NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts as at 6 March 2019 : This week features AMSA and @AIDAAustralia Team Up to Promote Indigenous Health and Workforce #NSW Bourke ACCHO CEO #WA @TheAHCWA #NT #Anyinginyi #Sunrise ACCHO @DanilaDilba @CAACongress @MiwatjHealth #NSW #Yerin ACCHO @Galambila

Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1. ACCHO Employment NEWS

1.1 Job/s of the week 

1.2 NT Aboriginal Health Practitioner Scholarships. Close March 11

2.Queensland

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1. NACCHO Employment News: 

The Australian Medical Students’ Association (AMSA) and the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) have renewed their agreement to work together to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing and provide support for Indigenous Australian medical students.

AIDA President, Dr Kristopher Rallah-Baker, and AMSA President, Jessica Yang, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) during AIDA’s Student Representative Committee (SRC) Meeting at Old Parliament House in Canberra on 1 March.

Ms Yang said that the MOU is a joint commitment to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

“AMSA and AIDA are committed to ongoing collaboration on crucial policy issues, including the recruitment and retention of Indigenous medical students,” Ms Yang said.

“AMSA is also committed to increasing the accessibility to our events for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander medical students,” Ms Yang said.

Representatives from all of Australia’s 22 medical schools last year voted in favour of AMSA’s 2019 National Priorities forming the basis for AMSA’s advocacy. Australian medical students have consistently identified the health of Australia’s Indigenous people as a critical priority.

Ms Yang said that AMSA has also launched its Indigenous Health Project, a joint initiative between AMSA and AIDA to improve AMSA’s engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and strengthen relationships between AIDA and Australian medical societies.

“AMSA’s Indigenous Health Project is an important initiative, led by AIDA, to improve AMSA’s support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students,” Ms Yang said.

“We acknowledge the outstanding contributions from AIDA members, Ben Jones, Megan Kent, and Russell Thompson, and 2018 AMSA President, Alex Farrell, in bringing this project to life.”

AIDA is the peak representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander medical students and doctors in Australia. AIDA is a not-for-profit association working towards equitable health and life outcomes, and the cultural wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

AMSA is the peak representative body of Australia’s 17,000 medical students.

Both organisations aim to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander medical students, with a focus on increasing the recruitment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, and providing support to current students.

Callouts for AMSA Indigenous Health Project are now open!

MSA are seeking passionate and skilled medical students who are looking for an opportunity to contribute to how AMSA engages with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and supports Indigenous Australian medical students.

The Australian Medical Students’ Association (AMSA) and the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) are excited to announce that applications are now open for the inaugural AMSA Indigenous Health Project team! We are seeking passionate and skilled medical students who are looking for an opportunity to contribute to how AMSA engages with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and supports Indigenous Australian medical students.

These positions are open to all medical students, regardless of the stage you are at in your degree. Most importantly, there is no prior experience in either AMSA or AIDA required for the role!

For this project team we are seeking:

  • 3-4 team members (applicants may be Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander or non-Indigenous)
  • One Indigenous team member will be invited to be the Lead Project Coordinator. This person will also need to be a member of AIDA. The following are additional application requirements:
  • A maximum 1-page expression of interest outlining why you are passionate about joining this team
  • Curriculum Vitae (maximum 2 pages)
  • A brief informal teleconference interview with a small interview panel comprising of both the AMSA President and AIDA Student Director.

Applications close 12 March 2019 at 11.59 pm and are to be emailed to benjamin.jones@aida.org.au.

Further details here.

1.1 Jobs of the week 

Chief Executive Officer : Bourke Aboriginal Health Service

About the business

The Bourke Aboriginal Community Health Service is an Aboriginal Community Controlled organisation established in November 1986 and incorporated on 19th day of October 1987 as a public company limited by guarantee.

The service is Aboriginal community controlled overseen by a body of Nine Directors who meet on a monthly basis.

Bourke Aboriginal Health Service has been in operation since 1986 delivering a highly professional Health Service to the Aboriginal community of Bourke and district, with a focus on Primary Health Care, Chronic Disease and specialist services.

About the role

This role will be responsible and accountable to the Bourke Aboriginal Health Service (BAHS) Board for the leadership, and efficient and effective management of the organisation in accordance with strategic directives, policies and procedures, as well as legislative and funding requirements.

Skills and experience

  • Pursuant to Section 14 of the Anti Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) the person must be of Aboriginal descent. Confirmation of Aboriginality from a recognised organisation must be provided in the application
  • Relevant tertiary qualifications in management, health management, business or similar discipline with a minimum of five years senior management experience
  • Proven ability to provide advice, making sound recommendations and implementing Board directions on complex issues, developing and implementing strategic, project and business plans
  • Proven high level of experience in a senior management role demonstrating excellent strategic thinking, planning and decision making skills
  • High level experience in managing the financial affairs of an organisation, including budgeting, financial management and reporting, and ensuring compliance with legal and funding obligations
  • Proven ability to take a lead role in communicating in high level meetings, committees and forums within Aboriginal communities, government departments and other agencies
  • Exemplary personal and professional ethics and conduct
  • Ability to promote a work environment that empowers, motivates and develops the diverse talents of all employees as well as implementing strategies that maximize staff performance
  • Current Class C Drivers Licence

How to apply

Applications must be received by BAHS by the closing of business 05 April 2019. Late applications will not be considered.

Contact person for enquiries re the position: Robert Knight, Chair Person (Board)

Applications to be sent to:

Post to (mark envelope Private and Confidential):-

Mr. Robert Knight Chair Person Bourke Aboriginal Health Service

P O Box 362

BOURKE NSW 2840

Personal Delivery (mark envelope Private and Confidential):-

Ms. Melanie Driscoll Human Resource Officer Bourke Aboriginal Health Service

61 Oxley Street

BOURKE NSW 2840

Email:

Application for position: melanied@bahs.com.au – Human Resource Officer

Enquiries re position: Zacmo@bahs.com.au – Corporate Services Manager

Health Services Section Manager  : Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation (AHAC)

Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation (AHAC) is a multi-disciplinary organisation which provides primary health care services to the Aboriginal people of Tennant Creek and the surrounding Barkly region.

Anyinginyi consists of five different sections (Health Centre, Corporate Services, Public Health Unit, Sports and Recreation, and Piliyintinji-Ki Stronger Families) which allows them to have an holistic approach to health ensuring that clients’ physical and emotional health and wellbeing is given the utmost priority.

About the Opportunity

Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation has an exciting opportunity for a full time Health Services Section Manager to join their team based in Tennant Creek, on a 2 year contract basis.

As a member of the Anyinginyi Executive Leadership Team and reporting to the General Manager, this position will see you managing the staff and resources of the Anyinginyi Health Services (Health Centre, RRHS and allied health), to ensure a high standard of care is provided in a culturally responsive manner. You will work closely with fellow Section Managers in multi-servicing needs for Anyinginyi clients.

More specifically, some of your duties will include but not be limited to:

  • Ensuring strategic links are established and maintained with funding bodies and other service providers working in the areas associated with Primary Health Care, especially the internal liaison and service coordination between Anyinginyi Sections;
  • Preparing and managing budgets and monitoring Funding Agreement compliance, including reporting requirements;
  • Communicating Board and senior management decisions to staff and provide Board and senior management with regular status reports on the program, as directed by the General Manager;
  • Effectively manage the staff and resources of Health Services Section including attraction and retention of employees.

To be considered for this position, you will have considerable, Executive-Level experience delivering primary health care services, within the not-for-profit sector and/or within Aboriginal community-controlled organisations.

To view the full position description, please click ‘apply now’.

About the Benefits

This is a highly varied and interesting role where you will truly make a difference in the lives of Aboriginal people and experience real job satisfaction every day – don’t miss out!

In return for your hard work and dedication, you will be rewarded with attractive remuneration circa $129,684-$145,827 + super, negotiable with skills and experience. In addition, you will have access to a range of great benefits including:

  • Salary packaging up to $15,899.94;
  • Subsidised furnished accommodation is available for candidates coming from outside of the Barkly region;
  • 6 weeks annual leave giving you plenty of time to explore the beautiful Barkly region;
  • Vehicle provided for full work and private use (up to 2500km per year);
  • One paid ADO monthly;
  • Free general medical;
  • Free general dentistry (excluding laboratory work);
  • Free gym membership; and
  • Free personal medical prescriptions (conditions apply).

You will be joining a friendly and professional team, where you will also receive personal and professional development opportunities.

This opportunity won’t last long – if you think you have what it takes – apply now!

Please note: When responding to the application questions, please refer to the selection criteria on page 2 of the attached position description.

APPLY HERE and MORE INFO

Anyinginyi now has an opportunity for a Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) Education Officer to join their team in Tennant Creek

https://www.seek.com.au/job/38324401?searchrequesttoken=5aa68c59-b287-4a82-9836-ae10fb10fdf9&type=standard

The Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service (PAMS) currently has an opportunity available for a Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) Project Officer to join the team.


With an administrative hub based in Newman, PAMS provides holistic primary health care to the individuals and families within the remote communities of Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji.  As the Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) Project Officer, you will manage the coordination, planning, development, implementation and evaluation of the TIS Programme in collaboration with Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (WMHSAC).

Key responsibilities will include (but not be limited to) the following:

• Ensuring that constant review of the programme is undertaken to ensure that milestones and KPI’s are met.
• Developing action plans and continual quality improvement (CQI) plans to ensure that strategies are implemented to meet the funding requirements.
• Identifying and developing networks at a local, regional, state and national level with respect to Tackling Indigenous Smoking.
• Implementing a range of strategies and interventions that support the prevention of smoking, reduction of nicotine use or quitting smoking.
• In conjunction with other stakeholders and service providers develop mechanisms to provide health promotion information to different age groups and tailor messages accordingly. ie young mothers, young children, young adults etc.

For more information and to apply, click on the following link:
https://ahcwa.applynow.net.au/jobs/AHCWA254
Applications close 5pm Sunday 10 March 2019

CATSINaM Nursing and Midwife jobs in all States and Territories

The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) is the sole representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives in Australia.

CATSINaM’s primary function is to implement strategies to increase the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into nursing and midwifery professions.

Search Here by State and Territory 

Yerin ACCHO Health Promotions Officer

The role of the Health Promotions Officer is to promote wellbeing within the community and to promote awareness of issues and behaviours that impact upon the health outcomes of the Aboriginal and Torres Islander community on the NSW Central Coast. This will be achieved by working closely with staff to plan and implement community activities and awareness raising activities.

To be successful for this role you will

  • Qualifications and / or related experience in Health Promotion or Public Health
  • Demonstrated experience in delivering health promotion, with a clear understanding of the health promotion duties and responsibilities of the role
  • Patient-centred approach to evidence-based care delivery
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively within a multidisciplinary environment
  • Police check clearance

You’ll also have access to salary sacrificing options up to $15,950 to increase the value of your take home pay.

All applicants MUST obtain an application pack and complete all information contained in the pack, prior to lodging your application for the position.  DO NOT APPLY VIA SEEK

This is an identified Position under Section 9A of the NSW Anti-Discrimination Act 1977.

For a confidential discussion about the position please contact Belinda Field, CEO Ph: 02 43511040.

Click here to download the Position Description.

Click here to download the Employment Package. Alternatively, contact Jo Stevens via email at recruitment@yerin.org.auor Ph: 02 4351 1040.

Job Applications close 5pm 8th March 2019

Sunrise ACCHO Katherine : Intensive Family Support Service Manager

Job No: 108693 – https://applynow.net.au/jobs/108693

Applications close : Check with ACCHO

Location: Katherine

* Leadership opportunity for a Social Worker or Psychologist – join this established Community Controlled Health Organisation!

* Truly rewarding position focusing on community development & empowerment!

* Highly attractive base salary circa $102,921 – $115,267 + super, salary sacrificing options, generous leave & more!

About the Organisation

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is a Community Controlled Health Organisation.

The Sunrise approach involves community people taking part in controlling their own health. Everything from financial management and governance, staff selection and service delivery priorities are directed by the organisation’s Aboriginal Board and Community Health Committees.

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation works in partnership with Northern Territory PHN (NT PHN), who provide support services to health professionals and organisation across the Northern Territory. NT PHN offers support and assistance to eligible nurses and allied health professionals who are relocating to the NT for the purposes of employment.

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation has a rewarding opportunity for an Intensive Family Support Service Manager to join their dedicated team. This position is based in Katherine, however a large amount of time will be spent within the Ngukurr community, where accommodation will be provided for any overnight stays.

The primary purpose of this role is to provide Intensive Family Support Service (IFSS) assessment service interventions and counselling-related services. This includes home-based and community-based intensive services targeted to reduce child neglect, with a focus on improving parental skills and how to provide better care for children.

You will step into this position with the aim to build on and improve the existing program, rather than creating a new program from scratch. Your ultimate goal will be to develop key strategies in order to evolve the program to a point where the delivery of the service provision is transferred wholly to a local and sustainable community level service delivery model.

Some of your key responsibilities will include (but will not be limited to):

* Managing the IFSS Program including budgets, reporting and data analysis;

* Accepting referrals and undertaking assessments, developing plans and delivering services/activities for clients who have been referred to the program;

* Ensuring effective health promotion delivery and improved program outcomes;

* Providing advice to support, manage, direct and up-skill IFSS staff;

* Liaising regularly with senior elders for strategic or program issues; and

* Acting as an effective conduit between the Federal Department of Social Services (DSS), NT DCF, the Primary Health Care Manager, the Ngukurr Community and its service provider agencies. To view a full position description, please go to https://applynow.net.au/jobs/108693

About You

To be considered for this role, you must have a background and qualification in Social Work, Mental Health Social Work or Psychology, while a background in Child Protection or working with disadvantaged groups will be highly regarded.

Previous experience working with children and their families is essential, as is experience working within Aboriginal communities.

Sunrise is seeking an individual who can display the initiative, discretion and cultural sensitivity needed to support and drive this important program. You will be comfortable living in a remote environment and working under Aboriginal management and control. The ability to build capacity of both staff and the community will be critical to your success in this role.

In addition, as you’ll be providing in depth support and clinical guidance to your reports in adverse and high pressure situations, strong leadership skills and demonstrated clinical experience at a supervisory level is required.

About the Benefits

This is an incredible opportunity to work closely with, and build the capacity of, a remote Aboriginal community in order to improve their health and wellbeing.

Your dedication will be rewarded with a highly attractive base salary circa $102,921 – $115,267 (based on skills and experience) plus super.

You will also have access to a wide range of benefits including:

* 6 weeks leave per year;

* Up to 10 days study leave;

* Access to company vehicle for work-related travel;

* Laptop and Phone;

* Accommodation for any overnight stays while working in the communities;

* Salary packaging options up to $15,899 per year.

Working at Sunrise Health Service and living in the Katherine region has lifestyle benefits that are unique to the Northern Territory. With the Katherine Gorge on your doorstep and an incredible outdoor lifestyle on offer, combined with some of the best fishing in the world, the Northern Territory is the place to be to make the most of life’s adventures.

Don’t miss out on these unique opportunities in which you can truly make a difference – Apply Now! For more information, and to apply, please go to https://applynow.net.au/jobs/108693

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health : Child and Adolescent Psychologist

 

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services is a community controlled health service providing holistic health care to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the ACT and surrounding areas. The Service manages approximately 30 programs through various funding agreements and employs more than 70 staff offering salary sacrifice pursuant to tax department regulations and organisational policy.

Child and Adolescent Psychologist

The role of the Child and Adolescent Psychologist is to enhance the clinical services offered at Winnunga AHCS through working in collaboration with the multidisciplinary team in the delivery of psychology services to young clients and their families. This includes work on an individual basis to provide high level clinical consultations and therapeutic support to children, adolescents and their families to address mental health and wellbeing needs.

We are seeking an experienced Child and Adolescent Psychologist to work within our Clinical and Social Health Teams. The successful applicant will have registration as a psychologist with AHPRA, eligible for a Medicare provider number have sound clinical assessment and treatment skills and competency in evidence-based psychological treatments. Experience in trauma informed practice and experience working with and understanding and commitment to the philosophy and practice of an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service and the ability to work sensitively and effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Previous experience working in mental health and a demonstrated ability to work in a multidisciplinary team is desirable.

A current driver’s licence is essential.

A copy of the position descriptions and selection criterias may be obtained by calling Roseanne Longford on 02 62846259 or email to Roseanne.Longford@winnunga.org.au Applications should be addressed and mailed to Julie Tongs, CEO, Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service 63 Boolimba Cres Narrabundah ACT 2604 or by email to Roseanne.Longford@winnunga.org.au

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 29th March 2019

WORKING WITH VULNERALBLE PEOPLE CHECK (WWVPC)

All people employed at Winnunga are required to provide their WWVPC registration, or to carry out a WWVPC pursuant to the Working With Vulnerable People (Background Checking) Act 2011 (ACT).

Galambila are recruiting for Aboriginal Health Workers – Do you know anyone who has a passion for working with out communities and focusing on health promotion activities?

This is an exciting opportunity to join our Ready Mob team.

We are recruiting across the region so vacancies at Port Macquarie (co located with our partner Werin Aboriginal Corporation Medical Clinic) Kempsey and here at Coffs Harbour.

1.2 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships News 

The Territory Labor Government is boosting health services with applications now open for Aboriginal Health Practitioner Scholarships.

Aboriginal Health Practitioners play a crucial role as cultural brokers and agents of change ensuring comprehensive primary health care is provided and culturally appropriate health care is delivered through prevention, early detection and early intervention.

The scheme aims to build the capacity and capability of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Health Practitioner profession and workforce.

There are four scholarships available, providing students with $5000 per year over two years of study for the Certificate IV Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice).

The Scholarship provides financial support to students studying the Cert IV Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice).

Apply and more info HERE 

Applications close 11 March 2019,

2.1 JOBS AT Apunipima ACCHO Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

 

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited has been providing primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for over 35 years. Our workforce has a range of professional, clinical, allied health, social emotional wellbeing and administration positions.

  • We have two sites in Cairns and a growing number of supplementary services and partnerships.
  • We have a diverse workforce of over 200 employees
  • 70 percent of our team identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people

Our team is dedicated to the Wuchopperen vision: Improving the Quality of Life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. If you would like to make a difference, and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, please apply today.

Expressions of Interest

We invite Expressions of Interest from:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Clinical Psychologists
  • Dietitians
  • Diabetes Educators
  • Exercise Physiologists
  • Medical Officers (FAACGP / FACCRM)
  • Registered Nurses
  • Midwives
  • Optometrists
  • Podiatrists
  • Speech Pathologists

In accordance with Wuchopperen’s privacy processes, we will keep your EOI on file for three months.

 Current Vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 30 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3  JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

 

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 2 POSITIONS VACANT

.

http://www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies

 

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

Check website for current Opportunities

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service (GWAHS) is an entity of Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service. GWAHS provides a culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care service for the local Aboriginal communities of western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains. GWAHS provides multidisciplinary services from sites located in Mt Druitt and Penrith.

The clinical service model includes general practitioners (GPs), Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, nursing staff, reception and transport staff. The service also offers a number of wraparound services and programs focused on child and maternal health, social and emotional wellbeing, Drug and Alcohol Support, chronic disease, as well as population health activities.

GWAHS is committed to ensuring that patients have access to and receive high quality, culturally appropriate care and services that meet the needs of local Aboriginal communities.

WEBSITE

8. Tasmania

 

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

 

Download the 4 Page PDF Here 

dq-website-ad_atsi-health-practitioner_300119

Research Assistant, Injury Team and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program

  • Full time (1.0 FTE), fixed term for 2 years
  • Respected global research organisation
  • Make an impact on global health outcomes

‘The George’ is 600+ people globally focused on improving the health of millions of people. A medical research institute affiliated with leading universities and with projects in approximately 50 countries, we are challenging the status quo in healthcare to find the best ways to prevent and treat chronic disease and injury, and to influence policy and practice worldwide.

This role will provide research assistance to the Injury Division and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program. The role will also be supported by and work with the Research Support and Administration team in collaboration with the Academic Project Operations team who provide overall administrative and research services support.

The Injury Team seeks to identify and test cost-effective programs to reduce the global burden of injury, influence policy and scale up proven programs for sustainable change. Our research cuts across the causes of unintentional injury that contribute most to the global burden – road injury, falls, burns and drowning. Our global research extends from Australia across Asia and Africa, with major collaborations ongoing in India, China, Vietnam and Bangladesh.

Improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is a major priority for the George Institute. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program is a cross cutting program. We work in partnership with Aboriginal communities, research organisations and other key stakeholders in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health to conduct high quality research that delivers meaningful impact. The underlying principles of our program ensure genuine engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities with research broadly spanning across social determinants of health, healthcare delivery and key conditions and injuries. We ensure strong Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership of projects and focus on building the capacity of researchers to enable collaborative approaches to conducting high quality, ethically sound research.

The Role

The Research Assistant will provide research support across the Injury Team and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program. A Research Assistant is required to support the research and communications activities as well as being responsible for the associated general administrative responsibilities. The candidate will have the opportunity for on the job research and administration skills development and there is potential for the right candidate to progress to a Masters or PhD related to this work.

Key responsibilities of the role will include:

  • Assisting with the preparation of presentations, reports, grant applications, ethics applications and publications
  • Maintaining, updating and tracking CVs, publications and other academic contributions on program and portfolio management system and work with external research management systems
  • Liaising with and building effective working relationships with staff and external stakeholders including with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations
  • Contributing to and assisting with communications and translation of research including relevant media, submissions and website management
  • Working closely with other administrators across organisation providing weekly reception relief, as required
  • Assisting with the wider research and administration teamwork across the organisation to ensure smooth and effective workflow processes, task delegation, and ongoing achievement of identified tasks.
  • Preparing, providing support and attending various meetings, as required
  • Undertaking designated administrative duties, including travel arrangements, financial payments, budget monitoring and expense reimbursements
  • Managing incoming enquiries, emails and requests for information and responding when appropriate

Our ideal candidate will possess:

Essential

  • Relevant qualifications and/or experience in a similar business administration and/or research role
  • Strong analytical skills and ability to synthesise complex information
  • Demonstrated understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture
  • Awareness of issues affecting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and ability to work in a culturally safe manner
  • Proficient in the use of the Microsoft Office suite, including Word, Excel, Outlook and SharePoint
  • Demonstrated ability to work with business sensitive information and maintain confidentiality
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively in different interpersonal environments i.e. autonomously, in small teams and with a wide range of varying stakeholders
  • Ability to be flexible and adaptable in the face of changing organisational priorities
  • Ability to evaluate and recommend changes to existing processes and procedures for greater effect
  • Strong general administration skills and experience, including taking minutes, organising meetings, organising travel etc.
  • Ability to work with databases with a high level of attention to detail
  • Methodical with good attention to detail and strong focus on quality of work
  • Strong writing and communication skills
  • Ability to produce social media and web content
  • Excellent time management and organisation skills
  • Demonstrated interpersonal skills with the proven ability to work across several teams and managing own workload

Desirable

  • Experience working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities
  • Previous research experience in injury prevention or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
  • Experience working in the fast-paced Australian medical or scientific research environment.
  • Relevant health related degree

Application close date: 05 April 2019

We are reviewing applications as soon as we receive them, so apply now!

This is a great opportunity for you to work on an exciting new project and make an impact on global health outcomes.

We offer a flexible and inclusive work culture with excellent staff benefits including, salary packaging arrangements and sound learning opportunities.

The George Institute is an equal employment opportunity employer committed to equity, diversity and social inclusion. Applications are encouraged from people with a disability; women; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; people who identify as LGBTIQ; mature-aged adults and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Why work at the George?

We are committed to attracting, developing, rewarding and retaining the best people in their fields to conduct and support our innovative and highest quality research programs

More Info apply HERE 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #RefreshTheCTGRefresh : Read or Download @billshortenmp speech plus @Malarndirri19 @LindaBurneyMP @SenatorDodson Press Release and annual #Closingthegap report to Parliament

 “So in that spirit, I welcome the new partnership between the Commonwealth, the States and the Coalition of Aboriginal Peak bodies – and the change in thinking that that represents. I’m conscious that the Peak organisations have done the heavy lifting too, to date, with limited resources.

And I congratulate them for persevering, for refusing to meekly accept the draft framework that was presented to you as a fait accompli in the past and instead, asserting your right to a permanent place at the table.

My colleagues and I deeply respect your role as advocates, as experts and as Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, committed to Closing the Gap. If we are successful at the next election, you will be central to setting policy and seeing that it is implemented, collaborating with frontline services and community leaders at local and regional level.

Partnership in action, not just words. Plainly, after ten years, refreshing the Closing the Gap targets is necessary. But this can never mean lowering our sights, reducing our targets, limiting our ambitions. ” 

Bill Shorten MP Opposition Leader Closing the Gap speech see Part 2 Below or Download 

Download Speech HERE

Bill Shorten Speech

Download CTG Report

 NACCHO Members Service 2019 CtG Report –

Watch Coverage

One day after the eleventh anniversary of the Apology to the Stolen Generations, the Prime Minister handed down his Close the Gap report – highlighting another year of stalled progress on this critical national project.

The report reminds us of the little progress we have made in addressing the structural inequalities facing First Nations peoples.

While we are pleased to see improvements in early childhood and Year 12 retention, we cannot deny the reality: only two targets out of seven are on track.

As a nation, this is an indictment upon us all.

First Nations people are frustrated, as is Labor. The Abbott- Turnbull- Morrison Government’s delay and dysfunction has no justification.

The targets have not failed. Governments have failed. It is our collective failure to not match well-intentioned rhetoric with action.

While a refresh of the Close the Gap framework is necessary, and we welcome the government new commitment to working in partnership with First Nations people, we cannot ignore the fact that until now, the government has failed to adequately engage with First Nations people.

If the government is truly committed to ensuring First Nations people have a say in matters that affect them, then they should immediately reverse their opposition to a constitutionally enshrined Voice for First Nations people.

The government has also failed to provide national bipartisan leadership on the refresh process. Labor was not consulted at any point in this process.

Whether it’s Close the Gap, the Community Development Program, the Indigenous Advancement Strategy or Constitutional Recognition, this government has constantly pursued flawed policies and failed to engage with First Nations people in their design or implementation.

Paternalism does not work. First Nations peoples must have a say in the matters that affect their lives and policies must be co-designed with full free and prior informed consent. This is how we achieve self-determination and properly address the substantial and structural inequality facing First Nations peoples.

This is how we close the gap.

If Labor is elected at the next election, a Voice for First Nations people, enshrined in our constitution, will be our first priority for constitutional reform.

Business as usual is no longer an option.

Only when First Nations people have a permanent and ongoing say in the issues that affect their lives, will we ever close the gap.

Part 2 Bill Shorten MP Opposition Leader Closing the Gap speech

I congratulate the Prime Minister on the address he’s just given. I acknowledge the traditional owners of this land and I pay my respects to elders past and present.

At the heart of reconciliation is a profound and simple truth: Australia is, and always will be, Aboriginal land. First Nations people loved and cared for this continent for millennia, long before our ancestors first arrived by boat.

They fished the rivers, hunted the plains, named the mountains, mapped the country and the skies. They made laws and administered justice here, long before this parliament stood. They fought fiercely to defend their home and they have battled bravely ever since, against discrimination and exclusion, preserving, for their children and for all of us, the world’s oldest living culture.

In addition to the acknowledgments made by the Prime Minister, I would like to specifically acknowledge the work of Prime Minister Rudd and the member for Jagajaga, Jenny Macklin, who helped initiate this annual Closing the Gap address.

Yesterday, I was consulting my Indigenous colleagues about this morning’s address. And I asked them: What could I say to prove this day has value and meaning to our first Australians, to all Australians, to people who have listened to Closing the Gap reports and speeches for 11 years running.

How do we, in this place, demonstrate this is not just an annual exchange of parliamentary platitudes and rhetoric. And Senator Malarndirri McCarthy said to me: “Just tell the truth about how you feel”.

And the truth is that feels a bit an ambiguous, doesn’t it? I feel that there is good news, but not enough good news. I feel there is hope, but not enough hope. That there is progress, but not enough progress. And I feel ambiguous, because how do you talk about the good without varnishing and covering up the bad?

How do you talk about the bad without presenting such a view that you ignore the good work? But the truth is that at this 11th Closing the Gap exchange, I’m frustrated. I suspect many members of the House feel that frustration too.

Frustration, disappointment that after a decade of good intentions, tens of thousands of well-meaning, well-crafted and well-intentioned words, heartfelt words, from five Prime Ministers, we assemble here and we see that not enough has changed. Mind you, I was halfway through expressing these views to the colleagues, when Senator Pat Dodson cut me off, and he said: “Comrade, how do you think we feel?”

And, really, that is our task, to put ourselves in the shoes of all the people who are giving everything to this endeavour. I speak of the heroes at Deadly Choices driving huge improvements in frontline health services.

The brilliant kids of Clontarf and Stars and Girls Academy and so many other great education and mentoring programs.

I speak of brave women and communities leading initiatives against family violence. I speak of the fearless campaigners for justice at Change the Record. I speak of the Indigenous Rangers right now on country, ensuring that all of us can understand and share in the wonders of country their people have called home for 60,000 years.

I speak of the First Australians who enrich every facet of our national life: as leaders and achievers in education and sport, medicine and the law, environmental conservation and academia and politics and art and music and comedy.

I speak of the mums and dads and aunties and uncles, the elders and the grannies doing their very best to keep children and families safe, to keep community together. There is no question, that we should recognise and celebrate their boundless hope and patience and perseverance, often in the face of overwhelming odds

. But we must recognise their frustration too. We should today acknowledge, that it’s not just the gap in life expectancy or health or educational results or employment opportunities. It’s the gap between words and actions, the gap between promises and results. The good ideas and practical initiatives of people on the frontline that get swallowed up in the morass of paperwork and process and waste and lethargy.

The committee recommendations, coroner’s reports, judicial inquiries and Royal Commissions that have been left to gather dust. Of course these years of neglect and indifference are punctuated by bursts of unilateral ‘interventions’ and ‘crisis meetings’ and ‘emergency action’.

And law after law, policy after policy, about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, written without Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

So in that spirit, I welcome the new partnership between the Commonwealth, the States and the Coalition of Aboriginal Peak bodies – and the change in thinking that that represents. I’m conscious that the Peak organisations have done the heavy lifting too, to date, with limited resources.

And I congratulate them for persevering, for refusing to meekly accept the draft framework that was presented to you as a fait accompli in the past and instead, asserting your right to a permanent place at the table.

My colleagues and I deeply respect your role as advocates, as experts and as Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, committed to Closing the Gap. If we are successful at the next election, you will be central to setting policy and seeing that it is implemented, collaborating with frontline services and community leaders at local and regional level.

Partnership in action, not just words. Plainly, after ten years, refreshing the Closing the Gap targets is necessary. But this can never mean lowering our sights, reducing our targets, limiting our ambitions.

And while I understand the Prime Minister is trying to make a point about the dangers of a ‘deficit model’, even the mindset of a ‘gap’.

The uncomfortable truth is that there is a stark gap between the Australia we inhabit and the lives of too many First Nations people.

There are deficits, in justice and jobs, in health and housing, in the opportunities afforded to Aboriginal children who go to school far from where we send our own kids. It is not the targets that have failed. It’s we who have failed to meet them. It is not the targets that have failed. It is we who have failed to meet them.

This is the hard truth this report demands we confront. The truth about ongoing discrimination and disadvantage. The truth about families and communities being broken by poverty, violence, abuse, addiction and alcohol.

The truth that there are still men and women being arrested, charged and jailed – not because of the gravity of their offence, but because of the colour of their skin. If this parliament can’t admit that racism still exists in 2019, then we’re just wasting the time of our First Australians today.

If we can’t admit that racism still exists, then how on earth do we ever fix it? This isn’t political correctness, it’s just stating the obvious, it’s the truth.

The truth that Aboriginal people are still suffering from diseases the rest of us never know, still dying at an age when the rest of us are contemplating retirement.

And the truth about children and young people who are suffering violence, taking their own lives in numbers and circumstances that should shame us all to action.

Last week, Senator Pat Dodson responded to the coroner’s report from those 13 indescribably tragic deaths in the Kimberley. He spoke of ‘unresolved trauma’, a sense of suffering, hopelessness and disillusionment.

And above all, he said, none these can be fixed by answers imposed from outside. The solutions depend on a say and a sense of empowerment and self-worth for young people. And a sense of hope for communities and regions, power in the hands of people who truly live and understand the challenges they face.

Simply put, if we seek to see real change in the lives of First Nations people, then we need to change. Change our approach, change our policies. And above all, change the way that we make decisions.

We need to let First Nations have real control in how decisions are made. So this is where partnership, the word partnership, where the rubber hits the proverbial road. If we say that we want partnership with our first Australians, then we don’t get to pick and choose our partners’ values or priorities.

For more than a decade now, Prime Ministers and Opposition Leaders of both the main parties have stood in this place and said we want to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in partnership.

But you don’t get to tell your partner what to think. It is that spirit of partnership which we saw at Uluru in 2017. First Nations people took up the invitation, 250 delegates presented this parliament with their vision. Countless dialogues, thousands of people consulted. I concede that what the First Australians came back to us with wasn’t what we were expecting. But that’s the challenge of partnership, isn’t it?

When the partner says: “I have a different set of priorities and if you really respect me, you will listen to me.”

They came back with a Makarrata Commission to work with National Congress, Land Councils, First Nations leaders and states and territories to continue the work of truth-telling and agreement-making.

And our partners said to us, “We seek a Voice enshrined in the Constitution.” An institution with national weight and local connection, bringing a powerful sense of culture, community and country to the shape of policy and its delivery.

A meaningful, permanent say for Aboriginal people in the decisions that affect their lives. Not a long demoralising slog measured in inches of progress.

Not starting from square one every time a particular issue breaks into the broader national consciousness.

Not a sense of ‘us’ and ‘them’ in the backdrop of everything that we do. Our partners want genuine engagement with humility on the Parliament to acknowledge their role, to recognise that genuine empowerment has to involve the sharing of real power.

You can’t have a partnership of unequals. Partnership means giving as well as taking, listening as well as telling. Today I am proud to declare again that enshrining a Voice for the First Australians will be Labor’s first priority for constitutional change.

If we are elected as the next government of Australia, we intend to hold a referendum on this question in our first term, as our partners have asked us to do. I am optimistic that reform can succeed, the referendum can succeed, because the proposition we should include our First Australians in the nation’s birth certificate is an idea whose time has come. It enjoys powerful support across communities, business and Australians young and old. We will seek bipartisan support.

This is not about building a “third chamber” of parliament, it is not a matter of “separatism” or “special treatment”.

How on earth, in the light of this Closing the Gap Report, with such devastating statistics and tragedies behind these numbers, can we say that we’re giving special treatment to people who don’t even get the same treatment?

This isn’t about favouritism, or conferring unfair advantage. It is about recognising inequalities, centuries old. Bringing honour to our nation.

It’s about recognising that powerlessness is created by prejudice and by discrimination and breaking these chains which hold, not just our First Australians back, but actually chain us all back. It’s as simple as the fact that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples do not start from a level playing field now.

And that true equality of opportunity is measured not by legal standing, or theoretical notions but by lived experienced, by the tangible chance every Australian deserves to get a great education, a good job, to live a happy, fulfilling and healthy life, to see their children grow up and flourish.

And to those who dismiss constitutional recognition as “symbolism” or “identity politics”. Perhaps, unwittingly, that final phrase is closest to the truth. Because enshrining a Voice in the constitution is most certainly about identity.

About our national identity, all of us. It’s about who we are, as Australians. Are we a people who can recognise our First Australians in our constitution, as part of our national identity. Are we big enough, are we brave enough, are we smart enough and generous enough to recognise historical truth, to commit ourselves to equal opportunity and to write that into our constitution.

And in the end, this is why, despite all the well-known impediments, the historical difficulties of changing our constitution, I remain optimistic that the referendum can and should gain support. Because beyond the specific wording of any particular question, as important as that is, this represents a simpler, more elemental test. A test about what we say about ourselves to the world, a test of what we teach our children about what it means to be Australian.

It’s a test of our generosity, of our basic, human decency. It’s a test of whether or not we are fair dinkum partners in the journey to the future. A test of our innate and instinctive sense of fairness. I believe that if we trust the people of Australia with the opportunity to broaden the definition of the fair go, to make our constitution more true to who we are, to describe who we are, they will repay the trust of parliament in overwhelming numbers.

And, Mr Speaker I say to those who somehow believe that constitutional change stands in the way of progress on other fronts, I can promise this. If we are elected as the next government of Australia, seeking to enshrine a Voice in the constitution doesn’t stop us from building the new houses that we need to. It doesn’t stop us from embracing the initiatives to encourage more teachers that we’ve heard about.

It doesn’t stop us training more Aboriginal apprentices or doubling the number of Rangers. It won’t prevent us from bringing together, in our first 100 days, people from all over the nation, the police, the child saftey people, families, to work out what must be done to protect the next generation of First Nations children.

Because we must address the two-pronged crisis in the abuse occurring in communities and the trauma being inflicted in out-of-home care. A Labor Government committed to a Voice will still invest in Aboriginal health care providers, the champions who make such a difference to new mothers and their babies.

A Labor Government will make justice reinvestment a national priority, because youth detention and jail time for young people should be a rarity, not a rite-of-passage. I acknowledge the Prime Minister’s announcement today regarding HECS relief for teachers, commitment to education is welcome. But we want people teaching in remote schools because they want to be there, and we will work to encourage that. And we want more local Aboriginal people, trained as teachers and nurses in their communities.

And to achieve real improvements, there must be not just specific funding, but real needs-based funding for schools and investments in early education, universities and TAFE.

Not just in the bush but in our cities and suburbs, where our first Australians also live, so Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children everywhere get the same chance as every other Australian child to get a great education.

This is the focus and purpose of Labor’s policies. We will support Australian languages in this International year of Indigenous Languages. We will provide compensation to survivors of the Stolen Generations from Commonwealth jurisdictions and create a National Healing Fund for descendants managing intergenerational trauma.

Because saying sorry must always mean making good. And we will abolish and replace the Community Development Program, not just because it is discriminatory, demoralising and punitive but because it is completely counterproductive and ineffective. Labor believes in the dignity of work and that is why we want people living in remote communities to work with dignity. And this isn’t just a job for government alone, I want to work with business and the unions to launch a trades and skills offensive, this is a call to arms.

A mass-mobilisation of training, TAFE and apprenticeships, to bring good jobs to country. Because funding projects in remote communities should not involve bringing contractors and tradies from the other side of Australia. We should give our own young people in these communities the pathway to be the tradespeople of their communities. This will be our approach, not grants without evidence or accountability but programs that put communities and regions back in control of their resources and their futures.

In conclusion, Mr Speaker, yesterday, you and I were present at the unveiling of the striking portrait of the Member for Barton.

This portrait of Australian Labor frontbencher Linda Burney, the first Aboriginal woman elected to the House of Representatives, will be displayed in a gallery dominated by white, male former prime ministers and presiding officers.

She wasn’t counted in a Commonwealth census until she was 14 years old. Now her painting will hang on the wall of the Commonwealth Parliament as an inspiration for generations to come. And if we are successful at the next election, she will be one of two First Australians in our new Cabinet, there on merit, for First Australians, and all Australians.

For those who seek to visit Linda’s portrait, it’s near the Barunga statement. A bare 327 words presented to Prime Minister Hawke in 1988. It was a vision for self-determination, for local control, for treaty, truth-telling, national reconciliation.

And just like the bark petitions from Yirrkala. Like the tent embassy on the Federation Lawns. Like Clinton Pryor’s Walk for Justice, or Michael Long’s a decade ago. All represent a message of hope. Proof that despite all the failures and shortcomings and the unfulfilled promises of political generations past, there is still a belief out there amongst our First Australians and indeed all Australians, that this place, this parliament, can play a worthwhile, valuable role in reconciling Australia.

The Uluru Statement offers us that chance, a chance to capture the spirit of the signatories at Barunga.

The Gurunji at Wave Hill. The grand campaigners of 67. The extraordinary victory against the odds of Eddie and Bonita Mabo.

The Apology. And all the other peoples and cultures and communities who have fought and won for their own patient struggles for justice.

We have a chance for Australians to celebrate the unique culture of our First Nations people, their ongoing contribution to the life of our nation.

A chance for us to affirm their special place in our nation’s history and its future. We have a chance for healing and unity and reconciliation.

And to take a further step to ensure that the next generation live to see and know an Australia where the gap is closed and the suffering has subsided.

So, with hope, with pride and with trust and faith in all of us, let us take up that challenge.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Children Good News stories : #QLD @Wuchopperen @ATSICHSBris @DeadlyChoices #VIC @VAHS1972 #NSW Redfern AMS ACCHO #SA @AHCSA_ #WA @TheAHCWA #NT

1.1 National : In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input!

1.2 National The Fourth Action Plan of the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children (2009-2020 ) launched

2. 1 QLD : ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane launches Deadly Kindy Program 2019

2.2 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Health Service Parenting Programs Make A Difference to Cairns Families

3. NSW : Redfern ACCHO Aboriginal Medical Service : School’s back this week! – Is your mob up to date with immunisations?

4. SA : AHCSA : Health survey for 16-29 year olds to give young people a voice

5. NT : Will $7.9 million be enough to address chronic hearing problems in Territory children?

6.1 WA : AHCWA and students from Curtin University came out to Midvale to conduct Ear Health Checks for all the children

6.2 WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service (PAMS) : Children in your car ? Fines of up to $1,000 if you are smoking

7. VIC : VAHS JUNIOR 12-15 years Pre-Season for Life is coming in 2019!

 

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input!

Survey until 15 Feb 2019 : To participate in a short survey, please CLICK HERE

Please tell us your ideas for

-improving quality of 715 health checks

-clinical software -implementation of the National Guide

-culturally responsive healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

More info 

1.2 National The Fourth Action Plan of the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children (2009-2020 launched

This is the first Action Plan under the Framework that has a standalone focus on improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are either at risk of entering, or in contact with child protection systems.

This is in recognition of the fact that the rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care is ten times that of non-Indigenous children,”

Assistant Minister for Children and Families, Michelle Landry 

Today (30 Jan ) at the launch of the 4th Action Plan under the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009-2020, SNAICC Director Natalie Lewis presented our new resource, The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle: A guide to support implementation.

” The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle (ATSICPP) aims to keep children connected to their families, communities, cultures and country while ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people participate in decisions about their children’s care and protection.

SNAICC – National Voice for our Children has developed a Guide to Support Implementation of the ATSICPP. Based on the new resource, SNAICC has held workshops with state and territory government child protection practitioners and policy makers, to support better implementation of the Child Placement Principle.”

Download the Fourth Action Plan HERE 

dss-fourth-action-plan-v6-web-final

The Fourth Action Plan of the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children (2009-2020) has been launched by the Government today following endorsement by state and territory Community Services Ministers across Australia.

The National Framework was established by the Australian Government in partnership with states and territories and the non-government sector, as a long-term national approach to ensure the safety and wellbeing of Australia’s children.

Minister for Families and Social Services, Paul Fletcher, says that the launch of the Fourth Action Plan is the next critical step in improving the way we, as a nation, care for and protect Australia’s children.

“The guiding philosophy of the National Framework is that protecting children is everyone’s business,” Minister Fletcher said.

“The endorsement of this Action Plan demonstrates that all levels of government across Australia are committed to working together to improve the safety and wellbeing of Australia’s children and young people.”

“Through this final Action Plan under the National Framework, we will build on and embed the important reform work under the National Framework to date, and continue to work towards providing a safe, nurturing environment for all children and young people.”

1.3 National : Healthy lunches for our kids going back to school

Healthy Lunchbox Week is a Nutrition Australia initiative that aims to inspire parents and carers across Australia to create healthy lunchboxes their children will enjoy.

Did you know children consume around 30% of their daily food intake at school? Most of this comes from the contents of their lunchbox. What children eat during their day at school plays a crucial role in their learning and development.

Healthy Lunchbox Week helps families prepare healthy lunchboxes by:

  • inspiring healthy lunchbox ideas and recipes
  • ensuring a healthy lunchbox balance across core food groups
  • awareness of lunchbox food hygiene and safety

We know each state starts their school year at a different time.

Healthy Lunchbox Week dates are based on the week before the first state goes back to school.

Check out our #HealthyLunchboxWeek website for recipes, inspiration and more!

https://www.healthylunchboxweek.org/

2. 1 QLD : ATSICHS Brisbane launches Deadly Kindy Program 2019

 

What is a Deadly Kindy?

A Deadly Kindy is a kindergarten program for children aged 3 to 5 years old. We understand the importance of your child’s kindergarten year in preparing them for their transition to school.

Our children: are connected and culturally safe: immersed in programs that value and build on languages and practices brought from their families.

  • Connections: to culture and community are key drivers for program design: supported and influenced by community and elders.
  • Needs are identified early: receiving health checks upon enrolment (or before) enrolment, and work with speech and occupational therapists weekly, affording early assessment and intervention.
  • Our educators: are continually upskilled: working alongside therapists.
  • Innovative programs: leveraging ATSICHS Brisbane’s comprehensive educational, health and human allied services and resources, to wrap around our children and families.
  • Families are crucial to a child’s development: our specialist teams and programs target and strengthen the capacity of families.

What will my child learn?

At kindy your child will learn through play. They will explore, create, investigate, experiment, imagine, extend their knowledge and develop relationships with others. They will be given opportunities to gain confidence in social settings, to develop relationships and become resilient negotiators. Going to kindy will help your child learn early literacy and numeracy concepts and develop communication skills to help their reading and writing.

The Deadly Kindy difference

Our Deadly Kindys have a focus on supporting and strengthening children’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identity through programs that are inclusive of the children’s culture, language and learning styles. As a parent or carer of a young child, you are the main influence on your child’s development. Deadly Kindy exists to help you with this important role.

Our program is based on the Queensland Kindergarten Curriculum Guidelines (QKCG). Deadly Kindy values the importance of play-based programs and is child centered, driven by observations of the children and also input from families and the community.

Children’s healthy development is vital for their learning and wellbeing and lays the foundation for a happy and healthy life. Families have access to a range of ATSICHS Brisbane services and programs including:

  • Health promotion materials and activities on dental health, healthy eating and physical activity and health, child development and parenting information.
  • Child and family health services, such as maternal health nurses and child health checks.
  • Primary health care services such as speech pathology, occupational therapy and nutrition groups, young mothers’ groups, fatherhood programs and Aboriginal health programs.
  • Child and adolescent mental health services including therapy for children and parents.
  • Allied health: services such as occupational therapists, speech pathologists and other allied health staff provide an allied health program to build the skills and knowledge of staff and parents to support children’s development. Activities include:
    • developmental screening
    • staff development sessions
    • parent consultations
    • parent and child group programs
    • short-term intervention for children.

Find out more or book a  place

For more info or to book your place call 3239 5381.

KINDY IS A DEADLY CHOICE!

For more info or to book your place call 07 3239 5381.

Get a free pre-Kindy health check and enrol today!

You can bring your child in for a free, pre-Kindy health check. Enrol them in Kindy and get a FREE Deadly Choices shirt!

BOOK YOUR PRE-KINDY HEALTH CHECK

Talk to our receptionists at one of our clinics to find out more today.

Logan Clinic

41 Station Road, Logan Central QLD 4114, phone: 3240 8940

Loganlea Clinic

Unit 4, 653 Kingston Road, Loganlea QLD 4131, phone: 3239 5355

Browns Plains

Village Square | 20-24 Commerce Dr, Browns Plains QLD 4118, phone:  3239 5300

Remember we now also open Saturdays from 8.30am – 4.30pm

For all other clinics.

2.2 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Health Service Parenting Programs Make A Difference to Cairns Families


Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen) has been providing a variety of parenting programs to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in the Cairns region to develop parenting skills and reduce the prevalence of mental health, emotional and behavioural problems in children.

In 2018, Wuchopperen saw 29 families graduate from our key parenting programs including Circle of Security, Parenting Under Pressure, and Triple P. Each program focuses on a different element of parenting and the many challenges of raising children at various ages.

Lorna Baker, Manager of Wuchopperen’s Children and Family Centre says the parenting programs not only develop the confidence of parents, but also of the children.

“We see huge changes in the families who participate in our parenting programs. The children are a lot more confident, and a number of our parents ask our educators for additional activities to do with their children at home.

The programs are all about creating positive relationships between parents and children and giving parents the tools to do this. The programs also provide parents with a support group of other people who might be going through similar issues,” says Lorna.

Following the huge success of the programs focused on families run by Wuchopperen in 2018, 2019 is set to be a great year for Wuchopperen and our clients.

“Throughout 2018 we had to establish an additional playgroup to accommodate the number of families coming through Wuchopperen. It is really great to see the progress of all the families and how our team is able to cater to the individual needs of everyone who walks through our doors,” says Lorna.

The team at Wuchopperen’s Children and Family Centre consists of Early Childhood Educators, Family Support Workers and Child Health Workers who can provide a holistic service to all our families.

3. NSW : Redfern ACCHO Aboriginal Medical Service : School’s back this week! – Is your mob up to date with immunisations?

4. SA : AHCSA : Health survey for 16-29 year olds to give young people a voice

Great work happening down at Survivalay in Semaphore by the AHCSA team.

Health survey for 16-29 year olds to give young people a voice

5. NT : Will $7.9 million be enough to address chronic hearing problems in Territory children?

AS the hot sun beats down on the red dirt of Bathurst Island, three-year-old Joel Heenan sits inside a renovated shipping container outside the community’s health clinic.

To see all images view WEB

From the NT News

The steel rectangle been transformed into an audiology booth, allowing young Tiwi Islanders to get their ears tested by specialists.

Clutched in Joel’s tiny hands is a picture book with bright illustrations of dogs, babies and sheep. He slowly flips through the pages from the warm comfort of his uncle’s lap.

From behind a closed door a button is pressed and a warbling high-pitched sound fills the room.

Joel doesn’t hear it. He’s distracted, fiddly. The sound continues to ring. He still isn’t sure.

Finally, he looks up — and is treated with the sight of a bouncing toy as a reward. A cheeky grin from Joel but the test is no laughing matter.

The fact is at only three-years-old, little Joel already has moderate hearing loss.

JOEL’S mum, Rowena Tipiloura has four kids. Two of them have problems with their ears.

Joel has a hole in his right eardrum, something which may soon need an operation. Joel’s big sister had an operation to patch up a burst eardrum when she was only six.

“After the patch, it’s been much better,” Rowena says of her older child.

“Joel is not too bad, he talks a lot at home. Knows his fruit, animals, loves his uncles.

“They got a little problem.”

Rowena’s not worried about her youngest child’s hearing, believing it is good enough to get by.

It’s not neglect, not disinterest, not out of a lack of compassion for Joel.

Rowena clearly loves her son — it’s obvious in the tender way she holds him, the way she strokes his short, fluffy hair and the way she lights up when she talks about his love of family. Rowena wants the best for Joel.

But his ears just aren’t her biggest concern. Not when it’s so normal for people to be hard of hearing in her community. Not where there are so many other significant health concerns to worry about.

JOEL is one of 425 Australian kids under the age of three taking part in an ear health study with the Menzies School of Health Research.

The program has been running for nearly seven years and, so far, the findings paint a disturbing picture about the ear health of kids living in remote Territory communities.

One toddler in the study has had an active infection and burst eardrum for six months. He’s only 18-months-old.

And in another case, an ear infection was recently detected in a four-week old baby.

Aboriginal kids have the highest rates of otitis media, a middle ear infection which can cause hearing loss, in the world.

According to federal health figures, only five per cent of one-year-old indigenous kids living in remote communities have bilateral normal hearing. This means 95 per cent of one-year-old indigenous kids living in remote communities can’t hear normally out of one or both of their ears.

Last year, thousands of hearing specialists services were provided to Aboriginal children and other young people in the NT.

But still, nine in 10 Aboriginal kids under the age of three in remote Territory communities have ear disease. Most of them will develop hearing loss which will affect their early brain development and set them on a path of disadvantage.

Early diagnosis and treatment in the first 1000 days of a child’s life can treat the disease but that rarely happens.

Disturbingly, just 13 per cent of the 2000 cases Menzies researchers recently examined and prescribed antibiotics for were followed up using best practice.

Which means just 13 per cent of the kids in desperate need of treatment are getting what they need.

In 2019 the $7.9 million Hearing for Learning program will be rolled out across remote communities in the NT.

The five-year initiative aims to address chronic hearing problems in Territory kids and is jointly funded by the NT Government, Federal Government and the Balnaves Foundation.

It’s expected to reach 5000 Territory children, with a focus on kids under three.

Infections are hard to pick up in babies because they rarely show signs of being in pain, which is why frequent checks are vital.

Led by Australia’s first indigenous surgeon — ear, nose and throat specialist Dr Kelvin Kong and Menzies School of Health Research professor Amanda Leach — the program will train and employ community members to help diagnose and treat ear disease and hearing problems in local children.

But how can this program work when so many before it have failed?

Prof Leach is realistic about the challenges facing service delivery in remote areas and is concerned at how many people fail to follow up with treatment.

“The guidelines say the children (prescribed antibiotics) should be seen within a week to make sure the ears aren’t getting worse, but that isn’t happening,” she says.

Prof Leach says ear disease is so common in remote Territory communities, it’s “normal” for young kids to struggle to hear.

Sadly, this “normalising” of the condition means parents don’t worry when their children show signs of hearing loss or “pus” ears.

In remote communities, Prof Leach says indigenous families face so many immediate health concerns — like rheumatic heart disease, hunger, housing instability — that issues with hearing quickly falls down the priorities list.

Sisters Mary Pilakui, 3, and sister Latoya Pilakui, 8, wait for Mary’s hearing test. They live in a house with 10 kids and eight adults. Housing security is a real concern in their community.

“Ear disease to a large extent is poorly understood and underestimated as a health issue in remote communities, they are dealing with a lot of other things,” Prof Leach says.

“The resources to deal with this issue are totally inadequate.

“It’s just overwhelmed with other issues in the clinic, and I think the families are probably very busy with things as well.”

Many people living remote don’t have reliable cars to travel to a health clinic, and as it’s not a service which can be delivered in homes, explains Prof Leach.

Even if they get to the clinic, ear specialists only visit remote communities every few months so the responsibility for checking ears falls to clinic staff.

And staff are often overwhelmed with other checks or not properly trained to use specialist equipment.

Even if they do remember, ear tests aren’t always pleasant — and a wiggly, irritated, and crying child rarely provides clear ear test results.

But Prof Leach is optimistic this new program can succeed where others have failed.

She says chronic ear conditions in remote communities won’t be cured by flying in more specialists but by upskilling community members who have strong connections with local families.

“The question is — how can we bolster resources within the community so there’s an expert within the community every day — so there is someone there to look at these kid’s ears, do those follow ups, support the family and support the fly in-fly out services that are still needed,” she says.

After a six-month training program, trained locals will act like the “glue” between primary healthcare providers, fly-in, fly-out specialists, families and the kids.

These workers might not have a medical degree but they have an established relationship with families and can note down red flags for follow-ups.

“If we do this well, it should work, and it should be a good model for communities to take more — more control of the country child healthcare — it’ll better inform the community, the family, the children, themselves,” she says.

MENZIES research nurse Beth Arrowsmith has been studying the ears of remote Territory kids for about five years.

Menzies research nurse Beth Arrowsmith checks the ears of Mary Pilakui, 3. She’s been studying the ears of remote NT kids as part of the program for about five years.

In all that time, she’s seen no “real improvements” in the rates of ear infections.

Ms Arrowsmith says until remote indigenous Australians are no longer living in poverty, ear infections will continue to plague them.

“We put it down to the social determinants of health, it’s overcrowding, its poor hygiene, its nutrition, the availability of services, specialists — all of those things combined,” she says.

“You’re talking about ear disease, it’s not a new thing. Any headway is very slow to make.

“It will be a very long time — the housing is inefficient, there is overcrowding. We spoke to a mum the other day who had 18 people in their house. 10 kids and eight adults.

“How can you possibly keep clean in that environment?”

Audiologist Janine Pisula says ear disease in indigenous communities isn’t a new issue, but it is a serious one.

“We’ve got to remember that the community brings up a child,” she says.

“And the community is so used to people with ear disease that they automatically do things to accommodate them.”

Ms Pisula wants the focus put back on ears — as hearing loss can impact a child’s potential.

“Kids with better hearing speak better, more clearly — they find it easier to learn, to understand the world around them,” she says.

“Hearing loss can impact someone for their whole life.”

Young kids with hearing loss are more likely to fall behind in school, become disconnected from their peers, and struggle to build relationships as they grow older.

And older people with hearing problems are more likely to feel depressed and develop dementia.

MURRUPURTIYANUWU Catholic School on Bathurst Island welcomes kids from preschool to year 13.

For nearly all of the students enrolled at the community school, English is not their first language — with the majority of indigenous kids speaking Tiwi at home with their families.

Deputy principal Stacey Marsh says hearing problems are a “huge” issue at the small school, but the kids themselves aren’t keen to wear aids that make them stand out.

“We don’t know if it’s the language barrier or the ears,” she says.

“When children can’t hear you, they can’t learn. It’s very hard to get the message across.”

Teacher Caroline Bourke has been at the Bathurst Island school for about three years and is worried about the long-term opportunities for kids on the island.

Of the indigenous population behind bars in the NT, 90 per cent have hearing loss.

It’s a troubling statistic which shows a clear downward spiral.

“(Poor) hearing is an enormous problem, it impacts big time on what they’re able to take home from lessons,” Ms Bourke says. “It’d have to be the biggest problem we face.”

She estimates 60 per cent of the kids at the school have trouble hearing, but says any new program set up to tackle the issue will have to go to the families — instead of expecting families to travel into the clinic.

One solution she sees is hearing tests and treatment options rolled out at school, which should improve the treatment rates of young kids.

IN the metal audiology booth, little James Orsto, 3, rolls a blue plastic truck along the table in front of him.

His mum, Gregorianna Orsto, watches her boy’s slow calculated movements from a chair just an arm’s length away.

James Orsto, 2.5, has his hearing tested in Bathurst Island.

From the other side of the screen, Janine Pisula presses a button and the same high-pitched warbling tune which alluded Joel echoes across the tiny room.

Instantly, James stops, and points at where he knows a toy is about to jump around.

Straight away, the tiny Tiwi Islander is greeted with the sight of a bouncing teddy.

He grins, and quickly returns to the toy truck in front of him.

Gregorianna smiles at her boy. James is her youngest son and his hearing is a priority.

“It’s very important,” says Gregorianna.

“(James) has no problems with his ears, he’s chatty at home.

“He’s really helpful at home, he can say ‘Mummy’, ‘Daddy’, ‘tea’ — he loves drinking tea.”

Gregorianna’s older boy, Angelo, had problems with “pus ears” when he young, so she knows the warning signs of ear disease.

Her partner’s ears sometimes cause him pain, and his hearing is far from perfect.

She doesn’t want little James to have the same challenge, so when specialists visit Bathurst Island in a few shorts months, Gregorianna will make sure her youngest son has his ears checked.

She’ll do everything she can to make sure James’s future sounds bright.

6.1 WA : AHCWA and students from Curtin University came out to Midvale to conduct Ear Health Checks for all the children

Students from AHCWA’s Ear Health Training course attended the My World Childcare Centre in Midvale to practice their ear health skills on the little koolangka’s

My World Childcare Centre responded

Thank you so much to the lovely ladies from the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) and students from Curtin University who came out to Midvale to conduct Ear Health Checks for all our children today. We appreciate your time,effort and knowledge in looking after the health of our families.

6.2 WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service (PAMS) : Children in your car ? Fines of up to $1,000 if you are smoking

Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service (PAMS) runs the Puyu Paki program and which is the Western Desert (Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji) ACCHO

Have you thought about who else is breathing in the smoke you put in your car? Puyu Paki – Don’t Smoke, Give it Up!

7. VIC : VAHS JUNIOR 12-15 years Pre-Season for Life is coming in 2019!


Last summer we brought you “Pre-Season for Life”, this year we are bringing it back in a JUNIOR version for young people aged 12-15!

All abilities & fitness levels are welcome, whether you play sport or not, join us for an afternoon of fun activities to get your body moving.

Details above, or for more info call 03 9403 3346.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI): Minister @KenWyattMP announces $2.8 million national project improving people’s health through better quality control and health data collection at local ACCHO’s Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services  

 ” Improving people’s health through better quality control and health data collection at local Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services is the aim of a $2.8 million national project funded by the Federal Government.

Our Government recognises the importance of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS), with data showing they provide over 2.5 million episodes of care each year for more than 350,000 people.

However, to help achieve better health outcomes as our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population grows, we need to support accountability, quality improvement and accurate data reporting.”

Minister Ken Wyatt Press Release Part 1 Below

” This National Framework for Continuous Quality Improvement in Primary Health Care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, 2018-2023 booklet is designed to provide practical support for all primary healthcare organisations in their efforts to ensure that the health care they provide is high quality, safe, effective, responsive and culturally respectful.”

NACCHO Acting Chair Donnella Mills

” NACCHO is proud of the record of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) in delivering primary health care to our community. We have learnt many lessons over the last 50 years about how to structure, deliver and improve care so that it best meet the needs of our communities across Australia.

This experience is used in the Framework to describe how to do, support and inform culturally respectful continuous quality improvement (CQI) in primary health care.”

Further resources including the Framework are available on our NACCHO website.

Direct link to PDF – https://www.naccho.org.au/wp-content/uploads/NACCHO-CQI-Framework-2019.pdf

Updated CQI pagehttps://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/cqi/

Pat Turner CEO of NACCHO see Press Release Part 2 below

 

Part 1 Ministers Press Release

In 2017, the Department of Health engaged KPMG to develop a national baseline quality audit at the individual service level to identify issues impacting on data quality and reporting and make recommendations for improvement. From February to May last year, 53 ACCHS volunteered to participate in the project.

The final report found that, despite reporting on national Key Performance Indicators and Online Services Report data collections since 2012-13 and 2007-08 respectively, only 30 per cent of the services visited were rated as having effective and mature processes in place to support and measure health data. The remaining 70 per cent were classified as needing support to improve.

The reports found characteristics of mature services include:

* Leadership focussed on a strong culture of Continuous Quality Improvement

* Clear workflows including induction, training and monitoring programs

* Resources and staff dedicated to recording and reporting health care activities

In Stage 2 of this project this year, KPMG will offer all health services not involved in Stage 1 the opportunity to participate, plus follow-up consultations for ACCHS in Stage 1 and the development of online training resources.

KPMG will also convene a national forum on best practice so ACCHS can share successful and effective reporting processes and practices with each other.

Part 2

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) has just published the National Framework for Continuous Quality Improvement in Primary Health Care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, 2018-2023.

Download the full NACCHO Press Release HERE 

al Community Controlled Health Services and Affiliates, health professional organisations and government. The project was funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health.

The CQI Framework provides principles and guidance for primary health care organisations in how to do, support and inform culturally respectful CQI.

It is designed to assist Aboriginal health services and private general practices, NACCHO Affiliates and Primary Health Networks, national and state/territory governments in their efforts to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have access to and receive the highest attainable standard of primary health care wherever and whenever they seek care.

It is relevant to clinicians, board members and practice owners, health promotion, administrative and management staff. Six case studies which illustrate how CQI has been implemented in ACCHSs are included.

NACCHO welcomes further case studies from other health services, general practice and Primary Health Networks.

Further resources including the Framework are available on the NACCHO website.

  1. Direct link to PDF – https://www.naccho.org.au/wp-content/uploads/NACCHO-CQI-Framework-2019.pdf
  2. Updated CQI page – https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/cqi/

For further information about the CQI Framework please contact: cqi@naccho.org.au

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health #refreshtheCTGRefresh #HOSW8 @fam_matters_au Download the #FamilyMatters Report 2018: The report 2018 urges that investment in #prevention is critical to stopping our national child removals crisis

 ” We call on all Australian Governments
 to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their representatives over the
 coming year and beyond to implement the evidence based strategies for change that this report shows are desperately needed. We hope that, as a result, next year’s report will show a changing story.

The choices that we make now go to the very heart of our shared obligation to heal our nation’s fractured past and secure our children’s future.”

– Natalie Lewis, Chair of Family Matters

At the launch of this Family Matters Report 2018, the campaign is calling upon the Council of Australian Governments to work in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders and organisations across the country, to develop a generational Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children’s strategy to eliminate over-representation in out-of-home care and address the causes of child removals.

Download the Report

Family-Matters-Report-2018

The rate at which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are being removed from their families is an escalating national crisis.

The Family Matters Report 2018, which was released at the Healing Our Spirit Worldwide Conference in Sydney today, finds that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are now 10.1 times more likely to be removed from their families than non-Indigenous children. And the rate is projected to triple in the next twenty years if urgent action is not taken.

Fewer than half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are placed with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers, following a steep decline over the last 10 years. This places Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are removed from their families at serious risk of being permanently disconnected from their families, communities and cultures.

The Family Matters Report 2018 points to a number of issues as the drivers of over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in the child protection system. Poverty is one – it was found that 25 per cent of clients accessing homelessness services were Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people, and most disturbingly, of those clients, one in four was a child under the age of 10.

Family violence was also highlighted in the report, where in 2016-17, emotional abuse, which can include exposure to family violence, was the most common child protection concern for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Another driver of over-representation is intergenerational trauma. Direct descendants of the Stolen Generations are 30 per cent more likely to have poor mental health than other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. All of these factors put our children at greater risk of entering the child protection system.

The report also notes with concern the strong trends in policy and legislative reform to increase the focus on permanent care and adoption. The recently released report from the Senate Inquiry into Local Adoption recommends pathways to open adoption for all children in out-of-home care, which will disproportionately impact Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

As recognised in the ALP’s dissenting report this “willfully ignores the weight of evidence from submitters, it also flies in the face of human rights conventions”. Safety for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is always the priority and this includes ensuring their connection to culture, community and kin, as recognised in the Family Matters Report.

This year’s report is solutions-focussed, highlighting the way forward for positive change. We must shift from being reactive to being proactive, invest heavily in solutions, and involve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in decision-making about their own children.

Governments are only investing 17% of child protection funding in support services for children and their families, which are critical to preventing the situations that lead to child removals. The majority of child protection funding (83%) is spent on child protection services and out-of-home care – reacting to problems once they’ve already occurred.

There must be a significant boost in funding of culturally safe preventative and early intervention measures to urgently put a stop to these high rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child removals.

But, the pace of investment and action in prevention and early intervention is slow. Efforts to address broader community and social issues that contribute to risk for our children across areas such as housing, justice, violence and poverty, remain vastly inadequate and lack coordination… This year’s Family Matters Report puts a spotlight on primary prevention measures in the early years of children’s lives – the years that matter most to changing the storyline for our families.”

– Natalie Lewis, Chair of Family Matters

Another way forward is putting greater focus on early years services to ensure that our children have the best possible start in life. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander five-year-olds are 2.5 times more likely to be developmentally delayed than non-Indigenous children. And yet they are accessing early childhood education and care at half the rate of non-Indigenous children. We must facilitate greater access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and their families to early years services.

The Family Matters Report 2018 also highlights the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander decision-making in child protection. So far only Victoria and Queensland have a statewide program to support Aboriginal families to participate in child protection decisions. Only the same two states have agreed on a comprehensive strategy to improve outcomes for children that is overseen by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family-led decision-making in child protection must be rolled out nation-wide to ensure the best outcomes for our children.

Family Matters is Australia’s national campaign to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people grow up safe and cared for in family, community and culture. The campaign is led by SNAICC – National Voice for our Children – the national peak body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Our goal is to eliminate the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care by 2040.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Racism #VicVotes @VACCHO_org Survey finds 86 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Victoria have personally experienced racism in a mainstream health setting

“Racism hinders people from actually getting good medical care, getting good health care accessing services,

The results highlight the need for government to appoint an independent health commissioner and address cultural awareness at all levels of the health system.

“There are avenues that can be taken to overcome these issues and we are here to urge they be adopted by whichever party wins government at the Victorian election later this month,

Acting CEO for VACCHO, Trevor Pearce, says incidents of racism within the mainstream health system often lead to Indigenous Australians seeking treatment much later than non-Indigenous people or avoiding it all together, contributing to the gap in health and wellbeing outcomes.

“On an individual level, exposure to racism is associated with psychological distress, depression, poor quality of life, and substance misuse, all of which contribute significantly to the overall ill-health experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Prolonged experience of stress can also have physical health effects, such as on the immune, endocrine and cardiovascular systems.”

Pat Anderson is chairwoman of the Lowitja Institute,  (and a former chair of NACCHO) see her opinion article below link ”

This article has been read over 22,000 times in past 4 years 

Read HERE 

 

Researchers have polled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Victorians about their experiences of racism at hospitals and GP clinics.

The online survey, with 120 respondents, found high levels of everyday racism in the health sector.

FROM NITV

Of those polled, 88 per cent reported incidences of racism from nurses, and 74 per cent had experienced racism when dealing with GPs.

The survey was conducted by the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) and designed in partnership with Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) students.

The results revealed 86 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Victoria have personally experienced racism in a mainstream health setting at least once, while 54 per cent said they experienced racism in hospitals every time they attended.

The survey responses showed fewer incidents of racism when interacting with dentists (48 per cent) and the ambulance service (46 per cent).

Mr Pearce attributed the lower figures to the cultural competency work VACCHO has done with Dental Health Services Victoria and Ambulance Victoria, and said it showed how working with the Aboriginal community could achieve beneficial results for everybody involved.

“This is going to require Aboriginal people not just being heard, but actions being taken on what we say. We know what is best for us, we have the answers. Pay attention to us and act accordingly,” he said.

Victoria’s health minister Jill Hennessy says the government is taking the issue seriously.

“We are ensuring our services are more responsive to the needs of Indigenous Australians, so they can get the high quality and safe care they need, when they need it – free from discrimination,” she said in a statement.

Aboriginal Health Alcohol and Other Drugs : Minister @KenWyatt and John Havnen #NACCHO deliver #NIDAC18 keynotes : What is currently being done to reduce the high levels of alcohol and other drug use within Aboriginal communities? 

 ” All of us want to see better health for First Nations Australians. 

We know that the excessive consumption of drugs and alcohol is associated with health problems in all societies.

It has been linked to chronic conditions such as cancer and liver disease, the spread of hepatitis and HIV, injuries and deaths from motor vehicle accidents and assaults, increased encounters with the law, deaths in custody, suicides and family breakdown.

The reasons why First Nations’ people engage in high risk drug and alcohol consumption are indeed, complex.

When families, communities, local organisations and governments join hands, we are powerful together.

Alcohol and other drugs, tobacco, lifestyle risk factors and social determinants represent more than half of the quest for health and life equality.

It’s now been 10 years since the launch of the Closing the Gap initiative.

The agenda is being refreshed and it’s time to refresh our approach – including by acknowledging the complexity of the drug and alcohol challenge and making even greater efforts to address it.

This conference NIDAC18 will be an important part of that solution – and I look forward to hearing the outcomes. ” 

Minister Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt see full speech Part 2 below

Read over 200 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alcohol and Other Drugs articles we have published over past 6 years 

Part 1 NACCHO Keynote by John Havnen Senior Policy Officer 

The harmful use of alcohol is a problem for the Australian community as a whole – alcohol misuse and alcohol-related disease remains a recognised as a nationwide problem.

It is estimated that in 2011 alcohol misuse caused 5.1% of the total burden of disease in Australia.

Alcohol related harm has clear social and economic determinants and it is closely related to disadvantage.

As such Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, which as we all know rate disproportionately in all measures of disadvantage, experience higher rates of alcohol misuse and alcohol-related harm than non-indigenous Australians.

This discrepancy leads to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experiencing significant health and social problems in a rate unequal to non-Indigenous Australians. But not all of us drink, in the 2016 National Drug Strategy Household Survey, Indigenous Australians aged 14 and over were more likely to abstain from drinking alcohol than non-Indigenous Australians.

This abstinence rate has been increasing over the last decade with more and more of us deciding not to drink.

So although there are proportionately more Indigenous people than non-Indigenous people who refrain from drinking, those of us who do drink are more likely to do so at high-risk levels.

In 2014-15 the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey found 19% of Indigenous Australians over the age of 15 exceeded the lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol consumption.

This is no more than 2 standard drinks per day on average or no more than 4 drinks per occasion.

Even though the rate of harmful drinking has declined in recent years, this has been mainly in non-remote areas, so there is still high rates of harmful drinking in remote areas and drinking at risky levels puts a person at risk of medical and social problems.

Due to these high levels of risky drinking, Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders are more likely to be hospitalised for alcohol-related conditions and accidents than non-Indigenous Australians including acute intoxication, liver disease, injuries, suicide or self-harm and cancer.

There is big differences in the rates with Indigenous males over 9 times more likely to need hospitalisation and Indigenous females 13 times more than non-Indigenous Australians.

These drinking patterns highlight that it is possible that risky drinking and binge drinking has been normalised within some communities and this could potentially act as a barrier to seeking treatment when needed.

However, alcohol is not the only substance that presents a major concern for in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

In 2014-15, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey stated that 30% of Indigenous Australians over the age of 15 years reported using an illicit substance in the previous 12-months.

This was an increase from 23% in 2008. The substances most commonly used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders were cannabis with 19% reporting, non-prescription analgesics and sedatives (such as painkillers, sleeping pills and tranquillisers) at 13%, and amphetamines or speed with a rate of 5%.

Smoking has overtime become common place in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander communities and whilst tobacco smoking is declining in Australia, rates remain disproportionately high among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Indigenous Australians more than twice as likely to be current daily smokers as non-Indigenous Australians.

Despite declines in rates of smoking in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the last 20 years there appears to have been no change to the gap in smoking prevalence between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian adult population.

Tobacco-related disease is responsible for between 1.5 and 8 times more deaths in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander community than in non-Indigenous Australians.

The harmful use of alcohol, in addition to tobacco and other drugs, are both the cause and effect of serious harm to physical health.

The health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is considerably lower than for non-Indigenous Australians with 71.0% of Indigenous Australians reporting having a long-term health condition compared with 55.3% of non-Indigenous Australians.

Those with long-term health conditions are also more likely to be a daily smoker or misuse alcohol and other drugs. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who experience multiple diagnoses are more likely to have more difficulty accessing treatment and have poorer outcomes when they do receive treatment than either a physical health condition or an alcohol or other drug disorder alone.

There is a well-known high rate of co-morbidity of substance use disorders with other mental health / social and emotional wellbeing issues, and medical conditions in particular chronic diseases.

These issues tend to cluster in individuals and communities along with other markers of social, economic and intergenerational disadvantage.

These high rates of comorbidity contribute to complexities in the treatment and causality of disorders and remains a significant challenge for the delivery of effective healthcare services for our people.

This is in part due to the complexity of the mental and physical health issues individuals display, and in part because of the burden of multiple disadvantages including; poverty and intergenerational disadvantage and this can reduce the capacity to engage consistently and meaningfully in treatment.

So, what is currently being done to reduce the high levels of alcohol and other drug use within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities?

Existing mainstream models of practice in the alcohol and other drug field have been developed within Western systems of knowledge and focus on a biomedical model with an emphasis on biological factors and discounts any psychological, environmental, and social influences. As a result, it is not generalisable to Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander culture and ignores important indigenous perspectives and needs.

Including the need for access to culturally appropriate and comprehensive services to address multiple problems, and the need for local links with Indigenous services.

Western alcohol and other drug services are based on an abstinence model and focuses on residential rehabilitation which is aimed more on the needs of alcohol users and not illicit drug users.

Residential alcohol and drug programs provide care and support for people within a residential community setting and can be medium to long-term duration of anywhere from 4 weeks to 12 months and but again only supports residents’ psychological needs only.

This model also lacks consideration to the prevention and early intervention strategies of risky drinking and drug use, lacks acknowledgement of family, culture and community which we know are important aspects in the holistic model of care.

Despite a paucity of data, the knowledge of how to prevent alcohol misuse among the general population – while not consistently translated to policy and practice – is extensive.

The evidence for the effectiveness of such programs for Indigenous Australians, however, remains scant.

Racism is still present in mainstream services so many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders might have limited access to mainstream health services.

Systemic racism in the health system directly influences Indigenous Australians’ quality of and access to healthcare.

The severity of this impact intensifies levels of psychological stress, which is closely linked to poorer mental and physical health outcomes.

Racism not only provides a major barrier to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ access to health care but also to receiving the same quality of healthcare services available to non-Indigenous Australians.

There is also a tendency to stereotype Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders as ‘drunks’ or ‘alcoholics’ which, as I have previously discussed today is not necessarily the case.

So, what will work if mainstream alcohol and other drug services have limited evidence for our people?

Historically, reactions to the concerns of alcohol and other drug misuse among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were driven not by governments, but by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people themselves who recognised the fact that mainstream services were non-existent or largely culturally inappropriate.

Today, Indigenous Australians are acutely aware of the impacts of alcohol and other drugs and have been actively involved in responding to alcohol and other drugs misuse in their communities.

Any initiative to reduce the harmful effects of alcohol and other drugs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities should be developed with, and led by, those communities.

There is value in supporting these communities, including the evaluation of strategies implemented so that communities can learn from their own and from other communities’ experience.

Any action that attempts to treat alcohol and other drugs needs to come from a holistic model of care that is comprehensive and culturally appropriate.

Awareness of the land, the physical body, clan, relationships, and lore, it is the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole community and not just the individual.

This is why western models of treatment just won’t work.

Comprehensive primary health care is a key strategy for improving the health of Indigenous Australians and is an important platform from which to address the complex health and social issues associated with alcohol and drug misuse.

A holistic approach locally designed and operated by Indigenous people is favoured in its ability to be tailored to community needs and in a cultural context that is owned and supported by the community. 

Despite inadequate funding and resources, the ACCHOs sector has been identified as having a unique role in making alcohol and other drug treatment services more accessible.

One of the unique attributes of Aboriginal controlled drug and alcohol services is that they are a practical expression of Aboriginal peoples’ self-determination, reflected in their governance and treatment models.

A recent example of what works is the pilot of an integrated model of care within Central Australian Aboriginal Congress based in Alice Springs.

Congress developed an integrated non-residential treatment model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with alcohol and other drug issues and it is based on providing care for all aspects of health through three streams of care:

Social and cultural support – which is delivered by Indigenous workers with cultural knowledge, language skills and an in-depth knowledge of the Aboriginal community alongside social workers. This stream includes case management and care coordination, advocacy on behalf of clients, social support, cultural support, access to medical care, and opportunistic alcohol and other drug counselling and brief interventions.

Psychological therapy – which is carried out by qualified therapists delivering evidence-based treatments including cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and related psychological therapies and access to neuropsychological assessment and treatment. And:

Medical treatment – which is provided by Congress GPs and other members of the primary health care team, and includes medical assessments of alcohol and other drug clients, management of chronic disease and prescription of pharmacotherapies where appropriate to assist with alcohol withdrawal.

This model recognises the comorbidities that occur with alcohol and other drug clients and sought to address within a holistic approach that is adaptable based on needs of individuals.

In 2016-17, in the presenting alcohol and other drug clients, 28% received only one stream of care, 59% received two-streams and the remainder, 13% received all three streams of care.

The Congress ‘three streams model’ of care for alcohol and other drug treatment has been developed over many years to provide a single, integrated multidisciplinary service organised around social and cultural support; psychological therapy; and medical care.

In doing so, it reduces demands on clients presenting with alcohol and other drug issues to navigate multiple health care providers, and attempts to address their holistic needs, including advocacy and support around the social determinants of health and wellbeing including housing, welfare and employment, criminal justice, and basic life needs.

This is a great example of how well it can work when the system is correct and can be used as a model for other ACCHOs to learn from.

The diversity of Aboriginal Australia means that no service model can be simply transferred from one place to another. Instead, the strength of Aboriginal community-controlled health services is their capacity to adapt successful models to the particular needs, strengths and histories of the communities they serve.

But funding is a barrier in implementing optimal services in many regions.

A recent report on organisations conducting Indigenous-specific alcohol and other drug services found that a lack of government commitment to funding community-controlled organisations has compromised the capacity of Indigenous Australians to address alcohol and other drug issues within their own communities.

In addition, the capacity of Aboriginal community-controlled organisations to deliver services was severely constrained by staff shortages, lack of trained and qualified staff, and very limited access to workforce development programs.

Treatment is also not the only key, continuing to increase the community awareness and education about the effects of alcohol and other drugs and the treatment options for dealing with issues is vital.

Including a range of health promotion activities and groups including exercise and nutrition programs, tobacco use treatment and preventions groups to address the holistic needs is essential and well help to reduce the levels of risky drinking and the efficacy of treatment once in treatment.

We need to enable our people to have control over their health and improve health literacy on risky behaviours to help stop the impacts of alcohol and other drugs.

 Part 2 Minister Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt keynote 

Good morning. In West Australian Noongar language I say “kaya wangju” – hello and welcome.

I acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which we’re meeting, the Kaurna people, and pay my respects to Elders past and present.

The 5th National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Conference is a positive opportunity to make progress on a difficult issue.

The conference theme is Responding to Complexity – and there certainly is no one-size-fits-all solution to the challenges our people face.

This is why we have to attack the scourge of drug and alcohol dependency and abuse on multiple fronts.

To form new partnerships.

To speak and to listen, with open minds and hearts.

All of us want to see better health for First Nations Australians.

We know that the excessive consumption of drugs and alcohol is associated with health problems in all societies.

It has been linked to chronic conditions such as cancer and liver disease, the spread of hepatitis and HIV, injuries and deaths from motor vehicle accidents and assaults, increased encounters with the law, deaths in custody, suicides and family breakdown.

The reasons why First Nations’ people engage in high risk drug and alcohol consumption are indeed, complex.

Working together, we are making progress, reducing binge drinking rates among our people from 38 per cent to 31 per cent between 2008 and 2014–15.

But there is still much work to be done.

As we see in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework report, social determinants are estimated to make up 34 per cent of the gap in health outcomes between First Nations’ people and other Australians.

Together, with behavioural risk factors, such as alcohol, drug and tobacco use, they account for 53.2 per cent of the health gap.

Alcohol and drug abuse has a broad and insidious impact.

We have a moral and social imperative to work together to put an end to violence and dysfunction and the drug- and alcohol-driven neglect of children in our communities.

Our Government is committed to working with families and individuals to address substance misuse and to break the cycle of disadvantage that prevents children from attending school, and adults from going to work.

Particularly for the protection of children, we have invested over $10 million to provide better diagnosis and management, develop best practice interventions and services to support high-risk women.

A 10-year FASD Strategic Action Plan is in the final stage of development.

Just as important, we see outstanding examples of local warriors for health – like June Oscar and her team in Fitzroy Crossing – who have tackled alcohol in their communities, with life-changing results for children and families.

We must try harder to understand and address the underlying causes of alcohol and drug misuse.

The percentage of First Nations’ people who drink is no greater than for other Australians – in fact, there are many of our people who do not drink at all.

Equally, the impacts of trauma on the health of our communities cannot be ignored, because they add to the complexity of the challenge.

Trauma is no excuse for substance abuse, violence or neglect – but understanding its history can help us reduce its impact.

It reaches across generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and must be acknowledged and addressed.

Significant health impacts have resulted from displacement from family and country, institutionalisation, racism, abuse and neglect.

This has led to increasingly high rates of incarceration and juvenile detention, suicide, family violence, children being taken into care, and poorer physical and mental health.

63 per cent of First Nations’ prisoners are incarcerated as a result of violent crimes and offences that cause harm.

First Nations’ offenders are also more likely to be under the influence of alcohol when they offend.

It’s a sad fact, that alcohol was involved in 80 per cent of cases of domestic homicide, where both the offender and the victim were First Nations’ people.

That’s more than three times the level of domestic homicides involving other Australians.

It’s also known that First Nations people who engage in alcohol-related crime are themselves more likely to be the victims of such offences.

The question is, how do we reduce high-risk levels of alcohol consumption?

Harm reduction programs can minimise the immediate danger posed by alcohol misuse; but our broader aim should be to reduce alcohol intake.

Our Government is investing in a series of activities which have been shown to be effective.

These range from alcohol restrictions to treatment and rehabilitation.

Under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, the Government has committed around $70 million in 2017–18 to support over 80 Indigenous alcohol and other drug treatment services.

They are located in places with high First Nations’ populations, in capital cities and regional centres as well as outer regional and remote areas.

Alcohol is a particular problem in the Northern Territory.

Our Government recognises this and is providing more than $91 million over seven years for targeted local action to reduce alcohol related harm.

A significant part of our national support to reduce risk also includes primary healthcare and population health programs addressing smoking and alcohol, in urban, regional and remote locations across Australia.

Poor mental health as a result of drug and alcohol problems is a huge issue and one which I am pleased will be addressed during this important conference.

It is equally high on our Government’s agenda.

The Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council recently endorsed the National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2017–2023.

The council has prioritised development of a national Indigenous Health and Medical Workforce Plan, which aims to increase the number of Aboriginal doctors, nurses and health workers on country and in our towns and cities.

Primary Health Networks across Australia also have mental health and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health among their priorities.

I am very keen to ensure Primary Health Networks provide a strong platform for culturally comfortable drug, alcohol and mental health services.

To that end, we have targeted more than $85 million to improve access for integrated, culturally appropriate and safe mental health services for First Nations people.

Our Primary Health Networks are also currently investing a further $79 million on the provision of alcohol and other drug services specifically designed to meet the needs of First Nations people, at the local level.

While the effects of alcohol and drugs can be dire, the insidious damage caused by tobacco is significant.

Statistics show that smoking is responsible for 23 per cent of the gap in health outcomes between First Nations’ people and other Australians.

That is why reducing smoking rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is central to our efforts to close the gap.

By supporting locally linked projects within a national campaign, we are seeing some success.

The daily smoking rate for First Nations’ people aged 15 years and over has declined from 49 per cent in 2002 to 39 per cent in 2014–15, with most of this since 2008, when targeted measures commenced.

However, the daily smoking rate in remote areas is still 47 per cent, and worryingly, the number of First Nations’ women smoking while pregnant remains far too high, at 46 per cent.

To continue supporting change for the better – through funding certainty and proven programs – we have gone to a four-year, $300 million funding commitment for the successful Tackling Indigenous Smoking program.

We are supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific education programs, as part of the National Tobacco Campaign.

“Don’t Make Smokes Your Story” targets First Nations’ smokers aged 15 years and over.

Since its third phase concluded at the end of June, evaluation has shown its effectiveness.

86 per cent of First Nations smokers were aware of the campaign.

7 per cent had quit and 26 per cent said they had reduced the amount they smoke.

If we can maintain this sort of momentum, I am we will see significant improvements in health in future.

We have also had significant success in reducing petrol sniffing, which can cause brain damage and even death.

Independent research undertaken since 2005 indicates that in communities with low aromatic fuel, petrol sniffing has dropped by 88 per cent.

Low aromatic fuel, subsidised by the Government, has now replaced regular unleaded in around 175 outlets in the Northern Territory, Queensland, Western Australia and South Australia.

There were special factors related to petrol sniffing which make it impractical to apply the same approach to alcohol and drug misuse.

But there is one big lesson from that success.

When families, communities, local organisations and governments join hands, we are powerful together.

Alcohol and other drugs, tobacco, lifestyle risk factors and social determinants represent more than half of the quest for health and life equality.

It’s now been 10 years since the launch of the Closing the Gap initiative.

The agenda is being refreshed and it’s time to refresh our approach – including by acknowledging the complexity of the drug and alcohol challenge and making even greater efforts to address it.

This conference will be an important part of that solution – and I look forward to hearing the outcomes.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities #HealthPromotion #AUSTPH2018 #NSW @AHMRC #WA @TheAHCWA #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @Deadlychoices @Wuchopperen @QAIHC @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima Plus FYI @NATSIHWA @IAHA_National Allied Health

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 ACCHO Job/s of the week 

Wuchopperen ACCHO Sexual Health Nurse Cairns FNQ Closing 2 October

Wuchopperen ACCHO Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Environmental Health Coordinator Carnarvon ACCHO WA

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council Project Officer

General Practitioner _ Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative

1.2 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland

2.Queensland 

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

1. 1 ACCHO Job/s of the week

1.Wuchopperen ACCHO Sexual Health Nurse Cairns FNQ Closing 2 October 

‘Keeping Our Generations Growing Strong’

Wuchopperen is a Community controlled Aboriginal Health Organisation providing holistic health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cairns.

Sexual Health Nurse

Full Time – Temporary 30 June 2020

Based in Cairns

The Sexual Health Nurse position co-ordinates the clinical sexual health programs targeting at risk clients, in both outreach and Wuchopperen Health Service clinic settings. The position will provide support and specialised sexual health education for all clinical services to improve the care of at risk clients.

The Sexual Health Nurse (RN) must have current registration as a Registered Nurse (Division 1) with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency, with a minimum of five years’ experience in direct clinical nursing care and/or community Health nursing.

Benefits of working with Wuchopperen:

* Generous salary sacrifice benefits

* 5 Weeks annual leave

* Commitment to professional development

* Private Health Care Corporate Rate

* 11.5% Superannuation Contribution

Applicants for the above position will:

* Demonstrate relevant experience and/or qualifications

* Possess a current driver’s licence

* Possess, or be eligible for, a Blue Card (for suitability to work with children and young people)

* Consent to a broader criminal history check, where relevant

Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Do Not Apply Through Seek

How to apply:

For information about this position, or for a recruitment package, please refer to www.wuchopperen.org.au/careers

Closing date for applications: 9am on Tuesday, 02 October 2018

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

2. Wuchopperen ACCHO Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Wuchopperen is a Community controlled Aboriginal Health Organisation providing holistic health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cairns.

Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Full Time Permanent

Based in Cairns

The Registered Nurse, Child Health is responsible for working with clinic teams to improve the standard of health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families.

The successful applicant is required to have a minimum of 5 years’ experience in a similar role, hold a Registered Nursing degree, qualification of Child Health and be Immunisation Endorsed.

Benefits of working with Wuchopperen:

* Generous salary sacrifice benefits

* 5 Weeks annual leave

* Commitment to professional development

* Private Health Care Corporate Rate

* 11.5% Superannuation Contribution

Applicants for the above position will:

* Demonstrate relevant experience and/or qualifications

* Possess a current driver’s licence

* Possess, or be eligible for, a Blue Card (for suitability to work with children and young people)

* Consent to a broader criminal history check, where relevant

How to apply:

For information about this position, or for a recruitment package, please refer to www.wuchopperen.org.au.

Closing date for applications: 9am on, 2 October 2018

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

Environmental Health Coordinator Carnarvon ACCHO WA

Location: Carnarvon, WA
Location: Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC), Carnarvon WA
Employment Type: Full time / Permanent
Remuneration: $77,026 – $86,694 + superannuation + salary sacrifice

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

To find out more about CMSAC please click here

About the Opportunity

CMSAC has an opportunity for a motivated and professional Environmental Health Coordinator to join their team and take the lead in the development, monitoring and evaluation of environmental health initiatives.

As the Environmental Health Coordinator, you will be predominantly responsible for reducing the risk and incidents of environmental health issues for the Aboriginal communities in the North West Gascoyne region of WA. This includes (but is not limited to) drinking water, waste management, solid waste, housing supply and maintenance, power supply, animal management, food safety and supply, pest and mosquito control, dust control and emergency management.

To be successful in this position, your skills, experience and qualifications will include:

  • Qualifications and experience as a practicing Environmental Health / Health Promotion Officer or equivalent;
  • Sound knowledge and understanding of environmental health related legislation;
  • Competency in the use of environmental and public health monitoring tools and equipment;
  • Ability to evaluate, mediate, negotiate and achieve results in environmental and public health context;
  • Knowledge of Aboriginal culture and key relationship issues

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please click here.

About the Benefits

$77,026 – $86,694 + superannuation + salary sacrifice

In addition, you will have access to a number of fantastic benefits including:

  • 5 weeks annual leave
  • Vehicle provided for operational purposes
  • Support to further invest in your career through additional training
  • Study leave options
  • Annual leave loading
  • Employee assistance program

A relocation allowance can be negotiated with the right candidate, to find out more about Carnarvon and the community please click here

Applications close at 5pm, Friday 5 October 2018

For further information about this position please call Sarah Calder on 08 6145 1049.

As per section 51 of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA) CMSAC seeks to increase the diversity of our workforce to better meet the different needs of our clients and stakeholders and to improve equal opportunity outcomes for our employees.

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) WA 4 positions

Are you a dynamic team member who thrives on a challenge, loves working with people and has a genuine passion for client service delivery? A team player who appreciates the value of an energetic team environment and respects cultural diversity?

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) is currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants. If you have any questions please contact (08) 9022 5591 or email recruitment@bega.org.au

All advertised positions may require one or more of the following:

Please Note: Applications received via indeed.com; other Recruitment Agencies and without a cover letter will not be accepted.


Health Practitioner – Mobile Clinic

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Health Practitioner (Mobile Clinic)

  • As the Health Practitioner you will provide health clinical assessment and treatment, care coordination, client support and community development activities to clients and families of the Goldfields.
  • You must be able to undertake scheduled travel within the Goldfields region on a regular basis, up to 4-5 days at a time and have an interest in developing and maintaining effective networks, alliances and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and other Health Organisations.
  • Due to the remote nature of this work, we require our Mobile Clinic team to have at least 2 years Primary Health Care experience.
  • You must hold a current AHPRA registration as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Enrolled Nurse or Registered Nurse; hold a current “MR” or higher WA drivers licence (or willing to obtain); police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check.

View position description

Apply for position


Health Practitioner – New Directions

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Health Practitioner (New Directions).

  • As a Health Practitioner – New Directions you will involved in Maternal and Child health clinical assessment and treatment, care coordination, client support and community development activities.
  • You must have a current registration with AHPRA as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Enrolled or Registered Nurse; police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check; current WA drivers licence.
  • This position may require you to travel on Outreach as required.

View position description

Apply for position


Registered Nurse – Mobile Clinic

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Registered Nurse (Mobile Clinic).

  • The Registered Nurse is responsible for the delivery of quality primary health care to clients and families of the Goldfields.
  • You must be able to undertake scheduled travel within the Goldfields region on a regular basis, up to 4-5 days at a time and have an interest in developing and maintaining effective networks, alliances and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and other Health Organisations.
  • Due to the remote nature of this work, we require our Mobile Clinic team to have at least 2 years Primary Health Care experience.
  • You must hold a current AHPRA registration as a Registered Nurse, hold a current “MR” or higher WA drivers licence (or willing to obtain); police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check;

View position description

Apply for position


Manager Primary Health

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and experienced candidates with a proven track record in clinical management to fill the role of Manager Primary Health.

  • The Manager Primary Health is a key leadership role reporting to the Chief Operations Officer (COO) and is supported by the Assistant Manager Primary Health.
  • The core function is to provide clinical governance oversight and ensure clinical services are conducted in accordance with best practice, including all relevant clinical and regulatory legislation.
  • An integral component of this function is to ensure contractual reporting obligations of funding bodies are met in a timely manner while ensuring staff compliance with organisational and operational policies across all levels of clinical programs.
  • It is expected that you will be an exemplary leader who provides guidance, mentoring and coaching to all clinical staff in the pursuit of maintaining a workplace cultural that is free from unhealthy behaviours.
  • To be considered for this role, you will hold tertiary qualifications in health care and business management with at least five (5) years senior management experience in an Aboriginal Primary Health or similar setting.

Please continue with this link to read more

View position description

Apply for position

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council Project Officer – AOD Our Way Program

We are seeking two experienced AOD project officers to undertake program support in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $84,150 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* Cairns location

* Temporary position till 30th June 2020

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 29 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ATSICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The AOD Our Way program is designed to increase capacity in communities, families and individuals to better respond locally to problematic Ice and other drug use. The Project Officer position is based in Cairns but will have a state-wide focus to support this program. Reporting directly to the Manager, AOD, you will be responsible for ensuring that QAIHC meets its AOD Our Way program obligations and commitments under its Agreement with Queensland Health. The role includes ensuring services are engaged, supported and provided with the opportunity to participate in the AOD Our Way program.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Alcohol and Other Drugs program delivery.

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders.

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* A current drivers licence

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 7th October 2018

General Practitioner _ Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative

Organisational Profile

GEGAC is an Aboriginal Community organization based in Bairnsdale Victoria. Consisting of about 160 staff, GEGAC is a Not for Profit organization that delivers holistic services in the areas of Primary Health, Social Services, Elders & Disability and Early Childhood Education.

Position Purpose

The General Practitioner position will provide medical services to the population served by GEGAC Primary Health Care. This will include the management of acute and chronic conditions and assistance with the delivery and promotion of primary health care. The role will be part of a multidisciplinary team; including Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Koori Maternity Services, Dental and visiting allied health/Specialists.

Qualifications and Registrations Requirement (Essential or Desirable).

Relevant and Australian recognised medical degree Essential 

Registration with AHPRA; Fellowship of the College of General Practitioners or similar or be eligible of such Essential

Training in CPR, undertaken with the past three years Essential

A person of Aboriginal / Torres Strait Islander background Desirable

How to apply for this job

A copy of the position description and the application form can be obtained below, at GEGAC reception 0351 500 700 or by contacting HR@gegac.org.au.

Or by following the below links –

Position Description – https://goo.gl/iTiSGg

Application Form – https://goo.gl/xVbf3w

Applicants must complete the application form as it contains the selection criteria for shortlisting. Any applications not submitted on the Application form will not be considered.

Application forms should be emailed to HR@gegac.org.au, using the subject line:  General Practitioner

Or posted to:

Human Resources

Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative
PO Box 634
Bairnsdale Vic 3875

Applications close 29th September 5.00pm.

No late applications will be considered.

A valid Working with Children Check and Police check is mandatory to work in this organisation.

“this advertisement is pursuant to the ‘special measures’ provision at section 8 of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth)”.

 

Aboriginal Health Practitioner Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO 

  • Are you an Aboriginal Health Practitioner or Worker wanting to contribute to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal people?
  • Join a well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
  • Identified position for Aboriginal candidates

The Clinic

Primary Care Services (PCS) provides comprehensive primary health care to the Aboriginal community. The multi-disciplinary team consists of Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, a Clinical Services Officer, Enrolled and Registered Nurses, and General Practitioners and Registrars. Services are augmented by a range of visiting medical specialists and allied health professionals. The PCS team liaises and works closely with the Women, Children and Family Health program, the Social and Emotional Wellbeing program and the Community Health Promotion and Education program to ensure a high standard of integrated and coordinated client care.

The Opportunity

As an Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) or Aboriginal Health Worker (AHW) you will be required to work collaboratively with PCS staff and other members of Health Services teams to provide best practice client care. As a vital team member your role will contribute to the high quality and culturally appropriate client care that Nunkuwarrin Yunti is known to provide.

In order to deliver this, some of your key responsibilities will include:

  • Undertake client assessments and follow -up care, care plans and referrals from other members of the multi-disciplinary team
  • Provide health education and brief intervention counselling to improve health outcomes for individual clients
  • Promote the importance and benefits of general preventative health assessments and immunisations and ensure access to these services for clients

About you

  • Both AHP and AHW are required to have a Cert IV in Aboriginal Primary Health Care (Practice) or equivalent.
  • As an AHP you will be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Registration Authority (AHPRA); and bring a minimum of three (3) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a Primary Health Care setting.
  • As an AHW you will bring a minimum of two (2) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a relevant health field, preferably Primary Health Care.

As a suitably qualified AHP or AHW you will have well developed clinical skills and a sound knowledge of best practice approaches to comprehensive primary health care with broad knowledge of existing health and social issues within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. You will have the ability to resolve conflict, solve problems and negotiate outcomes. Organisational skills, self-confidence and the ability to work independently and autonomously, assess priorities, organise workloads and meet deadlines is critical to success.

Click here to download the AHP Job Description

Click here to download the AHW Job Description

Click here to download the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Application Form

Please note: It is a requirement of all roles that successful candidates have a current driver’s licence and are willing to undergo a National Police Check prior to commencing employment. 

Both roles are identified Aboriginal positions; exemption is claimed under Section 8 (1) of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975.

The Benefits

Classified under the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Enterprise Agreement of 2017 you will be entitled to the following dependent on qualifications and experience:

  • AHP – Health Services Level 4 with a starting salary of $69,255.98, plus super
  • AHW – Health Services Level 3 with a starting salary of $61,430.62, plus super

You will have access to salary sacrificing options which allow you to significantly increase your take home pay.

In addition, you will have access to generous leave allowances, including additional paid leave over the Christmas period, on top of your annual leave benefits!

Our organisation has a strong focus on professional development so you will have access to both internal and external training and development opportunities to enhance your career and self-care.

To apply

Please forward your CV, a Cover Letter and Application Form addressing the assessment questions to hr@nunku.org.au

Candidates who do not complete and submit the Application Form, Cover Letter and CV will not be considered further for this position.

We encourage and thank all applicants for their time, however only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Should you have any queries or for further information please contact HR via hr@nunku.org.au

Applications close Monday 1st October 2018 at 10am Adelaide time

Miwajt Health ACCHO : Coordinator Regional Renal Program

Are you passionate about improving health care to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in remote Northern Territory?

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is a regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Our Values

  • Compassion care and respect for our clients and staff and pride in the results of our work.
  • Cultural integrity and safety, while recognising cultural and individual differences.
  • Driven by evidence-based practice.
  • Accountability and transparency.
  • Continual capacity building of our organisation and community.

We have an exciting opportunity for a self-motivated hard working individual who will coordinate Miwatj Health’s Regional Renal Program across East Arnhem Land. Renal services are contracted to a partner organisation and the Regional Renal Program Coordinator will provide a central point of contact between services, foster and strengthen links between PHC programs and renal services, develop and implement an Aboriginal workforce model for the program, and coordinate and drive the aims of the community reference groups.

Key responsibilities:

  • Implement and coordinate renal program plan as per renal program statement and principles.
  • Manage program budgets and investigate funding opportunities.
  • Establish, support and engage regularly with the regional community reference groups and patient groups in Darwin.
  • Drive action on identified priorities of community reference groups.
  • Coordinate with WDNWPT regarding patient preceptor work plans.

To be successful in this role you should have current registration with AHPRA as Registered Nurse / Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner / other relevant qualified health professional.

More info APPLY

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland


Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

Dr Puggy Hunter was the NACCHO Chair 1991-2001

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 144 + Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996. He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council. He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

The scheme provides scholarships for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people studying an entry level health course.

Applications for PHMSS 2019 scholarship round are now open.

Click the button below to start your online application.

Applications must be completed and submitted before midnight AEDT (Sydney/Canberra time) Sunday 14 October 2018. After this time the system will shut down and any incomplete applications will be lost.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not available for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

A significant number of applications are received each year; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The scholarships are funded by the Australian Government, Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing. The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

2.1 There are 6 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 There are 7 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

 

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 24 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3 There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

 

Current Vacancies
  • Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Clinical)

  • Intake Officer / Support Worker

  • Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Senior)

  • Counsellor (Specialised) / Social Worker – Various Roles

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

 

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

General Practitioner (Swan Hill)Mental Health Nurse (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Mildura)Alcohol and Other Drugs Support WorkerCaseworker, Kinship ReunificationPractice Nurse – Chronic Care CoordinatorAboriginal Family-Led Decision-making Caseworker (Swan Hill)First Supports Caseworker (Swan Hill)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Mildura)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Health Worker (1)Team Leader, Early Years (Swan Hill)General Practitioner (Mildura)

MDAS Jobs website 

 

 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

Check website for current Opportunities

 

8. Tasmania

Are you interested in Chronic Disease Management?

Do you have a qualification as an Aboriginal Health Worker, Enrolled Nurse, or Registered Nurse?

We have a part time position at the

Aboriginal Health Service in Hobart,

for immediate start, to 30th June 2019.

 

Please provide a covering letter outlining your desire to work in this area and a current resume to payroll@tacinc.com.au

or email raylene.f@tacinc.com.au for further information.

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR (INDIGENOUS APPLICANTS ONLY)

The LIME Network – Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Only Indigenous Australians are eligible to apply as this position is exempt under the Special Measure Provision, Section 12 (1) of the Equal Opportunity Act 2011 (Vic).

Salary: $88,171 – $95,444 p.a. (pro rata) plus 9.5% superannuation

The Event and Project Coordinator will take a lead in the coordination, planning and implementation of key projects and events of the LIME Network.  These include the LIME Connection international conference, stakeholder meetings, seminars and other events.

Close date: 14 Oct 2018

Position Description and Selection Criteria

0046502.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to: https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/selection-criteria

Advertised: AUS Eastern Standard Time
Applications close: AUS Eastern Daylight Time

Website 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : National @CPMC_Aust #ACT @WinnungaACCHO celebrates 30 years #NSW @Galambila #QLD @IUIH_ @DeadlyChoices @Apunipima #RUOKDay #NT @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.1 National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

Winnunga last night celebrated its 30th anniversary , as it continues to go from strength to strength – providing responsive, appropriate services, tailored to the needs of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in Canberra

Picture above : Wally Bell welcome to country at dinner celebrating 30 years of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health : Pictures below Geoff Bagnall

  

The Ngunnawal people are the Traditional Owners of the lands that the ACT is located on. However, there are many Aboriginal people from other parts of the country living in and visiting Canberra.

This is mainly due to the mobility of people generally, connecting with family, the histories of displacement, and employment opportunities particularly in the Commonwealth public service.

Winnunga was established in 1988 by local Aboriginal people inspired by the national mobilisation of people around the opening of the new Parliament House in May and the visit by the Queen.

The late Olive Brown, a particularly inspirational figure who worked tirelessly for the health of Aboriginal people, saw the need to set up a temporary medical service at the Tent Embassy site in Canberra and this proved to be the beginning of Winnunga.

Mrs Brown enlisted the support of Dr Sally Creasey, Carolyn Patterson (registered nurse/midwife), Margaret McCleod and others to assist. Soon after ACT Health offered Mrs Brown a room in the office behind the Griffin Centre to run a clinic twice a week (Tuesday and Thursday mornings) and on Saturday mornings. Winnunga operated out of this office from 1988 to 1990. The then Winnunga Medical Director, Dr Peter Sharp, began work at Winnunga in 1989.

Other staff worked as volunteers. In January 1990 the t ACT Minister for Health at the time, Wayne Berry, provided a small amount of funding. By 1991 the clinic was operating out of the Griffin Centre as a full time medical practice. In that same year the ACT attained self-government.

In 2004 Winnunga moved to its current premises at Boolimba Cres in Narrabundah, and employs over 60 staff. Winnunga has grown into a major health service resource for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the ACT and surrounding region, and delivers a wide range of wholistic health care services.

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

Today I visited Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and it was beaut to get a tour of the new clinic with manager Catherine Hampton.

The clinic at North Side Shopping Complex will provide comprehensive primary health care services for all Aboriginal people living in the North Side area

Warren Snowdon is the local Federal member for Lingiari

People living in the north of Alice Springs will now have access to a new clinic as primary health care service Central Australian Aboriginal Congress expands its network.

The new Congress Northside Clinic in the Northside Shopping Centre held an open day on Saturday September 8 and begin providing services from Wednesday September 12.

It will cater for nearly 2000 clients living in the town’s north, including Trucking Yards, Charles Creek and Warlpiri Camp.

Congress chief executive officer Donna Ah Chee said the clinic would have doctors, Aboriginal health practitioners, nurses, podiatry services, a dietician, a diabetes educator and also offer care coordination and social and emotional well-being help.

Ms Ah Chee said it would also provide advocacy and other support to families in the northside area.

“Providing a smaller clinic closer to our clients is an exciting development and builds on the success of our Larapinta and Sadadeen clinics that opened in 2016,” she said.

The new clinic has nine consultation rooms, a double treatment room and two allied health treatment rooms.

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress said it had found that smaller, multidisciplinary teams delivered better continuity of care, access and chronic disease outcomes.

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

Our Quit Support Team had a great weekend at Freedom Day Festival
KWHB were a proud sponsor to make the festival smoke free 🚭to protect everyone from harmful cigarette smoke.

Check out the AFL and Basketball teams next to our deadly archway!

What’s your smoke free story?


National Best Practice Unit Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

SHPA caught up with Chris Braithwaite, a pharmacist with the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Northern NSW.

Chris spoke to us about:

  • his journey to working with indigenous communities
  • what an average day looks like
  • the challenges posed by existing funding models for home medicines reviews
  • cultural competence and institutional racism

Listen to the Podcast HERE 

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

The number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months since the introduction of a new online birth registration system by the NSW Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages (BDM).

Attorney General Mark Speakman announced the success of the online registration form as a result of the Our Kids Count campaign which aims to increase Aboriginal birth registrations through better access to information about the birth registration process.

“The number of unregistered Aboriginal births has traditionally been too high, but we’re closing the gap by highlighting the importance of registration and making the process faster and easier to complete,” said Mr Speakman.

“A birth certificate allows people to fully participate in society and without one, many of the basic opportunities we take for granted such as enrolling in school, sport or getting a driver licence, become unnecessarily complicated and out of reach.”

New figures show the average number of children registered to Aboriginal mothers since March 2018 has increased 82 per cent since the last quarter of 2017, and a 101 per cent increase since 2016.

NSW Registrar for Births Deaths & Marriages, Amanda Ianna said the new online birth registration has been popular among all sections of the community since it was introduced in April 2018.

“The take up rate for the online form has exceeded all our expectations with over 90 per cent of all NSW birth registrations now being made through the online system. The form is intuitive and people can complete it at a time and place that suits them,” Ms Ianna said.

BDM has spread the message about the benefits of birth registration during visits to Aboriginal communities and through brochures and online material, including an educational video.

For more information about Our Kids Count, visit: www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/Aboriginal

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

This partnership will bring life-changing benefits for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples right across Australia,

The Sharks players will assist in educating youth about the importance of taking a preventative approach to their health, and living healthy lifestyles. This includes reducing the negative impacts of smoking and drinking alcohol, and advocating consistent attendance at school.

It provides the kids a chance to make positive decisions around being a deadly student. It’s about our young ones looking at the opportunities available, with education being the passport towards achieving their dreams.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson.

Club stalwart and 2001 Dally M Player of the Year, Preston Campbell returned to his former NRL club recently, as the Cronulla Sharks announced a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

As a Deadly Choices Ambassador, Campbell has been instrumental in assisting to bring about better health and educational outcomes among Indigenous communities in Australia; a formula which the Sharks will now implement to boost existing and future community programs within its Sharks Have Heart portfolio.

A huge thank you to Deadly Choices and local elder Aunty Deanna Schreiber for designing and creating our farewells gifts to JT

“The Deadly Choices – Cronulla Sharks partnership will help reinforce those positive mental and physical health outcomes among communities, through the promotion of healthy eating, active participation in sport, and emphasising the importance of a good education,” said Campbell.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices.

“When you have kids at such an impressionable age it’s important to direct plenty of positive messaging and ensuring they create good habits for themselves.

“I’ve had a chance to speak with the boys today about the Deadly Choices programs and they’re excited about the impact they’ll have on our young kids”

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back.”

As explained by Sharks Have Heart General Manager George Nour, empowering youth within communities is exactly what the Sharks intend to achieve through the Deadly Choices partnership.

“Sharks Have Heart are extremely proud to launch our partnership with Deadly Choices,” Nour said. “To be associated with such a strong and respected brand within the Indigenous community is only going to strengthen our programmes within our diversity pillar.”

At the launch, the Sharks were provided a snapshot of what it means to make Deadly Choices and be role models for community, with Campbell joined by fellow long-term Deadly Choices Ambassador and former league international Steve Renouf in discussing their roles.

Sharks Co-Captain Wade Graham, a member of the Australian World Cup squad last year and twice an Indigenous All Star in 2016 and 2017, was joined by Indigenous teammates Andrew Fifita, Jesse Ramien and Edrick Lee at the program launch.

Graham was excited by the Sharks new partnership and to be teaming up with Deadly Choices.

“I think staying fit is extremely important in this day and age, particularly for the youth and if the Sharks and Deadly Choices can encourage as many people as possible to get the body moving, to eat healthy and to have an active lifestyle, it is going to be extremely beneficial to the Indigenous community,” Graham said.

“I am looking forward to working with Deadly Choices who do outstanding work in the Indigenous community and to be helping to spread their important messages,” he added.

In 2016-17 in South East Queensland alone, the Deadly Choices team delivered 145 education programs to more than 1860 participants. The team also held 10 community and sporting events, with almost 1500 attendees and participants.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

WATCH HERE

Today and every day is RU OK Day? Start a conversation and support your friends, colleagues, family and community.

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch


This innovative project began with Kalyakool Moort research. The highly collaborative project has embodied passion and commitment to improve perinatal wellbeing and engagement for women and men at this significant time.

The ‘Baby Coming-You Ready?” Rubric has been developed, digitised and designed by Aboriginal women, men and researchers.

NACCHO Press Release Aboriginal Male Health Outcomes : #OchreDay2018 The largest ever gathering for a NACCHO male health conference : View 15 #NACCHOTV interviews with speakers

 ” We, the Aboriginal males  gathered at the Ochre Day Men’ Health Summit, nipaluna (Hobart) Tasmania in August 2018; to continue to develop strategies to ensure our  roles as grandfathers, fathers, uncles, nephews, brothers, grandsons, and sons  caring for our families.

We commit to taking responsibility for pursuing  a healthy, happier,  life for  our families and ourselves, that reflects the opportunities experienced by the wider community.

We acknowledge the NAIDOC theme “Because of her we can”We celebrate the relationships we have with our wives, mothers, grandmothers,  granddaughters,  aunties, nieces  sisters and daughters.

We also acknowledge that our male roles embedded in Aboriginal culture as well as our contemporary lives  must value the importance of the love,  companionship, and support of our Aboriginal women, and other partners.

We will pursue the roles and practices of Aboriginal men grounded in their  cultural as  protectors, providers and mentors. “

Our nipaluna (Hobart) Ochre Day Statement:  That our timeless culture still endures 

All NACCHO reports from #Ochre Day

For so many of the men at Ochre Day, healing had come about through being better connected to their culture and understanding, and knowing who they are as Aboriginal men. Culture is what brought them back from the brink.

We’ve long known culture is a protective factor for our people, but hearing so many men in one place discuss how culture literally saved their lives really brought that fact home.

It made me even more conscious of how important it is that we focus on the wellbeing side of Aboriginal health. If we’re really serious about Closing the Gap, we need to fund male wellbeing workers in our Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations.

In Victoria, the life expectancy of an Aboriginal male is 10 years less than a non-Aboriginal male. Closing the Gap requires a holistic, strength- based response. As one of the fellas said, “you don’t need a university degree to Close the Gap, you just need to listen to our mob”.

I look forward to next year’s Ochre Day being hosted on Victorian country, and for VACCHO being even more involved.

Trevor Pearce is Acting CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Health Organisation (VACCHO) Originally published CROAKEY see in full part 2 below  : Aboriginal men’s health conference: “reclaim our rightful place and cultural footprint “

Download our Press Release NACCHO Press release Ochre Day

The National Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chairperson John Singer, closed recent the Hobart Ochre Day Conference-Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It!

View interview with NACCHO Chair John Singer

Ochre Day is an important Aboriginal male health initiative to help draw attention to Aboriginal male health in a holistic way. The delegates fully embraced the conference theme, many spoke about their own journeys in the male health sector and all enjoyed participation in conference sessions, activities and workshops.

More than 200 delegates attended and heard from an impressive line-up of speakers and this year was no exception.

Delegates responded positively to The Hon. Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health funding of an Aboriginal Television network.

View Minister Ken Wyatt speech

Mr John Paterson CEO of AMSANT spoke about the importance of women as partners in men’s health

View interview with John Paterson

and Mr Rod Little from National Congress delivered a brief history on the progress of a Treaty in Australia as a keynote address for the Jaydon Adams Oration Memorial Dinner. The winner of the Jaydon Adams award 2018 was Mr Aaron Everett.

View interview with Rod Little

A comprehensive quality program involving presentations from clinicians, researches, academics, medical experts and Aboriginal Health Practitioners were delivered.

Delegates listened to passionate speakers like Dr Mick Adams, Dr Mark Wenitong, Patrick Johnson.

View all interview here on NACCHO TV 

Joe Williams, Deon Bird, Kim Mulholland and Karl Briscoe. Topics included those on suicide, Deadly Choices, cardiovascular and other chronic diseases as well as family violence impacting Aboriginal Communities. Initiatives to address these problems were explored in workshops that were held to discuss how to make men’s health a priority and how to support the reaffirmation of cultural identity.

Speeches by Ross Williams, Stan Stokes and Charlie Adams addressed the establishment of Men’s Clinics within the Anyinginiyi Aboriginal Health Service and Wuchopperen Aboriginal Health Service, which demonstrated the positive impact that these facilities have had on men’s health and their emotional wellbeing.

These reports as well as the experiences related by delegates highlighted the urgent need for more Aboriginal Men’s Health Clinics to be established especially in regional, rural and remote areas.

As a result of interaction with a broad cross section of delegates the NACCHO Chairman
Mr John Singer was able to put forward a range of priorities that he believed would go some way to addressing some of the concerns raised.

These priorities were the acquisition of funds to enable the;

  • Establishment of 80 Men’s Health Clinics in urban, rural and remote locations and
  • The employment of both a Male Youth Health Policy Officer and Male (Adult) Health Policy Officer by NACCHO in Canberra.

Delegates also welcomed the funding of $3.4 million for the Aboriginal Health Television network provided that the programs were culturally appropriate and supported a
strength-based approach to Men’s Health.

Our Thanks to the Sponsors 

 

 

Part 2 Trevor Pearce is Acting CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Health Organisation (VACCHO) Originally published CROAKEY 

 Aboriginal men’s health conference: “reclaim our rightful place and cultural footprint “

I’ve just returned from my first NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference in Hobart, and it was so deadly, it most definitely won’t be my last.

About 260 Aboriginal men from the Kimberleys to urban environments and everywhere in between attended. White Ochre Day started as an Aboriginal response to White Ribbon Day. For Aboriginal people, White Ochre has significant cultural and ceremonial values for Aboriginal people.

It’s not just about the aesthetics of painting white ochre on to our skin, there are strong cultural elements to the ceremony and identity. Ochre Day is a gathering of Aboriginal men for sharing ideas of best practice and increasing access to better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men for us to deal with family violence, and with spiritual healing, as Aboriginal men.

I was privileged to attend this conference with all the male Aboriginal staff members from VACCHO, who represented a diversity of ages and backgrounds. They work at VACCHO in areas including cultural safety, mental health, policy, sexual health and bloodborne viruses, telehealth, and alcohol and other drugs. It was a great bonding experience for us, and fantastic to be part of this national conversation.

Aboriginal men die much younger than Aboriginal women, and we die an awful lot younger than the non-Aboriginal population. We have the highest suicide rates in the world, and suffer chronic disease at high rates too.

We walk and live with poor health every day, and much of this is down to the symptoms that colonisation has brought us. We didn’t have these high rates of illness and suicide pre-colonisation, when we had strength in our culture, walked on our traditional homeland estates and we all spoke our languages. And we certainly didn’t have incarceration before contact.

A rightful place

The Ochre Day Conference covered all aspects of health and wellbeing for Aboriginal men; physical, mental, social and emotional wellbeing. It was about our need to reclaim our rightful place and cultural footprint on the Australian landscape.

It is a basic human right to be healthy and have good wellbeing, as is our right to embrace our culture. Improving our health is not just about the absence of disease, it’s about developing our connection to Country, our connection to family, and feeling positive about ourselves.

This position of reclamation of our right place within Australia society is critical given the current political landscape, and the challenges that Aboriginal people face. Victoria has an election in November, and a national election to come soon too. As Aboriginal people we know that race relations will be a tool used against us, and our lives will often be portrayed from the deficit point of view that will focus on what’s wrong with us.

In light of the above, it was good to hear about all the positive things Aboriginal men are doing across the country to help their families and communities, from the grassroots to the national level.

Rightfully, we talked a lot about mental health issues. There was a lot of personal sharing; men talking about their own issues; men who had attempted suicide speaking openly about it. There were survivors of abuse, of family violence. For any man, Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal, these are big things to get up and talk about.

I was so impressed and moved by what these Aboriginal men had to share. There was such generosity of spirit from these men in sharing their stories, and I’m not ashamed to say some of these brought me to tears.