NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #SmartEatingWeek : We give 40,000 years of bushtucker and #nutrition the #thumpsup : Contributions from @Wuchopperen @NutritionAust #NATryFor5 #NATryFor5 @SandroDemaio @MenziesResearch @DAA_feed

 ” Bush tucker, or bush food, we have used the environment around us for generations (40,000 years ) , living off a diet high in protein, fibre, and micronutrients, and low in sugars. Much of the bush tucker eaten is still available and eaten today.

We guide you through it here ”

See Part 1 Below.

Read over 45 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Nutrition Healthy Foods articles published last 6 years

 ” Wuchopperen Health Service celebrated Smart Eating Week (12 – 18 February) by promoting the GOOD TUCKER app which gives food items thumbs up, thumbs across, or thumbs down depending on how healthy they are.

The GOOD TUCKER app was developed by Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up!, The University of South Australia and Menzies School of Health Research in partnership with The George Institute, to provide a simple way for people to identify the healthiest food and drink options available in stores.

Your smart phone can help you make smart choices, Sometime the nutrition panels on food items can be complex – using the Thumbs Up app gives people a quick rating to help them make a better choice “

See Part 2 Below

 ” Why you still need to eat healthy foods — even if you aren’t overweight

We all have that one friend whose eating habits and body shape simply don’t add up. While enjoying the unhealthiest of meals and a sedentary lifestyle, somehow they effortlessly retain a slender figure.

At first glance we may assume these slim people are healthy, but it’s not always the case.

So if you don’t have weight to worry about, what’s the impetus for avoiding sweet or salty temptations and eating good, nutritious foods instead? ”

Alessandro R Demaio is an Australian medical doctor and fellow in global health and non-communicable diseases at the University of Copenhagen ( and a supporter of NACCHO ) See Part 3 Below

 ” Menzies is working towards better health through better nutrition by supporting #SmartEatingWeek,Join the celebrations by following
#SmartEatingWeek and check out our SHOP@RIC study resources “

Click here for Resources

To help celebrate Smart Eating Week we’re giving five Australians the chance to WIN some great prizes! To enter upload a photo or video on Facey or Insta of how you’re incorporating veggies into your snacks!

  To help celebrate Smart Eating Week we’re giving five Australians the chance to WIN some great prizes! To enter upload a photo or video on Facebook or Instagram of how you’re incorporating veggies into your snacks!

Don’t forget to tag @NutritionAust and use the hashtag #NATryFor5

DAA would  love for you to get involved this week in . Share with us what Smart Eating means to you. Join the celebrations by downloading our social media toolkit here

Part 1 Bush tucker, or bush food, we have used the environment around us for generations

Originally published HERE

Food from Animals

Providing the consumer with their required intake of Vitamin B, Aboriginal people learnt to hunt animals when they were at their fattest, offering the most amount of meat. Sometimes the meat would require a pounding before being traditionally cooked either over an open fire or by steaming it in pits. When fishing in the ocean, rivers, and ponds, mud crabs and barramundi were the popular choices. Whilst mud crabs were easy to catch, and tasted delicious boiled or roasted, barramundi would commonly grow to 1.2 metres, feeding more mouths, served on hot coals and wrapped in paper bark.

Land animals such as kangaroos, historically known as being high in protein, and emus whose meat is known to be higher in protein, Vitamin C, and protein than beef, are both low in fat. Not only are the two animals from the national emblem native foods, but hunters don’t stop there, hunting both small and large animals. Goannas are said to offer oily white meat tasting like chicken, while a 100g serving of stewed crocodile meat contains as much as 46g of protein, which is almost double the serving of a similar portion of chicken.

Other native animals previously captured by both Aboriginal and White Australians include: carpet snakes, rats, mussels, oysters, turtles, wallabies, echidnas, eels, and ducks. Most animals are still eaten today, and many like barramundi have made it to restaurants.

Insects and Grubs

The most famous of all bush tucker is the witchetty grub, which can be eaten either raw or roasted over a fire or coals, and holds a nutty taste. This grub is ideal for survival as they are a good source of calcium, thiamin, folate, and niacin, rich in protein and supportive of a healthy immune system. Like witchetty grubs, green ants are relatively high in fat content and another popular choice for tucker. Said to taste like lemon, the green ant’s white larvae is usually eaten, otherwise the green ants and their eggs have also made an appearance in a drink suitable for relieving headaches by grounding and mixing them together with water.

Many other insects known to be favoured include river red gum grub, Coolibah tree grub, cicadas, and tar vine caterpillars. Edible insects themselves offer a large amount of protein for such small creatures, for example, caterpillars contain 280g of protein per 1kg, which is 20g more than what salmon provides, along with good flavour, making insects a popular choice for bush tucker, especially on-the-go.

Fruits and Vegetables

We all know you need to find your five a day, and in bush tucker this is no exception.  Red fruits like quandong, which can be eaten raw or dried, and are often made into jams, and green fruits such as Kakadu plums contain 100 times more Vitamin C than oranges do. Other fruits and berries often eaten include kutjera, Davidson’s plum, boab, native gooseberry, lady apple, wild orange, wild passionfruit, desert lime, snow berry, and white elderberry.

Similarly to fruits, vegetables also act as a source of vitamin C, however, they are usually richer in other vitamins. The kumara, for example, are a staple crop of sweet potatoes that are rich in protein, Vitamins A and C, calcium, dietary fibre, and iron. Other common vegetables include yams, warrigal greens, water lilies, bush potatoes, and sea celery.

Native Spices

You can’t have a meal or make herbal drinks or sweets without a variety of spices. Throughout Australia, there are plenty of native spices from the mountain pepper and aniseed myrtle, to native basil, native ginger, and blue-leaved mallee. Each of these sources is able to be turned into food, an alternative flavour to one of the aforementioned food groups, a healthy drink, or act as a natural medicine.

Tree gums, for example, can be dissolved in water with honey, making sweets that the kids will love, but alternatively the sweet exudate that can be found on some of these trees can be made into jelly. Lemon ironbark and, one of the most famous plants in history, lemon myrtle, can be used in cooking or alternatively used as a herbal ingredient for tea to relieve cramps, fevers, and headaches.

Edible Nuts and Seeds

Nuts and seeds are another popular small choice; however, with many nut allergies seen today this shouldn’t be a go-to food group should you have any. Many of the edible seeds require soaking, pounding, and grinding before being baked in a careful ritual that is designed to remove the toxins from the food prior to eating them. If this preparation is not done correctly, most seeds will not be suitable for eating. Most nuts like the macadamia nut, peanut, and the Australian cashew, and seeds like the cycad palm seeds and seeds from the strap wattle and pigweed, can be eaten or turned into breads and cakes.

A prominent food for the Australian Aboriginals is the bunya nut. Similar to a chestnut (in both taste and appearance) this nut can be eaten raw or cooked. Traditionally, the Aboriginal people have been known to turn this nut into a paste to be eaten, or cooked on hot coals making bread. Similarly, seeds from the dead finish are collected to make delicious seedcakes.

Fungi

Although fungi are often believed among Aboriginal communities to hold ‘evil magic’, thus deeming them inedible, there are certain fungi that are believed to be of ‘good magic’. The truffle-like fungus, Choiromyces aboriginum, is a traditional native food that can be eaten raw, as well as cooked for over an hour in hot sand and ashes. This fungus is also a source of water, which is always key.

Commonly known as native bread (fungi) the Laccocephalum mylittae can also be eaten raw, but alternatively when roasted this fungi has been described to hold the flavour of boiled rice.

Part 2 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO Thumbs Up for Smart Eating Week

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited will celebrate the Dietitians Association of Australia Smart Eating Week (12 – 18 February) by promoting the GOOD TUCKER app which gives food items thumbs up, thumbs across, or thumbs down depending on how healthy they are.

Members of Wuchopperen’s Allied Health team including Community Dietitian Matthew Topping, Coordinator Allied Health Service Michelle Dougan, Diabetes Educator Tony Pappas, Dietitian Sue Charlesworth, and Exercise Physiologist Myles Hardy will wheel a trolley of common food items around Wuchopperen clinics , showing clients how the app works, and spark conversations about why particular foods get a thumbs up, across or down.

Community Dietitian Matthew Topping said the app was a useful tool to help people make healthy choices around what to eat.

‘Your smart phone can help you make smart choices,’ Matthew explained.

‘Sometime the nutrition panels on food items can be complex – using the Thumbs Up app gives people a quick rating to help them make a better choice.’

‘There’s no need to up end your diet, the key messages are around scanning a couple of your regular items and if they come up thumbs down or thumbs across, scanning another one to see if it’s a thumbs up.

Small changes are all that’s needed. The other thing to remember is that the healthy choice is not always the expensive choice – a home brand bag of rolled oats for example, is only a few dollars.

‘We are looking forward to taking our trolley into the clinics and having a chat with clients about the ratings, and why common foods may be rated thumbs up or thumbs down. This app is all about giving people the knowledge to make good choices.’

App demonstrations took place across Wuchopperen clinics on Tuesday 13 and Wednesday 14 February and at Wuchopperen’s Edmonton Clinic on Thursday 15 February.

Find out more about the GOOD TUCKER app here

Check out the app here

 Part 3 Why you still need to eat healthy foods — even if you aren’t overweight

We all have that one friend whose eating habits and body shape simply don’t add up. While enjoying the unhealthiest of meals and a sedentary lifestyle, somehow they effortlessly retain a slender figure.

At first glance we may assume these slim people are healthy, but it’s not always the case.

So if you don’t have weight to worry about, what’s the impetus for avoiding sweet or salty temptations and eating good, nutritious foods instead?

Healthy weight ≠ good health

Body mass index or BMI, the tool most often used to determine “healthy weight ranges”, was designed primarily to track the weight of populations.

While it’s a simple and useful screening tool when looking at groups of people, it’s not a good marker of individual health.

This is because BMI is a measure of our height and our weight, and the ratios of their combination.

But weight alone doesn’t discriminate between a kilogram of fat versus a kilogram of muscle nor does it account for body shape and fat distribution differences relating to, say, ethnicity or gender.

Just as not all obese individuals have heart disease risk factors or unhealthy metabolisms (the conversion of food into energy), nor do all lean people have healthy ones.

There’s a well-documented subset of people known as metabolically obese, normal weight individuals.

These people are not obese as determined by their height and weight, but may face metabolic dysfunction such as insulin resistance (which leads to a build-up of sugar in the blood), and like their physically obese counterparts are predisposed to type 2 diabetes, high levels of fats in the blood, heart disease and even some cancers.

Food is health

The most compelling reason to eat healthy foods is the correlation between good nutrition and wellbeing.

Coupled with regular exercise, eating a diet rich in whole foods and grains, healthy oils and low in sugar and salt, has been shown to convey a number of benefits.

These include a longer life with less pain and suffering, less risk of back pain or muscular problems and even an increased libido.

Studies from around the world also show people with healthy diets are less likely to experience depression while unhealthy diets may put individuals at an increased risk of depression.

Food has been identified as an important risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia in older age.

A healthy diet combined with physical activity can strengthen bones and reduce body aches and pains.

And these benefits are conferred irrespective of your baseline weight or age.

Health risks aren’t always visible

While it might be easy to take solace in a thinner weight, many of the serious health risks associated with poorer diet are often hidden from plain sight.

Excessive salt consumption can cause the kidneys to hold on to more water, resulting in an increase in blood pressure.

High blood pressure strains the arteries that supply blood to our vital organs including our heart and brain, and increases our risk of stroke, dementia, heart attack and kidney disease.

Consumption of high amounts of sugar, especially from sugar sweetened beverages, is associated with an increased risk in fatty liver disease, among many other health problems.

This in turn significantly increases our risk of liver scarring, heart disease and stroke.

Recent research has also reconfirmed a link between bowel cancer and red meat consumption. Processed meats such as ham, bacon and salami appear to be especially problematic.

Not only can all of these occur without any visual cues, but they can also develop irrespective of our weight.

Our kids’ health

The importance of a good diet is not just limited to our own health.

Children of parents with poor diets are significantly more likely to inherit similarly unhealthy eating habits.

And it doesn’t stop there. Through a mechanism called epigenetics, our health and our diet can result in alterations to the expression of our genes.

Animal studies have shown epigenetic changes resulting from poor diet (and other stressors) can influence the healthiness of future generations.

Many scientists now believe the same will prove true for humans too.

Saving lives, and money

Contrary to what many of us think, the latest evidence suggests eating a healthy diet is actually cheaper than consuming the unhealthy foods that now dominate many Australian households.

Analysis of both wealthier and poorer suburbs in Brisbane, for example, showed the average family of four spends 18 per cent more on current diets than would be required if they could more closely adhere to healthy dietary recommendations.

This is not to say eating healthily is easy, accessible or even possible for everyone, but might be more possible than we first think.

Not only would adopting a healthy diet be a beneficial investment for individuals and families, it might also go a long way to curbing the major societal costs from growing weight gain.

The annual costs from obesity already add up to $830 million in Australia alone.

The consequences of poor diet increasingly burden Australians and our healthcare system.

While it’s easy to measure our health based on a reading of the bathroom scales, eating a diverse and nutritious diet will bring overwhelming benefits to everyone — regardless of our current weight.

Thomas Goodwin contributed to the research and writing of this article.

Alessandro R Demaio is an Australian medical doctor and fellow in global health and non-communicable diseases at the University of Copenhagen.

Originally published in The Conversation

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #CloseTheGap Press Release : Download a 10 year Review : The #ClosingTheGap Strategy and 6 Key Recommendations to #reset

The life expectancy gap has in fact started to widen again and the Indigenous child mortality rate is now more than double that of other children.

This is a national shame and demands an urgent tripartite health partnership. This must be high on the agenda at tomorrow’s COAG meeting.”

In a departure from the campaign’s usual report, this year’s review focusses on the decade since the 2008 signing of the Close the Gap Statement of Intent.”

Close the Gap Campaign Co-Chair and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, June Oscar AO, said the Close the Gap strategy began in 2008 with great promise but has failed to deliver.

 Read  CTG call for urgent action to address national shame press release Part 2

Download the 40 Page review HERE

CTG 2018_FINAL_WEB

 

“ The Close the Gap refresh being considered by the COAG provides an opportunity to reflect upon and reform current policy settings and institutionalised thinking,

The Close the Gap targets should remain, as should the National Indigenous Reform Agreement framework and associated National Partnership Agreements. They serve to focus the nation and increase our collective accountability.

What we need however is radically different action to achieve the targets

This starts with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, their community controlled health organisations and peak representatives having a genuine say over their own health and wellbeing and health policies.

“Increased funding is needed for ACCHOs to expand in regions where there are low access to health services and high levels of disease, and in areas of mental health, disability services and aged care.

ACCHOs have consistently demonstrated that they achieve better results for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, at better value for money.

NACCHO Chairperson, Mr John Singer.

Download NACCHO Press Release

1. NACCHO media release CtG – FINAL

Download NACCHO Press Background Paper

2. NACCHO media release ATTACH CTG – FINAL 10 Years On

Part 1 NACCHO Press Release : Increased support to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations needed to Close the Gap in life expectancy gap

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) calls for urgent and radically different action to Close the Gap.

“The Council of Australian Governments’ (COAG) commitment to Close the Gap in 2007 was welcome.

It was a positive step towards mobilising government resources and effort to address the under investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ health”, said NACCHO Chairperson, Mr John Singer.

“But ten years on the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians is widening, not closing.

Jurisdictions currently spend $2 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for every $1 for the rest of the population whereas the Commonwealth in the past has spent only $1.21 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island person for every $1 spent on the rest of the population. NACCHO calls for the Commonwealth to increase funding to Close the Gap”, said John Singer.

NACCHO is a proud member of the Close the Gap Campaign and stands by its report released today: ‘A ten-year review: the Closing the Gap Strategy and Recommendations for Reset’.

The review found that the Close the Gap strategy has never been fully implemented. Underfunding in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services and infrastructure has persisted – funding is not always based on need, has been cut and in some cases redirected through mainstream providers.

The role of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) in delivering more successful care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples than the mainstream service providers is not properly recognised.

A health equality plan was not in place until the release of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan Implementation Plan 2015, and this is unfunded.

And despite the initial investment in remote housing, there has not been a sufficient and properly resourced plan to adequately address the social determinants of health.

The framework underpinning the Close the Gap strategy – a national approach and leadership, increased accountability, clear roles and responsibilities and increased funding through National Partnership Agreements – has unraveled and in some cases been abandoned altogether.

A comprehensive and funded Indigenous health workforce is required to improve the responsiveness of health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander peoples and increase cultural safety.

A boost in disease specific initiatives is urgently needed in areas where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have a high burden of disease or are particularly vulnerable, like ear health and renal disease, delivered through ACCHOs.”

“There also needs to be a way in which NACCHO and other Indigenous health leaders can come together with COAG to agree a ‘refreshed approach’ to Close the Gap”, said Mr Singer.

NACCHO has proposed to Government a way forward to Close the Gap in life expectancy and is looking forward to working with the Australian Government on the further development of its proposals.

The only way to close the gap is with the full participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Until Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are fully engaged and have control over their health and wellbeing any ‘refresh’ will be marginal at best, and certainly won’t close the gap

Part 2 CALL FOR URGENT JOINT ACTION TO ADDRESS NATIONAL SHAME

Australian governments must join forces with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to address the national shame of a widening life expectancy gap for our nation’s First Peoples.

“It’s time for each State and Territory government to affirm or reaffirm their commitments made via the Close the Gap Statement of Intent.

“Until now, the scrutiny has rightly been on the Federal Government regarding the need for it to lead the strategy and to coordinate and resource the effort.

But it’s now time for state and territory governments to step up.

“We want to see Premiers, Chief Ministers, Health and Indigenous Affairs Ministers in every jurisdiction providing regular and public accountability on their efforts to address the inequality gaps in their State or Territory.

“No more finger pointing between governments. A reset Closing the Gap Strategy should clearly articulate targets for both levels of government and be underpinned by a new set of agreements that include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, their leaders and organisations.”

Last year, the Prime Minister reported that six out of the seven targets were ‘not on track’. Since then, the Federal Government has announced that the COAG agreed

Closing the Gap Strategy would go through a ‘refresh’ process.

Close the Gap Co-Chair and Co-Chair of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples Rod Little, said the refresh process is the last chance to get government policy right to achieve the goal of health equality by 2030.

“The Close the Gap Campaign is led by more than 40 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous health and human rights bodies,” Mr Little said.

“No other group can boast this level of leadership, experience and expertise. We stand ready to work together with Federal, State and Territory governments. We have the solutions.

“You must get the engagement on this right. No half measures. No preconceived policies that are imposed, rather than respectfully discussed and collectively decided.”

The Close the Gap Campaign Co-Chairs have warned that, without a recommitment, the closing the gap targets will measure nothing but the collective failure of Australian governments to work together and to stay the course.

“While the approach has all but fallen apart, we know that with the right settings and right approach, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples leading the resetting of the strategy, we can start to meet the challenge of health inequality, and live up to the ideals that all Australians have a fundamental right to health,” the Co-Chairs said.

Part 3 :This review’s major findings are:

1.First, the Close the Gap Statement of Intent (and close the gap approach) has to date only been partially and incoherently implemented via the Closing the Gap Strategy:

An effective health equality plan was not in place until the release of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan Implementation Plan in 2015 – which has never been funded. The complementary National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2017-2023 needs an implementation plan and funding as appropriate. There is still yet to be a national plan to address housing and health infrastructure, and social determinants were not connected to health planning until recently and still lack sufficient resources.

The Closing the Gap Strategy focus on child and maternal health and addressing chronic disease and risk factors – such as smoking through the Tackling Indigenous Smoking Program – are welcomed and should be sustained.

However, there was no complementary systematic focus on building primary health service capacity according to need, particularly through the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and truly shifting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health to a preventive footing rather than responding ‘after the event’ to health crisis.

2.Second, the Closing the Gap Strategy – a 25-year program – was effectively abandoned after five-years and so cannot be said to have been anything but partially implemented in itself.

This is because the ‘architecture’ to support the Closing the Gap Strategy (national approach, national leadership, funding agreements) had unraveled by 2014-2015.

3.Third, a refreshed Closing the Gap Strategy requires a reset which re-builds the requisite ‘architecture’ (national approach, national leadership, outcome-orientated funding agreements).

National priorities like addressing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health inequality have not gone away, are getting worse, and more than ever require a national response.

Without a recommitment to such ‘architecture’, the nation is now in a situation where the closing the gap targets will measure nothing but the collective failure of Australian governments to work together and to stay the course.

4.Fourth, a refreshed Closing the Gap Strategy must be founded on implementing the existing Close the Gap Statement of Intent commitments.

In the past ten years, Australian governments have behaved as if the Close the Gap Statement of Intent was of little relevance to the Closing the Gap Strategy when in fact it should have fundamentally informed it.

It is time to align the two. A refreshed Closing the Gap Strategy must focus on delivering equality of opportunity in relation to health goods and services, especially primary health care, according to need and in relation to health infrastructure (an adequate and capable health workforce, housing, food, water).

This should be in addition to the focus on maternal and infant health, chronic disease and other health needs. The social determinants of health inequality (income, education, racism) also must be addressed at a fundamental level.

5.Fifth, there is a ‘funding myth’ about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health – indeed in many Indigenous Affairs areas – that must be confronted as it impedes progress.

That is the idea of dedicated health expenditure being a waste of taxpayer funds.

Yet, if Australian governments are serious about achieving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health equality within a generation, a refreshed Closing the Gap Strategy must include commitments to realistic and equitable levels of investment (indexed according to need).

Higher spending on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health should hardly be a surprise.

Spending on the elderly, for example, is higher than on the young because everyone understands the elderly have greater health needs.

Likewise, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population have, on average, 2.3 times the disease burden of non-Indigenous people.[i] Yet on a per person basis, Australian government health expenditure was $1.38 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person for every $1.00 spent per non-Indigenous person in 2013-14.[ii]

So, for the duration of the Closing the Gap Strategy Australian government expenditure was not commensurate with these substantially greater and more complex health needs.

This remains the case. Because non-Indigenous Australians rely significantly on private health insurance and private health providers to meet much of their health needs, in addition to government support, the overall situation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health can be characterised as ‘systemic’ or ‘market failure’.

Private sources will not make up the shortfall. Australian government ‘market intervention’ – increased expenditure directed as indicated in the recommendations below – is required to address this.

The Close the Gap Campaign believes no Australian government can preside over widening mortality and life expectancy gaps and, yet, maintain targets to close these gaps without additional funding. Indeed, the Campaign believes the position of Australian governments is absolutely untenable in that regard.

 

In considering these findings, the Close the Gap Campaign are clear that the Close the Gap Statement of Intent remains a current, powerful and coherent guide to achieving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health equality, and to the refreshment of the Closing the Gap Strategy in 2018.

Accordingly, this review recommends that:

Recommendation 1: the ‘refreshed’ Closing the Gap Strategy is co-designed with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders and includes community consultations.

This requires a tripartite negotiation process with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders, and the Federal and State and Territory governments. Time must be allowed for this process.

Further, Australian governments must be accountable to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for its effective implementation.

Recommendation 2: to underpin the Closing the Gap Strategy refresh, Australian governments reinvigorate the ‘architecture’ required for a national approach to addressing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health equality.

This architecture includes: a national agreement, Federal leadership, and national funding agreements that require the development of jurisdictional implementation plans and clear accountability for implementation.

This includes by reporting against national and state/territory targets.

Recommendation 3: the Closing the Gap Strategy elements such as maternal and infant health programs and the focus on chronic disease (including the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program) are maintained and expanded in a refreshed Closing the Gap Strategy.

Along with Recommendation 2, a priority focus of the ‘refreshed’ Closing the Gap Strategy is on delivering equality of opportunity in relation to health goods and services and in relation to health infrastructure (housing, food, water).

The social determinants of health inequality (income, education, racism) must also be addressed at a far more fundamental level than before. This includes through the following recommendations:

Recommendation 4: the current Closing the Gap Strategy health targets are maintained, but complemented by targets or reporting on the inputs to those health targets.

These input targets or measures should be agreed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders and Australian governments as a part of the Closing the Gap Strategy refresh process and include:

  • Expenditure, including aggregate amounts and in relation to specific underlying factors as below;
  • Primary health care services, with preference given to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, and a guarantee across all health services of culturally safe care;
  • The identified elements that address institutional racism in the health system;
  • Health workforce, particularly the numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people trained and employed at all levels, including senior levels, of the health workforce; and
  • Health enabling infrastructure, particularly housing.

Recommendation 5: the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan Implementation Plan is costed and fully funded by the Federal government, and future iterations are more directly linked to the commitments of the Close the Gap Statement of Intent; and, an implementation plan for the complementary National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2017-2023 is developed, costed and implemented by the end of 2018 in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders and communities

This will include:

  1. A five-year national plan to identify and fill health service gaps funded from the 2018-2019 Federal budget onwards and with a service provider preference for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs). This includes provision for the greater development of ACCHS’s satellite and outreach services.
  2. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leadership, Federal, State and Territory agreements clarifying roles, responsibilities and funding commitments at the jurisdictional level.
  3. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leadership, Primary Health Network and Federal agreements clarifying roles, responsibilities and funding commitments at the regional level.

Recommendation 6: an overarching health infrastructure and housing plan to secure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples equality in these areas, to support the attainment of life expectancy and health equality by 2030, is developed, costed and implemented by the end of 2018.

 

 

 

 

[i]      Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2016. Healthy Futures—Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services: Report Card 2016. Cat. no. IHW 171. Canberra: AIHW, p. 40.

[ii]     Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council, 2017, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 Report, AHMAC, Canberra, p. 192.

Aboriginal Community Controlled and Health Sector : 30 plus #JobAlerts Includes @ahmrc #Nursing @Nganampa_Health @IUIH_ @CAACongress This week #TopJobs #CEO Jobs in #SA and #WA

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

This weeks top job

Chief Executive Officer

Location: Carnarvon, WA
Employment Type: Full time/ Permanent
Remuneration: Salary and employment conditions will be commensurate with qualifications and experience and will be negotiated with the successful applicant

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

About the Opportunity

CMSAC has a highly rewarding opportunity for a Chief Executive Officer to lead its professional, multi-disciplinary team, based in Carnarvon, WA.

This pivotal leadership position will work directly with the Board of Directors and is responsible for the day to day management and delivery of high quality, comprehensive and culturally appropriate primary healthcare services to the local Aboriginal community.

Key areas of responsibility will include (but will not be limited to):

  • Leading, directing and managing the operations of the organisation;
  • Implementing and achieving the strategic objectives and responsibilities of the organisation set by the Board of Directors;
  • Developing and fostering a high performing work environment
  • Driving and implementing cultural workplace changes;
  • Diversifying and growing revenue streams to increase service delivery;
  • Strengthening the organisation’s stakeholder relations, community engagement and patient satisfaction; and
  • Building and sustaining strong financial performance.

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please click here.

To view and download the application pack, please click here.

About YouOur successful candidate will have sound experience in a senior leadership position, along with tertiary qualifications in business and/or health.

As an inspiring and collaborative leader with a strong understanding of healthcare trends for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, you will work strategically to enable transformative change by strengthening the organisation and creating a sustainable future for improved health outcomes for our local Aboriginal communities.

Although not essential, experience working in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service will be highly regarded.

Please Note: The successful candidate will be required to undertake a National Police Check prior to employment.

About the BenefitsFor your hard work and dedication, you will enjoy a highly attractive remuneration package plus salary sacrifice benefits. (Salary and employment conditions will be commensurate with qualifications and experience and will be negotiated with the successful applicant).

In addition, you will have access to a number of fantastic benefits including:

  • Fully furnished accommodation (exc utilities)
  • A fully maintained company vehicle for business and reasonable personal use
  • Mobile phone allowance (up to $1200 p/a)
  • 6 weeks annual leave
  • Support to further invest in your career through additional training
  • Study leave options
  • Annual leave loading
  • Employee assistance program
  • Work/life balance, with Monday – Friday hours, 8:30am – 5pm

A relocation allowance can be negotiated with the right candidate!

Closing date: Wednesday 14 February 2018 at 5pm.

APPLY HERE

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 

Job Ref : N2018 -1

ACCHO Member : Congress Alice Springs

Position: Childcare Educational Leader

Location : Alice Springs

Closing Date : 9 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -3

ACCHO Member : Congress Alice Springs

Position: Continuous Quality Improvement Facilitator

Location : Alice Springs

Closing Date : 5th February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -6

ACCHO Member : Congress Alice Spring

Position : Dentist

Location : Alice Springs

Closing Date : 30 january

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -7

ACCHO Member : Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service

Position: GP. General Practitioner

Location : Wyalla SA

Closing Date : 31 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -8

ACCHO Member :

Position: Remote Chronic Disease Nurse

Location : Tjunjuntjara via Kalgoorlie WA

Closing Date : 9 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -9

ACCHO Member : Nganampa Health Service

Position: Remote Area Nurses and Midwives

Location : Far NW region of SA

Closing Date : 2 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -10

ACCHO Member : Ngaanyatjarra Health Service

Position: Alcohol & Other Drugs Counsellor

Location : Remote WA

Closing Date : 29 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : 2018-16

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Early Years Education Coordinator

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 2 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-17

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Clinical Optometrist

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 31st January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-22

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Trainer – Aged Care and Disability

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 2nd February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-26

ACCHO Member : Wellington ACCHO

Position: Aboriginal Health Worker (Counsellor) – SEWB

Location : wellington NSW

Closing Date : 31ST January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-27

ACCHO Member : Wellington ACCHO

Position: Drug & Alcohol Worker- SEWB

Location : Wellington NSW

Closing Date : 31ST January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 32

ACCHO Member : AHMRC – NSW

Position: Policy Management Systems Officer

Location : Surry Hills – NSW

Closing Date : 19 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 33

ACCHO Member : AHMRC – NSW

Position: Training and Workforce Development Coordinator

Location : Little Bay – NSW

Closing Date : 19 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 34

ACCHO Member : AHMRC – NSW

Position: Finance Officer

Location : Little Bay – NSW

Closing Date : 19 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 35

ACCHO Member : AHMRC – NSW

Position: Executive Support Officer

Location : Surry Hills – NSW

Closing Date : 19 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 36

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Bendigo

Closing Date : 18 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 37

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Mildura – VIC

Closing Date : 18 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 38

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Shepparton – VIC

Closing Date : 18 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 39

ACCHO Member : AHCWA

Position: Human resources Advisor

Location : Perth WA

Closing Date : 6 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 40

ACCHO Member : Bulgarr Ngaru Medical AC

Position: Practise Nurse RN

Location : Tweed Heads – NSW

Closing Date : 14 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 41

ACCHO Member : ATSICHS

Position: Care Coordinator – Registered Nurse

Location : Brisbane – QLD

Closing Date : 9 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 – 42

ACCHO Member : Carnavon Medical Services

Position: Chief Executive Officer

Location : Carnavon – WA

Closing Date : 14 February

More Info apply :

 

Job Ref : N2018 – 43

ACCHO Member : Pangula Mannamurra AC

Position: Chief Executive Officer

Location : Mt Gambier – SA

Closing Date : 16 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -44

ACCHO Member : South West AMS

Position: Human Resources Officer

Location : Bunbury WA

Closing Date : 1 February

More Info apply :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate 13 February The 10th Anniversary of the National #Apology10 : Plus Download 2018 Calendar #Indigenous Days #Health days and events calendar HERE

This anniversary is a great opportunity for all Australians to come together and acknowledge a significant milestone in our history,”

“The National Apology made in Federal Parliament on 13 February 2008 was a landmark event, as the first formal, national recognition of past atrocities and a first step towards national truth telling and reparation.

“It was a significant event for members of the Stolen Generations and their families, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and other Australians.  It really was a time to feel proud about being Australian.”

Healing Foundation CEO Richard Weston.

National Apology concert celebrates resilience and healing see full press release Part 2 below

Some of Australia’s most popular Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists will share the stage to send a message of unity and healing at a concert to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the National Apology to the Stolen Generations.

The concert, which will be a free public event, will take place on February 13, 2018, at Federation Mall (Lawns of Parliament House), hosted by the Healing Foundation.

Part 1 NACCHO Weekly Member Service Aboriginal Health

2018 # Save A Date as at 23 January 2018

Aboriginal Conferences, Events, Workshops, Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 50 Page 2018 Health days and events calendar HERE

2018-Health-Days-and-Events-Calendar-by-Zockmelon

Download the 6 Page 2018 Aboriginal / Health  days and events calendar HERE or view below  

NACCHO Save a date date as at 23 Jan 2018

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Events have been selected on their basis of relevance to the broad Aboriginal health promotion and public health community in Australia.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update our info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

Part 2 National Apology concert celebrates resilience and healing

‘Words are not enough’ – musicians celebrate the Apology while calling for renewed commitment to healing

 ” Busby Marou will take to the stage next month in Canberra for #Apology10 – a concert to mark the 10 year anniversary of the National Apology to the Stolen Generations.

The Rockhampton duo are keen to celebrate the significance of the Apology and its impact for Stolen Generations members, while also highlighting concerns around increasing levels of disadvantage for Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders Including the impact on young people.”

The Healing Foundation is a national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation established in 2009 to address the ongoing trauma in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities caused by past actions like the Stolen Generations.

By building culturally strong, community designed and delivered pathways to healing, it is creating real change in the social, spiritual and emotional wellbeing of survivors and their families.

On February 13, The Foundation will lead a range of commemorative activities for all Australians to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and inspire healing informed and trauma aware national action.

The concert will be hosted by Aboriginal comedian Steven Oliver and TV and radio presenter Myf Warhurst. It will feature live performances from Archie Roach, Shellie Morris, The Preatures, Busby Marou and Electric Fields.

Entitled ‘Apology10 – Heal Our Past, Build Our Future’, the concert will shed light on the continued strength and resilience of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

This anniversary is a great opportunity for all Australians to come together and acknowledge a significant milestone in our history,” said Healing Foundation CEO Richard Weston.

“The National Apology made in Federal Parliament on 13 February 2008 was a landmark event, as the first formal, national recognition of past atrocities and a first step towards national truth telling and reparation.

“It was a significant event for members of the Stolen Generations and their families, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and other Australians.  It really was a time to feel proud about being Australian.”

By coming along to the concert, Australians can continue to acknowledge what happened to the Stolen Generations and therefore support their ongoing healing.

They can also celebrate the strong spirit and strong culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people today, including our musicians who have been taking the world by storm in recent years.

Aboriginal music icon Archie Roach, whose well known song, ‘Took The Children Away’, speaks to the very heart of Stolen Generation’s trauma and healing.

Members of the Stolen Generations, from around Australia, will be there for the celebrations and I hope Canberrans, and anyone from interstate who wants to make the journey, will come along and show their support and solidarity for building a different future.”

“The National Apology means a great deal to me. It means that the Government of the day recognised the great injustice to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by the forced removal of children from families. It means they are sorry and ashamed that such practices took place.”

“I am still grateful for the National Apology but we need to address the high number of our children still in out of home care,” said Archie. “The 10th anniversary will bring attention to the fact there is much more work to be done, and that all Australians can work together to heal the past.”

“In particular, we need to people to understand the impact and reach of Intergenerational Trauma and its link to social and health issues in in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, including suicides family violence, substance abuse, incarceration rates and the high number of children entering the protection system”, said Mr Weston.

“The Healing Foundation is partnering with communities to design and deliver successful healing initiatives, which have had significant impact but we need to scale this work up”.

Event Details:

Federation Mall, Canberra (the lawns in front of Parliament House)

Tuesday 13th February 2018 / 6pm – 10pm

Facebook: facebook.com/healingfoundation
Twitter: @HealingOurWay

Website: www.healingfoundation.org.au

DATE EVENT #
January
26/1/2018 Invasion/Survival Day

#InvasionDay

#SurvivalDay

#AustraliaDay

February
11/2 – 17/2/2018 National Sexual Health Week #NationalSexualHealthWeek
12/2-18/2/2018 Smart Eating Week #SmartEatingWeek
13/2/2018 Apology Day

More info

#StolenGensHeroes
20/02/2018 World Day of Social Justice #socialjusticeday
25/2-3/3/2018 Hearing Awareness Week #HearingAwarenessWeek
March
All March Australian Women’s History Month
3/3/2018 World Hearing Day
4/3-10/3 2018 Kidney Health Week #KidneyHealthWeek
8/03/2018 2018 Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Perth WA

More info

8/03/2018 International Women’s Day #InternationalWomensDay #BeingBornaGirl
8/03/2018 World Kidney Day #WorldKidneyDay                       #move4kidneys
15 -16 /3/2018 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – Striving Together Conference

MORE INFO Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – Striving Together Conference

16/3/2018 Close the gap Day #Closethegapday
16/3/2018 National Day of Action

Against bullying

#BullyingNoWay
18/3-25/3/2018 Cultural Diversity Week
19/3-25/3/2018 A taste of harmony #TasteofHarmony
20/03/2018 World Oral Health Day #WOHD2018
21/3/2018 International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination #jointogether

#standup4human rights #fightracism

31/3/2018

More info share your view Close the Gap

April
31/3-9/4 2018 National Youth Week #NationalYouthWeek
2/4/2018 World Autism Awareness Day #WorldAutismAwarenessDay #LightitUpBlue

#LIUB

7/4/2018 World Health Day
11/4/2018

More INFO

23/4-29/42018 World Immunisation Week
25/4/2018 World Malaria Day #EndMalaria
May
6/5-12/5/2018 Heart Week #HeartWeek
7/5/2018 National Domestic Violence Remembrance Day
12/5/2018 International Nurses day #IND2017
13/05-19/5/2018 Food Allergy Awareness Week #FoodallergyWeek
15/5- 21/5/2018 National Families Week #FamiliesWeek
18/5/2018 HIV Vaccine Awareness Day #HVDA2018
21/5-28/5/2018 National Palliative Care Week #npcw18

#dying to talk

26/05/2018 National Sorry Day #NationalSorryDay
26/05-2/6/2018 National Reconciliation Week #NRW2018
31/05/2018 World No Tobacco Day #WorldNoTobaccoDay
June
3/6/2018 National Cancer Survivors Day
3/6/2018 Mabo Day #MaboDay
5/6/2018 World Environment Day #WorldEnvironmentDay
11/6-17/6/2018 Men’s Health Week #MENHEALTHWEEK
16/6/2018 Fresh Veggies Day #FreshVeggiesDay
28-29 June National Conference on Indigenous Incarceration

More INFO mailto:mperkinsnsw@gmail.com

30/6/2018 Red Nose Day #RedNoseDay OZ
July
7/7/2018 AIME National Hoodie Day #AIMEHoodieDay
8/7-14/7/2018 National Diabetes Week #NationalDiabetesWeek #NDW2018

#NDW18

8/7-15/7/2018 Naidoc Week #NAIDOC 2018
27/7/2018 White Ribbon Night #whiteRibbonNight
28/7/2018 World Hepatitis Day #WorldHepatitisDay

#Showyourface

August
4/8-11/8/2018 Dental Health Week #DentalhealthWeek
9/82018 International Day for the Worlds Indigenous Peoples #weareIndigenous
14 to

16/08/2018

 

 

More info Close the Gap Hearing

24/8/2018 Daffodil Day #DaffodilDay
SEPTEMBER Prostate cancer Awareness Month
1/9- 7/9/2018 Asthma Week #NationalAsthmaWeek
3/9-7/9/2018 Women’s Health Week #WomensHealthWeek
3/9-9/9/2018 National Stroke Week #StrokeWeek

#fightstroke

6/9/2018 Indigenous Literacy Day #IndigenousliteracyDay
9/9/2018 FASD Awareness Day #FASDAwarenessDay
10/09/2018 World Suicide Prevention Day #WSPD
13/9/2018 RU OK ? DAY #RUOK ?

 

29/9/2018 World Heart Day #WorldHeartDay
October
ALL OCTOBER Breast Cancer Awareness Month #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth
10/10/2018 World Mental health Day #WorldMentalHealthDay
11/10/2018 WORLD Sight Day #WorldSightDay
11/10/2018 World Obesity Day #WorldObesityDay
14/10-20/10/2018 National Nutrition Week #NNW2018
14/10-20/10/2018 Anti-Poverty Week

More info

15/10 National Carers Week #Carers2018
20/10-28/10/2018 Children’s Week
November
14/11/2018 World Diabetes Day #WorldDiabetesDay

#WDD2018

25/11/2018 White Ribbon Day #WhiteRibbonDay

#BreakingtheSilence

25/11/2018 International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women #orangetheworld
December
1/12/2018 World AIDS Day #WorldAIDSDay

#WAD2018

#GettingtoZero

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth #Suicide : #DefyingTheEnemyWithin Powerful new book extract from @joewilliams_tew out 22 January – a promising career derailed by booze, drugs and mental health problems.

That afternoon, a guy I’d never seen before, who was partying with the group, approached me and asked if I needed anything to help me stay awake. That was the day I had my very first ecstasy tablet. Boom. I was instantaneously hooked.

Now I had a drinking and drug problem. But I didn’t for one second think I might have a mental-health problem.

I thought that someone who was mentally unwell was “weird” or not stable in society. I even believed that mentally ill people were criminals.

How wrong I turned out to be. “

This is an edited extract from Defying The Enemy Within by Joe Williams, published by ABC Books, in stores Monday

See 3 Pages from book below Part 2

Win a copy of the book by sending an email to media@naccho.org.au

Telling Joe in 50 words or less why you would like to read his book : Entries Close Wednesday 24 January : Winner Announced Thursday 25 January NACCHO Deadly Good News Post

‘Joe Williams has been into the darkest forest and brought back a story to shine a light for us all. He’s a leader for today and tomorrow.’Stan Grant

‘In telling his powerful story, Joe Williams is helping to dismantle the stigma associated with mental illness. His courage and resilience have inspired many, and this book will only add to the great work he’s doing.’Dr Timothy Sharp, The Happiness Institute

‘It is through his struggles that Joe Williams has found direction and purpose. Now Joe gives himself to others who walk the path he has.‘ – Linda Burney MP

Former NRL player, world boxing title holder and proud Wiradjuri First Nations man Joe Williams was always plagued by negative dialogue in his head, and the pressures of elite sport took their toll.

Joe eventually turned to drugs and alcohol to silence the dialogue, before attempting to take his own life in 2012. In the aftermath, determined to rebuild , Joe took up professional boxing and got clean.

Defying the Enemy Within is both Joe’s story and the steps he took to get well. Williams tells of his struggles with mental illness, later diagnosed as Bipolar Disorder, and the constant dialogue in his head telling him he worthless and should die. In addition to sharing his experiences, Joe shares his wellness plan – the ordinary steps that helped him achieve the extraordinary.

Joe Williams was guest speaker at NACCHO Conference Canberra : See full text from the Enemy Within  .

 

View Joe Williams Presentation from NACCHO Conference 2018

Read over 169 NACCHO Mental Health Articles published over past 6 years

Read over 119 NACCHO Suicide Prevention articles published over past 6 years

MOVING to Sydney to chase my dream in the NRL was a fantastic opportunity; spending my first two years in the big city under Arthur Beetson’s roof gave me a lifetime of memories and an experience I am truly grateful for.

But those years also provided me with some of the biggest and toughest life lessons I’ve learned.

During the 2002 pre-season, I got my first taste of mixing with the squad as a full-time player. I was expected to train with the team either on the field or in the weights room two or three times a day, five days a week.

It was essential to get to training on time but one day I was running late for a mid-morning session because I’d had to stay at Marcellin (College) a bit later than usual for school photos.

I raced to training, knowing I’d get in trouble from coach Ricky Stuart for being late. Sure enough, being the tough coach he was, Ricky started ripping into me.

When I told him I was late because I had my school photos, he and all the players burst out laughing. For the next few weeks, it became the running joke as an excuse for being late.

I learned so much during that off-season and impressed the coaching staff enough to be chosen in the top squad for the trial period.

Having just turned 18, it was amazing to play in two trial first grade NRL games at halfback inside Brad “Freddy” Fittler, one of the greatest five-eighths of all.

I didn’t make my NRL debut that year because the coaching staff wanted me to gain more experience playing in the Roosters’ under-20s Jersey Flegg side.

Looking back, although I felt like I was ready, I definitely needed the time and experience under my belt to become a more complete player and the sort of on-field leader a halfback needs to be

At the time, though, it was disappointing to go from playing with the first grade team one week to training with guys who were pretty much hoping to get a spot so they’d be contracted.

It was after I was put back to the under-20s that I first noticed the negative voices in my mind rearing their ugly head, telling me I didn’t deserve to be in Sydney given I wasn’t playing first grade and that I should just pack up and head back to the bush (Wagga) because I was worthless.

Back then, there wasn’t as much emphasis on the psychology of professional athletes and the pressures that came with playing elite sport.

There were days when training staff were almost like army drill sergeants. Sometimes they screamed at players and humiliated and even degraded players in front of other members of the team.

Occasionally, they would even bring the racial identity of a player into the abuse. It may be that they believed this was the way to make the players mentally stronger and that, if you weren’t mentally strong, you should just give up playing rugby league.

For me and many others, that approach of ridicule, embarrassment and tough love didn’t work.

In fact, it had the opposite impact of sending my self-esteem lower and lower.

But the negative thoughts were a different story altogether. They’d often spiral out of control, to the point where I felt like I was witnessing an argument taking place between two separate people; the negative Joe and positive Joe.

The head noise and voices affected my mental well-being so severely that it started to affect me physically.

Things grew worse, as the voices wreaked havoc on my ability to think. I started second-guessing every decision I made both on and off the field. The voices became so vivid and loud in my head, it was like I was hearing actual voices.

After a while, I became so anxious and down that I’d get to the point where I’d convinced myself I was worthless, a failure.

Even on the days I didn’t put a foot wrong on the footy field or won player of the match, I’d convince myself I would be dropped from the squad because of the negatives in my game.

I would be scared to go to training because I dreaded the coach saying I wouldn’t be in the team the following week.

The only way I knew how to combat these constant thoughts, turn down the voices and deaden the pain I felt, was to drink as much alcohol as I could.

Despite the negative voices and drinking, I managed to stay on track with my footy, even captaining the under-20s Roosters team. They were a great bunch of guys and good players and we ended up having a fantastic season and making it through to the Grand Final.

On the day of the Grand Final I kicked three goals, had two try assists and kicked the winning field goal. After our first grade team also won their grand final, we had one hell of a party that went on for a few days.

During the 2003 season, I was really battling emotionally, suffering from homesickness and looking for comfort at the bottom of a bottle. Instead of concentrating on playing well, I was busy worrying about what drinking and late-night partying the crew had planned after the game.

It all began to take its toll physically and mentally. At the same time, I found I was clashing with some of the coaching staff. I became desperate for a change. As a result, I decided to move to South Sydney Rabbitohs.

When I called my mother to tell her I’d signed with the Rabbitohs, she burst into tears of joy. Mum had been an avid Souths fan since she was a young girl and had dreamed that one day she’d get to see me run out in the famous red-and-green South Sydney colours.

I’d signed with Souths to show I was still keen to be an NRL player but the money wasn’t great so the pre-season was tough. As a result, I had to make a living like many league players did, working long hours labouring on a construction site. Afterwards, I’d go to football training then get some sleep and do it all over again.

To make matters worse, I broke my thumb in the opening trial game and had to have surgery on it, causing me to miss the first six weeks of the season.

I was no longer drinking so much or partying hard as I didn’t have much money. After a few weeks of putting a huge effort into training and committing myself both physically and mentally, I was picked in the reserve grade team. I began to play myself into form, stringing a few good games together and it was noticed by the coaching staff.

It wasn’t long before I was picked in the first grade team to make my NRL debut. Finally, the time had come to live out my childhood dream.

I didn’t sleep a wink the night before my first grade debut. On the way to Shark Park, I seemed to take every wrong turn and was late for the warm-up. To my surprise and happiness, though, the coach had organised for my dad to present me with my playing jersey.

I’d dreamed of this moment for most of my life and the fact I was playing for the mighty South Sydney Rabbitohs made things even sweeter.

People sometimes ask me what it was like playing my first NRL game. The funny thing is, I copped a knock to the head that gave me a mild concussion for the rest of the match.

I do remember that we lost but one thing that stood out for me was that my idol, close friend and mentor Dave Peachey was playing in his 200th NRL game. After the siren and when we were shaking hands, “The Peach” said to me: “Young brother, as my career is nearing its end, yours is just starting. Good luck”.

Joe Williams tells his story.

I had spent my entire life chasing the dream of becoming an NRL player. I now had the monkey off my back and it was time to get to work and live up to my potential.

Unfortunately, wins were few and far between for Souths in 2004.

My alcohol abuse was becoming rampant again, now I was earning more, and playing first grade had sent my ego to an all-time high, especially after I was named Rookie of the Year in 2004.

Things got even worse when I discovered party drugs during the 2004-2005 off-season. I enjoyed being the life of the party, laughing and joking, the centre of attention.

On Mad Monday, I celebrated by drinking so much alcohol I couldn’t stand up. That afternoon, a guy I’d never seen before, who was partying with the group, approached me and asked if I needed anything to help me stay awake. That was the day I had my very first ecstasy tablet. Boom. I was instantaneously hooked.

Now I had a drinking and drug problem. But I didn’t for one second think I might have a mental-health problem.

I thought that someone who was mentally unwell was “weird” or not stable in society. I even believed that mentally ill people were criminals.

How wrong I turned out to be.

NEED Help ? Contact your nearest ACCHO and see a Doctor or Mental Health Professional OR

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Heart Health : @HeartAust #NickysMessage “Heart disease is the number one killer of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. “

 “The people you love, take them for heart health checks.

Learn the warning signs of a heart attack and make sure to ring 000 (Triple Zero) if you think someone in your community is having one. Secondly give cigarettes the boot:

If you smoke, stop. I was only a light smoker but it still did me harm, so now I’ve given up.”

Former champion footballer Nicky Winmar always looked after his health, apart from having been a light smoker for years.

Nicky Winmar lifts his jumper in the memorable 1993 St Kilda v Collingwood match. Picture: Wayne Ludbey

But he had a heart attack at only 46, after losing his own father to a heart attack at 50

Read over 50 NACCHO Aboriginal Heart Health articles published in the past 6 years

Watch Nicky’s very moving heart story HERE

 

What’s a heart health check?

  • All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples over the age of 35 should have regular heart health checks. These are simple and painless.
  • A heart health check can be done as part of a normal check up with your ACCHO doctor or health practitioner.
  • Your ACCHO doctor will take blood tests, check your blood pressure and ask you about your lifestyle and your family (your grandparents, parents, brothers and sisters).

  • Give your doctor as much information about your lifestyle and family history as possible.
  • Once your doctor or health practitioner has your blood test results, ask them for your report which will state if you have high (more than 15%); moderate (10-15%) or low risk (less than 10%) of a heart attack or stroke.

Warning signs of a heart attack

  • Pain in the chest – or arms, shoulders, neck, jaw or back
  • Breathless
  • Sick in the stomach
  • Cold sweats
  • Dizzy or light-headed

If someone seems to be having a heart attack:

  • Make them stop what they are doing
  • Give them a tablet of aspirin to chew
  • Call 000 (Triple Zero) for help. The operator will tell you what to do next

Do you have more questions?

The Heart Foundation Helpline is here to answer them. Call 13 11 12 and talk to one of our qualified heart health professionals. If you need an interpreter, call 131 450 and ask for the Heart Foundation.

Download Social media resources

For help also Contact your nearest ACCHO -Download the APP

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Mob : Our first 2018 #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories @KenWyattMP #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS

1.WA : AHCWA team helps with a Meningococcal vaccination campaign to protect the people living in Central WA Desert Communities

2. QLD: Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service : Hearing loss surgery sounds great for 16 children from Yarrabah FNQ

3.ACT : Winnunga AHCS Healthy Weight Program Epitomises Holistic Health Philosophy

4 .NSW : Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation call for more Indigenous health care professionals to help close the gap

5.VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service VALE GARRY (“GILLA”) JOHN McGUINNESS

6.SA : What is the “Nganampa Health Council Difference”?

7. NT : Katherine West Health , Congress Alice Springs , Anyinginyi Health and Miwatj ACH More Indigenous Health Leaders for Remote Australia

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Kipli Kani Open nutrition sessions

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Our next Deadly News Post is January 25

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.WA : AHCWA team helps with a Meningococcal vaccination campaign to protect the people living in Central WA Desert Communities

AHCWA staff members, Stacee and Veronica recently visited the Central Communities including, Warburton, Warakurna, Blackstone, Jameson, Tjirrkarli, Tjukurla, Wanarn, Wingellina, Cosmo Newberry, Punmu, Jigalong, Parnngurr, Kunawarritji, and Kiwirrkurra to help with a vaccination campaign planned to protect the people living in Central Communities from the recent outbreak of Meningococcal W and to help prevent further spread of the disease.

Under this program, the Meningococcal A, C,W,Y vaccine was offered to all people aged 2 months and older living in these communities.

The team involved were truly amazed at the way the Communities got behind the campaign and encouraged all people, young and old, to have their Meningococcal needles.

The children were incredibly brave and if upset, the families would speak in language to the children.

It was obvious to the team that the children were really listening and took in what the family was saying about how important the needle was.

AHCWA would like to thank all the people from Communities in the NG Lands and Pilbara for the wonderful support that was shown in response to the Meningococcal vaccination campaign.

Also a big thank you to the WACHS teams who invited AHCWA
to participate in this campaign.

2. QLD: Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service : Hearing loss surgery sounds great for 16 children from Yarrabah FNQ

 Up to 16 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids from Yarrabah will have life-changing hearing health surgery this week at Cairns Day Surgery. Registered Nurse Karen Leeman prepares 7 year old Dallas Sands for surgery on a perforated eardrum. Cairns Post Story and PICTURE: STEWART McLEAN

THE sounds of their tropical home will become much more clearer for 16 children from Yarrabah who have gone under the knife to improve their hearing.

Several health organisations united yesterday to assist the indigenous children with day surgery in Cairns under the federally funded Eye and Ear Surgical Support Services program.

Children ranging from 2-15 years of age were treated for a series of hearing impairments, including perforated eardrums and middle-ear infections.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children experience some of the highest levels of ear disease and hearing loss in the world. Rates are up to 10 times more than those for non-indigenous Australians.

Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service Aboriginal Corporation nurse Dannielle Gillespie said, due to Yarrabah’s relatively remote location, it was difficult for parents to get their children to doctors.

She said an initial list of 200 children needing hearing loss surgery had to be whittled down to the list treated at Cairns Day Surgery yesterday.

“Hearing loss in Yarrabah is right across all kids,” she said.

“Basically, if the perforations in the ear are not fixed, then that has a future roll-on effect with their speech, their education, their learning abilities – even their social skills, it starts affecting that, too.”

Yarrabah mum Zoe-Ann Sands’ daughter Dallas, 7, had surgery yesterday.

Ms Sands said she was thankful her daughter would finally have better hearing.

Funding for the surgery was provided to health advocacy group CheckUP by the Commonwealth Government

3.ACT : Winnunga AHCS Healthy Weight Program Epitomises Holistic Health Philosophy

Long serving CEO Julie Tongs couldn’t help reminiscing that Winnunga AHCS ACT Government funded Healthy Weight Program replicated the sector’s bedrock philosophy of truly Aboriginal community controlled holistic health services.

‘It means that you can work with a person individually, get to know their real needs, monitor and refer them for support in various ways through the holistic approach to health care that underpins how Winnunga AHCS works,’ Ms Tongs said.

‘This has been a major initiative,’ Ms Tongs said ‘with funding of $640,000 provided over a three year period.’

‘We are confident getting closer to the end of this Program, we will prove decisively that the program has worked and worked brilliantly. It is a preventative health program.’

Ms Tongs said the program which has been operating for over two years now, has achieved a number of significant outcomes, such as:

– Significant participation in the program with over 100 people being monitored on a regular basis

– The employment of a full-time Aboriginal person, Leeton-born, but Cowra raised Christine Saddler as program co-ordinator

– The creation of regular full-time gym training program with a regular clientele

– The training of numerous Winnunga AHCS staff members with the skills to identify at risk clients and to then ensure that once identified they are contacted regularly

‘There is absolutely no doubt this Program works well, within the confines of our sector’s holistic and culturally safe health and wellbeing environment,’ said Christine Saddler. ‘It’s about trust and the ability to work with clients,’ she added.

Christine noted that Winnunga AHCS pushed for the introduction of a Healthy Weight Program with the knowledge that many clients struggled with their weight.

‘There are many reasons why this happens and almost in each case the circumstances are never quite the same’, said Chris, who has worked in the Aboriginal community controlled health sector for many years including at Newcastle’s Awabakal Health Service before joining Winnunga AHCS five years ago.

Chris also explained that once a person joined the program a range of resources were provided, including regular sessions at a local gymnasium. ‘We are running these gym sessions three times a week with each session lasting for one hour. We have tried various formats and tailor the sessions to each person’s needs and capabilities.

‘We have employed personal trainers to assist some of our clients. This has worked. Many of our Program participants have lost a significant amount of weight as well as improved other health factors’ Christine said.

 

Mother and daughter Lorna and Tammy Cotter, participants of the program from day one, were quick to explain what it has meant for them. Said Mum Lorna ‘Once I heard of this program I joined because I believed it would help me to control my diabetes and to prevent chronic sickness.’

‘I enjoy the program but more importantly it has worked. I have lost 10.5 kilograms and 8 centimetres from my waist and my Hb1Ac diabetes reading has fallen from 10.3 to 8.2.

I have also met many people in our community whom I hadn’t met before. The thing I like most is that I do the program with my daughter and now my granddaughter’.

For daughter Tammy the weight loss figures are also dramatic. ‘I have lost 10.5kg and 16cm from my waist while by BMI (body mass index) has fallen by 3.4kg/m2’.

Tammy said because of the guidance on eating habits the program provided she was eating healthier and her overall health and lifestyle had also improved. ‘It’s something I now will be passing on to my children,’ she said.

Both Tammy and mum Lorna said neither would have been able to afford to access any other health programs and very specifically would definitely not have been able to afford a gym membership or the usually very high cost of personal trainers.

Julie Tongs noted the community feedback on the program had been very positive, adding she had a letter from one male client congratulating Winnunga AHCS on the program while also saying it had made a huge difference to his level of health.

The weight loss factor and its associated many health benefits was also highlighted by Winnunga AHCS’s Executive Director of Clinical Services, Dr Nadeem Siddiqui.

‘Diabetes is a huge health problem within Indigenous communities. We know the Program has helped clients lower the risks of diabetes,’ Dr Siddiqui said. ‘Because we have a dedicated and experienced Aboriginal health worker co-ordinating the program we can make sure participants are not only monitored but directly referred to other Winnunga services as required, be they from our GP’s, nurses, dieticians, psychologists or even our tobacco control workers.’

‘It is by working holistically and just as importantly within a culturally safe Aboriginal health service that this program is succeeding.’ And both he and Christine emphasised that they firmly believed it would not work in other environments.

Dr Siddiqui said strong links had also been established with external mainstream services, for example with The Canberra Hospitals’ Chronic Disease Management Unit, to provide in-reach services to support program clients.

Both emphasised that as many Indigenous people within the ACT suffered from social isolation the fact that they could meet regularly and openly discuss and share issues that impacted on their daily lives, that in itself was a major factor in play to reflect the Program’s overall acceptance and take up within the local Aboriginal community.

And another very simple initiative that had assisted enormously in breaking down barriers was the simple introduction of a post-gym cup of coffee. ‘The Healthy Weight Program is one that works. Not only does it encourage empowerment it also provides support, feedback and guidance that has seen numbers attending gym classes remain high’.

‘We will continue to be innovative’ stated Julie Tongs ‘and have demonstrated this by introducing hypnotherapy sessions and trauma informed yoga, as intergenerational trauma remains a significant factor for many of our people’.

Dr Nadeem noted ‘As a non-Indigenous person and a doctor it opens your eyes as to how holistic medicine in a truly supportive and sensitive environment can work where purely clinical responses don’t.’

4 NSW : Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation call for more Indigenous health care professionals to help close the gap

The key to improving health in Indigenous communities may be to train more Indigenous doctors and health professionals.

CEO of the Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation Darren Carr said Indigenous communities have a mistrust of medical professionals stemming from the Stolen Generations.

“When you look at the Stolen Generations, a lot of removals of kids happened in a health care setting – so if a child had gone to hospital for some reason, that’s where the child would be taken from their parents,” Mr Carr said.

“There is an understandable historical suspicion and mistrust of health services, and that’s why you need Aboriginal health professionals and services – people know they will feel safe going to them, so they’re more likely access those health services.”

Tina Pollard is one of the only Indigenous nurses in Wagga; she said increasing the number of Indigenous health care professionals is vital if we want to close the gap in life expectancy.

“It’s because we come from the same backgrounds and we have more of an understanding of what the issues are for our people, so we can relate to them a lot better and make our clients feel safe,” Ms Pollard said.

“I see it pretty well every day, especially during hospital visits – they feel very uncomfortable when they go to the hospital, so I will go with them to make sure they’re okay, because they’re more likely to come back for followups if they have a good experience.”

Tina hopes she can be a role model for other Indigenous students.

“If we have more people out there showing that this is what aboriginal people can do, then they’ll know they can do it too.”

5.VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service VALE GARRY (“GILLA”) JOHN McGUINNESS

The Victorian Aboriginal Health Service is sad to learn of the passing of Garry (Gilla) John McGUINNESS on the evening of Tuesday 9 January 2018.

Gilla (as he is better known in the community) died peacefully at St Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne after several days. He is a member of a large family and he leaves behind him a son, John (JBL) and a granddaughter, sisters and brothers and many nieces and nephews.

Gilla graduated from Koori Kollij in the mid-1980s as an Aboriginal Health Worker. He has been associated with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service for many years as a patient, a member and for several years as a Director on the VAHS Board. Many will remember and talk about Gilla and his family and their close association with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service. Even as a young person frequenting Fitzroy where VAHS first commenced, Gilla was closely linked in some way.

Gilla always talked about the 3CR Radio Station based in Smith Street, Fitzroy and how he brought Radio participation through the airways for prisoners. He spoke of his long association with 3CR (over 30 or more years) and about being a member of the local ATSIC Melbourne Aboriginal Regional Council where he was part of an elective representation of Aboriginal people in Melbourne.

In his latter years Gilla used the VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Gym and the services of VAHS until he became too sick to come to continue.

Board of Directors and staff pay their condolences to the family of Gilla

6.SA : What is the “Nganampa Health Council Difference”?

A: The Nganampa Health Difference is a term we use to describe the experience that is on offer when you’re working at NHC. We strive to empower people to make a difference on the frontline of primary healthcare for Indigenous Australians. Working and living remotely can be challenging but our people tell us that this is where their sense of fulfilment comes from! They also value the learning culture at NHC, our professional practice and processes, and the support that they feel we provide, to give them what they and their patients need. You will feel a part of our close, collaborative community and have the opportunity to make a direct impact on our communities! The work we do really improves the lives of the communities we work for. Read more about our accomplishments in the regions here

Q: What are some of the benefits of working for NHC?

A: In return for your professionalism, commitment and care, Nganampa Health brings you a truly unique and satisfying career opportunity. We offer excellent financial rewards and the chance to develop a remarkable skill set and experience a different side to Australia. Working remotely can be challenging, so we’re pleased to be able to provide great financial benefits. For example, people working for us on the APY lands tend to earn a higher salary than they would in more mainstream contexts, and they live in rent-free, fully furnished housing with paid electricity, internet and phone line. Please note though – the real benefit is making a difference in the community so if money is your only motivation, you won’t last long!

Q: What if I am not looking for a permanent role?

A: A Locum role could be for you! With highly competitive remuneration and the flexibility of a fly-in-fly-out locum role you can have the opportunity to make a positive impact and also spend time with your family back home. The level of flexibility and diversity offered by these positions means that there is still autonomy in the services you can provide and you’re not limited to supporting only one particular patient type. In all our roles at NHC, you can work with everyone from newborns to the elderly and see all kinds of medical conditions including emergencies, elderly issues, chronic disease as well as the opportunity to provide health advice and disease prevention.

Q: What qualifications or skills do I need to have?

A: NHC employs people in roles from nurses, doctors and aboriginal health workers to personal carer’s at our aged care facility and corporate staff in environmental health, logistics and finance. All of our people come to NHC with a diverse range of skills and we are always in support for people who want to further their education even more! If you have the relevant qualifications listed in our job ads and a particular interest or passion within the areas NHC covers, then please get in touch with us.

Our people all share the desire to make a real difference on the frontline of primary health, whether working directly with clients or in the office. Our people are professional, committed and really care.

Q:  What positions are currently available?

A: Please see our current opportunities page for positions that are currently advertised.  If you don’t see a suitable position right now, you can also express your interest by contacting us here. If you want to find out more about the different career opportunities at NHC, read some of our staff stories and hear about their journey so far!

7. NT : Katherine West Health , Congress Alice Springs , Anyinginyi Health and Miwatj ACH More Indigenous Health Leaders for Remote Australia

 The Turnbull Government will support a further 14 Northern Territory Aboriginal health services staff members to undertake specialised leadership and management training, as it continues moves to bolster the indigenous health workforce.
The Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said the new participants would bring the total number of people supported by the Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Traineeship program to 66.
 
Customised training will help equip these outstanding nominees to become future leaders in the Aboriginal community controlled health sector,” Minister Wyatt said. 
 
Building a strong indigenous health workforce is a key factor in closing the gap.
“Increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people representation at all levels of the health system, including administration, service delivery, policy, planning and research is crucial.”
The Turnbull Government’s $715,535 commitment brings the total Commonwealth investment in the Northern Territory traineeship program to more than $5 million since 2012.
 
“Strong local leaders will help ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote communities in the NT have access to high-quality, culturally appropriate and comprehensive primary health care,” said Minister Wyatt.
The successful trainees will receive a nationally accredited Diploma of Leadership and Management. The new funding will be shared between four health services:
  • Katherine West Health Board Aboriginal Corporation
  • Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Aboriginal Corporation
  • Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation
  • Miwatj Aboriginal Health Corporation

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Kipli Kani Open nutrition sessions

 

 

 

Aboriginal Community Controlled and Health Sector #JobAlerts #Doctors #Nursing @Nganampa_Health @IUIH_ @CAACongress This week #TopJob #CEO Pangula Mannamurna ACCHO SA

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

This weeks top job

Chief Executive Officer – Pangula Mannamurna Aboriginal Corporation (Mt Gambier, Sth. Aust.)

Pangula Mannamurna Aboriginal Corporation is a Community Controlled Health Service located in Mt Gambier that is committed to closing the health, well-being and quality of life inequity gap experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples throughout the Limestone Coast.

The Chief Executive Officer will provide day to day leadership to the Corporation to

• ensure the implementation of the Board’s vision and strategic direction,
• build an organisational culture that taps into the resilience, experience and knowledge of Aboriginal people to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people within the Limestone Coast, and
• ensure that the effort of Pangula Mannamurna’s staff is in line with the Corporation’s strategic plan.

You will be a consummate professional experienced in working effectively across the domains of strategy, positive health outcomes and practical support. You will be appropriately qualified with senior management experience within an organisation providing quality health programs from a position of cultural competence. Other skills in your repertoire will include strategic thinking, visionary leadership, negotiation and communication abilities and financial acumen.

Applications close Friday 16 February 2018.

A copy of the job and person specifications may be downloaded from here.

Applicants will need to address the essential requirements in their application.

Phone enquiries directed to Jeff Mountford on 08 8273 7200.

Applications in Word format only should be forwarded by email to jeff.mountford@ahcsa.org.au

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 

Job Ref : N2018 -1

ACCHO Member : Congress Alice Springs

Position: Childcare Educational Leader

Location : Alice Springs

Closing Date : 9 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -2

ACCHO Member : Congress Alice Springs

Position:   Aboriginal AOD Care Management Worker

Location : Alice Springs

Closing Date : 22 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -3

ACCHO Member : Congress Alice Springs

Position: Continuous Quality Improvement Facilitator

Location : Alice Springs

Closing Date : 5th February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -4

ACCHO Member : Congress Alice Springs

Position: MIDWIFE & WOMENS HEALTH NURSE

Location : Alice Springs

Closing Date : 22 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -5

ACCHO Member : Congress Alice Springs

Position: REMOTE AREA NURSES/ABORIGINAL HEALTH PRACTITIONERS

Location : Alice Springs

Closing Date : 22 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -6

ACCHO Member : Congress Alice Spring

Position : Dentist

Location : Alice Springs

Closing Date : 30 january

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -7

ACCHO Member : Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service

Position: GP. General Practitioner

Location : Wyalla SA

Closing Date : 31 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -8

ACCHO Member : Spinifex Health Service

Position: Remote Chronic Disease Nurse

Location : Tjunjuntjara via Kalgoorlie WA

Closing Date : 9 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -9

ACCHO Member : Nganampa Health Service

Position: Remote Area Nurses and Midwives

Location : Far NW region of SA

Closing Date : 2 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -10

ACCHO Member : Ngaanyatjarra Health Service

Position: Alcohol & Other Drugs Counsellor

Location : Remote WA

Closing Date : 29 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018- 11

ACCHO Member : Ngaanyatjarra Health Service

Position: Care Coordinator Integrated Chronic Disease Program

Location : Remote WA

Closing Date : 22 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-12

ACCHO Member : Ngaanyatjarra Health Service

Position: Men’s Sexual Health Nurse

Location : Remote WA

Closing Date : 22 january

More Info apply :

Job Ref : : N2018-13

ACCHO Member : Ngaanyatjarra Health Service

Position: Primary Health Care Nurse

Location : Remote WA

Closing Date : 22 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-14

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Senior Manager – Birthing in Our Community

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 26 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-15

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Business Intelligence Analyst / Developer

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 26 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : 2018-16

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Early Years Education Coordinator

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 2 February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-17

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Clinical Optometrist

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 31st January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-18

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Medical Information System Trainer / Data Support Officer

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 19th January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-19

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Legal Administration Support Officer

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 19th January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-20

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Podiatrist

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 19th January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-21

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Community Liaison Officer

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 19th january

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-22

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Trainer – Aged Care and Disability

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 2nd February

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-23

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Team Leader, Family Support Worker

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 25th January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-24

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Paediatric Coordinator

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 26th January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-25

ACCHO Member : Institute for Indigenous Urban Health

Position: Early Years Operations Manager

Location : Brisbane

Closing Date : 26th January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-26

ACCHO Member : Wellington ACCHO

Position: Aboriginal Health Worker (Counsellor) – SEWB

Location : wellington NSW

Closing Date : 31ST January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-27

ACCHO Member : Wellington ACCHO

Position: Drug & Alcohol Worker- SEWB

Location : Wellington NSW

Closing Date : 31ST January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018- 28

ACCHO Member :Wellington ACCHO

Position: Care Coordinator – GWAHS

Location : Wellington NSW

Closing Date : 18 January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018-29

ACCHO Member : Wellington ACCHO

Position: Aboriginal Outreach Worker – GWAHS

Location : Wellington NSW

Closing Date : 18th January

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -30

ACCHO Member : South West Aboriginal Medical Services

Position: Health Promotions Officer

Location : Bunbury WA

Closing Date : 25th january

More Info apply :

Job Ref : N2018 -31

ACCHO Member : Yerin Aboriginal Medical Services

Position: Mental Health Worker

Location : Wyong NSW

Closing Date : 23th January

More info

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Junkfood #Sugarydrinks #Sugartax @AMAPresident says Advertising and marketing of #junkfood and #sugarydrinks to children should be banned

 

 ” Poor nutrition has been linked to the reduced health outcomes experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, contributing to conditions known to disproportionately affect this population, including type 2 diabetes, kidney disease and some cancers.

Twenty two per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people live in a household that has, in the past 12 months, run out of food and not been able to purchase more. Food insecurity increases for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who live in remote areas.

Efforts to Close the Gap must recognise the potential impacts of improved nutrition on health outcomes, as well as the implications of food insecurity “

AMA Position Statement on Nutrition 2018

Download AMA Position Statement on Nutrition 2018

Advertising and marketing of junk food and sugary drinks to children should be banned, and a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages should be introduced as a matter of priority, the AMA says.

Releasing the AMA Position Statement on Nutrition 2018, AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, said today that eating habits and attitudes toward food are established in early childhood.

“Improving the nutrition and eating habits of Australians must become a priority for all levels of government,” Dr Gannon said.

“Governments should consider the full complement of measures available to them to support improved nutrition, from increased nutrition education and food literacy programs through to mandatory food fortification, price signals to influence consumption, and restrictions on food and beverage advertising to children.

“Eating habits and attitudes start early, and if we can establish healthy habits from the start, it is much more likely that they will continue throughout adolescence and into adulthood.

“The AMA is alarmed by the continued, targeted marketing of unhealthy foods and drinks to children.

“Children are easily influenced, and this marketing – which takes place across all media platforms, from radio and television to online, social media, and apps – undermines healthy food education and makes eating junk food seem normal.

“Advertising and marketing unhealthy food and drink to children should be prohibited altogether, and the loophole that allows children to be exposed to junk food and alcohol advertising during coverage of sporting events must be closed.

“The food industry claims to subscribe to a voluntary code, but the reality is that this kind of advertising is increasing. The AMA calls on the food industry to stop this practice immediately.”

The Position Statement also calls for increased nutrition education and support to be provided to new or expecting parents, and notes that good nutrition during pregnancy is also vital.

It recognises that eating habits can be affected by practices at institutions such as child care centres, schools, hospitals, and aged care homes.

“Whether people are admitted to hospital or just visiting a friend or family member, they can be very receptive to messages from doctors and other health workers about healthy eating,” Dr Gannon said.

“Hospitals and other health facilities must provide healthy food options for residents, visitors, and employees.

“Vending machines containing sugary drinks and unhealthy food options should be removed from all health care settings, and replaced with machines offering only healthy options.

“Water should be the default beverage option, including at fast food restaurants in combination meals where soft drinks are typically provided as the beverage.”

NACCHO Campaign 2013 : We should health advice from the fast food industry !

Key Recommendations:

·         Advertising and marketing of unhealthy food and beverages to children to be prohibited.

·         Water to be provided as the default beverage option, and a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages to be introduced.

·         Healthy foods to be provided in all health care settings, and vending machines containing unhealthy food and drinks to be removed.

·         Better food labelling to improve consumers’ ability to distinguish between naturally occurring and added sugars.

·         Regular review and updating of national dietary guidelines and associated clinical guidelines to reflect new and emerging evidence.

·         Continued uptake of the Health Star Rating system, as well as refinement to ensure it provides shoppers with the most pertinent information.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Food insecurity

Food insecurity occurs when people have difficulty or are unable to access appropriate amounts of food.13

It has been estimated that four per cent of Australians experience food insecurity,14 though it is likely the extent of the problem is much higher.

Food insecurity is associated with a range of factors, including unstable living situations, geographic isolation and poor health.

It is more prevalent in already disadvantaged communities. In households with limited incomes, food budgets can be seen as discretionary and less of a priority.

This can result in disrupted eating habits and an over-reliance on less nutritious foods.

Food insecurity can have significant health implications, such as increased hospitalisation and iron deficiency anemia (in children) and increased kidney disease, type 2 diabetes and mental health issues (among adolescents and adults).

Poor nutrition has been linked to the reduced health outcomes experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, contributing to conditions known to disproportionately affect this population, including type 2 diabetes, kidney disease and some cancers.16

Twenty two per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people live in a household that has, in the past 12 months, run out of food and not been able to purchase more. Food insecurity increases for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who live in remote areas.17

Efforts to Close the Gap must recognise the potential impacts of improved nutrition on health outcomes, as well as the implications of food insecurity. The development and implementation of potential solutions must be led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The nutrition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote communities may be heavily dependent on Outback Stores. The 2009 Parliamentary Inquiry ‘Everybody’s Business: Remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Community Stores’ resulted in a number of practical recommendations to increase the availability and affordability of healthy foods in Outback Stores, many of which have not been implemented.

Recommendation

These Stores, in consultation with local communities, should prioritise and facilitate access to affordable nutritious foods.

The AMA Position Statement on Nutrition 2018 is available at https://ama.com.au/position-statement/nutrition-2018

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #ChooseHealth wishes you a very Healthy Xmas and #sugarfree 2018 New Year #SugaryDrinksProperNoGood

 ”  This campaign is straightforward – sugary drinks are no good for our health.It’s calling on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks.’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Cape York and throughout all our communities experience a disproportionate burden of chronic disease compared to other Australians.’

‘Regular consumption of sugary drinks is associated with increased energy intake and in turn, weight gain and obesity. It is well established that obesity is a leading risk factor for diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease and some cancers. Consumption of sugary drinks is also associated with poor dental health.

Water is the best drink for everyone – it doesn’t have any sugar and keeps our bodies healthy.’

Apunipima Public Health Advisor Dr Mark Wenitong

WATCH Apunipima Video HERE

“We tell ‘em kids drink more water; stop the sugar. It’s good for all us mob”

Read over 30 NACCHO articles Health and Nutrition HERE

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/nutrition-healthy-foods/

 ” Let’s be honest, most countries and communities (and especially Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders ) now face serious health challenges from obesity.

Even more concerning, so do our kids.

While no single mission will be the panacea to a complex problem, using 2017 to set a new healthy goal of giving sugar the kick would be a great start.

Understand sugar, be aware of it, minimise it and see it for what it is – a special treat for a rare occasion.

This New Year’s, make breaking up with sugar your planned resolution.

“Hey sugar – it’s not me, it’s you…”

Alessandro R Demaio  Global Health Doctor; Co-Founded NCDFREE & festival21; Assoc. Researcher, University of Copenhagen and NACCHO supporter ( First Published 2016 see in full below )

 

We recommend the Government establish obesity prevention as a national priority, with a national taskforce, sustained funding and evaluation of key measures including:

  • Laws to stop exposure of children to unhealthy food and drink marketing on free to air television until 9.30 pm
  • Mandatory healthy food star rating from July 2019 along with stronger food reformulation targets
  • A national activity strategy to promote walking, cycling and public transport use
  • A 20 per cent health levy on sugary drinks

Australia enjoys enviable health outcomes but that is unlikely to last if we continue to experience among the world’s highest levels of obesity.

 CEO of the Consumers Health Forum, Leanne Wells

NACCHO Aboriginal #HealthStarRating and #Nutrition @KenWyattMP Free healthy choices food app will dial up good tucker

” Weight gain spikes sharply during the Christmas and New Year holiday period with more than half of the weight we gain during our lifetime explained just by the period between mid-November and mid-January.

Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA

 ” Labels that warn people about the risks of drinking soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages can lower obesity and overweight prevalence, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

The study used computer modelling to simulate daily activities like food and beverage shopping of the populations of three U.S. cities – Baltimore, San Francisco and Philadelphia.

It found that warning labels in locations that sell sugary drinks, including grocery and corner stores, reduced both obesity and overweight prevalence in the three cities, declines that the authors say were attributable to the reduced caloric intake.

The virtual warning labels contained messaging noting how added sugar contributes to tooth decay, obesity and diabetes.

The findings, which were published online December 14 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, demonstrates how warning labels can result in modest but statistically significant reductions in sugary drink consumption and obesity and overweight prevalence.”

Diabetes Queensland : Warning labels can help reduce sugary drinks consumption and obesity, new study suggests

 

Global recognition is building for the very real health concerns posed by large and increasing quantities of hidden sugar in our diets. This near-ubiquitous additive found in products from pasta sauces to mayonnaise has been in the headlines and in our discussions.

The seemingly innocuous sweet treat raises eyebrows from community groups to policy makers – and change is in the air.

Let’s review some of the sugar-coated headers from 2016 :

  • The global obesity epidemic continued to build while more than two-in-three Australian adults faced overweight or obesity – and almost one in four of our children.
  • Science around sugary drinks further solidified, with consumption now linked to obesity, childhood obesity, heart disease, diabetes (type-2), dental caries and even lower fertility.
  • Australians were estimated to consume a staggering 76 litres of sugary drinks each since January alone, and new reports highlighted that as much as 15% of the crippling health costs associated with obesity could result from sugary drinks consumption.
  • Meanwhile around the planet, more countries took sound policy measures to reduce sugar consumption in their citizens. France, Belgium, Hungary, Finland, Chile, the UK, Ireland, South Africa and many parts of the United States implemented, continued or planned the implementation of pricing policies for sugary drinks.

In short, the over-consumption of sugar is now well recognised as a public health challenge everywhere.

With all this in mind and a New Year ahead, it’s time to put big words into local action. With resolutions brewing, here are seven helpful tips to breaking up with sugar in 2017.

1. Understand sugar

When it comes to sugar, things can get pretty confusing. Below, I shed some light on the common misunderstandings, but let’s recheck sugar itself – in simplest terms.

Sugar is a type of refined carbohydrate and a source of calories in our diet. Our body uses sugar and other sources of calories as energy, and any sugar that is not used is eventually stored as fat in our liver or on our bellies.

“Free sugars” are those added to products or concentrated in the products – either by us or by the manufacturer. They don’t include sugars in whole fruits and vegetables, but more on that later. For a range of health reasons, the World Health Organization recommends we get just 5% of our daily calories from free sugars. For a fully grown man or woman, this equates to a recommended limit to sugar consumption of roughly 25 grams – or 6 teaspoons. For women, it’s a little less again.

Consume more than this, and our risk of health problems rises.

2. Quit soft drinks

With 16 teaspoons of sugar in a single bottle serving – that’s more than 64 grams – there’s nothing “soft” about soft drinks. Including all carbonated drinks, flavoured milks and energy drinks with any added sugars, as well as fruit drinks and juices, sugary drinks are a great place to focus your efforts for a healthier 2018. Sugary drinks provide no nutritional value to our diets and yet are a major source of calories.

sugartax

What’s more concerning, evidence suggests that when we drink calories in the form of sugary drinks, our brains don’t recognise these calories in the same way as with foods. They don’t make us feel “full” and could even make us hungrier – so we end up eating (and drinking) more. In this way, liquid calories can be seen as even more troubling than other forms of junk foods. Combine this with studies that suggest the pleasure (and sugar spike) provided by sugary drinks may make them hard to give up – and it’s not difficult to see why many of us are drinking higher amounts, more often and in larger servings. This also makes cutting down harder.

The outcome is that anything up to one-seventh of the entire public cost of obesity in Australia could now result from sugary drinks. In other words, cut out the sugary drinks and you’ll be doing your own health a favour – and the health of our federal and state budgets.

3. Eat fruit, not juice

When it’s wrapped in a peel or a skin, fruit sugars are not a challenge to our health. In fact, the sugars in fruit are nature’s way of encouraging us to eat the fruit to begin with. Fruits like oranges, apples and pears contain important fibres. The “roughage” in our foods, this fibre is healthy in many ways but there are three in particular I will focus on. First, it slows our eating down; it is easy to drink a glass of juice squeezed from 7 apples, but much harder to eat those seven pieces whole. Second, it makes us feel full or satiated. And third, it slows the release of the sugars contained in fruit into our blood streams, thus allowing our bodies to react and use the energy appropriately, reducing our chances of weight gain and possibly even diabetes.

Juice, on the other hand, involves the removal of most of those fibres and even the loss of some of the important vitamins. What we don’t lose though, is the 21 grams or more than five teaspoons of sugar in each glass.

In short, eat fruit as a snack with confidence. But enjoy whole fruit, not juice.

4. Sugar by any other name

High-fructose corn syrup, invert sugar, malt sugar and molasses – they all mean one thing: sugar.

As the public awakens to the health challenges posed by sugar, the industry turns to new ways to confuse consumers and make ‘breaking up’ more difficult. One such way is to use the many alternative names for sugar – instead of the ‘s’ word itself. Be on the lookout for:

Evaporated cane juice, golden syrup, malt syrup, sucrose, fruit juice concentrate, dextrose and more…

5. Eat whole foods where possible

Tomato sauce, mayonnaise, salad dressings, gravies, taco sauces, savoury biscuits and breakfast cereals – these are just some of the many foods now often packed with hidden, added sugars.

A study found that 74% of packaged foods in an average American supermarket contain added sugars – and there is little evidence to suggest Australia would be dramatically different. Added to food to make it more enjoyable, and moreish, the next tip when avoiding such a ubiquitous additive is to eat whole foods.

It’s hard to hide sugar in plain flour, or a tomato, or frozen peas. Buying and cooking with mostly whole foods – not products – is a great way to ensure you and your family are not consuming added sugars unaware.

6. See beyond (un)healthy claims

Words like “wholesome”, “natural” and “healthy” are clad on many of our favourite ingredients. Sadly, they don’t mean much.

Even products that are full of sugar, like breakfast cereals and energy bars, often carry claims that aim to confuse and seduce us into purchase. Be wary – and be sure to turn the package over and read the ingredients and nutrition labelling where possible (and if time permits).

7. Be okay with sometimes

The final but crucial message in all of this is that eating or drinking sugar is not a sin. Sugar is still a part of our lives and something to enjoy in moderation. The occasional piece of cake, or late night chocolate – despite the popular narrative painted by industry to undermine efforts for true pricing on sugar – these occasional sweet treats are not the driving challenge for obesity. The problem is that sugary drinks, and sugar in our foods, have become every day occurrences.

With this in mind, let’s not demonise sugar but instead let’s see it for what it is. Enjoy some juice or bubbles from time to time but make water the default on an everyday basis. With the average can of cola containing 39 grams or 9 teaspoons of sugar, be OK with sometimes.

Bitter truth

Let’s be honest, We now face serious health challenges from obesity.

Even more concerning, so do our kids.

Learn more about our ACCHO making Deadly Choices