Aboriginal Women’s Health @DiabetesAus #Diabetes #WDD2017 Our #SuperSHEroStrong Karen West Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa QLD

 ” It’s World Diabetes Day today and around the global, we’re acknowledging the extraordinary effort of women who are living with or caring for someone with diabetes.

Diabetes doesn’t take a break & neither do our Diabetes Super SHEroes! Who’s your SuperSHEro?

Our Hero : Karen West Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa QLD

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.

See Part 2 Below

Part 1 : Gestational diabetes – the epidemic posing an immediate threat to thousands of pregnancies, and a future threat to the health of mothers, babies and families.

NACCHO has published over 130 articles Aboriginal Health and Diabetes over the past 5 years

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/diabetes/

Health experts this week warned of the alarming increase in gestational diabetes which in the past 12 months has affected 38,000 Australian women during pregnancy.

“In the last ten years, more than 200,000 women have developed gestational diabetes. Latest projections show that over the next decade more than 500,000 women could develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy,” said Professor Greg Johnson, CEO of Diabetes Australia

14 November was World Diabetes Day and Diabetes Australia has warned that gestational diabetes is now the fastest growing type of diabetes in Australia.

“Importantly, gestational diabetes poses a dual threat – firstly without appropriate management and care, it can be a serious risk to mother and baby during the pregnancy, and secondly it poses a serious future risk for both mother and baby developing type 2 diabetes and other health issues,” he said.

“After gestational diabetes, women are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and children born to mothers who have gestational diabetes are also at an increased risk of being overweight or obese, or developing type 2 diabetes later in life.”

“The alarming increase in number of women developing gestational diabetes presents an intergenerational diabetes issue and threatens to make the type 2 diabetes epidemic even bigger in future.”

“Our latest projections suggest that gestational diabetes could trigger over 250,000 women to develop type 2 diabetes or prediabetes in the coming decade.”

“Developing gestational diabetes is one of the biggest risk factors for type 2 diabetes and we need to ensure Australian mums and families get the support they need after gestational diabetes to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. We need to break this intergenerational cycle of diabetes.”

A/Professor Alison Nankervis, an Endocrinologist at the Royal Melbourne and Royal Women’s Hospital said the short term complications for mother and baby can be serious, but the risk of complications can be reduced with good treatment and care.

“Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born. The abnormal blood glucose levels can affect both the mother and baby,” A/Professor Nankervis said.

“The condition makes pregnancy higher risk for both. Babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes are more likely to be born prematurely or via C-section, be larger babies, have shoulder dystocia and a range of other complications.”

“Women with gestational diabetes may need intensive glucose management to avoid serious problems. But with the best possible management and care, the risks can be reduced and women can avoid complications.”

A/ Prof Nankervis said growth in gestational diabetes was already putting pressure on health services with the number of women with the condition doubling at the Royal Women’s Hospital since 2014.

“There are a number of factors contributing to the growing rates of gestational diabetes including the age women are falling pregnant, the changing ethnic makeup of Australia’s society, and the weight of women when they fall pregnant. The growth of gestational diabetes has been exacerbated by recent lowering of the diagnostic threshold,” she said.

Professor Johnson said diabetes in pregnancy was a major priority in the Australian National Diabetes Strategy 2016-20 but there was still no clarity on the implementation plans from the Australian Government and the State and Territory Governments.

“New approaches are needed for pre-pregnancy, during pregnancy, and after pregnancy,” said Professor Johnson.

“There needs to be help for women to be a healthy weight before pregnancy. We need to improve access to diabetes education and support for women with gestational diabetes during pregnancy as well as ensuring they are getting the care and support they need after the birth.”

“This includes seeing their GP for follow up testing to detect type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, and access to type 2 diabetes prevention programs and health professionals including diabetes educators, dietitians and exercise physiologists who can help with lifestyle management to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes.”

“Sitting back and doing nothing is not an option. This is an avalanche that will bury the health system if we don’t act,” he said.

Melbourne mum Karla Jennings developed gestational diabetes during pregnancy and subsequently developed type 2 diabetes at the young age of 30.

“I had great support while I was managing gestational diabetes but it wasn’t enough to prevent me from developing type 2 diabetes,” she said.

“The day of my type 2 diabetes diagnosis was devastating. I cried and I cried for days.”

“It was much harder for me to accept than being diagnosed with gestational diabetes but I am determined to manage diabetes and keep living my life.”

“I do think it is critical that Australia does more to support mums like me and help reduce the number of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the future.”

Diabetes Australia is the national body for people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk. Diabetes Australia is committed to reducing the impact of diabetes.

We work in partnership with diabetes health professionals, researchers and the community to minimise the impact of diabetes.

PART 2

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.

Watch the short video below for a quick guide to the benefits of the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS).

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.

The following information is from the ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ flipcharts for Indigenous Australians. It is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical

The ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ resource was originally developed by Healthy Living NT with funding provided by the Department of Health and Ageing through Diabetes Australia. The reprinting and distribution of the most recent addition has been made possible with funding by the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) – an initiative of the Australian Government administered by Diabetes Australia.

How do you feel? (Symptoms)

If you have any of the following symptoms you should talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.

  • Feeling tired or weak
  • Go to the toilet a lot
  • Feeling thirsty
  • Leg cramps
  • Feeling itchy
  • Sores and boils that won’t heal
  • Blurry vision
  • Pins and needles
  • Feeling grumpy or angry.

Through a simple test, a doctor can find out if they’re the result of diabetes.

What is it? (About diabetes)

Sugar (glucose) gives your body energy. The sugar (glucose) moves from your blood into your muscles with something called insulin. With diabetes your insulin isn’t working properly, so the sugar (glucose) doesn’t get into your muscles and body easily and there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood.

Everyone has a little bit of sugar (glucose) in their blood. The optimum sugar (glucose) level is between 4 to 6 mmol/L (after fasting).

Sugar (glucose) is fuel that comes from some of the food you eat and drink. It gives your body energy to do all sorts of things:

  • Walk
  • Think
  • Play sports
  • Hunt
  • Work
  • Rake
  • Gardening
  • Resting.

To help the sugar (glucose) move into your muscles and body cells your body needs something called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas – a body part which is near your stomach.

Insulin helps keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

With diabetes, the insulin isn’t helping the sugar (glucose) move from your body into your muscles and body cells. So it stays and builds in your body, making your blood sugar (glucose) level high.

Type 2 Diabetes

There are different types of diabetes. A lot of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is when your body stops the insulin working properly.

Fat bellies, not being active enough, eating a big mob of fatty food can stop the insulin working properly in your body.

Being active, eating healthy and being a healthy weight can help your insulin work better to keep your sugar (glucose) normal. Sometimes people might need to take tablets and insulin everyday to keep their sugar (glucose) levels normal.

Gestational Diabetes

Another type of diabetes is gestational diabetes. This happens when you are pregnant, but not all women get it. It goes away after pregnancy but you and your baby can get type 2 diabetes later in life.

Pre Diabetes

There is also Pre Diabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT). This happens when your sugar (glucose) level is high, but not high enough to be called diabetes. It doesn’t mean you have diabetes now, but it does mean you might get it later. Being active and eating healthy you can slow down the start of type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes

Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 1 diabetes. This usually happens in kids and teenagers. Type 1 diabetes is when your body kills the insulin making part in the pancreas and no insulin is made in your body. To give the body the insulin it needs, insulin injections are needed every day for the rest of their life.

What do I do? (Management of diabetes)

When there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood it damages your heart, kidneys, feet, eyes and nerves.

You can keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal by:

Eating healthy

  • Have plenty of bush tucker and have shop foods and home cooked meals that are low in fat, sugar and salt.
  • Have something from each of the core food groups every day. They give you energy, fight sickness and help care for your body to keep it strong.
  • Drink plenty of water.

Avoiding and eat less fat, sugar and salt

  • Eat less fat as it makes you put on weight and gives you problems with your heart.
  • Pick meat with no fat or only small bits of fat on it. Cut the fat off the meat and take the skin off chicken.
  • Drain the juices (fat) after cooking meat and scoop out the fat from the top of stews.
  • Avoid cooking with or having fats like butter, oil, margarine or dripping.
  • It is better to boil, steam, stew, grill, microwave or stir-fry food.

Being a healthy weight (not too fat and not too skinny)

  • Do this by eating less, eating healthy and being more active.

Keeping active

  • It helps you lose weight and keep it off and it keeps you healthy.
  • It helps your insulin to work properly.
  • Walk, job, play sport, hunt, garden, work around the place.
  • Be active for 30 minutes or more every day OR do 10 minutes 3 times a day.

Taking your medicine

  • Take your medicine at the times the doctor tells you.
  • Take them with or after eating in the morning, afternoon and supper time every day.
  • Refill your medicine box in the morning (get some more medicine before it gets low and so you don’t run out).
  • Take your medicine with you when you go to see family, walkabout or away from home.
  • Put your medicines somewhere cool, dry and safe so they won’t go bad.
  • Keep your medicines out of reach of kids.

Remember to:

  • Have your check-ups with your doctor, health worker or nurse. Have regular check-ups for your eyes, feet, kidneys, blood pressure, skin and teeth. If you notice anything different about your body talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.
  • Check your sugar (glucose) levels at the times your doctor, health worker or nurse tells you.
  • See your doctor, health worker or nurse straight away if you feel sick.
  • Check your feet and skin for sores and/or cracks every day.

Why take medicine for? (Medications for diabetes)

Indigenous

Diabetes medicine helps to keep your body strong and well and it helps to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

When eating healthy, being active and being a healthy weight isn’t working at keeping your sugar (glucose) levels normal, you might need to take tablets and/or insulin.

The doctor might put you on tablets called Metformin to help your insulin work better and to lower the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood.

After a while the pancreas gets tired from working too hard and can’t make enough insulin, so your doctor might put you on tablets called Sulphonylurea. This medicine helps your body make more insulin.

Or, after awhile, the doctor might need to add another lot of tablets called Glitazone or Acarbose.

Remember to have your medicine with or after eating, in the morning, afternoon or supper time. Take them at the time the doctor tells you to.

All tablets work differently and some can have side effects.

If the following problems don’t go away or if you are still worried about them, then talk to your doctor.

  • Feel sick like you want to vomit (nausea)
  • A sore belly
  • Diarrhoea
  • Sugar (glucose) levels going too low
  • Have fluid build-up (retention)

When your sugar (glucose) levels get too high and stays high the doctor might put you on tablets and give you insulin.

  • Having insulin doesn’t mean you have type 1 diabetes.
  • Insulin isn’t like tablets so it shouldn’t be swallowed.
  • You inject the insulin under your skin in different places on your belly.

Talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse about insulin and what is right for you.

Having too much insulin or taking too many Sulphonylurea tablets can make your sugar (glucose) levels go too low (under 3) and make you hypo (hypoglycaemia).

You can also go hypo (hypoglycaemia) if you are:

  • Not eating, not eating enough or eating too late
  • Being extra active
  • Drinking grog (alcohol).

You might not feel anything when you have a hypo (hypoglycaemia), but sometimes you might feel:

  • Shaky
  • Hungry
  • Get headaches
  • Weak
  • Confused
  • Angry
  • Talk like you’re drunk when you’re not
  • Sweaty.

When you have these feelings or think you are having a hypo (hypoglycaemia), get your sugar (glucose) level up fast by drinking or eating something sweet.

Keep your sugar (glucose) level normal and stop having another hypo (hypoglycaemia) by eating a sandwich or meal after you have something sweet.

Remember, after taking your tablets or insulin:

  • Keep them somewhere cool, dry and safe (maybe in the fridge at home or at the clinic) so that they won’t go bad
  • Keep them out of reach of children
  • Get rid of your syringes/needles and finger pricking needles by putting them in a “sharps container” or “hard plastic” empty container with a lid (see if the clinic has one).

Remember when you go see family, walkabout or are away for home take your tablets and/or insulin with you.

Why me? (Risk factors)

Nobody knows how or why some people get diabetes but there are some things we know that can add to your chances of getting it. You have more chance of getting it when you are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, but not all Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islande people have diabetes.

Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people live different to how they used to live. Changes that add to your chances of getting diabetes are:

  • Not as active
  • More overweight
  • Eating fatty salty, sugary foods.

People living the old way were:

  • Active
  • Leaner and fit
  • Eating healthy food (bush tucker).

Other chances of getting diabetes include:

  • It is in your family tree or when someone in your family has diabetes
  • You had diabetes when pregnant
  • You get older
  • You eat too much and you eat too many fatty and sugary foods
  • You are overweight
  • You are not active enough
  • You have pancreatitis (a sickness of the pancreas).

There are things you can’t change or stop you from getting diabetes:

  • It’s in your family
  • You are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
  • You are pregnant with diabetes
  • You are getting older.

The things you can do to slow down the start of diabetes:

  • Eat healthy and be a healthy weight
  • Be active
  • Don’t drink too much grog.

Nobody knows why or how people get diabetes. After a while it can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves making you really sick.

Talk to your doctor, clinic, nurse or health worker about having a test to find out if you have diabetes. You can’t always feel it or see it happening, so you might not kn

Aboriginal Health and #Respectourelders @KenWyattMP Launching education for aged care facilities cultural considerations caring for elders

 

Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People is an important program which will help address the fundamental need for culturally appropriate care for Aboriginal people, some who may need to use aged care services at an earlier stage of their lives

Programs like this are a vital part of ensuring the care of senior Indigenous people is as culturally continuous as possible”

Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt has welcomed the new course, which coincides with his announcement of a new North West Ageing and Aged Care Strategy which aims to create age-friendly communities across the Pilbara and the Kimberley, while encouraging more seniors support services and greater local employment in aged care.

Photos above Ken Wyatt meeting with the elders from the Yindjibarndi Aboriginal Corporation in Roebourne WA\.

The launch of Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People will be streamed live via the Aged Care Channel at 10.45am AEDT on 22 November with Aboriginal Elder Mr Elliot taking part in answering live questions from members.

Developed by the Aged Care Channel (ACC) in partnership with the Department of Health, the Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People course aims to help inform aged care facilities across Australia of the cultural considerations of caring for Indigenous Australians.

ACC Group Manager Content and Production, Steve Iliffe says the program took six months to put together with the help of research, lots of resources, government input and guidance of Indigenous people as well as visits to different aged care facilities in Pilbara and northern Adelaide.

“We thought it was an important program to do because Indigenous Australians do have a series of complex needs different to the rest of the population due to their history and access to health in areas,” he explains.

“They have a connection to the land, a connection to their family and want to still have access to bush tucker and do things that they traditionally do.

“We went out to a number of different aged care facilities to talk to the people there about what they do to provide tailored care.”

ACC Learning and Development Manager Nicola Burton says providing culturally-appropriate care is a crucial part of the person-centred approach.

“The goal of this program is to recognise how to respond to the cultural needs of Indigenous Australians receiving care,” she says.

“There are significant regional differences between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups, each with complex and diverse ways of life.

“Language, music and art vary in each area, but a connection with culture, community and the land seems to be common to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

While working of the course and program, the ACC team spoke to and sought the advice of subject matter expert Ngarrindjeri elder and Chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group Mark Elliott.

“It was important for us to work with an indigenous leader – he guided us through the process and the research,” Mr Iliffe says.

“With this new course, we hope that we can increase understanding between cultures because at the end of the day, it’s about creating a home for people in aged care and providing them with a life they are still living.”

The new Strategy announced by the Minister includes short, medium and long-term goals, from the engagement and inclusion of seniors in local communities, through to tailored home and residential care support.

“[Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People] is an important program which will help address the fundamental need for culturally appropriate care for Aboriginal people, some who may need to use aged care services at an earlier stage of their lives,” Minister Wyatt says.

“Programs like this are a vital part of ensuring the care of senior Indigenous people is as culturally continuous as possible.

“It will contribute to this goal by helping staff understand the impact of historical events and past government policies, along with broadening their appreciation of Indigenous culture and the health challenges faced by some people.

“Giving staff these insights can contribute to better care, and I encourage everyone involved in indigenous aged care to take the course.”

He adds that the aim of the North West Ageing and Aged Care Strategy is to foster quality and culturally relevant residential aged care facilities that allow people to stay connected to community and age safely with dignity.

“Hopefully the new course will contribute to achieving this outcome,” he says.

“The program showcases the Pilbara’s Yaandina residential aged care facility, whose staff are experienced in providing residents with culturally sensitive care.”

Mr Iliffe says the result of the research and creation of the program is close to the hearts of all involved.

“The people involved had the most amazing time and it is something they will cherish forever,” he says.

“These experiences help us more closer to closing the gap.”

The launch of Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People will be streamed live via the Aged Care Channel at 10.45am AEDT on 22 November with Aboriginal Elder Mr Elliot taking part in answering live questions from members.

NACCHO Aboriginal #HealthStarRating and #Nutrition @KenWyattMP Free healthy choices food app will dial up good tucker

“Users simply scan the barcode of a product with their phone to see if it’s a healthy choice,

Once scanned, the app gives a ‘thumbs up’, ‘thumbs down’, or ‘thumbs sideways’ message, according to how healthy the product is.

“One of the app’s best features is that, once it’s downloaded, all the information is on your phone and there’s no need for the internet, so it’s ideal for people living in remote areas.”

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said the Uncle Jimmy’s Good Tucker app was easy to use and a first for remote communities.

Read over 30 NACCHO Articles about Healthy Food and Nutrition

The GOOD TUCKER app has been launched with the intention to assist people living in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to make healthier food and beverage choices at the local store.

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt AM gave the official thumbs up to the free app today. The app allows shoppers to scan a food or beverage product’s barcode and instantly reveal if it is a healthy option, should be consumed in moderation or avoided altogether.

DOWNLOAD INFO HERE

The app has been championed by the Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies), the University of South Australia (UnisSA) and Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up! , which has been promoting awareness and the benefits of a healthy diet to Indigenous children for more than 10 years.

Graham “Buzz” Bidstrup, CEO of Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up!, said there was an overwhelming need for the app.

“We know that there is over consumption of ultra-processed foods particularly in remote Indigenous Australian communities. These foods are typically energy dense and high in added sugar and salt which fuels the obesity epidemic and a raft of early onset chronic diseases.

“The GOOD TUCKER app shows at a glance how healthy or unhealthy a product is with a simple thumbs up, sideways or down message. The Thumbs rating is derived from a combination of the products’ Health Star Rating and Australian Bureau of Statistics’ discretionary food classification,” Mr Bidstrup said.

The app has been more than two years in the making with joint input from Menzies, UniSA and Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up!.

Associate Professor Julie Brimblecombe, head of the nutrition program at Menzies, said she hoped the GOOD TUCKER app would help to tackle the significant health gap facing many people living in remote communities.

We know that nutrition plays a huge role in contributing to poor health. Making even small changes to our diets, such as consuming a little less salt and added sugar, and eating less fat (particularly saturated fat) and energy (kilojoules) could help prevent diseases including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity and type 2 diabetes.

This app will help people to change their shopping habits as well as generate new learning about healthy food choices for community residents and store managers,” Assoc Prof Brimblecombe said.

The GOOD TUCKER app, which is powered by the highly successful FoodSwitch app, provides Thumbs ratings for tens of thousands of products on sale in food stores all across Australia.

It also provides guidance about take-away foods, such as pizzas and burgers and other non-packaged, non-barcoded items like fresh fruit and vegetables.

Prior to the launch the app was trialled by Indigenous musicians and performers at the Bush Band Bash concert in Central Australia , Wiraduri woman, Johanna Campbell said she found it educational and easy to use and is looking forward to it being introduced into rural and remote communities across Australia.

“The GOOD TUCKER app is great. To be able to scan the barcode on a food packet to find out if it is healthy or not will be really useful. Some foods are not so obviously unhealthy, so to be able to receive a thumbs up, sideways or down will help buy healthier options at the store,” Ms Campbell said.

Dr Tom Wycherley from UniSA’s Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), said the app uses imagery and branding that is easily interpretable and familiar to communities.

“The GOOD TUCKER app builds on existing Thumbs Up! branding that has been seen in many communities for over 10 years and provides information in a culturally appropriate form. Early feedback is really positive but the real test now will be to see if this can noticeably change food choices.”

A full evaluation of the app is planned to take place after the release.

The GOOD TUCKER app works on:

1. Apple mobile devices that have a camera with auto-focus. Requires iOS 7.0 or later.

2.Android devices running versions 4.0.x and above that have a camera with autofocus.

As all the information is in the app there is no need for the user to be in internet or phone range to use the app

Part 2 Minister Wyatt’s Press Release  :Free healthy food app dials up good tucker for remote Indigenous communities

A new mobile phone app launched today promises to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in remote areas make healthy food choices.

The thumbs rating is based on the Government’s Health Star Rating system and the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

“The app is named in honour of legendary singer Jimmy Little, who established the Jimmy Little Foundation and dedicated much of his life to promoting better Indigenous health,” said Minister Wyatt.

“People in remote communities can face considerable food challenges, from the combination of limited supplies, particularly the difficulty in getting fresh fruit and vegetables, and limited storage.

“Uncle Jimmy’s app will complement our work to make good food more accessible in remote areas, through the Outback Stores scheme. The accredited stores provide healthy food cheaper than in other remote area stores and implement a nutrition strategy that includes health promotion activities and cooking demonstrations.

“Improving food choices is one of the most effective ways of helping close the gap in Indigenous health, with poor diet behind 10 per cent of diseases.”

The Good Tucker app was created by the Jimmy Little Foundation, in partnership with the Menzies School of Health Research, the University of South Australia and the George Institute for Global Health.

The app links with the Health Star Ratings system, which has more than 7,500 food products displaying the Health Star Rating logo.

Background

The GOOD TUCKER app was developed by Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up!, The University of South Australia and Menzies School of Health Research in partnership with The George Institute, to provide a simple way for people to identify the healthiest food and drink options available in stores.

Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up! was established in 2007 by legendary Australian entertainer Dr. Jimmy Little AO with veteran musician and founding CEO Graham “Buzz” Bidstrup.

The Thumbs Up! program uses music and new media to bring awareness of good nutrition and healthy lifestyle to Indigenous children living in regional and remote communities across Australia. Thumbs Up! engages with the whole of community, including traditional owner groups, schools, local food stores, health services and community groups.

 How do I get the Good Tucker app?

iPhone1 users: Download Good Tucker from the App Store1, either online or on your device.

Android2 smartphone users: Download Good Tucker from Google Play2, either online or on your Android smartphone.

The app is free of charge. An internet connection (mobile/cellular data or Wi-Fi) is required to download it and to share information by social media and email. Standard usage charges may apply – check with your internet and mobile service providers for more information.

Once the Good Tucker app has been downloaded onto your phone you do NOT need to have phone or internet connection for it to operate. All information on products will be stored on the phone.

Other FAQs about the APP

Welcome to the Good Tucker APP!

A simple and easy way of checking out how healthy a food product is.

Download from

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Alcohol : #NT set to lead the nation on alcohol policy reform says @AMSANTaus

 ” This report has the potential to be a game-changer in responding to the alcohol-related harms that are far too prevalent here in the Northern Territory.

“It is really heartening to see how much the review has listened to the long-standing policy solutions that AMSANT has been advocating for more than a decade.

Implementing this report will reduce premature death, hospitalisations, domestic violence and child neglect. It will help significantly to close the health gap in the NT. ”

Mr John Paterson CEO  Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT (AMSANT) today welcomed the final report of the NT Review of Alcohol Legislation and Policy released last Thursday.

Download the Final Report HERE

NT Alcohol Policies and Legislation Review

“It is really heartening to see how much the review has listened to the long-standing policy solutions that AMSANT has been advocating for more than a decade”, he said.

“For a very long time we have been concerned about the harms being caused by cheap grog, too many outlets and take-away licenses, too much alcohol promotion and lack of adequate data, amongst other issues.

“This report addresses all of these issues and goes further, providing a comprehensive response to alcohol problems in the NT. Previous attempts at reform, such as the “Enough is Enough” program, not been far-reaching enough to have a major impact, but we are confident that this report provides the policy options to effectively deal with the NT’s alcohol problems.

“AMSANT thanks the Gunner Government for their immediate and emphatic response to the report in supporting all but one of the 220 recommendations.

The leadership shown by our Chief Minister on this key public health issue is commendable.

“The Territory is on the cusp of finally coming to terms with alcohol and the harm it causes. Instead of being the jurisdiction famous for its “bloody good drinkers”, we now have an opportunity to lead the nation in action to address alcohol.

“Implementing this report will reduce premature death, hospitalisations, domestic violence and child neglect. It will help significantly to close the health gap in the NT.

Research shows that in any population, the most disadvantaged people are most impacted by alcohol and have the most to gain from an effective public health response”, he concluded.

Riley review: Floor price on alcohol, 400sqm rule to be scrapped in wake of NT alcohol policy paper

Photo: Michael Gunner (centre) says he agrees with nearly all the recommendations of Trevor Riley (left). (ABC News: Felicity James)

Published HERE

The review by former chief justice Trevor Riley could usher in some of the biggest-ever changes to the Northern Territory’s alcohol policies.

Already the Gunner Government has said it will accept in principle nearly all of the 220 recommendations from the review, including a floor price or volumetric tax on alcohol products and a policy shift away from floor-size restrictions.

Major recommendations of the Riley Review:

  • The NT Liquor Act be rewritten
  • Immediate moratorium on takeaway liquor licences
  • Reduce grocery stores selling alcohol by phasing out store licences
  • Floor price/volumetric tax on alcohol products designed to reduce availability of cheap alcohol
  • Shift away from floor size restrictions for liquor outlets and repeal 400-square-metre restrictions
  • Reinstating an independent Liquor Commission
  • Legislating to make it an offence for someone to operate a boat or other vessel while over the limit
  • Establish an alcohol research body in the NT
  • Trial a safe spaces program where people can manage their consumption and seek intervention

“I got that one wrong going into the election and it has been good to see that Trevor [Riley] has come forward with this report with a much more considered, better way of dealing with density and sales of take-away outlets,” Mr Gunner said following the release of the report.

The Government has also said it will enact today a “complete moratorium” on all new take-away alcohol licences, including at greenfield sites.Attorney-General Natasha Fyles said the Northern Territory had the highest rate of alcohol consumption of anywhere in the world.

But the AHA’s opposition to Dan Murphy’s in the NT continues.

“We see that there are some recommendations in there in relation to additional licencing fees… to put an additional impost on businesses above the GST… we would see would be unfair,” he said.

“If the spirit of the review is followed in the Liquor Act, then the end result will be a reduction in alcohol in the volume of alcohol in the community.”

The national branch of the Australian Hotels Association does not support a floor price but the Northern Territory branch is in favour of it and has widely accepted the Riley review.

The figure would be indexed against ordinary wages and evaluated after three years.

“Floor space doesn’t impact on the amount of alcohol out there… it’s the price that makes the alcohol obtainable… if we’ve got people selling bottles of wine for $3, that’s cheaper than water, it seems to me you’ve clearly got a problem,” he said.

It said the relationship between the size of these premises and any increased harm is less clear, dismissing the claim that floor space was a contributing factor to alcohol related harm.

Floor price a more powerful way to reduce harm

He also acknowledged the Territory’s problem with alcohol-related harm and promised to sell liquor responsibly, if the licence was to be granted.

In a statement he said the company planned to move ahead with their application for a liquor licence in the Northern Territory.

Dan Murphy’s will try to operate in the NT

Other reforms include introducing licensing inspectors to help police at bottle shops, a move the NT Police Association has been pushing for.

Once the review is in place, one of the first priorities would be to reinstate an independent Liquor Commission, followed by a complete rewrite of the Liquor Act, which is expected to take 12 months.

“It is time that the Northern Territory gets rid of the tag of being an alcohol-fuelled community,” Ms Fyles said

He said details of how the floor price on alcohol will operate are yet to be determined, and any such price would be abolished if the Federal Government were to introduce its own volumetric tax.

Another recommendation that the Government has said it will back is a law to make it an offence for a person to operate or navigate a vessel on the water with a blood-alcohol content above 0.05 per cent.

Chief Minister Michael Gunner conceded that he made an error in pushing for the 400-square-metre rule, which had been dubbed a “Dan Ban” because it was seen as preventing Dan Murphy’s from opening a large store in Darwin.

NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health #F1000DA17 : International @First1000DaysOz Movement gets Aboriginal Make-Over

“We work to support parents in taking responsibility for our children, providing them with the best start in life and ensuring that the protective factors inherent in our culture and our strong family structures are evident in our work with families.

The work of First Thousand Days Australia is aimed at reducing chronic stressors for mums and dads, so that the focus is on healthy pregnancies and giving our parents the opportunity to provide their children the best start in life.

We welcome the support of Congress and note that both the recent Redfern and Uluru statements from the national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership highlighted early childhood development and health as a major priority for Indigenous communities “

Professor Kerry Arabena, Chair of Indigenous Health (Pictured above ) at the University of Melbourne, who heads up the Australian initiative says her group is unique in that it’s an Indigenous designed and managed intervention.

“Some of our people are kept apart from us –by politics and power— and forced to live away from the people who care most about them,” she told the audience of child care workers, educationalists, health workers and researchers. “They are in prisons and in out-of-home care.

“As long as they exist separated from us, from their families, from our communities and from our society, we remain a people who are unable to exercise the right of self-determination.

Dr Huggins, Co-Chair of the National Congress of First Peoples, said that the lack of success in improving the outcomes for Indigenous infants and children was a source of deep anxiety for all Indigenous families see Part 2 Below

Read over 270 NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health Articles published over the pat 5 Years

International First Thousand Days Movement got an  ” Aboriginal Make-Over ” when national summit began in Brisbane this week

Brisbane  hosted one of Australia’s most significant gatherings of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child and maternal health experts and community leaders when the First Thousand Days Australia national summit convened this week .

The first 1,000 days of life – the time spanning roughly between conception and one’s second birthday – is a unique period of opportunity when the foundations of optimum health, growth, and neurodevelopment across the lifespan are established.

In Australia this international movement has been broadened out, by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander health researchers and practitioners, from the original nutrition-focused international initiative to include child protection, early life literacy, the role and contribution of men and the range of other issues which impact on Indigenous parents and infants in Australia.

Professor Arabena said the Queensland Government had supported the initiative with a $1.5m grant to establish two trial sites in the state and other funds have been made available for ongoing research and evaluation.

“There is a sense of desperation in many of our communities and organisations that current efforts to give our kids the best possible opportunities in life are not having the impact we’d like; our children are being put into out-of-home-care at unprecedented rates and the COAG targets to close the gap on child mortality, school attendance and literacy and numeracy haven’t been met this year.

“It’s clear that we need new initiatives that give Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities more control over developing strategies and First Thousand days Australia is aiming to do just that,” said Professor Arabena.

The First Thousand Days Australia National Summit will run from tomorrow until Friday 20 October

View the Summit program including abstracts and presenters’ bios here.

 Part 2 Australian Government has historic opportunity to build safety and health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children  

Aboriginal leader, Dr Jackie Huggins, has told a child and maternal health summit In Brisbane that Australia’s elevation to the UN Human Rights Committee should cause the Australian Government to ensure its domestic actions matches its international rhetoric on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families.

Speaking at the First Thousand Days Summit in Brisbane today Dr Huggins, Co-Chair of the National Congress of First Peoples, said that the lack of success in improving the outcomes for Indigenous infants and children was a source of deep anxiety for all Indigenous families.

“Some of our people are kept apart from us –by politics and power— and forced to live away from the people who care most about them,” she told the audience of child care workers, educationalists, health workers and researchers. “They are in prisons and in out-of-home care.

“As long as they exist separated from us, from their families, from our communities and from our society, we remain a people who are unable to exercise the right of self-determination.

The first 1,000 days of life – the time spanning roughly between conception and one’s second birthday – is a unique period of opportunity when the foundations of optimum health, growth, and neurodevelopment across the lifespan are established.

In Australia this international movement has been broadened out, by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander health researchers and practitioners, from the original nutrition-focused international initiative to include child protection, early life literacy, the role and contribution of men and the range of other issues which impact on Indigenous parents and infants in Australia.

Dr Huggins said the Turnbull Government had an historical opportunity to engage with the Indigenous community on child health and safety through the Aboriginal-led First Thousand Days Australia initiative.

“Indigenous people are the experts when it comes to taking responsibility for, and looking after our children,” Dr Huggins said. “We have the right to develop and provide services which address inter-generational trauma. We have the right to teach our children in their languages and ensure they have a culturally appropriate education and have the right to deliver pre-natal services according to the needs of our communities.”

First Thousand Days Australia CEO, Professor Kerry Arabena, welcomed the support of Congress and said that both the recent Redfern and Uluru statements from the national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership highlighted early childhood development and health as a major priority for Indigenous communities.

“We all need to start focusing on the strengths and resilience of our families and work with them to build on these strengths rather than the continued emphasis on the perceived weaknesses,” said Professor Arabena.

 

Aboriginal Maternity Health Program : #CATSINaM17 @IUIH_ Million-dollar boost for groundbreaking #Indigenous maternity program

“It is informed by Indigenous knowledge and community control with a redesigned health service to provide 24/7 continuity of midwifery care and birthing in an Indigenous birth centre,

“With Indigenous leadership and a team with expertise in Indigenous health and research we can translate what we know works in other settings, and other countries, into practice here in Australia.”

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health CEO Adrian Carson said a key component of the project was the Indigenous control and governance of services.

A maternity program designed to achieve better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their babies has received a $1.1 million grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).

The project, led by The University of Queensland’s Professor Sue Kildea and researchers from the University of Sydney and the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, will implement Birthing on Country on a number of sites with a view to an Australia-wide roll out.

The NHMRC grant will help determine the sustainability of a Birthing on Country service model in each community, along with the impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, their communities and health services.

“The Birthing On Country program has a strong emphasis on culturally and clinically safe care, strengthened support for families, growing a culturally capable workforce and the Indigenous maternal and infant workforce,” Professor Kildea said.

“This program focuses on the year before and the year after birth, as the most important time in life.

“It also allows us to review the effect on three of the most costly health outcomes across the lifespan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: preterm birth, low birth weight and hospital admissions in the first year of life.”

Professor Kildea said the project team was calling on all Australian governments and health organisations to work with them to implement Birthing On Country programs.

“After two decades of research, including consultation with Indigenous elders and communities, we can now enact State and Federal health policy and put into practice national and international evidence of the safety, benefits and cost-effectiveness of culturally safe care,” she said.

“With Indigenous leadership and a team with a wealth of cross-disciplinary expertise in Indigenous and health services, we can translate what we know works in other settings and other countries into practice here in Australia.”

The project, entitled ‘Building on Our Strengths (BOOSt): Developing and Evaluating Birthing On Country Primary Maternity Units’, also includes the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service (ATSICHS) Brisbane, the Waminda South Coast Women’s Health and Welfare Aboriginal Corporation, the Australian College of Midwives, the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives, and the Rhodanthe Lipsett Indigenous Midwifery Charitable Fund.

The NHMRC grant builds on previous funding from the Ian Potter Foundation in Melbourne, the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, ATSICHS Brisbane, the Mater Health Service, Queensland Health and an earlier NHMRC grant.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #RHD @RHDAustralia and @MenziesResearch release an educational short film on rheumatic heart disease in pregnancy

“I chose to help create this film because I wanted to help young women living with RHD and make sure they can access information about contraception, pregnancy and planning for a baby.

What is the take home message from the film?

“The film points out the main needs of a young woman living with RHD to help care for herself, her heart and her baby. The film re-assures young women with RHD that they can have a normal healthy pregnancy; they just need to take extra care of themselves.”

RHDAustralia sat down with one of the directors, Ms Kenya McAdam, a 21 year old Jaru and Kira woman from Halls Creek, Western Australia currently living in Katherine, Northern Territory.

See Kenya’s full story PART 2 Below

For Kenya this film was deeply personal and an intimate reflection on life as a young woman living with RHD. Kenya developed RHD at 15 years old and required open heart surgery within 3 months of diagnosis. Since that time, Kenya has worked with RHDAustralia to raise awareness about this 100% preventable disease.

The target audience for this film is girls and young women from ages 13 to 20s who have mild to moderate RHD

You can find these films and other important resources on the RHDAustralia resource page.

NACCHO and AMA support RHD Prevention

With Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians still 20 times more likely to die from RHD, the AMA’s call for firm targets and a comprehensive and consultative strategy is welcome. We encourage governments to adopt these recommendations immediately.

“As noted by the AMA, it is absolutely critical that governments work in close partnership with Aboriginal health bodies. Without strong community controlled health services, achieving these targets for reducing RHD will be impossible.

While this is a long term challenge, the human impacts on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are being felt deeply right now. Action is required urgently.

NACCHO is standing ready to work with the AMA and governments to develop and implement these measures. We have to work together and we have to do it now.”

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chairperson Matthew Cooke pictured above at Danila Dilba Health Service NT with AMA President Dr Michael Gannon

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #RHD : AMA Report Card on Indigenous Health highlights need for Aboriginal community controlled services

The RHD Story

A new film written and directed by a group of Northern Territory Indigenous women follows the story of Tess, a young women whose boyfriend, Jamie, reveals his desire to start a family.

While surprised and happy, she’s not told Jamie about her rheumatic heart disease (RHD).

She’s not sure how her heart disease will affect her pregnancy or if she can have a baby at all. Looking for answers, Tess turns to her best mate, her mum and the local health clinic for guidance on what to do next.

Will they have the answers?

The film will be launched in Bagot Community, Darwin on 6 October. Sharing a Heartbeat is freely available in English and Kriol with plans to make the film available in more Indigenous languages.

You can find these films and other important resources on the RHDAustralia resource page.  Additional print resources are linked with the English and Kriol through the resource page on our website.

By embracing two-ways learning and a spirit of cross cultural cooperation, RHDAustralia and Menzies School of Health Research are proud to announce the completion of the first ever   educational short film on rheumatic heart disease in pregnancy entitled Sharing a Heartbeat.

Hi Kenya, why did you decide to get involved in the creation of this film?

“I chose to help create this film because I wanted to help young women living with RHD and make sure they can access information about contraception, pregnancy and planning for a baby.

What is the take home message from the film?

“The film points out the main needs of a young woman living with RHD to help care for herself, her heart and her baby. The film re-assures young women with RHD that they can have a normal healthy pregnancy; they just need to take extra care of themselves.”

From a personal perspective, the film answered my unanswered questions. For other young women with RHD, I think it will help them understand more about approaching pregnancy.”

Having Kenya involved from the very start was central to ensuring the film was produced from a patient centric, woman centric and gender sensitive standpoint. But of equal importance was making certain it was developed to be culturally appropriate and safe. This was accomplished by including Indigenous women throughout the process, whether in the design, development, testing or making of the resource.

One of the key contributors alongside Kenya was Noeletta McKenzie whose daughter, Raychelle, was diagnosed with RHD four years ago at the age of nine. Noeletta’s been involved in numerous community development projects in Maningrida and Darwin and was quick to answer a call for assistance with the making of the film. “I saw the advertisement on the RHDAustralia Facebook page and enquired about how I could support with the development of the resource.” Noeletta helped to co-write the film and to guide and consult the actors on set.

When asked about why it was important to have Indigenous women involved in the making of the film she told us “I feel that as the resource is targeted at Indigenous young women, we needed to ensure that they were featured. It’s also about cultural safety and cultural context, educating our young women in our way.”
Leading by example, Noeletta is instilling these qualities into her daughter as well. When asked if the film has helped her daughter learn more about her RHD, Noeletta said “She’s well aware of the disease and how as a young woman it has affected her life. She would like to be a part of an advisory group to share her experience and pass on her knowledge.”

Acknowledgements

There were many people involving in the making of this film and we would like to thank the actors, directors, writers, and producers for producing such a well-crafted and meaningful film that is educational, culturally responsive, collaborative and meaningful. This film was produced by RHDAustralia and made possible with a grant from NTPHN.

Background

Literature reviews and content surveillance of health promotion material from Australia and New Zealand shows that there is very little information available for girls and women who have RHD. A recently completed study conducted by the Australian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System (AMOSS) has shown that for Indigenous women in Australia, there are many misconceptions around rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and how it can impact their pregnancies.

Films directed by Indigenous women on any content are rare. Rheumatic heart disease is up to twice as common in women, and tends to affect women during their child bearing years. There is a 30-50% increased cardiac workload in normal pregnancy.

The target audience for this film is girls and young women from ages 13 to 20s who have mild to moderate RHD.

Part 2 Rheumatic heart disease a blight on Indigenous population

When Kenya McAdam wasn’t bedridden as a child, she would drag herself to school and sit in the classroom. “I wouldn’t move,” says the 21-year-old childcare worker, whose current good health is proof that she has survived rheumatic heart disease.

From The Australian

But Australia has a high level of the disease, which is caused by a bacterial infection of the throat and skin and is common in poverty-stricken nations.

Some of the nation’s leading medical researchers are meeting today in Darwin to create a plan to wipe out the life-threatening condition, which disproportionately affects indigenous Australians.

Pediatrician Jonathan Carapetis, who has led research efforts for 20 years, says young people such as Ms McAdam are up to 122 times more likely to contract the disease than non-indigenous youngsters. And it affects one in 43 indigenous people living in ­remote and rural Australia.

“It’s entirely preventable, yet the rates of this devastating condition among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are among the highest in the world,” says Professor Carapetis, director of Perth’s Telethon Kids Institute. “It should no longer exist in Australia.”

Rheumatic heart disease can result in permanent damage to the heart if it is not treated with antibiotics. It is caused by a bacterial infection of the throat and skin, which can result in heart failure and other complications, including stroke, without antibiotic treatment.

Ms McAdam’s life was saved by heart surgery to repair leaky valves after a cardiac arrest and years of breathlessness. “My mum thought that only older people suffer from heart attacks,” she said.

Her younger brother and sister must endure a painful penicillin injection every month for up to 10 years to prevent further infections.

But many affected indigenous youth fail to receive more than half their monthly penicillin requirement. More than 2600 ­people in the Northern Territory have rheumatic heart disease, while sufferers in Western Australia’s remote Kimberley Region are recorded as dying at an average age of 41.

Professor Carapetis said research institutes around Australia were collaborating on ways to prevent and treat streptococcus infections that lead to the disease, such as long-acting penicillin or an antibacterial vaccine.

Heather D’Antoine, from Menzies School of Health Research’s Aboriginal Programs, said today’s meeting to discuss lifesaving initiatives “can’t come soon enough”.

“The impact on our community is devastating; children must travel for heart surgery; young adults live with premature disability; and pregnant women face high-risk pregnancies,” she said.

NACCHO and @CancerAustralia Aboriginal Women’s Health and Breast Cancer #LotsToLiveFor video launch to share and educate

 ” Sharing Cancer Australia’s Lots to live for video on social media will start a conversation between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about breast cancer and how early detection can save lives.

If you are an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, it is vitally important you know the normal look and feel of your breasts, the symptoms to look out for and the importance of seeing their doctor if you find a change.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Australia, including among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, yet Indigenous women are 16 per cent less likely to survive than non-Indigenous women.”

Professor Jacinta Elston ( breast cancer survivor )  Chair of the Cancer Australia Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control : She is a descendent of both the Kalkadoon people of North-West Queensland and the South Sea Islander people.

See Key Facts Breast cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women or Part 2 Below

Part 1 Launch today of The Lots to live for video, which features NITV’s Marngrook Footy Show presenter Leila Gurruwiwi

VIEW HERE

A new breast awareness video designed for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to share with family and friends on social media aims to increase early detection of breast cancer and improve survival.

Cancer Australia CEO, Dr Helen Zorbas, said the video, titled Lots to live for, had been produced to put vital knowledge about the importance of breast awareness and early detection of breast cancer in the hands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and communities.

“Finding breast cancer early, while it is still confined to the breast, significantly increases the chances of survival,” Dr Zorbas said. “Early detection of breast cancer through breast awareness and increasing participation in mammographic screening are important ways to improve survival outcomes and address the disparity in breast cancer survival between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women.”

Professor Jacinta Elston, Chair of the Cancer Australia Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control, and an Aboriginal woman from Townsville, supported the video’s message and encouraged women to share it on social media.

“Studies have shown that social media has been used effectively in getting health messages out into our community,” Professor Elston said.

See opening message

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women aged between 50 and 74 years are also encouraged to have a free breast screen every two years. Mammographic screening is the best early detection test for reducing deaths from breast cancer.”

Professor Elston, who is herself a breast cancer survivor, acknowledged that some Indigenous women may be reluctant to discuss a breast change, due to shame, embarrassment, fear or stigma, but that this could seriously impact on their breast cancer outcomes.

“Changes in your breast may not be due to cancer, but if you find a change that is new or unusual, it’s important to see a doctor without delay,” Professor Elston said. “We need to look after our health – for ourselves and our families.”

The Lots to live for video, which features NITV’s Marngrook Footy Show presenter Leila Gurruwiwi, is designed to be easily accessible and shareable on social media platforms widely used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Cancer Australia is committed to improving cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,” Dr Zorbas said.

Visit www.canceraustralia.gov.au/atsi for more information.

Part 2 Key Facts Breast cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Key statistics

Incidence

• Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

• The number of breast cancer diagnoses among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women increased by over 60% between the years 2004-08 and 2008-12.

Survival

• The breast cancer survival rate was 16% lower for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women than for non-Indigenous women between 2006-2010.

Mortality

• Breast cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women after lung cancer (between 2007 and 2011).

• In 2010-2014, there were 154 deaths from breast cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australia.

Factors affecting breast cancer outcomes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women:

are less likely than non-Indigenous women to have a screening mammogram

• may choose not to visit a doctor when they notice changes in their breasts.

• are less likely to undergo cancer treatment

• are less likely to complete cancer treatment

• are more likely to have 1 or more other health problems such as heart disease and/or diabetes.

As a result of these factors, breast cancer may be more advanced when diagnosed.

Key messages

Finding breast cancer early

1. Breast awareness and early detection of breast cancer for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

• Finding breast cancer early means there are more treatment options and the chances of survival are greatest.

• More than half of breast cancers are diagnosed after a woman or her doctor notices a change in the breast.

This shows how important it is that women are aware of the normal look and feel of their breasts and are confident in reporting unusual breast changes.

How can Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women get to know the normal look and feel of their breasts?

• Women of all ages, daughters, mothers, aunties and grandmothers, are encouraged to get to know the normal look and feel of their breast.

• They don’t need to be an expert or know a special way to check their breasts. They can do this as part of everyday activities such as dressing, looking in the mirror, or showering.

Changes to look out for

There are a number of changes to look out for:

• A new lump or lumpiness

• A change in the size or shape of your breast

• A change in the nipple

• Discharge from the nipple

• Any unusual pain

• A change in the skin of your breast

What to do if women find a change?

While most breast changes are not due to cancer, if a woman finds a change in her breast that is new or unusual for her, it’s important to see a doctor without delay.

Screening mammograms

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women aged between 50 and 74 years are encouraged to attend mammographic breast screening every two years. Mammographic screening is the best early detection test for reducing deaths from breast cancer.

Where to go to have a breast screen?

BreastScreen Australia provides free breast screening for women 50-74 years and has services in all states and territories. To find out more call 13 20 50.

Lots to Live For!

Cancer Australia’s new video Lots to Live For was developed to put vital knowledge about the importance of breast awareness and early detection of breast cancer in the hands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and communities.

The Lots to Live For video, which features Marngrook Footy Show presenter Leila Gurruwiwi, is designed to be accessible and shareable on social media platforms widely used by Indigenous communities.

Visit https://www.facebook.com/canceraustralia/ or

https://twitter.com/CancerAustralia #LotsToLiveFor @CancerAustralia

For more information

Visit http://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/atsi

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @sistaquit Smoking : Smoking rates among pregnant Indigenous women tackled in major research project

 ” In 2014 it was reported 45 per cent of surveyed Indigenous mothers smoked during pregnancy, compared to 13 per cent of non-Indigenous pregnant women.

Those figures have spurred University of Newcastle associate professor Gillian Gould to study what can be done to help reduce rates of Indigenous women smoking while pregnant.

It’s not only that they may be born with low birth rate, or have risks of premature birth, but it can set them up for things like obesity, diabetes, a higher risk of heart disease, and lots of respiratory illnesses.”

Smoking rates among pregnant Indigenous women tackled in major research project 

See full ABC report here or Part 2 below

Part 1 Project update 26 September

Currently we have received EOIs from about 20 ACCHS in 5 states that we are targeting for the SISTAQUIT study. These states are NSW, QLD, SA, WA and NT.

These sites will now undergo a two-way discussion for mutual interest, and to find out what protocols we need to go through to get their communities signed up.

We are aiming for 30 services to be signed up to SISTAQUIT by end of the year.

We will have a trade table at the NACCHO AGM, so interested CEOs and managers of ACCHS can get more information,  meet with Joley Manton face-to-face, and sign up their interest or consent.

Our pilot study “ICAN QUIT in Pregnancy” has been successful wrapped up, and we are applying our learnings to go forward to this larger SISTAQUIT trial.

We would like to thank pilot ACCHS services in NSW, SA and QLD for their tremendous support in making this happen.

What does the SISTAQUIT™ in Pregnancy study aim to do?

Our study aims to improve the provision of timely, evidence-based smoking cessation support to pregnant women attending Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS), by training health providers such as GPs, Aboriginal Health Workers and midwives in culturally appropriate smoking cessation care.

The SISTAQUIT intervention (culturally appropriate smoking cessation training for health providers) has been developed over a decade. We most recently explored the feasibility and acceptability of the SISTAQUIT intervention through the ICAN QUIT in Pregnancy pilot study with six Aboriginal Community Controlled Health services.

We aim to increase the proportion of health providers offering assistance in quitting to pregnant smokers and to improve the quit rates of pregnant smokers, measured by carbon monoxide testing during pregnancy and after birth. We also aim to improve birth weights and respiratory outcomes of the babies in the first six months of life.

We are currently seeking EOIs from AMS interested in participating in the trial. Funding is available to cover AMS trial participation costs, and pregnant mothers will be offered a voucher for their time for each study visit.

Contact Details

School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle:

Assoc. Prof. Gillian Gould: gillian.gould@newcastle.edu.au

Ms Joley Manton: sistaquit@newcastle.edu.au;  Phone: (02) 4033 5720

Website: www.newcastle.edu.au/SISTAQUIT

Part 2

 

SISTAQUIT project aiming to help 450 Indigenous women quit smoking.

 “We want to show that SISTAQUIT works, and that women are able to quit with our approach.

We wanted to be able to reach out eventually to any service in Australia through the internet, so we decided to do that through interactive webinars.

We know now that quite a few chronic diseases are set up by babies being exposed to smoking when they’re in the womb,”

Associate Professor Gould said

It is hoped a large-scale research project will help provide clearer solutions for tackling smoking rates among pregnant Indigenous women across the country.

In 2014 it was reported 45 per cent of surveyed Indigenous mothers smoked during pregnancy, compared to 13 per cent of non-Indigenous pregnant women.

Those figures have spurred University of Newcastle associate professor Gillian Gould to study what can be done to help reduce rates of Indigenous women smoking while pregnant.

It’s not only that they may be born with low birth rate, or have risks of premature birth, but it can set them up for things like obesity, diabetes, a higher risk of heart disease, and lots of respiratory illnesses.

“From that point of view, it is important.

“We know that one of the problems is that women are not given enough help to quit smoking.”

Associate Professor Gould has been working on the multi-phase research project for a number of years.

In the first phase of the study, the research team worked with Indigenous communities in the NSW Hunter Valley to develop a suite of resources to train health providers in supporting women while they quit smoking.

Many of those resources have been digitally focused.

Phase two involved a pilot project using those resources, and was implemented in NSW, South Australia and Queensland.

“We had trained all of the health providers at those services,” Associate Professor Gould said

Project aiming to give health workers effective tools

With the pilot study finished, the research is now expanding into 30 Aboriginal medical centres around the country, with the SISTAQUIT project aiming to help 450 Indigenous women quit smoking.

“We will link up with the services, and we’re conducting three one-hour webinars, which will be live and interactive,” Associate Professor Gould said.

“We [also] have this booklet that women receive, and within that booklet are embedded different videos.

“The women can use an app on their phone, and when they scan the little screenshot of the video that’s in the booklet, they can hear [information] from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals which is going to help them quit smoking.

“We’re mainly aiming it at the health professionals — GPs, midwives, Aboriginal health workers — to give them training, and then they have these resources that are going to, in consultation with women, help them quit.

“By doing it this way and being able to do it in enough women, we will get the answer — ‘is this approach the best approach?’ — and therefore, can the Government then scale-up our approach to make those webinars and resources available across the whole of Australia?”

Cultural sensitivities are observed in the training materials, and Associate Professor Gould said that helped build trust.

“We’re talking to women, giving them accurate, factual messages, but in a way that’s delivered by people they would trust,” she said.

“We’ve developed the whole approach with Aboriginal medical services, and we’ve had Aboriginal investigators on our team guiding us and working very closely with us

“By doing it this way and being able to do it in enough women, we will get the answer — ‘is this approach the best approach?’ — and therefore, can the Government then scale-up our approach to make those webinars and resources available across the whole of Australia?”

Cultural sensitivities are observed in the training materials, and Associate Professor Gould said that helped build trust.

“We’re talking to women, giving them accurate, factual messages, but in a way that’s delivered by people they would trust,” she said.

“We’ve developed the whole approach with Aboriginal medical services, and we’ve had Aboriginal investigators on our team guiding us and working very closely with us

Hopes smoking rates will drop

The study is set to last until 2021, and Associate Professor Gould was optimistic the approach would help reduce rates of smoking.

“This is the real world; it’s a real-world study, so this is what life is like,” she said.

“In our pilot study so far, we’ve had four women quit out of 22, which means we’ve already got a quit rate of almost 25 per cent. The usual quit rate is about 3 per cent. So, we think we’re doing pretty good.

“We’re aiming in the bigger trial to improve the quit rate from the baseline of 3 per cent up to 11 per cent, but already in our pilot we’ve exceeded our aim.

“You never know if this is going to work or not, and that’s why [we’re] doing the study

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Obesity : Download #TippingtheScales Report Leading health orgs set out 8 urgent actions for Federal Government

“Sixty-three per cent of Australian adults and 27 per cent of our children are overweight or obese.

This is not surprising when you look at our environment – our kids are bombarded with advertising for junk food, high-sugar drinks are cheaper than water, and sugar and saturated fat are hiding in so-called ‘healthy’ foods. Making a healthy choice has never been more difficult.

The annual cost of overweight and obesity in Australia in 2011-12 was estimated to be $8.6 billion in direct and indirect costs such as GP services, hospital care, absenteeism and government subsidies.1 “

 OPC Executive Manager Jane Martin 

Download the report HERE  tipping-the-scales

Read over 30 + NACCHO Obesity articles published last 5 years

Read over 30+ NACCHO Nutrition and Healthy foods published last 5 years

Thirty-four leading community, public health, medical and academic groups have today united for the first time to call for urgent Federal Government action to address Australia’s serious obesity problem.

In the ground-breaking new action plan, Tipping the Scales, the agencies identify eight clear, practical, evidence-based actions the Australian Federal Government must take to reduce the enormous strain excess weight and poor diets are having on the nation’s physical and economic health.

Led by the Obesity Policy Coalition (OPC) and Deakin University’s Global Obesity Centre (GLOBE), Tipping the Scales draws on national and international recommendations to highlight where action is required. Areas include:

  1. Time-based restrictions on TV junk food advertising to kids
  2. Set clear food reformulation targets
  3. Make the Health Star Rating mandatory by July 2019
  4. Develop a national active transport strategy
  5. Fund weight-related public education campaigns
  6. Introduce a 20% health levy on sugary drinks
  7. Establish a national obesity taskforce
  8. Develop and monitor national diet, physical activity and weight guidelines.

OPC Executive Manager Jane Martin said the eight definitive policy actions in Tipping the Scales addressed the elements of Australia’s environment which set individuals and families up for unhealthy lifestyles, rather than just focusing on treating the poor health outcomes associated with obesity.

Watch video HERE : How does junk food marketing influence kids

“Sixty-three per cent of Australian adults and 27 per cent of our children are overweight or obese. This is not surprising when you look at our environment – our kids are bombarded with advertising for junk food, high-sugar drinks are cheaper than water, and sugar and saturated fat are hiding in so-called ‘healthy’ foods. Making a healthy choice has never been more difficult,” Ms Martin said.

“The annual cost of overweight and obesity in Australia in 2011-12 was estimated to be $8.6 billion in direct and indirect costs such as GP services, hospital care, absenteeism and government subsidies.1 But Australia still has no strategy to tackle our obesity problem. It just doesn’t make sense.

“Without action, the costs of obesity and poor diet to society will only continue to spiral upwards. The policies we have set out to tackle obesity therefore aim to not only reduce morbidity and mortality, but also improve wellbeing, bring vital benefits to the economy and set Australians up for a healthier future.”

Professor of Epidemiology and Equity in Public Health at Deakin University, Anna Peeters, said the 34 groups behind the report were refusing to let governments simply sit back and watch as growing numbers of Australians developed life-threatening weight and diet-related health problems.

“For too long we have been sitting and waiting for obesity to somehow fix itself. In the obesogenic environment in which we live, this is not going to happen. In fact, if current trends continue, there will be approximately 1.75 million deaths in people over the age of 20 years caused by diseases linked to overweight and obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer heart disease, between 2011-20501,” Professor Peeters said.

“Obesity poses such an immense threat to Australia’s physical and economic health that it needs its own, standalone prevention strategy if progress is to be made. There are policies which have been proven to work in other parts of the world and have the potential to work here, but they need to be implemented as part of a comprehensive approach by governments. And they need to be implemented now.

“More than thirty leading organisations have agreed on eight priorities needed to tackle obesity in Australia. We would like to work with the Federal Government to tackle this urgent issue and integrate these actions as part of a long-term coordinated approach.”

In addition to the costs to society, the burden of obesity is felt acutely by individuals and their families.

As a Professor of Women’s Health at Monash University and a physician, Professor Helena Teede sees mothers struggle daily with trying to achieve and sustain healthy lifestyles for themselves and their families, while having to deal with the adverse impact of unhealthy weight, especially during pregnancy.

“As a mother’s weight before pregnancy increases, so does the substantive health risk to both the mother and baby. Excess weight gain during pregnancy further adds to these risks and is a key driver of infertility, long-term obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes, while for the child, their risk of becoming overweight or obese and developing chronic diseases in later life greatly increases,” Professor Teede said.

“The women I see are generally desperate for help to improve their lifestyle and that of their families. They want to set themselves and their families up for healthy, long lives.

“Currently, there is a lot of blame placed on individuals with unhealthy diets and lifestyles seen as being due to individual and family discipline. Women from all backgrounds and walks of life struggle with little or no support to achieve this. It is vital that we as a community progress beyond placing all responsibility on the individual and work towards creating a policy context and a society that supports healthy choices and tips the scales towards obesity prevention to give Australian families a healthy start to life.”

The calls to action outlined in Tipping the Scales are endorsed by the following organisations: Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance (which includes the Heart Foundation, Cancer Council Australia, Kidney Health Australia, Diabetes Australia and the Stroke Foundation), Australian Health Policy Collaboration (AHPC), Australian Medical Students’ Association (AMSA), Australian & New Zealand Obesity Society (ANZOS), Australasian Society of Lifestyle Medicine, Baker Heart & Diabetes Institute, CHOICE, Consumers Health Forum of Australia, Deakin University’s Global Obesity Centre (GLOBE), Institute For Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), Monash Centre for Health, Research and Implementation (MCHRI), LiveLighter, Menzies School of Health Research, The University of Melbourne’s Melbourne School of Population & Global Health, Melbourne Children’s (which includes The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne), the National Rural Health Alliance Inc, Nutrition Australia, Obesity Australia, Obesity Policy Coalition, Obesity Surgery Society of Australia & New Zealand, Parents’ Voice, Public Health Association of Australia and Sugar By Half.

Download the Tipping the Scales action plan and snapshot at opc.org.au/tippingthescales


1. Obesity Australia. Obesity: Its impact on Australia and a case for action. No time to Weight 2. Sydney, 2015.