NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @NDIS : Download @LowitjaInstitut 13 recommendations Report : Understanding disability through the lens of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people – challenges and opportunities

” The 2011 Census indicated that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience profound or severe disability at higher rates than non-Indigenous Australians at all ages, with 6.1% of Indigenous males and 5.4% of Indigenous females reporting a profound or severe disability.1

 The Australian Bureau of Statistics found in 2015 that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were 1.8 times more likely than non-Indigenous people to be living with a disability.2

 The First People Disability Network (FPDN) estimates that the current number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people nationally eligible for participation in the NDIS is around 60,000.3 “

From project background see part 2 below

Read over Aboriginal and health and NDIS articles published by NACCHO Here

Part 1 Download 13 recommendations report

Lowitja_UnderstandingDisability_291019_D4_WEB

Representing a major change in the way supports for people living with disability are funded, the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) presents both opportunities and significant challenges.

This project, Understanding disability through the lens of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people – challenges and opportunities, was developed to examine the:

  • Implementation of the NDIS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Engagement Strategy1
  • Interaction between National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) staff, local area co-ordinators (LACs) and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
  • Experiences of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in accessing the NDIS, planning, and receiving disability supports through the scheme

The research was conducted in collaboration with the MJD Foundation (MJDF) and Synapse, organisations which have longstanding connections with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities in the Northern Territory and Queensland respectively

Part 2 Background to project

From HERE

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) represents a major change in the way the services and supports for people with disability are funded.

It presents both tremendous opportunity yet significant challenges.

Ensuring that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people receive the same care as other Australians is an important human rights obligation. This project will improve the ability of the NDIS to achieve this.

At this stage, with the exception of an evaluation conducted in Barkly, very little is known about the roll-out of the NDIS to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This project will examine:

  • the implementation of the NDIS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander engagement strategy
  • the interaction between the National Disability Agency (NDIA) staff, local area co-ordinators and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) and NGOs
  • the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in accessing the NDIS program, planning and receiving the supports/services through the program.

Recognition that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disabilities are not well served by mainstream services has led to strong advocacy and the development of culturally competent service models by the community controlled and NGO sector.

This project is a collaboration of 3 such organisations; Machado Joseph Disease Foundation (MJDF), Synapse and First Peoples Disability Network and the University of Melbourne.

The project will take a co-design approach to developing a study of the roll out of the NDIS for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Co-­design, or experience-based co-design, is not only a way to actively involve consumers in the design, delivery and/or evaluation of services but also enables the design of systems where consumer and carer experiences are central.4

Our approach to the project will bring together expertise from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations working to provide services to people with disabilities, with researchers and policy makers.

The approach to design and data collection will support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership, optimise existing data and knowledge, and develop local research capacity among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

It will bring together community, researchers, providers, policy makers and NDIA staff and develop an evidence informed approach to improving the NDIS and developing a workforce to support it.

The project will involve four phases:

  1. Establishment of a project reference group
  2. Co-design
  3. Interviews
  4. Reporting and review.

It is expected that the project will identify strengths and weaknesses of the NDIS implementation. It will identify promising strategies to improve the ways the NDIA works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations.

Related resources:

NACCHO Affiliates and Members Deadly Good News : Registrations for #NACCHOAgm19 #NACCHOYouth19 extended to 25 October Plus #NSW @Walgett_AMS #Qld @DeadlyChoices @Wuchopperen @ashbarty @EvonneGoolagong #Vic @VACCHO_org #NT @CAACongress #WA #SA

1.1 National : NACCHO , Affiliates and members visit Kimberleys to learn about renal services

1.2 National : Registrations to this year’s Youth Conference and the NACCHO National Conference will now close on 25th October 2019. 

1.3 National : Closing the Gap / Have your say CTG deadline extended to Friday, 8 November 2019.

2.1 QLD :Australia’s Sportswoman of the Year Ash Barty and tennis legend Evonne Goolagong Cawley helping out at the Deadly Choices NAIDOC Tennis Camp hosted by Wuchopperen Health Service Ltd

2.2 QLD : Treaty consultations in Queensland could deliver better housing and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

3.NSW : AHMRC : A primary care oasis: Community Control success stories at Walgett AMS

4.VIC : VACCHO partners with BreastScreen Victoria’s to arrange the hot pink van, known as “Marjorie” to visit Gunditjmara Aboriginal Cooperative ACCHO in Warrnambool

5. WA Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporations staff support Rowans Walk and suicide prevention awareness

6. SA : First Syphilis Point of Care Test at Nunyara ACCHS’ Community Connection Day 

7. NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs healthy promotions teams are getting out to communities to spread prevention messages 

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.National : NACCHO , Affiliates and members visit Kimberleys to learn about renal services

Pictured here at Derby Renal Health Centre are Neil Willmett (CEO, QAIHC), Dania Ahwang (CEO, Wuchoperren Health Service, Cairns), Donnella Mills (Acting Chairperson, NACCHO) and Dawn Casey (Deputy CEO, NACCHO).” REPOST – QAIHC CEO Neil Willmett

The incidence of Kidney Disease in the Kimberley is one of the highest in Australia. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) and End-Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD) incidence within the Aboriginal population of the Kimberley greatly exceeds the national burden of disease.

Dialysis prevalence for this region has more than tripled in the last decade and is increasing at a much faster rate than in the rest of Western Australia (WA).

Kimberley Renal Services is a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd established to manage regional renal support and dialysis services in Broome, Derby, Kununurra and Fitzroy Crossing.

Fitzroy Crossing Renal Health Centre opened in July 2012 and currently has 4 chairs

Broome Renal Health Centre (previously known as Kimberley Satellite Dialysis Centre KSDC) has been in operation since 21st October 2002 and currently has 10 chairs

Kununurra Renal Health Centre opened in May 2013 and currently has 6 chairs

Derby Renal Health Centre opened in May 2013 and currently has 6 chairs

Each Renal Health Centre operates Monday to Saturday with varying opening hours providing dialysis services to clients across the Kimberley.

Care is provided largely by Nurses and Aboriginal Health Workers (AHW) and support staff includes Aboriginal Care Coordinators, Patient Care Assistants, Receptionists and Administrative Support Staff and Cleaners.

1.2 National : Registrations to this year’s Youth Conference and the NACCHO National Conference extended to 25 October 2019. 

Monday 4th November 2019 NACCHO Youth Conference *Youth Registration is Free of Charge

The central focus of the NACCHO Youth Conference Healthy youth, healthy future is on building resilience.

For thousands of years our Ancestors have shown great resolve thriving on this vast continent. Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who make up 54% of our population, now look to the example set by generations past and present to navigate ever-changing and complex social and health issues.

Healthy youth, healthy future provides us with opportunities to explore and discuss issues of importance to us, our families and communities, and to take further steps toward becoming tomorrow’s leaders. We hope to see you there!

Registrations are now open for the 2019 NACCHO Youth Conference, which will be held November 4th in Darwin at the Darwin Convention Centre.

Register More Info HERE 

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Tuesday 5th & Wednesday 6th November 2019

7th November 2019 NACCHO AGM

This year, NACCHO’s Members’ Conference focuses on the theme –

Because of them we must: improving health outcomes for our people aged 0-29 years.

We have chosen this focus because we know that investing in the health and wellbeing of our babies, children and young people can help prevent ill health, disease and disability. Strong investment in this age group will help them to thrive, help them build strong and healthy families and communities, and help to positively influence their future health outcomes and life expectancy measures.

Because of them we must provides an opportunity to place our future generations at the forefront of our discussions, to hear about the innovative work that is happening in our community controlled and other sectors, to exchange ideas and share our knowledge.

Registrations to this year’s Youth Conference and the NACCHO National Conference will close on 25th October 2019.  Late registrations will not be accepted.

We hope you can join us!

Register HERE

If you have any questions or would like further information contact Ros Daley and Jen Toohey on 02 6246 9309 or via email conference@naccho.org.au

1.3 National : Closing the Gap / Have your say CTG deadline extended to Friday, 8 November 2019.

 

The engagements are now in full swing across Australia and this is generating more interest than we had anticipated in our survey on Closing the Gap.

The Coalition of Peaks has had requests from a number of organisations across Australia seeking, some Coalition of Peak members and some governments for more time to promote and complete the survey.

We want to make sure everyone has the opportunity to have their say on what should be included in a new agreement on Closing the Gap so it is agreed to extend the deadline for the survey to Friday, 8 November 2019.

This will help build further understanding and support for the new agreement and will not impact our timeframes for negotiating with government as we were advised at the most recent Partnership Working Group meeting that COAG will not meet until early 2020.

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

2.1 QLD :Australia’s Sportswoman of the Year Ash Barty and tennis legend Evonne Goolagong Cawley helping out at the Deadly Choices NAIDOC Tennis Camp hosted by Wuchopperen Health Service Ltd

It’s not every day a tennis World Number 1 is in Cairns but that was the case today when Ash Barty, along with Evonne Goolagong-Cawley came to have a hit with some of Cairns up-and-coming stars.

2.2 QLD : Treaty consultations in Queensland could deliver better housing and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

The first Indigenous woman elected to Queensland’s parliament has encouraged all Queenslanders to take part in the 26 treaty consultation sessions to be held across the state.

Official talks of a treaty that could deliver better housing and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Queensland began in Cairns on Thursday.

They were the first in a series of community consultation sessions across the state with plans to reach a treaty with First Nations people.

“I encourage all Queenslanders to attend a consultation session and participate in this important conversation,” said Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch.

“This is an historic step we take together, one that is long overdue but one that will strengthen the way to greater reconciliation, self-determination and a more inclusive, respectful shared future.”

The state government outlined plans towards a treaty with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders people in July, with the aim for greater self-determination in Indigenous communities.

Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Jackie Trad told parliament on Thursday it was time for the truth about the state’s ancient history and colonisation to be told as part of steps towards a shared and inclusive future

3.NSW : AHMRC : A primary care oasis: Community Control success stories at Walgett AMS

Driving through Gamilaraay country in the remotest reaches of northwestern NSW, the single most striking feature is the dry; vast expanses of parched land.

At the Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service, the walls are beginning to crack because the soil the building stands on is too dry to support its weight.

On the day I visit, the water from the taps runs yellow, sediment settling in it from the artesian basin below, and the Shire Council advises locals to boil it before drinking.

Walgett is not expecting rain for another three years, and though it is nowhere to be seen, water – or, more precisely, the lack of it — courses through every conversation.

The situation is so precarious the AMS is now receiving donated water and storing it casks on palates for distribution on Mondays and Wednesdays to those who need it most.

Walgett-Water-Palates

Water stored in casks on palates. Photo credit Dr Tim Senior.

This doesn’t seem sustainable, but for Christine Corby, CEO of the long-running Walgett AMS, it is simply one more way in which the service offers comprehensive and holistic primary care.

It may look like a conventional medical clinic, offering a range of programs including acute medical care, chronic disease management, dental and oral health services, allied health, psychology, specialist clinics, child health and antenatal care, but Walgett AMS is so much more than a one-stop shop for health. It is of, by and for the community. Really, it *is* the community, and Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners are integral to its success.

Read in Full HERE

This article was written by Dr Tim Senior and edited by Amy Coopes, on behalf of Croakey Professional Services.

It was sponsored by The Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AH&MRC) of NSW, which had final say over the content.

Croakey Professional Services help generate funds to sustain our public interest journalism activities, and also aim to provide a useful service to our readers. To find out more about the range of services on offer, see here.

4.VIC : VACCHO partners with BreastScreen Victoria’s to arrange the hot pink van, known as “Marjorie” to visit Gunditjmara Aboriginal Cooperative ACCHO in Warrnambool

To mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Aboriginal women in Warrnambool this week got free breast screens – the best way to find cancer early and save lives.

BreastScreen Victoria’s hot pink van, known as “Marjorie” visited Gunditjmara Aboriginal Cooperative at Harris Reserve to give free breast screens to women aged 50 .

Originally published HERE

The first 50 women to receive a mammogram received a free cultural screening shawl to wear during the procedure, and to take home with them.

These shawls have been developed to make breast screening more comfortable for Aboriginal women across Victoria, with Warrnambool’s shawl featuring a design by local Warlpiri artist, Rebecca Clayton.

Morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea was also be provided throughout the day.

BreastScreen Victoria CEO, Vicki Pridmore, said that the initiative was a culmination of months of hard work and planning with project partner, the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO).

“We hope that the beautiful shawls created by Aboriginal artists as a part of this project can assist women screening to feel comfortable, welcome andrespected,” Ms Pridmore said.

We hope that the beautiful shawls created by Aboriginal artists as a part of this project can assist women screening to feel comfortable, welcome and respected.

BreastScreen Victoria CEO, Vicki Pridmore

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Aboriginal women in Victoria. A breast screen can find cancer as small as a grain of rice, long before a woman or her doctor can see or feel anything.

Typically, women aged between 50 and 74 should have a breast screen every two years – the best way to find breast cancer early, when treatment is most effective.

All breast screens are with a female radiographer, in a friendly and safe environment. Clients don’t need a doctor’s referral or Medicare card, and only take 10 minutes.

Ms Pridmore is encouraging Aboriginal women aged 50 to 74 to take advantage of the van’s visit to town.

“When found early, breast cancer can be treated very successfully. This visit has been organised with our partners at VACCHO and Gunditjmara to make sure that Aboriginal women in Warrnambool have access to a potentially life-saving breast screen,” she said.

“The vans use the highest quality digital radiography machines to ensure that women receive the best service, regardless of their location.”

5. WA Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporations staff support Rowans Walk and suicide prevention awareness

In support for Rowans Walk and suicide prevention awareness, WMHSAC staff had a great time yesterday encouraging all participants with cool refreshments, as they completed the awareness walk.

6. SA : First Syphilis Point of Care Test at Nunyara ACCHS’ Community Connection Day 

Nunyara’s Willhelmine Lieberwirth ( also NACCHO Board Member ) and Kate Warren. Syphilis Point of Care Test (finger prick with result in 15 minutes).
SAHMRI Young Deadly Free poster https://youngdeadlyfree.org.au/

7. NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs healthy promotions team are getting out to communities to spread prevention messages 

The Congress FASD Prevention Program visited Ntaria community this week, promoting ‘NO grog before, during and after pregnancy is safest for dad, mum and bub’….here is Donna and Justine having a yarn with Ntaria school kids.

Check out our health promotion team who are out at Amoonguna community spreading health messages about risky alcohol behaviours, nutrition, Tackling Indigenous Smoking and Sexual Health education

NACCHO Aboriginal Men’s #MentalHealth : ‘ Whatever you grow will save a bro’ says @DeadlyChoices Nathan Appo selected to be one of the faces for the 2019 International #Movember campaign. Please support Donate

A few months ago I was asked to travel to London to be one of the faces of the 2019 International Movember campaign.

Of course I said yes and I’m honoured and blessed to be apart of such an important cause.

If you know me you’d know I’m very passionate about mental health and educating our mob around the importance of staying mentally healthy.

Too many of my brothers are passing away from suicide, don’t be shame my brothers. We need to be there for each other & educate our people around mental health & depression

This is just another way in supporting friends and family going through depression and anxiety as we can always educate someone around us.

This year Movember is reminding us that not everyone can grow the world’s best moustache but that shouldn’t stop you because ‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’.

 No matter if it’s patchy, lopsided or just kind of…furry, like mine! Every Mo has the power to save 

Your donation will help Movember fund groundbreaking work in prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention.

To donate please click on Nathan’s link 

Nathan Appo from Innisfail / Mamu / Goreng Goreng / Bundjalung /Living in Brisbane and working with Deadly Choices

Men’s health charity, Movember, has launched its 2019 campaign for its annual month of moustache-growing.

This year, the campaign’s tagline is ‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’, acknowledging the variety of shapes and styles of moustache that are grown during Movember.

UK-based creative agency, MATTA, was behind the campaign. The ad was voiced by comedian Dave Lawson, and features testicular cancer survivor Harvee Pene, prostate cancer survivor Charlie Jia and mental health advocate Nathan Appo.

” Training isn’t always about physical health and strength. ‪I exercise to stay mentally healthy, mentally fit.‬
#MovemberMotivation‪What’s your Deadly Choice?‬ Says Nathan 

To donate please click on Nathan’s link 

“It’s amazing to see so many different faces from all over the world featured in the Movember campaign this year,” Jia said.

“As well as being a lot of fun to shoot and highlighting that anyone can grow a Mo, ‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’ has put Indigenous men’s health front and centre. It also shows that background, colour and beliefs don’t matter, because prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health issues won’t discriminate.”

A second video released shows Pene recount his story with testicular cancer to his barber.

Movember’s chief marketing officer, Juliette Smith, said: “‘Whatever you grow will save a bro’ arose from the insight that some men want to support the charity, but feel embarrassed by their facial hair, or its perceived inadequacy.

It also nods to the fact that the landscape of male grooming has changed, where the ask for many is no longer ‘grow a moustache’ but increasingly more often ‘shave your beard’, adding another layer of vulnerability for the grower.

 ” No matter if it’s patchy, lopsided or just kind of…furry, like mine! Every Mo has the power to save lives. My father Neily Apps is the reason why I participate in Movember, it’s a chance to educate and support our fellow men ” Says Nathan Appo 

To donate please click on Nathan’s link 

“The campaign aims to dispel these anxieties, demonstrating the ultimate importance of Movember; that the wider awareness of our charity and its causes; prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health, can change lives for better.”

MATTA’s design and production director, Tom Allwood, said: “Movember is so important in raising often un-talked about issues among men. We found a way of bringing people together from all backgrounds, showing that we’re all unique, but focusing throughout on the integral message of the movement.”

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Research #ourculturescount #HaveYourSayCTG : Download @Mayi_Kuwayu and @LowitjaInstitut Defining the Indefinable: Descriptors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ culture and their links to health and wellbeing

“In recent years, interest in understanding the relationship between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ cultures and how culture relates to health and wellbeing has been growing. The first step in understanding this relationship is to identify what is described in the literature as ‘culture’ and then to describe how the literature reports the relationship between culture and health and wellbeing.

Some people argue that culture is not definable or that it is intangible. However, all people are born into and grow, work and live within a culture or cultures. Cultures are maintained or modified when they are passed on and are reinforced and practised in both specific and general situations.

The many definitions encompass culture- specific knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviours (including within cultural variations according to rules), and all human life is culturally bound.

Much work in epidemiology and public health focuses on the presence (or absence) of disease and not on the culture within which illness and wellbeing manifest.

We need to understand both wellbeing and culture to have effective public health. “

From the publication Mayi_Kuwayu and Lowitja Institute Defining the Indefinable : Continued Part 1

Download HERE

Defining_Indefinable_report_FINAL_WEB

In Australia, limited data establish or define the relationship between health, wellbeing and culture and the mechanisms through which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural determinants impact health and wellbeing.

There is increasing attention on the relationship between culture, health and wellbeing in this population.

The authors conducted this literature review as preliminary work for the Mayi Kuwayu Study—Mayi Kuwayu broadly means “to follow Aboriginal people over a long time” in Ngiyampaa language (language of the Wongaibon people of New South Wales, Australia).

Survey Website 

The aim was to help us understand the cultural factors that are important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and how these factors relate to health and wellbeing.

The authors examined the Australian literature, as well as literature from countries that have experienced colonisation events similar to those of Australia— primarily Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada and the United States.

 Part 1 Introduction continued from opening 

This work stems from the desire of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to achieve that understanding in order to improve our health. Culture (the maintenance, revitalising, embracing, nurturing and growth of it) is important to our happiness and wellbeing and for improving health outcomes.

This review provides insights into what Indigenous peoples across the world describe as culture. However, much more knowledge is likely to be held by cultural leaders and others who have not engaged in what is often non-

Indigenous-led research. This also means that what is described as culture is largely viewed through the lens of people from non-Indigenous cultures. The content of this review is not intended to be a tool to measure indigeneity or cultural proficiency for individuals or groups and should not be read or interpreted as such.

The Lowitja Institute Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health CRC funded this review under project 16- SDH-0503. Our aims were to identify from the literature the broad domains (and additional sub-domains) of Indigenous peoples’ cultures and describe how these relate to health and, more broadly, wellbeing.

We mainly restricted our review to literature published between 1990 and 2017 and used an iterative search process that initially returned many thousands of results from five online databases and through hand searching. We included grey literature to ensure as much material as possible was included.

We identified six broad, frequently cited cultural domains or themes, each with a number of sub-domains (see ‘Summary of cultural indicators’ at the end of Chapter 3). The broad domains were:

  • Connection to Country
  • Indigenous beliefs and knowledge
  • Indigenous language
  • Family, kinship and community
  • Cultural expression and continuity
  • Self-determination and

This revised edition of the literature review has been published by the Lowitja Institute as part of the project completion process.

Part 2 : The Conclusion

We have highlighted the often complex and overlapping factors that affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and wellbeing.

These factors can operate at the individual or community level. Importantly, we have identified that, while some practices, processes and beliefs are different in the context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, there are some universal elements across Australia and internationally.

We have highlighted in this review that health and more broadly wellbeing appear to be enhanced when cultural elements and culture more broadly is learnt, practiced and incorporated into people’s lives.

While we have likely not produced a succinct definition of culture, as a result of this review we have a better understanding of what things constitute the varying parts of culture for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and how these relate to health and wellbeing.

The authors acknowledge that this review may not include some elements of Indigenous peoples culture however this paper, has for the first time, put in one place the range of factors describing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture from an Australian and international perspective.

As a result of the extensive search we have been able to list broad domains of culture and a range of sub themes under each broad cultural domain. This is the first time to our knowledge this has been done.

Through the review we have been able to identify quantitative cultural measures that did not currently exist and this enabled the research team identify areas for data development – the creation of new measures for Mayi Kuwayu, the National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing.

This review also assisted in informing the modification of existing measures for inclusion in the Study. The Mayi Kuwayu Study commenced data collection in October 2018.

The report was prepared by Minette Salmon, Kate Doery, Phyll Dance, Jan Chapman, Ruth Gilbert, Rob Williams & Ray Lovett

 Part 3 Have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people  #HaveYourSay about #closingthegapCTG

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people know what works best for us.

We need to make sure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth voices are reflected and expertise is recognised in every way at every step on efforts to close the gap in life outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.’

‘The Coalition of Peaks is leading the face to face discussions, not governments.

The Peaks are asking Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth to tell us what should be included in a new Closing the Gap agreement and we will take this to the negotiating table.’

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #Saveadate : This week #NationalCarersWeek #Nutrition #NNW2019 #AntiPovertyWeek #RaisetheRate #APW2019 REGISTRATIONS Close 20 October #NACCHOAgm19 #NACCHOYouth19 November 4 to 7 Plus #ClosingTheGap #HaveYourSayCTG

This week

13 –19 October National Nutrition Week 2019

13 -19 October Anti-Poverty week Raise the Rate Newstart

13 – 19 October National Carers Week 2019

This month 

25 October Coalition of Peaks Have Your Say Survey Closes

Next month

4 November Applications close for the Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme !

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand

13 – 19 October National Nutrition Week 2019

13-19 October is all about how to try for five serves of vegetables each day by learning to embrace your food waste!

Scary Stats

Less than 4% of us eat our recommend five serves of vegetables a day and only 1% of children / teenagers! In fact, the average Australian eats eat only half that. Not only can eating a healthy and balanced diet help reduce the risk of many chronic diseases but it may even reduce your risk of depression. And yet we throw a lot of good food away.

More than one third of rubbish bins in Australian kitchens contain leftovers and wasted food. That’s nearly $4000 worth of groceries per household per year that can end up in landfill, where food breaks down and emits harmful greenhouse gases, including methane, which affect air quality and public health. Wasting food also waste the resources used to grow it (water, soils and energy) plus energy to process, package and transport food.

What can you do?

With a few simple steps, you can discover new ways to add veg to your day and reduce your household food waste, while saving money and the environment at the same time!

Here’s some quick tips to get you started:

  • Eat more parts of your vegetables such as skins, stalks ad leaves.
  • Use up your ageing vegetables that would otherwise go in the bin
  • Choose ‘ugly’ and ‘imperfect’ vegetables to prevent them going to landfill. They’re just as nutritious, and often cheaper
  • Give ageing veg a second life by adding them to vegetable soups, egg frittatas or savoury muffins
  • Have some ‘go to’ recipes up your sleeve will help you use up your ageing vegetables.
  • Learn how to store different types of vegetables, so they stay fresh for as long as possible.

tryfor5.org.au is your go-to resource and is loaded with everything you need to know from handy hints and tips to practical information. Get on board!

13-19 October Anti-Poverty week #RaisetheRate Newstart

In 2019, Anti-Poverty Week will be held from the 13th to the 19th of October. Each year we choose an evidence-based solution to be a focus and partner with the leading campaign/organisation in that space to take action to end poverty.

This year we have invited the Raise the Rate campaign led by ACOSS as increasing Newstart and related payments is the single most effective way to reduce poverty in Australia. This campaign is aimed at increasing the rate of Newstart and associated allowances by $75 a week.

Around a million Australians are reliant on these payments which have not been increased in real
terms for more than 25 years. Newstart at around $40 a day traps many people in poverty and
many employers say it acts as brake on job search.

We can improve our social security system to lift people out of poverty and unemployment – to truly give them a new start.

MORE  INFO 

13 – 19 October National Carers Week 2019

Graphic above Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour

 Is a time for the recognition and celebration of the 2.7 million Australians who provide unpaid carers to a family member or friend.

Carers Australia CEO, Ara Cresswell, said, ‘Each and every week Australia’s unpaid carers provide complex, ongoing care to family members or friends who have a disability, mental illness, chronic condition, terminal illness or who are frail aged.

‘Anyone at any time can become an unpaid carer and National Carers Week is a time to raise awareness among all Australians of the enormous contribution carers make to our nation.

‘We want to hear from carers about why they do what they do, and we also welcome messages of support from the broader community, so that we can let all Australians know Why We Care.’

Visit the National Carers Week website to Tell Us Why You Care, so that we can help raise awareness not only of unpaid carers, but of the realities of the caring role in Australia.

You can also hear from our National Carers Week Ambassadors, AFL star, Moana Hope; and sporting legend, Mat Rogers, both of whom perform caring roles.

The website also contains a broad range of information on how you can get involved in this year’s campaign, as well as a host of promotional materials and resources.

You can also take a look at our interactive map which lists a number of National Carers Week events taking place across Australia.

By sharing stories about Why We Care, we can help build a carer-friendly Australia.

25 October Survey Closes  : Have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people #HaveYourSay about #closingthegap

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

The Coalition of Peaks are leading face to face meetings with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, communities and organisations on Closing the Gap during the month of October.

The meetings provide an opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in each state and territory to tell the Coalition of Peaks and governments what changes are needed to improve their lives

October Engagement Meetings:

 

South Australia

2 October – Adelaide Closed

15 October – Ceduna Closed

18 October – Port Augusta

23 October – Mount Gambier

 

Tasmania

11 October – Launceston Closed

 

Western Australia

14 October – Broome Closed

17 October – Geraldton

21 October – Kalgoorlie

23 October – Port Headland

28 October – Perth

30 October – Narrogin

 

Australian Capital Territory

17 October – Canberra

28 October – Canberra

 

Victoria

15 October – Melbourne

16 October – Bendigo

17 October – Morwell

 

New South Wales

21 October – Sydney

 

Northern Territory

4 October – Katherine Closed

11 October – Yirrkala Closed

30 October – Darwin

 

National

23 and 24 October – Canberra

 

VIC Update

There will be three meetings held across Victoria, details are below.

Website RSVP 

City Date Venue Time
Morwell Thursday 17 October Gathering Place, 99 Buckley Street 12PM – 4PM

NSW Update 

The NSW Coalition of Aboriginal Peak Organisations (CAPO) of which NSW Aboriginal Land Council is a member, are leading the Closing the Gap engagements across the state.

28 consultations will be taking place during the month of October and early November. The consultations are an opportunity for communities to have their say on Closing the Gap.

The 2019 Closing the Gap consultation will see a new way of doing business, with a focus on community consultations. NSW is embarking on the largest number of membership consultations, more than any other state or territory, with an emphasis on hearing your views about what is needed to make the lives of Aboriginal people better.

Your voices will formulate the NSW submission to the new National Agreement. By talking to Aboriginal people, communities and organisations, CAPO can form a consensus on priority areas from NSW when finalising the new National Agreement on Closing the Gap with governments.

The discussion booklet: ‘A new way of doing business’ provides background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be discussed at the consultations.

The consultations are being supported by the NSW Government.

Come along and join in the conversation. The dates and locations are:

Route 1
Albury Monday 14th Oct
Deniliquin Tuesday 15th Oct
Balranald Wednesday 16th Oct
Griffith Thursday 17th Oct

Route 2
Wagga Wagga Tuesday 15th Oct
Young Wednesday 16th Oct
Queanbeyan Thursday 17th Oct
Batemans Bay Friday 18th Oct

Route 3
Dubbo Tuesday 22nd Oct
Condobolin Wednesday 23rd Oct
Cobar Thursday 24th Oct
Bourke Friday 25th Oct

Route 4
Newcastle Tuesday 22nd Oct
Central Coast Wednesday 23rd Oct
Muswellbrook Thursday 24th Oct
Tamworth Friday 25th Oct

Route 5
Broken Hill Tuesday 29th Oct
Wilcannia Wednesday 30th Oct
Menindee Thursday 31st Oct
Dareton Friday 1st Nov

Route 6
Lismore Monday 28th Oct
Coffs Harbour Tuesday 29th Oct
Kempsey Wednesday 30th Oct

Route 7
Redfern Monday 4th Nov
Mount Druitt Tuesday 5th Nov
Bathurst Thursday 7th Nov

Route 8
Moree Tuesday 5th Nov
Walgett Wednesday 6th Nov

To register your attendance at Routes 1 and 2, please do so via Eventbrite:

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/o/nsw-coalition-of-aboriginal-peak-organisations-16575398239.

Routes 3 to 8 will follow shortly.

Consultations will run from 11am – 3pm with lunch provided.

If you are unable to make the consultations, you can still have your say through an online survey. The survey closes on 25 October, 5pm.

For more information on the Closing the Gap consultations: https://www.aecg.nsw.edu.au/close-the-gap/

Each jurisdiction has structured the events differently, some opting for fewer large events and some opting for a larger number of smaller events.

For more information on The Coalition of Peaks, The Joint Council,

The Partnership Agreement and to sign up for our mailing list, go to: https://www.naccho.org.au/ programmes/coalition-of-peaks/

4 November Applications close for the Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme !

This scholarship provides financial assistance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are intending to enrol or are currently enrolled in an eligible health-related course at an Australian educational institution.

Eligible health areas include:

•             Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health workers and practitioners

•             Allied health (excluding pharmacy)

•             Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)

•             Direct entry midwifery

•             Medicine

•             Nursing

Examples of eligible study areas.

This scholarship is for entry level or graduate entry level courses only. Funding is not available for postgraduate study. Scholarships are valued up to $15,000 per year for the normal duration of the course. Further information, including eligibility and selection criteria can be found our website.

Applications close Monday 4 November 2019

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Monday 4th November 2019 NACCHO Youth Conference *Youth Registration is Free of Charge

The central focus of the NACCHO Youth Conference Healthy youth, healthy future is on building resilience.

For thousands of years our Ancestors have shown great resolve thriving on this vast continent. Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who make up 54% of our population, now look to the example set by generations past and present to navigate ever-changing and complex social and health issues.

Healthy youth, healthy future provides us with opportunities to explore and discuss issues of importance to us, our families and communities, and to take further steps toward becoming tomorrow’s leaders. We hope to see you there!

Registrations are now open for the 2019 NACCHO Youth Conference, which will be held November 4th in Darwin at the Darwin Convention Centre.

Register More Info HERE 

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

 

Tuesday 5th & Wednesday 6th November 2019

7th November 2019 NACCHO AGM

This year, NACCHO’s Members’ Conference focuses on the theme –

Because of them we must: improving health outcomes for our people aged 0-29 years.

We have chosen this focus because we know that investing in the health and wellbeing of our babies, children and young people can help prevent ill health, disease and disability. Strong investment in this age group will help them to thrive, help them build strong and healthy families and communities, and help to positively influence their future health outcomes and life expectancy measures.

Because of them we must provides an opportunity to place our future generations at the forefront of our discussions, to hear about the innovative work that is happening in our community controlled and other sectors, to exchange ideas and share our knowledge.

Registrations to this year’s Youth Conference and the NACCHO National Conference will close on Sunday 20th October 2019.  Late registrations will not be accepted.

We hope you can join us!

Register HERE

If you have any questions or would like further information contact Ros Daley and Jen Toohey on 02 6246 9309 or via email conference@naccho.org.au

Conference Co-Coordinators Ros Daley and Jen Toohey 02 6246 9309

7 November

On Thursday 7 November, following the NACCHO National Members Conference, we will hold the 2019 AGM. In addition to the general business, there will be an election for the NACCHO Chair and a vote on a special resolution to adopt a new constitution for NACCHO.

Once again, I thank all those members who sent delegates to the recent national members’ workshop on a new constitution at Sydney in July. It was a great success thanks to your involvement and feedback.

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #Saveadate : This week 5O Anniversary #AustPH2019 plus lock in #NACCHOAgm19 #NACCHOYouth19 November 4 to 7 #ClosingTheGap #HaveYourSay closes 25 October

Upcoming feature NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

This weeks feature 

25 October Our Coalition of Peaks #HaveYourSay survey on Closing the Gap Closes

This week

15-19 September 50 year of PHAA Annual Conference Adelaide 17 – 19 September #AustPH2019

Next week 

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

30 September Our NACCHO Communique Survey Closes

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand

This weeks feature 

25 October Our Coalition of Peaks #HaveYourSay survey on Closing the Gap Closes

 

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

17-19 September 50 year of PHAA Annual Conference Adelaide 17 – 19 September 

The Australian Public Health Conference (formally the PHAA Annual Conference) is a national conference held by the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) which presents a national and multi-disciplinary perspective on public health issues. PHAA members and non-members are encouraged to contribute to discussions on the broad range of public health issues and challenges, and exchange ideas, knowledge and information on the latest developments in public health.

Through development of public health policies, advocacy, research and training, PHAA seeks better health outcomes for Australian’s and the Conference acts as a pathway for public health professionals to connect and share new and innovative ideas that can be applied to local settings and systems to help create and improve health systems for local communities.

In 2019 the Conference theme will be ‘Celebrating 50 years, poised to meet the challenges of the next 50’. The theme has been established to acknowledge and reflect on the many challenges and success that public health has faced over the last 50 years, as well as acknowledging and celebrating 50 years of PHAA, with the first official gathering of PHAA being held in Adelaide in 1969.

Conference Website 

24- 25 September NACCHO Acting Chair Donnella Mills to be keynote speaker at Health Justice Conference in Sydney 

 

Do you work in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisation or with First Nations communities?

Do you recognise complexity and wonder how to help people with multiple, intersecting need?

Then Health Justice 2019 is for you!

Over 24-25 September in Sydney, this highly engaging program will bring together everyone working at the intersections of legal, health and social need: practitioners, researchers, policy-makers, funders and community members; across disciplines, services, systems and communities.

A fresh approach to conferencing, Health Justice 2019 is less about talking heads and more about opportunities to learn, share and collaborate.

Sessions of particular interest to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and services include:

  • Keynotes from Donnella Mills and Eddie Cubillo, reflecting on their experiences as leaders in Aboriginal community controlled health and legal services and advocating to improve health in their communities
  • Alistair Fergsuon and other voices from collective impact approaches placing communities at the heart and head of responses to increasing social disadvantage, rising crime and community safety fears
  • Roundtable discussion about health justice partnerships and how they are responding to complex and intersecting need
  • Panels and workshops exploring the social determinants of health and how we define outcomes around what communities want
  • Showcasing organisational approaches to improve workforce resilience and targeted workshops to build strategies to support practitioner wellbeing.

Join us to share your insights and be part of the conversation to set new directions for people with intersecting health, social and legal needs and the services that support them.

Registration includes access to highly targeted workshops building capability to work in partnership and to tell the stories about what you do and why it matters.

Visit the conference website to see the full program and register here:healthjustice2019.org/register.

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

30 September Our NACCHO Communique Survey Closes

Our NACCHO Communique has been a great success, and we thank you for being a part of our online community!

We’re in the process of making some changes to the Communique to better provide you with information, and would appreciate your valuable input.

Please take a few minutes to complete the survey to help us launch the new and improved NACCHO Communique.

Click here to start the survey.

Closing date 30 September.

Thank you for your participation!

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

Print

Location:             Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin NT
Theme:                 Disruptive Innovations in Healthcare
Register:              Register Here
Web:                     www.aida.org.au/conference
Enquiries:           conference@aida.org.au

The AIDA 2019 Conference is a forum to share and build on knowledge that increasingly disrupts existing practice and policy to raise the standards of health care.

People with a passion for health care equity are invited to share their knowledges and expertise about how they have participated in or enabled a ‘disruptive innovation to achieve culturally safe and responsive practice or policy for Indigenous communities.

The 23rd annual AIDA Conference provides a platform for networking, mentoring, member engagement and the opportunity to celebrate the achievements of AIDA’S Indigenous doctor and students.

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

 

2019 Marks 10 years since the formation of NATSIHWA and registrations are now open!!!

During the 9 – 10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference will be celebrated at the Convention Centre in Alice Springs

Bursaries available for our Full Members

Not a member?!

Register here today to become a Full Member to gain all NATSIHWA Full Member benefits

Come and celebrate NATSIHWA’s 10 year Anniversary National Conference ‘A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition’ which is being held in Alice Springs. We aim to offer an insight into the Past, Present and Future of NATSIHWA and the overall importance of strengthening the primary health care sector’s unique workforce of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners throughout Australia.

During the 9-10 October 2019 delegates will be exposed to networking opportunities whilst immersing themselves with a combination of traditional and practical conference style delivery.

Our intention is to engage Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in the history and knowledge exchange of the past, todays evidence based best practice programs/services available and envisioning what the future has to offer for all Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Watch this space for the guest speaker line up, draft agenda and award nominations

15-17 October IUIH System of Care Conference

15 October IUIH 10 year anniversary

Building on the success of last year’s inaugural conference, the 2019 System of Care Conference will be focusing on further exploring and sharing the systems and processes that deliver this life changing way of looking at life-long health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

This year IUIH delivers 10 years of experience in improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with proven methods for closing the gap and impacting on the social determinants of health.

The IUIH System of Care is evidence-based and nationally recognised for delivering outcomes, and the conference will share the research behind the development and implementation of this system, with presentations by speakers across a range of specialisations including clinic set up, clinical governance, systems integration, wrap around services such as allied and social health, workforce development and research evidence.

If you are working in:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled health services
  • Primary Health Networks
  • Health and Hospital Boards and Management
  • Government Departments
  • The University Sector
  • The NGO Sector

Watch this video for an insight into the IUIH System of Care Conference.

Download brochure HERE IUIH System of Care Conference 2019 WEB

This year, the IUIH System of Care Conference will be offering a number of half-day workshops on Thursday 17 October 2019, available to conference attendees only. The cost for these workshops is $150 per person, per workshop and your attendance to these can be selected during your single or group registration.

IUIH are also hosting a 10 years of service celebration dinner on Tuesday 15 October – from 6.30-10pm. Tickets for this are $150 per person and are not included in the cost of registration.

All conference information is available here https://www.ivvy.com.au/event/IUIH19/

15 October IUIH 10 year anniversary

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

 

The NACCHO Youth Conference will again take place the day before the Members Conference on Monday 4 November at the Darwin Convention Centre.

The conference theme is Healthy Youth – Healthy Futures and it is a day of learning, sharing, and connecting on health issues affecting young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This year we aim to have around 80 youth delegates attend to hear from guest speakers, voice their ideas and solutions and connect with the other future leaders in the sector.

Registrations will open in early September 2019, so please encourage the young people from your community who you think will benefit attending.

I strongly encourage those who can afford it to arrange for your youth delegates to remain for the Members Conference and AGM so they can increase their understanding of the Sector as a whole and learn how to network and build useful contacts.

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinators Ros Daley and Jen Toohey 02 6246 9309

conference@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

 

As you may be aware, this year’s conference is being held in Darwin on Tuesday 5 and Wednesday 6 of November at the Darwin Convention Centre.

The theme for our conference is Because of Them We Must: Improving Health Outcomes for 0 to 29 Year Olds and will focus on how our Sector is working to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes for children, youth and young adults.

Clearly those in the 0 – 29 year age bracket are a significant proportion of our total population. If we can get their health and wellbeing outcomes right, we should hopefully overtime reduce the comorbidity levels which are so debilitating for so many of our older people.

There are many amazing examples in our sector of how we work with young people. I would like to see us share them at the conference.

Please let us know if you have an idea for a presentation that will highlight innovative and successful work that you do in this area.

To make a submission please complete this online form.

If you have any questions or would like further information contact Ros Daley and Jen Toohey on 02 6246 9309 or via email conference@naccho.org.au

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinators Ros Daley and Jen Toohey 02 6246 9309

conference@naccho.org.au

7 November

On Thursday 7 November, following the NACCHO National Members Conference, we will hold the 2019 AGM. In addition to the general business, there will be an election for the NACCHO Chair and a vote on a special resolution to adopt a new constitution for NACCHO.

Once again, I thank all those members who sent delegates to the recent national members’ workshop on a new constitution at Sydney in July. It was a great success thanks to your involvement and feedback.

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO Our Members #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : Features National @NACCHOChair @KenWyattMP #NSW @ahmrc #RedfernAMS #KatungulACCHO#VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @DeadlyChoices #WA @TheAHCWA #WirrakaMayaACCHO #NT @CAACongress

1.1 National : Minister’s ongoing talks about the Closing the Gap refresh

1.2 National : CEO Pat Turner presents at international Conference in New Zealand about developing a  ” Roadmap to end RHD “

1.3 National : Our Deputy CEO Dawn Casey co chair Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Systems Evaluation: Health Sector Co-design Group (HSCG) Download Communiqué for February 2019

2.1 NACCHO joins Redfern AMS congratulating Aunty Dulcie Flower OAM  on receiving an Order of Australia Medal (OAM)

2.2 NSW : Download the 75 Page AH&MRC report om World No Tobacco Day and the work being done by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) in tobacco control.

2.3 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Fathers and Sons video launched

3.VIC : VACCHO SEWB Gathering for members , training ,celebrating culture and spending time together.

4.1 QLD : QAIHC  Mobile health scoping study to address cardiovascular disease risk factors

4.2 QLD : The Deadly Choices Maroons health campaign being implemented by Community Controlled Health Services throughout Queensland kicks in over coming weeks

5.1 WA : AHCWA recently delivered our Aboriginal Health Worker Immunisation Course at the Bega Garnbirringu Health Service in Kalgoorlie.

5.2 WA : Alfred Barker Chairperson of Wirraka Maya working to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

6.NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs Medical Director on Queens Birthday Honour List

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

 

1.1 National : Minister’s ongoing talks about the Closing the Gap refresh

Our Acting NACCHO Chair Donnella Mills and representatives of the Coalition of Peaks met in Canberra this week with Minister for Indigenous Australians Ken Wyatt for constructive and positive ongoing talks about the Closing the Gap refresh and the Partnership Agreement with the Coalition of Peaks.

1.2 National : CEO Pat Turner presents at international Conference in New Zealand about developing a  ” Roadmap to end RHD “

Our CEO Pat Turner presenting powerful case studies at Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference in NEW Zealand this – keeping governments accountable to community priorities in health

Developing a new Roadmap to end RHD Pat talked about the partnership of NACCHO with the RHD coalition

1.3 National : Our Deputy CEO Dawn Casey co chair Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Systems Evaluation: Health Sector Co-design Group (HSCG) Download Communiqué for February 2019

The Department of Health commissioned a national evaluation of the Australian Government’s investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care, which occurs primarily through the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme.

This evaluation is occurring over four years from 2019-2022 and includes the evaluation team working closely with a Health Sector Co-Design Group (HSCG).

The HSCG’s third meeting in February was the first meeting in the implementation phase of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Systems Evaluation.

After an Acknowledgement of Country and a welcome by the acting co-chairs – Dr Casey and Ms Young – members were invited to discuss what was ‘top of mind’ coming into the meeting.

Download Communique HSCG Meeting No.3 Communique – 2019_05_31

2.1 NACCHO joins Redfern AMS congratulating Aunty Dulcie Flower OAM  on receiving an Order of Australia Medal (OAM)

On behalf of the Aboriginal Medical Service Board, Staff and Community we wish Aunty Dulcie Flower congratulations on receiving an Order of Australia Medal (OAM) on the weekend.

Aunty Dulcie is an AMS founding member, volunteer, a staff member and continues today as a long standing board member.

Dulcie was instrumental in the development of the Aboriginal Health Worker Program, which ensures our communities are advocated and cared for by appropriately skilled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce staff.

Read Dolcie’s interview about Indigenous rights activism HERE

Dulcie has had distinguished career as a Registered Nurse and Lecturer, an activist and mentor, but above all a friend to many.

Congratulations Aunty Dulcie!

2.2 NSW : Download the 75 Page AH&MRC report om World No Tobacco Day and the work being done by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) in tobacco control.

Around the world last month, activities for World No Tobacco Day 2019 put the spotlight on “tobacco and lung health”, aiming to increase awareness of tobacco’s impact on people’s lung health and the fundamental role lungs play for the health and well-being of all people.

The campaign also served as a call to action, advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption and engaging stakeholders across multiple sectors in the fight for tobacco control.

In Australia, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW (AH&MRC) sponsored an innovative Twitter Festival, hosted by Croakey Professional Services, to profile the work being done by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) in tobacco control.

Download the report from Here

NoTobaccoDay_Report_Final

Or from Croakey

https://croakey.org/read-all-about-it-download-the-communitycontrol-twitter-festival-report/

NACCHO social media contribution page 11 -15

2.3 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Fathers and Sons video launched

Katungul Koori Connections Officer Wally Stewart talking about last years Father & Sons Camp; a fantastic program that brings people back to country, helping to keep culture alive and encourage a healthy lifestyle.

Music created by participants of the Katungul Music/Dance program run by Sean Kinchela & Wally Stewart.

Video courtesy of Afterglow. We’d like to thank them for their generosity & partnership – www.afterglow.net.au S

 

3.1 VIC : VACCHO SEWB Gathering for members , training ,celebrating culture and spending time together.

VACCHO’s Whitney Solomon, ETU Program Coordinator SEWB, delivering Ice Prevention training to Victoria’s awesome SEWB Aboriginal Health Workers at VACCHO’s SEWB Gathering


Proud Waywurru woman Sam Paxton from Djimba (in red), guides SEWB Aboriginal Health workers through a yarning circle at our SEWB Gathering

Proud Wagiman man Nathan Patterson from Iluka Art & Design [-o-] leads a painting workshop while proud Gunditjmara woman Laura Thompson from The Koorie Circle teaches SEWB Aboriginal health workers to create contemporary Aboriginal designed and inspired jewellery made from sustainably sourced timber.

So it’s not all work at our SEWB Gatherings, it’s also about celebrating culture and spending time together.

4.1 QLD : QAIHC  Mobile health scoping study to address cardiovascular disease risk factors

“This type of m-health innovation has the potential to provide culturally responsive and appropriate primary health care that can be embedded in our models of care.

Preliminary data suggest m-health technology can increase engagement and ownership throughout the patient journey and facilitate sustainable positive heath behaviour changes.

As cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of disease for First Nations Peoples, we are committed to exploring options that empower individuals to improve the management of their health, as well as improve access to health services.”

Chief Executive Officer of QAIHC, Neil Willmett, is excited about the potential the app has to improve health care access and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with hypertension.

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples taking antihypertensive medication has increased, indicating a rise in the number of people at risk of cardiovascular disease.

The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have partnered on a mobile health (m-health) scoping study for the screening and management of cardiovascular disease.

CSIRO have developed an app that can be customised for blood pressure monitoring and are interested in learning how it could work within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisation (ATSICCHO) sector’s models of care. Specifically, CSIRO and QAIHC are seeking input from the sector about how m-health could help manage risk factors for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with cardiovascular disease.

An m-health based model of care could facilitate blood pressure and medication management in people who have been diagnosed with hypertension, reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Additionally, the scoping study will assess how a m-health based model of care could be adapted or enhanced to support preventative health interventions addressing cardiovascular disease risk factors such as increasing physical activity, improving dietary intake, and reducing smoking rates.

Between April and June 2019, QAIHC and CSIRO are conducting consultations to seek input from regional, remote, and urban ATSICCHOs on the use of m-health for the management of risk factors for people with cardiovascular disease. This feedback will be used to inform development of the hypertension m-health app.

Outcomes of the scoping study will be shared with the ATSICCHO Sector in the coming months.

4.2 QLD : The Deadly Choices Maroons health campaign being implemented by Community Controlled Health Services throughout Queensland kicks in over coming weeks

Two legends of QRL, supporting our state-wide Deadly Maroons campaign.
Book in now for your health check, at a participating AMS and score one of these deadly shirts.

“ The Deadly Maroons health campaign is being implemented by Community Controlled Health Services throughout Queensland and further strengthens delivery of our Deadly Choices messages which aim to empower our people to take control of their health – to stop smoking, to eat healthier and exercise more,”

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health CEO Adrian Carson

The Deadly Choices – Deadly Maroons State-wide preventative health campaign moves full throttle over coming weeks, with a host of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women featuring for Queensland in the annual State of Origin match on Friday June 21 in Sydney, before the men do battle in Perth on Sunday June 23.

Fans will have the opportunity to mix and mingle with all the NRLW superstars this weekend during the QRL’s traditional pre-Origin Fan Day on Sunday at South Pine Sporting Complex at Brendale, where the Deadly Maroons team will also be out in force.

NRLW forward mainstay Tallisha Harden, who was a standout in the Indigenous All Stars match earlier in the year, has made a speedy recovery from ankle surgery to earn her place in the side and is hoping to turn the tables on the Blues this year.

Former Jillaroo and World Cup winner, Jenni-Sue Hoepper returns to the representative scene following an extended maternity break, while livewire centre Amber Pilley caps off a stellar 12 months, earning her first Queensland cap after an NRLW Premiership-winning season with the Brisbane Broncos.

There’s been considerable talk surrounding the injection of Stephanie Mooka, who was a standout at the recent NRLW National Championships and is likely to form a formidable centre pairing with Pilley.

All four proud, Indigenous women advocate the importance of healthy living and are supportive of the Deadly Maroons program, which helps promote healthy lifestyle choices among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“The Deadly Maroons campaign is an amazing partnership initiative between the Queensland Rugby League and the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s Deadly Choices preventative health program,” confirmed Harden.

“As a speech pathologist with the Institute, a representative of the Deadly Maroons and a Deadly Choices Ambassador, I’ve seen first-hand how these programs make a positive difference in the lives of so many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“Winning next Friday is what we’re all about when we go into camp this weekend, but I also know all the girls are aware of the Deadly Maroons campaign and are looking forward to supporting this deadly promotion.”

The support of the women is matched by an unwavering commitment among the men’s team who have already generated immense interest right across Queensland.

“The Deadly Maroons health campaign is being implemented by Community Controlled Health Services throughout Queensland and further strengthens delivery of our Deadly Choices messages which aim to empower our people to take control of their health – to stop smoking, to eat healthier and exercise more,” added Institute for Urban Indigenous Health CEO Adrian Carson.

“Football is so much more than a game – it is a vehicle to drive important health messages for our people and to encourage our people to access their local Community Controlled Health Services for support to make deadly choices, including completing a regular Health Check.

“Our Deadly Choices shirts have played a key role in driving demand for preventative health care, contributing to an incredible 4000% increase in Health Checks in South East Queensland and leading to the expansion of Deadly Choices across Queensland, with support from Queensland and Australian Governments.”

“Through Deadly Choices, we’re making a real difference in closing the health and life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and with the support and commitment of the QRL, and ongoing support from Queensland and Australian Governments, momentum will be enhanced over coming years.”

5.WA : AHCWA recently delivered our Aboriginal Health Worker Immunisation Course at the Bega Garnbirringu Health Service in Kalgoorlie.

The training is run in conjunction with the Communicable Disease Control Directorate Department of Health and is a nationally accredited immunisation course that provides Aboriginal Health Practitioners with the knowledge and skills to promote and safely immunise clients across all ages.

For more information on the course, contact our Immunisation Coordinator, Stacee Burrows at stacee.burrows@ahcwa.org

5.2 WA : Alfred Barker Chairperson of Wirraka Maya working to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD, through supporting their partners not to drink during pregnancy. “‘Grog before, during and after pregnancy is no good for Dad, Mum and bub’.

6.NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs Medical Director on Queens Birthday Honour List

“Congress is very proud to have Dr Sam’s outstanding contribution recognised on the 2019 Queens Birthday Honours list with an OAM” 

Congress Chief Executive Officer, Donna Ah Chee.

Congress Medical Director, Dr Sam Heard has been awarded an Order of Australia Medal in the Queen’s Birthday honours, for his contribution to Medicine. Dr Heard was recognised for his work as a GP across the Northern Territory and his tireless commitment to the education of doctors and other medical staff for over 20 years, particularly through extensive training of GP registrars.

He served 9 years as Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Regional Director and 10 years as Chair of Northern Territory General Practice Education.

As Congress’ Medical Director, Dr Heard is applying his wealth of knowledge and experience to assist Congress in the vital work we are doing in Aboriginal health especially in the recruitment, retention and training of our current and future medical workforce.

 Dr Heard provides clinical leadership to Congress’ 14 clinics in Alice Springs and across six remote Central Australian communities.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO Debate : Who will be the Minister for Indigenous Affairs and Minister for #Indigenous #Health for the incoming Government after 18 May ?

 

 ” Let us not forget that major policies that wreak havoc on communities — like the Northern Territory Intervention and the cashless welfare policies — were enacted with bipartisan support.

While Dodson is a strong voice against laws and policies that harm our people, we cannot ignore that he belongs to a party that has a long history of harming us and voting in favour of policies introduced by the other major party, which harmed us also, under the guise of “for our own good”.

It is disingenuous to lay the fault for oppressive policies solely at the feet of the Coalition, because Labor had their hand in supporting these policies and, in some instances, expanding their scope. Labor has a lot to answer for and only meaningful change can ever address the historical atrocities committed by this organisation.

Labor has not only been historically responsible for policies that oppressed our people but they have been complicit in contemporary oppressive policies “

On Pat Dodson, Labor’s paternalism and avoiding lip service NATALIE CROMB                

Gamilaraay woman and Indigenous affairs editor, Independent Australia. Crikey 

In the final week of the Election 2019 campaign this is the first of our series  “Who will be the Minister for Indigenous Affairs and Minister for Indigenous Health for incoming Government after 18 May ” We welcome your feedback in comments below 

“ Our Shadow Cabinet, guided by our First Nations’ Caucus Committee, has identified targeted and focused initiatives, launched today, that will bring the vision of justice and fairness to the lives of First nations’ peoples.

In education, we have many new and powerful initiatives that work directly to build bridges for the futures of our young people.

Our unprecedented investments in Indigenous health will be community designed and delivered, more than ever before.

Our new policies and programs in the environment will help visitors to understand the complex national cultural web from which our landscapes arise from.

It will be a challenge for us, to do all we have set out in our new policies and programs.

But we will work to achieve that.

We want to be the party of choice for First Nations Peoples “

Senator Patrick Dodson speaking at the Australian Labor Party national launch in Brisbane Sunday full speech HERE and Download policy Document

I have been asked by many about my thoughts on Pat Dodson potentially being minister for Indigenous affairs.

As an outspoken black woman, you best believe I have thoughts — many.

Do I think this is a good thing? Yes. Do I think this is the answer? Hard no on that one.

I am not here to rubbish Dodson, he has a lengthy track record of seeking change for our people. But he is part of the political machine.

He is part of a major party and is beholden to policies drafted about us without us, and because of that I view this announcement by Bill Shorten with the cynicism that is necessary for black fullas.

It is difficult not to be caught up in the exciting prospect of having an Indigenous person holding the role of Indigenous affairs minister after so many years dealing with the farce that has been Nigel Scullion and Tony Abbott but it is essential that we stow our celebrations and consider what this really means in politician speak.

Shorten’s promises

The clue in why we need to be reserved lies in the language of the announcement that Bill Shorten made. Shorten said that paternalism and top-down approaches had failed, which is correct. He also said that “we want to try something different if we get elected”, and stated further “we want to try the idea of Aboriginal-controlled organisations making decisions”.

We need to remember that the words used by politicians are very deliberate, considered and rehearsed. So when Shorten says we “want to try” it sends off alarm bells in my head — he is using this appointment and manner of policy roll-out as an experiment and we are the subjects of this experiment. You might think I am jumping at shadows and consider this rather innocuous but this language and approach is a maintenance of the deficit dynamic.

Bill Shorten does believe he is making a genuine and positive announcement but he doing this from a position of privilege and one where he has not considered change beyond policy roll-out. He has not considered that the issues affecting communities are not “problems” — they are consequences. He has not considered systemic reform to address the failure that is colonisation and the institutions resultant.

What Labor needs to do next

Consequently, it is essential that our support of this announcement be contingent upon it not being mere lip service and change goes beyond merely the manner of policy delivery.

If elected, Labor as a party and as a government needs to have their policies crafted by First Nations drafts people following community consultations with the very communities affected.

Policies should not be broad-brush either; they need to start seeing us for the diverse and vast communities we are. It is not unreasonable for a policy — at the request of the community — to apply solely to that community. Applying a “one size fits all” approach needs to go out the window, along with the viewpoint that we are a problem that needs to be solved.

This announcement does not change anything and we need to remember this and resist tokenism.

Shorten’s announcement is a good one and I do not want to diminish the pride we will all feel when we have one of our own heading up this portfolio. However, the appointment is merely tokenistic if it does not empower Dodson to make structural changes to the way this portfolio operates and to a Labor government should it be elected.

Unless Labor changes the way it operates as a party then this new approach will fail and that failure will be put at the feet of Dodson.

Make no mistake, unless there is change from within the institutions that “govern” this country, all that is happening here is paternalism repackaged. If the intent is to maintain the policies that oppress our people and communities but change the way in which the policies are rolled out, this is simply getting black bodies to do the work of white decision makers. Shorten is not suggesting systemic change here, he is suggesting a change in approach with the delivery of policies — not the policies themselves and herein lies the issue.

While I back Shorten’s announcement, I call upon him and his party for more. Think bigger, more than 200 communities bigger, and then you may grasp how utterly out of your depth you are and see the value in self-determination.

We are not homogenous and have resisted colonial assimilation for over 200 years, perhaps we might know a little something about survival under the worst conditions, and perhaps we could teach a thing or two about how to make this country thrive.

Let me tell you: what we have to teach has nothing to do with capitalism.

NACCHO has developed a set of policy  10 #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

The current health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are unacceptable. 65% of Indigenous people live in rural Australia.

We are calling on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

Our ACCHO TOP 10 key asks of a new Federal Government

Read all the 10 Recommendations HERE

 

NACCHO Members #VoteACCHO #Election2019 #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #NSW @ahmrc @Galambila #Armajun ACCHO #VIC @VACCHO_org @VAHS1972 #NT @CAACongress #KatherineWest #QLD @DeadlyChoices #Gidgee #Mamu #SA #ACT

Feature Article this week from Apunipima ACCHO Cape York leading the way vaccinating the mob against the flu at no cost to the patient

1.1 National :  Report from the recent Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain National Conference 2019 hosted by AMSANT released

1.2 National : Survey Yarning with New Media Technology:
Mediatisation and the emergence of the First Australians’ cyber-corroboree.

1.3 NACCHO calls on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms

2.1 NSW : AHMRC April Edition of Message Stick is out now!

2.2 Brand new Ready Mob team and Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour CEO Reuben Robinson participate in Team Planning & Meet n’ Greet day.

2.3 NSW : Adam Marshall MP  catches up with the team from Inverell-based Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation to discuss their exciting $5.7 million expansion plans

3.1 VIC : VACCHO Launches its #Election 2019 Platform

3.2 VIC : VAHS ACCHO launches new new 2019 Deadly Choices Health Check Shirts

4.1 NT : Katherine West Health Board ACCHO prepare healthy lunches for the kids at Kalkarindji School everyday.

4.2 NT Congress farewells and thanks Sarah Gallagher from our Utju Health Service after 22 years of exceptional service as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

5.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa Comms & Marketing team were up in Doomadgee this week attending the ‘Get Set for School 2020 & Career Expo

5.2 QLD : MAMU Health Service Innisfail celebrates 29 Years of Service to community 

5.3 QLD : Deadly Choices Patrick Johnson say winter is coming!! Book into your local Aboriginal Medical Service ASAP for your flu shot and health check.

6.1 SA : Morrison Government is providing almost $250,000 to three South Australian Aboriginal medical services to replace outdated patient information systems.

7.1 ACT : Download the April edition of our Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter.

8.1 WA: KAMS ACCHO as an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services encourages the use of traditional bush medicines

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

Feature Article this week from Apunipima ACCHO Cape York leading the way vaccinating the mob against the flu at no cost to the patient

The Federal Government has recently announced a program that will ensure almost 170,000 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and adolescents are vaccinated against the flu at no cost to the patient, with an additional provision of $12 million provided to boost a national immunisation education campaign.

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children aged between 6 months and 14 years will have access to the influenza vaccine. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander experience a higher burden from influenza infection and are more likely to be hospitalised with the disease. This funding is a welcomed initiative.

The ‘Get the Facts about Immunisation’ campaign will be delivered over the next three years and will include a national television campaign, to help raise awareness around the benefits and importance of immunisation.

FOR MORE INFO about immunisation

1.1 National :  Report from the recent Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain National Conference 2019 hosted by AMSANT released

The conference report from the recent Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain National Conference 2019 held by Indigenous Eye Health (IEH) and co-hosted by Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) in Alice Springs on 14 and 15 March 2019.

We also include for your interest and information a two-page conference summary report and an A3 poster to celebrate activities at the Conference.

Over two days of the Conference, more than 220 delegates and over 60 speakers from all state and territories and including representation from community, local and regional services, state organisations, national peak and non-government agencies, and government came together to share, learn, and be inspired.

Conference attendance has grown significantly year to year since the first conference (+83%) held in Melbourne in 2017. This increase also reflects over 50 regions, covering more than 80% of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, that are now engaged in activities to close the gap for vision.

IEH would like to thank everyone that attended and contributed to the Conference and especially the speakers for sharing their stories, thoughts and learnings. Congratulations again to our deserved 2019 Leaky Pipe Award winners.

The feedback IEH has received from delegates and speakers has been very positive and supports the joint commitment to close the gap for vision by 2020.

The Conference reports, presentations, photo gallery, and other supplementary materials can be accessed here on IEH website. Please feel free to forward this email and information to your colleagues and networks and we also continue to welcome your further feedback, input and commentary.

We will look forward to welcoming you to the next national conference planned in March 2020 and in the year ahead let’s keeping working together to close the gap for vision.

Hugh R Taylor AC
Harold Mitchell Chair of Indigenous Eye Health
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
The University of Melbourne

1.2 : National : Survey Yarning with New Media Technology:
Mediatisation and the emergence of the First Australians’ cyber-corroboree.

Throughout this study, we use the terms ‘First Australian’ or ‘Indigenous Australian’ when referring to people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage, and ‘Peoples’ when referring to the collective group of Aboriginal nations.

We acknowledge the inadequacy of these homogenising Western terms used to describe such a diverse range of Peoples, languages and cultures.  However, we hope this terminology is sufficient for the purposes of this survey in describing the multi-dimensional relationship that this survey covers. We offer an unreserved apology in lieu of our inadequate terminology causing any undue annoyance or umbrage; this was not our intention.

Take the survey HERE

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FVPD3K6

Any questions or concerns should be addressed to:- keith.robinson2@griffithuni.edu.au

1.3 NACCHO calls on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

See NACCHO Election 2019 Website

2.1 NSW : AHMRC April Edition of Message Stick is out now!

Welcome to the April edition of the Message Stick!

Yaama from me, Dr Merilyn Childs! I recently joined AH&MRC in the role of Senior Research Advisor. This means that I help researchers improve the quality of research applications before they are sent to the AH&MRC Ethics Committee. I’ll be providing Professional Learning Opportunities and resources for researchers, and feedback on applications where appropriate.

While I’m with AH&MRC 3 days a week, I have other roles. For example, I’m Honorary Associate Professor at Macquarie University, and I’m on Academic Board for the newly proposed College of Health Sciences at the Education Centre of Australia.

As I write this, I think of my mother Helen. When I was a child in the 1960s, Helen taught me about racism, stolen land, and stolen Aboriginal lives and languages. She was a passionate advocate of land rights. With her, and my two-year-old toddler, I marched as an ally of First Nations people on January 26th, 1988 in Sydney.

Two decades later at Charles Sturt University I was fortunate enough to work for some years with the amazing team embedding Indigenous Cultural Competence into curriculum. Because of them I continued the journey I began with my mother as I tried respectfully to develop ‘yindiamarra winhanga-nha’ – the wisdom of respectfully knowing how to live well in a world worth living in, from the voices of the Wiradjuri people’. In 2015 I joined Macquarie University and collaborated with Walanga Muru colleagues to amplify Aboriginal voices in Higher Degree Research training.

I feel privileged to continue my journey working at AH&MRC with warm and amazing colleagues and with those of you I meet in the future, to improve the quality of research applications that are submitted to the AH&MRC Ethics Committee.

Read View HERE

2.2 Brand new Ready Mob team and Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour CEO Reuben Robinson participate in Team Planning & Meet n’ Greet day.

Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour CEO Reuben Robinson joined in the interactive activities and shared his vision for Ready Mob and Galambila  in moving forward in service of our communities. SEE FACEBOOK PAGE

2.3 NSW : Adam Marshall MP  catches up with the team from Inverell-based Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation to discuss their exciting $5.7 million expansion plans

Adam Marshall MP  catches up with the team from Inverell-based Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation to discuss their exciting $5.7 million expansion plans last week.

Armajun is planning to build a new and expanded health service centre next door to its current premises in River Street to cater for for patients and offer more health services to the community.

Part of this will be a $400,000 expanded dental clinic, which Adam will be approaching the State Government to fund.

Armajun provides services to many communities across the Northern Tablelands and do a wonderful job!

3.1 VIC : VACCHO Launches its #Election 2019 Platform

It’s out! We’ve just published our #auspol  #AusVotes2019  Election Platform.
Read all about what Aboriginal Communities need from the Federal Government to improve our health and wellbeing, to not just Close the Gap, but eliminate it all together.
Sustainability, Prevention Accountability to & for us.
Download HERE

3.2 : VAHS ACCHO launches new new 2019 Deadly Choices Health Check Shirts

VAHS, Essendon Football Club and The Long Walk have continued to work collaboratively that empowers our community to be more aware of their personal and family health by completing an annual health assessment.

An annual Health Assessment is a deadly way to monitor your own health and identify or prevent a chronic disease. Plus its 100% free if you complete this health assessment at VAHS. Anyone can complete an Health Check.

We have plenty of shirts for our mob all year, so don’t stress if you have completed an Health Check recently. You only allowed an annual Health Check every 9 months. Ring VAHS on 9419-3000 if you’re due for a health check.

Also we have another exciting news to announce very soon. Stay tune

4.1 NT : Katherine West Health Board ACCHO prepare healthy lunches for the kids at Kalkarindji School everyday.

This is Gabrielle and Mary they help prepare healthy lunches for the kids at Kalkarindji School everyday.  They are both great cooks and are working with myself to make their meals high iron and vitamin C so kids can have strong blood to learn and play.
#oneshieldforall

4.2 NT Congress farewells and thanks Sarah Gallagher from our Utju Health Service after 22 years of exceptional service as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

For 22 years with us, Sarah has been delivering culturally safe and responsive health care and programs to her people in the Utju community.

Born and raised in Utju, Sarah commenced her training as an AHP in the Utju Clinic, received her Certificate IV in AHP and progressed her career as a senior health practitioner and clinic manager.

In 2014 Sarah was a finalist at the ATSIHP Awards in the excellence in remote service delivery category. Sarah remains committed to the health and wellbeing of her people as elected Chairperson of the Utju Health Services board.

5.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa Comms & Marketing team were up in Doomadgee this week attending the ‘Get Set for School 2020 & Career Expo’

Was lovely to see so many people and services attend this event. If you pop down to the Gidgee Healing stall Guy Douglas our new Practice Manager at Doomadgee Clinic, Andrew, Trish or Gavin would be happy to help you fill in birth registration forms. There are a few goodies also so please go check them out and say hello.

5.2 QLD : MAMU Health Service Innisfail celebrates 29 Years of Service to community 

5.3 QLD : Deadly Choices Patrick Johnson say winter is coming!! Book into your local Aboriginal Medical Service ASAP for your flu shot and health check.

Make a Deadly Choices a healthy choice and get your DC beanie.

I’m sporting my North Queensland Toyota Cowboysbeanie what DC beanie are you sporting? Institute of Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH)

6.1 SA : Morrison Government is providing almost $250,000 to three South Australian Aboriginal medical services to replace outdated patient information systems.

Picture Above Minister Ken Wyatt visit earlier this year 

Ensuring high quality primary health care, delivered in a culturally competent way, is a key to improving the health and wellbeing of First Australians.

Federal Member for Grey Rowan Ramsey said it was important that all medical services across Australia were provided with the right tool kit to do their work.

“As a result of this announcement three Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in Grey, Nunyara in Whyalla, Pika Wiya in Port Augusta and and the Ceduna Kooniba Health Service will receive assistance to install new “state-of-the-art” patient record keeping systems”, Mr Ramsey said. “The efficiency of any good health system is dependent on good record-keeping and accurate, easy-to-access patient information.

“Streamlined modern information systems will enable healthcare professionals to gain instant, secure, and efficient access to the medical and treatment histories of patients. This can be especially valuable where we have transingent populations as is particularly the case with some indigenous families.”

This funding through the Morrison Government’s Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme will contribute to new systems to provide better patient care.

Under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme, the Morrison Government funds around 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services across Australia to provide culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care services to First Australians.

The Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt said the Federal Government is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities to develop practical, evidence-based policy and deliver programs that will make a real difference to the lives of First Australians.

”It is part of our focus on closing the gap and supporting culturally appropriate primary health care and programs,” Mr Wyatt said.

“Good health is a key enabler in supporting children to go to school, adults to lead productive working lives, and in building strong and resilient communities.”

The Morrison Government is providing $4.1 billion to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the next four years.

7.1 ACT : Download the April edition of our Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter.

 

April edition of our Winnunga Newsletter.

Read or Download Winnunga AHCS Newsletter April 2019 (1)

Please also note that the details for Winnunga’s National Sorry Day Bridge Walk for 2019 is included in this newsletter, so please Save the Date and join us.

8.1 WA: KAMS ACCHO as an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services encourages the use of traditional bush medicines

 ” Back in 2017 when I found some funding ($3,000) to start the idea of making some Bush medicine with a couple of ex- AHW’s at Balgo, was a very exciting time for us and them.

 The Bush medicines an integral part of Aboriginal culture and traditional customs.

Jamilah Bin Omar Acting SEWB Manager Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd.

 As an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services encourages the use of traditional bush medicines and talk up the bush medicine information through the Certificate III and Cert. IV Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Program under the competency units;

  • Support the safe use of medicines
  • Administer medicines

Myself and Joanna Martin (Pharmacist) from the KAMS Pharmacy Support team spent one week in Balgo working with the community Women Elders to make three different types of bush medicines.  These were;

  • Piltji (used on all parts of the body to heal internal injuries, organs, arthritis and many other problems)
  • Ngurnu Ngurnu (used for cold and flu and rubbed on the chest and head)
  • Yapilynpa (used as a rub on the chest and head for the relief of colds and headaches)

At the completion, bush medicines became available in the Balgo Health Centre, for patients to select and use individually or in conjunction with western medicine.

The Bush Medicines program is an opportunity for KAMS staff to collaborate with community members.  It will provide a forum for traditional practices to be used and passed onto future generations.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO : With only 15 days to #Election2019 how do the major parties’@LiberalAus and @AustralianLabor Indigenous health election commitments stack up

” It’s difficult to identify major differences between the two parties’ Indigenous health promises. The likely impact of these polices is also hard to gauge given the significant role played by state and territory governments in service delivery.

Labor has promised to support Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations but specific details have not been announced.

Labor’s significant funding pledge for rheumatic heart disease, though, makes their Indigenous health offering perhaps slightly more likely to achieve health gains than the Coalition’s.”

David Coombs PhD candidate in Nura Gili Indigenous Studies, UNSW Diana Perche Senior Lecturer and Academic Coordinator, Nura Gili Indigenous Programs Unit, UNSW from The Conversation

See Part 2 below

And read all 17 NACCHO Election Articles HERE

Eleven years after Australia adopted the Closing the Gap strategy, many pressing First Nations health issues remain unresolved.

The gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous life expectancy, currently 10.8 years for men and 10.6 years for women, is actually widening.

Similarly, the target to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous child mortality has not been met. The Indigenous rate of 164 deaths per 100,000 children aged 0-4 years is still 2.4 times the non-Indigenous rate of 68 deaths per 100,000 in this age group.

The causes of Indigenous health inequality are complex. They stem from social determinants such as employment, education, social inclusion, and access to traditional land, rather than strictly biomedical causes.

Government policies have a critical role to play here. But funding cuts, policy incoherence, and governments retaining control over resources and decision-making explain why the gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health outcomes are not closing.

Regardless of who wins the federal election on May 18, these enduring health issues affecting Indigenous Australians will require sustained and concerted policy attention.

A look at the major parties’ policy promises reveals some signs of hope, but also plenty of room for improvement.

Read more: Three reasons why the gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians aren’t closing

The Coalition’s commitments

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups criticised the lack of Indigenous-specific health measures in the Morrison government’s first budget detailed in April.

The budget did include A$35 million for First Nations solutions to family violence, and A$10 million for the Lowitja Institute for health research.

Indigenous youth suicide remains an urgent policy concern, with Indigenous children five times more likely to die in this way than non-Indigenous children. A coronial inquest recently identified complex causes including intergenerational trauma, poverty, and problems stemming from the home environment.

Read more: Indigenous health leaders helped give us a plan to close the gap, and we must back it

The Coalition’s budget committed A$5 million over four years to address Indigenous youth suicide. This figure has since been increased to A$42 million following criticism from First Nations organisations and advocates.

Meanwhile, the budget directed A$129 million towards the expansion of a cashless welfare card system that operates in a number of Aboriginal communities. The card quarantines 80% of welfare recipients’ income for use in government-approved stores, and on government-approved items, to prevent spending on alcohol, cigarettes and gambling. This decision was taken despite a lack of evidence these cards reduce social harm or public expenditure.

The government also made some pre-budget commitments around Indigenous health. These included:

The Coalition also honoured a previous commitment of A$550 millionfor remote housing in the Northern Territory.

The Morrison government deserves some credit for its part in reaching an agreement between the Council of Australian Governments and a coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak organisations in December 2018.

This agreement commits governments and Indigenous peak bodies to shared decision-making and joint accountability in devising and working towards new Closing the Gap targets.

Read more: Budget 2019 boosts aged care and mental health, and modernises Medicare: health experts respond

Labor’s commitments

In keeping with its election campaign emphasis on health spending, Labor recently announced a A$115 million Indigenous health package.

The package includes almost A$30 million to reduce Indigenous youth suicide and mental ill-health.

It also offers A$33 million to address rheumatic heart disease, a preventable condition that disproportionately affects Indigenous children. The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) highlighted rheumatic heart disease as one of ten Indigenous health priorities for this election.

Labor has also promised A$20 million for sexual health promotion in northern Australia, A$13 million to combat vision loss, and A$16.5 million for the “Deadly Choices” initiative, which aims to prevent chronic disease through education.

Further, the opposition has announced a compensation scheme and healing fund for surviving members of the Stolen Generations and their families. This could help manage the effects of intergenerational trauma.

What’s lacking

Both parties’ funding commitments must be assessed in the context of the 2014 budget cut of more than A$500 million dollars to Indigenous affairs by the then Coalition government, which only the Greens have committed to restoring.

Impacts have been severe for specific programs, especially those run at the community level. These include youth services in Maningrida (NT) and employment and training programs in Inala (Queensland).

Funding for crucial Indigenous health infrastructure and capital works is also lacking, with the current shortfall estimated at A$500 million. Many Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services are run from old buildings in desperate need of upgrades to accommodate increasing patient numbers and rising demand for services. The Coalition recently announced an incremental increase to infrastructure funding, but much more is needed.

Neither the Coalition nor Labor has made any substantial commitment to a national Indigenous housing strategy. Inadequate, insecure and poor quality housing worsens physical and mental health through overcrowding, inadequate heating and cooling, injury hazards, and stress.

Similarly, both parties have been silent on reducing poverty in Indigenous communities. Poverty is another social determinant that contributes to Indigenous physical and mental ill-health, as well as high incarceration levels.

What about self-determination?

Labor has stated it will prioritise Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations as the vehicles for delivering much needed health services.

As the Close the Gap steering committee’s shadow report emphasised, “when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are involved in the design of the services they need, we are far more likely to achieve success”.

The Coalition has been silent on the issue of community control, and funding reforms under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy and the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme have destabilised the position of Aboriginal organisations.

Read more: The Coalition’s report card on health includes some passes and quite a few fails

Community control is threatened by the government’s focus on competitive tendering, where First Nations organisations compete with “mainstream” service providers trying to secure contracts to deliver Indigenous health services.

Neither the Coalition nor Labor has outlined a response to these structural issues.

Part 2

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.”

Our ACCHO TOP 10 key asks of a new Federal Government

1.The incoming Federal Government must increase funding of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations to deliver primary health care services across Indigenous communities.

2.The incoming Federal Government must increase funding for capital works, infrastructure upgrades and Telehealth services through the Indigenous Australians Health Programme.

  1. The incoming Federal Government must end rheumatic heart disease by funding preventive health programs within 15 rural and remote communities across the country.

4.The incoming Federal Government must invest in ACCHOs, so we can address youth suicide

5.The incoming Federal Government must improve Indigenous housing and community infrastructure

6.The incoming Federal Government must allocate Indigenous specific health funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.

7.The incoming Federal Government must Close the Gap at this Federal election by increasing range and access to Medicare items for Indigenous health workers and Aboriginal health practitioners.

8.The incoming Federal Government must improve Indigenous Pharmacy Programs

9.The incoming Federal Government fund Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations deliver dental services.

10.The incoming the Federal Government must support the development of an Indigenous Workforce Employment Strategy

Read all the 10 Recommendations HERE