Indigenous people was 2.7 times higher than for other Australians.
  • In 2012-13, the main cause of hospitalisation for Indigenous people was for care involving dialysis, responsible for 48% of Indigenous separations.

Selected health conditions

Cardiovascular disease

  • In 2012-2013, 13% of Indigenous people reported having a long-term heart or related condition; after age-adjustment, these conditions were around 1.2 times more common for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2012, hospitalisation rates for circulatory disease were 1.6 times higher for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2012, cardiovascular disease was the leading cause of death for Indigenous people, accounting for 25% of Indigenous deaths.
  • In 2012, the age-adjusted death rate for Indigenous people was 1.6 times the rate for non-Indigenous people.

Cancer

  • In 2005-2009, age-adjusted cancer incidence rates were slightly lower for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2004-2008, the most common cancers diagnosed among Indigenous people were lung and breast cancer.
  • In 2012-13, age-standardised hospitalisation rates for cancer were lower for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2012, the age-standardised death rate for cancer for Indigenous people was 1.5 times higher than for non-Indigenous people.

Diabetes

  • In 2012-2013, 8% of Indigenous people reported having diabetes; after age-adjustment, Indigenous people were 3.3 times more likely to report having some form of diabetes than were non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2013-14, age-adjusted hospitalisation rates for diabetes for Indigenous males and females were 3 and 5 times the rates for other males and females.
  • In 2012, Indigenous people died from diabetes at 7 times the rate of non-Indigenous people.

Social and emotional wellbeing

  • In 2012-13, 69% of Indigenous adults experienced at least one significant stressor in the previous 12 months.
  • In 2012-13, after age-adjustment, Indigenous people were 2.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous people to feel high or very high levels of psychological distress.
  • In 2008, 90% of Indigenous people reported feeling happy either some, most, or all of the time.
  • In 2011-12, after age-adjustment, Indigenous people were hospitalised for ICD ‘Mental and behavioural disorders’ at 2.1 times the rate for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2012-13, there were 16,393 hospital separations with a principal diagnosis of ICD ‘Mental and behavioural disorders’ identified as Indigenous.
  • In 2012, the death rate for ICD ‘Intentional self-harm’ (suicide) for Indigenous people was 2.0 times the rate reported for non-Indigenous people.

Kidney health

  • In 2009-2013, after age-adjustment, the notification rate of end stage renal disease was 6.2 times higher for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2012-13, care involving dialysis was the most common reason for hospitalisation among Indigenous people.
  • In 2008-2012, the age-standardised death rate from kidney disease was 2.6 times higher for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.

Injury

  • In 2012-13, after age-adjustment, Indigenous people were hospitalised for injury at nearly twice the rate for other Australians.
  • In 2012-13, the hospitalisation rate for assault was 34 times higher for Indigenous women than for other women.
  • In 2012, injury was the third most common cause of death among Indigenous people, accounting for 15% of Indigenous deaths.

Respiratory disease

  • In 2012-2013, 31% of Indigenous people reported having a respiratory condition. After age-adjustment, the level of respiratory disease was 1.2 times higher for Indigenous than non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2012-2013, 18% of Indigenous people reported having asthma.
  • In 2012-13, after age-adjustment, rates for Indigenous people were 4.4 times higher for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 3.3 times higher for influenza and pneumonia, 1.8 times higher for asthma, 1.8 times higher for acute upper respiratory infections and 1.4 times higher for whooping cough, than for their non-Indigenous counterparts.
  • In 2012, after age-adjustment, the death rate for respiratory disease for Indigenous people was 2.2 times that for non-Indigenous people.

Eye health

  • In 2012-2013, eye and sight problems were reported by 33% of Indigenous people.
  • In 2008, the rate of low vision for Indigenous adults aged 40 years and older was 2.8 times higher than for their non-Indigenous counterparts.
  • In 2008, the rate of blindness for Indigenous adults aged 40 years and older was 6.2 times higher than for their non-Indigenous counterparts.

Ear health and hearing

  • In 2012-2013, ear/hearing problems were reported by 12% of Indigenous people.
  • In 2012-13, the hospitalisation rate for ear/hearing problems for Indigenous children aged 0-3 years was 0.8 times lower the rate for non-Indigenous children and the rate for Indigenous children aged 4-14 years was 1.6 times higher than the rate for non-Indigenous children.

Oral health

  • In 2007-2008 in NSW, SA, Tas and the NT, Indigenous children had more dental problems than non-Indigenous children.
  • In 2004-2006, caries and periodontal diseases were more prevalent among Indigenous adults than among non-Indigenous adults.

Disability

  • In 2008, after age-adjustment, Indigenous people were 2.2 times as likely as non-Indigenous people to have a profound/core activity restriction.

Communicable diseases

  • In 2006-2010, after age-adjustment, the notification rate for tuberculosis was 12.5 times higher for Indigenous people than for Australian-born non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2011-2013, the crude notification rate for hepatitis B was 5 times higher for Indigenous people than non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2011-2013, the crude notification rate for hepatitis C for Indigenous people was 3.7 times higher for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2007-2010, notification rates for Haemophilus influenza type b were 12.9 times higher for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2011, the age-standardised rate of invasive pneumococcal disease was 8 times higher for Indigenous people than for other Australians.
  • In 2007-2010, the age-standardised notification rate of meningococcal disease was 2.7 times higher for Indigenous people than for other Australians; the rate for Indigenous children aged 0-4 years was 3.8 times higher than for their non-Indigenous counterparts.
  • In 2013, Indigenous people had higher crude notification rates for gonorrhoea, syphilis and chlamydia than non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2013, age-standardised rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnosis were 1.3 times higher for Indigenous than non-Indigenous people.
  • In some remote communities, more than 70% of young children had scabies and pyoderma.

Factors contributing to Indigenous health

Nutrition

  • In 2012-2013, less than one half of Indigenous people reported eating an adequate amount of fruit (42%) and only one-in-twenty ate enough vegetables (5%) on a daily basis.

Physical activity

  • In 2012-13, 46% of Indigenous adults met the target of 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity on most days.
  • In 2012-2013, after age-adjustment, 62% of Indigenous people in non-remote areas reported that they were physically inactive, a similar level to that of non-Indigenous people.

Bodyweight

  • In 2012-2013, 66% of Indigenous adults were classified as overweight or obese; after age-adjustment, the level of obesity/overweight was 1.2 times higher for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.

Immunisation

  • In 2013, 93% of Indigenous children aged 5 years were fully immunised against the recommended vaccine-preventable diseases.

Breastfeeding

  • In 2010, breastfeeding initiation levels were similar among Indigenous and non-Indigenous mothers (87% and 90% respectively).

Tobacco use

  • In 2012-13, 44% of Indigenous adults were current smokers; after age-adjustment, this proportion was 2.5 times higher than the proportion among non-Indigenous adults.
  • Between 2002 and 2013, there has been a decline in the number of cigarettes smoked daily among Indigenous people.
  • In 2011, 50% of Indigenous mothers reported smoking during pregnancy.

Alcohol use

  • In 2012-13, 23% of Indigenous adults abstained from alcohol; this level was 1.6 times higher than among the non-Indigenous population.
  • In 2012-2013, after age-adjustment, lifetime drinking risk was similar for both the Indigenous and non-Indigenous population. In 2008-10, after age-adjustment, Indigenous males were hospitalised at 5 times and Indigenous females at 4 times the rates of their non-Indigenous counterparts for a principal diagnosis related to alcohol use.
  • In 2006-2010, the age-standardised death rates for alcohol-related deaths for Indigenous males and females were 5 and 8 times higher respectively, than those for their non-counterparts.

Illicit drug use

  • In 2012-13, 22% of Indigenous adults reported that they had used an illicit substance in the previous 12 months.
  • In 2005-2009, the rate of drug-induced deaths was 1.5 times higher for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people.

 

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NACCHO Healthy Futures Summit Melbourne 24-26 June 2014 : Invitation to submit abstracts

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On behalf of the NACCHO Board and Secretariat it is my pleasure to invite you to submit an abstract to the NACCHO Healthy Futures Summit at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre 24-26 June 2014.

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ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ABSTRACT PORTAL

The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits.

A good way of demonstrating how economically valuable ACCHS are is to showcase our success at a national summit.

SUMMIT WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO REGISTER

NACCHO would like to demonstrate to the government at this summit how investing more in ACCHS is the best way of promoting better health more employment, more jobs and greater community economic benefits.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS ONLINE

NACCHO Healthy futures Summit-Melbourne 24-26 June 2014

NACCHO invites abstracts submission from its members the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholder organisations to showcase policy frameworks, best practice and investment in Aboriginal Health.

The delegates will be a representation from all over Australia in clinical practice, policy and research.

IMPORTANT DATES

Call for Abstracts open 25 February
All Abstracts Due 21 Mar 2014
Abstract Notifications 4 April 2014
Presenter Registration Due 18 April 2014
Early bird registrations open 25 February 2014
Early-Bird registrations Closes 18 April 2014
Program released 4 April 2014
Exhibition and sponsorship 16 May 2014
NACCHO 2014 Summit 24 -26 June 2014

Program Streams

1.Economic Development

  • Economic models of investment  into Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
  • Economic models of investment through partnership
  • Income generation through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations
  • Brokerage Modelling with Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

2.Health Reform

2.1 Workforce

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • National, State, Regional and Local Workforce Needs Analysis
  • Models of success
  • Recruitment and Retention Strategies
  • Mentoring Programs
  • Workforce Innovation Partnership
  • Career pathways that incorporate Scope of Practice within ACCHO’s

2.2 Continuous Quality Improvement

  • Affiliate Registered Training Organisations Capacity Building of ACCHO’s through scope of practice
  • Accreditation
  • Clinical Standards

3.Healthy Futures

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • Clinic Practice/frontline servicing
  • Mental Health
  • Social Emotional Wellbeing
  • Drug & Alcohol
  • Mums & Babies
  • Women’s Health
  • Men’s Health
  • Oral Health
  • Aged Care
  • Disabilities
  • Adolescent
  • Sexual Health

4.Youth

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • Investment in Youth by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations
  • Career pathways within an ACCHO, Affiliates and key stakeholders
  • Youth Leadership
  • Mentoring
  • Healthy Lifestyles and Youth
  • Health Promotion Strategies

5.Research & Data

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • Population Health
  • Best practice models
  • Gap and Needs analysis
  • Research within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations
  • Research Partnerships
  • Health Information
  • Importance of Data
  • Cultural protocols into practice
  • What’s the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Data telling us?

General guidelines for submissions

  • Abstracts will only be accepted by submitting through the online process below .
  • Abstracts must be a maximum of 300 words .
  • All abstracts must be original work.
  • The abstract will contain text only; no diagrams, illustrations, tables or graphics.
  • All presenting authors must register and pay for their registration for the conference by 18 April 2014 otherwise the presentation will be removed from the program.
  • The NACCHO advisory group reserves the right to accept and reject abstracts for inclusion in the program and allocate to a format that may not have been initially specified by the author/presenter.
  • The conference organisers will not be held responsible for submission errors caused by internet service outages, hardware or software delays, power outages or unforeseen events.
  • It is the responsibility of the presenting author to ensure that the abstract is submitted correctly. After an author has submitted their abstract, they should check their abstract was uploaded successfully.
  • All authors will receive notification of the outcome of their submission on 4 April 2014.
  • Responsibility for the accuracy of abstracts rests with the author.
  • Where there are co-authors, only one abstract is to be submitted. The presenting author is responsible for ensuring the co-authors agree with and are aware of the content before submitting the abstract.
  • An abstract which does not adhere to these requirements will not be accepted

ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ABSTRACT PORTAL

For further information contact the NACCHO SUMMIT TEAM 02 6246 9300 or EMAIL

NACCHO funding alert:Telehealth Infrastructure Support Grants 2013

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Telehealth Infrastructure Support Grants 2013 Round 2 January 2014

NACCHO has received funds from the Department of Health and Ageing under the Telehealth Delivery Project to provide services with grants that will allow them to purchase the necessary infrastructure to undertake Telehealth consultations between specialists and patients.

The grant funding under Round 2 is for amounts up to $7,000 (GST inclusive) to be provided to eligible Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

Services that have been successful in receiving a Telehealth Infrastructure Support Grant from Round 1 will not be eligible to apply.

To ensure all successful member services purchase their Telehealth Infrastructure and are reimbursed in a timely manner it is advised that all applications meet the current dates as outlined in both in this document and the applications form.

Download HERE (3 word files in TELEHEALTH SECTION)

Information Pack

Application form

Draft contract

 Infrastructure eligible for grant support

Infrastructure under this grant includes:

  • Computers and associated video conferencing equipment such as cameras, speakers, monitors, monitor stands, etc.
  • Specialised applications.
  • Specialised medical equipment.
    • Supporting back end equipment (servers, databases, virtualisation application etc).
    • High speed networks equipment (Modems, Switches, Routers, cables) for land-based connections.
    • Satellite equipment (satellite dish, bracket, cables, decoders) for satellite-based connections.
  • Infrastructure installation costs.
  • Internet service provision costs.
  • Reasonable transport costs to get equipment to your service.

Making an application

To apply for funding you will need to fill out and sign the application form outlining the costs of the equipment and /or services you would like to purchase to assist you with Telehealth implementation. You will also need to get a quote that specifies costs for each item. All applications must be received by NACCHO by 27 January 2014.

Quotes

Quotes for the items you propose to purchase must be scanned and attached to the application. If scanning the quote/s is not possible, please make a note of this in the application and post copies of the quotes to NACCHO via Australia Post. Please make sure that they reach NACCHO within 5 business days of the closing date of the grant application process.

Submission of applications

Completed and signed applications must be received by NACCHO no later than 27 January 2014 by email to Troy Combo: telehealth@naccho.org.au or by mail to Troy Combo at PO Box 3205 South Brisbane 4101.

Notification of success of application

 Applicants will be notified by 3 February 2014 if their application has been approved. A contract for the approved amount will be sent for signing by the person of authority at your service and needs to be returned to NACCHO it will then be counter-signed by NACCHO then a fully signed copy of the contract will be sent to your service.

Payment of funds

Funds will be paid on receipt of an invoice supported by copies of receipts indicating that the agreed purchases have been made.

NACCHO will not pay more than the agreed amount for items as specified in the quote/s that were submitted with the application.

It is required to provide documentary evidence by 7 February 2014 for your service to be reimbursed the agreed amount as stated in the contract.

Enquiries

Contact Troy Combo on (07) 3328 8500 or telehealth@naccho.org.au

Other NACCHO NEWS

HAVE You checked out the NACCHO APP HERE ?

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DOWNLOAD links here

The NACCHO App contains a geo locator, which will help you find the nearest Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in your area and automatically creates a number to call .

2014-01-13 07.27.37