NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health : #NAIDOC2018 #BecauseofHerWecan @VAHS1972 #ThisGirlCan and #HerTribe inspires women to #Bepositive #bebrave #Befocused #bestrong and #bedeadly in a 16 week exercise program for local Indigenous females of all ages and abilities

I wanted to create an environment where women could come together, feel safe and confident and be able to get fit together,

121 women enrolled in the free course, which challenged participants over the course of two hours, once a week, through a range of fitness activities from gym to indoor cardio, running, walking, weights, boxing and stretching.”

Inspired by helping women in her local community gain confidence around their body image and exercise, Laura Thompson, in conjunction with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service in Preston, Victoria, created #HerTribe, a sixteen-week exercise program for local Indigenous females of all ages and abilities.

Read over 350 Aboriginal Women’s Health articles published by NACCHO in the last 6 years

Watch Video HERE

Many of the women had never participated in physical activity on a regular basis, or for a number of years, and had to overcome a range of fears to simply turn up to their first session.

“My voice said I didn’t think I’ll be able to do this because we were told it’s going to be full on,” said Aboriginal elder, Ruth Pinkard. “I feared being judged by my height, weight and age. But I have done levels that I didn’t think I could do and other people thought I couldn’t do.”

Marayne Muller saw the program advertised on Facebook and overcame enormous anxiety to sign up. “Pretty much one quarter of the way through, I was addicted. It gave me a sense of purpose and helped break down the barriers in my head. I went from someone who was pretty adamant that I didn’t want to be here anymore, to someone that was able to dream.”

For others, the supportive but challenging environment has given back a sense of identity and helped them regain good health.

“This mob has helped me to keep out of hospital. I was thinking I was too old. I suffer from asthma and I thought the younger people would laugh at me trying to keep up with them. But they were very supportive,” said Maureen Moore.

Added Lisa Thorpe, “it’s given me the ability to participate and to find out who the real person is, without being a mother or a daughter. I come here as Lisa.”

Women acting as a role model for each other, has not only provided inspiration, it has also given each participant a sense of kinship in a supportive environment where they can strive to be their best.

VicHealth research reveals that worrying about being judged stops many women from being physically active. In fact, 41% of Victorian women feel too embarrassed to exercise in public.

Which is why campaigns like This Girl Can Victoria and programs like #HerTribe, are so important. Empowering women to be active whenever, wherever and however they choose – in a supportive environment – is critical.

“From the moment I came into the environment they had created here, I found it especially amazing the variety ofpeople. They had aunties and elders and kids, and I’m a young person, so I just loved the environment they created where everyone was welcome,” said J-Mara McDonald.

Marayne Muller sums it up perfectly, “I thought I can’t get involved because everyone was better than me. But I guess, when you have amazing people around you – and women – that’s when we can start breaking that down.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s #WeCan18 Health : #NAIDOCWEEK #BecauseOfHerWeCan @ABSStats Report Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are becoming empowered through education while embracing their cultural heritage.

 “As mothers, aunts, grandmothers, sisters and daughters, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women continue to play a pivotal role in leading and supporting communities, providing support for those around them and guiding the next generation and this is celebrated with the 2018 NAIDOC week theme: Because of her, we can!

Increasing numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are becoming empowered through education while embracing their cultural heritage. They strengthen and support their communities, and provide a stimulating environment for the next generation of children.

In 2014–15, there were 231,100 women in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population aged 15 years and over “

Extracts from ABS NAIDOC WEEK

Read over 350 Aboriginal Women’s Health articles published by NACCHO over the past 6 years

Have you been chosen for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey?

WATCH VIDEO HERE

In line with this year’s NAIDOC theme, ‘Because of her, we can’, singer songwriter Shellie Morris helps champion the importance of participating in this Survey

Being empowered

 ” In our culture, our mothers, sisters aunties and grandmothers are highly respected and are the key to keeping families and culture strong. Education is giving us women and our communities hope and opportunities to be even stronger.

We dare to dream now “

Fiona Northern Territory

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are increasingly engaging in formal education and are achieving higher academic levels that ever before. In 2014-15, almost half (47%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females aged 15 years and over had achieved a Certificate, Diploma or Degree.

This represents a 45% increase from 2008 (up from 33% Figure 1.1)

The proportion of women whose highest (non school) educational attainment was a Certificate doubled between 2002 and 2014 (up from 17%to 34%). Similarly, the proportion of women holding a Diploma level or higher qualification increased from 7% in 2002 to 12% in 2014-15. Engaging in learning can lead to better employment, health and social outcomes, with the transition from education to work often smoother for higher education graduates than those entering the workforce directly from school.

Strengthening community

Providing care and support both within and outside of the household, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women play an enormous role in strengthening social and family networks in the community.

Support to those in need

In 2014-15, three out of ten women (30%) cared for someone in need (with a disability, a long-term health condition or old age). Women in the age group 45-54 years were among the most likely (35%) to have provided care to a person in need. Women living in Remote areas were more likely to provide care than those in other areas (36% compared with 28%, reflecting a combination of factors such as reduced access to services, closer family networks and strong communities relationships.

Additionally, three out of five women (61%) provided support to someone living outside of their household. Almost two thirds (61) of these women lived in a household with dependent children.

Raising the next generation

 ” Because of her, we can’ is a very powerful message, which makes all the stars girls and any Indigenous female feel very proud. It makes you think about who created us, how fare back it goes. They created us, we make the change. We continue to grow and make those who created us proud.”

Kylie Duggan,

Stars Foundation

Raising the next generation

Women are most commonly the main carers for their community’s children and therefore play a key role in a child’s learning pathway. In 2014–15, almost two-thirds (65%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0–14 years had a main carer who was an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander female. As children grow, the positive experiences they have with their main carer (and other prominent people in their lives) influence development and often lead to better outcomes as they mature into young adults[3].

The vast majority (95%) of children aged 0–14 years, whose main carer was an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander female, spent time engaged in informal learning with that carer. Between 2008 and 2014 there were increases in the proportion of women engaging with a child in playgroups, and also those assisting with homework or educational activities (increases of 52% and 17%, respectively).

Time spent with a child taking part in cultural or informal learning activities is an investment in their future, and can boost a child’s confidence academically and socially.

It takes a community to raise a child

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities work together to educate, nurture and support children. In 2014–15, most children (69%) aged 3–14 years, whose main carer was an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander female, participated in selected cultural activities in their community. Popular activities included hunting, fishing or gathering local foods (59%), and creating Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander arts or crafts (25%).

Connection to culture

Yesteryear, our grandmother regularly invited women into her house on Coranderrk Aboriginal Station Healesville.
One of the mission management rules was to say prayers in the evening.
Jemima closed the door and pulled the hessian curtains across the window.
The women all spoke in their traditional Aboriginal languages.Today my granddaughter sings in public places our ‘Call to Country’ in our Woiwurrung language.Resistance, resilience and pride prevail – because of her we can.Aunty Joy,
Victoria

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have an important role in passing on knowledge and leading successive generations through their cultural journey. In 2014–15, 85% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women participated in, watched, or attended a cultural event or activity. Three-quarters (75%) of women aged 15 years and over recognised an area as homelands or traditional country and three-fifths of women (63%) identified with clan, tribal or language group.

In 2014–15, most (73%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women either lived on or had access to homelands. Of those with access to homelands, almost half (48%) did so at least once per year. Between 2002 and 2014–15, the proportion of women reporting a connection to homelands has steadily increased (Figure 1.3), suggesting that over time women are increasingly embracing and connecting with their spiritual and cultural heritage.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Features #NAIDOCWeek #BecauseofHerWeCan Mum Shirl and NACCHO Women Leadership Tributes : Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) #NACCHOagm2018 Registrations and Expression of Interest to present NOW OPEN

NAIDOC WEEK 2018 Tribute

NAIDOC Week celebrations will kicked off yesterday highlighting the histories, rich cultures, and outstanding achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The 2018 theme #Becauseofherwecan highlighted the past and present contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

NAIDOC Week is an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women – who are strong role models and leaders in their homes, communities and society more broadly

We can all play a part in improving outcomes for women and this year’s theme provides an opportunity to press even harder for progress in our ACCHO’s

These woman in our Part 1 and 2 tribute today represent the 45 years of ACCHO’s advocating for culturally respectful, needs based approach to improving the health and wellbeing outcomes of our people in the past and now into our healthy futures.

Part 1 Coleen Shirley Perry Smith AM MBE (22 November 1921 – 28 April 1998), better known as Mum Shirl, was a prominent Wiradjuri woman, social worker and humanitarian activist committed to justice and welfare of Aboriginal Australians. She was a founding member of the Aboriginal Legal Service, the Aboriginal Medical Service, the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, the Aboriginal Children’s Service and the Aboriginal Housing Company in Redfern, a suburb of Sydney. During her lifetime she was recognised as an Australian National Living Treasure

Mum Shirl was born as Coleen Shirley Smith in the Erambie Mission, near Cowra in 1921 to Joseph and Isabell Smith. She did not attend a regular school because of her epilepsy and was taught by her grandfather and learned 16 different Aboriginal Languages. She began to visit Aboriginal people in jail after one of her brothers was incarcerated and she discovered that her visits were beneficial to other prisoners as well.

Her community activism also saw her accompanying indigenous people who were unfamiliar with the legal system to court when they had been charged with a crime. Her nickname came from her habit of replying, “I’m his mum” whenever officials queried her relationship with the prisoners – the name by which she became widely known.[1]

Because of her work visiting Aboriginal prisoners, Mum Shirl is the only woman in Australia to have been given unrestricted access to prisons in New South Wales. “She’d be at one end of the state one day, and seen at the other end of the state the next day. The department wasn’t getting her from A to B. She used to rely on family and friends to get her around,” said Ron Woodham from NSW Corrective Services.[2] Later the Department of Corrective Services revoked her pass, making her prisoner support work near impossible.[3]

Smith’s welfare work, however, was not confined only to prisons and the legal system. She also spent considerable time and money finding homes for children whose parents could not look after them, and helping displaced children to find their own parents again. The children with nowhere to go often ended up living with her. By the early 1990s she had raised over 60 children. Likewise, many people with no family or friends in Sydney arrived at Mum Shirl’s Redfern house seeking shelter.

In 1970, Smith, along with Ken Brindle, and Chicka and Elsa Dixon, were the guiding force behind a group of young Aboriginal men and women who were involved in the campaign for land rights by the Gurindji people. This same group, with Fred Hollows and others helped to establish Aboriginal Medical Service in July 1971. They also helped establish the Aboriginal Legal Service in 1971, the Aboriginal Black Theatre, the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, the Aboriginal Children’s Service, the Aboriginal Housing Company and the Detoxification Centre at Wiseman’s Ferry.[4]

Part 2

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health Leadership #IWD2018 We honour all the woman working in our #ACCHO’s over 45 years in #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS

  1. NSW : Dr Naomi Mayers one of the founders of Aboriginal Medical Service in Redfern ,AHMRC and NACCHO
  2. VIC: Jill Gallagher AO VACCHO CEO 2001-2018
  3. QLD : Pamela Mam establishment of the Aboriginal and Islander Community Health Service and Jimbelunga Nursing centre
  4. SA : Mary Buckskin (1955 – 2015 ) CEO of AHCSA for 8 years
  5. NT : Donna Ah Chee CEO Congress Alice Springs , NACCHO Board Member, Chair AMSANT former CEO NACCHO
  6. WA : Vicki O’Donnell. Chair AHCWA : CEO – Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services.
  7. ACT : Julie Tongs OAM CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service, NACCHO Board Member,
  8. TAS. Heather Sculthorpe CEO Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

10.Read over 336 NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health articles published in past 6 years

NAIDOC Week will be held from 8 – 15 July, guided by the theme ‘Because of her, we can!’ in recognition of the role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

NAIDOC Week celebrations will kick off today, highlighting the histories, rich cultures, and outstanding achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion said that the 2018 theme highlighted the past and present contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

“NAIDOC Week is an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women – who are strong role models and leaders in their homes, communities and society more broadly,” said Minister Scullion.

“The Turnbull Government proudly supports NAIDOC Week each year, and I am pleased to announce that a record number of organisations have received funding to celebrate 2018 NAIDOC Week.

This year, 528 organisations received grants through the Turnbull Government’s 2018 NAIDOC Week grants round.

The 2018 NAIDOC Week grants will support a variety of events in all states and territories, including a NAIDOC Touch Football Cup, historical recordings, art workshops, and cultural showcases and a Koori Cook Off.

“These grants support communities across the country to hold their own events, spreading understanding and pride of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures – the oldest continuing culture in the world.

Many of the 2018 NAIDOC Week grant recipients will hold events in honour of the theme, including the Celebrating Tiwi Women Awards, the Djab Wurrung Women Elders event in Budja Budja, Victoria and a women’s story telling film and portrait exhibition project in Ballarat.

The week will culminate in the National NAIDOC Awards Ceremony, held in Sydney on 13 July to recognise the outstanding contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in their communities and beyond.

The Turnbull Government is also supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women every other week of the year through culturally appropriate, place-based and Indigenous-led services delivered mostly through Indigenous owned and controlled organisations as part of the $5 billion Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS).

Through the IAS we are investing $41 million in women and girls specific education programmes, more than $140 million in domestic violence prevention and support measures, in addition to the $100 million Third Action Plan, as well as a range of health and cultural initiatives for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

The Turnbull Government is proud to be partnering with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, Ms June Oscar AO, who in February this year commenced a landmark national consultation process with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls.

The Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) project commissioned by Minister Scullion is a national conversation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls’ to understand their priorities, challenges and aspirations.

Findings will inform key policies and programs such as the Closing the Gap refresh, future investment under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy and development of the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and Their Children. Consultations are continuing through to November 2018.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, June Oscar AO, warmly invites Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls to come together as part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) project.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls have many strengths and play a central role in bringing about positive social change for our families and communities.

Dr Jackie Huggins will be hosting these engagements on behalf of the Commissioner. Dr Huggins and the team will be speaking with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women (18+) and girls (aged 12-17) through a series of community gatherings across the country, to hear directly about their needs, aspirations and ideas for change.

Please see details and registration options below.

EVENT DETAILS: Northern Territory – Borroloola, Katherine, Tiwi Islands and Darwin

Please join us for one of the following sessions and register by clicking on the relevant link. You can also email us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone us on (02) 9284 9600.


Borroloola – Monday 23rd July 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: Mabunji Aboriginal Resource Centre, 2087 Robinson Road, Borroloola, NT 0854

Please click here to register for this event.


Borroloola – Tuesday 24th July 2018
  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: Mabunji Aboriginal Resource Centre, 2087 Robinson Road, Borroloola, NT 0854

Please click here to register for this event.


Katherine – Thursday 26th July 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9.30am – 1:30pm​
  • Location: Flinders University, O’Keefe House, Katherine Hospital, Giles Street, Katherine, NT 0850

Please click here to register for this event.


Wurrumiyanga (Bathurst Island) – Monday 30th July 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 10.30am – 2.30pm
  • Location: Tiwi Enterprises – Mantiyupwi Motel – Meeting Room, Lot 969 Wurrumiyanga, NT 0822

Please click here to register for this event.


Pirlangimpi (Melville Island) – Wednesday 1st August 2018
  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: TBC

Please click here to register for this event.


Darwin – Thursday 2nd August 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am- 1.30pm
  • Location: Michael Long Learning & Leadership Centre – Conference Room, 70 Abala Rd Marrara, Darwin, NT 0812

Please click here to register for this event.


Palmerston – Friday 3rd August 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: Palmerston Recreation Centre – Community Room, 11 The Boulevard, Palmerston, NT 0831

Please click here to register for this event.


Refreshments: Refreshments will be provided. Please register to ensure there is sufficient catering and please call or email to let us know any dietary requirements you may have.

Accessibility: The venue is accessible for people using wheelchairs. If you have any access or support requirements, such as an interpreter, please call or email us.

More information: Please see the website for further information about Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices), including a list of our planned gatherings.

If you are unable to attend this gathering, we would still like to hear from you through our submission process. For more details visit the submission page.

We hope you can take part in this important national conversation dedicated to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls.

Please share this invitation with others who may be interested in attending.

Should you have any questions please email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

To find out more about NAIDOC Week and events in your community, visit naidoc.org.au.

 

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations and Expressions of Interest now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:          

Accommodation Link:                   

Book your early bird conference registrations before 30 June and save money per delegate.

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Expressions of Interest to present

NACCHO is now calling for EOI’s from Affiliates , Member Services and stakeholders for Case Studies and Presentations for the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

Download the Application

NACCHO Members Expressions of Interest to present to the Brisbane Conference 2018 on Day 1

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members Conference; ‘Investing in What Works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Health’. We are seeking EOIs for the following Conference Sessions.

Day 1 Wednesday 31 October 2018

Concurrent Session 1 (1.15 – 2.00pm) – topics can include Case Studies but are not limited to:

  • Workforce Innovation
  • Best Practice Primary Health Care for Clients with Chronic Disease
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Sustainable Growth
  • Harnessing Resources (Medicare, government and other)
  • Engagement/Health Promotion
  • Models of Primary Health Care and
  • Clinical and Service Delivery.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Regional, Rural or Remote.  Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes in either the Plenary or Breakout rooms.

OR

Table Top Presentations (2.00-3.00pm)

Presenters will speak from the lectern and provide a brief presentation on a key project or program currently being delivered by their service.

Presentation will be 10 minutes in duration-with 5 minutes to present and
5 minutes for discussion and questions from delegates.

Conference Website Link

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

July 11-12 National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference in Sydney.

When the National NAIDOC Committee announced the 2018 Theme: Because of Her, We Can in November 2017 there was a huge round of applause around Australia particularly from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women.

Amongst those women were Christine Ross, Sharon Kinchela and Chris Figg who all agreed we needed to celebrate this fabulous theme.

So, with great excitement Ngiyani Pty Ltd announced they would host a National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference to be held on 11 – 12 July 2018 at UNSW Kensington Campus Sydney. They are utlising the services of Christine Ross Consultancy as the Project Manager.

For all event enquires please call 1300 807 374 or email christine.ross@live.com.au

 

4 August National Children’s Day

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day (Children’s Day) is a time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families to celebrate the strengths and culture of their children. The day is an opportunity for all Australians to show their support for Aboriginal children, as well as learn about the crucial impact that community, culture and family play in the life of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child.

Children’s Day is held on 4 August each year and is coordinated by SNAICC – National Voice for our Children. Children’s Day was first observed in 1988, with 2017 being the 29th celebration. Each year SNAICC produces and distributes resources to help organisations, services, schools, and communities celebrate.

The theme for Children’s Day 2018 is SNAICC – Celebrating Our Children for 30 Years.

Our children are the youngest people from the longest living culture in the world, with rich traditions, lore and customs that have been passed down from generation to generation. Our children are growing up strong with connection to family, community and country. Our children are the centre of our families and the heart of our communities. They are our future and the carriers of our story.

This year, we invite communities to take a walk down memory lane, as we revisit some of the highlights of the last 30 years. We look back on the empowering protest movements instigated by community that had led to the establishment of the first Children’s Day on 4 August 1988. We look back at all of the amazing moments we’ve shared with our children over the years, and how we’re watching them grow into leaders.

We look back to see what we’ve achieved, and decide where we want to go from here to create a better future for our children. If you have celebrated Children’s Day at any time during the past 30 years, we would love to hear from you.

Website

Download HERE

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

October 30 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day 27-28 August

More info

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #TopEndFASD18 : “Let’s Make #FASD History” says Top End Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) forum with 6 key messages to be taken into account addressing FASD:

 ” The forum delegates agreed that there was an urgent need for action to prevent FASD in our Top End communities, and across the Northern Territory.

It is essential that our responses do not stigmatise women or Aboriginal people.

It is important that we don’t lay blame, but instead work together, to support our women and young girls.

Everyone is at risk of FASD, so everyone must be informed the harmful effects of drinking while pregnant.

Our men also need to step up and support our mothers, sisters, nieces and partners, to ensure that we give every child the best chance in life.”

A landmark Top End Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) forum* was held in Darwin on 30-31 May 2018

Read over 25 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and FASD articles published over 6 years

“ Territorians want and deserve access to high quality health services,” Ms Fyles said.

Alcohol abuse impacts on individuals, families, businesses and our community in many different ways, including the risk of causing permanent and irreversible damage to a baby if alcohol is consumed during pregnancy.

That’s why reducing alcohol related harm is a key priority of the Territory Labor Government.

Our Government will develop a whole of government framework to prevent FASD with universal and targeted strategies to address FASD “

Minister for Health, Natasha Fyles, today welcomed 180 delegates to the inaugural Top End Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Forum in Darwin see Ministers Press Release Part 2 below

#TopEndFASD18  Bringing together Aboriginal leaders, FASD experts, Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, government representatives, medical professionals, and Non-Government organisations. Approximately 180 delegates representing 37 organisations across the Northern Territory.

FASD is often considered to be a ‘hidden’ disability, because more often than not, the physical characteristics of the individual are not easily recognised. Instead, an individual may present with learning and behavioural difficulties, which may present for a range of disorders.

As a result, FASD is not easily identified and individuals can go undiagnosed and receive inadequate treatment and support.

The forum heard from the NT Minister for Health and the Attorney General Natasha Fyles, NT Children’s Commissioner, Colleen Gwynne, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Dr James Fitzpatrick, NOFASD and FASD Hub.

The forum also heard from Aboriginal community controlled organisations Danila Dilba, Wurli Wurlinjang, Anyinginyi Health Services, Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory and the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency.

Over two days, the forum delegates discussed the impacts of FASD on individuals, families and communities and acknowledged that alcohol misuse and its consequences are an issue for all Territorians, particularly our most vulnerable. Delegates also heard the evidence on how the prevalence of FASD impacts many of our services, including health, education and justice. Delegates learnt that trauma runs deep, and healing and making the right connections is crucial.

The delegates raised the following key messages to be taken into account in addressing FASD:

 1.Prevention and raising awareness

FASD is entirely preventable, much of its impacts are also irreversible. The harms caused by alcohol in our communities are not acceptable and we will all work together to develop prevention and intervention strategies that are culturally appropriate and relevant for our 2

people and communities. It is acknowledged that current and proposed alcohol control measures in the NT are a critical component of prevention.

2. Collaborative Approaches

The forum identified an urgent need for Aboriginal organisations, government agencies, NGOs and local communities to work together to develop policies and programs for women, men, children and communities in the Top End communities and to contribute to the development of an NT FASD Strategy. This needs to be Aboriginal community-led by the health, education, justice and child protection sectors.

 3.Access to FASD resources

It was evident that there is a need for more investment in developing culturally appropriate tools and resources for local Aboriginal communities and key stakeholders working on the frontline and also at the strategic level.

4.Assessment and Treatment services

An identified priority need is for the establishment of multi-disciplinary neuro-developmental assessment and treatment services that are strategically linked with existing service settings, including primary health care, education, child protection and the justice system.

5.Support for children and families

Research is needed to better understand how best to support children and families with FASD and other related issues that also often affect families, such as trauma. We refer to the Fitzroy Valley as a best practice model, as many strong women and leaders in the community worked in partnership with FASD experts and research institutes.

6.Workforce

The skilling and expansion of the workforce needed for prevention, assessment and treatment of FASD, particularly the community based remote Aboriginal workforce, was identified as an important need.

From this forum, we have heard the experiences about the high levels of despair and sense of disempowerment and hurt of our people and these are sad stories. We were also enlightened by the enthusiasm, dedication, passion and hope from local communities, all professions and services, that want to do more and can do more to make FASD History!

*APO NT will be producing a full report on the outcomes of the FASD Forum over the coming weeks.

Generational Change: Putting the spotlight on Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

30 May 2018

Minister for Health, Natasha Fyles, today welcomed 180 delegates to the inaugural Top End Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Forum in Darwin.

“Territorians want and deserve access to high quality health services,” Ms Fyles said.

“Alcohol abuse impacts on individuals, families, businesses and our community in many different ways, including the risk of causing permanent and irreversible damage to a baby if alcohol is consumed during pregnancy.

“That’s why reducing alcohol related harm is a key priority of the Territory Labor Government.

“Our Government will develop a whole of government framework to prevent FASD with universal and targeted strategies to address FASD.

“This strategy was supported by recommendations in the recent Riley Review into Alcohol Policy and Legislation Alcohol Report and is now an important part of the Territory Labor Government’s Alcohol Harm Minimisation Action Plan to deliver sweeping alcohol reforms for generational change.”

The NT Department of Health funded the Aboriginal Peak Organisations NT (APONT) to deliver the 2 day forum.

The themes of the Forum are:

  • Increase knowledge and raise awareness about FASD in Top End communities and the impact of alcohol during pregnancy on the developing baby;
  • Understand the impact of FASD on children, youth and their families
  • Identify the challenges, issues and solutions for governments, service providers and other key stakeholders;
  • Identify culturally appropriate resources, tools and protocols
  • Establish a Top End FASD Network.

Minister Fyles said that Forum provides an important consultation opportunity with the health sector and community to feed into the development of the NT’s FASD Strategy, for release later this year.

“Stories will be shared and ideas and actions generated to inform the Strategy, which in turn will help guide communities and Government to work together in partnerships to prevent FASD,” Ms Fyles said.

“The NT FASD Strategy will promote the screening of alcohol use before and during pregnancy; appropriate multi-disciplinary assessment; early intervention, support and case management; and will develop targeted education campaigns for those who are most at risk from alcohol-related harms.

“This work is supported in our Government’s 10-Year Early Childhood Development Plan to lead cultural change in reducing alcohol consumption and harms in the community.

“Our whole of government approach to respond to FASD will be crucial to preventing this completely preventable lifelong and permanent condition.”

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AFL @AlcoholDrugFdn #NRW2018 #WorldNoTobaccoDay : Senator Bridget McKenzie Minister for Sport and Rural Health supports Redtails Pinktails #SayNoMore Drugs, #Smoking and #FamilyViolence #SayYesTo #Education #Employment #Family #Community

 

 ” Over the weekend Senator Bridget McKenzie had a chat pregame to local Central Australia Redtails before they took on Darwin’s TopEnd Storm curtain raiser to AFL Sir Doug Nicholls Indigenous round , a 6 hour broadcast on Channel 7 nationally : The Redtails and PinkTails Right Tracks Program is funded by the Local Drug Action Teams Program ”

See Part 1 Below

Part 2 Say No more to Family Violence all players link up

Part 3 #WorldNoTobaccoDay May 31 launched in the Alice

 ” Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,”

Watch video launch in the

The Minister for Rural Health, Senator Bridget McKenzie was also is in Alice Springs to launch the next phase of the National Tobacco Campaign and said that smoking related illness devastates individuals, families and the wider community : see Part 3 below

PART 1

Arrernte Males AFL Opening Ceremony

Arrernte women AFL Opening Ceremony

Part 1 The Australian Government and the ADF are excited to welcome an additional 92 Local Drug Action Teams, in to the LDAT program

The Senator with Alcohol and Drug Foundation CEO Dr Erin Lalor and  General Manager of Congress’ Alice Springs Health Services, Tracey Brand in Alice Springs talking about the inspirational Central Australian Local Drug Action Team at Congress and announcing 92 Local Drug Action Teams across Australia building partnerships to prevent and minimise harm of ice alcohol & illicit drugs use by our youth with local action plans

WATCH VIDEO of Launch

The Local Drug Action Team Program supports community organisations to work in partnership to develop and deliver programs that prevent or minimise harm from alcohol and other drugs (AOD).

Local Drug Action Teams work together, and with the community, to identify the issue they want to tackle, and to develop and implement a plan for action.

The Alcohol and Drug Foundation provides practical resources to assist Local Drug Action Teams to deliver evidence-informed projects and activities. The community grants component of the Local Drug Action Team Program may provide funding to support this work.

Each team will receive an initial $10,000 to develop and finalise a Community Action Plan and then to implement approved projects in your community. Grant funding of up to a maximum of $30k in the first year and up to a maximum of $40k in subsequent years is also available to help deliver approved projects in Community Action Plans. LDAT funding is intended to complement existing funding and in kind support from local partners.

LDATs typically apply for grants of between $10k and $15k to support their projects

 

See ADF website for Interactive locations of all sites

The power of community action

Community-based action is powerful in preventing and minimising harm from alcohol and other drugs.

Alcohol and other drugs harms are mediated by a number of factors – those that protect against risk, and those that increase risk. For example, factors that protect against alcohol and other drug harms include social connection, education, safe and secure housing, and a sense of belonging to a community. Factors that increase risks of alcohol and other drug harms include high availability of drugs, low levels of social cohesion, unstable housing, and socioeconomic disadvantage. Most of these factors are found at the community level, and must be targeted at this level for change.

Alcohol and other drugs are a community issue, not just an individual issue.

Community action to prevent alcohol and other drug harms is effective because:

  • the solutions and barriers (protective/risk factors) for addressing alcohol and other drugs harm are community-based
  • it creates change that is responsive to local needs
  • it increases community ownership and leads to more sustainable change

Part 2 Say No more to Family Violence all players link up

Such a powerful message told here in Alice Springs today as the Redtails Football Club, Top End Storm football club, link arms with the Melbourne Football Club, Adelaide Football Club for the NO MORE Campaign AU before the AFL Indigenous Round started.

WEBSITE Link up and say ‘No More’

 

 Watch Channel 7 Coverage of this special statement from all players

Part 3 #WorldNoTobaccoDay May 31 launched in the Alice

Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,”

Watch the ABC TV Interview HERE

Watch video of launch in the Alice

Successful Tobacco Campaign Continues

Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

The Minister for Rural Health, Senator Bridget McKenzie was in Alice Springs to launch the next phase of the National Tobacco Campaign and said that smoking related illness devastates individuals, families and the wider community.

“In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,” Minister McKenzie said.

“The latest phase of Don’t Make Smokes Your Story continues to focus on Indigenous Australians aged 18–40 years who smoke and those who have recently quit. The campaign also concentrates on pregnant women and their partners with Quit for You, Quit for Two.

“An evaluation of the first two phases of the campaign revealed they had successfully helped to reduce smoking rates.

“More than half of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants who saw the campaign took some action towards quitting smoking — and 8 per cent actually quit.

“These are very promising stats, however, we must continue to support and encourage those Australians who want to quit, but need help.”

The launch of the next phase of the campaign aligns with World No Tobacco Day and this year’s theme is Tobacco and heart disease.

“Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in Australia, killing one person every 12 minutes,” Minister McKenzie said.

“There is a clear link between tobacco and heart and other cardiovascular diseases, including stroke — a staggering 45,392 deaths in Australia can be attributed to cardiovascular disease in 20151.

“Latest estimates show that tobacco use and exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke not only costs the lives of loved ones, but it costs the Australian community $31.5 billion in social — including health — and economic costs.”

“The Coalition Government, along with all states and territories, has made significant efforts to reduce tobacco consumption across the board.

“For example, we know that tobacco is the leading cause of preventable disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accounting for more than 12 per cent of the overall burden of illness.

“The Coalition Government has recently invested $183.7 million continuing to boost the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program to cut smoking and save lives.

“This comprehensive program has helped to cut the rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people smoking and we want to build on this success.

“The Government’s investment in this program highlights our long-term commitment to Closing the Gap in health inequality.”

The ABS report Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Smoking Trends, Australia, 1994 to 2014-15, reported a decrease in current (daily and non-daily) smoking rate in those aged 18 years and older from 55 per cent in 1994 to 45 per cent in 2014-15, which shows Indigenous tobacco control is working.

For help to quit smoking, phone the Quitline on 13 7848, visit the Department of Health’s Quitnow website or download the free My Quitbuddy app.

Your doctor or healthcare provider can also help with information and support you may need to quit.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WorldHypertensionDay @strokefdn High #bloodpressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob with 47% having high #stroke risk

 

 ” But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

A staggering 82 percent of those, found to have high blood pressure, were not aware prior to taking the health check and were referred to their doctor for a further assessment.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are between two and three times as likely to have a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians which is why increasing stroke awareness is crucial.

Too many Australians couldn’t spot a stroke if it was happening right in front of them.

We know that in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities this awareness is even lower.

We want all Australians, regardless of where they live or what community they’re from, to learn the signs of stroke.”

Stroke Foundation and Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Project

 ” Naomi and Rukmani’s stroke rap runs through vital stroke awareness messages, such as lifestyle advice, learning the signs of stroke, and crucially the need to seek medical advice when stroke strikes.

Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song and remember the FAST message – it could save their life,”

Stroke Foundation Queensland Executive Officer Libby Dunstan 

Naomi Wenitong  pictured with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media

Listen to the new rap song HERE

                                       or Hear

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated

NACCHO has published over 90 articles Aboriginal health stroke prevention and recovery READ HERE

“It can happen to anyone — stroke doesn’t discriminate against colour, it doesn’t discriminate against age “

Photo above Seith Fourmile, Indigenous stroke survivor campaigns for culture to aid in stroke recovery

” Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who experience and die from cardiovascular disease at much higher rates than other Australians.

What you don’t know can hurt you. Heart disease and strokes are the biggest killers of Australians, and the biggest risk factor for both of them is high blood pressure.

But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

John Kelly CEO-National, Heart Foundation

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, when compared with other Australians, are:

  • 1.3 times as likely to have cardiovascular disease
  • three times more likely to have a major coronary event, such as a heart attack
  • more than twice as likely to die in hospital from coronary heart disease
  • 19 times as likely to die from acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart Disease
  • more likely to smoke, have high blood pressure, be obese, have diabetes and have end-stage renal disease.

It was World Hypertension Day yesterday  and the Stroke Foundation is determined to slash stroke numbers in Australia – with your help.

Today kicks off Australia’s Biggest Blood Pressure Check for 2018 and communities are being urged to take five minutes out of their day for a potentially life-saving blood pressure check.

More than 4.1 Million Australians are living with hypertension or high blood pressure, putting themselves at serious and unnecessary risk of stroke.

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.

The major concern with high blood pressure is many people don’t realise they have it. It has no immediate symptoms, but over time, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of stroke and heart disease.

How you can help?

  • Encourage your family and friends to take advantage of a free check.
  • Help spread the word via social media:  Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.
  • Get your free health check today! https://bit.ly/2ps1UOn #WorldHypertensionDay

  • I am urging you – no matter what age you are – to have a blood pressure check regularly with your ACCHO GP (General Practitioner), pharmacist or via a digital health check machine.
  • Stroke strikes in an instant, attacking the brain. It kills more women than breast cancer and more men than prostate cancer and leaves thousands with an ongoing disability, but stroke is largely preventable by managing blood pressure and living a healthy lifestyle.
  • Stroke Foundation and SiSU Wellness conducted more than 520,000 digital health checks throughout 2017, finding 16 percent of participants had high blood pressure putting them at risk of stroke

Given there will be 56,000 strokes in Australia this year alone, if we can reduce high blood pressure we will have a direct and lasting impact on the rate of stroke in this country.Yours sincerely,

Sharon McGowan
Chief Executive Officer
Stroke Foundation

NACCHO Aboriginal Health supports @fam_matters_au campaign #WeBelieveFamilyMatters @IndigenousX Every child has the right to be safe : Plus @SNAICC Submission: #ClosingtheGap ‘Refresh’ Process

 

”  I am a proud advocate for change – because things need to change. Change can be uncomfortable and it can cause anxiety.

 But I see a near future where change can bring positive outcomes to our nation. I play a small role at SNAICC – National Voice for our Children, the national advocacy body fighting for the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

I say only small because there are plenty of stronger and louder voices in the national conversation speaking up about the changes that need to happen for our people. So I will only speak for myself and the changes that I dream of.”

Maylene Slater-Burns is Kamilaroi/Wiradjuri/Djungan/Gangalidda woman. Seeker of some real change : Continued Part 2 below

Or Read in full HERE

Hosting this week IndigenousX : Guardian Australia is proud to partner with IndigenousX to showcase the diversity of Indigenous peoples and opinions from around the country

Read over 300 Aboriginal Children’s Health articles published by NACCHO over past 6 years

 Part 1 SNAICC Submission: Closing the Gap ‘Refresh’ Process – April 2018 ( added by NACCHO )

SNAICC put it simply in its recent submission to the Closing the Gap “refresh”:

“We have a shared responsibility to ensure the right of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child to be safe and thrive in family, community and culture.”

It has been 10 years since COAG’s Closing the Gap strategy began.

In that time, only three of the seven national targets are reported as being on track and four are due to expire in 2018. COAG is currently undertaking the Closing the Gap ‘refresh’ process.

This process is a unique opportunity to influence the next phase of the CTG agenda, which will form the framework over the next 10 years for all Australian governments to advance outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It will also provide the framework for how government funding is prioritised to meet the targets.


SNAICC’s Key Calls

We have a shared responsibility to ensure the right of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child to be safe and thrive in family, community and culture. To achieve this:

  • an additional Closing the Gap target should be included to eliminate the overrepresentation of our children in out-of-home care by 2040, with sub-targets that address the underlying causes of child protection intervention; and
  • the current Closing the Gap target on early childhood education should be  strengthened to encompass early childhood development and  expanded to close the gap in outcomes for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from birth to 4 years by 2030

Download the SNAICC Submission HERE

SNAICC_Brief-CTG_Refresh-Apr._2018

Part 2 Every child has the right to be safe. Will you speak up with me?

Upon the delivery of the federal budget last week, it is clear that change for our people is not a priority for the federal government – but the government of the day has never scared me into thinking change is impossible. I, in tune with how I was raised by my family in Naarm, believe that real change happens from within community, by community and for community.

My mum, Sharon Slater, and my dad, Mel Burns, have lived and worked in the Melbourne Aboriginal community for decades. As I grew up, it was a normal part of life to be at work with them. My parents were foster carers, youth workers, basketball coaches, community drivers, fundraisers, and health workers – and completed their own admin at the end of the day. I am proud to follow in their footsteps. All I’ve ever known is my community from within.

SNAICC has been part of my life since early childhood, as Mum worked in administration and bookkeeping. Family was always centre at SNAICC – the best memory I have is my twin Marjorie and I mucking around with the photocopier.

In the late 1980s, following the first child survival seminar held in Naarm, community leaders called for the establishment of a national peak body to represent Aboriginal child care agencies, which led to the creation of SNAICC. Despite the ongoing harsh climate of constant political change that impacts a great number of our Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, SNAICC continues to be the voice of its members and the voice for our children.

For me, SNAICC’s work answers a natural calling in this journey to realise the changes that our children, families and communities deserve.

Today, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are over-represented in the child protection system at a rate of more than 10 times that of other children. We are losing our children and we must speak up right now, because enough is enough.

The Family Matters campaign is the coming together of organisations and individuals across the nation to reduce the over-representation of our children removed from family.

Family Matters is an approach that trusts Aboriginal people to deal with Aboriginal business, one that includes genuine collaboration and partnership, empowers communities and involves long-term, all-of-government support across the country.

It all comes down to trusting in the legacy of my role models, family members and past leaders who have paved the way before us. Our community knows what works best for our community, and the best way forward when it comes to reunifying the 17,664 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living away from home with their community, heritage and culture.

Community is bringing the Family Matters campaign to the doorstep of Australia.

SNAICC put it simply in its recent submission to the Closing the Gap “refresh”: “We have a shared responsibility to ensure the right of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child to be safe and thrive in family, community and culture.”

Now is the time for healing and restoration through connecting with other dreamers and change-makers to move forward together. Will you walk with me? Will you speak up with me? Our children are trusting us with their futures. Our work starts now.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features Pat Turner CEO co hosting @NITV #ThePoint #Budget2018NACCHO @GidgeeHealing #BecauseofHerWeCan @awabakalltd @Wuchopperen @CAACongressPlus News from #NSW #QLD #VIC #ACT

1.1 National : Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner co hosts a special Indigenous Health edition of NITV The Point 3 May 2018

1.2 National : NACCHO’s Budget proposal to accelerate Closing the Gap in Indigenous Life Expectancy

1.3 National : SistaQuit needs a few more ACCHO sites for an Indigenous smoking cessation trial for pregnant Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women who smoke 

2.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing Mt Isa An Indigenous health forum with more than advice for women

2.2 QLD  : Wuchopperen Health Service to raise awareness for Domestic Violence Prevention Month

3.NSW :Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle : Australian Ninja Warrior star Jack Wilson signs on to help fight chronic Indigenous obesity

4. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO leads the way May 27 , Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

5.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder diagnostic centre opens in Alice Springs amid ‘huge demand’

5.2 NT : Sir Michael Marmot visits Congress Alice Springs  

6.VIC : Planning the Closing the Gap future

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.National : Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner co hosts a special Indigenous Health edition of NITV The Point 3 May 2018

View the full program here

https://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/1214949955803/the-point-3-may

In my view, the only way to improve outcomes for Aboriginal people – no matter what the sector – is to put Aboriginal programs in Aboriginal hands

It would come as no surprise to any of you to hear me say that an ideal Australia should be one without any gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians

We are all aware of the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and how a succession of well-intended Governments have struggled to make any progress

Just look at the situation for our young people

At the moment, Indigenous children starting school have twice as many developmental hurdles

Young Aboriginal people are almost five times as likely to commit suicide

Young Aboriginal people are over 30-times more likely to be in juvenile detention

None of us want to see these sorts of statistics

None of us want to see the horrific system failures such as Dondale ever repeated again

We must build a fair and just society in which first Australians can flourish on equal terms and in which our kids get the chance they deserve

We need to do this by putting Aboriginal programs into Aboriginal hands

Closing the health gap with #715 Health checks

The gap in health and life expectancy between Aboriginal and other Australians is not closing

The burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island population is 2.3 times higher than for the rest of the population – Funding should reflect this

But it is much higher in remote areas

Yet a dangerous myth persists that Aboriginal and Torres Strait people receive ample funding

To address the disparity, the Commonwealth, in particular, needs to do more

The Commonwealth must lift expenditure not just to match the States’ spend of $2 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for every $1 for the rest of the population, but to match the burden of disease – i.e. $2.30 for every non-Indigenous dollar The Commonwealth only spent $1.21 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island person for every $1 spent on the rest of the population

The Closing the Gap targets should remain

But the Government seems to be walking away from these targets and reinventing a softer scheme in which it is less accountable

Until Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are fully engaged and have control over their health and wellbeing any ‘refresh’ will be marginal at best, and certainly won’t close the gap

We need radically different action to achieve the targets, but let’s start simply by putting Aboriginal programs in Aboriginal hands

1.2 National : NACCHO’s Budget proposal to accelerate Closing the Gap in Indigenous Life Expectancy

On Budget night follow #Budget2018NACCHO

Aboriginal Health Download NACCHO Pre #Budget2018 Submission : Budget proposals to accelerate #ClosingTheGap in #Indigenous life expectancy

1.3 National : SistaQuit needs a few more ACCHO sites for an Indigenous smoking cessation trial for pregnant Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women who smoke 

The SISTAQUIT Study aims to improve the provision of timely, evidence-based smoking cessation care to pregnant Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women who smoke and who attend an Aboriginal Medical and Health Service for their ante-natal care.

The study involves a randomized controlled trial testing the SISTAQUIT intervention against ‘usual care’ (all sites receive SISTAQUIT either now or later).

We will to do this through on-site face to face interactive webinar training, free trial resources, free oral NRT for all study sites and financial reimbursement to both study sites and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who consent to participate in the study.

The SISTAQUIT Team are aiming to recruit 30 study sites nationally and are very excited to have already recruited 22 ACCHOs from NSW, Queensland, NT, WA and SA.

We would love to hear from any ACCHOs who would be interested in becoming a study site or those who would like more information on the study.

If your service would like to be a part of this vital trial to help us understand how to provide the best chance of quitting during pregnancy then please call or email Ms Joley Manton on (02) 4033 5720 Mobile 0439 613 836 or email: joley.manton@newcastle.edu.au or sistaquit@newcastle.edu.au

2.QLD  : Gidgee Healing Mt Isa An Indigenous health forum with more than advice for women

The first Indigenous Women’s Health Forum launched at the Mount Isa Golf Clubhouse on Tuesday, May 1.

Gidgee Healing Regional Manager of Deadly Choices Daniella Solakovic said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have some of the poorest health statistics, so the aim of this event is for women to come together to hear from their peers and specialists on key aspects of health and share their personal experiences.

Originally Published here

The two-day event discussed the subjects of nutrition, sexual health, domestic violence, cancer and wellbeing and self care.

Ms Solakovic said they wanted the women to leave after the event with confidence.

“Confidence with the knowledge acquired from the topics we have discussed. Confidence to share the information with others in the community, confidence to access the support services within the community and confidence to remember they are worthy, loved and not alone,” she said.

The second day of the event had a pamper element as the women participated in a number of wellness based activities.

“We had weaving classes, cooking, nail painting, yoga, waxing, face masks and even hair cutting,” Ms Solakovic said.

“We want to acknowledge women and the hard work they do on a day-to-day basis.”

Special guest speaker and Deadly Choice ambassador Rhonda Purcell said meeting together and building networks is were we can get strength from one another.

“We come from a long line of women in our culture from which to draw strength from.

“I grew up in a house with domestic violence and saw a lot of things a child should never see,” Ms Purcell said

I can say today, I got my strength from my mother, she is my inspiration and always will be.”

Special Guest Shellie Morris is an indigenous Australian singer who in 2014 won the NAIDOC National Artist of the Year award.

Ms Morris has worked with numerous organisations using music as a healing tool.

“Meeting together like this is like a moment of respite used to empower us to be strong and know our self worth and that we can achieve anything,” she said.

2.2 QLD  : Wuchopperen Health Service to raise awareness for Domestic Violence Prevention Month

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited will hold outreach, clinic – based and online activities across Domestic Violence Prevention Month (May 1 – 31) to raise awareness of domestic and family violence and the pathways to change.

Social and Emotional Health Acting Manager Spencer Browne said Domestic Violence Prevention Month was all about encouraging people to speak up.

‘Wuchopperen’s theme for Domestic Violence Prevention Month 2018 is #SaySomething. Wuchopperen is encouraging anyone  affected by domestic or family violence to say something, whether it’s to ring an organisation like ours and ask for help, or check in on someone you are concerned about, speaking up makes a difference.’

‘Wuchopperen recognises that domestic and family violence harms individuals, families and communities and we have a range of culturally appropriate, specialised programs to provide advice, care and support for people experiencing, or committing domestic violence.

‘Our services include men’s and women’s yarning groups, youth programs, specialist counselling for men and women, a psychologist and clinical psychologist, court support and free legal advice.

‘Wuchopperen is committed to supporting healthy, respectful relationships which generate healthy families and healthy communities.’

Activities

#SaySomething Social Media Campaign

Community organisations, local schools and individuals will be encouraged to use the hashtag to promote domestic and family violence prevention and awareness.

Sample messages include:

[SCHOOL] says domestic and family violence is everyone’s business #SaySomething #DVPM18

[ORGANISATION] says healthy relationships matter #SaySomething #DVPM18

Week 1

Tuesday 1 – Friday 4 May

School based activities – domestic and family violence education and awareness, healthy relationships education and awareness

Week 2 

Tuesday 8 May, Wednesday 9 May

Wuchopperen male and female Family Support Workers providing outreach services at Manoora Community Centre

Murray St, Manoora

Thursday 10, Thursday 11, Friday 12 May

Wuchopperen male and female Family Support Workers providing outreach services at the Mooroobool Community Hub

Shang St, Mooroobool

Week 3 

Monday 14 – Friday 18 May

Information and awareness activities at Stockland Shopping Centre and Pease St IGA

Week 4 

Tuesday 21 – Friday 25 May

Community event at Wuchopperen Manoora featuring guest speakers, the community sector and a healthy meal

This release can be accessed online here.

 

3.NSW :Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle : Australian Ninja Warrior star Jack Wilson signs on to help fight chronic Indigenous obesity

Jack Wilson, the ‘Deadly Ninja’ from Channel 9’s Australian Ninja Warrior (ANW) series visited with Awabakal on Monday 23 April, showing off his deadly ninja moves and helping to inspire the Indigenous community.

Jack is a proud Indigenous Australian from Mount Isa who is on a mission to educate Aboriginal men, women and children to live a healthy lifestyle and always reach for their goals.

See full media coverage here

During his time on ANW Jack was best known for proudly wearing traditional body paint and Budgie Smugglers in the colours of the Aboriginal flag.

After a difficult upbringing, Jack has overcome his struggles with drug and alcohol abuse to become a successful distance runner and role model to Indigenous youth. He has now partnered with Awabakal to become an ambassador for their Indigenous health programs.

“Jack is the type of personality that our young people will really connect with and look up to,” says Raylene Gordon, Chief Executive Officer of Awabakal.

“His connection to culture and ability to overcome the challenges in his life is really inspiring,” Raylene continued.

Jack’s recent visit to Awabakal included an exercise session and motivational talk with the participants of their Knock Out Health Challenge, which is a collaboration between Awabakal and Love the Life (LTL) to encourage healthy living amongst staff and Awabakal community members.

Awabakal also arranged for Jack to show the Awabakal kids his moves at the Ninja Parc obstacle course at Howat Gym in Cooks Hill as part of their school holiday program. This was intended as a fun and engaging activity which helped to inspire and educate the kids to exercise and navigate the obstacles in everyday life.

For more details about Awabakal’s services and work with the Indigenous community, visit http://www.awabakal.org or phone (02) 4918 6400.

4. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO leads the way May 27 , Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

IGPA CANBERRA CONVERSATION PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES

RECONCILIATION IN THE ACT – ARE WE THERE YET?

DATE: Thursday 31 May 2018

TIME: 12.30pm – 1.30pm

VENUE: Function Room, Theo Notaras Multicultural Centre, 180 London Circuit, CANBERRA CITY

ABOUT: On 27 May 2018 the residents of Canberra will enjoy a public holiday, Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

This seminar will explore the extent to which genuine and sustainable progress has been made in achieving reconciliation in the ACT.

Discussion will centre on a range of data, summarised below, which reflects the extent to which Aboriginal people in Canberra continue to experience disadvantage and of the adequacy of the local response to these matters, including the degree of self-determination accorded the Aboriginal community.

  •  Native title has been completely extinguished in the ACT;
  •  Canberra’s Indigenous students fall two years behind their non-Indigenous peers in educational outcomes;
  • Canberra’s Indigenous people are 21 times more likely to be incarcerated compared to non-Indigenous people, and the ACT has the second highest rate of Indigenous incarceration in Australia;
  • An Aboriginal child in Canberra is 12 times more likely than a non-Aboriginal child to be removed, under a care and protection order, from its parents and the ACT has the second highest rate of removal of Aboriginal children in Australia;
  •  7.6% of Canberra’s Aboriginal community report that they live in housing in which they do not have access to working sewerage facilities;
  •  46% of Indigenous males and 39% of indigenous females in the ACT over the age of 15 used an illicit drug or other substance in the last year; and
  • 35% of Aboriginal children in Canberra live in poverty;

This IGPA seminar is co-sponsored by Winnunga Nimmityjah AHCS and is jointly convened by Professorial Fellow Jon Stanhope AO and Adjunct Professor Dr Khalid Ahmed PSM.

THE PANEL JULIE TONGS OAM has been the Chief Executive Officer of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service since 1998. Julie is a Wiradjuri woman and was born in Whitton. She has more than 30 years’ experience working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs and in particular in advising, formulating, implementing and evaluating public health initiatives, programs and policy at a local, regional and national level.

Julie has been a national leader and strong advocate of quality improvement initiatives within the Aboriginal Community Controlled sector. She is the recipient of a number of awards, including the ACT Governor General’s Centenary Medal, the ACT Indigenous Person of the Year, and the ACT Local Hero Award. In 2012 Julie was honoured with the Medal of the Order of Australia.

LOUISE TAYLOR is currently the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Legal Aid ACT. Louise is a Kamilaroi woman born and raised in inner city Sydney. For a significant portion of her career Louise was a specialist Family Violence prosecutor at the Office of the ACT Director of Public Prosecutions.

Louise has a particular interest in women’s issues especially in relation to family, domestic and sexual violence and is passionate about the importance of access to justice for women, particularly for Aboriginal and other marginalised women. She is a long time Convenor of the ACT Women’s Legal Centre Management Committee, a past member of the ACT Domestic Violence Prevention Council and former Chair of the ACT Ministerial Advisory Council on Women. Louise was the 2009 recipient of the ACT International Women’s Day Award, and is a member of the Law Council of Australia’s Indigenous Legal Issues Committee.

5.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder diagnostic centre opens in Alice Springs amid ‘huge demand’

 

The Northern Territory’s first diagnostic centre for foetal alcohol spectrum disorder has opened in Central Australia — where paediatricians estimate one in five children could suffer from the disorder.

Key points:

  • It is estimated more than 500,000 Australians have FASD but it is often not diagnosed
  • The new centre aims to diagnose children early so they can get listed on the NDIS
  • Early diagnosis could also help keep those with the disorder out of prison

 

The centre, launched by the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (CAAC), will use the first commonly adapted diagnostic tool to ensure early diagnosis of the disorder.

It will also offer a team of paediatricians, psychologists and other health professionals like speech pathologists to help asses at-risk children.

Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is an impairment to the brain caused by mothers consuming alcohol while pregnant.

It causes severe developmental delays, disability, learning difficulties, memory impairment and behavioural problems.

Known as the invisible disability, people with FASD can often go undiagnosed and untreated.

Yet it is estimated more than 500,000 people have FASD in Australia.

Congress child and family services senior manager Dawn Ross said the centre would help ensure those impacted were diagnosed early and services would be immediately available.

“Many children are presenting with [developmental] delays and Congress felt that it was important to not only do full health checks, but that wraparound services and support was given for children,” Ms Ross said.

“Every parent wants to know if there’s a delay that there’s a service out there that’s going to be provided for them.”

Diagnosis could keep children out of prison

Dr James Fitzpatrick, a paediatrician and researcher working with children who have FASD, said 36 per cent of people in juvenile detention in Western Australia had the disorder.

Not only would early diagnosis help get children listed on the National Disability Insurance Scheme and accessing support, he believed it could help lower prison rates.

Drug and Alcohol Services Australia chief executive Carol Taylor agreed, saying a lot of the youth problems in Alice Springs stemmed from intellectual impairment, and “throwing them in prison won’t solve the problem”.

Disorder is a ‘threat to culture’

While Ms Taylor welcomed the new centre opening, she warned that demand would be huge, particularly from Indigenous residents.

“We do have a lot of babies that come into DASA, they’re almost all Aboriginal kids,” Ms Taylor said.

For this reason, Dr Fitzpatrick indicated that reducing the impacts of the disorder could also help preserve Indigenous culture.

“[FASD] is a threat to the very culture that needs to be passed on through stories, song and tradition,” he said.

5.2 NT : Sir Michael Marmot visits Congress Alice Springs  

6.VIC : Planning the Closing the Gap future

The national Closing the Gap agenda and the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework are being refreshed this year. These are important documents. They guide policy and funding priorities in Aboriginal affairs, and set out how government will be held accountable for achieving those priorities.

Aboriginal people know what’s best for themselves, their families and their communities. That’s why the Victorian Government will be led by Aboriginal Victorians around what the new Closing the Gap agenda and Victorian Aboriginal Affairs framework should look like.

Throughout the first half of 2018, there will be a range of opportunities for Aboriginal Victorians to have their say and lead the refresh of both national and Victorian frameworks.

For more information on Closing the Gap or the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework see the Discussion Guide and Factsheet.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Teenage #Pregnancy #maternalMHmatters : Download @AIHW Report : Indigenous teenage mothers almost twice as likely to smoke during pregnancy as non-Indigenous mothers. @sistaquit #Prevention2018

 

” Indigenous teenage mothers are over-represented One in 4 (24%) teenage mothers identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander in 2015.

This means that Indigenous women were over-represented amongst teenage mothers, given Indigenous women aged 15–19 account for only 5.3% of the overall population of Australian females of the same age.

The proportion of Indigenous mothers in Australia is higher in Remote and Very remote areas, and teenage Indigenous mothers also follow this pattern

Compared to non-Indigenous teenage mothers, Indigenous teenage mothers were 1.5 times as likely to smoke in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy (43% compared with 28%) “

Read Part 2 Below or Download :

NACCHO Download aihw-per-93.pdf

Babies of teenage mothers are more likely to be premature and experience health issues in the first month than babies born to women just a few years older, a new report has revealed.

Teenage mums are also more likely to live in Australia’s lowest socio-economic areas (42 per cent) compared to mums aged 20-24 years (34 per cent), according to the report by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, published today , showed the numbers of teenage mothers had dropped from 11800 in 2005 to 8200 in 2015, with nearly three-quarters of teenage mothers aged 18 or 19.

Compared to babies born to mothers aged 20-24 years, more babies born to teenage mothers were premature, had a low birth weight and needed admission to special care nursery.

Despite the negative outcomes for babies, the report showed positive trends for teenage mothers including more spontaneous labours, lower caesarean section rates and less diabetes for teenage mothers.

“The difference between teenage mothers and those in the slightly older age group is due in part to a large number of teenage mothers living in low socio-economic areas,” says AIHW report author Dr Fadwa Al-Yaman.

Dr Al-Yaman said the differences could also be due to the higher smoking rates in pregnancy, with a quarter of teenage mothers smoking after 20 weeks of pregnancy compared to 1 in six of those aged 20 to 24.

A quarter of teenage mothers identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, with Indigenous teenage mothers almost twice as likely to smoke during pregnancy as non-Indigenous mothers.

Dr Al-Yaman said risk factors were highly interlinked, with issues such a smoking, low levels of education and employment being concentrated in remote areas.

The teenage birth rate in metro areas is less than half that of regional areas, she said.

“There is a strong link between socio-economic disadvantage and living in remote areas,” she told AAP.

“You need to have access to transport, access to health services and if you have to pay for your transport, sometimes over an hour’s worth, it’s going to take more of your welfare money.”

SISTAQUIT Trial Recruiting Services Now

The SISTAQUIT™ trial aims to improve health providers’ skills and when offering smoking cessation care to pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Pregnancy is an important window of opportunity for GPs and health providers to help smokers quit, however they often lack the confidence and skills to address their patients’ smoking.

This intervention provides webinar-based training in evidence based and culturally competent smoking cessation care for providers working within Aboriginal Medical and Health Services.

The SISTAQUIT™ Team are currently recruiting Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS) and GP practices in NSW, WA, QLD, SA and NT for this study.

To find out more about your service being involved in the SISTAQUIT™ trial please contact Dr Gillian Gould or Joley Manton at the University of Newcastle.

Website

Download the trial brochure here

Download an information sheet here

Part 2 Indigenous Mothers

Indigenous teenage mothers are over-represented One in 4 (24%) teenage mothers identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander in 2015.

This means that Indigenous women were over-represented amongst teenage mothers, given Indigenous women aged 15–19 account for only 5.3% of the overall population of Australian females of the same age.

Indigenous mothers are younger than average

The average age of Indigenous teenage mothers (17.8 years) was lower than for non- Indigenous mothers (18.1 years). Indigenous teenage mothers were 4.5 times as likely to be aged under 15 (1.8%; 35) as non-Indigenous teenage mothers (0.4%; 27) and less likely to be aged 19 (37.4%; 744 compared with 49.1%; 3,048).

More likely to live in remote areas

The proportion of Indigenous mothers in Australia is higher in Remote and Very remote areas, and teenage Indigenous mothers also follow this pattern.

In 2015, the Indigenous population rate for 15–19 year old mothers living in Remote and Very remote areas was 84.9 per 1,000 females, which was 5.5 times the non-Indigenous rate (15.2 per 1,000).

The population rate for 15–19 year old Indigenous mothers was also higher for women living in Major cities at 40.7 per 1,000 for Indigenous women compared with 7.1 per 1,000 for non-Indigenous women.

Fewer and later antenatal visits

Indigenous teenage mothers generally attended fewer antenatal visits than non-Indigenous teenage mothers, with higher proportions of 1 visit (1.5% compared with 0.9%) and 2–4 visits (9.5% compared with 6.1%) and lower proportions of 5 or more visits (86% compared with 91%).

They were 1.1 times as likely to attend their first antenatal visit at 20 weeks gestation or more (25% compared with 23%).

More likely to smoke

Compared to non-Indigenous teenage mothers, Indigenous teenage mothers were:

• 1.5 times as likely to smoke in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy (43% compared with 28%)

• 1.7 times as likely to smoke after 20 weeks (36% compared with 21%).

Higher rates of diabetes

Indigenous teenage mothers were 1.2 times as likely as non-Indigenous teenage mothers to have diabetes (6.0% compared with 4.9%) and gestational diabetes (5.1% compared with 4.2%).

Onset of labour, method of birth and perineal status

In 2015, Indigenous teenage mothers were more likely than their non-Indigenous counterparts to have spontaneous labour (66% compared with 62%), and less likely to have induced labour (28% compared with 32%), but equally likely to have no labour (both 6.1%).

Compared to non-Indigenous teenage mothers, Indigenous teenage mothers were slightly more likely to:

• have a caesarean section (19% compared with 18%)

• have an intact perineum (27% compared with 26%).