NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health #refreshtheCTGRefresh #HOSW8 @fam_matters_au Download the #FamilyMatters Report 2018: The report 2018 urges that investment in #prevention is critical to stopping our national child removals crisis

 ” We call on all Australian Governments
 to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their representatives over the
 coming year and beyond to implement the evidence based strategies for change that this report shows are desperately needed. We hope that, as a result, next year’s report will show a changing story.

The choices that we make now go to the very heart of our shared obligation to heal our nation’s fractured past and secure our children’s future.”

– Natalie Lewis, Chair of Family Matters

At the launch of this Family Matters Report 2018, the campaign is calling upon the Council of Australian Governments to work in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders and organisations across the country, to develop a generational Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children’s strategy to eliminate over-representation in out-of-home care and address the causes of child removals.

Download the Report

Family-Matters-Report-2018

The rate at which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are being removed from their families is an escalating national crisis.

The Family Matters Report 2018, which was released at the Healing Our Spirit Worldwide Conference in Sydney today, finds that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are now 10.1 times more likely to be removed from their families than non-Indigenous children. And the rate is projected to triple in the next twenty years if urgent action is not taken.

Fewer than half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are placed with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers, following a steep decline over the last 10 years. This places Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are removed from their families at serious risk of being permanently disconnected from their families, communities and cultures.

The Family Matters Report 2018 points to a number of issues as the drivers of over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in the child protection system. Poverty is one – it was found that 25 per cent of clients accessing homelessness services were Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people, and most disturbingly, of those clients, one in four was a child under the age of 10.

Family violence was also highlighted in the report, where in 2016-17, emotional abuse, which can include exposure to family violence, was the most common child protection concern for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Another driver of over-representation is intergenerational trauma. Direct descendants of the Stolen Generations are 30 per cent more likely to have poor mental health than other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. All of these factors put our children at greater risk of entering the child protection system.

The report also notes with concern the strong trends in policy and legislative reform to increase the focus on permanent care and adoption. The recently released report from the Senate Inquiry into Local Adoption recommends pathways to open adoption for all children in out-of-home care, which will disproportionately impact Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

As recognised in the ALP’s dissenting report this “willfully ignores the weight of evidence from submitters, it also flies in the face of human rights conventions”. Safety for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is always the priority and this includes ensuring their connection to culture, community and kin, as recognised in the Family Matters Report.

This year’s report is solutions-focussed, highlighting the way forward for positive change. We must shift from being reactive to being proactive, invest heavily in solutions, and involve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in decision-making about their own children.

Governments are only investing 17% of child protection funding in support services for children and their families, which are critical to preventing the situations that lead to child removals. The majority of child protection funding (83%) is spent on child protection services and out-of-home care – reacting to problems once they’ve already occurred.

There must be a significant boost in funding of culturally safe preventative and early intervention measures to urgently put a stop to these high rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child removals.

But, the pace of investment and action in prevention and early intervention is slow. Efforts to address broader community and social issues that contribute to risk for our children across areas such as housing, justice, violence and poverty, remain vastly inadequate and lack coordination… This year’s Family Matters Report puts a spotlight on primary prevention measures in the early years of children’s lives – the years that matter most to changing the storyline for our families.”

– Natalie Lewis, Chair of Family Matters

Another way forward is putting greater focus on early years services to ensure that our children have the best possible start in life. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander five-year-olds are 2.5 times more likely to be developmentally delayed than non-Indigenous children. And yet they are accessing early childhood education and care at half the rate of non-Indigenous children. We must facilitate greater access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and their families to early years services.

The Family Matters Report 2018 also highlights the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander decision-making in child protection. So far only Victoria and Queensland have a statewide program to support Aboriginal families to participate in child protection decisions. Only the same two states have agreed on a comprehensive strategy to improve outcomes for children that is overseen by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family-led decision-making in child protection must be rolled out nation-wide to ensure the best outcomes for our children.

Family Matters is Australia’s national campaign to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people grow up safe and cared for in family, community and culture. The campaign is led by SNAICC – National Voice for our Children – the national peak body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Our goal is to eliminate the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care by 2040.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Racism #VicVotes @VACCHO_org Survey finds 86 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Victoria have personally experienced racism in a mainstream health setting

“Racism hinders people from actually getting good medical care, getting good health care accessing services,

The results highlight the need for government to appoint an independent health commissioner and address cultural awareness at all levels of the health system.

“There are avenues that can be taken to overcome these issues and we are here to urge they be adopted by whichever party wins government at the Victorian election later this month,

Acting CEO for VACCHO, Trevor Pearce, says incidents of racism within the mainstream health system often lead to Indigenous Australians seeking treatment much later than non-Indigenous people or avoiding it all together, contributing to the gap in health and wellbeing outcomes.

“On an individual level, exposure to racism is associated with psychological distress, depression, poor quality of life, and substance misuse, all of which contribute significantly to the overall ill-health experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Prolonged experience of stress can also have physical health effects, such as on the immune, endocrine and cardiovascular systems.”

Pat Anderson is chairwoman of the Lowitja Institute,  (and a former chair of NACCHO) see her opinion article below link ”

This article has been read over 22,000 times in past 4 years 

Read HERE 

 

Researchers have polled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Victorians about their experiences of racism at hospitals and GP clinics.

The online survey, with 120 respondents, found high levels of everyday racism in the health sector.

FROM NITV

Of those polled, 88 per cent reported incidences of racism from nurses, and 74 per cent had experienced racism when dealing with GPs.

The survey was conducted by the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) and designed in partnership with Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) students.

The results revealed 86 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Victoria have personally experienced racism in a mainstream health setting at least once, while 54 per cent said they experienced racism in hospitals every time they attended.

The survey responses showed fewer incidents of racism when interacting with dentists (48 per cent) and the ambulance service (46 per cent).

Mr Pearce attributed the lower figures to the cultural competency work VACCHO has done with Dental Health Services Victoria and Ambulance Victoria, and said it showed how working with the Aboriginal community could achieve beneficial results for everybody involved.

“This is going to require Aboriginal people not just being heard, but actions being taken on what we say. We know what is best for us, we have the answers. Pay attention to us and act accordingly,” he said.

Victoria’s health minister Jill Hennessy says the government is taking the issue seriously.

“We are ensuring our services are more responsive to the needs of Indigenous Australians, so they can get the high quality and safe care they need, when they need it – free from discrimination,” she said in a statement.

Aboriginal Health Alcohol and Other Drugs : Minister @KenWyatt and John Havnen #NACCHO deliver #NIDAC18 keynotes : What is currently being done to reduce the high levels of alcohol and other drug use within Aboriginal communities? 

 ” All of us want to see better health for First Nations Australians. 

We know that the excessive consumption of drugs and alcohol is associated with health problems in all societies.

It has been linked to chronic conditions such as cancer and liver disease, the spread of hepatitis and HIV, injuries and deaths from motor vehicle accidents and assaults, increased encounters with the law, deaths in custody, suicides and family breakdown.

The reasons why First Nations’ people engage in high risk drug and alcohol consumption are indeed, complex.

When families, communities, local organisations and governments join hands, we are powerful together.

Alcohol and other drugs, tobacco, lifestyle risk factors and social determinants represent more than half of the quest for health and life equality.

It’s now been 10 years since the launch of the Closing the Gap initiative.

The agenda is being refreshed and it’s time to refresh our approach – including by acknowledging the complexity of the drug and alcohol challenge and making even greater efforts to address it.

This conference NIDAC18 will be an important part of that solution – and I look forward to hearing the outcomes. ” 

Minister Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt see full speech Part 2 below

Read over 200 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alcohol and Other Drugs articles we have published over past 6 years 

Part 1 NACCHO Keynote by John Havnen Senior Policy Officer 

The harmful use of alcohol is a problem for the Australian community as a whole – alcohol misuse and alcohol-related disease remains a recognised as a nationwide problem.

It is estimated that in 2011 alcohol misuse caused 5.1% of the total burden of disease in Australia.

Alcohol related harm has clear social and economic determinants and it is closely related to disadvantage.

As such Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, which as we all know rate disproportionately in all measures of disadvantage, experience higher rates of alcohol misuse and alcohol-related harm than non-indigenous Australians.

This discrepancy leads to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experiencing significant health and social problems in a rate unequal to non-Indigenous Australians. But not all of us drink, in the 2016 National Drug Strategy Household Survey, Indigenous Australians aged 14 and over were more likely to abstain from drinking alcohol than non-Indigenous Australians.

This abstinence rate has been increasing over the last decade with more and more of us deciding not to drink.

So although there are proportionately more Indigenous people than non-Indigenous people who refrain from drinking, those of us who do drink are more likely to do so at high-risk levels.

In 2014-15 the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey found 19% of Indigenous Australians over the age of 15 exceeded the lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol consumption.

This is no more than 2 standard drinks per day on average or no more than 4 drinks per occasion.

Even though the rate of harmful drinking has declined in recent years, this has been mainly in non-remote areas, so there is still high rates of harmful drinking in remote areas and drinking at risky levels puts a person at risk of medical and social problems.

Due to these high levels of risky drinking, Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders are more likely to be hospitalised for alcohol-related conditions and accidents than non-Indigenous Australians including acute intoxication, liver disease, injuries, suicide or self-harm and cancer.

There is big differences in the rates with Indigenous males over 9 times more likely to need hospitalisation and Indigenous females 13 times more than non-Indigenous Australians.

These drinking patterns highlight that it is possible that risky drinking and binge drinking has been normalised within some communities and this could potentially act as a barrier to seeking treatment when needed.

However, alcohol is not the only substance that presents a major concern for in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

In 2014-15, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey stated that 30% of Indigenous Australians over the age of 15 years reported using an illicit substance in the previous 12-months.

This was an increase from 23% in 2008. The substances most commonly used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders were cannabis with 19% reporting, non-prescription analgesics and sedatives (such as painkillers, sleeping pills and tranquillisers) at 13%, and amphetamines or speed with a rate of 5%.

Smoking has overtime become common place in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander communities and whilst tobacco smoking is declining in Australia, rates remain disproportionately high among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Indigenous Australians more than twice as likely to be current daily smokers as non-Indigenous Australians.

Despite declines in rates of smoking in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the last 20 years there appears to have been no change to the gap in smoking prevalence between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian adult population.

Tobacco-related disease is responsible for between 1.5 and 8 times more deaths in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander community than in non-Indigenous Australians.

The harmful use of alcohol, in addition to tobacco and other drugs, are both the cause and effect of serious harm to physical health.

The health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is considerably lower than for non-Indigenous Australians with 71.0% of Indigenous Australians reporting having a long-term health condition compared with 55.3% of non-Indigenous Australians.

Those with long-term health conditions are also more likely to be a daily smoker or misuse alcohol and other drugs. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who experience multiple diagnoses are more likely to have more difficulty accessing treatment and have poorer outcomes when they do receive treatment than either a physical health condition or an alcohol or other drug disorder alone.

There is a well-known high rate of co-morbidity of substance use disorders with other mental health / social and emotional wellbeing issues, and medical conditions in particular chronic diseases.

These issues tend to cluster in individuals and communities along with other markers of social, economic and intergenerational disadvantage.

These high rates of comorbidity contribute to complexities in the treatment and causality of disorders and remains a significant challenge for the delivery of effective healthcare services for our people.

This is in part due to the complexity of the mental and physical health issues individuals display, and in part because of the burden of multiple disadvantages including; poverty and intergenerational disadvantage and this can reduce the capacity to engage consistently and meaningfully in treatment.

So, what is currently being done to reduce the high levels of alcohol and other drug use within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities?

Existing mainstream models of practice in the alcohol and other drug field have been developed within Western systems of knowledge and focus on a biomedical model with an emphasis on biological factors and discounts any psychological, environmental, and social influences. As a result, it is not generalisable to Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander culture and ignores important indigenous perspectives and needs.

Including the need for access to culturally appropriate and comprehensive services to address multiple problems, and the need for local links with Indigenous services.

Western alcohol and other drug services are based on an abstinence model and focuses on residential rehabilitation which is aimed more on the needs of alcohol users and not illicit drug users.

Residential alcohol and drug programs provide care and support for people within a residential community setting and can be medium to long-term duration of anywhere from 4 weeks to 12 months and but again only supports residents’ psychological needs only.

This model also lacks consideration to the prevention and early intervention strategies of risky drinking and drug use, lacks acknowledgement of family, culture and community which we know are important aspects in the holistic model of care.

Despite a paucity of data, the knowledge of how to prevent alcohol misuse among the general population – while not consistently translated to policy and practice – is extensive.

The evidence for the effectiveness of such programs for Indigenous Australians, however, remains scant.

Racism is still present in mainstream services so many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders might have limited access to mainstream health services.

Systemic racism in the health system directly influences Indigenous Australians’ quality of and access to healthcare.

The severity of this impact intensifies levels of psychological stress, which is closely linked to poorer mental and physical health outcomes.

Racism not only provides a major barrier to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ access to health care but also to receiving the same quality of healthcare services available to non-Indigenous Australians.

There is also a tendency to stereotype Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders as ‘drunks’ or ‘alcoholics’ which, as I have previously discussed today is not necessarily the case.

So, what will work if mainstream alcohol and other drug services have limited evidence for our people?

Historically, reactions to the concerns of alcohol and other drug misuse among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were driven not by governments, but by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people themselves who recognised the fact that mainstream services were non-existent or largely culturally inappropriate.

Today, Indigenous Australians are acutely aware of the impacts of alcohol and other drugs and have been actively involved in responding to alcohol and other drugs misuse in their communities.

Any initiative to reduce the harmful effects of alcohol and other drugs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities should be developed with, and led by, those communities.

There is value in supporting these communities, including the evaluation of strategies implemented so that communities can learn from their own and from other communities’ experience.

Any action that attempts to treat alcohol and other drugs needs to come from a holistic model of care that is comprehensive and culturally appropriate.

Awareness of the land, the physical body, clan, relationships, and lore, it is the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole community and not just the individual.

This is why western models of treatment just won’t work.

Comprehensive primary health care is a key strategy for improving the health of Indigenous Australians and is an important platform from which to address the complex health and social issues associated with alcohol and drug misuse.

A holistic approach locally designed and operated by Indigenous people is favoured in its ability to be tailored to community needs and in a cultural context that is owned and supported by the community. 

Despite inadequate funding and resources, the ACCHOs sector has been identified as having a unique role in making alcohol and other drug treatment services more accessible.

One of the unique attributes of Aboriginal controlled drug and alcohol services is that they are a practical expression of Aboriginal peoples’ self-determination, reflected in their governance and treatment models.

A recent example of what works is the pilot of an integrated model of care within Central Australian Aboriginal Congress based in Alice Springs.

Congress developed an integrated non-residential treatment model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with alcohol and other drug issues and it is based on providing care for all aspects of health through three streams of care:

Social and cultural support – which is delivered by Indigenous workers with cultural knowledge, language skills and an in-depth knowledge of the Aboriginal community alongside social workers. This stream includes case management and care coordination, advocacy on behalf of clients, social support, cultural support, access to medical care, and opportunistic alcohol and other drug counselling and brief interventions.

Psychological therapy – which is carried out by qualified therapists delivering evidence-based treatments including cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and related psychological therapies and access to neuropsychological assessment and treatment. And:

Medical treatment – which is provided by Congress GPs and other members of the primary health care team, and includes medical assessments of alcohol and other drug clients, management of chronic disease and prescription of pharmacotherapies where appropriate to assist with alcohol withdrawal.

This model recognises the comorbidities that occur with alcohol and other drug clients and sought to address within a holistic approach that is adaptable based on needs of individuals.

In 2016-17, in the presenting alcohol and other drug clients, 28% received only one stream of care, 59% received two-streams and the remainder, 13% received all three streams of care.

The Congress ‘three streams model’ of care for alcohol and other drug treatment has been developed over many years to provide a single, integrated multidisciplinary service organised around social and cultural support; psychological therapy; and medical care.

In doing so, it reduces demands on clients presenting with alcohol and other drug issues to navigate multiple health care providers, and attempts to address their holistic needs, including advocacy and support around the social determinants of health and wellbeing including housing, welfare and employment, criminal justice, and basic life needs.

This is a great example of how well it can work when the system is correct and can be used as a model for other ACCHOs to learn from.

The diversity of Aboriginal Australia means that no service model can be simply transferred from one place to another. Instead, the strength of Aboriginal community-controlled health services is their capacity to adapt successful models to the particular needs, strengths and histories of the communities they serve.

But funding is a barrier in implementing optimal services in many regions.

A recent report on organisations conducting Indigenous-specific alcohol and other drug services found that a lack of government commitment to funding community-controlled organisations has compromised the capacity of Indigenous Australians to address alcohol and other drug issues within their own communities.

In addition, the capacity of Aboriginal community-controlled organisations to deliver services was severely constrained by staff shortages, lack of trained and qualified staff, and very limited access to workforce development programs.

Treatment is also not the only key, continuing to increase the community awareness and education about the effects of alcohol and other drugs and the treatment options for dealing with issues is vital.

Including a range of health promotion activities and groups including exercise and nutrition programs, tobacco use treatment and preventions groups to address the holistic needs is essential and well help to reduce the levels of risky drinking and the efficacy of treatment once in treatment.

We need to enable our people to have control over their health and improve health literacy on risky behaviours to help stop the impacts of alcohol and other drugs.

 Part 2 Minister Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt keynote 

Good morning. In West Australian Noongar language I say “kaya wangju” – hello and welcome.

I acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which we’re meeting, the Kaurna people, and pay my respects to Elders past and present.

The 5th National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Conference is a positive opportunity to make progress on a difficult issue.

The conference theme is Responding to Complexity – and there certainly is no one-size-fits-all solution to the challenges our people face.

This is why we have to attack the scourge of drug and alcohol dependency and abuse on multiple fronts.

To form new partnerships.

To speak and to listen, with open minds and hearts.

All of us want to see better health for First Nations Australians.

We know that the excessive consumption of drugs and alcohol is associated with health problems in all societies.

It has been linked to chronic conditions such as cancer and liver disease, the spread of hepatitis and HIV, injuries and deaths from motor vehicle accidents and assaults, increased encounters with the law, deaths in custody, suicides and family breakdown.

The reasons why First Nations’ people engage in high risk drug and alcohol consumption are indeed, complex.

Working together, we are making progress, reducing binge drinking rates among our people from 38 per cent to 31 per cent between 2008 and 2014–15.

But there is still much work to be done.

As we see in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework report, social determinants are estimated to make up 34 per cent of the gap in health outcomes between First Nations’ people and other Australians.

Together, with behavioural risk factors, such as alcohol, drug and tobacco use, they account for 53.2 per cent of the health gap.

Alcohol and drug abuse has a broad and insidious impact.

We have a moral and social imperative to work together to put an end to violence and dysfunction and the drug- and alcohol-driven neglect of children in our communities.

Our Government is committed to working with families and individuals to address substance misuse and to break the cycle of disadvantage that prevents children from attending school, and adults from going to work.

Particularly for the protection of children, we have invested over $10 million to provide better diagnosis and management, develop best practice interventions and services to support high-risk women.

A 10-year FASD Strategic Action Plan is in the final stage of development.

Just as important, we see outstanding examples of local warriors for health – like June Oscar and her team in Fitzroy Crossing – who have tackled alcohol in their communities, with life-changing results for children and families.

We must try harder to understand and address the underlying causes of alcohol and drug misuse.

The percentage of First Nations’ people who drink is no greater than for other Australians – in fact, there are many of our people who do not drink at all.

Equally, the impacts of trauma on the health of our communities cannot be ignored, because they add to the complexity of the challenge.

Trauma is no excuse for substance abuse, violence or neglect – but understanding its history can help us reduce its impact.

It reaches across generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and must be acknowledged and addressed.

Significant health impacts have resulted from displacement from family and country, institutionalisation, racism, abuse and neglect.

This has led to increasingly high rates of incarceration and juvenile detention, suicide, family violence, children being taken into care, and poorer physical and mental health.

63 per cent of First Nations’ prisoners are incarcerated as a result of violent crimes and offences that cause harm.

First Nations’ offenders are also more likely to be under the influence of alcohol when they offend.

It’s a sad fact, that alcohol was involved in 80 per cent of cases of domestic homicide, where both the offender and the victim were First Nations’ people.

That’s more than three times the level of domestic homicides involving other Australians.

It’s also known that First Nations people who engage in alcohol-related crime are themselves more likely to be the victims of such offences.

The question is, how do we reduce high-risk levels of alcohol consumption?

Harm reduction programs can minimise the immediate danger posed by alcohol misuse; but our broader aim should be to reduce alcohol intake.

Our Government is investing in a series of activities which have been shown to be effective.

These range from alcohol restrictions to treatment and rehabilitation.

Under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, the Government has committed around $70 million in 2017–18 to support over 80 Indigenous alcohol and other drug treatment services.

They are located in places with high First Nations’ populations, in capital cities and regional centres as well as outer regional and remote areas.

Alcohol is a particular problem in the Northern Territory.

Our Government recognises this and is providing more than $91 million over seven years for targeted local action to reduce alcohol related harm.

A significant part of our national support to reduce risk also includes primary healthcare and population health programs addressing smoking and alcohol, in urban, regional and remote locations across Australia.

Poor mental health as a result of drug and alcohol problems is a huge issue and one which I am pleased will be addressed during this important conference.

It is equally high on our Government’s agenda.

The Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council recently endorsed the National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2017–2023.

The council has prioritised development of a national Indigenous Health and Medical Workforce Plan, which aims to increase the number of Aboriginal doctors, nurses and health workers on country and in our towns and cities.

Primary Health Networks across Australia also have mental health and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health among their priorities.

I am very keen to ensure Primary Health Networks provide a strong platform for culturally comfortable drug, alcohol and mental health services.

To that end, we have targeted more than $85 million to improve access for integrated, culturally appropriate and safe mental health services for First Nations people.

Our Primary Health Networks are also currently investing a further $79 million on the provision of alcohol and other drug services specifically designed to meet the needs of First Nations people, at the local level.

While the effects of alcohol and drugs can be dire, the insidious damage caused by tobacco is significant.

Statistics show that smoking is responsible for 23 per cent of the gap in health outcomes between First Nations’ people and other Australians.

That is why reducing smoking rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is central to our efforts to close the gap.

By supporting locally linked projects within a national campaign, we are seeing some success.

The daily smoking rate for First Nations’ people aged 15 years and over has declined from 49 per cent in 2002 to 39 per cent in 2014–15, with most of this since 2008, when targeted measures commenced.

However, the daily smoking rate in remote areas is still 47 per cent, and worryingly, the number of First Nations’ women smoking while pregnant remains far too high, at 46 per cent.

To continue supporting change for the better – through funding certainty and proven programs – we have gone to a four-year, $300 million funding commitment for the successful Tackling Indigenous Smoking program.

We are supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific education programs, as part of the National Tobacco Campaign.

“Don’t Make Smokes Your Story” targets First Nations’ smokers aged 15 years and over.

Since its third phase concluded at the end of June, evaluation has shown its effectiveness.

86 per cent of First Nations smokers were aware of the campaign.

7 per cent had quit and 26 per cent said they had reduced the amount they smoke.

If we can maintain this sort of momentum, I am we will see significant improvements in health in future.

We have also had significant success in reducing petrol sniffing, which can cause brain damage and even death.

Independent research undertaken since 2005 indicates that in communities with low aromatic fuel, petrol sniffing has dropped by 88 per cent.

Low aromatic fuel, subsidised by the Government, has now replaced regular unleaded in around 175 outlets in the Northern Territory, Queensland, Western Australia and South Australia.

There were special factors related to petrol sniffing which make it impractical to apply the same approach to alcohol and drug misuse.

But there is one big lesson from that success.

When families, communities, local organisations and governments join hands, we are powerful together.

Alcohol and other drugs, tobacco, lifestyle risk factors and social determinants represent more than half of the quest for health and life equality.

It’s now been 10 years since the launch of the Closing the Gap initiative.

The agenda is being refreshed and it’s time to refresh our approach – including by acknowledging the complexity of the drug and alcohol challenge and making even greater efforts to address it.

This conference will be an important part of that solution – and I look forward to hearing the outcomes.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities #HealthPromotion #AUSTPH2018 #NSW @AHMRC #WA @TheAHCWA #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @Deadlychoices @Wuchopperen @QAIHC @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima Plus FYI @NATSIHWA @IAHA_National Allied Health

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 ACCHO Job/s of the week 

Wuchopperen ACCHO Sexual Health Nurse Cairns FNQ Closing 2 October

Wuchopperen ACCHO Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Environmental Health Coordinator Carnarvon ACCHO WA

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council Project Officer

General Practitioner _ Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative

1.2 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland

2.Queensland 

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

1. 1 ACCHO Job/s of the week

1.Wuchopperen ACCHO Sexual Health Nurse Cairns FNQ Closing 2 October 

‘Keeping Our Generations Growing Strong’

Wuchopperen is a Community controlled Aboriginal Health Organisation providing holistic health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cairns.

Sexual Health Nurse

Full Time – Temporary 30 June 2020

Based in Cairns

The Sexual Health Nurse position co-ordinates the clinical sexual health programs targeting at risk clients, in both outreach and Wuchopperen Health Service clinic settings. The position will provide support and specialised sexual health education for all clinical services to improve the care of at risk clients.

The Sexual Health Nurse (RN) must have current registration as a Registered Nurse (Division 1) with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency, with a minimum of five years’ experience in direct clinical nursing care and/or community Health nursing.

Benefits of working with Wuchopperen:

* Generous salary sacrifice benefits

* 5 Weeks annual leave

* Commitment to professional development

* Private Health Care Corporate Rate

* 11.5% Superannuation Contribution

Applicants for the above position will:

* Demonstrate relevant experience and/or qualifications

* Possess a current driver’s licence

* Possess, or be eligible for, a Blue Card (for suitability to work with children and young people)

* Consent to a broader criminal history check, where relevant

Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Do Not Apply Through Seek

How to apply:

For information about this position, or for a recruitment package, please refer to www.wuchopperen.org.au/careers

Closing date for applications: 9am on Tuesday, 02 October 2018

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

2. Wuchopperen ACCHO Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Wuchopperen is a Community controlled Aboriginal Health Organisation providing holistic health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cairns.

Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Full Time Permanent

Based in Cairns

The Registered Nurse, Child Health is responsible for working with clinic teams to improve the standard of health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families.

The successful applicant is required to have a minimum of 5 years’ experience in a similar role, hold a Registered Nursing degree, qualification of Child Health and be Immunisation Endorsed.

Benefits of working with Wuchopperen:

* Generous salary sacrifice benefits

* 5 Weeks annual leave

* Commitment to professional development

* Private Health Care Corporate Rate

* 11.5% Superannuation Contribution

Applicants for the above position will:

* Demonstrate relevant experience and/or qualifications

* Possess a current driver’s licence

* Possess, or be eligible for, a Blue Card (for suitability to work with children and young people)

* Consent to a broader criminal history check, where relevant

How to apply:

For information about this position, or for a recruitment package, please refer to www.wuchopperen.org.au.

Closing date for applications: 9am on, 2 October 2018

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

Environmental Health Coordinator Carnarvon ACCHO WA

Location: Carnarvon, WA
Location: Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC), Carnarvon WA
Employment Type: Full time / Permanent
Remuneration: $77,026 – $86,694 + superannuation + salary sacrifice

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

To find out more about CMSAC please click here

About the Opportunity

CMSAC has an opportunity for a motivated and professional Environmental Health Coordinator to join their team and take the lead in the development, monitoring and evaluation of environmental health initiatives.

As the Environmental Health Coordinator, you will be predominantly responsible for reducing the risk and incidents of environmental health issues for the Aboriginal communities in the North West Gascoyne region of WA. This includes (but is not limited to) drinking water, waste management, solid waste, housing supply and maintenance, power supply, animal management, food safety and supply, pest and mosquito control, dust control and emergency management.

To be successful in this position, your skills, experience and qualifications will include:

  • Qualifications and experience as a practicing Environmental Health / Health Promotion Officer or equivalent;
  • Sound knowledge and understanding of environmental health related legislation;
  • Competency in the use of environmental and public health monitoring tools and equipment;
  • Ability to evaluate, mediate, negotiate and achieve results in environmental and public health context;
  • Knowledge of Aboriginal culture and key relationship issues

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please click here.

About the Benefits

$77,026 – $86,694 + superannuation + salary sacrifice

In addition, you will have access to a number of fantastic benefits including:

  • 5 weeks annual leave
  • Vehicle provided for operational purposes
  • Support to further invest in your career through additional training
  • Study leave options
  • Annual leave loading
  • Employee assistance program

A relocation allowance can be negotiated with the right candidate, to find out more about Carnarvon and the community please click here

Applications close at 5pm, Friday 5 October 2018

For further information about this position please call Sarah Calder on 08 6145 1049.

As per section 51 of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA) CMSAC seeks to increase the diversity of our workforce to better meet the different needs of our clients and stakeholders and to improve equal opportunity outcomes for our employees.

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) WA 4 positions

Are you a dynamic team member who thrives on a challenge, loves working with people and has a genuine passion for client service delivery? A team player who appreciates the value of an energetic team environment and respects cultural diversity?

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) is currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants. If you have any questions please contact (08) 9022 5591 or email recruitment@bega.org.au

All advertised positions may require one or more of the following:

Please Note: Applications received via indeed.com; other Recruitment Agencies and without a cover letter will not be accepted.


Health Practitioner – Mobile Clinic

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Health Practitioner (Mobile Clinic)

  • As the Health Practitioner you will provide health clinical assessment and treatment, care coordination, client support and community development activities to clients and families of the Goldfields.
  • You must be able to undertake scheduled travel within the Goldfields region on a regular basis, up to 4-5 days at a time and have an interest in developing and maintaining effective networks, alliances and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and other Health Organisations.
  • Due to the remote nature of this work, we require our Mobile Clinic team to have at least 2 years Primary Health Care experience.
  • You must hold a current AHPRA registration as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Enrolled Nurse or Registered Nurse; hold a current “MR” or higher WA drivers licence (or willing to obtain); police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check.

View position description

Apply for position


Health Practitioner – New Directions

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Health Practitioner (New Directions).

  • As a Health Practitioner – New Directions you will involved in Maternal and Child health clinical assessment and treatment, care coordination, client support and community development activities.
  • You must have a current registration with AHPRA as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Enrolled or Registered Nurse; police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check; current WA drivers licence.
  • This position may require you to travel on Outreach as required.

View position description

Apply for position


Registered Nurse – Mobile Clinic

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Registered Nurse (Mobile Clinic).

  • The Registered Nurse is responsible for the delivery of quality primary health care to clients and families of the Goldfields.
  • You must be able to undertake scheduled travel within the Goldfields region on a regular basis, up to 4-5 days at a time and have an interest in developing and maintaining effective networks, alliances and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and other Health Organisations.
  • Due to the remote nature of this work, we require our Mobile Clinic team to have at least 2 years Primary Health Care experience.
  • You must hold a current AHPRA registration as a Registered Nurse, hold a current “MR” or higher WA drivers licence (or willing to obtain); police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check;

View position description

Apply for position


Manager Primary Health

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and experienced candidates with a proven track record in clinical management to fill the role of Manager Primary Health.

  • The Manager Primary Health is a key leadership role reporting to the Chief Operations Officer (COO) and is supported by the Assistant Manager Primary Health.
  • The core function is to provide clinical governance oversight and ensure clinical services are conducted in accordance with best practice, including all relevant clinical and regulatory legislation.
  • An integral component of this function is to ensure contractual reporting obligations of funding bodies are met in a timely manner while ensuring staff compliance with organisational and operational policies across all levels of clinical programs.
  • It is expected that you will be an exemplary leader who provides guidance, mentoring and coaching to all clinical staff in the pursuit of maintaining a workplace cultural that is free from unhealthy behaviours.
  • To be considered for this role, you will hold tertiary qualifications in health care and business management with at least five (5) years senior management experience in an Aboriginal Primary Health or similar setting.

Please continue with this link to read more

View position description

Apply for position

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council Project Officer – AOD Our Way Program

We are seeking two experienced AOD project officers to undertake program support in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $84,150 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* Cairns location

* Temporary position till 30th June 2020

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 29 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ATSICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The AOD Our Way program is designed to increase capacity in communities, families and individuals to better respond locally to problematic Ice and other drug use. The Project Officer position is based in Cairns but will have a state-wide focus to support this program. Reporting directly to the Manager, AOD, you will be responsible for ensuring that QAIHC meets its AOD Our Way program obligations and commitments under its Agreement with Queensland Health. The role includes ensuring services are engaged, supported and provided with the opportunity to participate in the AOD Our Way program.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Alcohol and Other Drugs program delivery.

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders.

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* A current drivers licence

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 7th October 2018

General Practitioner _ Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative

Organisational Profile

GEGAC is an Aboriginal Community organization based in Bairnsdale Victoria. Consisting of about 160 staff, GEGAC is a Not for Profit organization that delivers holistic services in the areas of Primary Health, Social Services, Elders & Disability and Early Childhood Education.

Position Purpose

The General Practitioner position will provide medical services to the population served by GEGAC Primary Health Care. This will include the management of acute and chronic conditions and assistance with the delivery and promotion of primary health care. The role will be part of a multidisciplinary team; including Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Koori Maternity Services, Dental and visiting allied health/Specialists.

Qualifications and Registrations Requirement (Essential or Desirable).

Relevant and Australian recognised medical degree Essential 

Registration with AHPRA; Fellowship of the College of General Practitioners or similar or be eligible of such Essential

Training in CPR, undertaken with the past three years Essential

A person of Aboriginal / Torres Strait Islander background Desirable

How to apply for this job

A copy of the position description and the application form can be obtained below, at GEGAC reception 0351 500 700 or by contacting HR@gegac.org.au.

Or by following the below links –

Position Description – https://goo.gl/iTiSGg

Application Form – https://goo.gl/xVbf3w

Applicants must complete the application form as it contains the selection criteria for shortlisting. Any applications not submitted on the Application form will not be considered.

Application forms should be emailed to HR@gegac.org.au, using the subject line:  General Practitioner

Or posted to:

Human Resources

Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative
PO Box 634
Bairnsdale Vic 3875

Applications close 29th September 5.00pm.

No late applications will be considered.

A valid Working with Children Check and Police check is mandatory to work in this organisation.

“this advertisement is pursuant to the ‘special measures’ provision at section 8 of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth)”.

 

Aboriginal Health Practitioner Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO 

  • Are you an Aboriginal Health Practitioner or Worker wanting to contribute to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal people?
  • Join a well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
  • Identified position for Aboriginal candidates

The Clinic

Primary Care Services (PCS) provides comprehensive primary health care to the Aboriginal community. The multi-disciplinary team consists of Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, a Clinical Services Officer, Enrolled and Registered Nurses, and General Practitioners and Registrars. Services are augmented by a range of visiting medical specialists and allied health professionals. The PCS team liaises and works closely with the Women, Children and Family Health program, the Social and Emotional Wellbeing program and the Community Health Promotion and Education program to ensure a high standard of integrated and coordinated client care.

The Opportunity

As an Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) or Aboriginal Health Worker (AHW) you will be required to work collaboratively with PCS staff and other members of Health Services teams to provide best practice client care. As a vital team member your role will contribute to the high quality and culturally appropriate client care that Nunkuwarrin Yunti is known to provide.

In order to deliver this, some of your key responsibilities will include:

  • Undertake client assessments and follow -up care, care plans and referrals from other members of the multi-disciplinary team
  • Provide health education and brief intervention counselling to improve health outcomes for individual clients
  • Promote the importance and benefits of general preventative health assessments and immunisations and ensure access to these services for clients

About you

  • Both AHP and AHW are required to have a Cert IV in Aboriginal Primary Health Care (Practice) or equivalent.
  • As an AHP you will be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Registration Authority (AHPRA); and bring a minimum of three (3) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a Primary Health Care setting.
  • As an AHW you will bring a minimum of two (2) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a relevant health field, preferably Primary Health Care.

As a suitably qualified AHP or AHW you will have well developed clinical skills and a sound knowledge of best practice approaches to comprehensive primary health care with broad knowledge of existing health and social issues within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. You will have the ability to resolve conflict, solve problems and negotiate outcomes. Organisational skills, self-confidence and the ability to work independently and autonomously, assess priorities, organise workloads and meet deadlines is critical to success.

Click here to download the AHP Job Description

Click here to download the AHW Job Description

Click here to download the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Application Form

Please note: It is a requirement of all roles that successful candidates have a current driver’s licence and are willing to undergo a National Police Check prior to commencing employment. 

Both roles are identified Aboriginal positions; exemption is claimed under Section 8 (1) of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975.

The Benefits

Classified under the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Enterprise Agreement of 2017 you will be entitled to the following dependent on qualifications and experience:

  • AHP – Health Services Level 4 with a starting salary of $69,255.98, plus super
  • AHW – Health Services Level 3 with a starting salary of $61,430.62, plus super

You will have access to salary sacrificing options which allow you to significantly increase your take home pay.

In addition, you will have access to generous leave allowances, including additional paid leave over the Christmas period, on top of your annual leave benefits!

Our organisation has a strong focus on professional development so you will have access to both internal and external training and development opportunities to enhance your career and self-care.

To apply

Please forward your CV, a Cover Letter and Application Form addressing the assessment questions to hr@nunku.org.au

Candidates who do not complete and submit the Application Form, Cover Letter and CV will not be considered further for this position.

We encourage and thank all applicants for their time, however only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Should you have any queries or for further information please contact HR via hr@nunku.org.au

Applications close Monday 1st October 2018 at 10am Adelaide time

Miwajt Health ACCHO : Coordinator Regional Renal Program

Are you passionate about improving health care to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in remote Northern Territory?

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is a regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Our Values

  • Compassion care and respect for our clients and staff and pride in the results of our work.
  • Cultural integrity and safety, while recognising cultural and individual differences.
  • Driven by evidence-based practice.
  • Accountability and transparency.
  • Continual capacity building of our organisation and community.

We have an exciting opportunity for a self-motivated hard working individual who will coordinate Miwatj Health’s Regional Renal Program across East Arnhem Land. Renal services are contracted to a partner organisation and the Regional Renal Program Coordinator will provide a central point of contact between services, foster and strengthen links between PHC programs and renal services, develop and implement an Aboriginal workforce model for the program, and coordinate and drive the aims of the community reference groups.

Key responsibilities:

  • Implement and coordinate renal program plan as per renal program statement and principles.
  • Manage program budgets and investigate funding opportunities.
  • Establish, support and engage regularly with the regional community reference groups and patient groups in Darwin.
  • Drive action on identified priorities of community reference groups.
  • Coordinate with WDNWPT regarding patient preceptor work plans.

To be successful in this role you should have current registration with AHPRA as Registered Nurse / Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner / other relevant qualified health professional.

More info APPLY

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland


Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

Dr Puggy Hunter was the NACCHO Chair 1991-2001

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 144 + Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996. He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council. He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

The scheme provides scholarships for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people studying an entry level health course.

Applications for PHMSS 2019 scholarship round are now open.

Click the button below to start your online application.

Applications must be completed and submitted before midnight AEDT (Sydney/Canberra time) Sunday 14 October 2018. After this time the system will shut down and any incomplete applications will be lost.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not available for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

A significant number of applications are received each year; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The scholarships are funded by the Australian Government, Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing. The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

2.1 There are 6 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 There are 7 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

 

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 24 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3 There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

 

Current Vacancies
  • Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Clinical)

  • Intake Officer / Support Worker

  • Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Senior)

  • Counsellor (Specialised) / Social Worker – Various Roles

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

 

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

General Practitioner (Swan Hill)Mental Health Nurse (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Mildura)Alcohol and Other Drugs Support WorkerCaseworker, Kinship ReunificationPractice Nurse – Chronic Care CoordinatorAboriginal Family-Led Decision-making Caseworker (Swan Hill)First Supports Caseworker (Swan Hill)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Mildura)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Health Worker (1)Team Leader, Early Years (Swan Hill)General Practitioner (Mildura)

MDAS Jobs website 

 

 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

Check website for current Opportunities

 

8. Tasmania

Are you interested in Chronic Disease Management?

Do you have a qualification as an Aboriginal Health Worker, Enrolled Nurse, or Registered Nurse?

We have a part time position at the

Aboriginal Health Service in Hobart,

for immediate start, to 30th June 2019.

 

Please provide a covering letter outlining your desire to work in this area and a current resume to payroll@tacinc.com.au

or email raylene.f@tacinc.com.au for further information.

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR (INDIGENOUS APPLICANTS ONLY)

The LIME Network – Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Only Indigenous Australians are eligible to apply as this position is exempt under the Special Measure Provision, Section 12 (1) of the Equal Opportunity Act 2011 (Vic).

Salary: $88,171 – $95,444 p.a. (pro rata) plus 9.5% superannuation

The Event and Project Coordinator will take a lead in the coordination, planning and implementation of key projects and events of the LIME Network.  These include the LIME Connection international conference, stakeholder meetings, seminars and other events.

Close date: 14 Oct 2018

Position Description and Selection Criteria

0046502.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to: https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/selection-criteria

Advertised: AUS Eastern Standard Time
Applications close: AUS Eastern Daylight Time

Website 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : National @CPMC_Aust #ACT @WinnungaACCHO celebrates 30 years #NSW @Galambila #QLD @IUIH_ @DeadlyChoices @Apunipima #RUOKDay #NT @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.1 National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

Winnunga last night celebrated its 30th anniversary , as it continues to go from strength to strength – providing responsive, appropriate services, tailored to the needs of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in Canberra

Picture above : Wally Bell welcome to country at dinner celebrating 30 years of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health : Pictures below Geoff Bagnall

  

The Ngunnawal people are the Traditional Owners of the lands that the ACT is located on. However, there are many Aboriginal people from other parts of the country living in and visiting Canberra.

This is mainly due to the mobility of people generally, connecting with family, the histories of displacement, and employment opportunities particularly in the Commonwealth public service.

Winnunga was established in 1988 by local Aboriginal people inspired by the national mobilisation of people around the opening of the new Parliament House in May and the visit by the Queen.

The late Olive Brown, a particularly inspirational figure who worked tirelessly for the health of Aboriginal people, saw the need to set up a temporary medical service at the Tent Embassy site in Canberra and this proved to be the beginning of Winnunga.

Mrs Brown enlisted the support of Dr Sally Creasey, Carolyn Patterson (registered nurse/midwife), Margaret McCleod and others to assist. Soon after ACT Health offered Mrs Brown a room in the office behind the Griffin Centre to run a clinic twice a week (Tuesday and Thursday mornings) and on Saturday mornings. Winnunga operated out of this office from 1988 to 1990. The then Winnunga Medical Director, Dr Peter Sharp, began work at Winnunga in 1989.

Other staff worked as volunteers. In January 1990 the t ACT Minister for Health at the time, Wayne Berry, provided a small amount of funding. By 1991 the clinic was operating out of the Griffin Centre as a full time medical practice. In that same year the ACT attained self-government.

In 2004 Winnunga moved to its current premises at Boolimba Cres in Narrabundah, and employs over 60 staff. Winnunga has grown into a major health service resource for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the ACT and surrounding region, and delivers a wide range of wholistic health care services.

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

Today I visited Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and it was beaut to get a tour of the new clinic with manager Catherine Hampton.

The clinic at North Side Shopping Complex will provide comprehensive primary health care services for all Aboriginal people living in the North Side area

Warren Snowdon is the local Federal member for Lingiari

People living in the north of Alice Springs will now have access to a new clinic as primary health care service Central Australian Aboriginal Congress expands its network.

The new Congress Northside Clinic in the Northside Shopping Centre held an open day on Saturday September 8 and begin providing services from Wednesday September 12.

It will cater for nearly 2000 clients living in the town’s north, including Trucking Yards, Charles Creek and Warlpiri Camp.

Congress chief executive officer Donna Ah Chee said the clinic would have doctors, Aboriginal health practitioners, nurses, podiatry services, a dietician, a diabetes educator and also offer care coordination and social and emotional well-being help.

Ms Ah Chee said it would also provide advocacy and other support to families in the northside area.

“Providing a smaller clinic closer to our clients is an exciting development and builds on the success of our Larapinta and Sadadeen clinics that opened in 2016,” she said.

The new clinic has nine consultation rooms, a double treatment room and two allied health treatment rooms.

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress said it had found that smaller, multidisciplinary teams delivered better continuity of care, access and chronic disease outcomes.

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

Our Quit Support Team had a great weekend at Freedom Day Festival
KWHB were a proud sponsor to make the festival smoke free 🚭to protect everyone from harmful cigarette smoke.

Check out the AFL and Basketball teams next to our deadly archway!

What’s your smoke free story?


National Best Practice Unit Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

SHPA caught up with Chris Braithwaite, a pharmacist with the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Northern NSW.

Chris spoke to us about:

  • his journey to working with indigenous communities
  • what an average day looks like
  • the challenges posed by existing funding models for home medicines reviews
  • cultural competence and institutional racism

Listen to the Podcast HERE 

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

The number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months since the introduction of a new online birth registration system by the NSW Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages (BDM).

Attorney General Mark Speakman announced the success of the online registration form as a result of the Our Kids Count campaign which aims to increase Aboriginal birth registrations through better access to information about the birth registration process.

“The number of unregistered Aboriginal births has traditionally been too high, but we’re closing the gap by highlighting the importance of registration and making the process faster and easier to complete,” said Mr Speakman.

“A birth certificate allows people to fully participate in society and without one, many of the basic opportunities we take for granted such as enrolling in school, sport or getting a driver licence, become unnecessarily complicated and out of reach.”

New figures show the average number of children registered to Aboriginal mothers since March 2018 has increased 82 per cent since the last quarter of 2017, and a 101 per cent increase since 2016.

NSW Registrar for Births Deaths & Marriages, Amanda Ianna said the new online birth registration has been popular among all sections of the community since it was introduced in April 2018.

“The take up rate for the online form has exceeded all our expectations with over 90 per cent of all NSW birth registrations now being made through the online system. The form is intuitive and people can complete it at a time and place that suits them,” Ms Ianna said.

BDM has spread the message about the benefits of birth registration during visits to Aboriginal communities and through brochures and online material, including an educational video.

For more information about Our Kids Count, visit: www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/Aboriginal

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

This partnership will bring life-changing benefits for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples right across Australia,

The Sharks players will assist in educating youth about the importance of taking a preventative approach to their health, and living healthy lifestyles. This includes reducing the negative impacts of smoking and drinking alcohol, and advocating consistent attendance at school.

It provides the kids a chance to make positive decisions around being a deadly student. It’s about our young ones looking at the opportunities available, with education being the passport towards achieving their dreams.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson.

Club stalwart and 2001 Dally M Player of the Year, Preston Campbell returned to his former NRL club recently, as the Cronulla Sharks announced a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

As a Deadly Choices Ambassador, Campbell has been instrumental in assisting to bring about better health and educational outcomes among Indigenous communities in Australia; a formula which the Sharks will now implement to boost existing and future community programs within its Sharks Have Heart portfolio.

A huge thank you to Deadly Choices and local elder Aunty Deanna Schreiber for designing and creating our farewells gifts to JT

“The Deadly Choices – Cronulla Sharks partnership will help reinforce those positive mental and physical health outcomes among communities, through the promotion of healthy eating, active participation in sport, and emphasising the importance of a good education,” said Campbell.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices.

“When you have kids at such an impressionable age it’s important to direct plenty of positive messaging and ensuring they create good habits for themselves.

“I’ve had a chance to speak with the boys today about the Deadly Choices programs and they’re excited about the impact they’ll have on our young kids”

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back.”

As explained by Sharks Have Heart General Manager George Nour, empowering youth within communities is exactly what the Sharks intend to achieve through the Deadly Choices partnership.

“Sharks Have Heart are extremely proud to launch our partnership with Deadly Choices,” Nour said. “To be associated with such a strong and respected brand within the Indigenous community is only going to strengthen our programmes within our diversity pillar.”

At the launch, the Sharks were provided a snapshot of what it means to make Deadly Choices and be role models for community, with Campbell joined by fellow long-term Deadly Choices Ambassador and former league international Steve Renouf in discussing their roles.

Sharks Co-Captain Wade Graham, a member of the Australian World Cup squad last year and twice an Indigenous All Star in 2016 and 2017, was joined by Indigenous teammates Andrew Fifita, Jesse Ramien and Edrick Lee at the program launch.

Graham was excited by the Sharks new partnership and to be teaming up with Deadly Choices.

“I think staying fit is extremely important in this day and age, particularly for the youth and if the Sharks and Deadly Choices can encourage as many people as possible to get the body moving, to eat healthy and to have an active lifestyle, it is going to be extremely beneficial to the Indigenous community,” Graham said.

“I am looking forward to working with Deadly Choices who do outstanding work in the Indigenous community and to be helping to spread their important messages,” he added.

In 2016-17 in South East Queensland alone, the Deadly Choices team delivered 145 education programs to more than 1860 participants. The team also held 10 community and sporting events, with almost 1500 attendees and participants.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

WATCH HERE

Today and every day is RU OK Day? Start a conversation and support your friends, colleagues, family and community.

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch


This innovative project began with Kalyakool Moort research. The highly collaborative project has embodied passion and commitment to improve perinatal wellbeing and engagement for women and men at this significant time.

The ‘Baby Coming-You Ready?” Rubric has been developed, digitised and designed by Aboriginal women, men and researchers.

NACCHO Press Release Aboriginal Male Health Outcomes : #OchreDay2018 The largest ever gathering for a NACCHO male health conference : View 15 #NACCHOTV interviews with speakers

 ” We, the Aboriginal males  gathered at the Ochre Day Men’ Health Summit, nipaluna (Hobart) Tasmania in August 2018; to continue to develop strategies to ensure our  roles as grandfathers, fathers, uncles, nephews, brothers, grandsons, and sons  caring for our families.

We commit to taking responsibility for pursuing  a healthy, happier,  life for  our families and ourselves, that reflects the opportunities experienced by the wider community.

We acknowledge the NAIDOC theme “Because of her we can”We celebrate the relationships we have with our wives, mothers, grandmothers,  granddaughters,  aunties, nieces  sisters and daughters.

We also acknowledge that our male roles embedded in Aboriginal culture as well as our contemporary lives  must value the importance of the love,  companionship, and support of our Aboriginal women, and other partners.

We will pursue the roles and practices of Aboriginal men grounded in their  cultural as  protectors, providers and mentors. “

Our nipaluna (Hobart) Ochre Day Statement:  That our timeless culture still endures 

All NACCHO reports from #Ochre Day

For so many of the men at Ochre Day, healing had come about through being better connected to their culture and understanding, and knowing who they are as Aboriginal men. Culture is what brought them back from the brink.

We’ve long known culture is a protective factor for our people, but hearing so many men in one place discuss how culture literally saved their lives really brought that fact home.

It made me even more conscious of how important it is that we focus on the wellbeing side of Aboriginal health. If we’re really serious about Closing the Gap, we need to fund male wellbeing workers in our Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations.

In Victoria, the life expectancy of an Aboriginal male is 10 years less than a non-Aboriginal male. Closing the Gap requires a holistic, strength- based response. As one of the fellas said, “you don’t need a university degree to Close the Gap, you just need to listen to our mob”.

I look forward to next year’s Ochre Day being hosted on Victorian country, and for VACCHO being even more involved.

Trevor Pearce is Acting CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Health Organisation (VACCHO) Originally published CROAKEY see in full part 2 below  : Aboriginal men’s health conference: “reclaim our rightful place and cultural footprint “

Download our Press Release NACCHO Press release Ochre Day

The National Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chairperson John Singer, closed recent the Hobart Ochre Day Conference-Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It!

View interview with NACCHO Chair John Singer

Ochre Day is an important Aboriginal male health initiative to help draw attention to Aboriginal male health in a holistic way. The delegates fully embraced the conference theme, many spoke about their own journeys in the male health sector and all enjoyed participation in conference sessions, activities and workshops.

More than 200 delegates attended and heard from an impressive line-up of speakers and this year was no exception.

Delegates responded positively to The Hon. Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health funding of an Aboriginal Television network.

View Minister Ken Wyatt speech

Mr John Paterson CEO of AMSANT spoke about the importance of women as partners in men’s health

View interview with John Paterson

and Mr Rod Little from National Congress delivered a brief history on the progress of a Treaty in Australia as a keynote address for the Jaydon Adams Oration Memorial Dinner. The winner of the Jaydon Adams award 2018 was Mr Aaron Everett.

View interview with Rod Little

A comprehensive quality program involving presentations from clinicians, researches, academics, medical experts and Aboriginal Health Practitioners were delivered.

Delegates listened to passionate speakers like Dr Mick Adams, Dr Mark Wenitong, Patrick Johnson.

View all interview here on NACCHO TV 

Joe Williams, Deon Bird, Kim Mulholland and Karl Briscoe. Topics included those on suicide, Deadly Choices, cardiovascular and other chronic diseases as well as family violence impacting Aboriginal Communities. Initiatives to address these problems were explored in workshops that were held to discuss how to make men’s health a priority and how to support the reaffirmation of cultural identity.

Speeches by Ross Williams, Stan Stokes and Charlie Adams addressed the establishment of Men’s Clinics within the Anyinginiyi Aboriginal Health Service and Wuchopperen Aboriginal Health Service, which demonstrated the positive impact that these facilities have had on men’s health and their emotional wellbeing.

These reports as well as the experiences related by delegates highlighted the urgent need for more Aboriginal Men’s Health Clinics to be established especially in regional, rural and remote areas.

As a result of interaction with a broad cross section of delegates the NACCHO Chairman
Mr John Singer was able to put forward a range of priorities that he believed would go some way to addressing some of the concerns raised.

These priorities were the acquisition of funds to enable the;

  • Establishment of 80 Men’s Health Clinics in urban, rural and remote locations and
  • The employment of both a Male Youth Health Policy Officer and Male (Adult) Health Policy Officer by NACCHO in Canberra.

Delegates also welcomed the funding of $3.4 million for the Aboriginal Health Television network provided that the programs were culturally appropriate and supported a
strength-based approach to Men’s Health.

Our Thanks to the Sponsors 

 

 

Part 2 Trevor Pearce is Acting CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Health Organisation (VACCHO) Originally published CROAKEY 

 Aboriginal men’s health conference: “reclaim our rightful place and cultural footprint “

I’ve just returned from my first NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference in Hobart, and it was so deadly, it most definitely won’t be my last.

About 260 Aboriginal men from the Kimberleys to urban environments and everywhere in between attended. White Ochre Day started as an Aboriginal response to White Ribbon Day. For Aboriginal people, White Ochre has significant cultural and ceremonial values for Aboriginal people.

It’s not just about the aesthetics of painting white ochre on to our skin, there are strong cultural elements to the ceremony and identity. Ochre Day is a gathering of Aboriginal men for sharing ideas of best practice and increasing access to better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men for us to deal with family violence, and with spiritual healing, as Aboriginal men.

I was privileged to attend this conference with all the male Aboriginal staff members from VACCHO, who represented a diversity of ages and backgrounds. They work at VACCHO in areas including cultural safety, mental health, policy, sexual health and bloodborne viruses, telehealth, and alcohol and other drugs. It was a great bonding experience for us, and fantastic to be part of this national conversation.

Aboriginal men die much younger than Aboriginal women, and we die an awful lot younger than the non-Aboriginal population. We have the highest suicide rates in the world, and suffer chronic disease at high rates too.

We walk and live with poor health every day, and much of this is down to the symptoms that colonisation has brought us. We didn’t have these high rates of illness and suicide pre-colonisation, when we had strength in our culture, walked on our traditional homeland estates and we all spoke our languages. And we certainly didn’t have incarceration before contact.

A rightful place

The Ochre Day Conference covered all aspects of health and wellbeing for Aboriginal men; physical, mental, social and emotional wellbeing. It was about our need to reclaim our rightful place and cultural footprint on the Australian landscape.

It is a basic human right to be healthy and have good wellbeing, as is our right to embrace our culture. Improving our health is not just about the absence of disease, it’s about developing our connection to Country, our connection to family, and feeling positive about ourselves.

This position of reclamation of our right place within Australia society is critical given the current political landscape, and the challenges that Aboriginal people face. Victoria has an election in November, and a national election to come soon too. As Aboriginal people we know that race relations will be a tool used against us, and our lives will often be portrayed from the deficit point of view that will focus on what’s wrong with us.

In light of the above, it was good to hear about all the positive things Aboriginal men are doing across the country to help their families and communities, from the grassroots to the national level.

Rightfully, we talked a lot about mental health issues. There was a lot of personal sharing; men talking about their own issues; men who had attempted suicide speaking openly about it. There were survivors of abuse, of family violence. For any man, Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal, these are big things to get up and talk about.

I was so impressed and moved by what these Aboriginal men had to share. There was such generosity of spirit from these men in sharing their stories, and I’m not ashamed to say some of these brought me to tears.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities Inc CEO @ahmrc @TISprogramme #NT #Sunrise @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

Job of the Week CEO AHMRC Expression of interest

 

Purpose of the position:

The CEO establishes the core values and strategy of the workplace and is accountable for developing, communicating and executing strategic plans to facilitate the sustainable business success of the AH&MRC. The CEO will lead the development of annual goals and will work with Senior Management Team to guide the successful implementation of strategies that promotes the organisation’s values.

The AH&MRC CEO is ultimately responsible to the Chairperson and the Board of Directors (the Board) for implementing strategic and operational policy and for the continued growth and viability of the organisation.  The CEO will be building the confidence, reputation and profile of the AH&MRC amongst the Members and across the Aboriginal health sector of NSW.  The CEO will develop and grow the organisation’s services to members and provide strategies and advice to the Board.

Depending on the notice period of the successful applicant this position is expected to commence around August/September for a period of a three (3) year contract, based in our Surry Hills office (66 Wentworth Ave, NSW).

Criteria:

  1. Knowledge of the Aboriginal Health sector
  2. Demonstrated experience working at a high level
  3. Current CEO experience and management
  4. This vacancy is an identified Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander recruitment under Part 22, section 22.9 of the AH&MRC Constitution. Applicants for this role must satisfy the Aboriginality criteria you will need to provide information on how you satisfy the Aboriginality

A detailed position description is attached which includes the duties of the position and the salary.

EOI should be forwarded to the HR department via email to gagic@ahmrc.org.au included with the application should be a current CV and a Cover Letter outlining the above criteria.

Please contact the HR Department via email gagic@ahmrc.org.au should you wish to discuss the position further.

Applications close Friday, 22 June 2018

 Download AHMRC_CEO_PD_May_2018

Rural Doctor job of the week

Gidgee Healing is currently seeking a General Practitioner to deliver integrated, comprehensive primary health care services at their Burke St Clinic in Mount Isa.

You will be supported by a team of dedicated clinic staff including Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Medical Receptionists, Practice Managers and visiting Specialists and Allied Health providers; in addition to community and secondary service providers.

ESSENTIAL CRITERIA:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding unconditional current registration with AHPRA
  • Vocationally Registered, FRACGP or FACRRM
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number
  • Knowledge, understanding and sensitivity towards the social, economic and cultural factors affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health.

ABOUT US:

Gidgee Healing is a dynamic Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service that provides a comprehensive and growing range of primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people residing in the Mount Isa, North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria regions. Our services include General Practice, maternal and child health, social and preventative health, health promotion and education, allied health and specialist services. Gidgee Healing is also the lead agency for headspace Mount Isa and the Normanton Recovery and Community Wellbeing Service. The organisation strives to provide high quality health and wellbeing services in a culturally welcoming environment, to enhance the accessibility and uptake of health services by our clients and support the early identification and management of illness and chronic diseases.

THE LIFESTYLE:

The North West offers a relaxed and casual lifestyle, with a wealth of camping and exploring, scenic national parks, gorges, as well as pristine river, lake and open water fishing and recreation.

Applications close COB Friday 15th June, 2018

To apply online, please click on the appropriate link below. Alternatively, for a confidential discussion, please contact Lauren Taylor on (07) 4743 6681, quoting Ref No. 798746.

APPLY HERE

General Practitioners Awabakal

We are currently seeking two dedicated and talented General Practitioners to join our growing team. A strong interest in, and commitment to Aboriginal Health is a must. You will form an essential part of our multidisciplinary team, serving the local community in strong consultation with a network of excellent nursing, allied health and administration specialists.

Our GP’s will rotate across our Medical Facilitates based at Hamilton, Raymond Terrace and Cardiff, and through Outreach programs.

Why work for Awabakal?

Awabakal is a dynamic and innovative community organisation with the support and wellbeing of the Aboriginal community in Newcastle, Hunter Valley, Lake Macquarie and Port Stephens at the heart of everything we do.

Our highly skilled teams across medical, aged care, housing and preschool services are passionate and driven to provide the most progressive and flexible services to our local Aboriginal communities and we actively empower our staff to be creative and forward thinking.

The positions:

You will work as an integral part of Awabakal’s Medical team, and report to the Senior Medical Officer.

The role will require you to provide quality, integrated, best practice primary health care to the patients of the Aboriginal Medical Service, both within the confines of the medical practice and through Outreach programs.

You will improve the health of the Awabakal community by improving patient access to appropriate treatment and health care plans.

What you need to be successful:

Professional medical registration with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Authority (AHPRA)

Fellowship of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners FRACGP

Fellowship of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or equivalent

Accredited GP registrar supervisor (desirable)

Demonstrated relevant experience as a General Practitioner as a vocationally registered/fellow in a community setting

Demonstrated experience of working effectively with Aboriginal clients and community

Demonstrated understanding of cultural issues impacting access to care for Aboriginal people

Extensive experience with patient consultation

Experience with Medicare Billing

Current Class C Drivers Licence

Salary:

Our teams are professional, hardworking and passionate, best describing our culture as innovative, flexible and supportive and we are committed to ensuring our leadership team members reflect our important organisational values.

A competitive salary will be negotiated with the right candidate, to match skills, experience and qualifications.

Please note as part of Awabakal’s recruitment process, prior to an offer of employment being made, recommended candidates will be required to undertake and provide a current Working with Children and National Police Check, and demonstrate evidence of current registration, and original qualifications.

All General Practitioners employed by Awabakal are required to maintain individual medical indemnity insurance, always, and as appropriate to their position at Awabakal. Medical indemnity insurance is an essential requirement of registration with the Medical Board of Australia.

How to Apply:

To apply please forward your resume and supporting covering letter, or alternatively contact Dr Dean Wright on 0419 638 796 or Jessica Gossage, Human Resource Consultant on (02) 4940 8743 for a confidential discussion.

We site www.yerin.org.au

Check out the Website

Jobs of the week 

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Research and Evidence Manager

We seek a high calibre professional, to undertake a range of research projects in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $100,000 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* South Brisbane location

* This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Research and Evidence Manager.

Role Overview

The Research and Evidence Manager will be responsible for managing the Research Division, consisting of the Health Information Team and Research Team (including funded programmes).  This includes undertaking a diverse range of research projects including the development of a research plan that will strengthen the capacity of QAIHC to develop innovative, culturally responsive and evidence informed programs and policy responses in high profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Understanding of Indigenous Health.

* Demonstrated capability in conducting evaluation projects, including design, analysis and interpretation of data.

* Knowledge of ethics committees.

* High level quantitative and qualitative data analysis skills.

* Ability to conduct literature reviews to a high standard including search, collation and summarising skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled health organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Health Policy Manager

An exciting opportunity for a high calibre professional, to provide high quality policy advice in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

  • Indigenous Health Organisation
  • Salary: $100,000 + superannuation
  • Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging
  • South Brisbane Location
  • This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Health Policy Manager.

Role Overview

The Health Policy Manager, will provide leadership to a small team responsible for providing high quality policy advice on complex and high-profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

  • Specific policy development knowledge.
  • Experience in developing state or national health policy.
  • Understanding of relevant state and federal government decision making process.
  • Understanding of the AICCHOs and the issues facing them.
  • Demonstrated experience of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.
  • Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Workforce Coordinator – Medicare Specialist

We are seeking a Medicare Specialist to support and train clinics in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* South Brisbane location

* Salary: $82,500 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The Medicare Specialist will be responsible for supporting QAIHCs Member Services across Queensland in the management and use of electronic patient information and recall systems and in maximising access to health incentives, Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and Medicare Benefits Schedule opportunities.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Medical claims and incentives programs is essential in this role, in particular:

o Medicare

o Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

o Practice Incentives Program

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders, including relevant government departments, networks and specialist providers

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills

* Project management experience

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business

* A certificate IV in Training and Assessment and knowledge of the VET sector is desirable

* A current drivers licence is required

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – mailto:applications@qaihc.com.au

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 10th June 201

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

There are 5 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website

MAMU HEALTH SERVICE LIMITED

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal community controlled health service providing comprehensive primary health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Ravenshoe and surrounding districts.  We are recruiting the following positions for our Ravenshoe Clinic:-

Aboriginal & or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Practice Certificate III/IV Fixed Term. Applicant must have previous experience in similar role.

Traineeship – Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) HLT30113 Certificate III – If you have a passion to work in the health industry we are offering a Traineeship in Certificate III ATSI Primary Health Care (Practice) fixed term (12- 14 months) (It is a genuine occupational requirement that the position be filled by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person as permitted by Section 25, 105 & 106 Queensland Anti-Discrimination (1991) Act.)

Registered Nurse – A Full time position is available. Applicants must have previous experience in working with the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people. This is a Rural & Remote position which offers an attractive employment package including accommodation & fuel allowance.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check, and a Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian.

To apply for this vacancy, a full application package can be obtained from our website on http://www.mamuhsl.org.au, or please don’t hesitate to contact Julie Browne on 07 4061 9988 or jbrowne@mamuhsl.org.au to register your interest.

Please submit your resume and written responses addressing the Knowledge, Skills and Personal Attributes/Selection Criteria outlined in the Position Description to: The Chief Executive Officer Mamu Health Service Limited PO Box 1537 INNISFAIL Q 4860 Applications close at 5.00 pm on Friday 8th June 2018

Mamu Website

Ravenshoe Positions:

RAV-067 Trainee Health Worker_Position Description

RAV-066 ATSI Health Worker_3

RAV-060 Registered Nurse_Position Description3

Innisfail Positions:

IFL-267 Trainee Health Worker

IFL-264 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL-263 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL 269 Community Liason Officer_Female (002)

IFL-261 Sport Rec Officer_Position Description_110518 (003)

FOR ALL POSITIONS

APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY 8th JUNE 2018 5.00PM

 

There are 3 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

+ Clinical Optometrist (Full Time or Part Time position based at Windsor) + Indigenous Outreach Worker (Ongoing Full Time position based at Strathpine) + Medical Quality Coordinator (Regional Fixed Term Position)

 There are 14 JOBS at ATSICHS Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 28 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

Director, Primary Health Care

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (SHSAC) is an independent, community controlled health service, directed by a Board of representatives from the remote Aboriginal communities. SHSAC has a philosophy of community participation and a strong focus on Care Coordination and Chronic Disease prevention and management including population health, health promotion and awareness.

The Director, Primary Health Care (DPHC) plays an Executive leadership role ensuring the organisation is operationally sustainable and responsive to the needs of people within the remote areas. This includes effective planning and management of human, financial and physical resources and the evaluation of services, ensuring effective systems are in place to support daily practice and the maintenance of all health related accreditation and standards underpinned by high quality service delivery.

Your new role

As the DPHC, you’ll provide professional direction to staff, influence the achievement of the strategic and operational goals, and provide progressive planning and operational service delivery advice to the Executive Management Team. As an advocate for change, you’ll shape an environment of strategic thinking, develop policies and cost savings measures, MOU’s and provide regular analysis of community health data.

Taking the lead in the review of activities and operations Clinic by Clinic including staffing levels, resource and accommodation requirements, you’ll collaborate with other managers and health service providers to ensure their participation in the activity and service delivery planning processes. You’ll manage and regularly review structures, budgets and operational costs across 9 Clinics in excess of $9m; audit all fiscal expenditure under your control and ensure full compliance and oversight of all clinical governance matters.

Via sound forward planning, you’ll support the Health Centre Managers with innovative and effective plans and solutions to workforce, recruitment and retention issues arising from working in rural and remote areas, to ensure an improved, merit based qualified and adequate remote health workforce across all of the Health Centres.

With the ability to inspire confidence and trust, and resolve workplace conflict, you’ll drive an effective, positive and united culture; fostering cohesive, respectful communication and a ‘one team’ outlook throughout remote clinics and head office. Continuously working to maximise access to accredited health services by community members, you’ll forge strong relationships at both community and professional level, working proactively to strengthen regional consensus and solidarity on health service delivery policy.

What you’ll need to succeed

You’ll have proven Executive / Senior level expertise in the management of complex operational and contentious issues in a health context, providing strategic leadership and advice with the management of clinical operations and strict budgets, complex projects, policy development, and improved resource mobilisation and efficiency. With contemporary problem solving, people and risk management skills, you’ll have the capability to lead significant change and negotiate through differences to achieve positive outcomes.

With a relevant tertiary qualification (i.e. Masters, MBA or PhD) and current health practitioner registration or eligibility, you’ll have a thorough understanding of the provision of advanced clinical care and health programs, and clinical leadership.

What you’ll get in return

On offer is an attractive package for a 1 year maternity cover contract. Benefits include salary packaging, 6 weeks Leave, 10 days study leave and relocation.

What you need to do now If you’re interested, please click apply now or forward a copy of your CV to mailto:hayley.schwab@hays.com.au

PLEASE NOTE – Please direct all applications to Hays who are exclusively managing the recruitment for this vacancy on behalf of Sunrise H

There are 5 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

 

Deputy Chief Executive Officer

About the Organisation

The name Derbarl Yerrigan is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River. Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC) is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation which was established in 1974 as the Perth Aboriginal Medical Service and later changed its name to DYHSAC in 1998

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

To view and download the application pack, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

Durri servicing the Macleay and Nambucca Valleys – making a difference

 

Durri’s vision is to achieve and maintain better health and wellbeing outcomes for our Aboriginal people and communities.

Durri aims to be an employer of choice in Aboriginal health, supporting a skilled and flexible workforce.

Durri is a great place to work – a family friendly and culturally sensitive work environment that values people.

If you have a passion for indigenous health and are committed to closing the gap, then why not join us?

Please view our current vacancies .

We are currently hiring for 2 Senior Policy & Research Officers
The link to the role on Ethical Jobs is here:

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Bendigo

Closing Date : 24 June

More Info apply: http://www.murrayphn.org.au/aboriginal-internship

Job Ref : N2018 – 37

 

Academic Leader: Indigenous Health (Identified*) – 180357

School of Medicine

Closing Date: 02/07/2018

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities Inc #Nurses #Doctors etc #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @SNAICC @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

Job of the week 

Deputy Chief Executive Officer

About the Organisation

The name Derbarl Yerrigan is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River. Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC) is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation which was established in 1974 as the Perth Aboriginal Medical Service and later changed its name to DYHSAC in 1998.

We provide holistic and integrated primary health care services to Aboriginal people living in the Perth metropolitan region. DYHSAC employs 138 staff across its head office in East Perth and clinics in Maddington, Midland and Mirrabooka.

DYHSAC targets the social, emotional, cultural and physical wellbeing of Aboriginal people living on Noongar country. Our staff deliver comprehensive primary health care services at each DYHSAC clinic including:

  • Preventative care focussed on early detection and management of chronic illness across all ages;
  • Post-natal and antenatal care to women and families;
  • Early childhood, school age, and adolescent health programs;
  • Team-based management of chronic diseases with a focus on preventing disease progression and complications and maintaining quality of life;
  • Dental services to DYHSAC clients aged 13 years and above, including the development of full dental plans;
  • Access to a comprehensive suite of services provided by mental health and allied health care professionals and specialist services; and
  • Pharmacy and transport services to DYHSAC clients.

For more information, please visit the DYHSAC website, www.dyhs.org.au

About the Opportunity

The Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is currently seeking to appoint a Deputy Chief Executive Officer (D/CEO).

This position provides an exciting and challenging opportunity for a suitably experienced professional, with the ability to oversee the day-to-day operations of a well-established Aboriginal community controlled health service currently operating through an extensive change management process.

The D/CEO will work directly with the CEO, Executive Management Team and Board of Directors, managing the day to day operations and delivery of primary healthcare services to the local Aboriginal communities across four sites in the Perth metro area (East Perth, Midland, Mirrabooka and Maddington).

Currently operating through a period of change, DYHSAC is seeking an individual with extensive executive management experience including a proven ability to achieve key strategic objectives in a dynamic and challenging environment.

As an inspiring and collaborative leader, the D/CEO will work strategically to enable transformative change by strengthening the organisation and creating a sustainable future for improved health outcomes for our local Aboriginal communities.

Primary responsibilities include but are not limited to:

  • Driving and implementing extensive cultural workplace changes
  • Achieving the strategic objectives and responsibilities of the organisation
  • Diversifying and growing revenue streams to increase service delivery
  • Strengthening the organisation’s stakeholder relations, community engagement and patient satisfaction
  • Building and sustaining strong financial performance
  • Developing and maintaining a collaborative and effective working relationship with the Board of Directors aspiring to a shared vision

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

To view and download the application pack, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

There are 2 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The link to  job vacancies on website is

MAMU HEALTH SERVICE LIMITED

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal community controlled health service providing comprehensive primary health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Ravenshoe and surrounding districts.  We are recruiting the following positions for our Ravenshoe Clinic:-

Aboriginal & or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Practice Certificate III/IV Fixed Term. Applicant must have previous experience in similar role.

Traineeship – Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) HLT30113 Certificate III – If you have a passion to work in the health industry we are offering a Traineeship in Certificate III ATSI Primary Health Care (Practice) fixed term (12- 14 months) (It is a genuine occupational requirement that the position be filled by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person as permitted by Section 25, 105 & 106 Queensland Anti-Discrimination (1991) Act.)

Registered Nurse – A Full time position is available. Applicants must have previous experience in working with the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people. This is a Rural & Remote position which offers an attractive employment package including accommodation & fuel allowance.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check, and a Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian.

To apply for this vacancy, a full application package can be obtained from our website on http://www.mamuhsl.org.au, or please don’t hesitate to contact Julie Browne on 07 4061 9988 or jbrowne@mamuhsl.org.au to register your interest.

Please submit your resume and written responses addressing the Knowledge, Skills and Personal Attributes/Selection Criteria outlined in the Position Description to: The Chief Executive Officer Mamu Health Service Limited PO Box 1537 INNISFAIL Q 4860 Applications close at 5.00 pm on Friday 8th June 2018

Mamu Website

Ravenshoe Positions:

RAV-067 Trainee Health Worker_Position Description

RAV-066 ATSI Health Worker_3

RAV-060 Registered Nurse_Position Description3

Innisfail Positions:

IFL-267 Trainee Health Worker

IFL-264 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL-263 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL 269 Community Liason Officer_Female (002)

IFL-261 Sport Rec Officer_Position Description_110518 (003)

FOR ALL POSITIONS

APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY 8th JUNE 2018 5.00PM

 

There are 3 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

+ Traineeship Coordinator (Ongoing Full Time position based at Windsor) + Clinical Optometrist (Full Time or Part Time position based at Windsor) + Social Health Care Coordinator – MATSICHS (Ongoing Full Time position located at Morayfield)

 There are 14 JOBS at ATSICHS Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 28 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

There are 7 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

Maternal and Child Health Team Manager

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti have a rewarding opportunity for a Registered Nurse (RN3) to join their vibrant team as a Maternal and Child Health Team Manager, based in Adelaide, on a full-time basis.

Leading the Strong Mums Solid Kids program the Maternal and Child Health Team Manager will focus on the line management, leadership and coordination activities of team of 6+ staff. With limited professional and management supervision, the Maternal and Child Health Team Manager will achieve continuity and quality of client care and be primarily accountable for the outcomes of practices in the practice setting.

What You Need to Succeed

Our ideal candidate will be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Registration Authority (AHPRA) Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia; and bring the following:

  • Knowledge and an understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies and culture and the issues which may impact on maternal child and family wellbeing
  • Proven experience leading a multi-disciplinary team within a professional practice framework, and of a broad range of health professionals
  • Demonstrated experience coordinating and managing service level operations within a comprehensive primary health care context and effectively oversee clinical governance in the area of midwifery and/or child and family health
  • Ability to communicate sensitively and effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and ensure culturally appropriate service delivery
  • Excellent time management skills and the ability to work under pressure in a complex, busy workplace
  • Previous experience working in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service or community primary health care that demonstrate best practice outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients will be highly regarded but is not essential.

To view the full position description, please click here.

About the Organisation

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia, providing a range of health care and community support services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and advance their social, cultural and economic status.

More info Apply HERE

We are currently hiring for 2 Senior Policy & Research Officers
The link to the role on Ethical Jobs is here:

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Bendigo

Closing Date : 24 June

More Info apply: http://www.murrayphn.org.au/aboriginal-internship

Job Ref : N2018 – 37

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WorldHypertensionDay @strokefdn High #bloodpressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob with 47% having high #stroke risk

 

 ” But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

A staggering 82 percent of those, found to have high blood pressure, were not aware prior to taking the health check and were referred to their doctor for a further assessment.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are between two and three times as likely to have a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians which is why increasing stroke awareness is crucial.

Too many Australians couldn’t spot a stroke if it was happening right in front of them.

We know that in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities this awareness is even lower.

We want all Australians, regardless of where they live or what community they’re from, to learn the signs of stroke.”

Stroke Foundation and Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Project

 ” Naomi and Rukmani’s stroke rap runs through vital stroke awareness messages, such as lifestyle advice, learning the signs of stroke, and crucially the need to seek medical advice when stroke strikes.

Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song and remember the FAST message – it could save their life,”

Stroke Foundation Queensland Executive Officer Libby Dunstan 

Naomi Wenitong  pictured with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media

Listen to the new rap song HERE

                                       or Hear

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated

NACCHO has published over 90 articles Aboriginal health stroke prevention and recovery READ HERE

“It can happen to anyone — stroke doesn’t discriminate against colour, it doesn’t discriminate against age “

Photo above Seith Fourmile, Indigenous stroke survivor campaigns for culture to aid in stroke recovery

” Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who experience and die from cardiovascular disease at much higher rates than other Australians.

What you don’t know can hurt you. Heart disease and strokes are the biggest killers of Australians, and the biggest risk factor for both of them is high blood pressure.

But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

John Kelly CEO-National, Heart Foundation

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, when compared with other Australians, are:

  • 1.3 times as likely to have cardiovascular disease
  • three times more likely to have a major coronary event, such as a heart attack
  • more than twice as likely to die in hospital from coronary heart disease
  • 19 times as likely to die from acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart Disease
  • more likely to smoke, have high blood pressure, be obese, have diabetes and have end-stage renal disease.

It was World Hypertension Day yesterday  and the Stroke Foundation is determined to slash stroke numbers in Australia – with your help.

Today kicks off Australia’s Biggest Blood Pressure Check for 2018 and communities are being urged to take five minutes out of their day for a potentially life-saving blood pressure check.

More than 4.1 Million Australians are living with hypertension or high blood pressure, putting themselves at serious and unnecessary risk of stroke.

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.

The major concern with high blood pressure is many people don’t realise they have it. It has no immediate symptoms, but over time, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of stroke and heart disease.

How you can help?

  • Encourage your family and friends to take advantage of a free check.
  • Help spread the word via social media:  Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.
  • Get your free health check today! https://bit.ly/2ps1UOn #WorldHypertensionDay

  • I am urging you – no matter what age you are – to have a blood pressure check regularly with your ACCHO GP (General Practitioner), pharmacist or via a digital health check machine.
  • Stroke strikes in an instant, attacking the brain. It kills more women than breast cancer and more men than prostate cancer and leaves thousands with an ongoing disability, but stroke is largely preventable by managing blood pressure and living a healthy lifestyle.
  • Stroke Foundation and SiSU Wellness conducted more than 520,000 digital health checks throughout 2017, finding 16 percent of participants had high blood pressure putting them at risk of stroke

Given there will be 56,000 strokes in Australia this year alone, if we can reduce high blood pressure we will have a direct and lasting impact on the rate of stroke in this country.Yours sincerely,

Sharon McGowan
Chief Executive Officer
Stroke Foundation

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #SocialDeterminants #RedfernStatement : The impact of political determinants of health must be recognised for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

 

 ” Western culture remains the dominant culture in Australian society.

Its worldview has shaped Australian society and is constantly in conflict with the cultural identity and knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, including that of women.

Recently, Australian Indigenous leaders have set out a blueprint for action in the Redfern Statement. 

This blueprint acknowledges that Aboriginal people have provided viable, holistic solutions.

Without a change in leadership attitudes, governance and administration, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women will continue to be disadvantaged, and their health will continue to suffer.

It is high time that Australian policymaking recognized the above issues and acted with integrity on the deficits because we will not have equality until Australia recognizes the impact of the political determinants of health as identified throughout this paper.

Australia will never be a whole, functioning society until institutionalised oppression ceases. ” 

Originally published here Power and Persuasion

Read over 340 Aboriginal Women’s Health articles published by NACCHO over past 6 years

Read over 100 Aboriginal Health and Social Determinants published by NACCHO over past 6 years

The role of government policy is to support its citizenry to thrive. By this measure, Australian policy is failing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and women are bearing the brunt of failed policy through seriously compromised health and wellbeing. “

In this analysis, Vanessa Lee from the University of Sydney applies a lens of political determinants of health to illuminate policy failure for Indigenous women and their communities, and calls for the government to be held accountable to the outcomes of generations of harmful policy.

 This piece is drawn from an article that ran in the Journal of Public Health Policy in 2017.

Paternalism is compromising the health of Indigenous women

When it comes to Australian policy, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are not being supported. Rather, a long history of paternalistic government decisions created barriers towards Indigenous women achieving equivalent health and wellbeing measures when compared to non-Indigenous women.

The manifestation of colonisation has included a displacement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, a history of segregation and apartheid, and a breakdown of culture and cultural values through the impact of missionaries and government legislation, Acts and policies.

These political determinants of health breech human rights conventions, lack an evidence base, and are profoundly damaging across generations. Better policy could be and should be implemented but there appears to be a lack of political will.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women experience poorer health and reduced social and emotional wellbeing when compared to non-Indigenous women, and this is due to generational life circumstances. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women take a holistic world view that intrinsically connects family and culture with everything else that they connect with.

What this means is that Indigenous women have a cultural and family relationship with their social and economic world.

The breakdown in life circumstances are evident today across employment and education where 39 per cent of the Indigenous females were employed compared to 55 per cent of the non-Indigenous females; and 4.6 per cent overall of the Indigenous compared to 20 per cent of the non-Indigenous people have completed a bachelor degree or higher degree.[1]

Educational attainment and employment are intrinsically linked to economic opportunity, with higher levels of education reducing societal disadvantage. Failure to address these fundamental social determinants in early life contributes to life-long disadvantage.

When the British colonized Australia, they did so under a paternalistic ideology that remains evident today as Australian federal, state, territory and local governments continue to implement paternalistic policies. Paternalistic policies are those that restrict choices to individuals, ostensibly in their ‘best interest’ and without their consent.

The justification of such policies is often to change individuals’ damaging behaviours; for example gambling, smoking, consumption of drugs and alcohol, or the reliance on welfare payments. Given the etymology of the word ‘paternalism’, it is little wonder that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have been the victims of extraordinarily high levels of sexism, domestic violence, marginalization, work-place lateral violence and racism.

Especially since the policies were developed and implemented from colonisation, with little or no evidence to support the need to change behaviours of the First Nations women of Australia.  The response to the impact of these paternalistic policies has resulted in an increase in prevalence in pain and trauma based behaviours such as substance abuse.

Social determining factors

Social determinants of health are about “the cause of the cause.” Poorer health outcomes are not narrowed to individual lifestyle choice or risky behaviour. Understanding the social determinants of health requires looking at the relationship between cause, social factors and health outcomes. Social factors are those societal factors that influence health throughout life and include housing, education, access to healthcare and family support.

The diagram below highlights an example of the circular relationship between the causes of the social factors and the social factors themselves across a person’s life stages. The unborn Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander child of parents with high drug and/or alcohol intake, low income and low education will be born into an environment influenced at the macrosocial level by history, culture, discrimination and the political economy.

This first stage of inequality can manifest in increasing risky behaviours such as smoking, drinking, unhealthy eating, and lack of exercise or imprisonment. These behaviours have been associated with intellectual impairment that continues through all life stages.[ii] Quite often the continuous exposure to drugs and alcohol from adults becomes part of the child’s assumption of the normality of risk-taking behaviour and the cycle continues.

Tragically, at times the child born into this situation may commit suicide. Indigenous young people are as much as five times more likely to commit suicide as their non-Indigenous peers. Or the child may end up in prison, and although Indigenous women make up 2% of the adult female population 2% of the adult female populationin Australia they make up 27 to 34% of the female prison population across jurisdictions (see also here). T

he imprisonment of women causes an upheaval in their lives and that of their families and for Indigenous women it also creates a breakdown in their world view and to all that is connected to their world view.

Diagram 1: Relationship between ‘the cause’ and life stages

Relationship between causes, social factors and life stages

Social and economic circumstances have a profound impact on individual experiences of inequity, yet within a neoliberal framework the individual is blamed for making poor choices. The government’s failure to acknowledge or address the causes which shape the social factors that in turn underpin individual lifestyle “choices” reveals a disinterest in addressing the socio-structural causes of illness and health.

When governments invest long-term resources and time into understanding the socio-structural causes of illness and health, they will recognize that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are constantly subjected to unnecessary inequalities that mitigate against making positive lifestyle choices for future generations.

Structured inequities within society are based on unequal distribution of power, wealth, income and status. A woman’s ability to move up and down the class system is directly impacted by socioeconomic position or status – including education, employment and income.

This truth epitomizes the gross inequalities that continue to exist in Australian society. Inequities in health are heightened because social class not only includes education, employment and income but also differential access to power. Social class structures are characterized by factors including race, sex/gender, ethnicity, Indigeneity and religion. Fundamentally, it is structural issues of class and political disadvantage that place Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women close to the bottom of the socioeconomic ladder.

Political determinants

From colonization of Australia until the present day, the policy decisions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people made by National, State and Territory governments, churches and other institutions have had dire effects on Indigenous peoples’ health and well-beingInequitable policies contributed to inequalities in health resulting from unequal distribution of power and resources between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.

The impact of policies which fail to take a holistic view on Indigenous population health reflects a political failure of the system with regard to the basic human rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their good health and well-being.

Denial of a human right directly violates a person’s right to self-determination. These rights should be protected by a covenant to which Australia is a signatory—The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966) (The Covenant). It states that “all peoples have the right of self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development” (Article 1 Section 1).

The level of Australia’s commitment to this covenant became questionable with the implementation of The Northern Territory National Emergency Response (the Intervention) in 2007. This was a federal government action that ignored one of its own government-funded reports highlighting the critical importance of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the design and implementation of initiatives for their communities. In less than six months, following the politically motivated “Intervention” that was introduced just prior to an election, the Australian parliament introduced a complex legislative package consisting of five Bills, all 450 pages long and passed in parliament on the same day.

The bills were primarily associated with welfare reform. In 2008, a national emergency response by the Australian government took effect and was administered across all of the Northern Territory using the political rationale ‘to protect Aboriginal children’. This appeared to be an excuse to further erode Indigenous self-determination rather than to address the safety of children; as one critic pointed out, “we have witnessed the abandonment of consultation with Indigenous people, diminishing use of available statistical and research evidence and increased marginalization of the experts – especially if their views diverge from national leadership.” (p. 7)

The impact on health outcomes

Welfare data published in 2016 show that Indigenous children in the Northern Territory were being removed from families at 9.8 times more often than that of non-Indigenous children based on ‘reforms’ in the five new ‘welfare reform’ Bills.

The Northern Territory Indigenous death rates are still 2.3 times higher than those of non-Indigenous people, and Indigenous people experience assault victimization at six times the rate of non-Indigenous people (see here).

The 2014/2015 Social Survey found that fewer than half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over were employed, and males were more than twice as likely as females to be working full time.

The deplorable outcomes of these politically motivated policies are most clearly illustrated by the understanding that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women between the ages of 20 and 24 years are four times more likely to commit suicide than are the other woman and between 70-60% of Indigenous women in prisons are due to them being victims of domestic violence.

Holding government accountable to policy outcomes

These outcomes demonstrate the political failure of Australian governments at national, state, territory and local levels to work with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and the lack of integrity surrounding equitable policy administration, leadership and governance.

Many policies developed for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders over a long period of time have contributed to the shameful inequity in Australian society between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. This level of inequity is even more dramatic with regard to Indigenous women.

The Covenant is neither the first Human Rights Charter that Australia has signed nor the first it has violated to the disadvantage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, their health and well-being (and of the entire Indigenous population). Australia played a key role as one of eight nations involved in developing the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights, when Australian Dr HV Evatt was the President of the United Nations General Assembly.

Until a referendum allowed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to become citizens, there was scant regard to Article 2: “Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status”. The Australian government is disregarding its own stated ideals when it disregards the rights of Indigenous Australians.

The gap in health outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and other Australians is becoming more apparent, leading to calls for a new and more effective response. The effects of discriminative policies are now being exposed more often – thus, they become more visible. Non-Indigenous services account for 80 per cent of Indigenous expenditure, and there is a lack of transparency and clarity evaluating how these organizations address policies developed by government for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Fifty per cent of the Indigenous Australian population is under the age of 22and their health, as that of their elders, remains dire. Without understanding their cultural ways of doing and knowing and without working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in making policy decisions, there will be no progress in achieving health equality for this population group.

Major changes needed

Western culture remains the dominant culture in Australian society. Its worldview has shaped Australian society and is constantly in conflict with the cultural identity and knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, including that of women. Recently,

Australian Indigenous leaders have set out a blueprint for action in the Redfern Statement.

This blueprint acknowledges that Aboriginal people have provided viable, holistic solutions. Without a change in leadership attitudes, governance and administration, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women will continue to be disadvantaged, and their health will continue to suffer.

It is high time that Australian policymaking recognized the above issues and acted with integrity on the deficits because we will not have equality until Australia recognizes the impact of the political determinants of health as identified throughout this paper. Australia will never be a whole, functioning society until institutionalised oppression ceases.

References

[1] Burns, J., MacRae, A., Thomson, N., Anomie., Catto, M., Gray, C., Levitan, L., McLoughlin, N., Potter, C., Ride, K., Stumpers, S., Trzesinski, A. and Urquhart, B. (2013) Summary of Indigenous women’s health. http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/population-groups/women/reviews/our-review.

[ii] Carson, B., Dunbar, T., Chenhall, R. and Bailie, R. (Eds.). (2007). Social determinants of indigenous health. Sydney, Australia: Allen & Unwin.