NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #DiabetesWeek #NDW2018 With Key Messages from @DiabetesAus @RuralDoctorsAus It’s About Time’ aims to raise awareness about the importance of early detection and early treatment for all types of diabetes

 ” Too many Australians especially Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are being diagnosed with diabetes too late. This is true for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The delay in diagnosis is putting many people at risk of major life-threatening health problems.

Early diagnosis, treatment, ongoing support and management can reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications.

Diabetes:

  • is the leading cause of blindness in adults
  • is a leading cause of kidney failure
  • is the leading cause of preventable limb amputations
  • increases the risk of heart attacks and stroke by up to four times

It’s About Time we detected all types of diabetes earlier and save lives

See the itsabouttime.org.au for more info

 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.”

Read over 140 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Diabetes articles published over past 6 years

Part 1

More info HERE

Or watch NDSS Video HERE

 ” This National Diabetes Week, the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) is urging rural and remote Australians to be alert for the early signs of diabetes, and to see their doctor as soon as possible if they are showing any symptoms.

RDAA is also urging those living in the bush to undertake preventative health checks to try to minimise the modifiable risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes, like being physically inactive, smoking, having a poor diet, and being overweight or obese ”

RDAA President, Dr Adam Coltzau see Part 2 Below

 ” Digital technology is changing the way people living in regional and remote communities access information, and now there’s a new app to help people with diabetes.

Taken directly from a program used in 70 touchscreen kiosks throughout Australia, the Diabetes Story is a health information module developed specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can download the app at www.diabetesstory.info

See Part 3 Below

Part 2 Rural Doctors Press Release

“The theme of National Diabetes Week this year, It’s About Time, reflects the fact that too many Australians are being diagnosed with diabetes too late” RDAA President, Dr Adam Coltzau, said.

“In the case of Type 1 diabetes, late diagnosis can be life-threatening.

“And with any type of diabetes, early diagnosis, treatment and ongoing management can reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications.

“There are various types of diabetes, including:

Type 1 diabetes (an auto-immune disease which is not linked to modifiable lifestyle factors, cannot be prevented or currently cured, and is more commonly diagnosed in childhood)

Type 2 diabetes (which is associated with modifiable lifestyle risk factors and usually develops in adults over the age of 45 years, but is increasingly occurring in younger age groups including children)

“Symptoms for both these types can include excessive thirst, passing more urine, feeling tired and lethargic, and always feeling hungry — though many people with Type 2 diabetes often display no symptoms at diagnosis.

“Gestational diabetes is another form of diabetes, which typically affects between 12% and 14% of pregnant women and usually occurs around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy.

“People who develop Type 1 diabetes will typically need to go onto insulin therapy for life (or until a cure is found), delivered either by multiple daily injections or via an insulin pump attached to their body.

“While Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented, Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented in up to 58 per cent of cases.

“Preventative health care starts with visiting your doctor for check ups and identification of early signs of Type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes.

“Maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active and following a healthy eating plan, as well as managing blood pressure, cholesterol levels and not smoking, all help to prevent Type 2 diabetes from developing.

“Should Type 2 diabetes develop, early detection and management through lifestyle modifications is key to minimising its impact, as well as ensuring the early detection and treatment of any complications.

“If you have immediate concerns that you may have diabetes, make an appointment with your local GP, community nurse or diabetes educator to get it checked out sooner rather than later.”

Part 3 There’s a new app to help people with diabetes

Digital technology is changing the way people living in regional and remote communities access information, and now there’s a new app to help people with diabetes.

Taken directly from a program used in 70 touchscreen kiosks throughout Australia, the Diabetes Story is a health information module developed specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can download the app at www.diabetesstory.info

It uses digital technology to explain a complex issue in a direct, interesting way that encourages people “to take charge of their diabetes”.  It is an interactive self-management module that delivers culturally appropriate health and wellbeing diabetes information.

Consumers can use it on their mobile phones while health workers and educators will be able to use it on tablets to conduct mediated diabetes education sessions, and to provide further support for self-management.

The six domains are:

  1. a)  What is diabetes
  2. b)  Managing diabetes
  3. c)  Fighting diabetes
  4. d)  Diabetes in Pregnancy
  5. e)  Personal Stories
  6. f)   Where to get help

The App also has an audio function.

The Diabetes Story, both the module and App, has been a collaborative partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations such as the Victorian Aboriginal community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS), Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in North Queensland, as well as Diabetes Victoria, Diabetes Qld and Diabetes Australia.

The Diabetes Story project is funded under the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS), an initiative of the Australian Government administered with the help of Diabetes Australia.

 

 

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