NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #LiteracyforLife @NITV In My Own Words screens nationally, July 30

 

 ” In My Own Words is an uplifting new documentary on the work of the Literacy for Life Foundation in the small New South Wales town of Brewarrina.

Watch on as a group of Aboriginal adults pick up pen and paper for the first time and begin to learn to read and write.

It is a heartwarming story that shows what is possible through lifting literacy.”

In My Own Words screens nationally, July 30, on NITV (8:30pm) and SBS It is directed by Erica Glynn and produced by Blackfella Films.

Trailer for Sydney Film Festival 2017  VIEW HERE

There’s a large adult-sized hole in Australia’s approach to boosting literacy levels among Indigenous children and young people.

For several decades, the focus has been on increasing investment in schools and refining the ways we engage Indigenous children.

But what if the most effective way to get more kids reading and writing was to give their parents those same skills?

The Literacy for Life Foundation is exploring this idea through the Aboriginal Adult Literacy Campaigns the organisation has been running in western New South Wales since 2012, in partnership with the University of New England.

The Foundation uses a campaign model known as Yes, I Can!, originally developed in Cuba. It has been used in 30 countries in the global south, including Timor-Leste where it reached 200,000 people.

Each campaign is led by local Aboriginal leaders and their organisations, supported by a small team from the Literacy for Life Foundation. So far, it has run in five western NSW communities, with completion rates over 65%.

This is five times higher than Indigenous students’ completion rates for formal, accredited Foundations Skills courses run through the national vocational education and training (VET) system, which aim to get students to a similar level on the Australian Core Skills Framework.

Nationally, the completion rate for VET Certificate One courses is only 13%, and lower in rural and remote areas. These courses are mainly funded for registered job-seekers aged 15-65, missing a large number of adults who have very low literacy.

A key difference identified in a recent NCVER study is that Yes, I Can! is taught in community, by community members, with a non-formal community education approach.

Struggle to complete everyday tasks

While adults are the focus, boosting literacy levels across an entire community creates a flow-on effect into other areas, including health, employment, justice and school education.

In initial household surveys, over 50% of adults said they did not have the literacy they needed for everyday tasks such as filling in forms.

The consequences of this can be quite dire.

Law and justice officials and community leaders in these locations report that people with low literacy are less likely to go for their drivers licences, resulting in multiple instances of fines, arrest and incarceration for unlicensed driving.

People with very low literacy also struggle to understand and respond to the official communications from Centrelink and job network agencies, which determine their continued eligibility for income support.

The lack of control that people with low literacy have over their circumstances brings with it a range of health problems. At the same time, they are less likely to access primary health care services, and to follow the instructions they are given for managing medications and treatments.

A way to get more kids reading and writing is to give their parents those same skills. Literacy for Life Foundation/Adam Sharman, Author provided (No reuse)

Impact on children

When the adults in a community experience these problems, they have obvious consequences for their children, including on their ability to participate in school.

Most importantly, parents and other adult relations who struggle with literacy are unlikely to be able to support their children at school, in the way that parents with more literacy can.

This includes reading to children when they are very young; being able to understand and respond to notes that come home from school; taking part in parent-teacher meetings; and advocating for their children when they are having trouble at school.

It should therefore come as no surprise that children who are least likely to attend regularly and do well in school are those who grow up in households where few adults, if any, have had a good education.

When Literacy for Life Foundation ran an adult literacy campaign in the small New South Wales community of Enngonia, the local school principal was one of the biggest supporters. She said:

More parents are talking to me about school and asking for their kids to be given homework. Our pre-schoolers are using the library more, too. It’s been a great thing for the community: it’s given the adults who did miss out on their schooling a chance to catch up and have a way to relate to their children.

An ARC-funded longitudinal study of the impact of the campaigns is now underway and due for completion in 2019. This will provide more detailed evidence of the links between lifting adult literacy across a community and better school outcomes for children.

In the meantime, there is plenty of evidence already in the public domain that indicates Indigenous adult literacy levels are alarmingly low and require immediate attention.

Aboriginal community leaders began calling for action on adult literacy nearly 30 years ago, and these calls were supported in the recommendations of the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.

If we are serious about getting more Indigenous kids reading and writing, we must tackle low adult literacy at the same time. If we don’t, the gap will only continue to widen.


Read more articles in this series.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Smoking : Download Tackling Indigenous Smoking Program prelim. evaluation report

 ” The overall goal of the national Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) program is to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through local population specific efforts to reduce harm from tobacco.

The purpose of this preliminary report is to provide a mid-term evaluation of progress to date in implementing the first year of the three year (2015-2018) TIS program.

The TIS programme with a budget of $116.8 million over 3 years ($35.3 million in 2015-16; $37.5 million in 2016-17 and $44 million in 2017-18) was announced by the Government, on 29 May 2015.”

Download 133 page PDF report Here :

NACCHO Download Dept Health Tackling Indigenous Smoking Evaluation June 2017

The report found the program is operating effectively, using proven approaches to change smoking behaviours, and delivering evidence-based local tobacco health promotion activities. I am pleased the report recommends it continues,

Smoking is the most preventable cause of disease and early death among Aboriginal people and accounts for almost one-quarter of the difference in average health outcomes between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

“The program provides grants in 37 urban, rural, regional and remote areas to assist local communities to develop localised anti-smoking campaigns

Minister Ken Wyatt

Read over 100 plus NACCHO articles published in past 5 years

This mid-term evaluation looks at progress to date of the TIS program, particularly in terms of regional grants delivering localised Indigenous tobacco interventions.

Source of intro

See list all 35 Recipients below

It does not look at long-term impact in relation to a reduction of smoking rates at a national level.

Findings focus on (see in full below 1-9)

  • the shift to TIS
  • community engagement and partnerships
  • localised health promotion
  • access to quit support
  • contribution to evidence base
  • National Best Practice Unit and TIS portal
  • governance and communications.

A number of key recommendations emerging from the evaluation are included in the report.(see Below Part 2)

Findings

1. Shift to TIS

Since the implementation of the TIS program, all grant recipients are primarily focused on planning for, and/or delivering, targeted and tailored activities that directly address reduction of smoking prevalence within communities.

For some grant recipients, broader health promotion activities without a clear link to tobacco reduction have dropped off significantly as a result of the shift to TIS, whilst for others the integration of healthy lifestyle and tobacco control strategies has been successful. There are varying degrees of clarity among grant recipients about the extent to which there is flexibility to tap into healthy lifestyle activities under the new guidelines.

2.Community engagement and partnerships

Community engagement and involvement in the design and planning of localised TIS programs is a key priority for grant recipients, and a key indicator of successful TIS activities.

While challenges were identified in terms of handling competing priorities in community, adhering to cultural protocols, and the change in focus of the TIS program and uncertainty about ongoing funding, in the main, grant recipients have demonstrated substantial progress in involving community in design and planning and garnering support for TIS activities.

This is evidenced by the popularity of community events hosted/attended by the TIS team and the proactivity of local community and Elders in advocating for tobacco control.

The success of the TIS program and the capacity for grant recipients to operate as a multi-level population health program in their region is highly dependent upon the quality and reach of partnerships between grant recipients and other agencies/organisations.

Whilst challenges to regional collaborations were reported, overall there has been a noticeable increase in the reporting of grant recipient collaboration and partnerships, representing an important shift to both a wider regional focus and wider community approach to tobacco reduction.

3.Localised health promotion

At the local level, a range of multi-component health promotion activities around tobacco control are being undertaken by grant recipients, in collaboration with external stakeholders. Local partnerships are crucial to the successful implementation of localised health promotion activities through facilitating access to priority populations, supporting capacity-building and enabling a broader population reach to achieve awareness and understanding of the health impacts of smoking and quitting pathways. viii

Increased levels of community support and ownership for local solutions to tackling Indigenous smoking are being seen across the TIS sites.

4.Community education

Community education, is being undertaken by all grant recipients. This manifests in a range of ways, including health promotion activities at community/sporting events, drama shows and comedy and social marketing.

The involvement of local champions and Elders in local education and awareness raising events and activities is recognised as central to tobacco control messages resonating with target audiences.

It has also been recognised that targeting priority groups, such as young people and pregnant women, requires the adaptation of messages so that they resonate with those groups.

Grant recipients are partnering with key local organisations (e.g. schools, other AMS etc.) to overcome some of the challenges around access to these priority groups.

Many grant recipients have established or showed progress in establishing social marketing campaigns to supplement other health promotion activities. Campaigns are developed largely through a strength-based approach, with ‘local faces and local places’ taking precedence. Grant recipients have acknowledged the challenges in measuring the impact of social marketing campaigns although some are demonstrating a commitment to collecting data on awareness, and influences on motivations and attempts to quit.

5.Smoke-free environments

An area that has been recognised by grant recipients as requiring attention is the promotion and establishment of smoke-free environments, particularly in rural and remote locations. Modelling smoke-free environments within the grant recipients’ own workplace is one way in which this issue is being addressed, with some evidence of success.

Challenges to the implementation of smoke-free workplaces include getting support from senior leaders or Board members who smoke, and organisations where tobacco control is not the main priority. Monitoring the compliance of smoke-free environments presented an additional challenge to grant recipients. Some external organisations have requested support to become smoke-free, and successful examples of smoke-free environments including smoke-free community events are evident.

Shifting attitudes around second-hand smoke (e.g. smoking indoors and in cars) and some evidence of behaviour change were reported by grant recipients and community members.

6.Access to quit support

TIS funded organisations are encouraged to take a systems approach to activity planning. The TIS program is part of a larger preventive health care system, all connected in different ways such as through referral pathways, and client appointments.

A key component of the TIS program is therefore enhancement of referral pathways and promoting access to quit support. Grant recipients have developed a range of opportunities for community members to achieve smoking cessation, with referral pathways having been established in two key areas: clinic-based referrals within their organisation and referrals made during localised TIS health promotion activities.

For some, successful referral pathways are dependent upon grant recipients partnering with external organisations.

Improving access to culturally appropriate support to quit has been a key focus of the grant recipients over the past 12 months.

Quitline enhancements are a component of the TIS program and data suggests that referrals to Quitline are higher in urban and some rural areas. Continuing to build strong partnerships between grant recipients and Quitline will be key to increasing referrals from local TIS programs into Quitline where appropriate.

Another key focus for grant recipients has been in increasing the skills of TIS workers and other professionals in contact with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to provide smoking cessation education and brief interventions. Quits kills training, and other smoking cessation education programs, have been accessed to support this goal.

7.Contributions to evidence base

The shift to delivering activities based in evidence and focusing more on outcomes than outputs has been welcomed by grant recipients, in the main, and has provided greater direction for activities and a goal to work towards.

A range of activities were undertaken by grant recipients to develop or strengthen their evidence base and work towards measurable outcomes. Collecting data remained challenging for some remote grant recipients operating in contexts with low literacy levels and where English is not the first language. Health service grant recipients wanting to collect population level data was also challenging when services are operating on different databases within a region and where there was an unwillingness to share data.

Overall, grant recipients expressed a willingness to focus on outcomes, and the confidence and capability to obtain data, although interpreting and reporting on data was presented as a challenge.

8.National Best Practice Unit and TIS portal

Advice and guidance around monitoring, measuring and further improving local TIS programs is provided to grant recipients through the NBPU TIS. Grant recipients have indicated that they value the support and advice provided through the NBPU TIS and this has aided in building their confidence and capacity to undertake monitoring and evaluation activities.

Some grant recipients reported that an additional level of support from NBPU TIS was needed. Resistance to change is common in any business when new processes are set in place. NBPU TIS therefore expected, and has witnessed, some resistance to this change. However, it continues to engage with grant recipients and support significant processes of change, not just reporting and compliance.

Another component of the work of the NBPU TIS is the development and ongoing maintenance and improvement of the Tackling Indigenous Smoking Resource and Information Centre (TISRIC) and its home, the TIS Portal (hosted by Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet).

Information and resources to support grant recipients in planning, monitoring, and evaluating activities, as well as information on workforce development is provided through the TIS Portal.

In addition, the Portal hosts an online forum (TIS Yarning Place) that enables grant recipients from across the country to share information and ask questions. Evaluation findings suggest that, whilst grant recipients are utilising the TIS Portal, some grant recipients have identified opportunities to enhance the useability of the TIS Portal.

9.Governance and communications

Various components of support are provided to grant recipients by the department and the NBPU TIS regarding the new focus and priorities and expectations of the TIS program.

To ensure consistent program messaging, and to enhance performance reporting, a range of initiatives were undertaken in the latter half of 2016 to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the various ‘players’ in the national TIS program.

The loss of experienced staff due to funding uncertainty has represented a significant challenge for several grant recipients in their planning and implementing activities.

Particularly in remote areas, recruitment has been an issue for many grant recipients due to the mix of skills demanded of TIS staff. Grant recipients report continued issues attracting and retaining staff with only short term contracts under the new TIS program.

Despite these concerns, indications are that providing grant recipients are given sufficient time and support to execute their Action Plans, they are on track for achieving stated tobacco reduction outcomes. The key risk to this is workforce stability, which would be mitigated by timely advice about the outcome of ongoing funding arrangements.

A number of key recommendations have emerged out of the evaluation findings:

Overall recommendations

1. Department: The TIS program in its current form should be continued, with a move away from short-term funding cycles.

2. Department: Provide immediate advice about the funding of TIS from June 2017 to end of current funding cycle.

Shift to TIS

3. Department: Provide clarity around what is allowable in relation to healthy lifestyle activities within the current iteration of the TIS program  Community engagement and partnerships

4. Grant recipients: Continue to broker partnerships and leverage relationships.

5. NBPU TIS: Continue to build capability of grant recipients to broker partnerships and leverage relationships through the distribution and promotion of relevant resources.

Community education and awareness

6. Grant recipients: Continue to identify and prioritise key groups, especially pregnant women.

7. Grant recipients: Ensure evidence-based best practice community education models (including monitoring and evaluation approaches) are sought and adopted where appropriate.

8. NBPU TIS: Ensure the evidence-based best practice community education models (including monitoring and evaluation approaches) are available, particularly for priority target groups such as pregnant women and activities around social marketing.

Smoke-free environments

9. Grant recipients: Continue to explore implementing smoke-free workplaces and enhance support for smoke-free public spaces.

10. National Coordinator: Lead a dialogue between regional leaders, including CEOs, Board members of TIS and non-TIS funded organisations around establishing smoke-free environments.

Access to quitting support

11. Grant recipients: Continue to strengthen partnerships with Quitline and other quit support structures where appropriate.  Contribution to larger evidence base

12. Grant recipients: Build on routine and existing data sources to reduce data collection burden.

National support

13. Grant recipients: Continue to seek feedback from NBPU TIS regarding M&E activities where required.

14. NBPU TIS: Continue to respond to feedback from GRs around M&E needs and TIS portal content and use ability.

15. Department: Articulate the role of the National coordinator  in the context that the program has evolved and as such his role has evolved. Governance and communication

16. Department: Provide greater clarification of TIS funding parameters, especially in terms of incorporation of healthy lifestyle activities and one-on-one smoking cessation support.

The Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) regional tobacco control grants aim to improve the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through population health activities to reduce tobacco use. It is an initiative of the Australian Government Department of Health (DoH).

At the end of 2015, a number of organisations were notified of their success in gaining a TIS grant for culturally appropriate tobacco cessation programs. The grants were awarded to a variety of service providers across the nation.

The 35 organisations that have commenced their programs are:

With the program funding provided until 2018, the successful organisations will work towards the intended outcomes of the TIS programme, including:

  • encouraging community involvement in and support for local tobacco control activities
  • increasing community understanding of the dangers of smoking and chewing tobacco
  • improving knowledge, skills and a better understanding of the health impacts of smoking.

Aboriginal Health Please support the @MaiWiruSCF #Sugar Challenge Palyaringkunytjaku – Towards Wellbeing

“ The rates of obesity and insulin resistance syndrome in our communities are now so high that the majority of the adult population over 35 will be affected.

This provides a situation in which we are not aiming to target a subset or at risk group of the population with a nutrition strategy but our whole population is both at risk and suffering disease.”

Professor Paul Torzillo, Medical Director of Nganampa Health Council said in Fighting for “Good Food” (Mai Wiru), submitted by Lorenzo Piemonte, International Diabetes Foundation (2015)

 ” Congratulations, Mai Wiru. They are excited to be taking 10 influential Anangu senior women on a nutrition education retreat so they can experience first hand how a healthy diet feels, and can consequently extend lives in the APY Lands – to do this though, they need your help

Friends,please share this and support it. I met so many wonderful people when I spent two day in the APY Lands last week – they deserve our help.”

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt

Amata was an alcohol-free community, but some years earlier its population of just under 400 people had been consuming 40,000 litres of soft drink annually.

The thing that I say in community meetings all the time is that, the reason we’re doing this is so that the young children now do not end up going down the same track of diabetes, kidney failure, dialysis machines and early death, which is the track that many, many people out here are on now,”

Mai Wiru, meaning good health, and managed by long-time community consultant John Tregenza.

See Previous NACCHO Post Aboriginal Health and Sugar TV Doco: APY community and the Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation

Palyaringkunytjaku – Towards Wellbeing is the brain child of Inawantji (Ina) Scales, a young Pitjantjatjara woman from the APY Lands.

Ina has seen too many family and friends, too many Anangu (people from the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands) die from diet related illnesses.

Watch video

Ina wants to give Anangu the same opportunity Hope For Health has given Yolngu in the top end

See fundraising website

In 2016 Ina met with Damon Gameau, the founding director of the Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation.

She told him of her sadness from watching so many people become ill and pass away, she also told of her personal experience from visiting Living Valley Springs and the happiness she felt at now understanding the solutions.

Ina asked Damon for his help, and the Foundation’s help, to share her experiences with other people on the APY Lands.

Here we are today, raising funds to send 10 senior and influential women to an intensive health and nutrition retreat where they will learn and be able to personally experience firsthand, the benefits of healthy eating and living.

By providing a culturally appropriate setting with language interpretation, we will free participants to focus, distraction free, on learning the extensive information that will be provided.

These strong community leaders will then be able to return to community to share their experiences and become healthy living champions.

This is a 2 week trip with an interpreter and staff member to support the women through their learning and experiences, and further to be able to support the women on their return to community.

This will also ensure longer lasting results and help participants maximise their learnings and minimise any stumbling blocks they come across.

Our aim is to have an intensive and immediate impact for these women, enabling them to experience the benefits of healthy eating and living, and to expand their understanding of the impacts of foods on their bodies, to understand the how and why foods have such influence over us.

In their roles in community they can then spread the word about their positive experience and help others make healthier choices.

The participants are being selected based on their location and their capacity to influence on their return.

As a result, these women will become healthy living champions, sharing their knowledge and experience in their regions.

We can’t do it without you.

Help Ina make a good impact on the health of her people, of the Anangu nation.

  • The rate of kidney failure in Aboriginal communities is 15 x the rest of Australia; Type 2 diabetes is 3 x the national average.
  • For too long now high Aboriginal death rates have been attributed to alcohol consumption. The communities and region of the APY lands have now been alcohol free for 40 years yet average life span on the lands is just 55; 20 years lower than the rest of Australia. This is because of poor diet.
  • Professor Paul Torzillo, Medical Director of Nganampa Health Council said in Fighting for “Good Food” (Mai Wiru), submitted by Lorenzo Piemonte, International Diabetes Foundation (2015) “The rates of obesity and insulin resistance syndrome in our communities are now so high that the majority of the adult population over 35 will be affected. This provides a situation in which we are not aiming to target a subset or at risk group of the population with a nutrition strategy but our whole population is both at risk and suffering disease.”
  • Dr Amanda Lee et al in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Nutrition in remote Aboriginal communities: Lessons from Mai Wiru and the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands, (2015), state that more than 75% of Indigenous deaths result from potentially avoidable causes. This includes type 2 diabetes, a preventable, non-communicable chronic disease. About 70% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults, and 38% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were considered overweight or obese in 2015, with an additional 8% of children who are underweight, another major contributor to the avoidable deaths.
  • Communities on the APY Lands have a long history of being proactive, for example, communities took back management of their stores to ensure food security (the availability and affordability of healthy food and essential items on a daily basis through their local store).
  • There are programs in place that address nutrition and health, but the scale of the problem necessitates a spot fire approach and they are struggling to extend and achieve the progressive results needed to combat chronic health and nutrition issues in the Aboriginal population.
  • The success of service delivery in remote communities depends on the level of community involvement and buy-in. By providing an intensive experience with ongoing support community members will be empowered to create and manage change in their communities.

To make this program fly we need your wonderful support to get there!

We know you’re all very busy people and this is why we appreciate your help more than you can know! Here is a list of 10 things that you could do to help us make Ina’s dream of Palyaringkunytjaku – Towards Wellbeing a reality.

  1. Share our emails – when you receive our emails – share them with your friends and networks.
  2. Share our Social Media posts – Follow us on Facebook and invite your friends to do the same.
  3. Talk to your friends, family, colleagues – tell them what we are doing and how they can support us.
  4. Give us a call. We are looking for more support and are ready to answer calls. We can talk in more detail about the project and who knows where a conversation may lead. Email info@maiwirufoundation.org
  5. Hold a fundraising event. Be creative – a donation box at your work for a month, hold a concert, a dinner party with tickets, a raffle, a physical challenge among your friends, a percentage of your office mates salaries for a month. Design your own style of fundraising.
  6. Create your own campaign under this ‘Palyaringkunytjaku’ umbrella – simply click the button at the bottom of the screen that says ‘Fundraisers – Create Your Own’. You can select one of the impact levels and let your friends and family know what the funds raise will enable. You might like to do ‘6 Spoons in June (and July)’ for the length of this campaign and ask for sponsorship, as an incentive
  7. Keep a close eye on our campaign-we need to hit the target, so if we get close and time is short consider donating again to get us over the top
  8. Have you got something special to give? Relevant health products or services? Donate towards our perks or retreat or help with distributing perks to donors.
  9. Send a message through your networks. Do you have a voice in your community? Do you have a big social media following? Perhaps a lot of professional networks? One or two emails during the campaign from you could result in thousands of dollars towards our very important work. We have email templates for you to use and technical support available if you require. Email: info@maiwirufoundation.org
  10. Did we mention sharing our social media, emails and talking to people you know about what we are doing? When people hear and understand your passion, they can be inspired to jump on board.

All donations are tax deductible.

What happens if we get more or less than $63,500?

By hitting $63,500 we can make Ina’s dream a reality and take 10 participants from the APY Lands on this program, means Palyaringkunytjaku can go ahead as Ina hoped.

There are always many people from the APY Lands who would benefit from this experience,, therefore the amount we raise will directly impact on the number of people Ina and the Mai Wiru Foundation are able to support.

The Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation is an indigenous community-led initiative, implementing nutrition programs in central Australia’s remote APY Lands. After two years of consultation, and multiple visits from nutritionists to indigenous communities, the team are working on three key projects: opening healthy living cafes, funding permanent nutritionists on the ground, and intensive nutrition workshops.

Melbourne filmmaker Damon Gameau embarked on a unique experiment to document the effects of a high sugar diet on a healthy body, consuming only foods that are commonly perceived, or promoted to be ‘healthy’. Damon’s now acclaimed documentary The Sugar Film raises awareness of the hazards of any diet containing too much sugar. In making the film Damon included a segment about an innovative health program initiated by Indigenous communities in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara(APY) Lands, where stores were stocking healthy foods and nutritionists were advising customers on the best food choices. Damon determined to give back to the APY communities who featured in That Sugar Film by supporting them in their mission to take control of their own nutrition and improve the health status of Aboriginal families on the APY Lands.

Damon founded the Mai Wiru (Good Food) Sugar Challenge Foundation, a not-for-profit enterprise working with APY communities in an indigenous-led initiative to improve their health.

The health challenges of Aboriginal people are well documented, with current research identifying a 10 year gap between the life expectancy of indigenous and non-indigenous males and indigenous and non-indigenous females. The report published by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare : Indigenous Health (2014) found that ‘The largest gap in death rates between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians was in circulatory disease deaths (22% of the gap) followed by endocrine, metabolic and nutritional disorders (particularly diabetes) (14% of the gap)’.

You can start your own campaign to raise money for Palyaringkunytjaku – with a goal for one of the impact levels below:

  • For the flights – 1 participant (12 in total) = $767
  • For the 2 week health workshop – per participant (10 participants) = $5,990
  • Meals during transit per person – 4 days (12 people) = $300
  • Vehicle expenses – hire, mileage, fuel, maintenance. Pickup and return to community – 3 vehicles for all participants = $11,169
  • Accommodation Alice Springs – per person 2 nights (each direction) twin share = $150

What happens if we get more or less than $63,500?

By hitting $63,500 we can make Ina’s dream a reality and take 10 participants from the APY Lands on this program, it means Palyaringkunytjaku can go ahead as Ina hoped. There are always many people from the APY Lands who would benefit from this experience, therefore the amount we raise will directly impact on the number of people Ina and the Mai Wiru Foundation are able to support

If you would prefer to make a donation by bank transfer/direct deposit, please see our bank account details below. Please advise by email – info@maiwirufoundation.org – when donation is made so we can issue a tax receipt. Thank you.

Account Name: Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation
Bank: Suncorp
BSB: 484 799
Acct No: 507433042
Description: Please enter your email address

Aboriginal Sexual Health #NAIDOC2017@sahmriAU Launches new initiative to prevent the spread of syphilis in remote #Indigenous communities

“ This multifaceted approach to educate young people is well overdue. The resources that have been developed and focus tested with young people will go a very long way in improving outcomes in the community.”

Associate Professor James Ward, Head of Infectious Disease Research – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health at SAHMRI said that education and awareness about syphilis transmission and its consequences is vital if we are to make a difference.

Consider this fact

Since 2011, there has been a sustained outbreak of infectious syphilis occurring in remote areas spanning northern, central and South Australia among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people predominantly aged between 15 and 35 years.

The South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute’s (SAHMRI) Infection and Immunity Theme has launched  a new multifaceted community education and awareness program in the fight against syphilis in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The campaign, entitled ‘Young, Deadly, Syphilis Free’, will utilise mediums including two television commercials.

TV Commercial 1 View Here

TV Commercial 2 View Here

social media, local radio and a new website to communicate to young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who live in remote communities the importance of being tested for syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection (STIs) that when left untreated, can have devastating effects.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/youngdeadlysyphilisfree/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/youngdeadlysyphilisfree/

Website: http://youngdeadlyfree.org.au/young-deadly-syphilis-free/

Why is this campaign so important?

This project, funded by the Commonwealth Government Department of Health, has the ultimate objective of increasing testing rates among young Aboriginal people in the affected areas so that rates of syphilis are reduced in these communities.

Since 2011, there has been a sustained outbreak of infectious syphilis occurring in remote areas spanning northern, central and South Australia among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people predominantly aged between 15 and 35 years.

The accrued number of cases is now over 1,400 including four neonatal deaths and several other cases of congenital syphilis notified. Worryingly, syphilis continues to spread into new areas, and this needs to be stopped.

In addition to targeting young people, this campaign will have focus on healthcare services and providers, through the use of supporting resources and education materials, such as videos, posters and animations.

Clinicians will play an important part in the success of this project and they are encouraged to consider talking more broadly about the syphilis outbreak among people of influence in their community to raise awareness.

Furthermore, the project will trial social media ambassadors, who will be young people from remote communities to help spread the campaign and its objectives.

Attached is also the Email signature jpeg which some members may be willing to use to help promote testing

Thank you for sharing

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #FASD Workshop dates : Development of the National #FASD Strategy 2018 – 2028

The Australian Government Department of Health is undertaking consultations to inform the development of the National FASD Strategy 2018– 2028.

The Strategy will provide a national approach for all levels of government, organisations and individuals on strategies that target the reduction of alcohol related harms relating to FASD, reducing the prevalence of FASD in Australia and provide advice and linkages on the support which is available for those affected by the disorder.

The objectives of the National FASD Strategy 2018 – 2028 are:

  • strengthen efforts and address the whole-of-life impacts of FASD;
  • address the whole-of-population issues;
  • support collaborative cross sectoral approaches required to prevent FASD in Australia; and
  • provide information and support those living with and affected by the disorder.

The Department has engaged Siggins Miller Consultants Pty Ltd (Siggins Miller) to undertake the development of the National FASD Strategywhich includes consultation with stakeholders and the development of a national strategy which provides a national holistic approach to reducing the prevalence of FASD; support Australians living with the disorder; guide the activities of individuals and communities as well as all levels of government, the public and research sectors, Not-For-Profit organisations which can adapted and implemented across Australia.

Siggins Miller is an experienced Australian consultancy company providing services for over 20 years in policy and program research, evaluation and management consultancy. The Siggins Miller project team is led by Professor Mel Miller (Director) and Mr James Miller (Senior Consultant).

As part of the consultation process, Siggins Miller will be conducting face-to-face strategy development workshops. There will also be other opportunities to provide feedback including through supplementary telephone interviews and written submissions.

The consultation period will run from 1st July, 2017 and conclude on the 1st September, 2017.

The workshops will be attended by with individuals and organisations working on FASD, individuals and organisations working with people affected by FASD, public health organisations and representatives of State and Territory Departments including: Health, Corrections and Juvenile Justice and Education and National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Affiliates.

The workshops will be catered and run from 9:30am – 3:30pm. Face-to-face strategy development workshops will be held in and on:

Sydney: Tuesday, August 1, 2017.

Canberra: Thursday August 3, 2017.

Melbourne: Tuesday,August 8, 2017.

Hobart: Thursday, August 10, 2017.

Brisbane: Tuesday,August 15, 2017.

Cairns: Thursday, August 17, 2017.

Perth: Tuesday,August 22, 2017.

Broome: Thursday, August 24, 2017.

Darwin: Tuesday,August 29, 2017.

Alice Springs: Thursday, August 31, 2017.

Adelaide: Monday, September 4, 2017.

Exact addresses of venues are in the process of being finalised and will be communicated to all stakeholder by Siggins Miller in the coming weeks.

It should be noted that due to capacity of venues, spaces to attend the face-to-face strategy development workshops are limited in each location. Invited participants will also be responsible for any costs associated with attending the face-to-face workshop in each location.

Siggins Miller will be in contact with you by email in the coming weeks with an invitation for you to attend one of the face-to face strategy development workshops.

In the meantime, should you have any questionsabout the consultation and written submission process, please contact Siggins Millerby email on fasdstrategy@sigginsmiller.com.au or by phone on: 1800 055 070.

Please note that the 1800 number provided is a message bank service in which you can leave your inquiry, a senior Siggins Miller staff member will endeavour to return your call within 72 hours.

 

 

Aboriginal Women’s Health #Breastcancer and @BCNAPinkLady : Sharing experiences and encourage you to connect, seek support and information.

” The theme of this year’s Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA) Summit was Making A Difference, and played host to many firsts, including the first-ever Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Think Tank focusing on the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians with breast cancer.

The Think Tank was facilitated by BCNA board member Professor Jacinta Elston, and brought together 48 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women from around Australia to share issues around treatment and survivorship of breast cancer in their communities.

The key outcome of the Think Tank was the development of a three year Action Plan that outlines BCNA’s key future work, in partnership with national peak Aboriginal health organisations.

VIEW BCNA Interview VIDEO of the women above HERE

More than 200 delegates gathered on the Sunshine Coast to help people in their community with breast cancer at BCNA’s 2017 National Summit

Breast Cancer Network Australia 2017 Summit at Novotel Twin Waters Resort, Sunshine Coast. photography by Lou O’Brien

More broadly, people across Australia were invited to participate in a range of workshops and lectures at Summit.

In various streams, delegates learnt new skills for helping others and managing emotions that come along with supporting other people with cancer.

As a result of activities at Summit, BCNA will be able to implement key strategic projects and services that will better support a wide range of communities and demographics.

Consultations helped informed BCNA about issues affecting Australians affected by breast cancer, but most importantly, looked at what solutions could be implemented at a local level.

These learnings will feed into BCNA’s State of The Nation project, to be launched in 2018. A dinner also took place to thank delegates for their participation, and gave attendees the opportunity to meet some of BCNA’s corporate partners, and exchange stories of their breast cancer experience.

BCNA would like to say a big thank you to our members, health professionals and corporate partners who attended this year’s National Summit.

We would like to extend our gratitude to those that gave up their own time to share experiences and learn from each other about how together we can improve the lives of all Australians affected by breast cancer. –

Resources

Early detection can boost your chances of surviving breast cancer. Many women have no signs or symptoms. However, some women do and there are things you can look out for.

Being ‘breast aware’ means becoming familiar with the normal look and feel of your breasts and reporting any unusual breast changes to your doctor as soon as possible.

Breast Health and Awareness info HERE

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

This is a private group for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples affected by breast cancer.

Closed Group Chat

NACCHO #Aboriginal Health and #Immunisation @AIHW reports Aboriginal children aged 5 national immunisation rate of 94.6%

 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffer a disproportionate burden from communicable diseases (diseases that can be transmitted from person to person), with rates of hospitalisation and illness due to these conditions many times higher than other Australians.1

Part 2  below presents results for children who were identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander on the AIR. “

 In 2015–16, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5 had an even higher national immunisation rate of 94.6%. However, there was wider variation across PHN areas, ranging from 98.8% in the Gold Coast (Qld) to 89.4% in Western Victoria.”

Download Healthy Communities:

AIHW_HC_Report_Imm_Rates_June_2017

See Previous NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WorldImmunisationWeek : @healthgovau Vaccination for our Mob

Part 1 Overview MORE INFO HERE

Immunisation is a safe and effective way to protect children from harmful infectious diseases and at the population level, prevent the spread of these diseases amongst the community.

Australia has generally high immunisation rates which have increased steadily over time, but rates continue to lag in some local areas.

This report focuses on local area immunisation rates for children aged 5 and shows changes in immunisation rates over time. It also presents 2015–16 immunisation rates for all children and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 1, 2 and 5.

Results are presented for the 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas. Where possible they are broken down into smaller geographic areas, including for more than 300 smaller areas and across Australian postcodes.

Further detailed rates are available in the downloadable Excel sheet and a new interactive web tool allows users to compare results over time by geography and age group.

This local-level information assists professionals to use their knowledge and context for their area, to target areas in need and develop effective local strategies for improvement.

The report finds:

  • Since 2011–12, childhood immunisation rates have improved nationally and across smaller areas, for all children and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Variation in rates still exists across local areas, however the gap between those areas with the highest and lowest rates is diminishing
  • Nationally 92.9% of all children aged 5 were immunised in 2015–16. All PHN areas achieved an immunisation rate of 90% or more, ranging from 96.1% in Western NSW to 90.3% in North Coast (NSW).

Summary

In 2015–16, childhood immunisation rates continued to improve nationally and in most local areas. Although rates vary across local areas, the gap in rates between the highest and lowest areas is diminishing.

This report focuses on immunisation rates for 5 year olds and presents results since 2011–12. It also provides the latest information for 1, 2 and 5 year olds for Australia’s 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas and smaller local areas.

From 2011–12 to 2015–16, there were notable improvements in rates for fully immunised 5 year olds. National rates increased from 90.0% to 92.9%. Rates increased for PHN areas too, as all areas reached rates above 90% in 2015–16.

Rates in smaller local areas (Statistical Areas Level 3, or SA3s) have also improved. In 2015–16, 282 of the 325 local areas had rates of fully immunised 5 year olds greater than or equal to 90%. This is up from 2011–12 when only 174 areas had rates in this range. Further, the difference in rates between the highest and lowest areas has decreased over time (Figure 1).

In 2015–16, the rate of fully immunised children varied across PHN areas for the three age groups:

  • 1 year olds – 95.0% to 89.8% (national rate 93.0%)
  • 2 year olds – 93.2% to 87.2% (national rate 90.7%)
  • 5 year olds – 96.1% to 90.3% (national rate 92.9%).

Part 2 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffer a disproportionate burden from communicable diseases (diseases that can be transmitted from person to person), with rates of hospitalisation and illness due to these conditions many times higher than other Australians.1

This section presents results for children who were identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander on the AIR. These data are based on Medicare enrolment records.

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, national immunisation rates in 2015–16 for 1 and 2 year olds were lower than the rates for all children (89.8% compared with 93.0% for 1 year olds, and 87.7% compared with 90.7% for 2 year olds).

In contrast, the national immunisation rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5 years was higher than the rate for all children (94.6% compared with 92.9%).

Primary Health Network areas

In 2015–16, the percentages of fully immunised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children varied across PHN areas for all three age groups as shown in Figure 6. The range in immunisation rates across PHN areas for the three age groups is outlined below.

  • 1 year olds – 94.2% in Tasmania to 76.1% in Perth North (WA)
  • 2 year olds – 93.4% in South Western Sydney (NSW) to 76.0% in Perth South (WA)
  • 5 year olds – 98.8% in Gold Coast (Qld) to 89.4% in Western Victoria.

Statistical Areas Level 4 (SA4s)

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, Statistical Areas Level 4 (SA4s) were used instead of SA3s as the smallest geographic areas. There are larger populations in SA4s and this allows more reliable reporting for smaller population groups such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Across more than 80 SA4s, the percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children fully immunised in 2015–16 varied considerably:

  • 1 year olds – ranged from 95.9% in Central Coast (NSW) to 72.4% in Perth–North West (WA)
  • 2 year olds – ranged from 96.0% in Coffs Harbour–Grafton (NSW) to 71.2% in Perth–South East (WA)
  • 5 year olds – ranged from 100% in Murray (NSW) to 87.6% in Perth–South East (WA).

Figure 6: Percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children fully immunised and numbers not fully immunised, by Primary Health Network area, 2015–16

# Interpret with caution: This area’s eligible population is between 26 and 100 registered children.

Notes

  • Components may not add to totals due to rounding.
  • Data are reported to one decimal place, however for graphical display and ordering they are plotted unrounded.
  • These data reflect results for children recorded as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander on the AIR. Levels of recording may vary between local areas.

Source Australian Institute of Health and Welfare analysis of Department of Human Services, Australian Immunisation Register statistics, for the period 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016, assessed as at 30 June 2016. Data supplied 2 March 2017.

ADDED June14

Influenza Vaccination During Pregnancy

Vaccination remains the best protection pregnant women and their newborn babies have against influenza.

Despite influenza vaccination being available free to pregnant women on the National Immunisation Program, vaccination rates remain low with only 1 in 3 pregnant women receiving the influenza vaccine.

Influenza infection during pregnancy can lead to premature delivery and even death in newborns and very young babies. Pregnant women can have the vaccine at any time during pregnancy and they benefit from it all through the year.

Health professional:

Pregnant women:

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #CarersGateway : Free online resources to support #Aboriginal #carers

It’s rewarding work, but without help Dolly finds herself emotionally and physically drained. Dolly reached out and found that she could get services to help her.

Like Dolly, millions of people in Australia care for others who need help with their everyday lives.

A carer may be someone who looks after their husband or wife, partner, grandparent, uncle, aunty, cousin, child, grandchild or any other family member, a neighbour, a friend or someone in their community who needs help.

Everyone’s situation is different. Some carers look after someone who is an older person or who is unwell or has difficulties getting around. Some carers may look after someone who has a disability, a mental illness or dementia, a chronic condition or a long-term illness or drug and alcohol problems.

Many people looking after someone else don’t think of themselves as carers. They just see caring as what they do to help their families or friends or people in their communities.

Carers need help too – someone they can talk to and find out about services that can help. Carer Gateway is a free, Australian Government funded service that provides information for carers and helps people get in touch with their local services. People can ring up and have a private chat or go online and find out about support in their area, free financial and legal help and what to do in emergencies.  They can also get tips on how to look after themselves so they don’t get burnt out while caring for someone else.

Carer Gateway has short videos about real-life carers in the community – showing how they cope and deal with problems – and how they make the most of the time they spend caring for someone in need.

The videos include Dolly’s story. Dolly is a mother and full-time carer for her two adult daughters, who both need support with their everyday needs.

“It’s pretty much 24/7 around the clock. Four years ago, I realised I was doing a care role and I was also a working mum so quite busy. I thought you know what, it’s time for me to step back and start looking after my own,” she said.

There are free online resources to support Aboriginal carers, including a guided relaxation audio recording and information brochures and posters for use by health and community groups  which can also be ordered from the Carer Gateway ordering form and a Carer Gateway Facebook page to keep up to date on services and supports for carers.

To find out more, Carer Gateway can be contacted on 1800 422 737, Monday to Friday between 8am and 6pm,

or by visiting carergateway.gov.au

You can join the Carer Gateway Facebook community by visiting https://www.facebook.com/carergateway/

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #NRW2017 Elder Care : Audit report Aged Care services were delivered to 35 083 Indigenous elders

 

 ” Health conditions associated with ageing often affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people earlier than other Australians.3

This is reflected in the Australian Government policy to provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people access to aged care services from 50 years old, in comparison to 65 years old for the broader population.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are also designated as a special needs group under the Aged Care Act 1997 and all aged care service providers must have regard to the particular physical, physiological, social, spiritual, environmental and other health related care needs of individual recipients.4″

From ANAO Audit report Download here

Dep of Health Audit report Indigenous Aged Care

Image above from here

Background

1. The Australian Government provided $15.2 billion in funding to the aged care sector in 2014–15 and $16.2 billion in 2015–16.

Aged Care services were delivered to 35 083 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2014–15 at an estimated cost of $216 million1 (approximately 1.4 per cent of the total aged care budget).2

2. See above intro 4

3. The Australian Government funds aged care services to assist frail older people, and the carers of frail older people, to remain living at home as well as residential aged care services. The programs funded include:

  • the Commonwealth Home Support Program, which provides entry-level home support for older people who need assistance to keep living independently;
  • the Home Care Packages Program, which provides services tailored to meet individuals’ specific care needs including care services, support services, clinical services and other services to support older people to remain living at home and connected to their communities; and
  • residential aged care, which provides supported accommodation services for older people who are unable to continue living independently in their own homes.

4. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people also have access to aged care services funded through the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program (Flexible Program). In 2015–16 funding for the Flexible Program was approximately $37 million, based on agreed funded places rather than occupancy. The Flexible Program aims to provide aged care services that meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally appropriate setting, close to home and community. The majority of Flexible Program services are delivered in regional, remote and very remote locations.5

5. The Department of Health is responsible for leading the development of evidence based policy, determining the allocation of funding, and regulation of the Commonwealth aged care system to improve the wellbeing of older Australians as well as the implementation of the aged care reforms. The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency is responsible for assessing the quality of care of Australian Government funded aged care service providers. This is done through:

  • the accreditation of residential aged care service providers;
  • quality reviews of aged care provided to people living in their own homes or in the community; and
  • education and training on quality aged care to the aged care sector.

Audit objective and criteria

6. The objective of the audit was to assess the effectiveness of Australian Government-funded aged care services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. To form a conclusion against the audit objective, the ANAO adopted the following high level criteria:

  • Is there an effective framework in place to support access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to quality aged care services?
  • Do the Department of Health and the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency have effective frameworks to oversee the delivery of aged care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?
  • Does the Department of Health have appropriate arrangements in place for monitoring and reporting on the achievement of program objectives and supporting the cost effectiveness and service continuity of aged care delivery to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?

Conclusion

7. Australian Government-funded aged care services are largely delivered effectively to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

8. The ageing of Australia’s population and growing diversity among older people, in terms of their care needs, preferences and socioeconomic status, are placing pressure on the depth and agility of Australia’s aged care system. There are additional challenges in ensuring access to culturally appropriate care and service continuity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly for those living in remote and very remote communities. Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may also have language or cultural preferences that influence their specific requirements.

9. The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program has been effective in increasing the access to culturally appropriate aged care services for elderly Indigenous Australians. The direct selection and recurrent funding approach of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program provides few opportunities for new service providers to enter the market. There would be benefit in the Department of Health extending the application process to new service providers and better aligning the funded places with service capacity.

10. The Department of Health has developed sufficient guidance materials and provides supplementary funding to support Indigenous-focused services that operate under the Commonwealth Home Support, Home Care Packages and residential programs. However, not all Indigenous-focused services are aware of the Department of Health’s sector support programs.6

11. The Department of Health and the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency have been largely effective in their administration of Australian Government-funded aged care services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Each entity has developed sound administrative arrangements to manage the delivery of aged care services and to review the quality of care delivered through aged care programs. The Department of Health can strengthen its administration by implementing a coordinated approach that ensures the timely sharing of relevant information to facilitate risk assessments across the Ageing and Aged Care Group.

12. Consistent with its policy intent, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program is a more cost effective and viable model for specialised aged care delivery to Indigenous Australians when services are located in remote and very remote communities. A 25.8 per cent share of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program funding is allocated to services located in major cities and inner regional areas. To optimise recurrent funding decisions, it is important the Department of Health ensures that the existing service providers, their location and number of places, remain the most appropriate.

13. Given that the majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people access aged care through Commonwealth Home Support Program, Home Care Packages Program and residential aged care programs, further work is required by the Department of Health to maintain the service continuity of Indigenous-focused service providers in areas where there are no culturally secure alternatives. The Department of Health has an opportunity to leverage its datasets to improve the targeting of sector support initiatives to Indigenous-focused services and to monitor the ongoing impacts of aged care policies and programs on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Supporting findings

Access and use of aged care services by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

14. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were most likely to access aged care services through the Commonwealth Home Support Program or the Home Care Packages Program, at rates consistent with their share of the aged care population. Fewer than one per cent of residential aged care places were taken up by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

15. The Department of Health has created clear and consistent pathways for individuals to access and progress through the aged care system. The My Aged Care Contact Centre and website are the main entry points to the aged care system. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to connect with the My Aged Care Contact Centre, and can call directly or use a trusted representative to speak on their behalf. Following an initial screening undertaken by Contact Centre staff, the Regional Assessment Service assesses older people’s needs for lower intensity services available under the Commonwealth Home Support Program. Aged Care Assessment Teams assess the more complex needs of people requiring access to higher intensity care available under Home Care Packages, Transition Care, and within residential aged care.

16. A key challenge in targeting aged care services is assessing the eligibility of individuals seeking to access them as well as the scope of services. This can be particularly challenging in the context of facilitating access for individuals in remote or very remote areas, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

17. The Department of Health advised the ANAO that it is working with the aged care sector to identify opportunities to improve client pathways for diverse groups, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, to address the specific difficulties they may experience.

18. The Department of Health manages the planning and allocation of aged care residential places and Home Care packages for service providers based on the national planning benchmark, population projections and the current level of service provision. The Commonwealth Home Support Program and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program are funded through a grants process.

19. Between 2012–13 and 2015–16 the number of Home Care Level 1‒2 packages allocated to Indigenous-focused service providers has not grown at the same rate as those allocated to mainstream service providers. However, the growth in Home Care Level 3‒4 package and residential place allocations to Indigenous-focused service providers have both been higher than for mainstream counterparts.

20. The distribution of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program funding has remained largely unchanged since its inception. This is largely due to the continuation of grant agreements to existing services that have been in place over the life of the program. These arrangements limit the potential for new providers to access the program.

21. The Department of Health has developed operational manuals and/or guidelines to support providers in the delivery and management of aged care services for the programs reviewed as part of the audit. The Department of Health also funds two peak bodies to develop additional resources to assist with managing the change introduced by aged care reforms (including resources targeted towards remote and very remote Indigenous-focused service providers).

22. The Department of Health funds a Remote and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Service Development Assistance Panel (SDAP) to support aged care providers. ANAO consultations with Indigenous-focussed service providers indicated that awareness of SDAP funding varied across states and territories. There would be benefit in the Department of Health raising the awareness of this assistance in a consistent manner across jurisdictions, and measuring the financial management and governance capacity that has been built and maintained among service providers as a result of having received the funding.

Administration and regulation of aged care services

23. The Department of Health has internal governance committees, templates and guidance to coordinate program administration. Health’s state and territory offices have also adopted various local strategies for engaging with Indigenous-focused service providers. The department has commenced work to strengthen relationships between its National Office and its state and territory offices, to improve links between policy development and program implementation, while still allowing for specific approaches within each jurisdiction.

24. The Department of Health has developed an Enterprise Risk Management Plan that is updated annually as part of the department’s business planning processes. Each of the programs reviewed as part of the audit included risk management (identification, analysis and evaluation) in its business processes. Risk is considered against the type of activity being funded and may result in different risk ratings being given to the same organisation across each activity or program being funded. For service providers that are funded under multiple programs, there is an opportunity for Health to implement a more coordinated approach that facilitates the timely sharing of relevant information across program areas.

25. The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency has developed policies, procedures and guidance materials to support the accreditation of residential aged care service providers, and specific policies for the quality review of Home Care Packages, Commonwealth Home Support Program and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program service providers. Documents reviewed by the ANAO demonstrate that the relevant accreditation and quality review procedures were followed internally.

26. The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency has collected information on assessments of all residential service providers against the accreditation standards. This information shows that between 2000-01 and 2015-16, 95 per cent of residential Indigenous-focused service providers had at least one episode of non-compliance, in comparison with 53 per cent of non-Indigenous-focused Residential service providers. Reported instances of non-compliance mostly related to governance, including regulatory compliance, risk management and human resources as opposed to issues relating to quality of care.

27. In 2014–15 the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency delivered 716 courses, seminars and compliance assistance training events to 10 638 participants from residential and Home Care service providers. Flexible service providers receive compliance assistance training as determined through a case management process. There would be benefit in the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency expanding the proposed cost recovery model to include the indirect and direct costs recovered from courses and workshops to be consistent with the Australian Government’s stated policy intention, as well as the Australian Government Cost Recovery Guidelines.

.@KenWyattMP Aboriginal Mother and Child Health #Familymatters #IHMayDay17 $40 million #BetterStarttoLife #DanilaDilba #NunkuwarrinYunti @IUIH_

” The ANFPP not only focuses on the mother and child but also assists their partners to develop a vision for their family’s future and encouragement to fulfil that vision.

The Australian Government has committed $40 million under the Better Start to Life approach to progressively expand the ANFPP from three sites to 13, by 30 June 2018.

These expansion sites were identified through a review of the child and maternal health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by geographic area, population health data including birth rates and existing services in the area.

The program will be implemented by the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (Brisbane South, Queensland), Danila Dilba Health Service, (Darwin, Northern Territory) and Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc. (Adelaide, South Australia). ”

The Federal Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt, announced today three new sites for the Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) that supports Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who are pregnant, or women pregnant with an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child.

Download the Ministers press Release Ken Wyatt Press Release

“The ANFPP is a nurse-led home visiting program, that supports women from around 16 weeks gestation to two years of age,” Minister Wyatt said.

“I am very pleased to announce the growth of the Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program to three new sites in Brisbane South, Darwin and Adelaide.

“The Australian Government has committed $40 million under the Better Start to Life approach to progressively expand the ANFPP from three sites to 13, by 30 June 2018.

“Based on the findings, consultations occurred with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Partnership Forums in each jurisdiction to seek further advice on the proposed locations and identify organisations with the capacity to implement and sustain the high fidelity of the program.”

Minister Wyatt said there is strong evidence that long-term gains in the health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people will come from investing in the early years of life and in supporting children and their families at this point in the life cycle.

“The program has demonstrated positive outcomes for women, children and families by providing comprehensive support for antenatal and postnatal care and child health and development. As at 31 March 2017, 1,269 mothers have been enrolled in the program, with 18,579 visits having taken place since the commencement of the program in 2009.

“The ANFPP not only focuses on the mother and child but also assists their partners to develop a vision for their family’s future and encouragement to fulfil that vision.”

The program will be implemented by the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (Brisbane South, Queensland), Danila Dilba Health Service, (Darwin, Northern Territory) and Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc. (Adelaide, South Australia).

The ANFPP is currently delivered in five sites: Wellington, New South Wales; Cairns and North Brisbane, Queensland; and Alice Springs and a hub and spoke model operating out of Darwin to support the Top End communities of – Wadeye, Maningrida, Gunbalunya and Wurrumiyanga, Northern Territory.

“The Australian Government is committed to reducing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infant mortality, and I am very pleased to support this important initiative,” Minister Wyatt said.