NACCHO Aboriginal Health 16 #Saveadate Events Workshops : #Leadership #Mentalhealth #Kidneys #ClosetheGap , #Eyes Plus more

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NACCHO Save a date NEW featured event

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Full details of these events and registration links below

22 February Racism survey Opens

23 February: Webinar to support the social and emotional well-being of Aboriginal youth in crisis

27 February: 2017 International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership

  • Healing and Empowerment Indigenous Leadership in Mental Health and Suicide Prevention exchange. 

3 March: AMSANT: APONT Innovating to Succeed Forum – Alice Springs

5 March: Kidney Health Week Starts

16 March: National Close the Gap Day

16 March Close the Gap Day VISION 2020

22 March: 2017 Indigenous Ear Health Workshop  Adelaide

29 March: RHD Australia Education Workshop Adelaide SA

26- 29 April The 14 th National Rural Health Conference Cairns

29 April:14th World Rural Health Conference Cairns

10 May: National Indigenous Human Rights Awards

26 May :National Sorry day 2017

2-9 July NAIDOC WEEK

If you have a Conference, Workshop or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

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22 February Understanding Racism survey Opens

racsim-survey-opens

Complete Survey Here

23 February: Webinar to support the social and emotional well-being of Aboriginal youth in crisis

atsi

NACCHO invites all health practitioners and staff to the webinar: An all-Indigenous panel will explore youth suicide in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. The webinar is organised and produced by the Mental Health Professionals Network and will provide participants with the opportunity to identify:

  • Key principles in the early identification of youth experiencing psychological distress.
  • Appropriate referral pathways to prevent crises and provide early intervention.
  • Challenges, tips and strategies to implement a collaborative response to supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in crisis

Working collaboratively to support the social and emotional well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in crisis.

Date:  Thursday 23rd February, 2017

Time: 7.15 – 8.30pm AEDT

REGISTER

27 February: 2017 International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership

  • Healing and Empowerment Indigenous Leadership in Mental Health and Suicide Prevention exchange. 

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Image copyright © Roma Winmar

The 2017 International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership (IIMHL) Exchange, Contributing Lives Thriving Communities is being held across Australia and New Zealand from 27 February to 3 March 2017.

NACCHO notes that registration is free for the Healing and Empowerment Indigenous Leadership in Mental Health and Suicide Prevention exchange.  This is co-hosted by National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leadership in Mental Health (NATSILMH) and the Queensland Mental Health Commission in partnership with the Queensland Department of Health.

It will be held at the Pullman Hotel, 17 Abbott Street, Cairns City, Queensland 4870.

The theme is Indigenous leadership in mental health and suicide prevention, with a focus on cultural healing and the empowerment of communities with programs, case studies and services.

For more about IIMHL and to register http://www.iimhl.com/

3 March: AMSANT: APONT Innovating to Succeed Forum – Alice Springs

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Following our successful 2015 AGMP Forum we are pleased to announce the second AGMP Forum will be held at the Alice Springs Convention Centre on 3 March from 9 am to 5 pm. The forum is a free catered event open to senior managers and board members of all Aboriginal organisations across the NT.

Come along to hear from NT Aboriginal organisations about innovative approaches to strengthen your activities and businesses, be more sustainable and self-determine your success. The forum will be opened by the Chief Minister and there will be opportunities for Q&A discussions with Commonwealth and Northern Territory government representatives.

To register to attend please complete the online registration form, or contact Wes Miller on 8944 6626, Kate Muir on 8959 4623, or email info@agmp.org.au.

5 March: Kidney Health week

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is nearly here! Learn how you can get involved this 5-11 March, and order your free event pack:

 

16 March Close the Gap Day

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples die 10-17 years younger than other Australians and it’s even worse in some parts of Australia. Register now and hold an activity of your choice in support of health equality across Australia.

Resources

Resource packs will be sent out from 1 February 2017.

We will also have a range of free downloadable resources available on our website

www.oxfam.org.au/closethegapday.

It is still important to register as this contributes to the overall success of the event.

More information and Register your event

16 March Close the Gap Day VISION 2020

logo-vision2020-australia

Indigenous Eye Health at the University of Melbourne would like to invite people to a two-day national conference on Indigenous eye health and the Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision in March 2017. The conference will provide opportunity for discussion and planning for what needs to be done to Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 and is supported by their partners National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Optometry Australia, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists and Vision 2020 Australia.

Collectively, significant progress has been made to improve Indigenous eye health particularly over the past five years and this is an opportunity to reflect on the progress made. The recent National Eye Health Survey found the gap for blindness has been reduced but is still three times higher. The conference will allow people to share the learning from these experiences and plan future activities.

The conference is designed for those working in all aspects of Indigenous eye care: from health workers and practitioners, to regional and jurisdictional organisations. It will include ACCHOs, NGOs, professional bodies and government departments.

The topics to be discussed will include:

  • regional approaches to eye care
  • planning and performance monitoring
  • initiatives and system reforms that address vision loss
  • health promotion and education.

Contacts

Indigenous Eye Health – Minum Barreng
Level 5, 207-221 Bouverie Street
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
The University of Melbourne
Carlton Vic 3010
Ph: (03) 8344 9320
Email:

Links

22 March2017 Indigenous Ear Health Workshop  in Adelaide

asohns-2017-ieh-workshop-22march2017-adelaide

The 2017 Indigenous Ear Health Workshop to be held in Adelaide in March will focus on Otitis Media (middle ear disease), hearing loss, and its significant impact on the lives of Indigenous children, the community and Indigenous culture in Australia.

The workshop will take place on 22 March 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre in Adelaide, South Australia.

The program features keynote addresses by invited speakers who will give presentations aligned with the workshop’s main objectives:

  • To identify and promote methods to strengthen primary prevention and care of Otitis Media (OM).
  • To engage and coordinate all stakeholders in OM management.
  • To summarise current and future research into OM pathogenesis (the manner in which it develops) and management.
  • To present the case for consistent and integrated funding for OM management.

Invited speakers will include paediatricians, public health physicians, ear nose and throat surgeons, Aboriginal health workers, Education Department and a psychologist, with OM and hearing updates from medical, audiological and medical science researchers.

The program will culminate in an address emphasising the need for funding that will provide a consistent and coordinated nationwide approach to managing Indigenous ear health in Australia.

Those interested in attending may include: ENT surgeons, ENT nurses, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers, audiologists, rural and regional general surgeons and general practitioners, speech pathologists, teachers, researchers, state and federal government representatives and bureaucrats; in fact anyone interested in Otitis Media.

The workshop is organised by the Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery (ASOHNS) and is held just before its Annual Scientific Meeting (23 -26 March 2017). The first IEH workshop was held in Adelaide in 2012 and subsequent workshops were held in Perth, Brisbane and Sydney.

For more information go to the ASOHNS 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting Pre-Meeting Workshops section at http://asm.asohns.org.au/workshops

Or contact:

Mrs Lorna Watson, Chief Executive Officer, ASOHNS Ltd

T: +61 2 9954 5856   or  E info@asohns.org.au

29 March: RHDAustralia Education Workshop Adelaide SA

edit

Download the PDF brochure sa-workshop-flyer

More information and registrations HERE

 

26- 29 April The 14 th National Rural Health Conference Cairns c42bfukvcaam3h9

INFO Register

29 April : 14th World Rural Health Conference Cairns

acrrm

The conference program features streams based on themes most relevant to all rural and remote health practitioners. These include Social and environmental determinants of health; Leadership, Education and Workforce; Social Accountability and Social Capital, and Rural Clinical Practices: people and services.

Download the program here : rural-health-conference-program-no-spreads

The program includes plenary/keynote sessions, concurrent sessions and poster presentations. The program will also include clinical sessions to provide skill development and ongoing professional development opportunities :

Information Registrations HERE

10 May: National Indigenous Human Rights Awards

nihra-2017-save-the-date-invitation_version-2

” The National Indigenous Human Rights Awards recognises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who have made significant contribution to the advancement of human rights and social justice for their people.”

To nominate someone for one of the three awards, please go to https://shaoquett.wufoo.com/forms/z4qw7zc1i3yvw6/
 
For further information, please also check out the Awards Guide at https://www.scribd.com/document/336434563/2017-National-Indigenous-Human-Rights-Awards-Guide
26 May :National Sorry day 2017
 
bridge-walk
The first National Sorry Day was held on 26 May 1998 – one year after the tabling of the report Bringing them Home, May 1997. The report was the result of an inquiry by the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission into the removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families.
2-9 July NAIDOC WEEK
17_naidoc_logo_stacked-01

The importance, resilience and richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages will be the focus of national celebrations marking NAIDOC Week 2017.

The 2017 theme – Our Languages Matter – aims to emphasise and celebrate the unique and essential role that Indigenous languages play in cultural identity, linking people to their land and water and in the transmission of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, spirituality and rites, through story and song.

More info about events

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NACCHO #Aboriginal Health #Leadership 15 Events #saveadate : #eyes #ears #RHD #suicide prevention #mental Health #closethegap #governance #rural

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Full details of these events and registration links below

14 February: #RedfernStatement Breakfast and PM Closing the Gap Report Canberra ACT

23 February: Webinar to support the social and emotional well-being of Aboriginal youth in crisis

27 February: 2017 International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership

  • Healing and Empowerment Indigenous Leadership in Mental Health and Suicide Prevention exchange. 

3 March: AMSANT: APONT Innovating to Succeed Forum – Alice Springs

10 March: Editorial proposals close: NACCHO Aboriginal Health 24 page Newspaper

16 March: National Close the Gap Day

16 March Close the Gap Day VISION 2020

17 March: Advertising bookings close: NACCHO Aboriginal Health 24 page Newspaper

22 March: 2017 Indigenous Ear Health Workshop  Adelaide

29 March: RHD Australia Education Workshop Adelaide SA

5 April: NACCHO Aboriginal Health 24 page Newspaper published in Koori

29 April:14th World Rural Health Conference Cairns

10 May: National Indigenous Human Rights Awards

26 May :National Sorry day 2017

2-9 July NAIDOC WEEK

If you have a Conference, Workshop or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

save-a-date

14 February: #RedfernStatement Breakfast and PM Closing the Gap Report Canberra ACT

redfern

Note 1 : Please note this event is now invitation only

Note 2 : The Prime Minister will deliver the Closing the Gap report to Parliament at 12.00 Tuesday

23 February: Webinar to support the social and emotional well-being of Aboriginal youth in crisis

atsi

NACCHO invites all health practitioners and staff to the webinar: An all-Indigenous panel will explore youth suicide in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. The webinar is organised and produced by the Mental Health Professionals Network and will provide participants with the opportunity to identify:

  • Key principles in the early identification of youth experiencing psychological distress.
  • Appropriate referral pathways to prevent crises and provide early intervention.
  • Challenges, tips and strategies to implement a collaborative response to supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in crisis

Working collaboratively to support the social and emotional well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in crisis.

Date:  Thursday 23rd February, 2017

Time: 7.15 – 8.30pm AEDT

REGISTER

27 February: 2017 International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership

  • Healing and Empowerment Indigenous Leadership in Mental Health and Suicide Prevention exchange. 

mh

Image copyright © Roma Winmar

The 2017 International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership (IIMHL) Exchange, Contributing Lives Thriving Communities is being held across Australia and New Zealand from 27 February to 3 March 2017.

NACCHO notes that registration is free for the Healing and Empowerment Indigenous Leadership in Mental Health and Suicide Prevention exchange.  This is co-hosted by National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leadership in Mental Health (NATSILMH) and the Queensland Mental Health Commission in partnership with the Queensland Department of Health.

It will be held at the Pullman Hotel, 17 Abbott Street, Cairns City, Queensland 4870.

The theme is Indigenous leadership in mental health and suicide prevention, with a focus on cultural healing and the empowerment of communities with programs, case studies and services.

For more about IIMHL and to register http://www.iimhl.com/

3 March: AMSANT: APONT Innovating to Succeed Forum – Alice Springs

21766661828_b1a71dd863_o

Following our successful 2015 AGMP Forum we are pleased to announce the second AGMP Forum will be held at the Alice Springs Convention Centre on 3 March from 9 am to 5 pm. The forum is a free catered event open to senior managers and board members of all Aboriginal organisations across the NT.

Come along to hear from NT Aboriginal organisations about innovative approaches to strengthen your activities and businesses, be more sustainable and self-determine your success. The forum will be opened by the Chief Minister and there will be opportunities for Q&A discussions with Commonwealth and Northern Territory government representatives.

To register to attend please complete the online registration form, or contact Wes Miller on 8944 6626, Kate Muir on 8959 4623, or email info@agmp.org.au.

10 March: Editorial and Advertising proposals close: NACCHO Aboriginal Health 24 page Newspaper

rates

Download the Rate card and make booking HERE

16 March: National Close the Gap Day

76694lpr-600

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples die 10-17 years younger than other Australians and it’s even worse in some parts of Australia. Register now and hold an activity of your choice in support of health equality across Australia.

Resources

Resource packs will be sent out from 1 February 2017.

We will also have a range of free downloadable resources available on our website

www.oxfam.org.au/closethegapday.

It is still important to register as this contributes to the overall success of the event.

More information and Register your event

16 March Close the Gap Day VISION 2020

logo-vision2020-australia

Indigenous Eye Health at the University of Melbourne would like to invite people to a two-day national conference on Indigenous eye health and the Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision in March 2017. The conference will provide opportunity for discussion and planning for what needs to be done to Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 and is supported by their partners National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Optometry Australia, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists and Vision 2020 Australia.

Collectively, significant progress has been made to improve Indigenous eye health particularly over the past five years and this is an opportunity to reflect on the progress made. The recent National Eye Health Survey found the gap for blindness has been reduced but is still three times higher. The conference will allow people to share the learning from these experiences and plan future activities.

The conference is designed for those working in all aspects of Indigenous eye care: from health workers and practitioners, to regional and jurisdictional organisations. It will include ACCHOs, NGOs, professional bodies and government departments.

The topics to be discussed will include:

  • regional approaches to eye care
  • planning and performance monitoring
  • initiatives and system reforms that address vision loss
  • health promotion and education.

Contacts

Indigenous Eye Health – Minum Barreng
Level 5, 207-221 Bouverie Street
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
The University of Melbourne
Carlton Vic 3010
Ph: (03) 8344 9320
Email:

Links

17 March: Advertising bookings close: NACCHO Aboriginal Health 24 page Newspaper

Download the Rate card and make booking HERE

22 March2017 Indigenous Ear Health Workshop  in Adelaide

asohns-2017-ieh-workshop-22march2017-adelaide

The 2017 Indigenous Ear Health Workshop to be held in Adelaide in March will focus on Otitis Media (middle ear disease), hearing loss, and its significant impact on the lives of Indigenous children, the community and Indigenous culture in Australia.

The workshop will take place on 22 March 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre in Adelaide, South Australia.

The program features keynote addresses by invited speakers who will give presentations aligned with the workshop’s main objectives:

  • To identify and promote methods to strengthen primary prevention and care of Otitis Media (OM).
  • To engage and coordinate all stakeholders in OM management.
  • To summarise current and future research into OM pathogenesis (the manner in which it develops) and management.
  • To present the case for consistent and integrated funding for OM management.

Invited speakers will include paediatricians, public health physicians, ear nose and throat surgeons, Aboriginal health workers, Education Department and a psychologist, with OM and hearing updates from medical, audiological and medical science researchers.

The program will culminate in an address emphasising the need for funding that will provide a consistent and coordinated nationwide approach to managing Indigenous ear health in Australia.

Those interested in attending may include: ENT surgeons, ENT nurses, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers, audiologists, rural and regional general surgeons and general practitioners, speech pathologists, teachers, researchers, state and federal government representatives and bureaucrats; in fact anyone interested in Otitis Media.

The workshop is organised by the Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery (ASOHNS) and is held just before its Annual Scientific Meeting (23 -26 March 2017). The first IEH workshop was held in Adelaide in 2012 and subsequent workshops were held in Perth, Brisbane and Sydney.

For more information go to the ASOHNS 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting Pre-Meeting Workshops section at http://asm.asohns.org.au/workshops

Or contact:

Mrs Lorna Watson, Chief Executive Officer, ASOHNS Ltd

T: +61 2 9954 5856   or  E info@asohns.org.au

29 March: RHDAustralia Education Workshop Adelaide SA

edit

Download the PDF brochure sa-workshop-flyer

More information and registrations HERE

 

5 April: NACCHO Aboriginal Health 24 page Newspaper published in Koori

29 April : 14th World Rural Health Conference Cairns

acrrm

The conference program features streams based on themes most relevant to all rural and remote health practitioners. These include Social and environmental determinants of health; Leadership, Education and Workforce; Social Accountability and Social Capital, and Rural Clinical Practices: people and services.

Download the program here : rural-health-conference-program-no-spreads

The program includes plenary/keynote sessions, concurrent sessions and poster presentations. The program will also include clinical sessions to provide skill development and ongoing professional development opportunities :

Information Registrations HERE

10 May: National Indigenous Human Rights Awards

nihra-2017-save-the-date-invitation_version-2

” The National Indigenous Human Rights Awards recognises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who have made significant contribution to the advancement of human rights and social justice for their people.”

To nominate someone for one of the three awards, please go to https://shaoquett.wufoo.com/forms/z4qw7zc1i3yvw6/
 
For further information, please also check out the Awards Guide at https://www.scribd.com/document/336434563/2017-National-Indigenous-Human-Rights-Awards-Guide
26 May :National Sorry day 2017
bridge-walk
The first National Sorry Day was held on 26 May 1998 – one year after the tabling of the report Bringing them Home, May 1997. The report was the result of an inquiry by the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission into the removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families.
2-9 July NAIDOC WEEK
17_naidoc_logo_stacked-01

The importance, resilience and richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages will be the focus of national celebrations marking NAIDOC Week 2017.

The 2017 theme – Our Languages Matter – aims to emphasise and celebrate the unique and essential role that Indigenous languages play in cultural identity, linking people to their land and water and in the transmission of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, spirituality and rites, through story and song.

More info about events

save-a-date

If you have a Conference, Workshop or event or wish to share and promote

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Contact 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Ear Health : Tackling Aboriginal ear disease will help close the gap

close-the-gap

” We should be embarrassed that Aboriginal Australians have the world’s worst incidence of middle ear infection and the worst deafness rates because of those infections. More than 90 per cent of young Aboriginal children have hearing-aid-level deafness for much of the year and 35 per cent of central Australian Aboriginal children have perforated eardrums at any one time.

The situation is a disgrace.”

Chris Perry is president of the Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery as published

Aboriginal children develop ear infections at a younger age and are affected more severely ­than any other racial group in the world by a factor of up to three. They have harmful bacteria colonising their nose and throat very early in life. The ear infections cause a build-up of infective fluid behind the eardrums that frequently burst and result in holes in these eardrums and a purulent discharge from the ears. These eardrum perforations often do not heal and the infection can dissolve the tiny middle ear bones called the ossicles, which conduct sound to the hearing nerves.

The partial deafness from infections is devastating to a child’s language development, ­especially where English is the second language. Children who are partially deaf never fully understand the spoken word. They find it difficult to follow conversations and to listen to what a teacher is saying. They become easily bored and disillusioned at school – that’s why we see the high rates of truancy and illiteracy among them.

Poor educational results lead to poverty and high unemployment levels. If you are illiterate it is hard to move away from an isolated community with high unemployment, violence and substance abuse issues.

Damien Howard, the distinguished academic psychologist from the Northern Territory, has documented the association of deafness in Aboriginal communities with violence, substance abuse, mental illness, suicide and the high rates of Aboriginal incarceration, especially in juvenile ­detention facilities.

Many ear, nose and throat surgeons, whom I represent, pediatricians, audiologists, education­alists and Aboriginal health workers have been involved in the research of this problem as well as the important provision of interventions that help mitigate the far-reaching, devastating consequences of this true pandemic.

Multiple health department jurisdictions, health regions, universities and medical centres across rural and outer suburban Australia are aware of the issue but still today these well-intentioned ­interventions are largely untested, not always evidence-based and are rarely benchmarked.

The terrible images from the Don Dale Youth Detention Centre and the high rates of Aboriginal incarceration have been brought to the attention of ordinary Australians who, through the years, have grown accustomed to tales of truancy, substance abuse, overcrowding and youth suicide.

The association of deafness as an important but remediable root cause has been unaccountably ­ignored, especially in Closing the Gap strategies, and unfortunately this reflects badly on us, the health practitioners and researchers who should be advocating for adequate treatment of this condition.

There is no shortage of surgeons, pediatricians, audiologists, speech therapists, educationalists and health workers wanting to help. States and territories need to come together to finance interventions that work.

Sound amplification systems in classrooms, hearing aids where appropriate, the training of teachers going to communities on how to teach a class of deaf kids, timely and appropriate GP and primary healthcare interventions, and timely surgery and vaccinations within the communities do work. Preventive action and early treatments are extremely cost ­effective when considered against the effects of hearing impairment.

It costs up to $60,000 to lock up a child for a year, and that is often followed by a life of welfare dependency. Australia would save a great deal of money and raise health and wellbeing among ­Aboriginal Australians by making ear health a priority.

A recognition of the consequences of inaction on Aboriginal deafness and the risk this poses to making any progress to closing the gap is essential. It should never be normal for people to have to suffer with ear disease and deafness. I am encouraged that this past year we have had a strong show of support from parliamentarians in Canberra and across several states and territories who have pledged their support to making Aboriginal ear disease a thing of the past.

To close the gap in health, we need a definitive ­national approach to address the Aboriginal ear disease crisis. The Ear Health for Life campaign that will be launched this year will draw together stakeholders from the health, social services, education and government sectors. It will raise awareness of this terrible problem, encourage preventive and early intervention action, and advocate for a co-ordinated national approach.

A nationally co-ordinated, evidence-based, benchmarked and multi-level response to the devastating rates of Aboriginal ear disease will boost Australia’s ability to close the gap. Join us in making this the year of ear health for all.

Chris Perry is president of the Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

NACCHO Programs ” What Works ” Aboriginal Health : #FASD , Ear and Hearing , #Safeeyes and #Qumax

fasd

 ” The package of FASD Prevention and Health Promotion resources also include data system resources to facilitate routine screening and monitoring for alcohol and tobacco use in pregnancy, and screening of non-pregnant women of childbearing age, at risk of having a prenatal alcohol exposed pregnancy.”

NACCHO Report 1 below

 “The Safe Eyes trial program relies on the effective facilitation of engagement, ownership and leadership within each community to address hygiene and environmental health factors that lead to the spread of trachoma and other communicable disease.

The Safe Eyes program has been developed and implemented by each community with the success of each program evaluated and owned by those communities.”

NACCHO Report 2 Below

 ” The Ear and Hearing Health Skill Set Training was conducted over a two-week period and provided a pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers to specialise in the provision of ear and hearing health.

NACCHO coordinated 100 Aboriginal Health Worker Ear and Hearing Training which were delivered in Brisbane, Darwin, Melbourne, Cairns, Perth, Dubbo, Sydney, Kalgoorlie, Albany and Adelaide.”

NACCHO Report 3 Below

 ” The QUMAX Program aims to improve health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who attend participating Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) in major cities, inner and outer regional areas.

QUMAX achieves this through the allocation of funding to participating ACCHOs to reduce barriers experienced by their clients to Quality Use of Medicines.”

NACCHO Report 4 below

Articles are from Page 5,18,19,20 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Newspaper out Wednesday 16 November , 24 Page lift out Koori Mail : or download

naccho-newspaper-nov-2016 PDF file size 9 MB

page-1-copy

NACCHO Report 1 of 4 :Prevent and reduce the impacts of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) 

NACCHO partnered with the Menzies School of Health Research and the Telethon Kids Institute (TKI) to develop and implement health promotion resources and interventions to prevent and reduce the impacts of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and young children.

FASD is an umbrella term used to describe the range of effects that can occur in individuals whose mother consumed alcohol during pregnancy. These effects may include physical, mental, behavioral, developmental, and or learning disabilities with possible lifelong implications.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Prevention and Health Promotion Resources (FPHPR) were developed for the 85 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services (NDMBS) across Australia. These resources primarily focused on prevention of FASD, but also provide information about sexual and reproductive health, smoking and substance abuse.

The FASD project was announced by Senator the Hon Fiona Nash in June 2014 and forms part of the National FASD Action Plan to address the harmful impact of FASD on children and families.

The FPHPR Project seeks to achieve the following broad outcomes by 30 June 2017:

  • Reduced alcohol consumption during pregnancy.
  • Reduced tobacco smoking and substance misuse during pregnancy.
  • Reduced unplanned pregnancies.

The Project Partnership and Research team developed and implemented a flexible, modular package of health promotion resources and interventions based on the key components of the approach developed by the Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Services.

This includes a set of discrete FASD education and awareness modules targeting key New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services (NDMBS) client groups, including:

Pregnant women using NDMBS antenatal and other services, including  their partners and families.

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women of childbearing age.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander grandmothers.
  • NDMBS staff (including but not limited to administrative and clinical staff).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men.

The package of FASD Prevention and Health Promotion resources also include data system resources to facilitate routine screening and monitoring for alcohol and tobacco use in pregnancy, and screening of non-pregnant women of childbearing age, at risk of having a prenatal alcohol exposed pregnancy.

Participating NDMBS use this system to evaluate the impact of the FPHPR on target groups of pregnant women using NDMB antenatal and other services, including their partners and families and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men.

The FPHPR Project team facilitated FASD train-the-trainer workshops with participants from NBMBS in each State and Territory.

Approximately 100 NDMBS staff – a diverse combination of clinical service providers and administrative staff, actively participated.

Workshops included information on FASD and its prevention by content experts; orientation to the FPHPR package; interactive training and rehearsal in the use of each component of the FPHPR package developed for each key NDMBS target groups; networking opportunities and strengthening links with other relevant service providers within each jurisdiction to reduce the impact of FASD.

NACCHO 2 Report : Australian Trachoma Alliance – Safe Eyes Program

In 2014 the Australian Trachoma Alliance (ATA) assembled a forum of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations ACCHOs) to develop an Aboriginal led, community owned action plan to address hygiene and environmental health factors to reduce the incidence of trachoma and other communicable diseases.

In 2015 three trial community sites were selected with guidance through the NACCHO Board of Directors in agreement with the relevant ACCHO:

  1. Yalata (South Australia) – services provided by Tullawon Health Services Inc.
  2. Kiwirrkurra (Western Australia) – services provided by Ngaanyatjarra Health Service
  3. Utju (Areyonga, Northern Territory) – services provided by Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

The criteria for the selection of each site included trachoma prevalence rate, population and available facilities (e.g. school, health service and sporting activities).

The Model: Engagement, Ownership and Leadership

The Safe Eyes trial program relies on the effective facilitation of engagement, ownership and leadership within each community to address hygiene and environmental health factors that lead to the spread of trachoma and other communicable disease.

The Safe Eyes program has been developed and implemented by each community with the success of each program evaluated and owned by those communities.

Moving from ownership of the problem to leading the development of a solution, empowers each community to drive the change process. Furthermore, owning the problem as well as understanding the benefits of addressing it are both necessary elements to embed behaviour change processes within families, organisations and whole communities.

The Safe Eyes program model continues to require a methodical and principled approach to its ongoing implementation.

The following three program stages demonstrate the programs continuing commitment to community engagement, ownership and enabling Aboriginal Leadership.

  1. The three trial community program sites were selected with the direct guidance of the national Aboriginal health leadership through the NACCHO Board of Directors and then through following the direction and agreement of the relevant Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (ACCHO).
  2. Following the site selection phase, each trial community program has been developed through the engagement, ownership and leadership from the relevant ACCHO and other key community organisations.
  3. All three trial community sites are developing their own Safe Eyes Action Plan to address the elimination of trachoma and other hygiene-related disease. These action plans will also include locally-developed, owned and led program indicators to ensure each community will measure its own success.

The three trial communities are currently at different stages of the planning process and implementation of their action plans. However, establishing and maintaining engagement with each of the trial communities continues to require a flexible and responsive approach.

Initially, formal and informal meetings occurred across each community to discuss the objective of Safe Eyes and to facilitate discussions about issues relating to hygiene and environmental health factors.

This has led to a broader group discussion about the health benefits to the community in addressing factors to stop the spread of germs and possibilities to address the issues identified.

From this starting point, these discussions developed into action plans in each of the three trial communities which provided answers relating to necessary actions, outcome measures, required resources and identifying those needed to be responsible for the actions.

The key elements of this approach undertaken by the Safe Eyes facilitators involve:

  • Demonstrating an ongoing commitment to reinforce community ownership of the action planning.
  • Respecting traditional knowledge and values.
  • Supporting rather than directing the change process.
  • Allowing time for change to occur.

The Safe Eyes program assumes that each community’s attempt to lead and own the elimination of trachoma and other communicable disease through hygiene and environmental health actions is based on the following principles:

  • Long term investment in, and commitment to change in public health behaviours at the individual, family (home) and broader community levels.
  • Community-led and owned solutions are sustainable because they are embedded in the community itself, since these solutions have actively valued and included local context within their development.

Evaluation

An external consultant has been engaged to evaluate the Safe Eyes model of Aboriginal leadership, community engagement and ownership within the three trial community sites.

This evaluation is essential to understanding and articulating how such a model of engagement, ownership and leadership may be applied and replicated within the 140+ trachoma-at-risk communities throughout remote and regional Australia.[1] The evaluation will document and assess the significant contextual factors at each of the three trial sites that have contributed to the successful development of community engagement, ownership and Aboriginal leadership in regard to the Safe Eyes program.[2]

[1] Australian Trachoma Surveillance Report 2013. Kirby Institute. University of New South Wales: p.10.

[2] The external evaluation of the ATA’s model of engagement, ownership and leadership will be completely distinct from the identification and development of measures of success undertaken within each trial community’s action plan.

NACCHO Report 3 of 4 . Ear and Hearing Health Project

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience some of the highest levels of ear disease and hearing loss in the world, with rates up to 10 times more than those for non-Indigenous Australians.

Children and adolescents are particularly vulnerable to ear infections. The most common ear disease among Aboriginal Children is otitis media (OM), which is inflammation or infection of the middle ear, typically caused by bacterial and viralpathogens.

Ear infections are responsible for the bulk of hearing problems with lifelong consequences, many of which are preventable and treatable if diagnosed early.

Overview

NACCHOs Ear and Hearing Project, aimed to coordinate the development and delivery of Ear and Hearing Health Skill Set Training for up to 115 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers.

The Project was funded under the Commonwealth Governments ‘Improving Eye and Ear Health Services for Indigenous Australians for Better Education and Employment Outcomes’ – a COAG measure, which also supported its implementation. The overall measure aimed to improve the early detection and treatment of eye and ear health conditions in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, leading to improved education and employment outcomes.

NACCHO received funding for five phases of the project by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Section of the Department of Health.

Selecting Registered Training Organisations

Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) were selected through a rigorous selection panel process with representatives from NACCHO, Department of Health and Hearing Services Australia.

The selection process was strict and services had to meet the following criteria:

  • Be a registered training provided – preference was be given to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Registered Training Organisations (RTOs).
  • Have the capacity and scope to deliver the Ear and Hearing Skill Set for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care training.
  • Provide qualified trainer and assessors to deliver Ear and Hearing Skill Set training.
  • Deliver the training within the required timeframe – April – October 2015.
  • Provide confirmation of training dates.
  • Be willing to take on bursary scheme participant/s as part of the delivery of training.
  • Take on eligible students to complete the training (list supplied by NACCHO).
  • Deliver training within the allocated budget.
  • Supply RTO details and provider number.
  • Lodgement of proposal by the closing date.

Outcomes

Four Registered Training Organistations rated as suitable to deliver training on behalf of NACCHO.

The successful organisations were:

  1. Central Australian Remote Health Development Service Ltd, Alice Springs, Northern Territory.
  2. Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia.
  3. The Aboriginal Health College, Sydney, New South Wales.
  4. Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc.

Ear and Hearing Health Training

The Ear and Hearing Health Skill Set Training was conducted over a two-week period and provided a pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers to specialise in the provision of ear and hearing health. Additionally, the skill set units provide credit towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care qualifications at the Certificate IV level or higher.

NACCHO coordinated 100 Aboriginal Health Worker Ear and Hearing Training which were delivered in Brisbane, Darwin, Melbourne, Cairns, Perth, Dubbo, Sydney, Kalgoorlie, Albany and Adelaide.

Due to Sorry Business, minimal trainees participated in Darwin with training in Katherine cancelled all together.

NACCHO Report 4 of 4 Quality use of Medicines Maximised for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

The Quality Use of Medicines Maximised for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (QUMAX) program is a collaboration between NACCHO and the Pharmacy Guild of Australia (PGoA) with funding provided by the Commonwealth Department of Health (DoH) under the Sixth Community Pharmacy Agreement (6CPA). Through the 6CPA, the QUMAX program received 12 months funding.

What is QUMAX?

The QUMAX Program aims to improve health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who attend participating Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) in major cities, inner and outer regional areas.

QUMAX achieves this through the allocation of funding to participating ACCHOs to reduce barriers experienced by their clients to Quality Use of Medicines. There are seven support categories specified under the 6CPA:

  1. a) Dose Administration Aids Agreements b) Flexible Funding
  2. Quality Use of Medicine Pharmacy Support
  3. Home Medicine Reviews (HMR) models of support
  4. Quality Use of Medicine Devices
  5. Quality Use of Medicine Education
  6. Cultural Education
  7. Transport

In 2015-2016, QUMAX engaged with over 50 per cent of NACCHO member organisations. This equated to 76 ACCHOs across each State and Territory participating in the program reaching 219,486 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients.

Challenges

The 2015-2016 QUMAX cycle has been a particularly challenging. The delay in notification of the 6CPA caused significant delays to the time sensitive QUMAX program cycle, placing additional administrative burden on NACCHO from a National Coordination stand point; and also at the ACCHO grassroots service delivery level.

The QUMAX program team supported ACCHOs through the completion and submission of their work plans and reporting requirements for this period. Despite these challenges, all program deliverables were met.

NACCHOs, QUMAX Programme: Quality use of Medicines Maximised for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People report was published in March 2016 highlighting the value and effectiveness of QUMAX for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients of participating ACCHOs.

Funding for QUMAX is and remains capped at 11 million dollars for the five year (2010-2015) 5CPA agreement. Although funding has increased annually, it has not been sufficient in meeting the ongoing needs of patients requiring support through the program. Coupled with additional financial investment provided by ACCHOs across the 2013-2015 financial years, the report indicated that a higher level of funding is needed.

Key outcomes from the report:

  • 81 organisations participated in the QUMAX program from 2010 to 2015.
  • ACCHOs reported greater uptake of QUMAX supported activities for which funding has not kept pace.
  • Program participants are evenly distributed across major cities and inner and outer regional areas.
  • Across the seven support categories:
  • The highest proportion has been allocated to Dose Administration Aids for complex medications (50 per cent).
  • Asthma masks and spacers, nebulisers and peak flow meters are the most highly used device with over 22,500 being provided.
  • 21 per cent of funds have been used for transport assistance for clients to acquire medications. It was noted that 80 per cent of contracted pharmacies are located over one kilometre away from ACCHO clinics.
  • 508 community pharmacies participated as Dose Administration Aids contracted pharmacies.
  • Community Pharmacies actively participated in improving their own cultural awareness and support for client education on medications.

NACCHO continues to work towards ensuring the QUMAX Program, and quality use of medicine support to ACCHOs continues throughout the 6CPA.

The full report is available on the NACCHO website http://www.naccho.org.au/wp-content/uploads/QUMAX-Report-Final-2016-04-10-hiq.pdf

Learn more about these NACCHO programs  at the  NACCHO Members Conference in Melbourne

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1. NACCHO Interim 3 day Program has been released -Download
2. The dates are fast approaching – so register today
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NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Ear Health : Innovative partnership tackles hearing and speech barriers for Aboriginal kids

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When kids can’t hear in school and can’t properly participate in society it creates all kinds of problems. Their language skills don’t develop as quickly, they don’t sleep well, they have to take more time off, they can misbehave and their education can fall behind,”

“I’m really pleased that we are no longer just talking about the problems; instead we are helping to change the record for hundreds of kids and their families thanks to the HEALS program. This offers a model to help close the gap that has been shown to work – it’s a good news story for improving urban Aboriginal child health “

CEO of Campbelltown’s Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation Mr Darryl Wright said delivering ENT and speech-language services to at-risk Aboriginal children was life-changing.

Picture above : SEARCH participant Marla Rai Lett

The SEARCH partners are: The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council, the Sax Institute, leading researchers across Australian universities and four Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services:

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation (Campbelltown),  Awabakal Ltd (Newcastle), Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation (Wagga Wagga) and Aboriginal Medical Service Western Sydney (Mt Druitt).

Hundreds of urban Aboriginal children have benefited from an innovative partnership program established to tackle speech and hearing difficulties, in a model that could be part of a broader solution for long-term health.

Established in 2013, the Hearing EAr health and Language Services (HEALS) program is a partnership between Aboriginal community controlled health services, researchers and hospitals in NSW. Funded by NSW Health, it has delivered over 7000 speech and language services and ear operations to almost 800 urban Aboriginal children. These services have been delivered by the Sydney Childrens’ Hospitals Network.

A new research paper published today in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health shows it is a model that could be scaled up to benefit even more Aboriginal kids and families.

HEALS is an outcome of the largest ongoing study of urban Aboriginal children ever conducted, the Study of Environment on Aboriginal Resilience and Child health (SEARCH). SEARCH, which involves 1600 urban Aboriginal children and their families, provided the first robust data that over 40% of children under 8 had significant speech and language impairments and/or ear health problems.

The study was able to identify children attending the participating community controlled health services who were in most need of hearing and speech services.

SEARCH directly addresses the huge information gap about the health of urban Aboriginal families, which exists even though more than three quarters of Aboriginal people in NSW live in urban areas.

Dr Hasantha Gunasekera, a paediatrician from The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, co-ordinates HEALS delivery of surgery and speech and language services.

“Indigenous children experience middle ear disease earlier, more often and with more complications than non-Indigenous children. Left untreated it can lead to hearing loss, speech and language delays and hamper the kids’ ability to learn,” he said.

“The partnership model in this program is what makes the HEALS model work so effectively. Working together, and with funding from the NSW Ministry of Health, we have almost eliminated the waiting lists at the centres where we are working.”

SEARCH Study Director Dr Sumi Mutthaya who is based at the Sax Institute – one of SEARCH’s founding partners – said the success of the HEALS program showed the importance of developing long-term research partnerships like SEARCH, to improve Aboriginal health and wellbeing.

“SEARCH aims to do much more than better understand the causes of ill-health and disease among urban Aboriginal children – it’s designed so that the information is actually put to use to drive real improvements in services and health outcomes for Aboriginal people. This is exactly what is happening with the HEALS program.”

Find out more

About SEARCH

The Study of Environment on Aboriginal Resilience and Child Health (SEARCH) is creating a long-term platform for closing the gap. The largest ongoing study of urban Aboriginal children ever conducted, SEARCH aims to do two equally important things: better understand the causes of health and disease among urban Aboriginal children and their families; and use this information to drive real improvements in services and health outcomes for Aboriginal people. It is an active partnership between Aboriginal health services and researchers, where health services set the research priorities and guide how data is collected, interpreted and used.

The SEARCH partners are: The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council, the Sax Institute, leading researchers across Australian universities and four Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services: Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation (Campbelltown), Awabakal Ltd (Newcastle), Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation (Wagga Wagga) and Aboriginal Medical Service Western Sydney (Mt Druitt).

NACCHO #NTRC Aboriginal Children’s Health : Update this weeks community consultations Royal Commission #DonDaleKids

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Indigenous infants were still suffering damage to brain growth from the impact on parenting on the colonial frontier with “trans-generational psychic trauma” disabling normal pathways of neurological maturation and effecting the capacity to manage stress.

A back of the envelope extrapolation on the figures of keeping children in detention or out-of-home care was also in the tens of millions,”

Paediatrician and Emeritus Professor at the University of Newcastle, John Boulton

Picture above : The Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory was told by several speakers at a public meeting in Darwin that the Department of Families and Children was “broken” and should be shut. Photo: Glenn Campbell Reported by SMH

Next weeks Community Consultations

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Eighty per cent of boys at the controversial Don Dale Youth Detention Centre had been sexually abused prior to their incarceration.

This was one of the bewildering claims made at a public meeting in Darwin where speaker after speaker attacked NT governments for cutting funds to child protection and allowing generations of public servants to take Indigenous children away from families reports by SMH Damien Murphy          

Many said the Department of Families and Children was “broken” and should be shut.

Most demanded that care of Indigenous children be the sole preserve of kin and were highly critical of favouritism given to white foster families who they claimed were not subjected to the same checks and balances by a public service culture that existed to perpetuate itself.

“You want to know why our kids end up in Don Dale? This is a new generation of stolen children,” a woman who said she had been subjected to undue red tape when applying to take a relative into care.

Stuart Davidson, the first deputy superintendent of Don Dale, said 80 per cent of teenagers under his care at the centre had been sexually abused prior to their incarceration.

“The system just didn’t recognise the trauma it is dealing with. And gradually those charged with looking after the boys started to reflect the lack of care of the management and, ultimately, the politicians.”

Welfare worker Lindsay Ah Mat said political parties courted the black vote when it suited them: “But soon as they get it they piss all over us.”

The meeting on Friday at Darwin’s Marrara Sports Complex was called by the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory as part of its community consultation program. It followed three days of public hearings this week.

The royal commission came in the wake of a July Four Corners program with footage showing teenagers at the Don Dale being tear gassed and one in a spit hood handcuffed to a chair.

One of the whistleblowers behind the Four Corners report, Darwin lawyer John Lawrence, told Fairfax Media the royal commission was on track to succeed where scores of other government inquiries on child protection had failed.

“This royal commission exists due to the failure of those in authority in the Territory to stand up for what is right,” he said.

“We’re all guilty. Lawyers, judges, politicians … We’re supposed to protect society. How did we get to a place where a spit hood is an appropriate way to treat a child? Years of complacency gave way to complicity and now process and budgets have usurped principles and ethics.”

The elite of the NT legal fraternity on Tuesday gathered in the NT Parliament just hours after the royal commission sat for the first time in the neighbouring Supreme Court building. One of the few Indigenous people present, James Parfitt, gave a welcome to country and then the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Victoria, Marilyn Warren, delivered an oration honouring Austin Asche, a doyen of the Darwin legal establishment, on the topic of young people offending in which she tip-toed around the royal commission.

Down the road in Mitchell Street, an Irish pub and restaurants Thailicious, Hunaman and Monsoon chased tourist dollars while Indigenous men and women sat on footpaths begging, singing and playing clapsticks, their songs drowned out by Neil Diamond and Dire Straits on sound systems.

Life went on in Darwin as if the royal commission was some unwanted outsider. Local media carried the stories but not prominently. One witness, Lowitja Institute chairwoman, Pat Anderson, suggested to the commission the dearth of local interest was shown by the fact that a crocodile story was on the morning’s NT News front page. A desultory process was staged the first day outside the Supreme Court.

The first three days of hearings saw bureaucrats and health professionals give evidence of the plethora of reports carried out on child protection for NT governments. Many were shelved or not acted upon. Meanwhile, funds to child welfare agencies continued to be cut by the federal governments and the Darwin administration failed to step in.

Commissioners were also told of the role that hearing loss and foetal alcohol spectrum disorder had come to play in the lives of teenagers in detention in the NT.

Paediatrician and Emeritus Professor at the University of Newcastle, John Boulton, cited research he conducted in the Kimberley on foetal alcohol spectrum disorder saying communities were breaking down, especially since the 1980s when women started drinking.

“A back of the envelope extrapolation on the figures of keeping children in detention or out-of-home care was also in the tens of millions,” Professor Boulton said.

He said Indigenous infants were still suffering damage to brain growth from the impact on parenting on the colonial frontier with “trans-generational psychic trauma” disabling normal pathways of neurological maturation and effecting the capacity to manage stress.

Commissioners also heard 94 per cent of Indigenous prisoners suffered impaired hearing and research found six out of 10 boys at the notorious Don Dale Detention Centre had hearing difficulties.

A deaf Indigenous community consultant, Jodie Barney, slammed the use of spit hoods and handcuffs on young offenders shown on Four Corners.

“I have had a few young people who have had a spit hood and they have also been bound. So therefore their form of communication is lost in every sense of the word,” she said.

The commission continues with community consultation meetings next week and will conduct further hearings next month.

How you can share  stories about Aboriginal Community Controlled Health issues ? Closing this week

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NACCHO #NTRC Royal Commission and Aboriginal Health : #FASD , Malnutrition, hearing and #mentalhealth are major factors

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 ” The profoundly damaging consequences of heavy drinking by pregnant women, malnutrition in early childhood and intergenerational “psychic trauma” are neither properly diagnosed nor treated in Aborigines coming into contact with the law, a royal commission has heard.

The effects of these conditions, which can stunt a child for life, meant affected youngsters were both more likely to become involved in criminal activity and less likely to benefit from punitive forms of rehabilitation.”

As reported in the Australian today

 ” Studies linked FAS-D to a “profound level of social morbidity in terms of violence, engagement in the justice system, depression, suicidal thoughts, suicide, very low chance of meaningful occupation and a very high risk of being in prison as adults requiring mental institution and support with drug addiction

Professor Boulton and NACCHO FASD Articles

 ” Most infants with FASD are irritable, have trouble eating and sleeping, are sensitive to sensory stimulation, and have a strong startle reflex. They may hyperextend their heads or limbs with hypertonia (too much muscle tone) or hypotonia (too little muscle tone) or both. Some infants may have heart defects or suffer anomalies of the ears, eyes, liver, or joints.

Adults with FASD have difficulty maintaining successful independence. They have trouble staying in school, keeping jobs, or sustaining healthy relationships. They require long-term support and some degree of supervision in order to succeed. “

Make FASD History  Image above a full story see below

 “Many boys caught up in the Northern Territory’s juvenile justice system suffer a “disease of disadvantage” that has crippled almost every aspect of their lives, the Northern Territory’s royal commission into youth detention and protection has heard.

Jody Barney, who works as a deaf indigenous community consultant, told the inquiry she has spoken to several young Aboriginal people with hearing impairments who have had their faces covered by spit hoods and bound behind bars.

News Report

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The Royal Commission website is available at https://www.childdetentionnt.royalcommission.gov.au.

Moreover they were perpetuating, meaning the effects could be passed through neurological and genetic means from generation to generation, the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the NT heard today.

The Commission looks likely to probe these effects more deeply, following depressing but insightful evidence given by University of Newcastle professor of pediatrics John Boulton, who clearly captured the commissioners’ interest.

“I think the Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder issue, together with the evidence that we have had this afternoon about deafness, throws such a complexion upon the participation of so many of these children in the criminal justice system, not to mention the child protection system, that we need to look at this carefully,” Commissioner Margaret White said.

“I think it’s fairly original inasmuch as the other many reports that we’ve been exposed to … have not had an opportunity to consider these areas of study.”

Professor Boulton told the Commission there was an urgent need for FAS-D and to be recognised under the National Disability Insurance Scheme. He said estimates in Canada of the lifelong cost of treating the condition reached into the millions of dollars.

“If there are one or two per cent of the total population of whom a fraction are severely affected with FASD, and therefore suffer the huge mental health and other subsequent complications and disabilities with FASD, then we are talking about an enormous burden to the overall Australian community in the tens of millions of dollars,” he said.

Studies linked FAS-D to a “profound level of social morbidity in terms of violence, engagement in the justice system, depression, suicidal thoughts, suicide, very low chance of meaningful occupation and a very high risk of being in prison as adults requiring mental institution and support with drug addiction” Professor Boulton continued.

He likened FAS-D to the thalidomide disaster, heavy metal poisoning or radiation sickness.

Professor Boulton said progress had been made through alcohol restrictions brought about in the Kimberley towns of Halls Creek and Fitzroy Crossing by local women. He said the restrictions had produced a “massive reduction in the amount of violence and of women seeking refuge”, and that there was evidence young children were growing better.

Earlier in the day the Commission was told many Aboriginal youngsters from the remotest areas suffered hearing problems related to ear infections in early life. In one example retold before the Commission, a boy before court had been crash tackled by a guard who thought he was trying to escape, when in fact the boy simply hadn’t heard an instruction.

Deafness holding NT’s indigenous kids back

Many boys caught up in the Northern Territory’s juvenile justice system suffer a “disease of disadvantage” that has crippled almost every aspect of their lives, the Northern Territory’s royal commission into youth detention and protection has heard.

Jody Barney, who works as a deaf indigenous community consultant, told the inquiry she has spoken to several young Aboriginal people with hearing impairments who have had their faces covered by spit hoods and bound behind bars.

“Taking away another sense from a person who already has a limited sense is frightening. And that fear stays forever… long after their sentence,” she said.

Footage of boys being tear gassed, shackled and put in spit hoods at Don Dale Youth Detention Centre was aired on national television in July, sparking the royal commission

Psychologist Damien Howard told the inquiry a chronic housing shortage is creating an “epidemic” of hearing loss in indigenous children that leads to learning difficulties, family breakdown and criminal involvement.

“It’s very much a disease of disadvantage,” Dr Howard told Darwin’s Supreme Court.

Crowded housing overwhelms a child’s capacity to maintain hygiene, allows infections to pass quickly, and increases exposure to cigarette smoke and loud noises, while the poverty limits nutrition.

On average, non-Aboriginal kids experience middle ear disease for three months of their childhood while indigenous children can get fluctuating hearing loss for more than two years.

This can result in a permanent condition, which Dr Howard says is a “smoking gun” leading to over-representation in the criminal justice system.

Make FASD History

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) are 100% preventable. If a woman doesn’t drink alcohol while she is pregnant, her child cannot have FASD.

There is a humanitarian crisis in the Fitzroy Valley region of remote North Western Australia, which has one of the highest Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) in the world.

The effects of alcohol on the fetal brain are a common cause of intellectual impairment in developed countries. Problems that may occur in babies exposed to alcohol before birth include low birth weight, distinctive facial features, heart defects, behavioural problems and intellectual disability.

Most infants with FASD are irritable, have trouble eating and sleeping, are sensitive to sensory stimulation, and have a strong startle reflex. They may hyperextend their heads or limbs with hypertonia (too much muscle tone) or hypotonia (too little muscle tone) or both. Some infants may have heart defects or suffer anomalies of the ears, eyes, liver, or joints.

Adults with FASD have difficulty maintaining successful independence. They have trouble staying in school, keeping jobs, or sustaining healthy relationships. They require long-term support and some degree of supervision in order to succeed.

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Bright Blue is very proud to partner with Nindilingarri Cultural Health Services to support the development and implementation of a comprehensive, evidence-based prevention and community capacity building programme, which aims to make FASD history.

The outcomes of this programme will work to:

  • Improve the health, quality of life and social and economic potential for the next generation of Fitzroy Valley children, and thus the fabric of the community itself;
  • Identify practical strategies that can be implemented elsewhere in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities to reduce and eliminate FASD;
  • Make WA a leader in FASD prevention;
  • Decrease costs associated with service provision, productivity, welfare and justice.

stacks_image_6848Led by Aboriginal community leaders Maureen Carter and June Oscar; and Paediatrician Dr James Fitzpatrick, it is important that the leadership of the Marulu strategy reflects the community ownership of the process.

Bright Blue needs your support to assist in prevention and capacity building, to develop an effective community – level support for women to abstain from drinking during pregnancy and child bearing years, so that all babies born in this community and across Australia have a full potential for a long and productive life.

Become a part of history. Together, let’s make FASD history.

The inquiry led by co-commissioners Margaret White and Mick Gooda continues.

NACCHO Aboriginal #ear Health : Aboriginal kids have the highest otitis media rates in the world

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 “Indigenous children are at a significantly higher risk of otitis media and hearing loss compared to non-Indigenous children. One study found Indigenous children were five times more likely to be diagnosed with severe otitis media than their non-Indigenous counterparts. During the eight-year period studied, Indigenous children saw the GP for discharge in their ear 40 times more than non-Indigenous children.”

Author Amanda Leach : Professor. Leader of the Ear Health Research Program (EHRP), Child Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research writing for the Conversation

This article is the final in our three-part series on blinding, deafening and sometimes deadly conditions in Indigenous Australian children that have little to no impact on their non-Indigenous counterparts. The previous articles looked at trachoma and rheumatic heart disease.


Aboriginal children have the highest rates of otitis media, a middle ear infection that causes hearing loss, than any other people in the world.

The main forms of the disease include acute otitis media, also known as a bulging eardrum; otitis media with effusion, commonly known as glue ear; and chronic suppurative otitis media, known as runny ear, which describes the pus discharged when a bulging eardrum bursts.

In 1996 – the most recent year comparative global data is available – the World Health Organisation reported that the prevalence chronic otitis media was highest in the Inuit (Eskimo) and Australian Aboriginal populations: at around 12% to 46%.

This was followed by Native Americans at 4% to 8%; South Pacific Islanders, Africans, Koreans and Indians at around 2% to 6%; and was lowest in United States and United Kingdom, at less than 1%.

The World Health Organisation considers a prevalence of 4% in the population of runny ears or chronic otitis media as a massive public health problem requiring urgent attention. Tragically, almost all Aboriginal children (90%) in remote areas have some form of otitis media: 50% have glue ear, 30% have acute otitis media, and around 15% have runny ears.


Hearing loss can have a significant impact on the person’s life trajectory, including academic achievement and employment prospects. Marianna Massey/AAP Image

Hearing loss and life trajectory

Otitis media is caused by multiple strains of three bacteria: Streptococcus pneumoniae, non-typeable Haemophilus infleunzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. These are common in the nasal passages of young children.

Indigenous children are at a significantly higher risk of otitis media and hearing loss compared to non-Indigenous children. One study found Indigenous children were five times more likely to be diagnosed with severe otitis media than their non-Indigenous counterparts. During the eight-year period studied, Indigenous children saw the GP for discharge in their ear 40 times more than non-Indigenous children.

The longer the infection is left untreated, the further risk it poses to hearing. The hearing loss associated with otitis media causes delayed language and speech, behavioural problems and social isolation; poor school attendance and low levels of literacy and numeracy; poor employment opportunities and increased poverty.

In fact, the issue of hearing is the most prevalent barrier to educational attainment for Indigenous children in the Northern Territory. In the NT in 2007 to 2011, 53% of Indigenous children receiving audiology services had some kind of hearing loss and 33% had a hearing impairment.

Shockingly, around 90% of Indigenous people incarcerated in the Northern Territory have hearing loss, which may have influenced their trajectory or compromised their communications with the justice system.



The Conversation, CC BY-ND

Prevention and treatment

Overcrowded housing and exposure to tobacco smoke can increase the risk of otitis media. There are several methods of preventing otitis media from occuring. As it is a bacterial infection, hygiene is vital to containing its spread. There are also vaccines to prevent infections caused by particular strains of bacteria.

Many otitis media episodes can be prevented by breastfeeding during the first six months of life. Exclusive breastfeeding in this period is associated with around a 43% reduction of acute otitis media in the first two years of life.

Accurate diagnosis is needed to determine the type of otitis media the child has in order to provide correct management. Preventing perforation of the ear drum in acute otitis media is a key goal of treatment, as this causes a higher level of hearing loss and is very difficult to treat.


Preventing perforation of the ear drum in acute otitis media is a key goal of treatment. Wikimedia Commons

Perforations can persist for months or years, severely affecting the child’s linguistic, social and academic development. Children under two with the infection in both ears are at greatest risk of progression to the chronic form of the disease.

To prevent this, acute otitis media (a bulging ear drum) in Indigenous children should be treated with antibiotics; specifics depending on the diagnosis and the likelihood of the condition worsening. The duration and dose of antibiotic (amoxycillin) may need to increase if the infection does not improve.

A child with persistent otitis media for three months or more should have a hearing test. The child may need hearing aids if there are concerns about normal language development or behaviour problems. They may also need surgery, where devices known as tympanostomy tubes (grommets) are inserted into the ear drum to prevent accumulation of fluid.

Perforations with discharging pus are more difficult to treat than other forms of otitis media, due to the extended spectrum of bacteria – nasal as well as those from the external environment – involved. Up to 16 weeks of twice daily cleaning and antibiotic drops are needed.

This can cure the infection, but the perforation is unlikely to heal, so the middle ear remains vulnerable to infections. Surgery may repair the tympanic membrane but these procedures have not been rigorously evaluated for Aboriginal children.

The early and persistent disease throughout childhood is depriving children of the opportunity to learn, to have self esteem and to reach their full potential.

NACCHO Aboriginal Ear Health : Specialists declare war on ear diseases affecting Indigenous kids

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” The chronic problem was not factored into “Closing the Gap’’ practical reconciliation metrics and even the Australian Medical Association ignored the problem, “but it should be part of gap closure, because as many as 90 per cent of Aboriginal children … have deafness more than three months of the year.”

Brisbane-based ENT surgeon Chris Perry, president of the Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery

Photo: Peter Maloney has his ears checked by NCACCH worker Nichole Weeks.

FROM Chronic middle ear infection treatments for Indigenous people could help close gap: surgeon

Read 24 NACCHO Ear and Hearing stories HERE

Ear, nose and throat specialists have declared war on one of the most preventable and treatable conditions undermining the wellbeing and learning of Aboriginal children — serious ear disease reports Tess Livingstone in the Australian today

“The incidence is seasonal,’’ Dr Perry said. “In the Northern Territory, about 25 per cent have perforated eardrums and in the APY lands of South Australia it is 35 per cent, many times the incidence in caucasian children. It’s responsible for delayed language development, difficulty with comprehension, boredom and inattention at school … and is a major contributing factor to truancy.’’

In turn, poor hearing and poor school performance set up a cycle of poor skills, unemployment, substance abuse, violence, high incarceration rates and suicide.

‘They are not being ignorant, they are deaf’

The Maloney family

Dr Perry and more than 20 other Queensland ENT surgeons regularly spend several weeks a year in indigenous communities, performing up to 10 operations a day to clear children’s ears and remove adenoids to reduce reinfections. They work as part of Queensland’s Deadly Ears program, which visits people in remote communities regularly.

On Wednesday, ENT specialists, audiologists, Aboriginal health workers, scientists and administrators will meet in Newcastle to discuss middle-ear infections and a proposed national initiative to standardise an evidence-based approach to the infections, deafness and its educational effects and to hear from Australia’s only indigenous ENT specialist, Kelvin Kong, a member of the Worimi people of Port Stephens, north of Newcastle.

Dr Perry cited a Senate committee report released in May 2010 that concluded indigenous Australians suffered deafness and ear problems at 10 times the rate of non-indigenous Australians.

“Little has been done since then,’’ Dr Perry said. He believed Queensland’s Deadly Ears program would serve as an ideal model to start from, but Aboriginal communities needed a program specifically designed for their circumstances.

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NACCHO Aboriginal #EarHealth : New annual plan to tackle Indigenous ear disease released

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Hearing problems can have a major effect on a person’s journey through life and sadly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children have one of the highest rates of middle ear disease in the world. This often means they have a conductive hearing loss.

“What is worse is that middleear disease, or otitis media, is most common in the earliest years of a child’s life, when hearing is crucial to development and learning.

Minister for Health and Ambulance Services Cameron Dick

“Many primary healthcare providers, including the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled health sector and the Royal Flying Doctor Service are strong supporters of Deadly Kids, Deadly Futures 2016-2026 and have committed to undertake a range of activities to strengthen health promotion, prevention and primary healthcare management,” .

“Early management of the disease in the primary health setting, including ensuring ear and hearing health screens are included in all routine child health checks, is the best way to ensure children can hear, talk and learn.”

Matthew Brown, Director of Children’s Health Queensland’s Deadly Ears Program

For the first time in Queensland, the health, education and early childhood sectors will combine in a joint annual plan to fight ear disease and associated hearing loss impacting Indigenous children.

Download Deadly Ears Action Plan here : deadly-kids-action-plan

Queensland’s new 12 month action plan to improve the ear and hearing health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children was released today.

Minister for Health and Ambulance Services Cameron Dick said the Deadly Kids, Deadly Futures Action Plan 2016-17 was an important step in the Palaszczuk Government’s landmark 10year commitment to closing the gap in health and education outcomes for Indigenous children.

“The Deadly Kids, Deadly Futures: Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Ear and Hearing Health Framework 2016-2026 launched in March 2016 aims to prevent and manage the high rates of middleear disease and associated hearing loss,” Mr Dick said.

“The 2016-17 action plan outlines 18 practical initiatives Queensland Health, the Department of Education and Training and nongovernment service providers will undertake to ensure Indigenous children across Queensland have healthy ears and can listen, learn and reach their full potential,” Mr Dick said.

These initiatives will lead to measureable and practical on the ground service improvements across the health, early childhood and schooling sectors”.

Minister for Education Kate Jones said the early childhood and schooling initiatives in the 2016-17 action plan ranged from developing child health resources for early childhood education and care providers, to advocating for amendments to the Building Code of Australia.

She said the plan also seeks to develop information sharing protocols between schools and local healthcare providers so teachers can provide targeted support to children with ear and hearing health problems.

The commitment demonstrated by our nongovernment partners, in particular the Queensland Catholic Education Commission and Independent Schools Queensland, to introduce consistent service delivery and workforce improvements across the schooling sector, has been very helpful.”

Matthew Brown, Director of Children’s Health Queensland’s Deadly Ears program responsible for coordinating the delivery of the 2016-17 action plan, said there was a strong focus on supporting primary healthcare providers to embed ear and hearing health into all primary healthcare provided to children.

The Deadly Kids, Deadly Futures framework builds on the foundations of the award winning Deadly Ears program which had seen considerable improvements in Indigenous child ear health over the past eight years.

Since launching the statewide service, the team has conducted more than 12,200 assessments of children at ENT clinics in remote and rural areas and provided ear health training to more than 1,000 local service providers across Queensland.