NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce : Download National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Strategic Framework (2016‐2023

 

 ” This National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Strategic Framework (2016‐2023) (the Framework) is a mechanism to guide national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce policy and planning.

The Framework focuses on prioritisation, target setting and monitoring of progress against growing and developing the capacity of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

It will assist in contributing to the needs of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce across all service delivery areas (both public and private), including: social and emotional wellbeing; drug and alcohol; and the mental health workforce.”

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The Framework has been developed by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Working Group (ATSIHWWG), a working group of the Health Workforce Principal Committee of the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council, with input from key Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health stakeholders.

The structural approach to the Framework has been to define a vision, guiding principles and strategies for action. The vision is the direction in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce effort should be focused, the principles are the underlying fundamentals that will guide strategic action to achieve the vision and the strategies are the planned actions that will deliver the vision.

The principles are the core of the Framework and the application of the principles to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce policy will be critical to the Framework’s success. The purpose of the principles is to provide a set of guidelines that will be applicable to all stakeholders, and applied by all stakeholders to health workforce policy.

The strategies outline actions that can be used to implement the vision. The strategies are deliberately broad to encompass the wide range of actions that may be undertaken by stakeholders nationally, within jurisdictions, within particular locations and within sectors of the health system.

Stakeholder partnership and collaboration will be essential to the delivery of the vision and the implementation of the Framework principles. It is anticipated that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce policy will be better coordinated across government, service settings, professional groups and the education, training and regulation sectors so as to maximise investment in its health workforce.

ATSIHWWG acknowledges and appreciates the commitment of all stakeholders in developing the Framework.

Aims

The Framework aims to contribute to the achievement of equitable health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through building a strong and supported health workforce that has appropriate clinical and non-clinical skills to provide culturally‑safe and responsive health care.

Implementation of the Framework is expected to contribute to the delivery of the following outcomes:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people being strongly represented across all health disciplines;
  • The representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the health workforce being proportional to the composition of the total population;
  • A health workforce that is able to adapt to changing health needs and service delivery environments;
  • Health workforce planning that optimises access to health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
  • Workplaces that attract, encourage and develop the talents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals;
  • A collaborative approach to health workforce development that involves all relevant stakeholders;
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals are supported to lead the development of social, human, economic and cultural capital within the health workforce;
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals playing a vital role in enhancing the Aboriginal health workforce capability through a range of career pathways;
  • Non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals recognise the trained skill sets and cultural knowledge of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce; and
  • Best practice training to build a culturally-safe and responsive health workforce.
  • Achieving these outcomes will require leadership at all levels of government and across the health service delivery and education sectors. Through leadership, effective resources are allocated and partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and relevant organisations are developed and maintained.

Key policy linkages

The Framework has been developed within the overall policy context of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 (the Health Plan), and its specific goal to ensure that Australia has a health system that delivers clinically‑appropriate care that is culturally safe, non-discriminatory and free from racism, high quality, responsive and accessible for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Health Plan provides a long-term, evidence-based strategic policy framework as part of the overarching Council of Australian Governments’ (COAG) approach to closing the gap in Indigenous disadvantage, which was set out in the National Indigenous Reform Agreement (NIRA) signed in 2008.

The NIRA was established to frame the task of closing the gap in Indigenous disadvantage. It sets out the objectives, outcomes, outputs, performance indicators and performance benchmarks agreed by COAG.  The Agreement is centred on five priority areas: tackling smoking; providing a healthy transition to adulthood; making Indigenous health everyone’s business; delivering effective primary health care services; and better coordinating the patient journey through the health system.

The Health Plan is complemented by its Implementation Plan, which addresses the broad changes needed to make the health system more comprehensive, culturally safe and effective. The Implementation Plan recognises that building Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce capability is a key component of building health systems effectiveness.  The Framework is acknowledged as the principal reference for supporting, growing and increasing the capability of the current and future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

Cross‑portfolio linkages for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce

There are links at the Commonwealth level between the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Department of Education and Training, Department of Human Services and the Department of Health and corresponding Ministries within states and territories.

The Department of Education and Training is the policy lead on Indigenous higher education. The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet is responsible for administering programs that support the Government’s policy objectives in this area.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Partnership Forums

Members of the Forums include the Commonwealth Department of Health, state and territory governments, and local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health peak bodies. Other invited guests include Primary Health Networks, and representatives from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

State and Territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce plans

States and territories have developed jurisdictional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce strategies and action plans. ATSIHWWG provides a forum for states and territories to articulate and report against jurisdictional work plans to address health workforce development strategies.  Through ATSIHWWG, jurisdictions report annually to the Health Workforce Principal Committee against agreed performance indicators, including the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people working in health roles and the numbers training towards health workforce qualifications.

Cultural Respect Framework

This Framework is consistent with the Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, which commits the Commonwealth government and all states and territories to embedding cultural respect principles into their health systems; from developing policy and legislation, to how organisations are run, through to the planning and delivery of services.   The Cultural Respect Framework will guide and underpin the delivery of culturally‑safe, responsive, and quality health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and contribute to progress made towards achieving the Closing the Gap targets agreed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG).

Higher education

For the purpose of the Framework, ‘higher education’ refers to all post-secondary study, including vocational education and training.

The publication Pathways into the Health Workforce for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: A Blueprint for Action was prepared for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council in 2008, and remains a key policy reference for maximising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation in the health workforce.  It discusses strategies for promoting and improving pathways between school, vocational education, training and higher education; and retaining and building the capacity of the existing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

The Review of Australian Higher Education (2008) was established to address whether the higher education sector positions Australia to compete effectively in the new globalised economy.  The Review concluded that while the system has great strengths, it faces significant challenges.

The Review recommended major reforms to the financing and regulatory frameworks for higher education and establishment of initiatives to increase both the enrolment of, and success of, students from disadvantaged backgrounds, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. The Review recommended that the Government regularly review the effectiveness of measures to improve higher education access and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Review of Higher Education Access and Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People (2012) builds on the Review of Australian Higher Education and examines how improving higher education outcomes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people will contribute to nation building and reduce Indigenous disadvantage.  The Review proposed a profound shift in the way that higher education institutions, governments and other education providers approach Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander higher education.  The Review envisaged a future with more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander professionals in decision-making roles across government, professions and industry, and in which our higher education institutions value and embed Indigenous knowledges and perspectives.  It challenges leaders and policy makers to lift their aspirations and work to establish higher education as a natural pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

In December 2015, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Advisory Council released its recommendations to progress priority areas in Indigenous higher education. The Council identified the need for better connections between policies and program responses across the education cycle from early childhood, through schooling and post-school education, which clearly places higher education as a natural post-school destination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.  It also noted the need for better connections between higher education and other Indigenous policy priorities; for example, higher education is the critical component for Indigenous economic development and governance, but is not highly visible in a policy agenda centred on training and employment.

In 2015, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework (the Health Curriculum Framework) was completed.  Implementation of the Health Curriculum Framework will provide a benchmark towards national consistency for the minimum level of capability required by graduates to effectively deliver culturally‑safe and responsive health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Health Curriculum Framework evolved from recommendation 23 of Health Workforce Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Project, final report Growing Our Future, December 2011:

Embed mandatory cultural competency curricula, including an understanding of the role of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker, in vocational and tertiary education for health professionals.

The Health Curriculum Framework has been developed specifically for the tertiary sector.  Further work will need to be undertaken to adapt the Health Curriculum Framework for use within the vocational education and training sector.

Vision and Principles

Vision

This Framework shares the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013‑2023 vision of an Australian health system that is free of racism and inequality, and where all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have access to health services that are effective, high quality, appropriate and affordable; and that the health system is comprised of an increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce delivering culturally‑safe and responsive health care.

Principles

The Framework is based on a commitment to the following principles.

Centrality of Culture

  • Effective, comprehensive and culturally-safe and responsive approaches to service delivery should have the flexibility to reflect the local context and the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce participation is an essential element within all health workforce initiatives, settings and strategies.
  • Cultural diversity, rights, views, values and expectations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are respected in the delivery of culturally‑safe and responsive health services.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce initiatives, and the wider health system, acknowledge and respect a holistic view of health that includes attention to physical, spiritual, cultural, emotional and social well‑being, community capacity and governance.
  • Cultural knowledge, expertise and skills of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals are reflected in health services models and practice.

Health Systems Effectiveness

    • Developing a health workforce with appropriate clinical and cultural capabilities to address the health needs and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is central to increasing access to health services that are effective, high quality, appropriate and affordable. Appropriate ongoing professional development and training that is recognised, supported and resourced is essential to achieving this.
  • Workplaces must be free of racism, culturally safe, supportive and attractive to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

 

Partnership and Collaboration

  • Respectful and effective partnerships and collaboration between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, government and non–government sectors (within and outside the health sector) that recognise the need for community-led initiatives, with shared commitment and responsibility, are required when designing and implementing programs to grow and develop the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce in both clinical and non‑clinical roles.
  • Ongoing inter-professional collaboration, education and support is essential to build a strong and sustainable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.
  • All stakeholders, including the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and communities, must be actively included in decision making.

 

Leadership and Accountability

  • Strong quality Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership at the senior manager and executive levels is essential to planning and designing culturally‑respectful health care services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Intentional leadership and talent development initiatives are required to advance Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in both targeted and mainstream positions.
  • Creation of structured career pathways is a vital element in leadership development and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees.
  • Commitment to achieving a culturally‑proficient and safe health workforce must come from the top and then filter down through the different levels of each organisation. This is key to growing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce, and will require sound policy, budgetary directions and strong leadership across governments.
  • Strong leadership from both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non‑Indigenous health professionals is essential in building social participation and eliminating racism from the health system. Commitment and accountability across and between all levels of government and non‑government sectors are critical requirements to support health workforce strategies.
  • Workplaces must be encouraged to attract and develop Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across all levels of the organisation, including management and representation in governance arrangements.

Evidence and Data

  • Workforce models and strategies are needed to develop an effective Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce. They must be based on community needs and evidence‑based practice, which is supported by meaningful and reliable data.

Key Strategies

Strategy 1: Improve recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals in clinical and non-clinical roles across all health disciplines

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Develop and implement communication strategies and community awareness campaigns to promote health careers.
  • Develop and implement flexible, innovative and culturally‑safe recruitment strategies that target Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Use measures intended to achieve equity and increase the representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the health workforce.
  • Develop and implement succession plans and clear career pathways, along with associated resources in both targeted and mainstream positions.
  • Create supportive and culturally‑safe workplaces.
  • Develop and implement mentoring programs.
  • Where possible, ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals are given the opportunity to work to their full scope of practice.
  • Ensure that the role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Practitioners is understood and valued.
  • Support ongoing professional development in strengthening both clinical and non‑clinical skills and capabilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals.

Strategy 2: Improve the skills and capacity of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce in clinical and non-clinical roles across all health disciplines

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Provide culturally-appropriate clinical supervision.
  • Provide professional development opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health staff that are tailored to local needs and build inter‑professional collaboration and networks.
  • Provide opportunities for the development of leadership capability, at all levels; from entry to leadership positions, which includes access to ongoing training and work‑based experience.
  • Provide and resource professional development of both clinical and non-clinical skills of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals.
  • Ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are able to participate in management, decision making and governance activities.

Strategy 3: Health and related sectors be supported to provide culturally‑safe and responsive workplace environments for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Ensure health service staff at all levels receive ongoing cultural safety training and embed completion of cultural safety training into performance management and/or professional development requirements.
  • Provide and resource appropriate cultural mentoring for non‑Indigenous health professionals.
  • Provide clinical placements in Aboriginal community‑controlled health services and in appropriate mainstream settings for both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non‑Indigenous students.
  • Embed the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework into higher education health courses in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • Identify and remunerate cultural professionals (cultural brokers, liaison officers etc) to assist in understanding health beliefs and practices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the service area.
  • Work with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to co-design and co‑deliver workforce programs and initiatives.

Strategy 4: Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students studying for qualifications in health

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Develop and implement communication strategies and awareness campaigns and deliver these at primary and secondary school health careers initiatives.
  • Offer extended learning opportunities to improve the preparedness of students entering higher education (both at the tertiary and vocational education and training levels).
  • Provide work experience and work‑readiness skills programs in the health and wider sector settings where opportunities exist, promoting the holistic approach to health and wellbeing.
  • Offer and resource scholarships, expanded cadetship and graduate programs, traineeships and internships.
  • Develop partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations at local, regional and national levels in planning and implementing activities to increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students studying for qualifications in health.

Strategy 5: Improve completion/graduation and employment rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health students

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Develop, resource and implement mentoring programs that are available from the first year of health studies.
  • Maintain scholarship programs that are fair and equitable across health disciplines.
  • Develop articulated career pathways.
  • Facilitate health services working with education providers at the local level to match training to employer needs and available jobs.
  • Work with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to co-design and co‑deliver workforce programs.
  • Develop relevant and appropriate place‑based workforce models to meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Strategy 6: Improve information for health workforce planning and policy development

Suggested mechanisms:

  • Create a systematic approach and best‑practice guidelines for the establishment, collection, recording, usage, definitions and interpretation of data about and for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.
  • Data collection capacity and mandated performance indicators to ensure cultural safety targets are being achieved and service delivery is improving.
  • Collaborate with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals to develop and maintain these best‑practice guidelines.
  • Ensure that the perspectives, aspirations and needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals are embedded in these guidelines and reflected in their usage.
  • Develop partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to lead community‑driven workforce models and policy initiatives.

Monitoring and Reporting

ATSIHWWG will oversee implementation of the Framework through an annual work plan that is consistent with the Framework and broader government health workforce reform agendas across all sectors. It will include timeframes, targets and milestones for agreed priorities and actions.

ATSIHWWG will monitor and report progress on the Framework at each ATSIHWWG meeting and to the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council (AHMAC), through its annual report to Health Workforce Principal Committee (HWPC).

Annual reporting will encompass reporting against agreed performance indicators by Commonwealth, state and territory governments, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce professional bodies, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community‑controlled health sector.

Contributing to closing the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the broader population within a generation is a key aim of the health workforce development and reform activities embedded in the Framework. Progress in implementing the Framework will also be guided by, and influence, key bodies such as the Council of Australian Governments (COAG).

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Stroke : New Report : Regional and rural health divide : #stroke treatment a cruel lottery

 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are between two and three times as likely to have a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians which is why increasing stroke awareness is crucial.

Too many Australians couldn’t spot a stroke if it was happening right in front of them. We know that in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities this awareness is even lower. We want all Australians, regardless of where they live or what community they’re from, to learn the signs of stroke.”

Stroke Foundation and Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Project

“It can happen to anyone — stroke doesn’t discriminate against colour, it doesn’t discriminate against age “

Photo above Seith Fourmile, Indigenous stroke survivor campaigns for culture to aid in stroke recovery

Regional and rural communities are bearing the brunt of Australia’s stroke burden, according to an updated Stroke Foundation report released today.

Download the Report here : NSF1586_Postcode2017_web

Read over 60 plus NACCHO stroke Articles HERE

“No Postcode Untouched: Stroke in Australia 2017”, found 12 of the country’s top 20 hotspots for stroke incidence were located in regional Australia and people living in country areas were 19 percent more likely to suffer a stroke than those living in metropolitan areas.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said due to limited access to best practice treatment, regional Australians were also more likely to die or be left with a significant disability as a result a stroke.

“In 2017, Australians will suffer more than 56,000 strokes and many of these will be experienced by people living in regional Australia,’’ Ms McGowan said.

“Advancements in stroke treatment and care mean stroke is no longer a death sentence for many, however patient outcomes vary widely across the country depending on where people live.

“Stroke can be treated and it can be beaten. It is a tragedy that only a small percentage of Australian stroke patients are getting access to the latest treatments and ongoing specialist care that we know saves lives.”

See Video from the Project

Stroke Foundation Clinical Council Chair Associate Processor Bruce Campbell said Australian clinicians were leading the way internationally in advancements in acute stroke treatment, such as endovascular clot retrieval. However, the health system was not designed to support and deliver these innovations in treatment and care nationally.

“It is not fair that our health system forces patients into this cruel lottery,’’ A/Professor Campbell said.

“There are pockets of the country where targeted investment and coordination of services is resulting in improved outcomes for stroke patients.

“Consistent lack of stroke-specific funding and poor resourcing is costing us lives and money. For the most part, doctors and nurses are doing what they can in a system that is fragmented, under-resourced and overwhelmed.”

No Postcode Untouched: Stroke in Australia 2017 report and website uses data compiled and analysed by Deloitte Access Economics to reveal how big the stroke challenge is in each Australian federal electorate.

This data includes estimates of the number of strokes, survivors and the death rate, as well as those living with key stroke risk factors. It is an update of a Stroke Foundation report released in 2014.

The report shows the cities and towns where stroke is having its biggest impact and pinpoints future hotspots where there is an increased need for support.

Ms McGowan said stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in Australia, having a huge impact on the community and the economy. Media release

“Currently, there is one stroke in Australia every nine minutes, by 2050 – without action – this number is set to increase to one stroke every four minutes,’’ she said.

“Stroke doesn’t discriminate, it impacts people of all ages and while more people are surviving stroke, its impact on survivors and their families is far reaching.

“It doesn’t have to be this way. Federal and state governments have the opportunity to invest in proven measures to change the state of stroke in this country.”

In the wake of the report Stroke Foundation is calling for a funded national action plan to address the prevention and treatment of stroke, and support for stroke survivors living in the community.

Key elements include: A national action campaign to ensure every Australian household has someone who knows

Key elements include:

  •  A national action campaign to ensure every Australian household has someone who knows FAST – the signs of stroke and to call 000. Stroke is a time critical medical condition. Time saved in getting people to hospital and treatments = brain saved.

  •  Nationally coordinated telemedicine network – breaking down the barriers to acute stroke treatment.
  •  Ensuring all stroke patients have access to stroke unit care, and spend enough time on the stroke unit accessing the services and supports they need to live well after stroke.

The No Postcode Untouched:Stroke in Australia 2017 report was funded by an unrestricted educational grant from Boehringer Ingelheim.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #SA #NT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD

1.SA Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA awarded $500,000 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services grant

2. NSW : Awabakal Medical Services “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” health workshops for students

3.1 QLD New partnership between AFL Gold Coast Suns and Deadly Choices 715 Health Checks

3.2 QLD : 90th anniversary of 270km walk to be marked by ceremony and re-enactment

4.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team , Deadly Dan and Smoke Free Super Heroes

5.WA : First National first Aboriginal Affairs roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress .

6.NT  Additional $1.6m for Indigenous language interpreters

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.SA Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA awarded $500,000 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services grant

Local Aboriginal families with young children will benefit from new services after Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service was successful in gaining a $500,000 grant earlier this month.

FROM Whyalla News

The New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services program is an initiative of the Commonwealth Government’s Department of Health, and aims to deliver antenatal, postnatal and early childhood services targeting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with children under five yearsn old. Nunyara plans to use the funding to improve the health care of children from antenatal care right through until they attend primary school.

The health service currently have a part time Aboriginal Maternal Infant Care (AMIC) Practitioner and access to a Midwife one day per week.

The funding would increase the hours of these two positions as well as create four new jobs.  Nunyara will employ a Child Health Coordinator, Child Health Nurse, AMIC Trainee and Transport Officer to support the new program.

Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service chief executive officer Cindy Zbierksi said the team anticipates they can “more than double” Nunyara’s service delivery outputs relating to improved access and outcomes for under five-year-olds.

“We can increase the child health checks by at least doubling them in the first six months and increase childhood immunisation by 20 percent,” she said.

The provision of a Transport Officer in the new program will also assist clients to attend specialist appointments in Port Augusta, who have more Paediatric and Obstetric services than Whyalla.

Mrs Zbierski said this has been an issue in the past, as travelling to Port Augusta is less than 100 kilometres away so clients do not qualify for the Patient Assistance Transport Scheme.

Nunyara is working on converting one of its buildings into a space for this service and plans to have the team fully operational by the end of 2017. Nunyara is located at 17/27 Tully St, Whyalla

2. NSW : Awabakal Medical Services “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” health workshops for students

IRRAWANG High School Indigenous students were treated to some famous faces this week, with some Indigenous stars visiting the school to run a health workshop with the students

From News of the Area

The workshop was all about “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” and has been generously funded by the Awabakal Medical Services and facilitated by No Limit Management.Students were treated to three special guests who spoke to the crowd.

Cody Walker, a professional footballer in the NRL with the Sydney Rabbitohs is a proud man of Bundjalung and Yuin Heritage.

George Rose, a former NRL player, played for Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles, with whom he won the 2011 NRL premiership, and also Melbourne Storm and Sydney Roosters.

He played for the Walgett Aboriginal Connection in several Koori knockouts and is a proud Kamilaroi man.

International Indigenous model Samantha Harris, a respected Dunghutti woman, joined the football stars to run the workshop group for the morning.

Each of the guests spoke of their life journeys and reinforced to the students the dangers of smoking, encouraging them to maintain a fit and healthy lifestyle and stand up to peer pressure.
The students took part in fun, but physical team and confidence building activities, working together to reach outcomes.

The guest stars gave the students an opportunity at the end of the workshop for photos and autographs.

Matt Chaffey, Year 10 student from Medowie said “I really appreciated the mentors coming to our school.”

“From what they told us, it makes me more determined to never smoke.”

Well done to the staff and students for another unique and creatively managed experience for the students at Irrawang High School.

3.1 QLD New partnership between AFL Gold Coast Suns and Deadly Choices 715 Health Checks

The Deadly Choices  Gold Coast SUNS jersey will be free for community members when they have a full 715 Health Check Kalwun on the Gold Coast

The Deadly Choices  Gold Coast SUNS jersey will be free for community members when they have a full 715 Health Check Kalwun on the Gold Coast

3.2 QLD : 90th anniversary of 270km walk to be marked by ceremony and re-enactment

On Wednesday 28 June more than 100 people, including a support crew of cooks, a nurse, counsellor, community workers and volunteers, will set out to walk from Taroom, 290km west of Maryborough, to Woorabinda – more than 270km to the north – over eight days.

The Trek will be kicked off by a Healing Ceremony on Bundulla Station, the site of the former Taroom Aboriginal Settlement, which was closed down in 1927 because of the threat of flooding from a nearby irrigation scheme.

See full history HERE

The Taroom Aboriginal Settlement, also known as Taroom Aboriginal Reserve, was established as a government-operated reserve on a site on the Dawson River, east of the township of Taroom in 1911. The settlement was established under the Aboriginals Protection and Restriction of the Sale of Opium Act 1897, which enabled direct government control over the lives of Aboriginal people in Queensland, including forced removals to designated reserves. Under the direction of a superintendent, the settlement housed Aboriginal people from different language groups and regions of Queensland, who lived within a highly regulated and tightly controlled institutional environment until its closure in 1927.[1]

Inhabitants at the time were forced to move to what is now Woorabinda Aboriginal Shire, 170km south west of Rockhampton.

Most of them walked.

The purpose of the Healing Ceremony is to pay respect to those hundreds of Elders, men, women and children and to lay wreaths at a memorial at the site.

Trek walkers are expected to travel from Woorabinda, Yarrabah, Palm Island, Cherbourg and other central Queensland communities, and will include non-Indigenous participants.

This year marks the 90th anniversary of the walk and the third year of re-enacting the walk.

Media is welcome to attend. For more information or to arrange interviews, please contact Christine Howes on 0419 656 277.

4.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team , Deadly Dan and Smoke Free Super Heroes

This week the VAHSHLT were hanging out at Yappera Children’s Service Co-Operative reading Deadly Dan at the League and talking about the importance of staying smoke free!

At our Coach program we are educating the kids about healthy lifestyles and are creating a next generation of smoke free super heroes!!

#youSmokeYouChoke #StaySmokeFree Aboriginal Quitline Quit Victoria Department of Health & Human Services, Victoria

 

 5.WA : First National first Aboriginal Affairs roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress .

State and territory Aboriginal affairs leaders say it is inevitable the federal government will need to have treaty negotiations with indigenous people.

Representatives from Western Australia, the ACT, the Northern Territory, South Australia and Victoria met on Friday for the first roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress on Aboriginal affairs.

WA Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt, who is indigenous, said each state faced similar issues including housing, treaties, Aboriginal representation and land tenure.

“It’s an opportunity now for states and territories to have a much better understanding of what we’re all doing, and co-operate a lot more to create more opportunities for Aboriginal people,” he told reporters on Friday.

“We’re seeing a lot more happening in the space of Native title, constitutional recognition and closing the gap.”

Mr Wyatt met with SA Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Minister Kyam Maher, ACT MLA Rachel Stephen-Smith, NT MLA Chansey Paech and Member for Geelong Christine Couzens.

Roundtable meetings are expected to continue once or twice a year, with discussions towards the end of 2017 to focus on how states and territories will use land vested in Aboriginal communities to better create economic development.

Mr Wyatt said treaty conversations were occurring with Nyoongar people from WA’s South West region, and acknowledged this was happening across Australia.

“What Uluru has shown is that Aboriginal Australia is very keen to have this conversation about treaties elevated,” he said.

“It has created a new pressure on the commonwealth government to engage in an area that perhaps, may be new to them.” Mr Maher said a state treaty could be announced by the end of the year and that bilateral agreement would have a federal impact.

“When states and territories talk with one voice it helps solve problems,” he said.

 

6.NT  Additional $1.6m for Indigenous language interpreters

The Coalition Government is providing the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) with an additional $1.6 million to expand its successful Indigenous Interpreting Project.

See Background  Health NT Research TeleinterpretingServices

Indigenous language interpreters play an essential role in ensuring First Australians have access to a fair legal system, as well as government and community services. Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said 11 per cent of First Australians spoke an Indigenous language as their main language at home.

“In some parts of Australia, English is the third or fourth language spoken, clearly demonstrating the need for widely available interpreting services,” Minister Scullion said.

“This $1.6 million investment will ensure the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters is able to meet the growing need for accredited Indigenous language interpreters in regional and remote Australia, particularly in the health and justice sectors.

“The authority’s Indigenous Interpreting Project has already enjoyed considerable success.

Since 2012, it has led to 96 accreditations being awarded to Indigenous interpreters across 25 languages.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : The #NTIntervention 10 years on – history and evaluations

 ” And when the government announced the Intervention and commenced it, they sent in what they called ‘government business managers’ who were, in effect, the old, you know, ‘protectors’ of Aboriginals, the, you know, the old superintendents, the mission managers.

I mean, this is 10 years ago, this is not a hundred years ago, and Aboriginal people were being treated like this. It was almost a violation of every possible human right you could think of.”

Pat Turner AM CEO NACCHO speaking to Nick Grimm ABC (see full Interview Below

 

 Picture above : Powerhouse panel at UTS Sydney last night talking about the 10th anniversary of the #NTIntervention: @KylieSambo @Bunbajee Pat Turner & @LarissaBehrendt #IndigenousX

  ” In August 2007 the Howard Liberal Government enacted the Northern Territory National Emergency Response Act, or, “the Intervention”. Liberal politicians marketed it as a solution to problems within Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory.

These problems include health, housing, employment and justice.  When Labor was in power it continued the Intervention’s major initiatives.

See 10 Years history of the NT Intervention Below Part 2 after the Interview

 Major General David Chalmers, of the Inter-Agency Northern Territory Emergency Response Task Force, and Mal Brough, indigenous affairs minister, are greeted by David Wongway, a member of the Imanpa Local Community Council

 ” In 2008, following the change of government after the 2007 Federal Election, the Rudd Labor Government re-framed the intervention through a new national policy focus on “Closing the Gap”. Rudds’ intention to re-work the Intervention to focus more closely on reforming the welfare system linked closely with the already existing targets of the Close the Gap Campaign.

The aims of the campaign are set out in the 2012 National Indigenous Reform Agreement ”

 The Intervention and the Closing the Gap Campaign see part 3

 ” Evaluating the Intervention is not an easy task. Impartial data is difficult to find and there is a mass of complex and conflicting information. However, by looking at the Closing the Gap targets that were set by the Government and considering human rights concerns, we have provided our assessment. Below we give major features of the Intervention a score out of 10.  We also score it for compliance with human rights.”

Issues with Evaluating the Interventionhow did we work out our grades? Part 4

NT Intervention – nothing has changed for the better: Pat Turner

Hear Interview HERE

NICK GRIMM: Ten years ago this week, one of the defining moments in Australian national life began unfolding in remote communities in the outback.

The Northern Territory intervention was launched by the then Howard government in response to reports of social dysfunction and allegations of endemic abuse of women and children in remote communities.

Since then, the policy has continued under governments of both persuasions.

But 10 years on critics of the Intervention say it’s fixed nothing.

Pat Turner is currently CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

She was previously a CEO of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, ATSIC, and had a long career as a senior Commonwealth public servant.

I spoke to Pat Turner a little earlier.

Pat Turner, can I start by asking you this: Ten years on, what’s the best thing you have to say about the Northern Territory Intervention?

PAT TURNER: (Laughs) Nothing, really, I’m afraid.

It was a complete violation of the human rights of Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory.

It came out of the blue, following the Commonwealth Government’s reading and response to The Little Children Are Sacred report.

NICK GRIMM: So how would you describe the legacy of the process that began 10 years ago?

PAT TURNER: Well, I think it’s still a shambles.

You know, both sides of politics were responsible.

While it was introduced by the Liberal government, the Coalition under John Howard and Mal Brough, it was carried on also by Jenny Macklin and Kevin Rudd and Gillard and so on.

So the legacy is that Aboriginal people were completely disempowered.

They had the Army going into communities in their uniforms. They had no idea why the Army was there.

You know, to send the Army in at a time like that was just totally confusing. People were terrified that they’d come to take the kids away. There would be no explanation as to why they were going in.

And it wasn’t their fault; it was the way the Government handled it.

The government also, at the time, insisted that every child under 16 have a full medical check. Now, actually what they were looking for, I think, was whether a child had been sexually abused.

And we said, at the time, those of us who were opposed to the way the Government was handling this, “You cannot do that without parental permission. You must have parental permission. You would not do a medical check on any other child in Australia and you should not do that with our children without their parents’ say-so”.

And what’s more, fine, go ahead, do a full medical check, but what are you going to do when you find the otitis media, when you find the trachoma, when you find the upper respiratory diseases, when you find rheumatic heart disease? Where…

NICK GRIMM: All those common medical conditions in those areas.

PAT TURNER: Absolutely, absolutely. And what are you going to do to treat these people?

Because you don’t have the health services that Aboriginal people should have. You don’t have those in place.

And they were paying doctors a phenomenal salary.

They also, of course, introduced the infamous cashless welfare card, called it ‘income management’, where 60 per cent of the income was quarantined for food and clothes and so on.

People weren’t allowed to get access to video, so that was a… and that was fine for X-rated videos and adult videos, but certainly not for entertainment, which a lot of families relied on in outlying communities.

And it had ramifications. I mean, there was a young Aboriginal businesswoman in Tennant Creek whose business went bust because she couldn’t hire out videos.

NICK GRIMM: Well, in your view, can we say that anything has changed for the better in those remote communities?

PAT TURNER: No.

Look, the other thing that happened at the time, Nick, was there was a reform in local government.

So, from the hundreds of Aboriginal community councils that were in place, they all became part of these super shires, nine super shires, so all the decision making at the local community level had evaporated.

And when the government announced the Intervention and commenced it, they sent in what they called ‘government business managers’ who were, in effect, the old, you know, ‘protectors’ of Aboriginals, the, you know, the old superintendents, the mission managers.

I mean, this is 10 years ago, this is not a hundred years ago, and Aboriginal people were being treated like this. It was almost a violation of every possible human right you could think of.

And what’s more, I called it at the time the Trojan Horse to get the land that our people have under freehold inalienable title in the Northern Territory.

And I thought it was a land grab, and I still believe that, you know, the Commonwealth certainly wanted to have a greater say over Aboriginal land in the Northern Territory – as did the Northern Territory Government, by the way.

NICK GRIMM: Yeah, well we’ve talked about the situation on the ground there in the Northern Territory.

What then would you say have been the national implications of the Intervention?

PAT TURNER: Well, I think without the evidence they’ve adopted – you know, Alan Tudge is very keen on the cashless welfare card, as is Twiggy Forrest, who promoted it.

While I see that, you know, there may be, you know, some opportunity for women to buy more food, it’s fine if you have access to fresh produce at a reasonable price that you could expect to pay in a major regional centre like Alice Springs.

You go out to the communities, the prices are at least double if not tripled, and they’re stale, rotten, old vegetables and meats and so on.

So, you know, that’s where government services need to step up through their outback stores and make sure that people are getting really fresh produce all the time, and healthy produce.

NICK GRIMM: Alright, Pat Turner, thanks very much for talking to us.

PAT TURNER: You’re most welcome. Thank you.

NICK GRIMM: Pat Turner is CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Part 2

” In August 2007 the Howard Liberal Government enacted the Northern Territory National Emergency Response Act, or, “the Intervention”. Liberal politicians marketed it as a solution to problems within Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory.

These problems include health, housing, employment and justice.  When Labor was in power it continued the Intervention’s major initiatives. “

See 10 Years history of the NT Intervention

Intervention was directed at addressing the disproportionate levels of violence in Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory, as well as the endemic disadvantage suffered in terms of health, housing, employment and justice.

It was also a direct response to the Ampe Akelyernemane Meke Mekarle Report (‘Little Children are Sacred Report’) into sexual abuse of Indigenous children. This report was commissioned by the then Northern Territory Chief Minister Clare Martin following an interview on the ABC’s Lateline program, in which Alice Springs Senior Crown Prosecutor Dr Nanette Rogers SC commented that the violence and sexual abuse of children that was entrenched in Indigenous society was ‘beyond most people’s comprehension and range of human experience’. The then Commonwealth Minister for Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, Mal Brough, indicated in his second reading speech introducing the NTNERA that “[t]his bill… and the other bills introduced in the same package are all about the safety and wellbeing of children.”

The Little Children are Sacred Report was the result of in-depth research, investigation and community consultation over a period of over eight months by members of the Northern Territory Board of Inquiry. The focus of their inquiry was instances of sexual abuse, especially of children, in Northern Territory Indigenous communities. The findings were presented to Chief Minister Martin in April 2007 and released to the public in June. The striking facts, graphic imagery and ardent plea for action contained in this report saw this issue gain widespread attention both in the media and in the political agenda, inciting divisive debate and discussion.

The NTNERA was enacted by the Howard Government just two months after the report was released to the public, allowing little time for consultation with Indigenous communities. It was framed as a ‘national emergency’ with army troops being deployed to Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory. This took place in the lead up to the 2007 Federal Election, in which the Labor Party under Kevin Rudd defeated the Howard Government after four terms of Liberal government.

The Intervention in 2007

The Intervention was a $587 million package of legislation that made a number of changes affecting specified Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory. It included restrictions on alcohol, changes to welfare payments, acquisition of parcels of land, education, employment and health initiatives, restrictions on pornography and other measures.

The package of legislation introduced included:

  • NorthernTerritory National Emergency Response Act 2007.
  • Social Security and Other Legislation Amendment (Welfare Payment Reform) Bill 2007.
  • Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs and Other Legislation Amendment. (Northern Territory National Emergency Response and Other Measures) Act 2007.
  • Appropriation (NorthernTerritory National Emergency Response) Bill (No. 1) 2007-2008.
  • Appropriation (NorthernTerritory National Emergency Response) Bill (No. 2) 2007-2008.

In order to enact this package of legislation, several existing laws were affected or partially suspended, including:

  •  Racial Discrimination Act 1975.
  •  Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976.
  • Native Title Act 1993(Cth).
  • Northern Territory Self-Government Act and related legislation.
  • Social Security Act 1991.
  • IncomeTax Assessment Act 1993.

A raft of reforms and regulations were introduced by this package of legislation, including:

  • Restricting the sale, consumption and purchase of alcohol in prescribed areas. This included the prohibition of alcohol in certain areas prescribed by the legislation, making collection of information compulsory for purchases over a certain amount and the introduction of new penalty provisions.
  • ‘Quarantining’ 50% of welfare payments from individuals living in designated communities and from beneficiaries who were judged to have neglected their children.
  • Compulsorily acquiring townships held under title provisions of the Native Title Act 1993 with the introduction of five year leases in order to give the government unconditional access. Sixty-five Aboriginal communities were compulsorily acquired.
  • Linking income support payments to school attendance for all people living on Aboriginal land, and providing mandatory meals for children at school at parents’ cost.
  • Introducing compulsory health checks for all Aboriginal children.
  • Introducing pornography filters on publicly funded computers, and bans on pornography in designated areas.
  • Abolishing the permit system under the Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1976 for common areas, road corridors and airstrips for prescribed communities,.
  • Increasing policing levels in prescribed communities. Secondments were requested from other jurisdictions to supplement NT resources.
  • Marshalling local workforces through the work-for-the-dole program to clean-up and repair communities.
  • Reforming living arrangements in prescribed communities through introducing market based rents and normal tenancy arrangements.
  • Commonwealth funding for the provision of community services.
  • Removing customary law and cultural practice considerations from bail applications and sentencing in criminal trials.
  • Abolishing the Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP).

Changes under successive governments

After an initial focus on preventing child sexual abuse, successive federal governments re-designed and re-framed the Intervention. This involved linking the Intervention with the broader ‘Closing the Gap’ campaign, introducing new measures such as the BasicsCard and tougher penalties for the possession of alcohol and pornography. Changes were also made to the operation of the Racial Discrimination Act (see section on Human Rights). The current package of legislation retains the support of the Liberal Government and is due to expire in 2022.

2008 Changes

The Intervention was introduced in 2007 by the Howard Government, but a change of government in September of that year saw the Labor Government under Kevin Rudd gain power. After some consultation and minor changes, the NTNERA and associated legislation were initially maintained.

In 2008 Rudd apologised to the members of the Stolen Generations on behalf of the nation. In 2009, Rudd also declared support for the most substantive framework for the rights of Indigenous peoples, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The previous Howard government had voted against the ratification of this treaty. Article 3 of the Declaration states that:

‘Indigenous peoples have the right of self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development’.

The failure to recognise this right to self-determination would become one of the major points of criticism for the Intervention.

In 2009 Rudd implemented the BasicsCard.  The card is used to manage income in certain areas of the Northern Territory. It cannot be used to purchase alcohol, tobacco, tobacco-products, pornography, gambling products or services, home-brew kits or home-brew concentrate.

During the period 2009-2010 the Rudd Government committed itself to a re-design of the Intervention, with a focus on reinstating the suspended provisions of the Racial Discrimination Act (RDA). The Social Security and Other Legislation Amendment (Welfare Reform and Reinstatement of Racial Discrimination Act) Act 2010 (Cth) repealed the ‘special measures’ that had been created under the original Intervention to suspend the operation of the RDA. However, this new legislation still did not comply with the RDA as it continued to discriminate against Indigenous Australians through land acquisition and compulsory income management.These measures overwhelmingly  affect Indigenous people.

The focus of the government then shifted slightly, concentrating more closely on the need to ‘tackle the destructive, intergenerational cycle of passive welfare’ (see then Minister for Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Jenny Macklin’s second reading speech). The Rudd government explicitly linked the Intervention to the ‘Closing the Gap’ targets, changing the focus of the Intervention from the protection of children from sexual abuse to the reform of the welfare system.

2012 changes

The legislative basis for the Intervention was due to expire in 2012.  Decisions regarding its future had to be made. Under the Gillard Government, the StrongerFuturesin the Northern Territory Act 2012 (Stronger Futures) replaced the NTNERA and extended the Intervention for a further ten years to 2022.  The StrongerFutureslegislation comprises three principal Acts (the Stronger Futures package), plus associated delegated legislation. The three Acts are:

  • Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory Act 2012;
  • Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Act 2012; and
  • Social Security Legislation Amendment Act 2012.

In 2013, the  Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights examined Stronger Futures and the related legislation in their 11th Report. They noted that although the StrongerFutureslegislative package repealed the Northern Territory Emergency Response (‘NTER’) legislation, it retained three key policy elements:

  • The tackling alcohol abuse measure: the purpose of this measure was ‘to enable special measures to be taken to reduce alcohol-related harm to Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory.
  • The land reform measure: the land reform measure enabled the Commonwealth to amend Northern Territory legislation relating to community living areas and town
  • camps to enable opportunities for private home ownership in town camps and more flexible long-term leases.
  • The food security measure: the purpose of this measure was ‘to enable special measures to be taken for the purpose of promoting food security for Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory’; modifying the legislation involves a 10 year timeframe with most provisions other than the alcohol measures being reviewed after 7 years.

The key changes imposed under the 2012 Stronger Futures legislation package consist of:

  • Expansion of income management through the BasicsCard and the increase of ‘quarantined’ payments to 70%.
  • Increased penalties related to alcohol and pornography, with as much as 6-months jail time for a single can of beer.
  • Expansion of policy that links school attendance with continued welfare payments.
  • Introduction of licences for ‘community stores’ to ensure the provisions of healthy, quality food.
  • Commonwealth given power to make regulations regarding the use of town camps.

{Sources: SBS Factbox, Stronger Futures in the NT, Listening but not Hearing Report}

Although consultation with Indigenous communities did take place, there was much criticism of the nature of the consultative process and the extent to which it was acted upon. The ‘Listening butnot Hearing’ report by the Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning concluded that “the Government’s consultation process has fallen short of Australia’s obligation to consult with Indigenous peoples in relation to initiatives that affect them”.

The Australian Council of Human Rights Agencies has also stated that it was ‘invasive and limiting of individual freedoms and human rights, and require[s] rigorous monitoring’. Amnesty International commented that the new package of legislation was the same as the original ‘Intervention, but with the pretence of being non-discriminatory.’

2014 changes

The current Intervention legislation is not due to expire until 2022. During his time as Opposition Leader, Tony Abbott supported extending the intervention into the future.

In a speech in February of 2014, then Prime Minister Abbott identified the importance of closing the gap through investment in indigenous programs, with a specific focus on school attendance. However, this speech was followed by massive budget cuts to Aboriginal legal and health services, early childhood education and childcare, and the consolidation of 150 Indigenous programs into 5 core programs. While the 2015 Budget reinstated funding to Family Violence legal services, these ongoing cuts are expected to detrimentally affect attempts to Close the Gap of Indigenous disadvantage.

The 2015 Budget modified the  Stronger Futures NPA, redirecting $988.2 million in funds to the new National Partnership Agreement on Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment  (NPA) over eight years. This new NPA prioritises schooling, community safety and employment. This funding also aims to help the Northern Territory Government take full responsibility for the delivery of services in remote Indigenous communities. Additional funding will also be made available to extend the income management scheme until 2017. However, the new NPA has halved the spending allocated to health measures, and means that the Federal Government will have less control over target outcomes.

Government administered funding of $1.4 billion, previously available under Stronger Futures, will not be transferred to the new NPA, but will be delivered by the departments of Prime Minister and Cabinet and Social Services, outside the NPA framework. The new NPA will be complemented by a Remote Indigenous Housing Strategy that will receive $1.1 billion nationally.

Part 3 The Intervention and the Closing the Gap Campaign

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) had identified six areas of Indigenous disadvantage to target as the basis for the Closing the Gap Campaign. These were:

  1. Early childhood;
  2. Schooling;
  3. Health;
  4. Economic Participation;
  5. Safe Communities; and
  6. Governance and Leadership (see Right to Self Determination below).

The Closing the Gap in the Northern Territory National Partnership Agreement (2009) ceased on the 30 June 2012. The Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory package which started on 1 July 2012 continued to support the Closing the Gap reforms.

The 6th Annual Progress Report on Closing the Gap was tabled in Parliament by then Prime Minister Tony Abbott on 12 February 2014. It outlined the commitments made by the Coalition government, including:

  • Consolidating the administration of Indigenous programs from eight government departments into the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.
  • Establishing the Prime Minister’s Indigenous Advisory Council.
  • Increasing indigenous school  attendance  through  providing  $28.4 million funding for a remote school attendance program.
  • Improving indigenous  access to employment by commissioning a review and funding employment initiatives.
  • Supporting a referendum for the recognition of the First Australians in the Australian Constitution.

However, in the seventh annual progress report of 11 February 2015, then PM Tony Abbott labelled progress as ‘profoundly disappointing‘. The report concluded that 4 out of 7 targets were not on track to be met by their deadlines, with little progress in literacy and numeracy standards and a decline in employment outcomes since 2008.

Link to 2012 National Indigenous Reform agreement here.

Part 4 Issues with Evaluating the Intervention – how did we work out our grades? Part 4

Quantity of Evaluation:

The controversial nature of the Intervention and the need for expenditure to be accounted for has meant that there have been a large number of evaluations undertaken regarding various aspects of the Intervention. Within five years of the establishment of the Intervention, by December 2012, 98 reports, seven parliamentary inquiries and hundreds of submissions had been completed. However, the sheer quantity of these reports actually hinders the evaluation process, as it obstructs proper evaluation of effectiveness.

Impartiality of Evaluation:

The majority of evaluations of the Intervention have been undertaken by government departments and paid consultants. Australian National University researchers Jon Altman and Susie Russell suggest that the evaluation of the Intervention, instead of being an independent objective process, has been merged into the policy process and, in many cases, is performed by the policy-makers themselves. This means there is a real risk of evidence being ignored or hidden to suit an agenda.

Independent reports and government commissioned reports have often contradicted each other, with the government seeking to discredit independent reports rather than gathering additional data. This includes independent reports by researchers at Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning at the University of Technology Sydney, Concerned Australians and the Equality Rights Alliance, all of which have often come to different conclusions than government reports.

Quality and Consistency of Evaluation:

The ‘final evaluation’ of the Intervention under the NTNER occurred in November 2011 with the publication of the Northern Territory Emergency Response Evaluation ReportHowever, the Stronger Futures legislation did not come into effect until August 2012. This left eight months unaccounted for.

Closingthe Gap in the Northern Territory Monitoring Reports are conducted every six months. A significant criticism is that they focus on bureaucratic ‘outputs’ rather than outcomes. Income management studies, for example, have reported on ‘outputs’ such as the number of recipients of the Basics Card or the total amount of income quarantined, rather than focusing on the card’s effectiveness for health and child protection outcomes.

Much of the data collected has also relied on self-assessment in the form of surveys, such as asking individuals to rate their own health rather than collecting and analysing data on disease. Another issue is the ad hoc nature of some reports. For example, the review of the Alcohol Management Plan in Tennant Creek was only conducted once. This makes it difficult to make comparisons over the life of the policy and evaluate the effectiveness of particular measures.

Independent statistical data can be hard to find, since information compiled by the Australian Bureau of Statistics is national in scope and cannot be translated directly into the context of the individual Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory. Indigenous Australians also have a lower median age than other Australians, meaning data on employment rates or incarceration rates can be statistically skewed.

Benchmarks for Evaluation:

ANU researchers Jon Altman and Susie Russell have noted that the “absence of an overarching evaluation strategy has resulted in a fragmented and confused approach”. They found that the 2007 Intervention did not have any documentation articulating the basis of the policy, nor how it should be evaluated. The first document to address this was the unpublished Program Logic Options Report which was developed in 2010; three years after the Intervention began. This means that there are no original benchmarks for evaluation, and that the decision to extend the program in 2012 was made without clear evidence as to its effectiveness. Furthermore, there is a limited connection between the benchmarks proposed in the 2010 Report and those used in later evaluations.

Aboriginal Health and #prevention : New report : @Prevention1stAU health : How much does Australia spend and is it enough?

 ” The verdict is in: Prevention is better than cure when it comes to tackling Australia’s chronic disease burden, but is Australia pulling its weight when it comes to tackling the nation’s greatest public health challenge?

A new economic report looking at what Australia invests in preventive health has found Australia ranks poorly on the world stage and has determined that governments must spend more wisely to contain the burgeoning healthcare budget.

Treating chronic disease costs the Australian community an estimated $27 billion annually, accounting for more than a third of our national health budget.

Yet Australia currently spends just over $2 billion on preventive health each year, or around $89 per person.

One in two Australians suffer from chronic disease, which is responsible for 83 per cent of all premature deaths in Australia, and accounts for 66 per cent of the burden of disease.”

The report, Preventive health: How much does Australia spend and is it enough? was co-funded by the Heart Foundation, Kidney Australia, Alzheimer’s Australia, the Australia Health Promotion Association and the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education.

Download the report HERE

Preventive-health-How-much-does-Australia-spend-and-is-it-enough_FINAL

Produced by La Trobe University’s Department of Public Health, the report examines trends in preventive health spending, comparing Australia’s spending on preventive health, as well as the funding models used, against selected Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries.

The report also explores the question: ‘how much should Australia be spending on preventive health?’

Treating chronic disease costs the Australian community an estimated $27 billion annually, accounting for more than a third of our national health budget.

Yet Australia currently spends just over $2 billion on preventive health each year, or around $89 per person. At just 1.34 per cent of Australian healthcare expenditure, the amount is considerably less than OECD countries Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, with Australia ranked 16th out of 31 OECD countries by per capita expenditure.

Michael Thorn, Chief Executive of the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE), a founding member organisation of the Prevention 1st campaign, says that when looking at Australia’s spend on prevention, it should be remembered that one third of all chronic diseases are preventable and can be traced to four lifestyle risk factors: alcohol and tobacco use, physical inactivity and poor nutrition.

“We know that by positively addressing and influencing lifestyle factors such as physical activity, diet, tobacco and   alcohol consumption, we will significantly reduce the level of heart disease, stroke, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, lung disease and type 2 diabetes; conditions that are preventable, all too common, and placing great pressure on Australian families and on Australia’s healthcare systems,” Mr Thorn said.

Report co-author, Professor Alan Shiell says we should not simply conclude that Australia should spend more on preventive health simply because we spend less than equivalent nations, and instead argues that Australia could and should spend more on preventive health measures based on the evidence of the cost effectiveness of preventive health intervention.

“The key to determining the appropriate prevention spend is to compare the added value of an increase in spending on preventive health against the opportunity cost of doing so.

“If the value of the increased spending on preventive health is greater than the opportunity cost, then there is a strong case to do so,” Professor Shiell said.

Professor Shiell says there is clear evidence that many existing preventive health initiatives are cost-effective.

“Studies suggest Australia’s health could be improved and spending potentially even reduced if government was to act on existing policy recommendations and increase spending on activities already considered cost-effective.

“We also suspect that the choice of funding mechanism, or how money is allocated to whom for prevention – is an important factor for the overall efficiency of health prevention expenditure,” Professor Shiell said.

The report highlights England’s efforts in evaluating and monitoring the cost effectiveness and success of its public health interventions and Mr Thorn believes Australia would do well to follow their lead.

“In the United Kingdom we have a conservative government no less, showing tremendous leadership to tackle chronic disease, with bold policy measures like the recently introduced sugar tax and broad-based physical activity programs, all of which are underpinned by robust institutional structures,” Mr Thorn said.

The report will be launched at a Forum at Parliament House in Canberra today, where public health experts, including the World Health Organization’s Dr Alessandro Demaio will explain how they would invest in preventive health if given $100 million to spend.

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Priorities : 1st Anniversary of the #RedfernStatement

 

” One year ago today, Aboriginal leaders marked the Redfern Speech by launching the Redfern Statement, which asked governments to re-engage with Australia’s first peoples in a meaningful and constructive way to deal with the appalling health and social conditions experienced by far too many of Australia’s First Peoples.

The Redfern Statement was initially created as an election manifesto but our determination now is for it to become a roadmap for positive and effective engagement between Aboriginal peoples and Governments.”

The co-chairs of the National Congress of Austraia’s First Peoples, Dr Jackie Huggins and Mr Rod Little pictured above with NACCHO CEO Pat Turner June 9 2016 ( See First Peoples Health Priorities below )

The Redfern Statement

Download the 18 Page document here

Redfern Statement June 2016 Elections 18 Pages

First Peoples call for urgent action to tackle home-grown poverty

This year marks the 25th Anniversary of the Redfern Speech by Prime Minister Paul Keating, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders from peak representative organisations are calling on Australian governments at all levels to redouble their efforts to address the unacceptable poverty and disadvantage experienced by Australia’s First Peoples.

The co-chairs of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples, Dr Jackie Huggins and Mr Rod Little, said mounting evidence suggests that Australia is failing to meet the ‘Close the Gap’ targets. Despite this, governments are still unwilling to make the necessary commitments to bring about positive change.

“We are after an improved relationship with Federal, State and Territory Governments. We acknowledge the work that has been done to date however we can no longer afford to wait a generation for the change that is necessary now for our people”.

“Far too many First Peoples attend funerals of young and middle-aged people. This is because the Government’s Closing the Gap targets are failing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as shown by the latest 2017 report,” the co-chairs said.

“We are seeking a new relationship with the Federal, State and Territory Governments through COAG, to bring about a paradigm shift that stops the policy drift and amnesia which has impacted negatively on Australia’s First People.”

“We want to engage with Federal, State and Territory Governments in a positive way to develop an enduring framework which would feed into the 2018 Federal Budget and the COAG Closing the Gap Policy”.

The Redfern Statement outlined how the many reports released since 1992 called for real reconciliation based on facing the truths of the past and creating a just and mature relationship between the non-Indigenous Australian community and the First Peoples. But today, First Peoples face the same struggles as they did in 1992.

55 leaders met  9th of June 2016, in Redfern where in 1992 Prime Minister Paul Keating spoke truth about this nation – that the disadvantage faced by First Peoples affects and is the responsibility of all Australians.

An urgent call for a more just approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs

“When we drafted the Redfern Statement we wanted to remind the nation of Prime Minister Keating’s historic Redfern Speech in 1992, which spoke so many truths about our history and the reality we face today,” the co-chairs said.

“The Federal Government and each of the State and Territory Governments, share responsibility to right this nation’s past injustices. The current Government has an unprecedented nation-building opportunity to meaningfully address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander disadvantage. They have the mandate to act”

First Peoples Health Priorities

Closing the Gap in health equality between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians is an agreed national priority. The recognised necessity and urgency to close the gap must be backed by meaningful action.

All parties contesting the 2016 Federal Election must place Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs at the heart of their election platforms, recognising the health equality as our national priority.

Despite the regular upheaval of major policy changes, significant budget cuts and changes to Government in the short election cycles at all levels, we have still managed to see some encouraging improvements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes. But much remains to be achieved and as we move into the next phase of Closing the Gap, enhanced program and funding support will be required.

We appeal to all political parties to recommit to Closing the Gap and to concentrate efforts in the priority areas in order to meet our goal of achieving health equality in this generation.

We call on the next Federal Government to commit to:

  1. Restoration of funding

The 2014 Federal Budget was a disaster for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This is not an area where austerity measures will help alleviate the disparity in health outcomes for Australia’s First Peoples.

The current funding for Aboriginal health services is inequitable. Funding must be related to population or health need, indexed for growth in service demand or inflation, and needs to be put on a rational, equitable basis to support the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (2013–2023).

  1. Fund the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (2013–2023)

Future Budgets must adequately resource the Implementation Plan’s application and operation. As a multi-partisan supported program, the Implementation Plan is essential for driving progress towards the provision of the best possible outcomes from investment in health and related services.

  1. Make Aboriginal Community Controlled Services (ACCHS) the preferred providers

ACCHS should be considered the ‘preferred providers’ for health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Where there is no existing ACCHS in place, capacity should be built within existing ACCHS to extend their services to the identified areas of need. This could include training and capacity development of existing services to consider the Institute of Urban Indigenous Health strategy to self-fund new services. Where it is appropriate for mainstream providers to deliver a service, they should be looking to partner with ACCHS to better reach the communities in need.

  1. Create guidelines for Primary Health Networks

The next Federal Government should ensure that the Primary Health Networks (PHNs) engage with ACCHS and Indigenous health experts to ensure the best primary health care is delivered in a culturally safe manner. There should be mandated formal agreements between PHNs and ACCHS to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership.

  1. Resume indexation of the Medicare rebate, to relieve profound pressure on ACCHS

The pausing of the Medicare rebate has adversely and disproportionately affected Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their ability to afford and access the required medical care. The incoming Federal Government should immediately resume indexation of Medicare to relieve the profound pressure on ACCHS.

  1. Reform of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy

The issues with the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) are well known. The recent Senate Finance and Public Administration Committee Report into the tendering processes highlighted significant problems with the IAS programme from application and tendering to grant selection and rollout.

The next Federal Government must fix the IAS as an immediate priority and restore the funding that has been stripped from key services through the flawed tendering process.

  1. Fund an Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy encompasses Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ holistic view of mental health, as well as physical, cultural and spiritual health, and has an early intervention focus that works to build strong communities through more community-focused and integrated approaches to suicide prevention.

The Strategy requires a considered Implementation Plan with Government support to genuinely engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, their organisations and representative bodies to develop local, culturally appropriate strategies to identify and respond to those most at risk within our communities.

  1. Develop a long-term National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Determinants of Health Strategy

The siloed approach to strategy and planning for the issues that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face is a barrier to improvement. Whilst absolutely critical to closing the gap, the social determinants of health and wellbeing – from housing, education, employment and community support – are not adequately or comprehensively addressed.

The next Federal Government must prioritise the development of a National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Determinants of Health Strategy that takes a broader, holistic look at the elements to health and wellbeing for Australia’s First Peoples. The Strategy must be developed in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through their peak organisations.

Please note the balance of document can be read here

Redfern Statement June 2016 Elections 18 Pages

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories from #ACT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD #NT #TAS @KenWyattMP

1.Winnunga ACCHO elders garden has healthy future for community

2. SA : Nathan Krakouer  no more bad choices now Deadly Choices

3.1 The new Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Council will bring together six different ACCHO’s  across North East Victoria

3.2 VAHS hosts Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima 

4.AHCWA calls for “ICE “ intervention and prevention ACTION

5.1 NSW 60 Students graduate AHMRC Aboriginal Health College

 5. 2 NSW Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking program hits the road.

 6.QLD ‘No Smokes’ one-day training 

7. NT Uncle Jimmy and NT ACCHO’S helps to stop Trachoma

8.Tasmania Culture Centre employment assistance service

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media     Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.Winnunga ACCHO elders garden has healthy future for community

When you think of a garden and gardening, most of us wouldn’t think of it as a gift of life. But for 74 year old Uncle Brian Demery this is exactly what it did for him. ‘I went to Winnunga coz I was sick but when I went to Winnunga a new chapter of my life was opened. Winnunga just cares, not only about me but about lots of our Elders’ Uncle Brian said.

Twelve years ago Uncle Brian and his late wife, who passed away 11 years ago, operated a community garden but when the funding stopped, the couple found themselves struggling to keep it going due to the ongoing costs.

‘I was speaking to Julie Tongs at Winnunga. I told her, what had happened and how I was paying for it out of my own pocket. Julie said ‘how can we help you’, Uncle Brian explained. ‘I couldn’t do it without Winnunga. It’s expensive with the seeds and punnets’ he added.

From humble beginnings in its current Queanbeyan location, the Winnunga Elders Garden became what it is today – a thriving community garden with a variety of seasonal vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, peas, beans, capsicum, lettuce, corn, turnips, chilli’s and some grapes.

The Ngemba Elder from Bourke said although it’s a lot of hard work taking care of 10 large garden beds, a green house, a number of sleepers and five trellises, he said it gives him a purpose, a reason to get up each morning. ‘I just love it, it’s satisfying. You just feel good within yourself. If you don’t do anything, you get bored, you drink, you do bad stuff but this keeps you on track. It’s also good exercise’ Uncle Brian explained.

Uncle Brian who works in the garden two hours a day and for four to five hours on a Saturday and Sunday was keen to describe the feeling he gets from seeing the plants grow. ‘You put the seeds in and wait to see it grow, see it sprout. Every day, it’s exciting. You then get to pick it and taste it’ he said.

Those who know the keen golfer, father of two, a grand-father and great-grandfather, can’t speak highly enough of his character. One of these people is Ian Bateman, Manager of Winnunga’s Social Health Team. ‘Uncle Brian is not only a great role model but also an interesting character with a great sense of humour. He brings a lot of knowledge and passion and we couldn’t think of a better person for the garden. It’s also good to see someone his age still being so active. He gives back to the community’ Mr Bateman said.

The Elders Garden has had a significant impact on the community.

‘I do up vegetable packages for families and Elders. There are about 15 families with kids, we give to. I like helping these families and Elders as they are battling to make ends meet, it saves them money’ Uncle Brian said. Mr Bateman also echoed Uncle Brian’s thoughts on the important role of the garden. ‘It’s a big benefit to the community. There are people struggling especially our Elders and pensioners. A lot of the pensioners are supporting extended families with serious social issues. So the garden and its produce are of a great benefit to the community’ Mr Bateman explained.

Uncle Brian also added ‘People are so grateful. For me, it’s mainly for the kids. Everything I grow isn’t sprayed, no pesticides, it’s all organic. This way, they get fresh vegetables, it encourages the kids to eat vegetables’ he said. Uncle Brian said although he is getting on in age, he still plans to keep working the garden for a little longer but welcomes any volunteers to help him out.

‘I reckon I’ve got two years left in me to keep doing this. It’s getting hard but I’ll still do it. I’d love to hear from any Koori fellas who’d like to help out. They could start out with one garden bed, I’ll help. I’ll give them the seeds’ he said.

If you would like to assist with the Winnunga AHS Elders Garden, please contact the Social Health Team at Winnunga on 02 6284 6222.

2. SA : Nathan Krakouer  no more bad choices now Deadly Choices

Port Adelaide Power journeyman Nathan Krakouer opens up on bad choices that almost ended his life READ Story Here

Nathan Krakouer speaks out about his past choices and how he turned his life around. Now Nathan wants to help others by using his lessons from binge drinking and drugs to advise indigenous youth to not go down the path he did.

Power signs on to boost health care

PORT Adelaide will have its indigenous players — such as Nathan Krakouer — become powerful role models in Aboriginal communities to promote better health.

And Power chief executive Keith Thomas explains the bold move from “the core business of football” as part of the Port Adelaide Football Club taking on greater responsibility with indigenous issues.

“We have a role to play in Aboriginal health care,” said Thomas, who this week challenged the AFL and its clubs to broaden the indigenous agenda beyond a celebration of Aboriginal culture with the Sir Doug Nicholls Round.

Port Adelaide yesterday signed an agreement with the Aboriginal Health Council of SA to be part of the “Deadly Choices” program that will encourage indigenous communities to have health checks.

The Deadly Choices program aims to advise indigenous youth the impact of poor lifestyle decisions by empowering them to make healthy decisions for themselves and their families.

The Deadly Choices team from Queensland were in Adelaide last week to bump heads with us before the big launch day on July 1st.

(L-R) Thomas Gilles, Ian Lacey, Wade Thompson, Trent Wingard, Nathan Appo, Marlon Motlop

Deadly Choices is a school-led, 8-week health and lifestyle program will encourage young people make the right choices to look after their own health.

And if they complete the health check at one of our member clinics, they will be able to win the Deadly Choices Guernsey.

Our member clinics are at Pipalyatjara, Amata, Umuwa, Fregon, Ernabella, Mimili, Indulkana.

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3.1 The new Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Council will bring together six different ACCHO’s  across North East Victoria

Six Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations will collaborate with Murray PHN to help improve access to health services and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our area.

They will form the newly-established Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Council, committed to improving indigenous health outcomes in the region, in line with the operational principles of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

Matt Jones, CEO of Murray PHN, said the organisation was the first Primary Health Network in Australia to establish an Indigenous Health Advisory Council.

“Our goal is to ensure that primary health services and the health service system across the Murray PHN catchment area are responsive to the needs of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities,” Mr Jones said.

“This is part of wider efforts to close the gap in life expectancy and health outcomes in the Indigenous population.

“As a representative voice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our region, the Indigenous Health Advisory Council will allow for the authentic participation of indigenous people in designing and developing models of care,” he said.

The Murray PHN Advisory Council membership will consist of:

  • Albury Wodonga Aboriginal Health Service (AWAHS)
  •  Bendigo and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BDAC)
  •  Mallee District Aboriginal Service (MDAS)
  •  Mungabereena Aboriginal Corporation
  •  Murray Valley Aboriginal Cooperative (MVAC)
  •  Njernda Aboriginal Corporation
  •  Murray PHN

Improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is one of the key health priorities for the region. Murray PHN has more than 14,800 people who identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (14,800+), and whose health status continues to be considerably lower than the wider population.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience a burden of disease two-and-a-half times that of other Australians, with 70 per cent of the health gap due to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, chronic respiratory disease, chronic kidney disease and mental health issues.

The Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Committee will meet quarterly.

3. VAHS hosts Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima 

 

“What inspires me and what I’m taking away is the love, I always have faith In community. Its powerful and has touched my heart and I’m taking that away with me.

I felt the love of community in this building and in this work, faith/belief in community, past present and future, I felt that within myself powerful. 

Oxfam fights alongside Indigenous communities. The power is in the love of community.”

After hearing Gary Foley’s  powerful recount of the rich and proud history of VAHS , Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima made this statement to the VAHS board, staff and community.

Thank you to Uncle Bill Nicholson, Aunty Janice Austin, Gary Foley, Jimmy Peters and the Board, Uncle Phil Ah Wanh, and Ngarra, Justin and the Oxfam team for making today happen.

4.AHCWA calls for “ICE “ intervention and prevention ACTION

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia has called for better access to early intervention and prevention programs to help address increasing methamphetamine (ice) use in regional WA. AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson Cox said “beggared belief” that there had not been any significant investment into grassroots community intervention programs despite ice use continuing to increase over the past decade.

“It is frustrating that despite several state and federal strategies highlighting the need to increase investment in community-led and culturally appropriate early intervention prevention, treatment and support services, we are yet to see any significant amounts of funding directed to our sector and other Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, “she said.

Ms Nelson Cox said there had been a concerning shift with ice use overtaking excessive alcohol use in some communities, resulting in services being unprepared and lacking the appropriate programs and services to provide care to those using the illicit drug.

“There is a growing presence of illicit drugs in the regions,” she said.

“While there is evidence that alcohol use is still higher than methamphetamine use, from the Aboriginal community perspective we are certainly seeing methamphetamine use becoming just as significant as alcohol use.

“Our people are crying out for help. They want community-led solutions and want to work with government departments but all they are getting is lip service.”

Ms Nelson Cox said there was no conclusive evidence that cashless welfare cards had made any impact in minimising drug use.

“Our Elders are gravely concerned about the impact of the cashless welfare card. There is no significant evidence to suggest that cashless welfare cards lead to any reduction in drug use in our regional communities”, she said.

“What we have seen in certain towns is an increase around elder abuse, black market trades of the cards for cash, reports of prostitution and a rapid rise in crime.

“Regional communities are trying to take practical approaches and strategies to deal with this problem.

“Penalising people through their Centrelink payments is not the solution. This approach will not deal with the crux of the problem. It will not empower our people and we are also yet to see investment into additional support services as was promised with its introduction.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal health services currently members.

5.1 NSW 60 Students graduate AHMRC Aboriginal Health College

 

A big day for 60 Students graduating today from courses at the AHNMRC Aboriginal Health College. Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands

Congratulations Aboriginal Health College 2017 graduates. Equals more Aboriginal health workers & culturally appropriate care

5.2 NSW Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking program hits the road.

Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking program hit the road last week with the help of some familiar faces.

We ran a workshop with the students to educate them about smoking and the effects the habit can have.

We would like to say a big thank you to our special guests for the day who were on hand to share some important messaging – George Rose, Samantha Harris, Latrell Mitchell, Connor Watson and Will Smith.

 6.QLD ‘No Smokes’ one-day training 
 

Please see the attached invitation to ‘No Smokes’ one-day training which will be delivered at Apunipima Cairns office on Thursday 15 June 2017 from 9.00am to 3.30pm.

The training provides an introduction to the ‘No Smokes’ resources, which include a variety of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific tools, as well as resources to inform people of the dangers of smoking and to assist them to quit.

The main resource used with the training will be a flipchart, which can be viewed here: http://nosmokes.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/TobaccoFlipchart_Sept2012_A4.pdf

The training is FREE and lunch and morning tea will be provided.

Please RSVP to Nina Nichols nina.nichols@apunipima.org.au or Kelly Franklin kelly.franklin@nintione.com.au.

7. NT Uncle Jimmy and NT ACCHO’S helps to stop Trachoma

 

Day one of the Barkly Desert Culture tour in Tennant Creek…For the past three years local artists the E town Boyz, Hill Boyz and The Sand Hill Women have been making inspirational music under the mentorship of Monkey Marc, Beatrice Lewis and Sean Spencer with support of the Barkly Shire Council.

The artists have collaborated to write and perform a great song to make their community aware of Trachoma and how to stop it.

Here is a sneak preview of the song and video that we will share with you all very soon.

OR WATCH VIDEO HERE

The tour goes to Elliott tomorrow, then Alpurrulam, Ampilatawatja, Ali Curung, Alparra and a big finale concert in Alice Springs on June 16th. Clean Faces, Strong Eyes Indigenous Eyehealth Caama Alice Springs CAAMA Music See Desert Hip Hop for all tour dates…..

8.Tasmania Culture Centre employment assistance service

“Interested in these jobs at IBIS Styles Hobart, or other jobs coming up?

Not sure how to apply?

Come along to the Aboriginal Health Service this Friday June 9 from 10.30 am to get some tips and help with updating your resume, writing your application and get some interview tips.

Let Sally know if you are interested in attending.. hobart@tacinc.com.au or ring 62340700”

Aboriginal Health : Second Atlas of Healthcare Variation highlights higher Aboriginal hospitalisation rates for all 18 clinical conditions

 

“The report, compiled by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, shows us that high hospitalisation rates often point to inadequate primary care in the community, leading to higher rates of potentially preventative hospitalization

The most disturbing example of this  has been the higher hospitalisation rates for all of the 18 clinical conditions surveyed experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, people living in areas of relative socioeconomic disadvantage and those living in remote areas.

 Chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson who is a member of the Atlas Advisory Group.

 “Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Please note

  • Features of the second Atlas include: Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status

DOWNLOAD Key-findings-and-recommendations

Mr Martin Bowles Secretary Dept of Health  launches the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation

A new report showing dramatic differences in treatment rates around Australia signals a pressing need for reforms to ensure equitable access to appropriate health care for all Australians, the Consumers Health Forum, says.

“A seven-fold difference in hospitalisation for heart failure and a 15-fold difference for a serious chronic respiratory disease depending on place of residence, are among many findings of substantial variations in treatment rates in Australia revealed in the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation,” the chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson, said.

“While there are a variety of factors contributing to these differences,  the variation in health and treatment outcomes is, as the report states, an ‘alarm bell’ that should make us stop and investigate whether appropriate care is being delivered.

“These findings show that recommended care for chronic diseases is not always provided.  Even with the significant funding provided through Medicare to better coordinate primary care for people with chronic and complex conditions, fragmented health services contribute to suboptimal management, as the report states.

“We support the report’s recommendation for a stronger primary health system that would provide a clinical ‘home base’ for coordination of patient care and in which patients and carers are activated to develop their knowledge and confidence to manage their health with the aid of a healthcare team.

“The Atlas provides further robust reasons for federal, state and territory governments to act on the demonstrated need for a more effective primary health system that will ensure better and more cost effective care for all Australians.

“The Atlas also examined  variations in women’s health care, and its findings included a seven-fold difference in rates of hysterectomy and  21-fold  difference in rates of endometrial ablation.  The report states that rates of hysterectomy and caesarean sections in Australia are higher than reported rates in other developed nations.  These results highlight the need for continuing support and information on women’s health issues,” Mr Lawson said.

The Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation (second Atlas) paints a picture of marked variation in the use of 18 clinical areas (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications) across Australia.

This Atlas, the second to be released by the Commission, illuminates variation by mapping use of health care according to where people live.  As well, this Atlas identifies specific achievable actions for exploration and quality improvement.

The second Atlas includes interventions not covered in the first Atlas, such as hospitalisations for chronic diseases and caesarean section in younger women. It also builds on the findings from the first Atlas – for example, examining hysterectomy and endometrial ablation separately, and examining rates of cataract surgery using a different dataset.

Priority areas for investigation and action arising from the second Atlas include use of:

  • Hysterectomy and endometrial ablation
  • Chronic conditions (COPD, diabetes complications)
  • Knee replacement.

Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Healthcare Variation – what does it tell us

Some variation is expected and associated with need-related factors such as underlying differences in the health of specific populations, or personal preferences. However, the weight of evidence in Australia and internationally suggests that much of the variation documented in the Atlas is likely to be unwarranted. Understanding this variation is critical to improving the quality, value and appropriateness of health care.

View the second Atlas

The second Atlas, released in June 2017, examined four clinical themes: chronic disease and infection – potentially preventable hospitalisations, cardiovascular, women’s health and maternity, and surgical interventions.

Key findings and recommendations for action are available here.

View the maps and download the data using the interactive platform.

What does the Atlas measure?

The second Atlas shows rates of use of healthcare interventions (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications,) in geographical areas across Australia.  The rate is then age and sex standardised to allow comparisons between populations with different age and sex structures. All rates are based on the patient’s place of residence, not the location of the hospital or health service.

The second Atlas uses data from national databases to explore variation across different healthcare settings. These included the National Hospital Morbidity Database and the AIHW National Perinatal Data Collection.

Who has developed the second Atlas?

The Commission worked with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) on the second Atlas.

The Commission consulted widely with the Australian government, state and territory governments, specialist medical colleges, clinicians and consumer representatives to develop the second Atlas.

Features of the second Atlas include:

  • Greater involvement of clinicians during all stages of development
  • Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status
  • Analysis of data by patient funding status (public or private).

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Chronic disease and infection: potentially preventable hospitalisations

1.1 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
1.2 Heart failure
1.3 Cellulitis
1.4 Kidney and urinary tract infections
1.5 Diabetes complications

Chapter 2 Cardiovascular conditions

2.1 Acute myocardial infarction admissions
2.2 Atrial fibrillation

Chapter 3 Women’s health and maternity

3.1 Hysterectomy
3.2 Endometrial ablation
3.3 Cervical loop excision or cervical laser ablation
3.4 Caesarean section, ages 20 to 34 years
3.5 Third- and fourth-degree perineal tear

Chapter 4 Surgical interventions

4.1 Knee replacement
4.2 Lumbar spinal decompression
4.3 Lumbar spinal fusion
4.4 Laparoscopic cholecystectomy
4.5 Appendicectomy
4.6 Cataract surgery
Technical Supplement
About the Atlas
Glossary

Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation data set specifications are available at http://meteor.aihw.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/674758

 

NACCHO TOP #JobAlerts #Scholarships this week in Aboriginal Health : #Doctors #GP #Aboriginal Health Workers / #Nurses / #Dentist

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1.This weeks good news AMA /Aboriginal Health career story

2.Sunrise Health Service NT – Chief Executive Officer 

3. PART-TIME DENTIST Goolburri Aboriginal Health 

4.South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

5.LECTURER/SENIOR LECTURER IN INDIGENOUS HEALTH

6. Senior Drug and Alcohol Educator – Murdi Paaki Drug and Alcohol Network

7 – 11 Danila Dilba Health Services Darwin 

12. Aboriginal Quitline Coordinator

13. Congress EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST- CLIENT SERVICE ROLES

14. Congress General Practitioner

15. NT Medical Practitioner / General Practitioner

16.Aboriginal students Nursing Scholarships Victoria

17 .This weeks good news AMA /Aboriginal Health career story

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 1.This weeks good news Aboriginal Health career story

 ” As a 13-year-old, James Chapman watched his father, a proud Indigenous man from Yuwlaaraay country, die after a short, seven-week battle with acute myeloid leukaemia. As a school leaver, he became his mother’s carer for 12 months as she recovered from brain surgery.

Today, the 25-year-old, second-year medical student has won the 2017 AMA Indigenous Medical Scholarship –$10,000 a year for each year of study – to help him pursue his dream of becoming a medical professional.”

See full AMA Story HERE  or Part below

2.Sunrise Health Service NT – Chief Executive Officer 

Sunrise Health Service now has an extremely rewarding opportunity for an experienced Chief Executive Officer to join their dedicated, multidisciplinary team, on a full-time basis. 
In this role you will be responsible for the efficient delivery of health and related services to the Katherine East communities in accordance with Sunrise Health Service rules, policies, and procedures.

You will also provide high level leadership, direction, management and coordination of the Sunrise Health Service activities through the Executive Management Team whose purpose is to plan, develop and implement organisational objectives in a manner that is consistent with corporate governance, reporting, financial and regulatory requirements. 

Applications Close June 29

For full details and application form, please visit:
 
3. PART-TIME DENTIST Goolburri Aboriginal Health 

Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Company Limited (Goolburri) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled not for profit organisation, whose vision is “to Close the Gap in oral and broader health disparities experienced by Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander peoples within the Goolburri Service Area”.

This is achieved through delivery of innovative, comprehensive and integrated health and well-being support services including:
• Oral Health Care in Toowoomba with mobile service delivery to communities around Roma, Cunnamulla & Charleville (1.5 FTE Dentists)
• a Primary Health Care bulk billing GP services and chronic disease management program based in Toowoomba (1,5 FTE GP clinic)
• In Home support services to elderly clients in Toowoomba
• Family Support services in Toowoomba with satellite offices in St George, Roma, Cunnamulla & Charleville.
Goolburri reaches over 1000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from its Toowoomba fixed clinic and has expanded services in the region, with the a fully equipped Mobile Dental Van.
We require an experienced Dentist to provide quality services as an integrated component of our multi-disciplinary primary health care approach.

This position will primarily work from the Toowoomba based clinic with potential for assistance with the Mobile van service as required.
Competitive Salary Package including salary sacrifice
• Attractive purpose built premises/van
• Set within a small Primary Health Care clinic with professional staff
• Well Balanced working environment – Days negotiable
If you are interested in this position and would like more information, please contact the David Smith (Practice Manager) on (07) 4632 0338

4.South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) is a non Government Health Service based in Bunbury which provides a variety of health services to Aboriginal people in the South West of Western Australia.  SWAMS delivers a wide range of community programs and has a strong growth strategy through partnership opportunities and future community development.

Aboriginal Health Worker (50d) Full Time

Here at SWAMS we have an exciting position available for someone looking to make a difference. As an Aboriginal Health Worker, you will be involved in assessment, care coordination, support, advocacy and community development activities.

Specific requirements of this position include but are not limited to;

Essential Criteria

  • Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders descent under section 50(d) Equal Opportunity Act.
  • Current Certificate IV (preferred) in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care.
  • Demonstrated ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with Aboriginal people.
  • A demonstrated understanding of the unique issues affecting and impacting upon the health of Aboriginal people
  • Experience, skills and knowledge in multidisciplinary teamwork and conflict management.
  • Sound written and oral communication skills.
  • Demonstrated organisational and time management skills along with an ability to adapt to changing needs.
  • Knowledge and experience in the provision of health promotion programs.
  • Knowledge of community and local Aboriginal cultural issues.

Desirable Criteria

  • Knowledge and expertise in the use of Communicare or similar clinical database system.

All candidates must have a WA Drivers License and will be required to undertake a National Police Check prior to beginning employment.

In addition to above award wages, Salary Sacrifice is available for the right candidate .

For Information 

For further information about this position, please telephone the Human Resources Coordinator on (08) 9791 1166 during normal business hours.

To Apply

To apply for this role, please visit http://www.swams.com.au Current Vacancies and click on the role that you would like to apply for. This will take you to through the online application process. Alternatively please come and see one of the friendly HR staff who will be able to assist you in going through the online application process

Applications must be received by 5pm Wednesday, 14th June 2017

SWAMS reserves the right to withdraw this advertisement prior to the stated closing date.

To apply online, please click on the appropriate link below. Alternatively, for a confidential discussion, please contact Tia Ashwin on , quoting Ref No. 758896.

5.LECTURER/SENIOR LECTURER IN INDIGENOUS HEALTH (INDIGENOUS APPLICANTS ONLY)

 Agency: Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences
Job no: 0039059
Work type: Continuing
Location: Parkville
Categories: Various categories

Apply now

Centre for Health Equity
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Only Indigenous Australians are eligible to apply as this position is exempt under the Special Measure Provision, Section 12 (1) of the Equal Opportunity Act 2011 (Vic).

Salary: Level B $98,775 – $117,290 p.a or Level C $120,993 – $139,510 p.a. plus 17% superannuation. Level of appointment will be commensurate with the qualifications and relevant experience of the successful appointee.

The University of Melbourne Indigenous Health Equity Unit is seeking an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander individual to coordinate the Melbourne School for Population and Global Health’s teaching program in Indigenous health. This exciting position will provide the opportunity for the appointee to be part of a leadership team committed to leading and growing the future health workforce capable of creating parity between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and all Australians. The appointee will demonstrate expertise in the fields of public health and Indigenous health research and demonstrate a strong commitment to advance and coordinate clinical and non-clinical teaching strategies, strengthen curriculum, improve enrollments and if desired undertake research in Indigenous health.

Established in September 2014, the Indigenous Health Equity Unit (IHEU) addresses health impacts of poor socio-economic status, education, unemployment and avoidable health inequities that arise because of situations in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people grow, live, work and age. The appointee will engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, staff and students to close the health gap between Australia’s First Peoples and other Australians. In addition, the appointee will link local, national and international agencies in teaching and research excellence and promote evidence-informed, strengths-based approaches in population, public and global health to ‘closing the gap’ on life expectancy.

The appointee will be responsible for the establishment and evaluation of Indigenous Health Teaching and Learning programs in the Melbourne School for Population and Global Health. This position will design, develop, implement and evaluate the impact of delivery of curricula, staff development for current and future staff, students and graduates. The appointee will also work with the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health teaching staff to ensure students maximise their exposure to Indigenous health issues locally and globally, and coordinate teaching activities as required with the University’s Department of Rural Health in Shepparton.

Close date: 25 June 2017

Position Description and Selection Criteria

Download File 0039059.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/search/info/selection-criteria

Advertised: Jun 05 2017 AUS Eastern Standard Time
Application close: Jun 25 2017 AUS Eastern Standard Time

6. Senior Drug and Alcohol Educator – Murdi Paaki Drug and Alcohol Network

  • Rewarding opportunity to develop the capacity of health workers and support Aboriginal communities in the Murdi Paaki region.
  • Attractive remuneration package & excellent professional development opportunities.
  • Immediate start, contract position until 30th June 2018.

The organisation

Lyndon is a non-government organisation providing drug and alcohol services in regional, rural and remote areas, including: residential services in Orange and outreach programs to the Central West, Blue Mountains, the Murdi Paaki Region (West and Far West NSW) and Bega on the South Coast of NSW.

Lyndon provides innovative, person-centred and evidence-based programs to clients across the lifespan to improve the wellbeing of individuals, families and the community.

The role

Lyndon is seeking an experienced Drug and Alcohol Clinician for a Senior Drug and Alcohol Educator role in the Murdi Paaki Drug and Alcohol Network (MPDAN), a workforce development strategy that aims to reduce the harm done by drugs and alcohol in Aboriginal communities.

Based at the Clinical Hub in Orange NSW, the position is responsible for providing: clinical, group and practice supervision, training and education and capacity building services to primary health care providers such as Aboriginal Health Workers, D&A workers and other community service workers in the MPDAN region. An important part of this role is supporting service development of partner Aboriginal Health Services in the region.

Regular travel to the region (i.e. Bourke, Broken Hill, Walgett and Coonamble) is required.

The position is full-time until 30th June 2018.

The candidate

The ideal candidate will have:

  • Tertiary qualifications in health, welfare or related disciplines.
  • A minimum of 5 years’ experience in drug and alcohol service delivery.
  • A commitment to upskilling the drug and alcohol workforce including: evaluation, research, ongoing program development and quality improvement.
  • Experience providing education and supervision to clinical staff.
  • An ability to work in a multi-disciplinary, cross-agency and cross-cultural environment.
  • Experience working with or for Aboriginal organisations and communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with relevant experience and qualifications are encouraged to apply.

The benefits

Enjoy an attractive remuneration package negotiable with experience, plus superannuation, salary packaging, flexible working hours, laptop, paid travel expenses and excellent professional development and training opportunities.

How to apply

For further information on the position or to view a copy of the position description, contact RenCare Recruit on 0439 906 284 or email: renee@rencare.com.au.

 

To apply, email a cover letter (addressing the selection criteria, available at www.rencare.com.au/jobs) and your CV to renee@rencare.com.au. All applications will be reviewed upon submission.

7 – 11 Danila Dilba Health Services Darwin

7.SOCIAL WORKER

(Integrated Team Care)

*Total Salary $101,200 – $106,344

Full Time / Fixed Term / 1 position

The Social Worker will be responsible for working collaboratively with patients, general practitioners, practice staff and Aboriginal Health Workers to provide appropriate multidisciplinary care and services for Aboriginal people with a chronic condition.

For further information please contact Malcolm Darling (General Manager, Darwin) on 0418 855 839 or email Malcolm.Darling@ddhs.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

 

To apply please select HERE

8.FAMILY PARTNERSHIP WORKER (FPW)

(ANFFP)

*Total Salary $66,097 – $70,920

Full Time / Fixed Term / 2 position

The Family Partnership Worker (FPW) is integral to the successful implementation of the Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program (ANFPP).

The Family Partnership Worker is responsible for maintaining high level standards of community practice, foster acceptance of the ANFPP model in the community and observe the Primary Health Care Service’s policies and guidelines. The FPW is an identified position.

joy.mclaughlin@daniladilba.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

 

To apply please select HERE

9.NURSE SUPERVISOR

(ANFFP)

*Total Salary $107,818 – $115,833

Full Time / Fixed Term / 1 position

The Nurse Supervisor will facilitate the implementation and delivery of the Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) to pregnant women with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander baby and their families using a therapeutic, partnership approach.

joy.mclaughlin@daniladilba.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

 

To apply please select HERE

10.COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER

*Total Salary $81,186 – $89,229

Full Time / Fixed-Term / 1 position

The Marketing and Communications Officer works as part of Corporate Services Team in providing quality support services to the GM Marketing and Corporate Affairs in day-to-day communications, events and stakeholder engagement.

Kyrn.Stevens@ddhs.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

All applicants must apply via the online portal (link below) ensuring they address the Selection Criteria and include current resume/CV.

 

To apply please select HERE

11.REGISTERED MIDWIFE

*Total Salary $118,730 – $123,714

Full Time / ongoing / 1 position

The Registered Midwife will contribute to the quality and delivery of primary health care within the Danila Dilba Health Service Mothers and Babies Clinic, by providing high quality, comprehensive and culturally appropriate midwifery care to patient with the aim of improving maternal and birth outcomes.

Elle.Crighton@ddhs.org.au This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

APPLICATIONS CLOSE: 12 June 2017 (5pm)

 

12. Aboriginal Quitline Coordinator

Medibank


We’re passionate about nurturing careers.

We support new innovation and thinking, and openly collaborate and share new ideas. We’re healthy and active in our lives and wellbeing is encouraged at every level.  Our people play an important role in the future of health and healthcare and we believe that working together, we’re stronger.

About Us

Medibank is a leading private health insurer with 40 years of experience delivering better health to Australians. We look after the health cover needs of millions of customers and deliver a wide range of programs to support health and wellbeing in the community.

The Opportunity

Medibank is delivering the best possible smoking cessation outcomes for Aboriginal clients in NSW and ACT on behalf of Quitline, the Cancer Institute of NSW and Healthdirect Australia.

The Aboriginal Quitline Program provides both inbound and outbound calls to Aboriginal clients who are considering smoking cessation. We have a dedicated team of counsellors who provide specific interventions such as delivering one off counselling, focusing on quit planning, supporting with quitting (including managing withdrawal symptoms), providing strategies for relapse prevention and providing outbound milestone checks.

Joining our Relationship Management team, the Aboriginal Coordinator will provide team leadership and program direction in relation to Quitline, specifically focused on the delivery of the program to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Clients. This is a 12 month maternity leave contract and will be critical in promoting the service & liaising with Aboriginal Health workers & key Aboriginal Health & Community Controlled Services to ensure strong partnerships. The role will have a distinct community focus and will be key in the promotion of the program amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. This is a satisfyingly broad role with a range of responsibilities including:

  • Develop and implement Aboriginal Health Community Engagement Strategies for the NSW and ACT Aboriginal Quitline program
  • Foster relationships within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to promote awareness of services by travelling to identified communities;
  • Represent NSW Quitline at Aboriginal Health community events, organising and hosting promotional stalls as required;
  • Lead Aboriginal Advisory Groups with participation from key influencers in Aboriginal health groups to inform service design and the delivery of service improvement initiatives;
  • Lead engagement efforts to increase the variety of services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities;
  • Support the development and delivery of cultural education and training across the business and contribute to the Aboriginal Employment Strategy.

About You

You have exceptional communication and stakeholder engagement skills which enable you to build strong and lasting relationships across a range of internal and external stakeholders/clients and community groups. Critical thinking, decision making and problem solving skills are your strong suit as is your ability to lead and motivate others to achieve shared goals and objectives. You will also have the following skills and experience:

  • Strong community engagement experience with Aboriginal communities, ideally in health, welfare or similar;
  • Strong delivery focus; project management skills will be highly regarded;

Highly desirable – experience as a Counsellor, Registered Nurse or Allied Health Professional

This position will only be open to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander applicants – Medibank considers this to be a genuine occupational requirement under the relevant anti-discrimination legislation.

What We Offer

In return for your hard work we offer a range of great benefits. Furthermore, we take the health and wellbeing of our employees seriously, offering flexible working conditions and encouraging well-being at all levels of life.

Medibank is an equal opportunity employer committed to providing a working environment that embraces and values diversity and inclusion. If you have any support or access requirements, we encourage you to advise us at the time of application to assist you through the recruitment process.

A Career at Medibank adds up to more. More achievement. More progress. More passion and more innovation for health.

For a career option that will suit you better, click to apply.

Please note, if this position attracts a large volume of interest, the closing date for applications may be brought forward. With this in mind, we encourage you to submit your application as soon as possible.

MORE INFO

13. Congress EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST- CLIENT SERVICE ROLES

Alice Springs
Reference: 3511700
  • Client Service Officer
  • Across Multiple Sites​
  • Base Hourly Rate $25.84 – $31.10

Aboriginal Identified

Due to expansion of service locations in Alice Springs Congress is seeking experienced Client Service Officers who will provide a high standard of client service and general administrative support to various Congress Clinical Teams, the roles may involve evening and weekend shiftwork.

Congress offers the following:

  • Competitive salaries and allowances
  • Six (6) weeks’ annual leave
  • Generous salary packaging up to $30,000 per annum
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)
  • Access to selected Congress health services at no cost for self and eligible family.

Applications will be reviewed as they are received.

Application close: MONDAY 31 JULY 2017.

For more information about jobs at Congress call Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or email vacancy@caac.org.au or visit www.caac.org.au/hr.

Applications Close: 31 Jul 2017

14. Congress General Practitioner

Alice Springs

Reference: 3326264

  • Base salary between $179,818 and $208,556 depending on experience (includes district allowance)
  • Paid annual leave 6 weeks plus 1 week paid professional development leave
  • Flexible working conditions
  • Medicare incentive scheme
  • NFP salary sacrifice up to $30,000 pa
  • General Practice Rural Incentives Program (as at 1 November 2016). Congress operates in MM6 and MM7 regions, providing access to annual gross payments of up to $35K and $60K respectively depending on performance.
  • Working with a large team of general practitioners
  • Access to Congress provided selected medical services at no cost for self and eligible family..

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 40 years’ experience providing comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal people living in Central Australia. Congress is seeking a General Practitioner who is interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

This position is based in Alice Springs with a town of 27,000 people, with good access to good schools, flights, amenities.

For more information on the position please contract, Medical Director, Sam Heard 0438 556 050 or sam.heard@caac.org.au.

For more information about jobs at Congress call Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or email vacancy@caac.org.au or visit www.caac.org.au/hr.

Applications will be reviewed as they are received.

Applications Close: 30 Jun 2017

15. NT Medical Practitioner / General Practitioner

Job No: 89281
Location: Ngukkur, Katherine region, NT
Closing Date: 8 Jul 2017
  • Rewarding opportunity for experienced GP to join a well-established Community Controlled Health Organisation! 
  • Contribute to the improvement of medical services for a number of remote communities!
  • Highly attractive remuneration package circa $330,000 including a number of fantastic benefits!

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation now has a rewarding opportunity for a Medical Practitioner / General Practitioner to join their dedicated team in Ngukurr, within the Katherine Region of the Northern Territory.

As a Remote Medical Practitioner (RMP) at SHSAC, you will work as part of a multi-disciplinary team, led by the Director of Public Health and Planning. The role will involve provision of primary health care, support for and sharing of skills with other health centre staff and participation in key primary health care initiatives and community consultation.

To be considered for this position you must have the following:

  • Registration as a General Practitioner with AHPRA;
  • An understanding and commitment to the principles of Aboriginal community control in primary health care delivery; and
  • Broad based experience in primary health care appropriate to working in a rural/remote location.

Your dedication will be rewarded with a highly attractive salary package negotiable with skills and experience and salary packaging options.

You will be working in brand new, state of the art facility and also have access to a huge range of other benefits including:

  • 6 weeks leave per year;
  • Up to 10 days study leave;
  • Fully subsidised air-conditioned housing, utilities, subsidised phone rental and up to $100 in phone calls;
  • Salary packaging options up to $15,899 per packaging year;
  • Full support from the health team; and
  • Generous relocation and repatriation.

About the Organisation

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (SHSAC) is a community Controlled Health Organisation providing medical services to a number of remote communities throughout the Katherine region including Barunga, Manyallaluk, Wugularr, Bulman, Mataranka, Jilkminggan, Minyerri, Ngukurr and Urapunga.

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation works in partnership with Northern Territory PHN (NT PHN), who provide support services to health professionals and organisation across the Northern Territory. NT PHN offers support and assistance to eligible nurses and allied health professionals who are relocating the to the NT for the purposes of employment.

Don’t miss out on this unique opportunity in which you can truly make a difference – Apply Now!

16.Aboriginal students Nursing Scholarships Victoria

An exciting new opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Enrolled Nursing Students at Austin Health, Victoria.

We are running a cadetship program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander enrolled nursing students to come and work at our organisation and gain pre-graduation paid practical work experience.

The cadetship program would involve working a total of 40 shifts from June/July – December this year.  The cadets will work under the delegation and supervision of a registered nurse.  This is an excellent opportunity for the students to have paid experience, learn skills for work readiness and to learn about working within a health service.

 

I have attached the position description and information flyer.  The job is listed on our careers website https://austinhealth.mercury.com.au/ under ‘Enrolled Nurse Aboriginal Cadetship Program’. The job closes today, but we will be extending the deadline to allow for more applications.

DOWNLOAD

Aboriginal EN Cadetship Position Description

Cadetship Program flyer

17 .This weeks good news AMA /Aboriginal Health career story

As a 13-year-old, James Chapman watched his father, a proud Indigenous man from Yuwlaaraay country, die after a short, seven-week battle with acute myeloid leukaemia. As a school leaver, he became his mother’s carer for 12 months as she recovered from brain surgery.

Today, the 25-year-old, second-year medical student has won the 2017 AMA Indigenous Medical Scholarship –$10,000 a year for each year of study – to help him pursue his dream of becoming a medical professional.

AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, who presented the Scholarship at the AMA National Conference 2017 in Melbourne today, said that Mr Chapman’s story is inspiring.

“We know that the medical workforce must reflect the diversity of its patients, and that Indigenous people have improved health outcomes when they are treated by Indigenous doctors and health professionals,” Dr Gannon said.

“Yet in 2017, there are just 281 medical practitioners employed in Australia as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander – representing 0.3 per cent of the workforce.

“This is an improvement. It means that there are 60 more Indigenous doctors practising in Australia than in 2012, which shows how critical medical students like Mr Chapman are to building the Indigenous health workforce.”

Mr Chapman said that while he did not realise it at the time, his father was a victim of the gap that exists between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

“After my father’s death, I travelled to Yuwlaaraay country (north-west NSW and south-west Queensland) with my grandfather to return my father,” Mr Chapman said.

“While on this journey, I learnt a lot about our culture, as well as witnessing rural communities with high Indigenous populations that were clearly suffering from health inequities.

“Coming from a regional city with access to most health specialist facilities within a 10km radius, I was shocked to see communities with access only to a visiting doctor and nurse.”

While doing his HSC, he studied biology and became intrigued by the way the human body worked. He dreamed of one day becoming a doctor, but was discouraged by his teachers.

After school, he began an Arts degree, majoring in Indigenous Studies, at the University of Wollongong. But his study was derailed when his mother was diagnosed with a brain tumour, and he became her carer for a year while she recovered.

“Constantly in clinical environments, my dream of becoming a medical professional became more intense, and after my mother recovered, I began a Science degree with the intention of completing post graduate medicine,” Mr Chapman said.

“Then I discovered an entry program for medicine at the University of New South Wales for Indigenous students.”

Now in his second year, Mr Chapman intends to study from Wagga Wagga from his third year onwards to experience rural health, and rural and remote Indigenous health care. He hopes to become a GP, working with Indigenous women and children in rural and remote Australia.

“I learnt a lot from my father, like the importance of family, culture, and education,” Mr Chapman said.

“His death made me realise my potential to contribute to my fellow Indigenous populations via providing access to health services.

“My purpose in studying medicine is so that I can practise in rural and remote Australia, offering Indigenous people access to equal health care, and addressing a major socio-economic inequality in Australia.

“While I realise that closing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people isn’t a one-man job, I take comfort in knowing that I can contribute and make a difference to my fellow Indigenous people’s lives; prolonging and preserving a culture that holds a very important place, both to myself and to many others.”

Dr Gannon said that, in 2017, a total of 286 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander medical students are enrolled across all year levels across Australia. However, four of the 15 colleges are yet to have an Indigenous trainee.

“The AMA Scholarship has assisted many Indigenous men and women, who may not have otherwise had the financial resources to study medicine, to graduate to work in Indigenous and mainstream health services,” Dr Gannon said.

“These wonderful doctors are now the pride of the medical profession and their communities, and role models for Indigenous Australians.”

The AMA Indigenous Medical Scholarship was established in 1994 with a contribution from the Commonwealth Government. The AMA is looking for further sponsorships to continue this important contribution to Indigenous health.

Donations are tax-deductible. For more information, go to https://ama.com.au/advocacy/indigenous-peoples-medical-scholarship

Aboriginal Health Programs-Debate : Evaluating #Indigenous programs : a toolkit for change

 

 ” The Federal Government recently announced it will allocate $10 million a year over four years to strengthen the evaluation of Indigenous programs.

However, given that the average cost of an evaluation is $382,000, the extra $10 million a year for Indigenous program evaluations will not go far.

To make the most of this additional funding the government must change the way it evaluates and monitors programs.”

Sarah Hudson Researcher The Centre for Independent Studies

Download the report HERE

Evaluating Indigenous programs a tool kit for change

” Aboriginal community-controlled organisations treat health not just as a physical problem, but see it as tied in with the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole community, in which each individual is able to achieve their full potential as a human being.

While this has its roots in Aboriginal cultural norms, she says, it also mirrors well-known social determinants of health.”

 ” Victoria’s peak Aboriginal health body was recently given two days to respond to a draft family violence plan “the size of a PhD”, its CEO says. It’s another example of governments just not getting how to work with Aboriginal communities.

Co-design with community groups cannot work if government asks for input after the big decisions have already been made or rush consultation, warns the head of Victoria’s peak body for the Aboriginal community health system.

“It’s not an equal partnership. We’re at their whim, and we’ve got to run to their agenda,”

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation CEO Jill Gallagher said last week in a speech at the University of Melbourne. See Article 2 Below

” Evaluation at the contract, program and outcome level will ensure we not only know where the money is being spent, but we will know what works and why.

“This is important for the government and taxpayers, but more important for communities in whose name the money is spent.

“It will also mean we will be better able to assess where our investm­ent needs to be focused in the future — and ensure the IAS continues to deliver outcomes for indigenous communities.”

From Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion Article 3 below

 Feb 3 2017 NACCHO Aboriginal Health #IAS Funding : Turnbull government to spend $40m evaluating effectiveness of Indigenous programs 

Although formal evaluations for large government programs are important, evaluation need not involve outside contractors. Government must adopt a learning and developmental approach that embeds evaluation into a program’s design as part of a continuous quality improvement process.

It is not enough just to evaluate, government must actually use the findings from evaluations to improve service delivery. Unfortunately, many government agencies ignore evaluations when making funding decisions or implementing new programs.

Analysis of 49 Indigenous program evaluation reports, found only three used rigorous methodology.

Overall, the evaluations were characterised by a lack of data and the absence of a control group, as well as an overreliance on anecdotal evidence.

Adopting a co-accountability approach to evaluation will ensure that both the government agency funding the program and the program provider delivering the program are held accountable for results.

An overarching evaluation framework could assist with the different levels of outcomes expected over the life of the program and the various indicators needed to measure whether the program is meeting its objectives.

Feedback loops and a process to escalate any concerns will help to ensure government and program providers keep each other honest and lessons are learnt.

Analysis of Indigenous program evaluations

Mapping of total federal, state and territory and non-government/not-for-profit Indigenous programs identified 1082 Indigenous specific programs. Of these:

49 were federal government programs;

• 236 were state and territory programs; and

• 797 were programs delivered by non-government organisations.

The largest category of programs were health related programs (n=568) followed by cultural programs (n=145) then early childhood and education programs (n=130) — see Figure 1.

The program category with the highest number of evaluations was health (n=44), followed by early childhood and education (n=16). However, percentage wise, more programs were evaluated under the jobs and economy category (15%) than the other program categories.

Of the 490 programs delivered by Aboriginal organisations, only 20 were evaluated (4%). The small number of businesses delivering a program (n=6) meant that while there were only two evaluations of Indigenous programs provided by a business, this category had the highest percentage of programs evaluated (33%).

Similarly, while only six of the 33 programs delivered by schools and universities were evaluated, this category had the second highest percentage of programs evaluated (23%). Conversely, government and non-Indigenous NGO delivered programs had the highest number of evaluations, n=36 and n=24, but much lower percentages of evaluations as the number of overall programs was higher, n=278 and n=276.

A total of 49 evaluation reports were analysed and assessed against a scale rating the rigour of the methodology. Only three evaluation reports utilised strong methodology (see Figure 4).

In general, Indigenous evaluations are characterised by a lack of data and the absence of a control group, as well as an over-reliance on anecdotal evidence

Suggestions for policy makers and program funders include:

  • Embedding evaluation into program design and practice — evaluation should not be viewed as an ‘add on’ but should be built into a program’s design and presented as part of a continuous quality improvement process with funding for self-evaluation provided to organisations.
  • Developing an evidence base through an accountability framework with regular feedback loops via an online data management system — to ensure data being collected is used to inform practice and improve program outcomes and there is a process for escalating concerns.

Suggestions for program providers include:

  • Embedding evaluation into program practice — evaluation should not be viewed as a negative process, but as an opportunity to learn.
  • Developing an evidence base through the regular collection of data via an online data management system to not only provide a stronger evidence base for recurrent funding, but also to improve service delivery and ensure client satisfaction with the program

Article 2 Govt co-design ‘not an equal partnership’: Aboriginal health CEO

Victoria’s peak Aboriginal health body was recently given two days to respond to a draft family violence plan “the size of a PhD”, its CEO says. It’s another example of governments just not getting how to work with Aboriginal communities.

Co-design with community groups cannot work if government asks for input after the big decisions have already been made or rush consultation, warns the head of Victoria’s peak body for the Aboriginal community health system.

“It’s not an equal partnership. We’re at their whim, and we’ve got to run to their agenda,” Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation CEO Jill Gallagher said last week in a speech at the University of Melbourne.

A particularly vivid example of this is engagement on the establishment of family violence hubs around the state. Gallagher, who is on the family violence industry taskforce, said she was handed a draft plan already outlining the main priorities on Monday, and asked to provide a written response by Wednesday. “A report the size of a PhD,” she added.

“So when they say ‘we want to co-design with you guys’, always ask them what their version of co-designing is,” she told the audience. “Without systematic change in mainstream attitudes and practices, and incorporation of Aboriginal peoples in all stages of policy design, health policies will remain unproductive.”

While Gallagher says she understands the challenges of trying to co-design with a community, government needed to make a more concerted effort to do it properly.

“It doesn’t give us due respect of being part of the beginning right through to the evaluation.”

Culture is strength

Aboriginal culture is often seen in the wider Australian population as a barrier to health, implying that assimilation is the only way forward, Gallagher said.

She rejects this idea. “Cultural differences need to be celebrated and preserved. They are a source of strength and resilience for our peoples, which offer protective factors against traumatic life events.”

Cultural safety and trust can have a big impact on engagement with institutions. She points to the fact that around the country, Aboriginal people are discharged against medical advice or at their own risk at eight times the rate of the rest of the population. This has obvious flow on effects for overall wellbeing.

“When we have a culturally safe place for patients and our people, we improve access to services and improve health for individuals, therefore health for families, therefore health for communities.”

Also in The MandarinIndigenous policy evidence, where it exists, over-relies on anecdotal evidence

Creating that environment should not only be up to Aboriginal employees or a good CEO, but come out of an organisation’s systems. This means more than just creating a few identified positions — it’s everyone’s responsibility.

Aboriginal community-controlled organisations treat health not just as a physical problem, but see it as tied in with the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole community, in which each individual is able to achieve their full potential as a human being. While this has its roots in Aboriginal cultural norms, she says, it also mirrors well-known social determinants of health.

“Possessing a strong sense of cultural identity is also vital for one’s self-esteem. A positive cultural connection not only contributes to better mental health and physical health, but may lessen the consequences of social prejudice against Aboriginal peoples.”

Yet despite plenty of experience to show the importance of culture as a source of resilience, it “remains largely unexplored” as a public health resource, she says.

Funding models that don’t fit

Governments ignoring the role of culture creates other problems, Gallagher explains.

The Commonwealth made a capital investment a few years ago to create a childcare centre and kindergarten in Melbourne’s northern suburbs called Bubup Wilam. Recurrent funding was only given for two years, with the idea that it would become self-sustaining by the end of that short period.

“Bubup Wilam grew and evolved and it’s a beautiful childcare centre and kindergarten for Aboriginal children, where they can learn and express aboriginal culture but also have access to what every other kid has access to.

Despite the success, it’s “struggling to continue that at the moment” and is trying to raise funds in the community, she says, “because it doesn’t just provide a kindergarten like for a mainstream nuclear family.”

“Because a lot of the kids and families that access Bubup Wilam are families that live well under the poverty line, a lot of them are touched by the child protection system. What Bubup Wilam tries to do is work with the children, but also work with the families — the mum or the dad or the caregiver — and that takes a lot of resources.

“So our model there does not fit within the mainstream model of how they fund a nuclear, non-Aboriginal childcare centre. … So that’s an example of how the differences and different needs and funding formulas don’t fit what we need to achieve.”

This comes back to the co-design problem: governments aren’t paying enough attention to what the community says, and end up designing the system to fit what they think the community needs, which is different to what it really needs.

“It’s about involving us from the word go,” says Gallagher.

“What Fitzroy might need is different to what Fitzroy Crossing might need.”

Part 3 : Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion

The Turnbull government will spend $40 million evaluating its indigenous affairs programs in an attempt to counter a national audit office report expected to be harshly critical of the way billions of dollars have been allocated.

Sidelined prime ministerial indigen­ous adviser Warren Mundine said yesterday the report, to be tabled today, was expected to be “damning”, as was the official Clos­ing the Gap report due within days.

The audit office report follows a Senate inquiry last year that blasted the 2014 implementation of the Abbott government’s flagship multi-billion-dollar Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

A 2015 Productivity Commission report found there was insufficient evidence being collected about the outcomes of indigenous programs and that “formal rigorous evaluations of indigenous programs that set the benefits of particular policies for reducing disadvantage against the costs are relatively scarce”.

Spending on mainstream and indigenous-specific programs and services has been estimated by the government to be worth $30 billion. A Centre for Independent Studies report last year found only 8 per cent of 1082 indigenous-spec­ific programs, worth $5.9bn, had been effectively evaluated.

However, Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion, who will announce the four-year evalua­tion program today, said reporting, monitoring and evaluation of the IAS had already been improved­, and accounting for how much was being spent in the portfolio was now possible.

“However, we need to continually build on this and further strengthen the evaluation of our investment to ensure that money allocated through the IAS is invest­ed in ways that make the greatest difference for our first Australians,” Senator Scullion said. “By establishing a multi-year funding allocation, we are ensuring there will be a long-term plan for evaluation and a formal strategy to monitor and review how individ­ual contracts and program streams are contributing to our effort­s to deliver better outcomes for indigenous Australians.

Senator Scullion said the evaluation would be rolled out in close consultation with Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, including­ indigenous-run firms. “Indig­enous-run companies are currently delivering rigorous evaluation for the government and this new framework will continue this partnership,” he said.