NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Communities #CoronaVirus News Alerts March 13- 16 : Contributions from our CEO Pat Turner, Prime Minister Scott Morrison, Dr Mark Wenitong, Dr Norman Swan and Marion Scrymgour

In this special Corona Virus edition

1.Pat Turner NACCHO Appearance on The Drum

2.Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s press conference

3.Department of Health download videos

4.Dr Norman Swan

5.DR Mark Wenitong

6.Marion Scrymgour CEO NLC

Read all previous Aboriginal Health and Corona Virus articles published by NACCHO since January

1.Pat Turner NACCHO Appearance on The Drum

Pat Turner, CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), warned tonight that if the novel coronavirus gets into Aboriginal communities, “it will be absolute devastation without a doubt”.

In particular, she urged state and local governments to lift their games, but acknowledged that some local governments, like those in Alice Springs and Halls Creek, were acting.

Turner also called for action to address “the national disgrace” of inadequate Aboriginal housing given the implications for infection control, and for screening of communities in vulnerable areas, stating that the docking of a cruise ship in Broome today had caught health authorities unawares.

The ACCHO sector had been working very hard to get out information to communities and clinics, but needed the Government to fund their services at a realistic level, she told ABC TV’s The Drum program.” 

Urgent calls for more resources to protect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities from COVID-19 From Croakey Read HERE in full 

Watch the full episode of The Drum on IView (Available till 20 March )

2.Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s press conference

 “Today, I now want to move to the decisions that we have taken that were consistent with the plan that I’ve outlined to you.

First of all, the National Security Committee met before the National Cabinet today and we resolved to do the following things; to help stay ahead of this curve we will impose a universal precautionary self-isolation requirement on all international arrivals to Australia, and that is effective from midnight tonight.

Further, the Australian government will also ban cruise ships from foreign ports from arriving at Australian ports after an initial 30 days and that will go forward on a voluntary basis. The National Cabinet also endorsed the advice of the AHPPC today to further introduce social distancing measures.

Before I moved to those, I just wanted to be clear about those travel restrictions that I’ve just announced. All people coming to Australia will be required, will be required I stress, to self isolate for 14 days.

This is very important. What we’ve seen in recent, in the recent weeks is more countries having issues with the virus.

And that means that the source of some of those transmissions are coming from more and more countries.

Bans have been very effective to date. And what this measure will do is ensure that particularly Australians who are the majority of people coming to Australia now on these flights, when they come back to Australia, they’re self-isolation for 14 days will do an effective job in flattening this curve as we go forward.

And there are major decisions that were taken today that reflect changing where we are heading.

The facts and the science, the medical advice will continue to drive and support the decisions that we are making as a National Cabinet, as indeed as a federal Cabinet at the Commonwealth level.

But the truth is that while many people will contract this virus that it’s clear, just as people get the flu each year, it is a more severe condition than the flu, but for the vast majority, as I said last week, for the majority, around 8 in 10 is our advice, it will be a mild illness and it will pass. “

 Prime Minister Scott Morrison press conference 15 march : Download full Transcript here 

PM Scott Morrison press conference full transcript

Download PM Press Release

Prime Ministers Press Release

3.Department of Health campaign download videos 

Download Videos

Coronavirus video – Help Stop The Spread

Coronavirus video – Recent Traveller

Coronavirus video – Stay Informed

Coronavirus video – Good Hygiene Starts Here

Dr Norman Swan provides some simple advice regarding Coronavirus.

– Wash your hands regularly with soap and water; or with hand sanitiser.

– Try to keep your distance from other people; and avoid physical contact

– If you need to sneeze or cough, do it into a fresh tissue which you then discard; or into your elbow.

– If you have a cough or a cold, it’s most likely that you have just a cough or a cold; but talk to your Doctor about it before turning up to a surgery.

For more information visit http://www.abc.net.au/coronavirus or http://www.health.gov.au

5. Dr Mark Wenitong

Dr Mark speaks with Black Star Radio about Coronavirus and the simple steps you can take to protect yourself.

“If you’re not sure, give the clinic a call and we’ll tell you what to do.” Dr Mark

 

6.Marion Scrymgour CEO NLC

“The NLC has received many calls from community members asking that we do all we can to ensure the safety and protection of Aboriginal people in their communities who are very concerned about the spread of COVID-19.

Should this virus break out in our communities, we don’t have the manpower to deal with this.

The NLC will be launching an information campaign in Indigenous languages to inform people about hygiene, testing for coronavirus and for them to avoid travel outside communities.

NLC staff have also cancelled their non-essential travel to communities including its regional council meetings.

“Somebody could come out and they could get infected and then go back into the community.

“The position we’re taking is if we can push back that virus taking hold in our communities, that’s a good thing. It means we can work at getting better prepared.”

The decision comes after the Northern Territory Government decided it will stop its employees from making non-essential travel to remote communities.

The NLC has received many calls from community members asking that we do all we can to ensure the safety and protection of Aboriginal people in their communities who are very concerned about the spread of COVID-19 “

Chief executive officer Marion Scrymgour said the move was to protect Aboriginal people in the communities who already faced issues like chronic health conditions, lack of resources and overcrowded housing.

Read in full HERE

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Diabetes: This health professional survey is designed to assist Dr Michael Mosley and Ray Kelly with a 3 part SBS series Australia’s Health Revolution.

” Australia’s Health Revolution is a new three-part documentary series for SBS TV that’ll be hosted by popular UK presenter and journalist Dr Michael Mosley and Australian Indigenous diabetes educator and exercise physiologist, Ray Kelly.

The series will feature people all over Australia, from all backgrounds aged between 18 and 70 who have been diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes and selected to be  part of a 12 week program, following a very low energy diet designed to achieve fast weight loss and help stabilise blood sugar levels.

The documentary will explore the big picture of type 2 diabetes in Australia, and the exciting new science behind diet and lifestyle programs that are reversing type 2 diabetes – previously considered incurable.”

Hear interview with Ray Kelly

We can turn blood sugar levels within seven days. It is really a matter of days and weeks to really transform someone form going toward the massive complications that come with type 2 diabetes and heart disease and turning them to becoming much healthier,”

Ray Kelly has been running a health program across Australia around the same principles as Dr Michal Mosley in the UK with great success covering some of the toughest areas and working closely with our ACCHO’s /Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS).

Read over 160 Aboriginal Health and Diabetes articles published by NACCHO over past 8 years 

How can you be involved ? Complete this diabetes survey.

 ” This GENERAL POPULATION and HEALTH PROFESSIONAL SURVEY designed to help inform some of the themes in the series.

The survey has been devised with help from The Charles Perkins Centre (Sydney Uni). The aim of the survey is to get an understanding of the experience of certain health conditions, including type 2 diabetes, from the perspective of (i) Australians and (ii) specifically, health professional’s (those involved in diabetes care and prevention as well as those who aren’t ).

Complete the survey HERE 

What we’ve known for many years is that type 2 diabetes is both preventable and reversible.

While the solution followed in the series is pretty simple-short term calorie restriction and using fresh, wholefoods as ‘medicine’- presenters want to highlight that low calorie diet programs aren’t routinely offered by most GPs or funded by Medicare.

Ray Kelly says that the TV series cannot come soon enough as Type 2 Diabetes is the fastest growing condition in the Western world yet it is both preventable and reversible.

“What we’ve known for many years is that type 2 diabetes is both preventable and reversible.”

Across 3 episodes, Ray Kelly and Dr Mosley will also shed a light on confronting health disparities and complexities of diabetes risk and prevalence in Australia.

At times they’ll explore confronting issues asking why diabetes death and hospitalisation rates are twice as high in remote areas than in major cities and why Australians are losing a staggering 4400 limbs to diabetes-related amputations every year.

Ray Kelly encouraged families and individual from all backgrounds, especially of Indigenous ancestry, to participate in the program.

.

 

NACCHO Affiliates and Members Deadly Good News : #National Our CEO Pat Turner on Final 2019 #QandA Mon 9 Dec Plus #NSW Dubbo ACCHO #VIC #VACCHO #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @DeadlyChoices Goodnir #NT @MiwatjHealth @NDIS #ACT @nimmityjah #SA Port Lincoln ACCHO

1.National : Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner to appear on the final 2019 ABC TV Q and A Monday 9 December

2.NSW : A doctor who helped establish the Dubbo Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS) has been honoured for long-standing service to country NSW.

3.Vic : VACCHO partners with  BreastScreen Victoria to win the 2019 VicHealth IMPROVING HEALTH EQUITY award for our Aboriginal Breast Screening Shawl project, which means our beautiful women win!

4.1 QLD : QAIHC hosts the annual Awards for Excellence, celebrating leaders, organisations and communities within the Sector.

4.2 QLD : Steven Miles – Health & Ambulance Services Minister & MP for Murrumba launches the Deadly Choices FIT

4.3 QLD : A personal reflection from Steve Conn Mobile Clinic Coordinator at Goondir ACCHO

5. NT Miwatj ACCHO  NDIS have begun delivering Capacity Building Community Access services

6. ACT : Work underway to build new clinic at Winnunga ACCHO 

7.SA : Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service kids take part in the Woolworths Cricket Blast Test Match Training session

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Friday

1.National : Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner to appear on the final ABC TV Q and A Monday 9 December

Malcolm Turnbull, Former Prime Minister of Australia

Anthony Albanese, Opposition Leader

Sisonke Msimang, Author

Patricia Turner, CEO of National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

Brian Schmidt, Nobel laureate and Vice-Chancellor, ANU

See More Details Here

2.NSW : A doctor who helped establish the Dubbo Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS) has been honoured for long-standing service to country NSW.

The NSW Rural Doctors Network presented Dr Rick Aitken with a prestigious 2019 Rural Medical Service Award during its annual conference at the Novotel Sydney Manly Pacific at the weekend.

From HERE

Dr Aitken was among 20 GPs to be honoured for more than 700 years of combined service to rural NSW communities.

The award recognises GPs who have spent the past 35 years or more providing healthcare to people in remote, rural and regional communities.

Dr Aitken has clocked up 35 years of service in Orange, Culburra Beach, Dubbo, Millthorpe, Moss Vale and Bundanoon.

In 2013 he was the senior medical manager during the establishment of the Dubbo AMS, also known as the Dubbo Regional Aboriginal Health Service.

Between 2012 and 2016, Dr Aitken was the regional GP educator for Bila Muuji Aboriginal Health Service in Western NSW

3.Vic : VACCHO partners with  BreastScreen Victoria to win the 2019 VicHealth IMPROVING HEALTH EQUITY award for our Aboriginal Breast Screening Shawl project, which means our beautiful women win!!

The project was piloted by VACCHO and Victorian Aboriginal Health Service -VAHS, this initiative is a culmination of months of hard work and planning by project partner BreastScreen Victoria, with Dhauwurd Wurrung DwechWinda-Maraa, Gunditj CorpKirrae Health Service Inc.Wathaurong Aboriginal Co OpRumbalara Aboriginal Co-OperativeRamahyuck District Aboriginal Corporation- SaleVictorian Department of Health & Human Services and Deakin University.

In October BreastScreen Victoria vans visited regional Aboriginal women with free beautiful handmade cultural screening shawls as part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

This Aboriginal community-led initiative addresses the barriers preventing Aboriginal women participating in breast screening by creating a culturally safe service.

The shawls, designed by Aboriginal women, were made for Aboriginal women in the trial to wear during their breast screen. They are a culturally safe alternative to being naked from the waist up or asking for a standard screening gown.

The shawls aim to improve Aboriginal women’s experience with breast screening. 100% of the women who participated strongly agreed the shawl increased their feeling of cultural safety, of comfort, and that it was easy to use.

Congratulations everyone.

4.1 QLD : QAIHC hosts the annual Awards for Excellence, celebrating leaders, organisations and communities within the Sector.

Established to recognise the hard work, determination and growth of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector, the awards acknowledge those that are making a real difference throughout their communities.

Congratulations to the winners:

– QAIHC Partnership Excellence Award – Institute for Urban Indigenous Health

– QAIHC Innovation Excellence Award – Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health

– QAIHC Patient Satisfaction and Service Excellence Award – NPA Family and Community Services Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation

– QAIHC Leader of the Year Award – Veronica Williams and Gary White

– QAIHC Member of the Year Award – Galangoor Duwalami Primary Healthcare Service.

4.2 QLD : Steven Miles – Health & Ambulance Services Minister & MP for Murrumba launches the Deadly Choices FIT

 

Let’s see how he pulled up after his first DC FIT session after launching the program at the Brisbane Broncos this morning.

If you’re aged 16-25 and want to kickstart your way towards a healthier lifestyle join DC FIT today: https://bit.ly/2P9uVcD

4.3 QLD : A personal reflection from Steve Conn Mobile Clinic Coordinator at Goondir ACCHO 

This photo was taken in the Mobile Medical Clinic’s outdoor waiting room.

It is a picture of myself, Steve Conn (Mobile Clinic Coordinator) enjoying an amazing didgeridoo from Gove with a baby and his Mother.

So much can and should be said about moments like these, so rather than letting it go or just giving it a caption, the following is brave admission of what it signifies to me.

The last twenty years of clinical work for me has been focused on emergency work.  Aside from continually experiencing the highs and lows of humanity, emergency work is fast-paced, mentally and physically draining and above all and relevant to this conversation, it is focussed on fixing the broken.

My new role as the MMC Coordinator keeps giving to me in ways I could not have anticipated.   The clinical focus is on primary health, essentially managing clients health with a view to preventing illness and disease and in doing so, help to ‘close the gap’.

It is a demanding job.  I perceive a massive responsibility, not just as a Registered Nurse but as a privileged white citizen of this country.  I have a head full of emergency type stories; naturally there are a few that seem never to leave me, stories of extreme loss and grieving.

Then this moment in the photo happened, it could have just been part of another day at ‘the office’, it could have only been let go or passed over except for the fact that it got beneath my thick clinical skin.

This beyond cute indigenous baby is sitting on his country. A natural connection.  He is listening to white man play didgeridoo as he taps his hands on the earth roughly to the beat.

His mother sits calmly waiting to see the doctor as this hardened emergency nurse takes two minutes out to connect.  For me, although a little brave as in out of the normal behaviour for a Registered Nurse I felt totally comfortable and I know the baby did too by his actions.

In my mind, we (Mother, child and I) shared a judgment-free connection, a genuinely human moment not tainted by skin or socioeconomic status but created by mutual respect, mutual admiration and most powerfully, hope.

All too often we are so consumed by our jobs that we in a way we forget what we are doing.  Working with our Indigenous people in remote areas has enriched my personal and professional life.  It has reminded me of why I became a nurse in the first place.

Thank you to our deadly Mob and thank you to the fantastic organisation and community that is Goondir ACCHO

Steve Conn

MMC Coordinator

As a First Nations visitor here in St George Qld, working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, I too recognise the privilege I hold as a professional but also the privilege I experience in receiving the Strong Stories of Indigenous community members that are often hidden under the stories of loss, grief, pain and the like.

To receive your story is an excellent reminder of how humbling it is to be in this position.

Thanks, Bro

Leonard.

5. NT Miwatj ACCHO  NDIS have begun delivering Capacity Building Community Access services

In Galiwin’ku a second hand 4×4 HI Ace Bus was purchased and then modified by Darwin based company Keep Moving to add a wheelchair lift. This Specialised Disability Transport will allow NDIS Participants to have greater access to community based activities and increase independence. The 4×4 Bus includes a snorkel and lift kit, which allows the bus access to more secluded areas in and around Elcho Island, ideal for hunting and fishing!

NDIS is latju! In celebration of International Day of People with Disability earlier this week, we would like to share some words from the owner of the very first motorised scooter on Milingimbi – an island located 440km east of Darwin.

“I am very happy getting more support. I can ask for help, especially with equipment. I can get help quickly and I have the choice in that type of equipment.

With my new scooter I have a lot of freedom and I can make my own decisions. I didn’t think I would ever get an electric scooter, I thought I would always have to use my small wheelchair and it was very hard for me to use all the time

When I had my stroke, I was very sad because I couldn’t do everything I used to do when I was strong. It helped a little bit when I got my wheelchair, but now I have my new scooter, which is better. I get lots of therapy like OT and physio too, I like doing my exercises.”

6. ACT : Work underway to build new clinic at Winnunga ACCHO 

Progress at Winnunga photos from site tour this week and they are currently on track to have building completed November 2020 . The veranda at the front of admin reception and Rec 2 gone and the boardroom is a shell existing walls and roof will come down in the next couple of weeks

7.SA : Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service kids take part in the Woolworths Cricket Blast Test Match Training session

Aboriginal children from Port Lincoln got the chance to be a part of a celebration of Aboriginal culture, and have some fun with cricket at a Woolworths Cricket Blast event at Adelaide Oval on November 28.

Twenty five Aboriginal children from the Woolworths Community Fund program, including from Port Lincoln took part in the Woolworths Cricket Blast Test Match Training session which included the launch of a new Aboriginal-designed shirt.

Designed by 16-year-old Aboriginal artist and Dharawal man Billy Reynolds, the shirt features Aboriginal art and depicts a goanna.

SACA northwest country cricket manager Peter Brown said children involved with Mallee Park Football Club had been involved with Woolworths Cricket Blast thanks to work with Jermaine Miller at Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service.

“Cricket Australia and SACA have been doing a lot of work in the indigenous space in the last few years and recognising the contributions of Aboriginal people,” he said.

Cricket Australia community cricket executive general manager Belinda Clark said the launch of the shirt shined a light on cricket’s ongoing commitment to reconciliation and providing options for young cricketers to celebrate First Nations cultures.

Children involved in Woolworths Cricket Blast will have the chance to wear the new shirt from February next year.

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #SuicidePrevention @cbpatsisp : Health Minister @GregHuntMP welcomes the #YouCanTalk campaign, encouraging our mob struggling with their mental health to reach out and find support

“ The Federal Government welcomes the #YouCanTalk campaign, which encourages Australians struggling with their mental health to reach out and find support.

The awareness campaign is a collaboration between several organisations, including Beyond Blue, Everymind, headspace, Lifeline, ReachOut, RU OK?, SANE Australia, the Centre of Best Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention, Roses in the Ocean and the Black Dog Institute.

The campaign will take place over the December-January holiday period, in recognition of how difficult this time of year can be for many Australians.

Our Government commends the collaboration of these organisations to raise awareness about the importance of starting a conversation, particularly over the Christmas-New Year period.” 

Health Minister Greg Hunt Press Release continued Part 1 below 

Read over 160 Aboriginal Health and Suicide Prevention articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years 

” Suicide has emerged in the past half century as a major cause of premature mortality and is a contributor to the overall health and life expectancy gap for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

In 2018 it was the fifth leading cause of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the age-standardised suicide rate was more than twice as high as the non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s rate.”

What we know about suicide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people : or see Part 3 Below

Sadly, more than 3,000 Australians choose to end their lives each year – about eight people a day.

Every life lost to suicide is a tragedy, creating a ripple effect that flows through families, friendship groups, schools, workplaces and communities.

That’s why the Federal Government has committed to Towards Zero – working towards reducing the suicide rate to zero.

Towards Zero is a total commitment to the value of each and every life, and recognises the importance of all lives, in all ages, and all groups.

This commitment is backed by our investment of $5.2 billion in mental health and suicide prevention services this financial year, including $63.3 million on suicide prevention activities.

It’s so important for Australians who are struggling to reach out and seek support.

The #YouCanTalk campaign also aims to connect people with tools that can support them through their website

www.lifeinmindaustralia.com.au/youcantalk.

#YouCanTalk exists to encourage all Australians to have a conversation with a friend, family member or work colleague they’re concerned about.

While it can be difficult to talk about suicide, research shows you can have a positive influence on someone who may be considering suicide by initiating a conversation with them and supporting them to seek help.

The main message is you don’t need to be a clinician, a GP, or a nurse to check-in with someone you are worried about.

It is OK to let someone know you have noticed they are struggling and ask them if they are experiencing thoughts of suicide.

It is normal to feel worried or nervous about having a conversation with a friend, family member or work colleague who might be experiencing suicidal thoughts, but there are resources available to help you.

Life in Mind is a national digital gateway providing organisations and communities access to suicide prevention information, programs, services, resources and research.

Part 3

Suicide has emerged in the past half century as a major cause of premature mortality and is a contributor to the overall health and life expectancy gap for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

In 2018 it was the fifth leading cause of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the age-standardised suicide rate was more than twice as high as the non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s rate.

The standardised death rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (24.1 per 100, 000) was higher than the non-Indigenous rate (12.4 per 100, 000)2.

On average, over 100 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons end their lives through suicide each year, accounting for 1 in 20 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths.

STATISTIC

Further suicide data can be found at the Centre of Best Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention, and from the ATSISPEP report.

Three main issues can be identified:

  1. There is variable quality of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identification at the state and national levels, resulting in an expected under-reporting of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suicides.
  2. Lack of reporting on suicide due to questions regarding intent, especially in the case of childhood suicides. Similarly, it can be demonstrated that there may be a reluctance to classify adult deaths as suicides for a variety of reasons also.
  3. Delays in reporting data, whereby incidences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suicide might not be known for months and often years after the fact.

NACCHO Affiliates and Members Deadly Good News : #National Download the NACCHO 2018-2019 Annual Report #NSW @ahmrc #VIC @VACCHO_org Ballarat @VAHS1972 #QLD @QAIHC_QLD #NT @CAACongress #SA @AHCSA_ #WA @TheAHCWA

1.1 National : Download the 2018-19 NACCHO Annual Report

1.2 National : Our CEO Pat Turner presents to the Joint standing committee on the NDIS 

1.3 National : NACCHO Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey chairs a round table to discuss medicines priorities and challenges for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

2. NSW : The November Edition of AHMRC Message Stick is out now!

3.1 VIC : In a Victorian first, the Andrews Labor Government has agreed with Aboriginal health organisations and Health Services to create a new forum to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Victorians across the state.

3.2 VIC : Ballarat and District Aboriginal Co-operative welcomes first patients into new $8 million medical and regional health hub

3.3 VIC : Deadly opening ceremony for new VAHS Epping Clinic in Melbourne’s northern suburbs

4. QLD : The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) hosted their third annual Awards for Excellence , celebrating leaders, organisations and communities within the Sector.

5. NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs Care Coordination Team awarded Administrator’s Medal in Primary Health Care 2019

6. SA New traineeship pathway for AHCSA Aboriginal Health Practitioners

7. WA AHCWA’s Mappa team and Ash from Waitj Productions are on set at the Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service shooting the Mappa Promo video.

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Download the 2018-19 NACCHO Annual Report 

Download  in PDF from HERE 

1.2 National : Our CEO Pat Turner presents to the Joint standing committee on the NDIS 

Ms Turner:  Thank you for the opportunity to appear. We have already made a written
submission to the committee, so I hope that that answers most of your questions.

We are here to elaborate on any other points that the committee may wish to put to us.
It’s important that we point out that we serve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through our local and regional Aboriginal health services that are community controlled, with some 145 organisations spread throughout Australia.

We represent their interests in terms of policy and leadership. We work closely with both
the bureaucracy in Canberra and the minister responsible, where we have a very professional and productive ongoing relationship.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are twice as likely to experience disability as other Australians. So there are nine per cent with a severe condition compared to four per cent for non-Indigenous people. Currently, 5.7 per cent of NDIS participants are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with 16,417 active participants as of 30 June this year, which is considerably less than the percentage thought to have a significant disability.

The percentage of NDIS participants who are Aboriginal is indicative of the numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with plans; however, it is not necessarily representative of the extent to which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are receiving assistance under those plans as a result of appropriate services not being readily available.

See pages 7-11 for Pat Turners presentation 

NACCHO Pat Turner NDIS

1.3 National : NACCHO Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey chairs a round table to discuss medicines priorities and challenges for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

On Friday November 15th, NACCHO – the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations – hosted a round table with Medicines Australia and representatives of its respective members to discuss medicines priorities and challenges for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The roundtable was also attended by Jo Watson, Chair of the Commonwealth HTA Consumer Consultative Committee.

NACCHO Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey  chaired the meeting and Evo Health consultants Renae Beardmore Sharon Musgrave acted as facilitators for the workshop.

The group discussed challenges and solutions to enhance medicines access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by improving how PBS medicines are listed and how medicine supplies are maintained. The group also considered how quality use of medicines materials and activities may be improved.

Participants worked constructively to develop a list of co-designed solutions that will be taken back to their respective organisations for

2.1 NSW : The November Edition of AHMRC Message Stick is out now!

Read about Oceania Tobacco Control Conference, success stories from Waminda – South Coast Women’s Health & Welfare Aboriginal Corp. and The Glen Rehab, as well as how to prepare your service for #HIVAwarenessWeek2019.

Read more >> http://bit.ly/34alu2Y

3.1 VIC : In a Victorian first, the Andrews Labor Government has agreed with Aboriginal health organisations and Health Services to create a new forum to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Victorians across the state.

Establishing a state-wide body has been identified by Victorian Community as a vital step towards ensuring all parts of the Victorian health system are working together to improve health outcomes for Victoria’s Aboriginal people.

At last week’s roundtable senior representatives from the Victorian Government met with Aboriginal community controlled health organisations (including our Acting CEO Trevor Pearce), other health associations, peak bodies and the Australian Government.

It was a chance for Government to hear from leaders in Aboriginal health about their key priorities and to discuss how a future forum could work to advance initiatives that will have a real impact on Aboriginal lives.

VACCHO Chair and CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Co-operative Karen Heap said “Finding effective solutions to the issues facing Aboriginal people must be driven by Aboriginal people working closely with Government and I am confident the new Forum will provide a much needed, high-level voice to ensure the most appropriate and effective way forward.”

3.2 VIC : Ballarat and District Aboriginal Co-operative welcomes first patients into new $8 million medical and regional health hub

The new dedicated stand-alone medical clinic and district health hub has welcomed its first patients and is now bringing communities throughout the greater western region of Victoria together.

With Aboriginal themes at the forefront of the design, this hub brings together high quality medical, health and community services under the one roof, so patients can get the treatment they need in a culturally welcoming environment.

Featuring ceiling lights curved in linear snake patterns, the facility also boasts a range of Aboriginal art as well as portraits of Elders and Founding Members to celebrate Aboriginal culture and promote understanding and respect within the community.

 

Integrating general practice rooms with specialist mental health and alcohol and other drugs consulting rooms allows for better coordinated care planning and greater interaction of services, including smoother cross referrals to the different services and programs offered by the Ballarat and District Aboriginal Co-operative.

Funding regional health infrastructure

The Victorian Government’s Regional Health Infrastructure Fund invested $6m towards this project, with the remaining $2.5m contributed by the Ballarat and District Aboriginal Co-operative to purchase the adjoining land.

The total investment allowed for the expansion of the existing premises and the build of the new facility to expand and create additional space for specialist medical and health-related services.

The Victorian Government established the Regional Health Infrastructure Fund to rebuild and refurbish rural and regional health facilities, ensuring all Victorians can access high quality care and facilities, no matter where they live.

3.3 VIC : Deadly opening ceremony for new VAHS Epping Clinic in Melbournes northern suburbs 

Image may contain: outdoor

Deadly opening ceremony for VAHS Epping Clinic. Officially opened by Life Member, Alan Brown, Long term board member, Tony McCartney and long term local community member resident, Tina Wright.

On behalf of VAHS, we acknowledge our ancestors work and in the spirit of community control, this clinic owned by the community, for the community.

4.QLD : The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) hosted their third annual Awards for Excellence , celebrating leaders, organisations and communities within the Sector.

Established to recognise the hard work, determination and growth of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector (ATSICCHS), the awards acknowledge those that are making a real difference throughout their communities.

QAIHC Chairperson Gail Wason said the organisation was impressed by the number of nominations in each category for this year’s awards.
“The volume of nominations received by the Sector this year demonstrates the growth and success experienced in rural and remote communities across Queensland,” said Ms Wason.

“I am truly inspired by the dedication and commitment of the people who work within our Sector.”

“It is important to acknowledge individuals and organisations for the work they do in improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Queensland,” she said.

QAIHC Chief Executive Officer, Mr Neil Willmett is proud of the Sector and acknowledges the tireless work of individuals working for ATSICCHS in Queensland.
“Staff at our Member Services often go above and beyond to work towards providing their clients with exceptional care through every stage of their life,” said Mr Willmett.

The winners of the QAIHC 2019 Awards for Excellence are:

  • QAIHC Partnership Excellence Award – Institute for Urban Indigenous Health
  • QAIHC Innovation Excellence Award – Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health
  • QAIHC Patient Satisfaction and Service Excellence Award – NPA Family and Community Services Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation
  • QAIHC Leader of the Year Award – Veronica Williams and Gary White
  • QAIHC Member of the Year Award – Galangoor Duwalami Primary Healthcare Service.

The QAIHC Awards for Excellence were proudly sponsored by CheckUP, Health Workforce Queensland, Mazars, Hunter Promotional Products & Uniforms and Griffith University First Peoples Health Unit.

5. NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs Care Coordination Team awarded Administrator’s Medal in Primary Health Care 2019

Pictured (L-R): Rachel Godley and Balpalwanga Louise Maymuru (Laynhapuy Homelands Health), Her Honour the Honourable Vicki O’Halloran AO, Kathleen Hauth (Central Australian Aboriginal Congress) and Michelle Dowden (One Disease).

These awards celebrate and recognise the Northern Territory’s exceptional health workforce.

The Administrator’s Medals in Primary Health Care 2019 were presented on Thursday 21 November by Her Honour the Honourable Vicki O’Halloran AO, Administrator of the Northern Territory, at an official awards ceremony at Government House.

These medals recognise and reward health professionals, teams and whole practices/health services that have contributed significantly to the provision of primary health care in the Northern Territory.

The 2019 recipients are:

Individual Medal – Michelle Dowden, One Disease

Team Medal – Care Coordination Team, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

Whole of Practice/Health Service Medal – Laynhapuy Homelands Health

Nominations were received for people, teams and practices/services from right across the Territory, including Darwin, Alice Springs and surrounding communities, Tennant Creek, Nhulunbuy and Galiwin’ku. The nominations also covered a diverse range of specialty areas, including nursing, dentistry, medicine, optometry, podiatry, physiotherapy, mental health, health promotion and health literacy.

‘Effective collaboration between individuals and teams working in primary health care in the Northern Territory is particularly important due to the inevitable challenges that remoteness poses to the delivery of high-quality health care,’ said Northern Territory PHN CEO Nicki Herriot.

‘The medal recipients are all fine examples of how to adopt innovative service delivery models to overcome these challenges.’ She continued, ‘it’s wonderful to have this annual opportunity to recognise them.’

More information on the winners:

Michelle Dowden – CEO, One Disease

Michelle has worked for 25 years in primary health care in the Northern Territory. Prior to her current role as CEO of One Disease, Michelle spent time managing the Ngalkanbuy Health Clinic and held the position of Director of Primary Health Services at Sunrise Health in the Katherine region. Michelle is admired for her innovative management style and people-centred approach to health care. She passionately delivered health promotion in the early days at the grass-roots level, travelling door-to-door in remote communities. She has worked on initiatives ranging from infant nutrition strategies to awareness campaigns designed to eliminate scabies and RHD. Michelle is commended for her long-term commitment to primary health care and her breadth of experience within the Northern Territory.

Care Coordination Team, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

The Congress care coordinators go the extra mile in providing culturally appropriate and safe health and social services to their clients in Central Australia. They focus heavily on involving clients’ family and carers as this is central to providing holistic comprehensive primary health care. The care coordinators often bring up issues and identify gaps in service provision for their most vulnerable clients. For example, appropriate housing is an obvious and long-standing issue for many of the complex and often elderly clients. The care coordinators advocate heavily for those clients to ensure that their social needs are met, which is an essential step to improving their health outcomes.

Laynhapuy Homelands Health

The team at Laynhapuy Homelands Health is holistic, friendly and extremely passionate about their job. They service the homelands of East Arnhem Land for all primary health care needs. They drive hundreds of kilometres to service Homelands and deliver up to date clinical care, building incredible rapport with patients. Laynhapuy are commended for always searching for innovative ways to improve the health of those living in the Homelands. For example, they have begun running local grocery stores in homelands, keeping prices as they are at Woolworths. This allows people better access to food without paying up to a large taxi bill to get into town.

More information
The Administrator’s Medals in Primary Health Care are proudly sponsored by Northern Territory Primary Health Network, Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory, Health Providers Alliance Northern Territory, the Centre for Remote Health, CRANAplus, Northern Territory General Practice Education and the Northern Territory Government Department of Health.

6. SA New traineeship pathway for AHCSA Aboriginal Health Practitioners

“Our commitment is to invest in making our health system culturally safe and appropriately responsive for our Aboriginal communities.

“This involves full and ongoing participation by Aboriginal people and organisations in all levels of decision making affecting their health needs. “

Australian Health Council of South Australia CEO Nahtanha Davey said offering new traineeships pathways will enable the organisation to develop the next generation of upcoming Aboriginal Health Practitioners.

A new traineeship has been established to support Aboriginal Health Practitioners prepare for their vital role helping to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Following an application from the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA), the Training and Skills Commission (TaSC) has declared the Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice a vocation, allowing the course to be delivered through a paid traineeship model for the first time.

Minister for Innovation and Skills David Pisoni says offering the qualification through an extensive two-year traineeship program advantages students, employers and patients.

“Traineeships and apprenticeships provide job seekers with a paid pathway to the skills, workplace experience and qualifications they need to establish meaningful careers,” Minister Pisoni said.

“The Marshall Liberal Government recognises this hands-on training model elevates motivated job seekers into capable employees and helps match growing industry demand for skilled workers – which is why our Skilling South Australia initiative aims to create more than 20,000 additional apprenticeships and traineeships over four years.

“The Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice includes 800 hours of on-job practice – making it easier for students to build workplace confidence and master clinical skills.

“This change will support job creation, skill development, and a higher quality of tailored health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

Chair of the TaSC, Michael Boyce OAM, said elevating the Aboriginal Primary Health Care Practice course to a paid traineeship is a good example of how the training system can adapt and improve on the advice of industry.

7. WA AHCWA’s Mappa team and Ash from Waitj Productions are on set at the Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service shooting the Mappa Promo video.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @END_RHD Our CEO Pat Turner and @jcarapetis deliver a heart-felt evidence-based Aileen Plant Oration @_PHAA_ #CDCConference2019 on Ending #RHD in Australia #ClosingTheGap

At END RHD, our vision is simple: that no child born in Australia today dies of rheumatic heart disease.

And in theory, it should be just that, simple, because RHD has already been eliminated in Australia’s non-Indigenous population. 94% of people who get RHD are our mob.

Despite widespread improvements to the living standards of most Australians, our First Nation’s people continue to experience disadvantage and conditions that perpetuate the spread of infectious diseases.

In my mind, there is no clearer example of a disease of disparity than rheumatic heart disease.

At NACCHO, we became a founding partner of END RHD not because this disease is a simple fix, but because it is hard.

Because it spans from housing, to clinics, to open heart surgery, and highlights the inequalities within the health system, and in outcomes. “

Pat Turner CEO NACCHO delivering this year’s Aileen Joy Plant Oration with END RHD Co-Chair, Professor Jonathan Carapetis. See Pats speech Part 2 below

Part 1 PHAA Press Release 

Download the full Press Release

PHAA RHD Press Release

The conference was run by the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) and delegates got a sneak preview on an end game strategy to rid Australia of RHD – a detailed report that is due for formal release early next year.

“It’s a strategy that relies on partnerships and empowering Indigenous people,” said Professor Jonathan Carapetis, Executive Director, Telethon Kids Institute

“The time has never been better for us to control this disease.”

Researchers are looking at new formulations so that sufferers don’t have to have monthly penicillin

injections for years. “An implant is being worked on,” Professor Carapetis said.

“For 25 years we’ve all been looking at silver bullets and not seeing improvements but we should have hope as we now pull together all we know especially the environmental determinants.”

“We should be able to reduce RHD prevalence by 70 percent,” Professor Carapetis said.

“It’s complex but not overwhelming. It involves multiple sectors and a comprehensive response.”

“The Australian Government is funding the development of a Strep A vaccine. There is progress in the field as we move towards a trial. But that won’t result in a vaccine for our kids for a decade.”

 

Part 2 Pat Turners Speech 

As an Aboriginal woman of Gurdanji-Arrernte heritage, I wish to acknowledge the Ngunnawal people as the traditional owners of the land where we meet today.

I also acknowledge our continuing and vibrant First Nation’s cultures. I am grateful for the contributions of our past, present, and emerging leaders.

Today, I stand here wearing two hats. As CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation – NACCHO – and as Co-Chair of END RHD, an alliance of peaks, community and research organisations committed to ending rheumatic heart disease in Australia.

It gives me great honour to be here today to deliver this year’s Aileen Joy Plant Oration with my END RHD Co-Chair, Professor Jonathan Carapetis.

RHD begins with a sore throat or a skin sore caused by Strep A.

For our children, these are common infections – but the impact can last a lifetime.

A lifetime which, too often, is cut short.

There is no cure for RHD, but patients must undergo a painful injection of antibiotics every 28 days for at least a decade to keep their heart as strong as possible. Some must also undergo surgery to have their heart valves replaced or repaired.

In our work to close the gap, there are many priorities. Our people are telling us that. There is just so much to be done, we can’t afford to have ‘favourite’ diseases.

But RHD sticks out. It is the greatest cause of cardiovascular inequality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in this country. Non-Indigenous people, literally, just don’t get it.

In the Kimberley, the average age of death of people living with RHD is just 41 years old. This is a chronic, life-limiting disease… and it starts from a skin sore or sore throat.

We get it because of crowded houses. Because a lot of our people don’t always have access to hot water. To showers that work. To washing machines that aren’t broken.

We get it because our clinics are overwhelmed with demand, and sometimes skin sores and sore throats go untreated.

We get it because acute rheumatic fever gets missed and sometimes it is too late for treatment.

At NACCHO, we became a founding partner of END RHD not because this disease is a simple fix, but because it is hard. ( Partners in this image )

Because it spans from housing, to clinics, to open heart surgery, and highlights the inequalities within the health system, and in outcomes.

Because tackling this disease offers a way to significantly close the gap.

We are fighting to prevent the next generation of our children experiencing this needless suffering. And we are fighting for our people already living with the disease.

Kids like Tenaya, who you can see in this photo

Read Tenaya’s full story Here

You wouldn’t know it from that gorgeous smile, but when I met Tenaya at the start of the year, she had recently been flown down to Perth in a critical condition suffering from heart failure. Her mother had taken her to the local hospital three times, and each time she had been sent home.

The fourth time, her mother refused to leave until she was flown to Perth, where upon arrival, she was rushed to the intensive care unit and put on life-support for two weeks.

A month later, when she was strong enough, she underwent two rounds of open-heart surgery.

Tenaya is seven years old. And she’ll need monthly injections until she is twenty-one. Most likely, she’ll need further surgery too.

She bears both the physical scars of her surgery, and the emotional scars of months spent away from friends, family and her community.

Her mum says that every time she sees a nurse she bursts into tears, terrified.

And on top of all of that, her family have been forced to make the tough decision to move off country to be closer to the specialist medical treatment needed to keep her alive.

The fact that this suffering was caused by a preventable disease is horrifying.

The fact that RHD persists in a country as wealthy as Australia is a national shame.

The fact that without urgent investment, it’s predicted another 10,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children will develop the disease by 2031, is unconscionable.

We cannot let it happen.

Our people know what needs to happen to end RHD in this country.

In fact, community-driven work is already underway across Australia.

Our communities are rising. They are demanding support.

In March this year, a historic Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap was signed between COAG and the Coalition of Peaks, and a joint council was formed of which I am Co-Chair.

This means that now, for the first time, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, through their peak body representatives, will share decision making with governments on Closing the Gap.

The Partnership Agreement embodies the belief of all signatories that:

  • When Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are included and have a real say in the design and delivery of services that impact on them, the outcomes are far better;
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples need to be at the centre of Closing the Gap policy: the gap won’t close without our full involvement; and
  • COAG cannot expect us to take responsibility and work constructively with them to improve outcomes if we are excluded from the decision making.

Rheumatic heart disease exemplifies the gap in health outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians.

And we know that by addressing the causes, we can also eliminate other linked conditions that unfairly blight our people such as scabies, otitis media, and kidney disease.

We cannot, and will not, close the gap without ending rheumatic heart disease.

Right now, we have the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership and community demand to tackle this disease.

We have a commitment from government to equal partnership in our work to close the gap.

And with over 25 years of research behind us, we have a strong evidence-base to support this community-driven work.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @NDIS : Download @LowitjaInstitut 13 recommendations Report : Understanding disability through the lens of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people – challenges and opportunities

” The 2011 Census indicated that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience profound or severe disability at higher rates than non-Indigenous Australians at all ages, with 6.1% of Indigenous males and 5.4% of Indigenous females reporting a profound or severe disability.1

 The Australian Bureau of Statistics found in 2015 that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were 1.8 times more likely than non-Indigenous people to be living with a disability.2

 The First People Disability Network (FPDN) estimates that the current number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people nationally eligible for participation in the NDIS is around 60,000.3 “

From project background see part 2 below

Read over Aboriginal and health and NDIS articles published by NACCHO Here

Part 1 Download 13 recommendations report

Lowitja_UnderstandingDisability_291019_D4_WEB

Representing a major change in the way supports for people living with disability are funded, the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) presents both opportunities and significant challenges.

This project, Understanding disability through the lens of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people – challenges and opportunities, was developed to examine the:

  • Implementation of the NDIS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Engagement Strategy1
  • Interaction between National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) staff, local area co-ordinators (LACs) and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
  • Experiences of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in accessing the NDIS, planning, and receiving disability supports through the scheme

The research was conducted in collaboration with the MJD Foundation (MJDF) and Synapse, organisations which have longstanding connections with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities in the Northern Territory and Queensland respectively

Part 2 Background to project

From HERE

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) represents a major change in the way the services and supports for people with disability are funded.

It presents both tremendous opportunity yet significant challenges.

Ensuring that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people receive the same care as other Australians is an important human rights obligation. This project will improve the ability of the NDIS to achieve this.

At this stage, with the exception of an evaluation conducted in Barkly, very little is known about the roll-out of the NDIS to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This project will examine:

  • the implementation of the NDIS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander engagement strategy
  • the interaction between the National Disability Agency (NDIA) staff, local area co-ordinators and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) and NGOs
  • the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in accessing the NDIS program, planning and receiving the supports/services through the program.

Recognition that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disabilities are not well served by mainstream services has led to strong advocacy and the development of culturally competent service models by the community controlled and NGO sector.

This project is a collaboration of 3 such organisations; Machado Joseph Disease Foundation (MJDF), Synapse and First Peoples Disability Network and the University of Melbourne.

The project will take a co-design approach to developing a study of the roll out of the NDIS for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Co-­design, or experience-based co-design, is not only a way to actively involve consumers in the design, delivery and/or evaluation of services but also enables the design of systems where consumer and carer experiences are central.4

Our approach to the project will bring together expertise from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations working to provide services to people with disabilities, with researchers and policy makers.

The approach to design and data collection will support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership, optimise existing data and knowledge, and develop local research capacity among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

It will bring together community, researchers, providers, policy makers and NDIA staff and develop an evidence informed approach to improving the NDIS and developing a workforce to support it.

The project will involve four phases:

  1. Establishment of a project reference group
  2. Co-design
  3. Interviews
  4. Reporting and review.

It is expected that the project will identify strengths and weaknesses of the NDIS implementation. It will identify promising strategies to improve the ways the NDIA works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations.

Related resources:

NACCHO Affiliates and Members Deadly Good News : Registrations for #NACCHOAgm19 #NACCHOYouth19 extended to 25 October Plus #NSW @Walgett_AMS #Qld @DeadlyChoices @Wuchopperen @ashbarty @EvonneGoolagong #Vic @VACCHO_org #NT @CAACongress #WA #SA

1.1 National : NACCHO , Affiliates and members visit Kimberleys to learn about renal services

1.2 National : Registrations to this year’s Youth Conference and the NACCHO National Conference will now close on 25th October 2019. 

1.3 National : Closing the Gap / Have your say CTG deadline extended to Friday, 8 November 2019.

2.1 QLD :Australia’s Sportswoman of the Year Ash Barty and tennis legend Evonne Goolagong Cawley helping out at the Deadly Choices NAIDOC Tennis Camp hosted by Wuchopperen Health Service Ltd

2.2 QLD : Treaty consultations in Queensland could deliver better housing and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

3.NSW : AHMRC : A primary care oasis: Community Control success stories at Walgett AMS

4.VIC : VACCHO partners with BreastScreen Victoria’s to arrange the hot pink van, known as “Marjorie” to visit Gunditjmara Aboriginal Cooperative ACCHO in Warrnambool

5. WA Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporations staff support Rowans Walk and suicide prevention awareness

6. SA : First Syphilis Point of Care Test at Nunyara ACCHS’ Community Connection Day 

7. NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs healthy promotions teams are getting out to communities to spread prevention messages 

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.National : NACCHO , Affiliates and members visit Kimberleys to learn about renal services

Pictured here at Derby Renal Health Centre are Neil Willmett (CEO, QAIHC), Dania Ahwang (CEO, Wuchoperren Health Service, Cairns), Donnella Mills (Acting Chairperson, NACCHO) and Dawn Casey (Deputy CEO, NACCHO).” REPOST – QAIHC CEO Neil Willmett

The incidence of Kidney Disease in the Kimberley is one of the highest in Australia. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) and End-Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD) incidence within the Aboriginal population of the Kimberley greatly exceeds the national burden of disease.

Dialysis prevalence for this region has more than tripled in the last decade and is increasing at a much faster rate than in the rest of Western Australia (WA).

Kimberley Renal Services is a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd established to manage regional renal support and dialysis services in Broome, Derby, Kununurra and Fitzroy Crossing.

Fitzroy Crossing Renal Health Centre opened in July 2012 and currently has 4 chairs

Broome Renal Health Centre (previously known as Kimberley Satellite Dialysis Centre KSDC) has been in operation since 21st October 2002 and currently has 10 chairs

Kununurra Renal Health Centre opened in May 2013 and currently has 6 chairs

Derby Renal Health Centre opened in May 2013 and currently has 6 chairs

Each Renal Health Centre operates Monday to Saturday with varying opening hours providing dialysis services to clients across the Kimberley.

Care is provided largely by Nurses and Aboriginal Health Workers (AHW) and support staff includes Aboriginal Care Coordinators, Patient Care Assistants, Receptionists and Administrative Support Staff and Cleaners.

1.2 National : Registrations to this year’s Youth Conference and the NACCHO National Conference extended to 25 October 2019. 

Monday 4th November 2019 NACCHO Youth Conference *Youth Registration is Free of Charge

The central focus of the NACCHO Youth Conference Healthy youth, healthy future is on building resilience.

For thousands of years our Ancestors have shown great resolve thriving on this vast continent. Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who make up 54% of our population, now look to the example set by generations past and present to navigate ever-changing and complex social and health issues.

Healthy youth, healthy future provides us with opportunities to explore and discuss issues of importance to us, our families and communities, and to take further steps toward becoming tomorrow’s leaders. We hope to see you there!

Registrations are now open for the 2019 NACCHO Youth Conference, which will be held November 4th in Darwin at the Darwin Convention Centre.

Register More Info HERE 

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Tuesday 5th & Wednesday 6th November 2019

7th November 2019 NACCHO AGM

This year, NACCHO’s Members’ Conference focuses on the theme –

Because of them we must: improving health outcomes for our people aged 0-29 years.

We have chosen this focus because we know that investing in the health and wellbeing of our babies, children and young people can help prevent ill health, disease and disability. Strong investment in this age group will help them to thrive, help them build strong and healthy families and communities, and help to positively influence their future health outcomes and life expectancy measures.

Because of them we must provides an opportunity to place our future generations at the forefront of our discussions, to hear about the innovative work that is happening in our community controlled and other sectors, to exchange ideas and share our knowledge.

Registrations to this year’s Youth Conference and the NACCHO National Conference will close on 25th October 2019.  Late registrations will not be accepted.

We hope you can join us!

Register HERE

If you have any questions or would like further information contact Ros Daley and Jen Toohey on 02 6246 9309 or via email conference@naccho.org.au

1.3 National : Closing the Gap / Have your say CTG deadline extended to Friday, 8 November 2019.

 

The engagements are now in full swing across Australia and this is generating more interest than we had anticipated in our survey on Closing the Gap.

The Coalition of Peaks has had requests from a number of organisations across Australia seeking, some Coalition of Peak members and some governments for more time to promote and complete the survey.

We want to make sure everyone has the opportunity to have their say on what should be included in a new agreement on Closing the Gap so it is agreed to extend the deadline for the survey to Friday, 8 November 2019.

This will help build further understanding and support for the new agreement and will not impact our timeframes for negotiating with government as we were advised at the most recent Partnership Working Group meeting that COAG will not meet until early 2020.

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

2.1 QLD :Australia’s Sportswoman of the Year Ash Barty and tennis legend Evonne Goolagong Cawley helping out at the Deadly Choices NAIDOC Tennis Camp hosted by Wuchopperen Health Service Ltd

It’s not every day a tennis World Number 1 is in Cairns but that was the case today when Ash Barty, along with Evonne Goolagong-Cawley came to have a hit with some of Cairns up-and-coming stars.

2.2 QLD : Treaty consultations in Queensland could deliver better housing and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

The first Indigenous woman elected to Queensland’s parliament has encouraged all Queenslanders to take part in the 26 treaty consultation sessions to be held across the state.

Official talks of a treaty that could deliver better housing and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Queensland began in Cairns on Thursday.

They were the first in a series of community consultation sessions across the state with plans to reach a treaty with First Nations people.

“I encourage all Queenslanders to attend a consultation session and participate in this important conversation,” said Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch.

“This is an historic step we take together, one that is long overdue but one that will strengthen the way to greater reconciliation, self-determination and a more inclusive, respectful shared future.”

The state government outlined plans towards a treaty with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders people in July, with the aim for greater self-determination in Indigenous communities.

Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Jackie Trad told parliament on Thursday it was time for the truth about the state’s ancient history and colonisation to be told as part of steps towards a shared and inclusive future

3.NSW : AHMRC : A primary care oasis: Community Control success stories at Walgett AMS

Driving through Gamilaraay country in the remotest reaches of northwestern NSW, the single most striking feature is the dry; vast expanses of parched land.

At the Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service, the walls are beginning to crack because the soil the building stands on is too dry to support its weight.

On the day I visit, the water from the taps runs yellow, sediment settling in it from the artesian basin below, and the Shire Council advises locals to boil it before drinking.

Walgett is not expecting rain for another three years, and though it is nowhere to be seen, water – or, more precisely, the lack of it — courses through every conversation.

The situation is so precarious the AMS is now receiving donated water and storing it casks on palates for distribution on Mondays and Wednesdays to those who need it most.

Walgett-Water-Palates

Water stored in casks on palates. Photo credit Dr Tim Senior.

This doesn’t seem sustainable, but for Christine Corby, CEO of the long-running Walgett AMS, it is simply one more way in which the service offers comprehensive and holistic primary care.

It may look like a conventional medical clinic, offering a range of programs including acute medical care, chronic disease management, dental and oral health services, allied health, psychology, specialist clinics, child health and antenatal care, but Walgett AMS is so much more than a one-stop shop for health. It is of, by and for the community. Really, it *is* the community, and Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners are integral to its success.

Read in Full HERE

This article was written by Dr Tim Senior and edited by Amy Coopes, on behalf of Croakey Professional Services.

It was sponsored by The Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AH&MRC) of NSW, which had final say over the content.

Croakey Professional Services help generate funds to sustain our public interest journalism activities, and also aim to provide a useful service to our readers. To find out more about the range of services on offer, see here.

4.VIC : VACCHO partners with BreastScreen Victoria’s to arrange the hot pink van, known as “Marjorie” to visit Gunditjmara Aboriginal Cooperative ACCHO in Warrnambool

To mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Aboriginal women in Warrnambool this week got free breast screens – the best way to find cancer early and save lives.

BreastScreen Victoria’s hot pink van, known as “Marjorie” visited Gunditjmara Aboriginal Cooperative at Harris Reserve to give free breast screens to women aged 50 .

Originally published HERE

The first 50 women to receive a mammogram received a free cultural screening shawl to wear during the procedure, and to take home with them.

These shawls have been developed to make breast screening more comfortable for Aboriginal women across Victoria, with Warrnambool’s shawl featuring a design by local Warlpiri artist, Rebecca Clayton.

Morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea was also be provided throughout the day.

BreastScreen Victoria CEO, Vicki Pridmore, said that the initiative was a culmination of months of hard work and planning with project partner, the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO).

“We hope that the beautiful shawls created by Aboriginal artists as a part of this project can assist women screening to feel comfortable, welcome andrespected,” Ms Pridmore said.

We hope that the beautiful shawls created by Aboriginal artists as a part of this project can assist women screening to feel comfortable, welcome and respected.

BreastScreen Victoria CEO, Vicki Pridmore

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Aboriginal women in Victoria. A breast screen can find cancer as small as a grain of rice, long before a woman or her doctor can see or feel anything.

Typically, women aged between 50 and 74 should have a breast screen every two years – the best way to find breast cancer early, when treatment is most effective.

All breast screens are with a female radiographer, in a friendly and safe environment. Clients don’t need a doctor’s referral or Medicare card, and only take 10 minutes.

Ms Pridmore is encouraging Aboriginal women aged 50 to 74 to take advantage of the van’s visit to town.

“When found early, breast cancer can be treated very successfully. This visit has been organised with our partners at VACCHO and Gunditjmara to make sure that Aboriginal women in Warrnambool have access to a potentially life-saving breast screen,” she said.

“The vans use the highest quality digital radiography machines to ensure that women receive the best service, regardless of their location.”

5. WA Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporations staff support Rowans Walk and suicide prevention awareness

In support for Rowans Walk and suicide prevention awareness, WMHSAC staff had a great time yesterday encouraging all participants with cool refreshments, as they completed the awareness walk.

6. SA : First Syphilis Point of Care Test at Nunyara ACCHS’ Community Connection Day 

Nunyara’s Willhelmine Lieberwirth ( also NACCHO Board Member ) and Kate Warren. Syphilis Point of Care Test (finger prick with result in 15 minutes).
SAHMRI Young Deadly Free poster https://youngdeadlyfree.org.au/

7. NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs healthy promotions team are getting out to communities to spread prevention messages 

The Congress FASD Prevention Program visited Ntaria community this week, promoting ‘NO grog before, during and after pregnancy is safest for dad, mum and bub’….here is Donna and Justine having a yarn with Ntaria school kids.

Check out our health promotion team who are out at Amoonguna community spreading health messages about risky alcohol behaviours, nutrition, Tackling Indigenous Smoking and Sexual Health education

NACCHO Aboriginal Men’s #MentalHealth : ‘ Whatever you grow will save a bro’ says @DeadlyChoices Nathan Appo selected to be one of the faces for the 2019 International #Movember campaign. Please support Donate

A few months ago I was asked to travel to London to be one of the faces of the 2019 International Movember campaign.

Of course I said yes and I’m honoured and blessed to be apart of such an important cause.

If you know me you’d know I’m very passionate about mental health and educating our mob around the importance of staying mentally healthy.

Too many of my brothers are passing away from suicide, don’t be shame my brothers. We need to be there for each other & educate our people around mental health & depression

This is just another way in supporting friends and family going through depression and anxiety as we can always educate someone around us.

This year Movember is reminding us that not everyone can grow the world’s best moustache but that shouldn’t stop you because ‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’.

 No matter if it’s patchy, lopsided or just kind of…furry, like mine! Every Mo has the power to save 

Your donation will help Movember fund groundbreaking work in prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention.

To donate please click on Nathan’s link 

Nathan Appo from Innisfail / Mamu / Goreng Goreng / Bundjalung /Living in Brisbane and working with Deadly Choices

Men’s health charity, Movember, has launched its 2019 campaign for its annual month of moustache-growing.

This year, the campaign’s tagline is ‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’, acknowledging the variety of shapes and styles of moustache that are grown during Movember.

UK-based creative agency, MATTA, was behind the campaign. The ad was voiced by comedian Dave Lawson, and features testicular cancer survivor Harvee Pene, prostate cancer survivor Charlie Jia and mental health advocate Nathan Appo.

” Training isn’t always about physical health and strength. ‪I exercise to stay mentally healthy, mentally fit.‬
#MovemberMotivation‪What’s your Deadly Choice?‬ Says Nathan 

To donate please click on Nathan’s link 

“It’s amazing to see so many different faces from all over the world featured in the Movember campaign this year,” Jia said.

“As well as being a lot of fun to shoot and highlighting that anyone can grow a Mo, ‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’ has put Indigenous men’s health front and centre. It also shows that background, colour and beliefs don’t matter, because prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health issues won’t discriminate.”

A second video released shows Pene recount his story with testicular cancer to his barber.

Movember’s chief marketing officer, Juliette Smith, said: “‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’ arose from the insight that some men want to support the charity, but feel embarrassed by their facial hair, or its perceived inadequacy.

It also nods to the fact that the landscape of male grooming has changed, where the ask for many is no longer ‘grow a moustache’ but increasingly more often ‘shave your beard’, adding another layer of vulnerability for the grower.

 ” No matter if it’s patchy, lopsided or just kind of…furry, like mine! Every Mo has the power to save lives. My father Neily Apps is the reason why I participate in Movember, it’s a chance to educate and support our fellow men ” Says Nathan Appo 

To donate please click on Nathan’s link 

“The campaign aims to dispel these anxieties, demonstrating the ultimate importance of Movember; that the wider awareness of our charity and its causes; prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health, can change lives for better.”

MATTA’s design and production director, Tom Allwood, said: “Movember is so important in raising often un-talked about issues among men. We found a way of bringing people together from all backgrounds, showing that we’re all unique, but focusing throughout on the integral message of the movement.”

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Research #ourculturescount #HaveYourSayCTG : Download @Mayi_Kuwayu and @LowitjaInstitut Defining the Indefinable: Descriptors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ culture and their links to health and wellbeing

“In recent years, interest in understanding the relationship between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ cultures and how culture relates to health and wellbeing has been growing. The first step in understanding this relationship is to identify what is described in the literature as ‘culture’ and then to describe how the literature reports the relationship between culture and health and wellbeing.

Some people argue that culture is not definable or that it is intangible. However, all people are born into and grow, work and live within a culture or cultures. Cultures are maintained or modified when they are passed on and are reinforced and practised in both specific and general situations.

The many definitions encompass culture- specific knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviours (including within cultural variations according to rules), and all human life is culturally bound.

Much work in epidemiology and public health focuses on the presence (or absence) of disease and not on the culture within which illness and wellbeing manifest.

We need to understand both wellbeing and culture to have effective public health. “

From the publication Mayi_Kuwayu and Lowitja Institute Defining the Indefinable : Continued Part 1

Download HERE

Defining_Indefinable_report_FINAL_WEB

In Australia, limited data establish or define the relationship between health, wellbeing and culture and the mechanisms through which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural determinants impact health and wellbeing.

There is increasing attention on the relationship between culture, health and wellbeing in this population.

The authors conducted this literature review as preliminary work for the Mayi Kuwayu Study—Mayi Kuwayu broadly means “to follow Aboriginal people over a long time” in Ngiyampaa language (language of the Wongaibon people of New South Wales, Australia).

Survey Website 

The aim was to help us understand the cultural factors that are important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and how these factors relate to health and wellbeing.

The authors examined the Australian literature, as well as literature from countries that have experienced colonisation events similar to those of Australia— primarily Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada and the United States.

 Part 1 Introduction continued from opening 

This work stems from the desire of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to achieve that understanding in order to improve our health. Culture (the maintenance, revitalising, embracing, nurturing and growth of it) is important to our happiness and wellbeing and for improving health outcomes.

This review provides insights into what Indigenous peoples across the world describe as culture. However, much more knowledge is likely to be held by cultural leaders and others who have not engaged in what is often non-

Indigenous-led research. This also means that what is described as culture is largely viewed through the lens of people from non-Indigenous cultures. The content of this review is not intended to be a tool to measure indigeneity or cultural proficiency for individuals or groups and should not be read or interpreted as such.

The Lowitja Institute Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health CRC funded this review under project 16- SDH-0503. Our aims were to identify from the literature the broad domains (and additional sub-domains) of Indigenous peoples’ cultures and describe how these relate to health and, more broadly, wellbeing.

We mainly restricted our review to literature published between 1990 and 2017 and used an iterative search process that initially returned many thousands of results from five online databases and through hand searching. We included grey literature to ensure as much material as possible was included.

We identified six broad, frequently cited cultural domains or themes, each with a number of sub-domains (see ‘Summary of cultural indicators’ at the end of Chapter 3). The broad domains were:

  • Connection to Country
  • Indigenous beliefs and knowledge
  • Indigenous language
  • Family, kinship and community
  • Cultural expression and continuity
  • Self-determination and

This revised edition of the literature review has been published by the Lowitja Institute as part of the project completion process.

Part 2 : The Conclusion

We have highlighted the often complex and overlapping factors that affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and wellbeing.

These factors can operate at the individual or community level. Importantly, we have identified that, while some practices, processes and beliefs are different in the context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, there are some universal elements across Australia and internationally.

We have highlighted in this review that health and more broadly wellbeing appear to be enhanced when cultural elements and culture more broadly is learnt, practiced and incorporated into people’s lives.

While we have likely not produced a succinct definition of culture, as a result of this review we have a better understanding of what things constitute the varying parts of culture for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and how these relate to health and wellbeing.

The authors acknowledge that this review may not include some elements of Indigenous peoples culture however this paper, has for the first time, put in one place the range of factors describing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture from an Australian and international perspective.

As a result of the extensive search we have been able to list broad domains of culture and a range of sub themes under each broad cultural domain. This is the first time to our knowledge this has been done.

Through the review we have been able to identify quantitative cultural measures that did not currently exist and this enabled the research team identify areas for data development – the creation of new measures for Mayi Kuwayu, the National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing.

This review also assisted in informing the modification of existing measures for inclusion in the Study. The Mayi Kuwayu Study commenced data collection in October 2018.

The report was prepared by Minette Salmon, Kate Doery, Phyll Dance, Jan Chapman, Ruth Gilbert, Rob Williams & Ray Lovett

 Part 3 Have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people  #HaveYourSay about #closingthegapCTG

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people know what works best for us.

We need to make sure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth voices are reflected and expertise is recognised in every way at every step on efforts to close the gap in life outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.’

‘The Coalition of Peaks is leading the face to face discussions, not governments.

The Peaks are asking Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth to tell us what should be included in a new Closing the Gap agreement and we will take this to the negotiating table.’

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/