NACCHO #VoteACCHO Aboriginal Health and Immunisation : It’s World #ImmunisationWeek 24- 30 April . Here are the facts how #vaccination protects you and our mob. #ProtectedTogether #VaccinesWork

The theme this year is Protected Together: Vaccines Work!, and the campaign will celebrate Vaccine Heroes from around the world – from parents and community members to health workers and innovators – who help ensure we are all protected through the power of vaccines.
Picture above AHCWA 

Feature article

We seek all ACCHO assistance in supporting women to get vaccinated against influenza and pertussis during pregnancy.

The influenza and pertussis vaccines are available at no cost to pregnant women through the National Immunisation Program (NIP).

The most important factor associated with uptake of influenza and pertussis vaccination during pregnancy is a healthcare provider recommendation.

The Department of Health is undertaking an online campaign to promote pertussis and influenza commencing March through to May 2019.

Key campaign messages

  • Antenatal vaccination is recommended to protect both pregnant women and their babies from influenza and pertussis and their complications.
  • Maternal antibodies against pertussis provide protection to babies until they have received at least two doses of pertussis containing vaccines (at six weeks and four months of age).
  • Maternal antibodies against influenza provide protection to babies for the first few months of life until they are able to be vaccinated themselves at six months of age.
  • Babies less than six months of age are at greatest risk of severe disease and death from influenza and pertussis.
  • Pregnant women are also at increased risk of morbidity and mortality from influenza compared with non-pregnant women. Pregnant women are more than twice as likely to be admitted to hospital as other people with influenza.

Please note that the evidence around the timing of pertussis vaccination in pregnancy has recently been reviewed and the pertussis-containing vaccine is now recommended as a single dose between 20 and 32 weeks in each pregnancy, including pregnancies that are closely spaced to provide maximal protection to each infant.

This advice is reflected in the Australian Immunisation Handbook at www.immunisationhandbook.health.gov.au.

Please take all opportunities to speak to your pregnant patients and their partners about the importance of getting vaccinated against influenza and pertussis during pregnancy. Ideally, vaccination should be part of routine antenatal care.

To support you in these discussions, I have enclosed a number of resources that you and your patients may find useful.

These resources are also available for order or download from the Department of Health’s immunisation website at www.health.gov.au/immunisation.

About vaccines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Read all previous NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Immunisation Articles Here

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are able to get extra immunisations for free through the National Immunisation Program (NIP) to protect you against serious diseases.

These extra immunisations are in addition to all the other routine vaccinations offered throughout life (childrenadultsseniorspregnancy).

https://beta.health.gov.au/resources/videos/get-the-facts-protect-your-mob-hero-video#

Getting your bub vaccinated is free and helps keep everyone safe from diseases.

My name is Belinda, I have four children.

No I was never late with my vaccinations, because I always check the health book you were given and at the back you know it tells you when you’re due for your vaccinations.

If there are children in your community that are not up to date, let their parents know to bring them to the clinic as soon as possible.

On each vaccination, you know the childhood nurse she explained to me what each injection was for and how often they were to have it.

I would say to other parents that it’s important to have your children immunised. Nothing scary about it.

Vaccinating on time makes sure your bub gets the best protection against serious diseases.

Get the facts at immunisationfacts.gov.au

Children aged 5 years old or under

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5 years or under should receive all routine vaccines under the NIP. You can see a list of these vaccines on the Immunisation for children page.

The Australian Government recommends that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5 years or under have the following additional vaccines.

Pneumococcal disease

An additional booster dose of pneumococcal vaccine is recommended between the ages of 12 and 18 months for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in:

  • Queensland
  • Northern Territory
  • Western Australia
  • South Australia.

Visit the Pneumococcal immunisation service page for information on receiving the pneumococcal vaccine.

Hepatitis A

Two doses of the hepatitis A vaccine are given 6 months apart. These doses should be given from 12 months of age for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in:

  • Queensland
  • Northern Territory
  • Western Australia
  • South Australia.

The age that both the hepatitis A and pneumococcal vaccines are given varies among the 4 states and territories. Speak to your state or territory health service for more information.

Visit the Hepatitis A immunisation service page for information on receiving the hepatitis A vaccine.

Influenza

The influenza vaccine is free for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 6 months and over through the NIP.

Visit the influenza immunisation service page for information on receiving the influenza vaccine.

Children aged 5 to 9 years old

Influenza

The influenza vaccine is free for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 6 months and over through the NIP.

Visit the influenza immunisation service page for information on receiving the influenza vaccine.

Catch-up vaccines

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5 to 9 years should receive any missed routine childhood vaccinations. Catch-up vaccines are free through the NIP. See the NIP Schedule for more information.

Children aged 10 to 15 years

Influenza

The influenza vaccine is free for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 6 months and over through the NIP.

Visit the influenza immunisation service page for information on receiving the influenza vaccine.

Catch-up vaccines

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 10 to 15 years old should receive any missed routine childhood vaccinations. Catch-up vaccines are free through the NIP. See the NIP Schedule for more information.

Other vaccines

All children should receive routine vaccines for children aged 10 to 15 years old. These are HPV (human papillomavirus) and diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis), meningococcal ACWY vaccines given through school immunisation programs.

People aged 15 to 49 years old

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 to 19 years old should receive any missed routine childhood vaccinations. Catch-up vaccines are free through the NIP. See the NIP Schedule for more information.

Influenza

The influenza vaccine is free for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 6 months and over through the NIP.

Visit the influenza immunisation service page for information on receiving the influenza vaccine.

Pneumococcal disease

Pneumococcal vaccines are free for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 to 49 years old who are at high risk of severe pneumococcal disease.

Visit the Pneumococcal immunisation service page for information on receiving the pneumococcal vaccine.

People aged 50 years old or more

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50 years old or more should receive any missed routine childhood vaccinations. Catch-up vaccines are free through the NIP. See the NIP Schedule for more information.

Pneumococcal disease

Pneumococcal vaccines are free for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50 years old or over.

Visit the Pneumococcal immunisation service page for information on receiving the pneumococcal vaccine.

Influenza

The influenza vaccine is free for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 6 months and over through the NIP.

Visit the influenza immunisation service page for information on receiving the influenza vaccine.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Alcohol @FAREAustralia : Overcoming #Indigenous #FamilyViolence. Download new study from @marcialangton #unimelb where experts find success in Alcohol Management Plans but fear government failure to understand the magnitude of the alcohol problem

Our research found that average annual hospital admissions for assault fell from 32.25 per 1,000 people to 5.7 over 11 years, in line with tightening alcohol supply restriction,

We’ve identified propositions for better AMP outcomes long-term, through realistic financial support and stronger community-led governance “

The Associate Provost and Chair of Australian Indigenous Studies, Professor Marcia Langton, who co-authored the paper, says since the AMP was introduced there has been a reduction in violent assaults and the severity of family violence across the traditional lands of the Thaayorre and Mungkan peoples on the western coast of Cape York Peninsula

Paper Title: The Alcohol Management Plan at Pormpuraaw, Queensland, Australia: An ethnographic community-based study

Download Alcohol Management Plan Melbourne Uni

Authors: Kristen Smith, Marcia Langton, Richard Chenhall, Penelope Smith & Shane Bawden

Read over 200 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alcohol and Other Drug articles published over pst 7 years 

Alcohol Management Plans (AMPs), including one that has helped dramatically reduce violent assault rates in the remote Indigenous community of Pormpuraaw in far north Queensland, are under threat.

Coinciding today with the 5th Annual Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence Forum in Melbourne, University of Melbourne researchers have released a new study on the successes and challenges of the Pormpuraaw AMP.

While the dramatic drop in hospital admissions showed the AMP was working extremely well, Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) Chief Executive Michael Thorn is concerned that AMPs are under threat and riddled with problems stemming from government inertia.

Mr Thorn said the Pormpuraaw AMP study highlighted the need for genuine government investment overseen by a strong national alcohol strategy for protecting children, women, families and communities from alcohol harms.

“The good news is that an AMP can be an effective tool to significantly reduce alcohol harm, including family violence. But there’s a gulf between the well-intended rhetoric of governments to address harms in Indigenous communities and the unrealistic, unsustainable government action on the ground,” Mr Thorn said.

The University of Melbourne in-depth, community-based study investigated how AMP controls, restrictions and responses are understood and managed with Australian Aboriginal communities.

Research Fellow and lead author of the paper, Dr Kristen Smith, says most community members in

Pormpuraaw welcomed the reduced violence and community disharmony.

“There is strong community commitment to ‘place-based’ programs, but there are many issues that are being experienced in the community which are not being addressed,” Dr Smith said.

Dr Smith said the biggest concern was government failure to understand the magnitude of the alcohol problem and therefore underestimate resourcing.

“Underfunding is compounded over time through erratic political and policy decisions that fail to reliably meet the community’s needs for treatment services or address issues such as ‘sly-grogging’, gambling and criminalisation,” she said.

Professor Langton said the AMPs were too vulnerable to political and policy instabilities to ensure their long-term success. “We’ve identified propositions for better AMP outcomes long-term, through realistic financial support and stronger community-led governance,” she said.

NACCHO Deadly Good Members News : Aboriginal Health #InternationalWomensDay #IWD2019 : #MorePowerfulTogether  Our tribute to our 10 Women NACCHO Board of Directors and 71 #ACCHO CEO’s of our majority female workforce

1.National : Donnella Mills – Chair NACCHO and Wuchopperen Health Service   

2.NT: Donna Ah Chee Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

3.NSW: LaVerne Bellear Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service

4.TAS: Raylene Foster Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation

5.NT: Olga Havnen Danila Dilba Health Service

6.VIC: Karen Heap Ballarat & District Aboriginal Co-operative

7.SA: Vicki Holmes Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia

8.WA: Lesley Nelson South West Aboriginal Medical Service

9.ACT: Julie Tongs Winnunga Nimmityjah Health and Community Service

10. QLD: Gail Wason Mulungu Primary Health Care Service

Aboriginal women are the best advocates and leaders for health and wellbeing in their own families and in the broader community.

They are proving to be effective role models, mentors and influencers for the next generation of Aboriginal female leaders.

Recently NACCHO CEO Pat Turner told a women’s leadership summit

As mothers, aunts, grandmothers, sisters and daughters, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have culturally and historically always played a pivotal role in supporting and caring for families in our communities so working in the health sector was a natural progression.

For over 47 years Indigenous health activists like Dr Naomi Mayers, Coleen Shirley (Mum Shirl) Smith AM MBE, Jill Gallagher AO, Vicki O’Donnell, Pamela Mam, and the late Mary Buckskin have been just some of our leaders who have successfully advocated for community controlled, culturally respectful, needs based approach to improving the health and wellbeing outcomes of our people.

See previous NACCHO #IWD Tribute HERE 

As a result of their leadership and years of commitment as role models they have now paved the way for 10 women to be on the NACCHO board, 71 Indigenous women promoted to CEO’s out of 145 Organisations who employ over 6,000 staff with a majority being Indigenous woman

Our ACCHO network has successfully provided a critical and practical pathway for the education, training and employment for many Indigenous women.But much more needs to be done to develop viable career pathways to graduate more Indigenous women doctors, nurses and allied health professionals.

Last year NACCHO, RANZCOG and other medical college Presidents met with the Minister for Indigenous Health and other ministers in Canberra who are all determined to do everything possible to Close the Gap in health outcomes.

Creating career pathways for Indigenous women in our workforce will be a good starting point to continue supporting the theme ” More powerful together ”

1.National : Donnella Mills – Chair NACCHO and Wuchopperen Health Service QLD 

Donnella is a Torres Strait Islander woman with ancestral and family links to Masig and Nagir in the Torres Strait.

She is a Cairns–based lawyer with LawRight, a Community Legal Centre which coordinates the provision of pro-bono civil legal services to disadvantaged and vulnerable members of the community. Donnella is currently the project lawyer for the Wuchopperen Health Justice Partnership through a partnership with LawRight. This innovative Health Justice Partnership is an exciting model of providing access to justice, where lawyers and health professionals collaborate to provide better health outcomes and access to justice for patients with legal issues.

Donnella said she was “very excited about the opportunity to contribute to working the new Chairperson, the new board and the NACCHO Executive to drive the national health debate, develop community led solution, and to champion why Community-Controlled is the pinnacle model in achieving greater autonomy and self-determination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Utilising a legal lens in which to view health, social justice, human rights, and access to justice, my commitment is to deliver expanded and enhanced innovative health services that are community driven and community led, addressing core systemic social determinant issues that have a direct impact on our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

2.NT: Donna Ah Chee CEO Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

Ms Ah Chee is the Chief Executive Officer of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Aboriginal Corporation, the Aboriginal community controlled primary health care service in Alice Springs.

Ms Ah Chee is a Bundgalung woman from the far north coast of New South Wales and has lived in Alice Springs for over 25 years.

She has been actively involved in Aboriginal affairs for many years, especially in the area of Aboriginal adult education and Aboriginal health. In June 2011, Ms Ah Chee moved to Canberra to take up the position of Chief Executive Officer of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation before returning to Congress in July 2012.

Ms Ah Chee convened the Workforce Working Party under the Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Forum, was Chairperson of the Central Australian Regional Indigenous Health Planning Committee, a member of the Northern Territory Child Protection External Monitoring Committee and jointly headed up the Northern Territory Government’s Alcohol Framework Project Team.

She currently sits on the National Drug and Alcohol Committee and at a local level, represents the Congress on the People’s Alcohol Action Coalition.

3.NSW: LaVerne Bellear CEO Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service

LaVerne Bellear a descendant from the Nunukle Tribe of south-eastern Queensland, grew up in the northern part of the Bundjalung Nation (north coast New South Wales).

LaVerne strongly believes that empowering Aboriginal people will create opportunity to make better informed decisions and choices regarding personal management of health care, ultimately resulting in better health outcomes. LaVerne has extensive experience in Aboriginal health, having worked in community health, Aboriginal controlled health services and as the Director, Aboriginal Health, Northern Sydney Local Health District.

Recently, LaVerne has taken up the position of CEO, Aboriginal Medical Service Cooperative at Redfern, New South Wales.

She has been a state representative on a number of working parties and committees concerning Aboriginal health. LaVerne has a Bachelor of Business, a Professional Certificate in Indigenous Research in Training and Practices and is studying a Master of Public Health at The University of New South Wales.

4.TAS: Raylene Foster Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation

Raylene Foster is a palawa women from the Cygnet area. She commenced her career in hospitality, becoming a chef, and then moved into adult teaching within the TAFE institute.

Raylene took on a six-month secondment to Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre in 1995 and stayed; she has now been with the TAC for over 20 years

She’s had varying roles within the TAC, including the Director of the Aboriginal Community School, Workforce Development Officer, Emotional and Social Wellbeing Coordinator and over the past 15 years the Manager of the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre in the South, which includes the Aboriginal Health Service.

Raylene has a Graduate Certificate in Administration and an Advanced Diploma in Human Resources, as well as Diploma of Alcohol and Other Drugs and Mental Health and a facilitator in the SMART Recovery program. Raylene is passionate about children’s wellbeing and keeping families connected to break the cycle of institutionalisation, separations and trauma-related illnesses.

Raylene’s Abstract For This Months Rural Health Conference in Hobart 

See Website 

The Aboriginal cultural camp was an initiative that commenced in 2016 for Tasmanian registrars, GPs and members of the Tasmanian Aboriginal community. We wanted to go beyond the basic requirements of attendance at cultural training, to offer an immersion in to Aboriginal culture, on Aboriginal country, with mutual benefit for the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities.

The camp is held annually at trawtha makuminya, Aboriginal-owned land in the Central Highlands of Tasmania, from a Friday afternoon until a Sunday afternoon. Registrars, General Practitioners, Practice Staff and General Practice Training Tasmania staff and family members attend, in addition to the TAC staff Camp Organisers and Caterers, Cultural and Land Educators, Elders and community members.

The weekend involves an official welcome speech, dance and music, yarning around the campfire, guided walks with discussion about Aboriginal history, the land and stone tools, kayaking, basket weaving, hand stencilling, clap stick making, and a session of “You Can’t Ask That”. There is a medical education session and participants hear from an Aboriginal Health Worker and Aboriginal Enrolled Nurse about the services offered by the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre.

There is a lot of informal discussion about culture and life stories shared by both the adults and the children.

The feedback given to date, both informally and through the evaluation forms, is overwhelmingly positive. Participants value the beautiful location, the opportunity to spend time with community members outside the clinical setting, the obvious connection to country displayed by the Aboriginal community and the sharing of stories in a cultural exchange.

5.NT: Olga Havnen CEO Danila Dilba Health Service Darwin 

Olga is of Western Arrente descent and grew up in Tennant Creek. Her great-grandfather was Ah Hong, a Chinese cook who worked on the Overland Telegraph Line[2] whose partner was an Aboriginal woman in Alice Springs.

Their daughter Gloria, Havnen’s grandmother, was the first Aboriginal woman to own a house in Alice Springs. Havnen’s father was a Norwegian sailor who jumped ship in Adelaide and her mother, Pegg lived in Tennant Creek. Havnen went to boarding school in TownsvilleQueensland.[3]

Olga Havnen has held positions as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Programs Co-ordinator for the Australian Red Cross, Senior Policy Officer in the Northern Territory Government’s Indigenous Policy Unit, Indigenous Programs Director with the Fred Hollows Foundation, and Executive Officer with the National Indigenous Working Group.

And was the Coordinator General of Remote Service Provision from 2011 until October 2012, when the Northern Territory Government controversially abolished the position.[4]

She released one report which detailed deficiencies in Northern Territory and Commonwealth Government’s service provision to remote communities in the Northern Territory.[5]

She is currently the Chief Executive Officer of the Danila Dilba Health Service in Darwin, an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service.[1]

Havnen gave evidence at the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory critical of the outcomes and delivery of the Northern Territory National Emergency Response, commonly referred to as the Intervention stating “the experience of the Intervention was such a debacle you’d never want that repeated, but I do think that there is a role for the federal government in here in the Northern Territory”,

6.VIC: Karen Heap Ballarat & District Aboriginal Co-operative : Chair VACCHO 

Karen Heap, a Yorta Yorta woman, has been the CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative for 12 years and brings with her a vast amount of knowledge and skillsets procured from extensive experience within the Aboriginal Service Sector.

Karen Heap was recently the winner of the Walda Blow Award ( pictured above )

This award was established by DHHS in partnership with the Victorian Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People, in memory of Aunty Walda Blow – a proud Yorta

Yorta and Wemba Wemba Elder who lived her life in the pursuit of equality.

Aunty Walda was an early founder of the Dandenong and District Aboriginal Cooperative and worked for over 40 years improving the lives of the Aboriginal community. This award recognises contributions of an Aboriginal person in Victoria to the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people.

Karen ensures the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people are always front and centre.

Karen has personally committed her support to the Ballarat Community through establishing and continuously advocating for innovative prevention, intervention and reunification programs.

As the inaugural Chairperson of the Alliance, Karen contributions to establishing the identity and achieving multiple outcomes in the Alliance Strategic Plan is celebrated by her peers and recognised by the community service sector and DHHS.

Karen’s leadership in community but particularly for BADAC, has seen new ways of delivering cultural models of care to Aboriginal children, carers and their families, ensuring a holistic service is provided to best meet the needs of each individual and in turn benefit the community.

7.SA: Vicki Holmes Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia

Vicki Holmes is an Aboriginal woman descended from the Tanganekald and Western Aranda clan. Vicki has been with Nunkuwarrin Yunti for 32 years where she has had many roles; her first position was the medical receptionist but she also did whatever was needed including home visits, transport and hospital visits.

In 1986, Vicki became the Health Coordinator and while in this role programs such as women’s health, HIV, diabetes, mental health and social/welfare support expanded and developed. In 2010, Vicki became the CEO of Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia. As CEO of Nunkuwarrin Yunti, she holds positions on the Boards of NACCHO, the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Research Excellence in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health (REACCH), and First Peoples National Congress.

Her vision for Nunkuwarrin Yunti is around what she calls the four Cs: Community, Communication, Caring, Consistency. Vicki has always been passionate about the social and emotional wellbeing of the Aboriginal community.

8.WA: Lesley Nelson CEO South West Aboriginal Medical Service

SWAMS are united by the drive and passion to provide culturally safe, accessible and holistic health care to the Aboriginal people of the South West. WA

As an organisation, they continue to attract and employ culturally appropriate and professional staff members. SWAMS employs over 70 staff members including specialist Aboriginal Health Practitioners, Dietitians, Nurses, Midwives, Mental Health workers and Social Workers and because of this, we are able to provide a large and diverse range of services to the community.

In addition to this, they strive to create Aboriginal career pathways and opportunities across the sector and maintain a positive percentage of ATSI employees

Last year as preparations got underway for the South West Aboriginal Medical Service’s 20th anniversary, centre chief executive officer Lesley Nelson has reflected on how far indigenous health has advanced in the South West in that time.

Ms Nelson said the centre started small with a handful of staff and a desire to improve Aboriginal health outcomes in the region.

Over the next 20 years, it expanded with clinics in Bunbury, Busselton, Manjimup, Collie and Brunswick.

“We started after local elders held discussions with a number of key groups about developing a culturally appropriate service to address the health-related issues of the South West’s Indigenous population,” she said.

“Since then we’ve gone from strength-to-strength, offering a number of employment opportunities in the sector, training programs and improved health outcomes.”

Ms Nelson said the local service played an important role in the community.

“Being based in a number of country towns ensured locals can access our services conveniently, especially if they lack transport options to the bigger cities,” she said.

“We offer an important service because we intervene and manage issues early on and slowly we are improving the health of the South West Noongar people.

“We are also standing out nationally when it comes to maternal and child health.”

Moving forward, SWAMS are keen to continue growing, participating in more research studies and working collaboratively with other similar services to offer a whole of community approach to improved health.

9.ACT: Julie Tongs Winnunga Nimmityjah Health and Community Service

Julie Tongs OAM has been the Chief Executive Officer of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services since 1998.  Julie has more than 30 years experience working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs and in particular has extensive experience in advising, formulating, implementing and evaluating public health initiatives, programs and policy at a local, regional and national level.

Julie has been a national leader and strong advocate of quality improvement initiatives within the Aboriginal Community Controlled sector.

Julie is the recipient of a number of awards, including the ACT Governor General’s Centenary Medal and the ACT Indigenous Person of the Year. In 2011 Julie received the ACT Local Hero Award within the Australian of the Year Awards 2012, and in 2012 Julie was honoured with the Medal of the Order of Australia.

Julie’s vision is that Winnunga continues to build on its reputation as a national leader in the provision of holistic primary health care services delivered in a culturally appropriate environment that achieves improved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Julie is committed to ensuring that Winnunga offers services that are delivered consistent with best practice standards.

10 .QLD: Gail Wason Mulungu Primary Health Care Service

We see the best way to build capacity and capability within our corporation is by encouraging strong leaders, maintaining effective governance, ensuring strong systems, and keeping focused on accountable performance management.

Mulungu help our clients to make informed decisions. We work in health but we also work across education and job opportunities. Our model supports individuals who want to do the best for themselves, their family and their community.’

CEO Gail Wason.

Gail is the Chief Executive Officer of Mulungu Primary Health Care Service in Mareeba. She has over 25 years’ experience in Aboriginal affairs and health, and an unwavering commitment to improving the health and wellbeing of her community.

Gail strives to ensure that the community has access to the full range of high quality, culturally appropriate primary health care services that empowers clients to fully participate in the management of their own health.

She has served as QAIHC’s Far North Queensland Director and Chairperson of QAIHC’s Finance Committee and has worked closely with the Board for many years.

Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre is an Aboriginal community-controlled health organisation working to improve the lives of Indigenous people in and around Mareeba.

The centre was established in 1991 and incorporated under the CATSI Act in 1993.

The rural town of Mareeba—a word from local Aboriginal language meaning ‘meeting of the waters’—is located on the Atherton Tablelands where the Barron River meets Granite Creek. Traditionally Muluridji people inhabited this land.

‘Although the bright lights of Cairns are only 65 kilometres away we feel like a stand-alone, small country town,’ says chair of the Mulungu board of directors (and valued volunteer) Alan Wason. ‘We have a population of 10,000 and our own identity separate from Cairns.’

The town of Mareeba may be a little tucked away but it has much to offer, including Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre—a bright, open, modern building—which employs a large professional staff who work as a team and support each other. Everyone is passionate about providing top quality holistic health care to the community through Mulungu’s programs and services.

Mulungu’s mission is to provide comprehensive primary health care to the community in culturally, socially and emotionally appropriate ways. It’s about handing back power to the people to manage their own health, wellbeing and spiritual needs. So as well as providing clinical health care services Mulungu ‘auspices’ other important primary health care programs, including the Mareeba Children and Families Centre (CFC), Mareeba Parent and Community Engagement (PaCE) Program, and the Mareeba Young and Awesome Project (MY&A).

The MY&A Project tackles the problem of binge drinking in the community. Its aim is to motivate young people (aged 12 to 25) to get involved in constructive activities that they might enjoy—and to get them away from drinking alcohol. This two-year project is funded by the Australian Government.

‘We help our clients to make informed decisions,’ says Gail Wason. ‘We work in health but we also work across education and job opportunities. Our model supports individuals who want to do the best for themselves, their family and their community.’

It’s all about changing and improving lives.

To learn more about Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service visit http://mulungu.org.au.

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #IWD2019 : $35 million investment in #FourthActionPlan will respond to the needs, backgrounds and experiences of #Indigenous women and children affected by domestic, family and sexual violence.

Unfortunately however too many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women face far higher levels of violence than the general community and that is why we need to put in place genuine Indigenous designed and Indigenous led solutions.
 
“The $35 million in Indigenous specific measures announced today will help tackle the drivers of family and domestic violence and address the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by violence.”

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said the investments announced as part of the Fourth Action Plan will respond to the needs, backgrounds and experiences of Indigenous women and children affected by domestic, family and sexual violence.: see Part 1 Below

Our Government’s first priority is to keep Australians safe. To hear the accounts of survivors, and see the statistics, it’s just not good enough .That’s why we are investing $328 million for the Fourth Action Plan to fund prevention, response and recovery initiatives.

This is the largest ever Commonwealth contribution to the National Plan. To stop violence against women, we need to counter the culture of disrespect towards women. A culture of disrespect towards women is a precursor to violence, and anyone who doesn’t see that is kidding themselves.   That’s why we are investing so heavily in prevention with $68.3 million to stop violence before it begins.

This is about changing attitudes to violence, and helping those who think violence is an option, to stop.

We will also develop Australia’s first national prevention strategy to stop domestic and family violence and sexual assault, and continue our work to change the attitudes and beliefs that can lead to violence.”

The Prime Minister said his Government would deliver the largest ever Commonwealth investment of $328 million for prevention and frontline services through the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022. See in Full Part 2

 

‘ This measure also supports an update of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners’ Abuse and violence: Working with our patients in general practice  
 
After family and friends, it is GPs and other primary care providers who survivors of family and domestic violence turn to for support.

The quality of the response from the GP has been found to have a deep and profound impact on victims, influencing whether they seek help and support in the future.’

Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said the Government is committing $9.6 million to boost family violence care. Of that funding, Minister Hunt said $2.1 million over three years will be invested to train 5000 primary care workers across Australia, including GPs, ‘to better respond and support family violence victims’ See Part 3 Below 

Part 1 : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their children will receive support through the Federal Government’s $35 million investment as part of the Fourth Action Plan (4AP) of the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

The $35 million package includes:

  • Ongoing additional investment to continue and expand Indigenous specific projects funded under the Third Action Plan to keep women and their children safe from violence including funding to increase Family Violence Prevention Legal Services’ capacity to deliver holistic crisis support to Indigenous women and children
  • New funding to support Indigenous women and children through intensive family case management in remote areas and areas of high need so they are able to access services that work with the whole family to address the impacts of violence
  • Practical intervention programs to work with Indigenous young people and adults at risk of experiencing or using violence to address past trauma and equip them with the practical tools and skills to develop positive and violence-free relationships
  • $1.7 million to support the second stage of the Wiyi YaniU Thangani (Women’s Voices) national conversation with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, June Oscar AO.

“These measures, funded out of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, have been developed in partnership with Indigenous leaders, service providers and experts who have told us that investment is needed to provide wrap around support to women and their families impacted by domestic violence and to address the trauma and violence that is often a cause of future violence.

“These measures will also be rolled out in consultation with Indigenous Australians with the establishment of an expert consultative committee involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders, experts and service providers such as representatives of the Family Violence Prevention Legal Services to ensure these measures are delivered in a culturally appropriate way, in the areas of highest need and with Indigenous organisations and service providers that can best meet the needs of women and their families. Appropriate monitoring and evaluation strategies will also be built into this work.

“On top of this investment, the Coalition Government will provide $2.5 million for the Office of the eSafety Commissioner to work with and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in communities across Australia to identify, report and protect themselves and their children from technology-facilitated abuse.

“Funding will also be provided to 1800RESPECT to improve accessibility for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to ensure they have access to high quality and culturally appropriate counselling and support.

“Together these initiatives provide a comprehensive suite of measures to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, victims and survivors of family and domestic violence and builds on existing initiatives such as the Coalition’s record $121 million investment to 2020 for 14 Family Violence Prevention Legal Services,” Minister Scullion said.

If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au.

Part 2 RECORD FUNDING TO REDUCE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Combating violence against women and children remains one of the Federal Government’s top priorities, as part of its plan to keep Australians safe.

The Prime Minister said his Government would deliver the largest ever Commonwealth investment of $328 million for prevention and frontline services through the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

“Our Government’s first priority is to keep Australians safe. To hear the accounts of survivors, and see the statistics, it’s just not good enough,” the Prime Minister said.

“That’s why we are investing $328 million for the Fourth Action Plan to fund prevention, response and recovery initiatives.

“This is the largest ever Commonwealth contribution to the National Plan.

“To stop violence against women, we need to counter the culture of disrespect towards women.

“A culture of disrespect towards women is a precursor to violence, and anyone who doesn’t see that is kidding themselves.

“That’s why we are investing so heavily in prevention with $68.3 million to stop violence before it begins.

“This is about changing attitudes to violence, and helping those who think violence is an option, to stop. “We will also develop Australia’s first national prevention strategy to stop domestic and family violence and sexual assault, and continue our work to change the attitudes and beliefs that can lead to violence.”

The National Plan connects the important work being done by all Australian governments, community organisations and individuals so that Australian women and children can live in safe communities.

The National Plan and the Government’s investments are the product of extensive consultations with frontline workers and survivors ahead of the release of the Fourth Action Plan 2019-22 in mid-2019.

Minister for Families and Social Services Paul Fletcher said the Commonwealth would invest $35 million in support and prevention measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and $78 million to provide safe places for people impacted by domestic and family violence.

“We will act against the different forms abuse can take, including preventing financial abuse and technology-facilitated abuse, and we have included specific measures targeted to address the risks faced by women with intellectual disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women,” Minister Fletcher said.

The Commonwealth commitment will also fund targeted prevention initiatives to reach culturally and linguistically diverse communities and people with disability.

“Domestic violence is a risk that all women face – but we recognise that specific groups may have particular vulnerability, which is why there are specific targeted measures included in this package.”

“Today’s announcement brings Commonwealth investment in this space since 2013 to over $840 million,” said Mr Fletcher.

The Commonwealth’s commitment also provides $82 million for frontline services, including investments to improve and build on the systems responsible for keeping women and children safe, such as free training for health workers to identify and better support domestic violence victims, and the development of national standards for sexual assault responses.

The Coalition will investment $62 million in 1800RESPECT to support the service, which has rapidly grown in scope as more Australians find the courage to seek help and advice.

Minister for Women Kelly O’Dwyer said all women and children have the right to feel safe, and to feel supported to seek help when they need it.

“The statistics on this issue are shocking – one in six women have experienced physical or sexual violence by a current or former partner since the age of 15. This figure increases to nearly one in four women when violence by boyfriends, girlfriends and dates is included,” Minister O’Dwyer said.

“The safety of women and children is vitally important. Our Government has zero tolerance for violence against women and children.

“Whether it’s at home, in the workplace, in our communities or online, all women and children deserve to be safe.”

Summary of new measures:

  • $82 million for frontline services
  • $68 million for prevention strategies
  • $35 million in support and prevention measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities funded under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.
  • $78 million to provide safe places for people impacted by domestic and family violence.
  • 1800RESPECT will receive $64 million to support the service.

The Coalition has taken strong action already to protect women and children, including:

  • introducing a minimum standard for domestic violence leave for the very first time;
  • banning the direct cross-examination of women by their alleged perpetrator during family law proceedings;
  • extending early release of superannuation on compassionate grounds to victims of family and domestic violence;
  • expanding Good Shepherd Microfinance’s No Interest Loan Scheme to 45,000 women experiencing family and domestic violence;
  • providing over 7,046 visas for women and children needing safe refuge through the Women at Risk program;
  • extending funding for Specialist Domestic Violence Units and Health Justice Partnerships including funding for additional financial support services;
  • funding support for an additional 31,200 families to resolve family law disputes quickly through mediation;
  • continuing advertising of the award winning Stop it at the Start campaign;
  • further funding 1800RESPECT, the National Sexual Assault, Domestic and Family Violence Counselling Service;
  • investing an additional $6.7 million in DV alert;
  • prioritising women and children who are escaping family violence in the $7.8 billion housing and homelessness agreement; and
  • establishing the eSafety Commissioner in 2017, expanding the scope of the Office of the Children’s eSafety Commissioner.

About the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children (2010-2022) (the National Plan)

The National Plan aims to connect the important work being done by all Australian governments, community organisations and individuals to reduce violence so that we can work together to ensure each year, less women experience violence and more women and their children live safely.

The Commonwealth Government is leading the development of the Fourth Action Plan 2019-2022 of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022 (the National Plan) in partnership with state and territory governments.

The Fourth Action Plan is the final action plan of the National Plan and is due for implementation from mid-2019.

For further information on the National Plan, visit

Part 3 Major funding boost for family violence training

FROM RACGP Post

Family violence has been in the spotlight, with two large funding pledges from the Federal Government.

In one announcement, Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said the Government is committing $9.6 million to boost family violence care.

Of that funding, Minister Hunt said $2.1 million over three years will be invested to train 5000 primary care workers across Australia, including GPs, ‘to better respond and support family violence victims’.

That training will be delivered by accredited providers and will reflect evidence-based trauma-informed models of care and culturally appropriate care.

‘This measure also supports an update of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners’ Abuse and violence: Working with our patients in general practice,’ Minister Hunt said.

‘After family and friends, it is GPs and other primary care providers who survivors of family and domestic violence turn to for support.

‘The quality of the response from the GP has been found to have a deep and profound impact on victims, influencing whether they seek help and support in the future.’

A further $7.5m will be provided over three years towards expanding the Recognise, Respond and Refer Program, an initiative of the Brisbane South Primary Health Network (PHN) to a further four PHN regions.

The trial states that it will:

  • deliver whole-of-practice training to GP staff to recognise the signs of family violence
  • develop locally relevant care and referral pathways for people who are, or are at risk of, experiencing family violence
  • provide post-training support to practices to assist them to put in place training to identify and support victims of family violence
  • develop models to integrate primary healthcare into the domestic and family violence sector in the local region, including clear roles for GPs.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Events and Conferences : This week features 8 March #InternationalWomensDay #MorePowerfulTogetherand March 3- 9 #WorldHearingWeek and #HearingAwarenessWeek

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

March 9 International Women’s Day #IWD

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

9 March  Bush to Beach Project Grazing Style Light Indigenous Marathon Fundraiser

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

14 March Workshop Brisbane Moving Beyond the Frontline project 

14 – 15 March 2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019

21 March National Close the Gap Day

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane

22 March : The experts priorities for the 2019 Federal Election 

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured Save date

March 9 International Women’s Day #IWD

International Women’s Day (IWD) will be celebrated on 8 March across all our 302 Aboriginal community controlled health clinics and 8 affiliates , where thousands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander woman are involved daily in all aspects and levels of comprehensive Aboriginal primary health care delivery.

Professional and dedicated Indigenous Woman CEO’S , Doctors, Clinic Managers, Aboriginal Health Workers , Nurses, Receptionists etc.

We honour all the woman working in our #ACCHO’s over 45 years in #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS

VIEW NACCHO Tribute first published 2018

IWD is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women.

Australia’s IWD 2019 theme, More Powerful Together, recognises the important role we all play – as women, men, non-binary and gender diverse people. It takes all of us, working in collaboration and across that which sometimes divides us, breaking down stereotypes and gendered roles to create a world where women and girls everywhere have equal rights and opportunities.

More Powerful Together is a clarion call to stand in unison for gender equality.

AIATSIS : Have you ordered your International Women’s Day poster yet?

This year’s features a wonderful portrait of the much loved and respected Yolŋu leader, Laurie Baymarrwaŋa.

We have limited numbers of the poster available to order, while stocks last

REQUEST HERE 

March 3-9 March Hearing Awareness Week

We are super excited to launch our in celebration of !

We’re calling on all Australians to take the first step toward healthy hearing by joining us. Check your hearing online now:

Part 2 Pictured above 

Sound Scouts is proud to participate in Hearing Awareness Week  from the 3rd to the 9th of March, 2019.  Thanks to Australian Hearing and funding from the Australian Government, you can download the app for free and test your child today.

Sound Scouts is the children’s hearing check designed to make testing easy. Sound Scouts incorporates the science of a hearing test in a fun game. The children don’t even know they are being tested.

Developed in collaboration with the National Acoustic Laboratories, Sound Scouts provides an instant report and guidance on next steps if a problem is detected.

EASY SETUP

Fun app-based test delivering an immediate report.

PROVEN

Published in the International Journal of Audiology, and recommended by
Australian Hearing.

AWARD WINNING

Highly recognised and  supported by NSW Health.

Hearing issues are a common cause of speech, learning and behavioural problems so it is important for all children to have their hearing tested. If a child struggles to hear, they’ll also struggle to learn. The World Health Organisation recommends children have their hearing tested when they start school*.

1 in 10 children are held back at school by hearing loss. Take action to ensure your child isn’t one of them.

WEBSITE 

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

9 March  Bush to Beach Project Grazing Style Light Indigenous Marathon Fundraiser

The Port Macquarie Running Festival is happening over the weekend of the 9th-10th March 2019. As a part of this event we are running a fundraiser to support the important work being undertaken by Charlie & Tali Maher as a part of the Indigenous Marathon Project Running And Walking group. Come along to hear from Olympians Nova Peris, Steve Moneghette & Robert de Castella while meeting members of the Indigenous Marathon Project over lunch. We hope to see you there.

All funds raised will go towards the Bush to Beach Project. The project aims
to develop a strong relationship between the Northern Territory community of
Ntaria and the coastal community of Port Macquarie, with an exchange program
occurring several times throughout the year. This will include young Indigenous
people visiting the communities and participating in running and walking events
to promote healthy living. We thank you for your support.

Guest Speakers: Olympians Nova Peris, Steve Moneghetti & Robert de Castella.

Any enquiries please get in touch with Nina Cass or Charlie Maher (ninacass87@gmail.com / charles.maher@det.nsw.edu.au)

Tickets $59 Register HERE 

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

Djirra has been chosen to be the charity partner of the next Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence conference organised by Aventedge in Melbourne on the 12th and 13th of March.

On the first day, Tuesday 12th of March, Marion Hansen, Djirra’s chairperson, will give the opening and closing address. At 10.30am, Djirra’s CEO Antoinette Braybrook will share her experience and knowledge on Supporting Aboriginal women, their children and communities to be safe, culturally strong and free from violence.

Family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, predominantly women and their children, is a national crisis.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their organisations hold the solutions to ending the disproportionate rates of family violence. However this requires the support and involvement of a range of stakeholders around the country.

The 5th annual Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence Forum (Melbourne & Perth) has partnered with Djirra and brings together representatives from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Organisations, specialist family violence support and prevention services, community legal services, government, police and not-for-profit organisations.

During the course of this conference and 1-day workshop, we will explore critical issues in working to end family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including state and federal government initiatives; how frontline services are engaging in prevention, early intervention and response; learning from the stories and experiences of survivors of family violence; working more effectively with people who use violence towards accountability and behaviour change and the impacts of family violence on children and young people.

For more information on these events, pricing and discounts click below:
Melbourne | 12th-14th March 2019
Event homepage – www.ifv-mel.aventedge.com
Register here – http://elm.aventedge.com/ifv-mel-register

Perth | 5th-6th March 2019
Event homepage – www.ifv-per.aventedge.com
Register here – http://elm.aventedge.com/ifv-per/register

14 March Workshop Brisbane Moving Beyond the Frontline project 

An interactive workshop for currently enrolled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and medical students.

Panel conversations with

Associate Professor Chelsea Bond (UQ Poche)
Associate Professor Shannon Springer (Bond Uni)
Professor Mark Brough (QUT) &
Dr Bryan Mukandi (UQ Medicine)

The workshop shares key findings from the Moving Beyond the Frontline project to facilitate a broader conversation about how to foster culturally safe learning environments for Indigenous health and medical students. 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students currently enrolled in a health or health related degree program (undergraduate or postgraduate), at any institution, are eligible to attend.

Register by 6 March to secure your place.

Catering will be provided.

** Please note that due to limited capacity, preference is to accomodate Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students **

For more information about Moving Beyond the Frontline project, visit the Lowitja Institute website or watch a short video about the project here: https://vimeo.com/278096582

For further information about the event, please email UQ Poche at poche@uq.edu.au

REGISTER HERE

14 – 15 March 2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019

Indigenous Eye Health (IEH) at the University of Melbourne and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT), are pleased to invite you to register for the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020:Strengthen & Sustain – National Conference 2019 which will be held at the Alice Springs Convention Centre on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 in the Northern Territory. This conference is also supported by our partners, Vision 2020 Australia, Optometry Australia and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

The 2019 conference, themed ‘Strengthen & Sustain’ will provide opportunity to highlight the very real advances being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait eye health. It will explore successes and opportunities to strengthen eye care and initiatives and challenges to sustain progress towards the goal of equitable eye care by 2020. To this end, the conference will include plenary speakers, panel discussions and presentations as well as upskilling workshops and cultural experiences.

Registration (including workshops, welcome reception and conference dinner) is $250. Registrations close on 28 February 2019.

Who should attend?

The conference is designed to bring people together and connect people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

Speakers will be invited, however this year we will also be calling for abstracts for Table Top presentations and Poster presentations – further details on abstract submissions to follow.

Please share and forward this information with colleagues and refer people to this webpage where the conference program and additional informationwill become available in the lead up to the conference. Note: Please use the conference hashtag #CTGV19.

We look forward to you joining us in the Territory in 2019 for learning and sharing within the unique beauty and cultural significance of Central Australia.

Additional Information:

If you have any questions or require additional information, please contact us at indigenous-eyehealth@unimelb.edu.au or contact IEH staff Carol Wynne (carol.wynne@unimelb.edu.au; 03 8344 3984 email) or Mitchell Anjou (manjou@unimelb.edu.au; 03 8344 9324).

Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain – National Conference 2019 links:

– Conference General Information

– Conference Program

– Conference Dinner & Leaky Pipe Awards

– Staying in Alice Springs

More information available at: go.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6 

21 March National Close the Gap Day

Featured Save date

For the last 10 years many thousands of Australians from every corner of the country, in schools, businesses and community groups, have shown their support for Close the Gap by marking National Close the Gap Day each March.

This National Close the Gap Day, we have an opportunity to send our governments a clear message that Australians value health equality as a fundamental right for all.

On National Close the Gap Day we encourage you to host an activity in your workplace, home, community or school.

Our aim is to bring people together to share information, and most importantly, to take meaningful action in support of achieving Indigenous health equality by 2030.

How to get involved in National Close the Gap Day

  • Register your activity. You can download some online resources to support your event
  • Invite your friends, workmates and family to join you
  • Take action by signing the Close the Gap pledge and asking your friends and colleagues to do the same
  • Call, tweet or write to your local Member of Parliament and tell them that you want them to Close the Gap
  • Listen to and share the stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on Facebook – visit our Close the Gap Facebook page.
  • Share your photos and stories on social media. Use the hashtag #ClosetheGap
  • Donate to help our work on Close the Gap

With events ranging from workplace morning teas, sports days, school events and public events in hospitals and offices around the country — tens of thousands of people take part each year to make a difference.

Your actions can create lasting change. Be part of the generation that closes the gap.

National Close the Gap Day is a time for all Australians to come together and commit to achieving health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Close the Gap Campaign will partner with Tharawal Aboriginal Aboriginal Medical Services, South Western Sydney, to host an exciting community event and launch our Annual Report.

Visit the website of our friends at ANTaR for more information and to register your support. https://antar.org.au/campaigns/national-close-gap-day

EVENT REGISTER

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane 

The Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery is hosting a workshop on Indigenous Ear Health in Brisbane on Thursday, 21 March 2019.

This meeting is the 7th to be organised by ASOHNS and is designed to facilitate discussion about the crucial health issue and impact of ear disease amongst Indigenous people.

The meeting is aimed at bringing together all stakeholders involved in managing Indigenous health and specifically ear disease, such as:  ENT surgeons, GPs, Paediatricians, Nurses, Audiologists, Speech Therapists, Allied Health Workers and other health administrators (both State and Federal).

Download Program and Contact 

Indigenous Ear Health 2019 Program

22 March : The experts priorities for the 2019 Federal Election 

Listen to 3 of Australia’s leading health advocates outline their top priorities for change

– Book Here

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

Interested in the health and wellbeing of rural or remote Australia?

This is the conference for you.

In March 2019 the rural health sector will gather in Hobart for the 15th National Rural Conference.  Every two years we meet to learn, listen and share ideas about how to improve health outcomes in rural and remote Australia.

Proudly managed by the National Rural Health Alliance, the Conference has a well-earned reputation as Australia’s premier rural health event.  Not just for health professionals, the Conference recognises the critical roles that education, regional development and infrastructure play in determining health outcomes, and we welcome people working across a wide variety of industries.

Join us as we celebrate our 15th Conference and help achieve equitable health for the 7 million Australians living in rural and remote areas.

Hobart and its surrounds was home to the Muwinina people who the Alliance acknowledges as the traditional and original owners of this land.  We pay respect to those that have passed before us and acknowledge today’s Tasmanian Aboriginal community as the custodians of the land on which we will meet.

More info 

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

Thank you for your interest in the 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference will bring together Indigenous leaders, government, industry and academia representing Housing, health, and education from around the world including:

  • National and International Indigenous Organisation leadership
  • Senior housing, health, and education government officials Industry CEOs, executives and senior managers from public and private sectors
  • Housing, Healthcare, and Education professionals and regulators
  • Consumer associations
  • Academics in Housing, Healthcare, and Education.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference #2019WIHC is the principal conference to provide a platform for leaders in housing, health, education and related services from around the world to come together. Up to 2000 delegates will share experiences, explore opportunities and innovative solutions, work to improve access to adequate housing and related services for the world’s Indigenous people.

Event Information:

Key event details as follows:
Venue: Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre
Address: 2684-2690 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD 4218
Dates: Monday 20th – Thursday 23rd May, 2019 (24th May)

Registration Costs

  • EARLY BIRD – FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION: $1950 AUD plus booking fees
  • After 1 February FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION $2245 AUD plus booking fees

PLEASE NOTE: The Trade Exhibition is open Tuesday 21st May – Thursday 23rd May 2019

Please visit www.2019wihc.com for further information on transport and accommodation options, conference, exhibition and speaker updates.

Methods of Payment:

2019WIHC online registrations accept all major credit cards, by Invoice and direct debit.
PLEASE NOTE: Invoices must be paid in full and monies received by COB Monday 20 May 2019.

Please note: The 2019 WIHC organisers reserve the right of admission. Speakers, programs and topics are subject to change. Please visit http://www.2019wihc.comfor up to date information.

Conference Cancellation Policy

If a registrant is unable to attend 2019 WIHC for any reason they may substitute, by arrangement with the registrar, someone else to attend in their place and must attend any session that has been previously selected by the original registrant.

Where the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her place to another person, or to another event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

    • Registrations cancelled less than 60 days, but more than 30 days before the event are eligible for a 50% refund of the registration fees paid.
    • Registrations cancelled less than 30 days before the event are no longer eligible for a refund.

Refunds will be made in the following ways:

  1. For payments received by credit or debit cards, the same credit/debit card will be refunded.
  2. For all other payments, a bank transfer will be made to the payee’s nominated account.

Important: For payments received from outside Australia by bank transfer, the refund will be made by bank transfer and all bank charges will be for the registrant’s account. The Cancellation Policy as stated on this page is valid from 1 October 2018.

Terms & Conditions

please visit www.2019wihc.com

Privacy Policy

please visit www.2019wihc.com

 

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens 

The opening of the 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round has been moved forward! The National NAIDOC Grants will now officially open on Thursday 24 January 2019.

Head to www.naidoc.org.au to join the National NAIDOC Mailing List and keep up with all things grants or check out the below links for more information now!

https://www.finance.gov.au/resource-management/grants/grantconnect/

https://www.pmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/grants-and-funding/naidoc-week-funding

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

 

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

 

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO and @RACGP Aboriginal Women’s Health and #FamilyViolence : How to identify and provide early intervention for victims and perpetrators.

About four in 10 women who were physically injured [as a result of family violence] visited a health professional for their injuries
 
This information [from the report] offers important insights for those involved in family and domestic violence policy, as well as organisations which provide services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, aimed at preventing violence and supporting those affected by violence.’

ABS Director of the Centre of Excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics, Debbie Goodwin said.

 ” Chapter 16 of the RACGP NACCHO National Guide : ‘Family abuse and violence’, provides key recommendations on prevention interventions – screening, behavioural and environmental.

These recommendations aim to support healthcare professionals to develop a high level of awareness of the risks of family abuse and violence, and how to identify and provide early intervention for victims and perpetrators.”

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (

Published by NewsGP Morgan Liotta

The report forms part of the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (ABS) publication National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, 2014–15 and compares sociodemographic factors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who experienced family violence with those who did not in the year prior to the 2014–15 survey.

Key findings show that, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, around two in three women (72%) compared with one in three men (35%) were likely to identify an intimate partner or family member as at least one of the perpetrators in their most recent experience of physical violence.

Approximately one in 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women experienced family violence based on their most recent experience of physical violence.

Almost seven in 10 (68%) women who had experienced family violence reported that alcohol and/or other substances contributed to the incident:

  • More than half of women (53%) who had experienced family violence reported alcohol (by itself or with other substances) was a contributing factor
  • More than one in 10 (13%) reported that other substances alone were a contributing factor

When compared with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who had not experienced any physical violence, those who had were:

  • more likely to report high or very high levels of psychological distress (69% compared with 34%)
  • more likely to have a mental health condition (53% compared with 31%)
  • more likely to report they had experienced homelessness at some time in their life (55% compared with 26%)
  • less likely to trust police in their local area (44% compared with 62%)
  • just as likely to trust their own doctor (77% compared with 83%)

The report underlines the role of GPs’ support for such people.

GP resources

  • The RACGP and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO)’s National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (National Guide), Chapter 16: ‘Family abuse and violence’, provides key recommendations on prevention interventions – screening, behavioural and environmental. These recommendations aim to support healthcare professionals to develop a high level of awareness of the risks of family abuse and violence, and how to identify and provide early intervention for victims and perpetrators.
  • The RACGP’s Abuse and violence: Working with our partners in general practice (White book), Chapter 11: ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander violence’, outlines statistics and recommendations for healthcare professionals to show leadership at a community level through local organisations by advocating for provision of services that meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples experiencing family violence.

NACCHO Aboriginal #Agedcare Health : Minister @KenWyattMP Download : The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care #Consumer and Provider Action Plans to support the distinctive needs of our mob

” The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Action Plan Actions to support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, to be launched today, addresses the distinctive support needs of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and represents the first such aged care strategy since 1994. 

It is one of three aged care action plans being released under the Commonwealth’s Aged Care Diversity Framework, with the other two encompassing the needs of CALD communities and LGBTI people.( see below )

The action plan provides specific guidance to aged care providers on how to address the needs of Aboriginal peoples in enacting the overarching principles of the Aged Care Diversity Framework, which takes a human rights approach to driving cultural and systemic change in the aged care system, and to ensure that all Australians access safe, equitable and high-quality aged care services regardless of their ethnicity, culture, sexuality and life experiences.

Implementation of the plan will increase the accessibility of culturally safe aged care support and services to older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and provide guidance to mainstream service providers seeking to increase the cultural safety and appropriateness of the services they offer to Aboriginal people.

In particular this plan emphasises the need for mainstream service providers to collaborate and/or co-design services with Aboriginal community-controlled organisations.

Noeleen Tunny is manager of VACCHO’s Policy and Advocacy Unit

Originally published in Croakey

Read all NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Elder care Articles HERE

Download the Action Plans HERE

actions-to-support-older-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-a-guide-for-consumers

actions-to-support-older-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-a-guide-for-aged-care-providers

Minister Wyatt honoured to join Elders & such an amazing group of dedicated and talented advocates for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Aged Care, launching Australia’s first Aged Care Diversity Action Plan for First Nations people. Thanks – at Parliament House

Part 1 : Aged Care Diversity Framework

From Here

The Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Senior Australians and Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health, established an Aged Care Sector Committee Diversity Sub-Group to advise the Government on the development of an Aged Care Diversity Framework and action plans.

The Aged Care Diversity Framework (the Framework) was launched on 6 December 2017.

The Framework is an overarching set of principles designed to ensure an accessible aged care system where people, regardless of their individual social, cultural, linguistic, religious, spiritual, psychological, medical and care needs are able to access respectful and inclusive aged care services. The Framework takes a human-rights based approach in line with the World Health Organization principles of:

  • non-discrimination
  • availability
  • accessibility
  • acceptability
  • quality
  • accountability

Development of the Framework was informed through:

Action plans

Three action plans have been developed under the Framework to assist aged care service providers and government to address specific barriers and challenges faced by:

  • Older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Older people from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds
  • Older lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and gender diverse, and intersex peoples

In addition there is a shared action plan and government action plan to support all diverse older people.

The action plans are informed by extensive public and aged care sector consultations.

An action plan for older people who are homeless, or at risk of homelessness, is currently being developed.

Part 2 : Actions to support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in aged care

Originally published in Croakey

While the gap in life expectancy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is still significant, there are people living into their older years who require aged care support that meets their diverse needs.

The 65 and over Aboriginal population is projected to grow by 200 per cent by 2031, making it critical for us to get aged care right now.

Aboriginal Australians are affected by chronic disease more frequently and at a younger age than non-Indigenous people. In some areas the prevalence of dementia is almost five times that of non-Indigenous Australians, with higher rates of self-reported falls, incontinence and pain. Yet despite these statistics, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are less likely than the general population to access aged care.

Successive iterations of the Productivity Commission’s Report on Government Services indicate that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples who are eligible to receive an aged care assessment are less likely to be assessed than their counterparts in both the general population and in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. This disparity was evident both at a national level and in each Australian jurisdiction and suggests a need to support better engagement of older Aboriginal people within the aged care system.

Stolen Generations

Adding further complexity to the space is the fact that 100% of the Stolen Generation will be at least 50 years old by 2023, i.e. eligible for aged care as Aboriginal people can access these services earlier due to their broader lower life expectancy. This group will require sensitive, trauma-informed care that does not re-traumatise them.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Action Plan Actions to support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, to be launched tomorrow, addresses the distinctive support needs of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and represents the first such aged care strategy since 1994.  It is one of three aged care action plans being released under the Commonwealth’s Aged Care Diversity Framework, with the other two encompassing the needs of CALD communities and LGBTI people.

The action plan provides specific guidance to aged care providers on how to address the needs of Aboriginal peoples in enacting the overarching principles of the Aged Care Diversity Framework, which takes a human rights approach to driving cultural and systemic change in the aged care system, and to ensure that all Australians access safe, equitable and high-quality aged care services regardless of their ethnicity, culture, sexuality and life experiences.

Collaboration

The Institute of Urban Indigenous Health (based in Brisbane) and the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) collaborated in the development of the plan. VACCHO coordinated the consultation process in NSW, Victoria, Tasmania and SA.

Consultations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and aged care providers included:

  • 629 completed surveys
  • 51 individual consultations carried out by the project team and members of the working group = these complemented the survey data and explored in more detail issues being raised in the survey responses and views expressed by members of the Working Group; and
  • a written submission from the Healing Foundation in recognition of the specific issues related to ageing and the needs of the Stolen Generations.

Implementation of the plan will increase the accessibility of culturally safe aged care support and services to older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and provide guidance to mainstream service providers seeking to increase the cultural safety and appropriateness of the services they offer to Aboriginal people. In particular this plan emphasises the need for mainstream service providers to collaborate and/or co-design services with Aboriginal community-controlled organisations.

To quote the plan: “The plan can assist providers to identify actions they could take to deliver more inclusive and culturally appropriate services for consumers. It acknowledges that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to diversity, and that each provider will be starting from a different place and operating in a different context.”

VACCHO and its members, including those members who themselves provide aged care supports,  look forward to working with aged care providers to ensure the best, culturally appropriate care is provided to older Aboriginal people; they are the keepers of culture, and deserve to be respected and valued.

Noeleen Tunny is manager of VACCHO’s Policy and Advocacy Unit

NACCHO #SaveaDate : This week features @NationalFVPLS #OchreRibbon2019, and #DontSilenceTheViolence @ScottMorrisonMP Releases #ClosingTheGap Report @HealingOurWay #SorryDay

12- 19 February Ochre Ribbon Week 

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

13 February 11 th Anniversary Sorry Day

14 February Closing the Gap Report Released by Prime Minister 

14 February Aboriginal Men’s Gathering 

20 February IAHA 2019 Special General Meeting Web Conference.

22 February Awabakal ACCHO Strong Youth Launch

6 March AIATSIS Culture and Policy Symposium

9 March  Bush to Beach Project Grazing Style Light Indigenous Marathon Fundraiser

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

14 – 15 March 2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019

21 March National Close the Gap Day

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

12- 19 February Ochre Ribbon Week 

The Ochre Ribbon Campaign is an initiative supported by the National Family Violence Prevention Legal Services Forum and its member organisations across Australia, including Djirra.

The Ochre Ribbon Campaign raises awareness of the devastating impacts of family violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and calls for action to end the violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – especially our women and children.

How to get involved?

  • Wear an Orange Ribbon.
  • Start conversations on how violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women devastates communities and destroys families. In comparison with other women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 32 times more likely to be hospitalised from family violence and 10 times more likely to be killed as a result of violent assault. use the information from the National Forum to help you.
  • Follow the National Family Violence Prevention Legal Services Forum on Facebook and Twitter
  • Share your thoughts on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtags #OchreRibbon2019, and #DontSilenceTheViolence, and tag the National FVPLS Forum twitter page @NationalFVPLS
  • Use the Ochre Ribbon Facebook frame, image and banner:
      

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

Djirra has been chosen to be the charity partner of the next Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence conference organised by Aventedge in Melbourne on the 12th and 13th of March.

On the first day, Tuesday 12th of March, Marion Hansen, Djirra’s chairperson, will give the opening and closing address. At 10.30am, Djirra’s CEO Antoinette Braybrook will share her experience and knowledge on Supporting Aboriginal women, their children and communities to be safe, culturally strong and free from violence.

Family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, predominantly women and their children, is a national crisis.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their organisations hold the solutions to ending the disproportionate rates of family violence. However this requires the support and involvement of a range of stakeholders around the country.

The 5th annual Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence Forum (Melbourne & Perth) has partnered with Djirra and brings together representatives from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Organisations, specialist family violence support and prevention services, community legal services, government, police and not-for-profit organisations.

During the course of this conference and 1-day workshop, we will explore critical issues in working to end family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including state and federal government initiatives; how frontline services are engaging in prevention, early intervention and response; learning from the stories and experiences of survivors of family violence; working more effectively with people who use violence towards accountability and behaviour change and the impacts of family violence on children and young people.

For more information on these events, pricing and discounts click below:
Melbourne | 12th-14th March 2019
Event homepage – www.ifv-mel.aventedge.com
Register here – http://elm.aventedge.com/ifv-mel-register

Perth | 5th-6th March 2019
Event homepage – www.ifv-per.aventedge.com
Register here – http://elm.aventedge.com/ifv-per/register

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

13 February 11 th Anniversary Sorry Day

14 February Closing the Gap Report 2019 Released by Prime Minister

14 February Aboriginal Men’s Gathering 

15 February NACCHO RACGP Survey closes 

Survey until 15 Feb 2019 : To participate in a short survey, please CLICK HERE

Please tell us your ideas for

-improving quality of 715 health checks

-clinical software -implementation of the National Guide

-culturally responsive healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input!

More info 

20 February IAHA 2019 Special General Meeting Web Conference.

The Indigenous Allied Health Australia Ltd (IAHA) Board would like to thank you for your continued support of IAHA and invite you to participate in the special General Meeting of IAHA to be held at 1:00 pm (Canberra time) on Wednesday 20 February 2019 at Units 3-4, Ground Floor, 9-11 Napier Close, Deakin ACT 2600.

Attending General Meeting using Zoom conferencing

Members have the option to attend the General Meeting using “Zoom” remote conferencing services by video or voice link.  Instructions to help use Zoom are available here and detailed below.

To join the meeting go to:
https://zoom.us/j/313336712

OR One tap mobile
+61280152088,,313336712# Australia
+61871501149,,313336712# Australia

Dial by your location
+61 2 8015 2088 Australia
+61 8 7150 1149 Australia
Meeting ID: 313 336 712

Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/adnswZr8cW

Agenda for General Meeting

The key items for the General Meeting are to consider and vote on resolutions to:

  • remove IAHA’s current auditor and appoint a replacement auditor; and
  • amend IAHA’s company constitution.

Documents for the meeting

The documents for the meeting are:

  • A letter to Members from the Company Secretary with details of the special General Meeting and how to participate click here
  • Notice of General Meeting (including the Explanatory Notes and Proxy Form) click here;
  • a letter from an IAHA Member nominating a new company auditor click here; and
  • a copy of IAHA’s company constitution, with marked-up text to show the proposed changes to be considered by Members, click here.

Members will be required to use their own computer hardware and software to access this facility and are solely responsible for connecting to the conference by 1:00 pm (Canberra time) on the meeting day.

RSVP if you intend to attend/participate
in the special General Meeting

Members who plan to attend the meeting either in person or through Zoom are asked to register for the meeting.

Please email the Company Secretary at secretary@iaha.com.au to register, preferably by 1:00pm Monday 18 February 2019.

21 February Galambila ACCHO Gumbaynggirr Cultural Show for Coffs Harbour Pharmacists 

Please join us in the evening on Thursday the 21st of February 2019 for a Gumbaynggirr Cultural Show.

Through the QUMAX program (Quality Use of Medicines for Maximised for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people), Galambila AHS will be hosting a cultural event for pharmacists, pharmacy assistants and health professionals in Coffs Harbour to learn more about our local indigenous culture. QUMAX Cultural Awareness activities aim to improve culturally sensitive care for Aboriginal clients and enhance the working relationship between Galambila and local pharmacies.

The event will be run by Clark Webb and his team at Bularri Muurlay Nyanggan Aboriginal Corporation (BMNAC). BMNAC recently won a Bronze Medal at the 2018 NSW Tourism Awards for Excellence in Aboriginal Tourism. To see more information on what this great organisation is all about, visit their website at the following link: https://bmnac.org.au/

The night will include the following:

– Traditional Welcome to Country

– Traditional fire making

– Introductory Gumbaynggirr Language Lesson

– Sharing of traditional Gumbaynggirr dreaming stories that connect participants to our local landscape

– Uses of various varieties of plants, including medicinal

– Damper and tea will be provided on the night

Please RSVP by COB on Monday 18th of February 2019 via Eventbrite. Get in quick as places will be limited!

BOOK HERE 

22 February Awabakal ACCHO Strong Youth Launch

Featuring MC Sean Choolburra and performances by Koori Rep, Shanelle Dargan (as seen on X-Factor) and Last Kinnection.

RSVP: 0457 868 980 or zkhan@awabakal.org by February 15.

6 March AIATSIS Culture and Policy Symposium 

Info and Register

9 March  Bush to Beach Project Grazing Style Light Indigenous Marathon Fundraiser

The Port Macquarie Running Festival is happening over the weekend of the 9th-10th March 2019. As a part of this event we are running a fundraiser to support the important work being undertaken by Charlie & Tali Maher as a part of the Indigenous Marathon Project Running And Walking group. Come along to hear from Olympians Nova Peris, Steve Moneghette & Robert de Castella while meeting members of the Indigenous Marathon Project over lunch. We hope to see you there.

All funds raised will go towards the Bush to Beach Project. The project aims
to develop a strong relationship between the Northern Territory community of
Ntaria and the coastal community of Port Macquarie, with an exchange program
occurring several times throughout the year. This will include young Indigenous
people visiting the communities and participating in running and walking events
to promote healthy living. We thank you for your support.

Guest Speakers: Olympians Nova Peris, Steve Moneghetti & Robert de Castella.

Any enquiries please get in touch with Nina Cass or Charlie Maher (ninacass87@gmail.com / charles.maher@det.nsw.edu.au)

Tickets $59 Register HERE 

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

14 – 15 March 2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019

Indigenous Eye Health (IEH) at the University of Melbourne and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT), are pleased to invite you to register for the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020:Strengthen & Sustain – National Conference 2019 which will be held at the Alice Springs Convention Centre on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 in the Northern Territory. This conference is also supported by our partners, Vision 2020 Australia, Optometry Australia and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

The 2019 conference, themed ‘Strengthen & Sustain’ will provide opportunity to highlight the very real advances being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait eye health. It will explore successes and opportunities to strengthen eye care and initiatives and challenges to sustain progress towards the goal of equitable eye care by 2020. To this end, the conference will include plenary speakers, panel discussions and presentations as well as upskilling workshops and cultural experiences.

Registration (including workshops, welcome reception and conference dinner) is $250. Registrations close on 28 February 2019.

Who should attend?

The conference is designed to bring people together and connect people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

Speakers will be invited, however this year we will also be calling for abstracts for Table Top presentations and Poster presentations – further details on abstract submissions to follow.

Please share and forward this information with colleagues and refer people to this webpage where the conference program and additional informationwill become available in the lead up to the conference. Note: Please use the conference hashtag #CTGV19.

We look forward to you joining us in the Territory in 2019 for learning and sharing within the unique beauty and cultural significance of Central Australia.

Additional Information:

If you have any questions or require additional information, please contact us at indigenous-eyehealth@unimelb.edu.au or contact IEH staff Carol Wynne (carol.wynne@unimelb.edu.au; 03 8344 3984 email) or Mitchell Anjou (manjou@unimelb.edu.au; 03 8344 9324).

Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain – National Conference 2019 links:

– Conference General Information

– Conference Program

– Conference Dinner & Leaky Pipe Awards

– Staying in Alice Springs

More information available at: go.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6 

21 March National Close the Gap Day

Description

National Close the Gap Day is a time for all Australians to come together and commit to achieving health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Close the Gap Campaign will partner with Tharawal Aboriginal Aboriginal Medical Services, South Western Sydney, to host an exciting community event and launch our Annual Report.

Visit the website of our friends at ANTaR for more information and to register your support. https://antar.org.au/campaigns/national-close-gap-day

EVENT REGISTER

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane 

The Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery is hosting a workshop on Indigenous Ear Health in Brisbane on Thursday, 21 March 2019.

This meeting is the 7th to be organised by ASOHNS and is designed to facilitate discussion about the crucial health issue and impact of ear disease amongst Indigenous people.

The meeting is aimed at bringing together all stakeholders involved in managing Indigenous health and specifically ear disease, such as:  ENT surgeons, GPs, Paediatricians, Nurses, Audiologists, Speech Therapists, Allied Health Workers and other health administrators (both State and Federal).

Download Program and Contact 

Indigenous Ear Health 2019 Program

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

Interested in the health and wellbeing of rural or remote Australia?

This is the conference for you.

In March 2019 the rural health sector will gather in Hobart for the 15th National Rural Conference.  Every two years we meet to learn, listen and share ideas about how to improve health outcomes in rural and remote Australia.

Proudly managed by the National Rural Health Alliance, the Conference has a well-earned reputation as Australia’s premier rural health event.  Not just for health professionals, the Conference recognises the critical roles that education, regional development and infrastructure play in determining health outcomes, and we welcome people working across a wide variety of industries.

Join us as we celebrate our 15th Conference and help achieve equitable health for the 7 million Australians living in rural and remote areas.

Hobart and its surrounds was home to the Muwinina people who the Alliance acknowledges as the traditional and original owners of this land.  We pay respect to those that have passed before us and acknowledge today’s Tasmanian Aboriginal community as the custodians of the land on which we will meet.

More info 

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

Thank you for your interest in the 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference will bring together Indigenous leaders, government, industry and academia representing Housing, health, and education from around the world including:

  • National and International Indigenous Organisation leadership
  • Senior housing, health, and education government officials Industry CEOs, executives and senior managers from public and private sectors
  • Housing, Healthcare, and Education professionals and regulators
  • Consumer associations
  • Academics in Housing, Healthcare, and Education.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference #2019WIHC is the principal conference to provide a platform for leaders in housing, health, education and related services from around the world to come together. Up to 2000 delegates will share experiences, explore opportunities and innovative solutions, work to improve access to adequate housing and related services for the world’s Indigenous people.

Event Information:

Key event details as follows:
Venue: Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre
Address: 2684-2690 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD 4218
Dates: Monday 20th – Thursday 23rd May, 2019 (24th May)

Registration Costs

  • EARLY BIRD – FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION: $1950 AUD plus booking fees
  • After 1 February FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION $2245 AUD plus booking fees

PLEASE NOTE: The Trade Exhibition is open Tuesday 21st May – Thursday 23rd May 2019

Please visit www.2019wihc.com for further information on transport and accommodation options, conference, exhibition and speaker updates.

Methods of Payment:

2019WIHC online registrations accept all major credit cards, by Invoice and direct debit.
PLEASE NOTE: Invoices must be paid in full and monies received by COB Monday 20 May 2019.

Please note: The 2019 WIHC organisers reserve the right of admission. Speakers, programs and topics are subject to change. Please visit http://www.2019wihc.comfor up to date information.

Conference Cancellation Policy

If a registrant is unable to attend 2019 WIHC for any reason they may substitute, by arrangement with the registrar, someone else to attend in their place and must attend any session that has been previously selected by the original registrant.

Where the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her place to another person, or to another event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

    • Registrations cancelled less than 60 days, but more than 30 days before the event are eligible for a 50% refund of the registration fees paid.
    • Registrations cancelled less than 30 days before the event are no longer eligible for a refund.

Refunds will be made in the following ways:

  1. For payments received by credit or debit cards, the same credit/debit card will be refunded.
  2. For all other payments, a bank transfer will be made to the payee’s nominated account.

Important: For payments received from outside Australia by bank transfer, the refund will be made by bank transfer and all bank charges will be for the registrant’s account. The Cancellation Policy as stated on this page is valid from 1 October 2018.

Terms & Conditions

please visit www.2019wihc.com

Privacy Policy

please visit www.2019wihc.com

 

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens 

The opening of the 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round has been moved forward! The National NAIDOC Grants will now officially open on Thursday 24 January 2019.

Head to www.naidoc.org.au to join the National NAIDOC Mailing List and keep up with all things grants or check out the below links for more information now!

https://www.finance.gov.au/resource-management/grants/grantconnect/

https://www.pmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/grants-and-funding/naidoc-week-funding

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

 

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #JunkFood : Increasing how much exercise we get and switching to a healthy diet can also play an important role in treating – and even preventing – depression

” The review found that across 41 studies, people who stuck to a healthy diet had a 24-35% lower risk of depressive symptoms than those who ate more unhealthy foods.

These findings suggest improving your diet could be a cost-effective complementary treatment for depression and could reduce your risk of developing a mental illness.

From the Conversation / Megan Lee

 ” NACCHO Campaign 2013 : Our ‘Aboriginal communities should take health advice from the fast food industry’ a campaign that eventually went global, reaching more than  20 million Twitter followers.”

See over 60 NACCHO Healthy Foods Articles HERE

See over 200 NACCHO Mental Health articles HERE 

Worldwide, more than 300 million people live with depression. Without effective treatment, the condition can make it difficult to work and maintain relationships with family and friends.

Depression can cause sleep problems, difficulty concentrating, and a lack of interest in activities that are usually pleasurable. At its most extreme, it can lead to suicide.

Depression has long been treated with medication and talking therapies – and they’re not going anywhere just yet. But we’re beginning to understand that increasing how much exercise we get and switching to a healthy diet can also play an important role in treating – and even preventing – depression.

So what should you eat more of, and avoid, for the sake of your mood?

Ditch junk food

Research suggests that while healthy diets can reduce the risk or severity of depression, unhealthy diets may increase the risk.

Of course, we all indulge from time to time but unhealthy diets are those that contain lots of foods that are high in energy (kilojoules) and low on nutrition. This means too much of the foods we should limit:

  • processed and takeaway foods
  • processed meats
  • fried food
  • butter
  • salt
  • potatoes
  • refined grains, such as those in white bread, pasta, cakes and pastries
  • sugary drinks and snacks.

The average Australian consumes 19 serves of junk food a week, and far fewer serves of fibre-rich fresh food and wholegrains than recommended. This leaves us overfed, undernourished and mentally worse off.

Here’s what to eat instead

Mix it up. Anna Pelzer

Having a healthy diet means consuming a wide variety of nutritious foods every day, including:

  • fruit (two serves per day)
  • vegetables (five serves)
  • wholegrains
  • nuts
  • legumes
  • oily fish
  • dairy products
  • small quantities of meat
  • small quantities of olive oil
  • water.

This way of eating is common in Mediterranean countries, where people have been identified as having lower rates of cognitive decline, depression and dementia.

In Japan, a diet low in processed foods and high in fresh fruit, vegetables, green tea and soy products is recognised for its protective role in mental health.

How does healthy food help?

A healthy diet is naturally high in five food types that boost our mental health in different ways:

Complex carbohydrates found in fruits, vegetables and wholegrains help fuel our brain cells. Complex carbohydrates release glucose slowly into our system, unlike simple carbohydrates (found in sugary snacks and drinks), which create energy highs and lows throughout the day. These peaks and troughs decrease feelings of happiness and negatively affect our psychological well-being.

Antioxidants in brightly coloured fruit and vegetables scavenge free radicals, eliminate oxidative stress and decrease inflammation in the brain. This in turn increases the feelgood chemicals in the brain that elevate our mood.

Omega 3 found in oily fish and B vitamins found in some vegetables increase the production of the brain’s happiness chemicals and have been known to protect against both dementia and depression.

Salmon is an excellent source of omega 3. Caroline Attwood

Pro and prebiotics found in yoghurt, cheese and fermented products boost the millions of bacteria living in our gut. These bacteria produce chemical messengers from the gut to the brain that influence our emotions and reactions to stressful situations.

Research suggests pro- and prebiotics could work on the same neurological pathways that antidepressants do, thereby decreasing depressed and anxious states and elevating happy emotions.

What happens when you switch to a healthy diet?

An Australian research team recently undertook the first randomised control trial studying 56 individuals with depression.

Over a 12-week period, 31 participants were given nutritional consulting sessions and asked to change from their unhealthy diets to a healthy diet. The other 25 attended social support sessions and continued their usual eating patterns.

The participants continued their existing antidepressant and talking therapies during the trial.

At the end of the trial, the depressive symptoms of the group that maintained a healthier diet significantly improved. Some 32% of participants had scores so low they no longer met the criteria for depression, compared with 8% of the control group.

The trial was replicated by another research team, which found similar results, and supported by a recent review of all studies on dietary patterns and depression. The review found that across 41 studies, people who stuck to a healthy diet had a 24-35% lower risk of depressive symptoms than those who ate more unhealthy foods.

These findings suggest improving your diet could be a cost-effective complementary treatment for depression and could reduce your risk of developing a mental illness.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #SocialDeterminants : Download @AIHW Report : Indicators of socioeconomic inequalities in #cardiovascular disease #heartattack #stroke, #diabetes and chronic #kidney disease @ACDPAlliance

 ” Most apparent are inequalities in chronic disease among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians. Social and economic factors are estimated to account for slightly more than one-third (34%) of the ‘good health’ gap between the 2 groups, with health risk factors such as high blood pressure, smoking and risky alcohol consumption explaining another 19%, and 47% due to other, unexplained factors.

 An estimated 11% of the total health gap can be attributed to the overlap, or interactions between the social determinants and health risk factors (AIHW 2018a).

Download the AIHW Report HERE aihw-cdk-12

‘By better understanding the role social inequality plays in chronic disease, governments at all levels can develop stronger, evidence based policies and programs aimed at preventing and managing these diseases, leading to better health outcomes across our community,’

AIHW spokesperson Dr Lynelle Moonn noted that these three diseases are common in Australia and, in addition to the personal costs to an individual’s health and quality of life, they have a significant economic burden in terms of healthcare costs and lost productivity

AIHW Website for more info 

Government investment is essential to encourage health checks, improve understanding of the risk factors for chronic disease, and implement policies and programs to reduce chronic disease risk, particularly in areas of socioeconomic disadvantage,

Chair of the Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance Sharon McGowan said that the data revealed stark inequities in health status amongst Australians.

Download Press Release Here : australianchronicdiseasepreventionalliance

The Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance is calling on the Government to target these health disparities by increasing the focus on prevention and supporting targeted health checks to proactively manage risk.

AIHW Press Release

Social factors play an important role in a person’s likelihood of developing and dying from certain chronic diseases, according to a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, Indicators of socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease, examines the relationship between socioeconomic position, income, housing and education and the likelihood of developing and dying from several common chronic diseases—cardiovascular disease (which includes heart attack and stroke), diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

Above image NACCHO Library

The report reveals that social disadvantage in these areas is linked to higher rates of disease, as well as poorer outcomes, including a greater likelihood of dying.

‘Across the three chronic diseases we looked at—cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease— we saw that people in the lowest of the 5 socioeconomic groups had, on average, higher rates of these diseases than those in the highest socioeconomic groups,’ said AIHW spokesperson Dr Lynelle Moon.

‘And unfortunately, we also found higher death rates from these diseases among people in the lowest socioeconomic groups.’

The greatest difference in death rates between socioeconomic groups was among people with diabetes.

‘For women in the lowest socioeconomic group, the rate of deaths in 2016 where diabetes was an underlying or associated cause of death was about 2.4 times as high as the rate for those in the highest socioeconomic group. For men, the death rate was 2.2 times as high,’ Dr Moon said.

‘Put another way, if everyone had the same chance of dying from these diseases as people in the highest socioeconomic group, in a one year period there would be 8,600 fewer deaths from cardiovascular disease, 6,900 fewer deaths from diabetes, and 4,800 fewer deaths from chronic kidney disease.’

Importantly, the report also suggests that in many instances the gap between those in the highest and lowest socioeconomic groups is growing.

‘For example, while the rate of death from cardiovascular disease has been falling across all socioeconomic groups, the rate has been falling more dramatically for men in the highest socioeconomic group—effectively widening the gap between groups,’ Dr Moon said.

The report also highlights the relationship between education and health, with higher levels of education linked to lower rates of disease and death.

‘If all Australians had the same rates of disease as those with a Bachelor’s degree or higher, there would have been 7,800 fewer deaths due to cardiovascular disease, 3,700 fewer deaths due to diabetes, and 2,000 fewer deaths due to chronic kidney disease in 2011–12,’ Dr Moon said.

Housing is another social factor where large inequalities are apparent. Data from 2011–12 shows that for women aged 25 and over, the rate of death from chronic kidney disease was 1.5 times as high for those living in rental properties compared with women living in properties they owned. For men, the rate was 1.4 times as high for those in rental properties.

Dr Moon noted that these three diseases are common in Australia and, in addition to the personal costs to an individual’s health and quality of life, they have a significant economic burden in terms of healthcare costs and lost productivity.

‘By better understanding the role social inequality plays in chronic disease, governments at all levels can develop stronger, evidence based policies and programs aimed at preventing and managing these diseases, leading to better health outcomes across our community,’ she said

Underlying causes of socioeconomic inequalities in health

There are various reasons why socioeconomically disadvantaged people experience poorer health. Evidence points to the close relationship between people’s health and the living and working conditions which form their social environment.

Factors such as socioeconomic position, early life, social exclusion, social capital, employment and work, housing and the residential environment— known collectively as the ‘social determinants of health’—can act to either strengthen or to undermine the health of individuals and communities (Wilkinson & Marmot 2003).

These social determinants play a key role in the incidence, treatment and outcomes of chronic diseases. Social determinants can be seen as ‘causes of the causes’—that is, as the foundational determinants which influence other health determinants such as individual lifestyles and exposure to behavioural and biological risk factors.

Socioeconomic factors influence chronic disease through multiple mechanisms. Socioeconomic disadvantage may adversely affect chronic disease risk through its impact on mental health, and in particular, on depression. Socioeconomic gradients exist for multiple health behaviours over the life course, including for smoking, overweight and obesity, and poor diet.

When combined, these unhealthy behaviours help explain much of the socioeconomic health gap. Current research also seeks to link social factors and biological processes which affect chronic disease. In CVD, for example, socioeconomic determinants of health have been associated with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, chronic stress responses and inflammation (Havranek et al. 2015).

The direction of causality of social determinants on health is not always one-way (Berkman et al. 2014). To illustrate, people with chronic conditions may have a reduced ability to earn an income; family members may reduce or cease employment to provide care for those who are ill; and people or families whose income is reduced may move to disadvantaged areas to access low-cost housing.

Action on social determinants is often seen as the most appropriate way to tackle unfair and avoidable socioeconomic inequalities. There are significant opportunities for reducing death and disability from CVD, diabetes and CKD through addressing their social determinants.

Summary

Australians as a whole enjoy good health, but the benefits are not shared equally by all. People who are socioeconomically disadvantaged have, on average, greater levels of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).

This report uses latest available data to measure socioeconomic inequalities in the incidence, prevalence and mortality from these 3 diseases, and where possible, assess whether these inequalities are growing. Findings include that, in 2016:

  • males aged 25 and over living in the lowest socioeconomic areas of Australia had a heart attack rate 1.55 times as high as males in the highest socioeconomic areas. For females, the disparity was even greater, at 1.76 times as high
  • type 2 diabetes prevalence for females in the lowest socioeconomic areas was 2.07 times as high as for females in the highest socioeconomic areas. The prevalence for males was 1.70 times as high
  • the rate of treated end-stage kidney disease for males in the lowest socioeconomic areas was 1.52 times as high as for males in the highest socioeconomic areas. The rate for females was 1.75 times as high
  • the CVD death rate for males in the lowest socioeconomic areas was 1.52 times as high as for males in the highest socioeconomic areas. For females, the disparity was slightly less, at 1.33 times as high
  • if all Australians had the same CVD death rate as people in the highest socioeconomic areas in 2016, the total CVD death rate would have declined by 25%, and there would have been 8,600 fewer deaths.

CVD death rates have declined for both males and females in all socioeconomic areas since 2001— however there have been greater falls for males in higher socioeconomic areas, and as a result, inequalities in male CVD death rates have grown.

  • Both absolute and relative inequality in male CVD death rates increased—the rate difference increasing from 62 per 100,000 in 2001 to 78 per 100,000 in 2011, and the relative index of inequality (RII) from 0.25 in 2001 to 0.53 in 2016.

Often, the health outcomes affected by socioeconomic inequalities are greater when assessed by individual characteristics (such as income level or highest educational attainment), than by area.

  • Inequalities in CVD death rates by highest education level in 2011–12 (RII = 1.05 for males and 1.05 for females) were greater than by socioeconomic area in 2011 (0.50 for males and 0.41 for females).

The impact on death rates of socioeconomic inequality was generally greater for diabetes and CKD than for CVD.

  • In 2016, the diabetes death rate for females in the lowest socioeconomic areas was 2.39 times as high as for females in the highest socioeconomic areas. This compares to a ratio 1.75 times as high for CKD, and 1.33 for CVD. For males, the equivalent rate ratios were 2.18 (diabetes), 1.64 (CKD) and 1.52 (CVD).viii

Part 2