Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NACCHOagm2017 #NSW #TAS #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

1.1 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference abstracts / Expressions of Interest close 21 August

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations

2.WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) officially launches the ‘Pink Box’

3. 1 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Medical serice  very active campaign in testing the ear health of preschool and school-age Aboriginal children

3.2 NSW : Governor of NSW visits Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services

4. NT : Miwatj Health had a HUGE presence at the 2017 Garma Festival

5.VIC : KIRRAE Health Services at Framlingham Aboriginal Reserve funded to fight ice

6.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service Mt Isa supports another cataract blitz

6.2 QLD : Jobs and health benefits in $120M boost for Indigenous infrastructure

7.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Health Workers out to break HEP.C stigma

8. Deadly Choices QLD trains up the Nganampa health team

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference abstracts / Expressions of Interest close 21 August

NACCHO is now calling for Expressions of Interest (EOI) from Member Services for speakers, case studies and table top presentations for the 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

Register HERE

2.WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) officially launches the ‘Pink Box’

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) have officially launched the ‘Pink Box’, a free vending machine that allows a discrete way for women to obtain sanitary products.

In partnership with Share the Dignity charity, the suppliers of the Pink Box, the launch took place at DYHS head office in East Perth.

Mrs Gail Yarran delivered the Welcome to Country followed by Jenny Bedford, DYHS’s new CEO who officially opened the launch. The audience listened to speeches from Maternal & Child Health worker, Jillian Taylor and the Founder of Share the Dignity charity, Rochelle Courtenay before the official ribbon cutting ceremony.

Also see : Indigenous girls missing school during their periods: the state of hygiene in remote Australia

3. 1 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Medical serice  very active campaign in testing the ear health of preschool and school-age Aboriginal children

This time last year, Harrison Faley was struggling to make sense of daycare.

Stuck hearing as if he were underwater, his parents thought he was simply a typical, inattentive two-year-old. But in reality, otitis media, a very common middle ear disease for young children, was blocking his conductive hearing.

Report from HERE

“We were alerted by his daycare that his speech was lagging a bit and he was getting constant ear infections,” mother Harnah Faley recalled.

“The specialist asked us to wait until he had all his teeth, and when that happened we had him tested again, and he was down to 10 per cent function.”

Within two months, Harrison had grommets (tiny tubes) inserted to allow air to reach his middle ear.

“The improvement was pretty much instant,” Mrs Faley said, adding that along with his hearing, Harrison’s speech and development progressed significantly.

“If you ask him, he got the potatoes out of his ears,” she said.

Harrison was just one of 51 children to have a free ear check up at the Inverell Shire Public Library on Tuesday, August 1 as part of the first local otitis media awareness day.

Two audiometry nurses were present to do the screening, one from Armajun Aboriginal Health Service.

Of those screened, 25 per cent had middle ear fluid and a further 22 per cent had a Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, which can lead to otitis media.

Only half the children screened on the day had a ‘normal’ reading for ear health.

Although Aboriginal children are ten times more likely to have otitis media and 70 percent more likely to have recurring otitis media; there was a higher percentage of ‘normal’ readings in Inverell’s Aboriginal children (13 per cent of those screened).

Organisers believe this was due to Armajun’s very active campaign in testing the ear health of preschool and school-age Aboriginal children in this area.

Hearing Support Teachers from the NSW Department of Education talked on factors that contribute to otitis media and how parents can help reduce the risks.

The morning period was very busy, with one local preschool bringing twenty seven students aged 3-5 for screening. The rest of the children were brought in by their parents or grandparents throughout the day.

Library staff were proactive and kept the children entertained with craft activities as they waited. Volunteers from the Inverell branch of Quota International also helped make the day a success.

With so many children having indications of either otitis media or Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, conductive hearing loss teacher Beverly Walls said it was a timely reminder to parents to be vigilant when their children complain of ear ache or have difficulty understanding instructions.

3.2 NSW : Governor of NSW visits Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services

Another great afternoon at our Batemans Bay clinic with community and His excellency David Hurley, Governor of NSW and wife. Pictured above with CEO Robert Skeen .Many thanks to Aunty Muriel Slockee for her Welcome to Country and the deadly Koori Choir from the Batemans Bay Primary School. Another thank you to Marty Thomas who enchanted all on the Didgeridoo.

4. NT : Miwatj Health had a HUGE presence at the 2017 Garma Festival

Did you pay us a visit at Garma 2017!?

Miwatj Health had a HUGE presence at the 2017 Garma Festival. From Clinicians, to our Raypirri Rom team, we were everywhere!

Our clinic was a great success, with 26 staff assisting over the four days, including 3 Aboriginal Health Practitioners and an admin staff member from Galiwin’ku (Elcho Island). Thank you to everyone to dedicated their time (and long weekend) to help provide a much needed service for the festival.

Miwatj Health would also like to thank Captain Starlight for coming all the way from Darwin to entertain the children; the clinic would not have been the same without you.

Our #YakaNgarali Team also went out to Garma to educate community members on the harmful affects of smoking. They tested approximately 40 people using the Smokerlyzer (check out our videos to see how the Smokerlyzer works), while also quizzing participants of the festival to gain a greater understanding of their knowledge around smoking facts.


Overall, we had a super successful weekend and cannot wait for Garma 2018!

5.VIC : KIRRAE Health Services at Framlingham Aboriginal Reserve funded to fight ice

KIRRAE Health Services is one of just 13 Victorian community groups to receive state government funding to help in the fight against ice.

The health service based at the Framlingham Aboriginal Reserve will receive $10,000 for an early intervention and prevention program targeting males aged eight to 17.

The state government funding is aimed at tackling ice through “a range of localised activities, including workshops, forums, social media, music events and education programs aimed at sporting communities”.

Kirrae Health Services will use the funding through its Koko Blokes program. “Koko” is a Kirrae Whurrong word meaning “younger brother”.

The program deals with positive role-modelling and issues around drug and alcohol use, domestic violence and respect.

6.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service Mt Isa supports another cataract blitz

Seventeen patients were in Mount Isa this month for the north-west Queensland city’s latest “cataract blitz”.

Not –for-profit organisation Check UP funded the North west Hospital and Health Service (NWHHS) to provide the eye surgery, targeted at Indigenous people form remote communities.

It follows a cataract surgery “blitz” last October. Patients travelled from Doomadgee, Mornington Island, Normanton, Cloncurry and Camooweal this month. Their pre-surgery clinics were conducted by telehealth, a first for cataract surgery, according to outreach coordinator Amy Davy.

“Providing Telehealth as an option for our patients from outlying communities reduces the number of trips or length of stay during their surgical procedures, so we’re pleased with the success of this, and will be utilising telehealth in similar situations,” she said.

Ms Davy praised the work Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service Gidgee healing’s Blake Fagan, who provided transport for the patients, and NWHHS Indigenous liaison officer Melissa Nathan, who assisted the patients through their eye surgery.

Visiting ophthalmologist Andrew Foster conducted 19 operations in 2 days, completing a cataract surgery every half hour.

“This blitz” is a very good system for getting patients treated,” he said.

“Doing it in a group like this is very effective as they support each other, and know each other. It works very well, with no “fail to attends”.

Dr Foster is based on the Sunshine Coast and flies into Mount Isa every month to do eye surgery.

6.2 QLD : Jobs and health benefits in $120M boost for Indigenous infrastructure

Indigenous communities across Queensland are set to benefit from critical infrastructure upgrades, with a $120 million boost over four years to improve water, wastewater and solid waste infrastructure.

Visiting Mornington Island, Aurukun and Pormpuraaw this week, Minister for Local Government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Mark Furner said the Indigenous Councils Critical Infrastructure Program funding was vital for the health of communities.

“I’m extremely proud to announce the Palaszczuk Government’s commitment to strengthen indigenous communities has been backed with our $120 million investment,” Mr Furner said.

“The program is about ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote communities have infrastructure to improve living conditions and provide a sustainable future.

“This funding will be tailored to each community, supporting the infrastructure they need now and into the future, helping to close the gap on disadvantage.

“One of the great things about this program is that the councils actually develop the skills locally to manage the infrastructure and projects moving forward.”

Minister Furner said for councils in remote locations, access, distance and logistics meant the cost of the projects could be up to seven times higher than mainland and metropolitan areas.

“The level of funding provided for the Indigenous Councils Critical Infrastructure Program is crucial to meet the additional challenges many of these communities face.

“Communities will be pleased to know that the first stage of project approvals are already underway and some of the most vital infrastructure projects will commence shortly.”

On-site condition assessments have been conducted to help prioritise projects that are necessary to the health and safety of communities and designed to meet the specific needs of each location.

7.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Health Workers out to break HEP.C stigma

By Jillian Mundy

Don’t be shamed to be screened or treated for hepatitis C. It is now curable in as little as eight weeks with the latest medicine, which is really available in Australia. That’s the message Aboriginal health worker Aaron Everett and land manager Jarrod Edwards want to spread. The two Tasmanian Aboriginal men, spoke at the second World Indigenous Peoples, Conference on Viral Hepatitis in Alaska thi month, want to break the stigma around viral hepatitis.

Mr Edwards is keen to share the journey of his own diagnosis treatment and recovery from hep-C. “I want to encourage other Aboriginal people to get screened and if they test positive have the treatment, “he told the Koori Mail.

“The advances in the treatment have come a long way and the side –effects I got don’t exist now”.

Mr Edwards encouraged people to also talk about hep-C to break the stigma. He said he was shocked when an Aboriginal health check in 2006 returned positive for the illness.

“I was an intravenous drug user at the time, but I was always really clean and careful with injecting equipment. I really don’t know how I got it. The diagnosis hit me for a six,” he said.

At first he did not seek treatment attributing the reluctance to his lifestyle.

“It was a stigma thing. I felt dirty,“ he said. “It was a long journey though. It took me five years.

“It was the holistic, community approach of the Aboriginal health service that gave me the ability to begin my healing journey, which included working on country”.

Mr Edwards said treatment at the time took 12 months and included weekly injections, daily pills, anti-depressants and regular visits to a psychiatrist.

There were also side-effects such as hair loss, fatigue to the point of passing out and very fragile and dry skin.

Mr Edwards has no doubt that without treatment he would be dead. “My liver would have packed it in,“ he said.

Mr Edwards is now cured and, coupled with his lifestyle changes, is proud to be a father and productive member of his community.

He also attributes his healing to the support of his partner, Aboriginal health practitioner Candy Bartlett.

“I wanted to have a long-term relationship, a family, a home of our own and be able to come back and on country”, he said.

DON’T HESITATE

These days Mr Edwards urges people not hesitate in seeking treatment.

“Don’t be ashamed of it. It doesn’t matter how you got it; just go and treat it,” he says.

Mr Everett, one of the clinical team working with patients during screening and treatment for hepatitis C at the Aboriginal health service in Hobart, said people are often shamed about the virus.

“it’s not a highly spoken about virus, because of the stigma on how it might have been contracted, often through sharing injecting equipment,” he said.

Mr Everett wants people to be open about being screened and treated, to help break the stigma surrounding viral hepatitis and in turn help eliminate it.

“Come in and be checked. Don’t be ashamed. It is not a death sentence,“ he said. “But it’s a different story if left untreated, especially when combined with an unhealthy lifestyle or other health issues it can be an extra burden, yet can be totally cured.”.

New direct-acting antiviral medicines which were added to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) last year have revolutionised hep-C treatment by increasing the cure rate to close to 100% and reducing treatment duration and side-effects.

Viral Hepatitis is usually transmitted through the re-use of contaminated injecting equipment. It can be spread through unscreened blood transfusions and inadequate sterilisation of medical equipment (highly unlikely in Australia these days), It can also be transmitted sexually, from mother to child and through contaminated sharp grooming equipment.

People with hepatitis can be unaware, and unknowingly pass on the virus.

The conference Mr Edwards and Mr Everett are attending aims to ensure Indigenous communities around the world are given the same access to prevention, testing and treatment as other people.

The World Hepatitis Alliance aims to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030

8. Deadly Choices QLD trains up the Nganampa health team

Just like the Nganampa Health Service staff, you can eat healthy and be the best version of yourself.

Some great photos from when Deadly Choices were up in Umuwa to share their experiences, wisdom and host training for the Nganampa team

Please share

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Immunisation : Health Minister @GregHuntMP launches a $5.5 #GetTheFacts campaign encouraging parents to vaccinate their children.

” Free vaccinations under the National Immunisation Program can be accessed through community controlled Aboriginal Medical Services, local health services or general practitioners (see part 2 below)

 Health disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians continue to be a priority for Australian governments.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are significantly more affected by: low birth weight, chronic diseases and trauma resulting in early deaths and poor social and emotional health.

Historically, immunisation has been and remains, a simple, timely, effective and affordable way to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health, delivering positive outcomes for Australians of all ages.

Reports that focus on vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs) and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are published regularly by the National Centre for Immunisation Research (NCIRS).

From NACCHO Post  #Aboriginal Health and #Immunisation @AIHW reports Aboriginal children aged 5 national immunisation rate of 94.6% 

Download Healthy Communities:

AIHW_HC_Report_Imm_Rates_June_2017

See Previous NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WorldImmunisationWeek : @healthgovau Vaccination for our Mob

The federal government is spending $5.5 million to encourage parents to vaccinate their children.

Specific info about Aboriginal health and Immunisation see part 2

Health Minister Greg Hunt says while more than 93 per cent of five-year-olds are fully vaccinated, immunisation rates in some parts of Australia remain low.

The “Get Facts about Immunisation” campaign, launched at Melbourne’s Royal Children’s Hospital yesterday , will target parents in these areas through child care centres and social media.

Immunologist Ian Frazer says vaccinating a child protects not just them but the wider community.

“We still see cases of disease outbreaks, particularly in areas of low immunisation coverage, so it’s important immunisation rates are as high as possible,” he said in a statement.

“A parent will never know when their child may come into contact with someone who has got one of these infections.”

What is immunisation?

Immunisation is a safe and effective way of protecting your child against serious diseases.

Immunisation protects your child from harmful infections before they come into contact with them. It uses their body’s natural defences to build resistance to specific infections. When they come in contact with that disease in the future, their immune system remembers it, and responds quickly to prevent the disease from developing.

After immunisation, your child is far less likely to catch the disease. If your child does catch the disease, their illness will be less severe and their recovery quicker than an unimmunised child.

Immunisation or vaccination – what’s the difference?

‘Vaccination’ means getting a vaccine – either as an injection or an oral dose.

‘Immunisation’ is the term for both the process of getting the vaccine and becoming immune to the disease as a result.

Australia’s National Immunisation Program 

The Australian Government funds the National Immunisation Program , which provides vaccines against 17 diseases, including 15 diseases important in childhood.

How immunisation works

Vaccines stimulate the body’s natural defences

Children come into contact with many germs, including bacteria and viruses each day and their immune system responds in various ways to protect the body. Vaccines strengthen the body’s immune system by training it to quickly recognise and clear out germs (bacteria and viruses) that the vaccination has made them familiar with.

When you’re vaccinated, your body produces an immune response. This is how your body defends itself against bacteria and viruses and other harmful substances.

When you come in contact with that disease in the future, your immune system remembers it. Your immune system responds quickly to prevent the disease from developing.

Without a vaccine, a child can only become immune to a disease by being exposed to the germ, with the risk of severe illness. Sometimes your child will need more than one dose of a vaccine. This is because a young child’s immune system does not work as well as an older child or adult. The immune system of young children is still maturing.

Vaccination helps to protect the community from contagious diseases.

The National Immunisation Program has further details about how vaccines help immunity.

Part 2 : Aboriginal health and Immunisation

A number of immunisation programs are available for people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent. These programs provide protection against some of the most harmful infectious diseases that cause severe illness and deaths in our communities.

Immunisations are provided for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander in the following age groups:

  • Children aged 0-five
  • Children aged 10-15
  • People aged 15+
  • People aged 50+

Free vaccinations under the National Immunisation Program can be accessed through community controlled Aboriginal Medical Services, local health services or general practitioners.

Children aged 0-five

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0-five should receive the routine vaccines given to other children. You can see a list of these vaccines in the Children 0-five page.

In addition, children aged 0-five of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent can receive the following additional vaccines funded under the National Immunisation Program:

Pneumococcal disease

An additional booster dose of pneumococcal vaccine is required between the ages of 12 and 18 months. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in Queensland, the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia continue to be at risk of pneumococcal disease for a longer period than other children.

This program does not apply to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania or the Australian Capital Territory, where the rate of pneumococcal disease is similar to that of non-Indigenous children.

Hepatitis A

This vaccination is given because hepatitis A is more common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in in Queensland, the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia than it is among other children. Two doses of vaccine are given six months apart starting over the age of 12 months.

The age at which hepatitis A and pneumococcal vaccines are given varies among the four states and territories.

Influenza (flu)

From 2015, the flu vaccine will be provided free for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged six months to five years is available under the National Immunisation Program. The flu shot will protect your children against the latest seasonal flu virus.

Some children over the age of five years with other medical conditions should also have the flu shot to reduce their risk of developing severe influenza.

Children aged 10 – 15

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 10-15 should receive the following routine vaccines given to other children aged 10-15:

  • Varicella (chickenpox)
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (whooping cough) (dTpa)

People aged 15+

Pneumococcal disease

Pneumococcal vaccines are free for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from 50 years of age, as well as those aged 15 to 49 years who are at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease.

Influenza (Flu)

Due to disease burden influenza vaccines are free for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged six months to five years old and 15 years old or over. The flu shot will protect you against the latest seasonal flu virus.

More information:

NACCHO NEWS ALERT: COAG Health Ministers Council Communique acknowledge the importance #ACCHO’s advancing Aboriginal health

 

  Included in this NACCHO Aboriginal Health News Alert

  1. All issues 11 included in  Communique highlighting ACCHO health
  2. Health Ministers approve Australia’s National Digital Health Strategy
  3. Transcript Health Minister Hunt Press Conference

” The Federal Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt, attended the COAG Health Council discussed the Commonwealth’s current work on Indigenous health priorities.

In particular this included the development of the 2018 iteration of the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 that will incorporate strategies and actions to address the social determinants and cultural determinants of health.

Ministers also considered progress on other key Indigenous health issues including building workforce capability, cultural safety and environmental health, where jurisdictions can work together more closely with the Commonwealth to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Ministers acknowledged the importance of collaboration and the need to coordinate activities across governments to support a culturally safe and comprehensive health system.

Ministers also acknowledge the importance of community controlled organisations in advancing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. ”

1.Development of the next iteration of the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 COAG Health Council 

Read over 50 NACCHO NATSIHP Articles published over past 50 years

INTRODUCTION

The federal, state and territory Health Ministers met in Brisbane on August 4 at the COAG Health Council to discuss a range of national health issues.

The meeting was chaired by the Victorian Minister for Health, the Hon Jill Hennessy MP.

Health Ministers welcomed the New South Wales Minister for Mental Health, the Hon Tanya Davies MP, the Victorian Minister for Mental Health, the Hon Martin Foley MP, the ACT Minister for Mental Health Mr Shane Rattenbury and the Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt AM, MP who participated in a joint discussion with Health Ministers about mental health issues.

Major items discussed by Health Ministers today included:

2.Andrew Forrest and the Eliminate Cancer Initiative

Mr Andrew Forrest joined the meeting to address Health Ministers in his capacity as Chairman of the Minderoo Foundation to discuss the Eliminate Cancer Initiative. The Minderoo Foundation is one of Autralia’s largest and most active philanthropic groups. It has established the Eliminate Cancer Initiatve (the Initiative), a global initiative dedicated to making cancer non-lethal with some of the world’s leading global medicine and anti-cancer leaders.

The Initiative is a united effort to convert cancer into a non-lethal disease through global collaboration of scientific, medical and academic institutes, commercially sustained through the support of the philanthropic, business and government sectors worldwide.

Australia has a critical role to play in this highly ambitious and thoroughly worthwhile goal.

3.Family violence and primary care

Today, Health Ministers discussed the significant health impacts on those people experiencing family violence.

Health Ministers acknowledged that health-care providers, particularly those in a primary care setting, are in a unique position to create a safe and confidential environment to enable the disclosure of violence, while offering appropriate support and referrals to other practitioners and services.

Recognising the importance of national leadership in this area, Ministers agreed to develop a plan to address barriers to primary care practitioners identifying and responding to patients experiencing family violence.

Ministers also agreed to work with the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners to develop and implement a national training package.

Further advice will be sought from Primary Health Networks on existing family violence services, including Commonwealth, State and NGO service providers in their regions, with a view to developing an improved whole-of-system responses to the complex needs of clients who disclose family violence

4.Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan

Health Ministers endorsed the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan 2017-2022 and its Implementation Plan.

The Fifth Plan is focused on improvements across eight targeted priority areas:

1. Achieving integrated regional planning and service delivery

2. Effective suicide prevention

3. Coordinated treatment and supports for people with severe and complex mental illness

4. Improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and suicide prevention

5. Improving the physical health of people living with mental illness and reducing early mortality

6. Reducing stigma and discrimination

7. Making safety and quality central to mental health service delivery

8. Ensuring that the enablers of effective system performance and system improvement are in place

The Fifth Plan also responds to calls for a national approach to address suicide prevention and will be used to guide other sectors and to support health agencies to interact with other portfolios to drive action in this priority area.

Ongoing collaboration and engagement across the sector and with consumers and carers is required to successfully implement the Fifth Plan and achieve meaningful reform to improve the lives of people living with mental illness including the needs of children and young people.

Health Ministers also agreed that mental health workforce issues would be considered by the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council.

5.The National Psychosocial Supports Program

Health Ministers agreed to establish a time-limited working group to progress the Commonwealth’s National Psychosocial Supports program. This will have the objective of developing bilateral agreements to support access to essential psychosocial supports for persons with severe mental illness resulting in psychosocial disability who are not eligible for the NDIS.

Those bilateral agreements will take into account existing funding being allocated for this purpose by states and territories.

6.Strengthened penalties and prohibition orders under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law

Health Ministers agreed to proceed with amendments to the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (the National Law) to strengthen penalties for offences committed by people who hold themselves out to be a registered health practitioner, including those who use reserved professional titles or carry out restricted practices when not registered.

Ministers also agreed to proceed with an amendment to introduce a custodial sentence with a maximum term of up to three years for these offences.

These important reforms will be fast tracked to strengthen public protection under the National Law. Preparation will now commence on a draft amendment bill to be brought forward to Ministers for approval, with a view to this being introduced to the Queensland Parliament in 2018. The Western Australian Parliament is also expected to consider legislative changes to the Western Australian National Law.

7.Amendment to mandatory reporting provisions for treating health practitioner

Health Ministers agree that protecting the public from harm is of paramount importance as is supporting practitioners to seek health and in particular mental health treatment as soon as possible.

Health Ministers agreed that doctors should be able to seek treatment for health issues with confidentiality whilst also preserving the requirement for patient safety.

A nationally consistent approach to mandatory reporting provisions will provide confidence to health practitioners that they can feel able to seek treatment for their own health conditions anywhere in Australia.

Agree for AHMAC to recommend a nationally consistent approach to mandatory reporting, following discussion paper and consultation with consumer and practitioner groups, with a proposal to be considered by COAG Health Council at their November 2017 meeting, to allow the amendment to be progressed as part of Tranche 1A package of amendments and related guidelines.

8.National Digital Health Strategy and Australian Digital Health Agency Forward Work Plan 2018–2022

Health Ministers approved the National Digital Health Strategy and the Australian Digital Health Agency Work Plan for 2018-2022.

Download Strategy and work plan here  

The Strategy has identified the priority areas that form the basis of Australia’s vision for digital health.

This Strategy will build on Australia’s existing leadership in digital health care and support consumers and clinicians to put the consumer at the centre of their health care and provide choice, control and transparency.

Expanding the public reporting of patient safety and quality measures

Health Ministers supported Queensland and other interested jurisdictions to collaboratively identify options in relation to aligning patient safety and quality reporting standards across public and private hospitals nationally.

Ministers agreed that the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) would undertake work with other interested jurisdictions to identify options in relation to aligning public reporting standards of quality healthcare and patient safety across public and private hospitals nationally.

The work be incorporated into the national work being progressed on Australia’s health system performance information and reporting frameworks.

 

9.National human biomonitoring program

Health Ministers noted that human biomonitoring data can play a key role in identifying chemicals which potentially cause adverse health effects and action that may need to be taken to protect public health.

Health Ministers agreed that a National Human Biomonitoring Program could be beneficial in assisting with the understanding of chemical exposures in the Australian population.

Accordingly, Ministers agreed that the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council will explore this matter in more detail by undertaking a feasibility assessment of a National Human Biomonitoring Program.

Clarification of roles, responsibilities and relationships for national bodies established under the National Health Reform Agreement

States and territories expressed significant concern that the proposed Direction to IHPA will result in the Commonwealth retrospectively not funding activity that has been already delivered by states and territories but not yet funded by the Commonwealth.

States and territories were concerned that this could reduce services to patients going forward as anticipated funding from the Commonwealth will be less than currently expected.

The Commonwealth does not agree with the concerns of the states and territories and will seek independent advice from the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority (IHPA) to ensure hospital service activity for 2015-2016 has been calculated correctly. The Commonwealth committed to work constructively and cooperatively with all jurisdictions to better understand the drivers of increased hospital services in funding agreements.

10.Legitimate and unavoidable costs of providing public hospital services in Western Australia

Health Ministers discussed a paper by Western Australia on legitimate and unavoidable costs of providing public hospital services in Western Australia, particularly in regional and remote areas, and recognised that those matters create a cumulative disadvantage to that state. Health Ministers acknowledged that Western Australia will continue to work with the Commonwealth Government and the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority to resolve those matters.

11.Vaccination

Health Ministers unanimously confirmed the importance of vaccination and rejected campaigns against vaccination.

All Health Ministers expressed their acknowledgement of the outgoing Chair, the Hon Ms Jill Hennessy and welcomed the incoming Chair Ms Meegan Fitzharris MLA from the Australian Capital Territory.

Health Ministers approve Australia’s National Digital Health Strategy

Digital information is the bedrock of high quality healthcare.

The benefits for patients are signicant and compelling: hospital admissions avoided, fewer adverse drug events, reduced duplication of tests, better coordination of care for people with chronic and complex conditions, and better informed treatment decisions. Digital health can help save and improve lives.

To support the uptake of digital health services, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Health Council today approved Australia’s National Digital Health Strategy (2018-2022).

Download Strategy and work plan here  

In a communique issued after their council meeting in Brisbane August 4 , the Health Ministers noted:

“The Strategy has identified the priority areas that form the basis of Australia’s vision for digital health. It will build on Australia’s existing leadership in digital health care and support consumers and clinicians to put the consumer at the centre of their health care and provide choice, control, and transparency.”

Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA) CEO Tim Kelsey welcomed COAG approval for the new Strategy.

“Australians are right to be proud of their health services – they are among the best, most accessible, and efficient in the world.

Today we face new health challenges and rapidly rising demand for services. It is imperative that we work together to harness the power of technology and foster innovation to support high quality, sustainable health and care for all, today and into the future,” he said.

The Strategy – Safe, seamless, and secure: evolving health and care to meet the needs of modern Australia – identifies seven key priorities for digital health in Australia including delivery of a My Health Record for every Australian by 2018 – unless they choose not to have one.

More than 5 million Australians already have a My Health Record, which provides potentially lifesaving access to clinical reports of medications, allergies, laboratory tests, and chronic conditions. Patients and consumers can access their My Health Record at any time online or on their mobile phone.

The Strategy will also enable paper-free secure messaging for all clinicians and will set new standards to allow real-time sharing of patient information between hospitals and other care professionals.

Australian Medical Association (AMA) President Dr Michael Gannon has welcomed the Strategy’s focus on safe and secure exchange of clinical information, as it will empower doctors to deliver improved patient care.

“Doctors need access to secure digital records. Having to wade through paperwork and chase individuals and organisations for information is

archaic. The AMA has worked closely with the ADHA on the development of the new strategy and looks forward to close collaboration on its implementation,” Dr Gannon said.

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) President Dr Bastian Seidel said that the RACGP is working closely and collaboratively with the ADHA and other stakeholders to ensure that patients, GPs, and other health professionals have access to the best possible data.

“The Strategy will help facilitate the sharing of high-quality commonly understood information which can be used with confidence by GPs and other health professionals. It will also help ensure this patient information remains confidential and secure and is available whenever and wherever it is needed,” Dr Seidel said.

Pharmacy Guild of Australia National President George Tambassis said that technology would increasingly play an important role in supporting sustainable healthcare delivery.

“The Guild is committed to helping build the digital health capabilities of community pharmacies and advance the efficiency, quality, and delivery of healthcare to improve health outcomes for all Australians.

“We are working with the ADHA to ensure that community pharmacy dispensing and medicine-related services are fully integrated into the My Health Record – and are committed to supporting implementation of the National Digital Health Strategy as a whole,” George Tambassis said.

Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) President Dr Shane Jackson said that the Strategy would support more effective medicationmanagement, which would improve outcomes for patients and improve the efficiency of health services.

“There is significant potential for pharmacists to use digital health records as a tool to communicate with other health professionals, particularly during transitions of care,” Dr Jackson said.

The Strategy will prioritise development of new digital services to support newborn children, the elderly, and people living with chronic disease. It will also support wider use of telehealth to improve access to services, especially in remote and rural Australia and set standards for better information sharing in medical emergencies – between the ambulance, the hospital, and the GP.

Consumers Health Forum (CHF) Leanne Wells CEO said that the Strategy recognises the importance of empowering Australians to be makers and shapers of the health system rather than just the users and choosers.

“We know that when consumers are activated and supported to better self-manage and coordinate their health and care, we get better patient experience, quality care, and better health outcomes.

“Digital health developments, including My Health Record, are ways in which we can support that to happen. It’s why patients should also be encouraged to take greater control of their health information,” Leanne Wells said.

Medical Software Industry Association (MSIA) President Emma Hossack said that the Strategy distils seven key themes that set expectations at a national level.“The strategy recognises the vital role industry plays in providing the smarts and innovation on top of government infrastructure.

This means improved outcomes, research, and productivity. Industry is excited to work with the ADHA to develop the detailed actions to achieve the vision which could lead to Australia benefitting from one of the strongest health software industries in the world,” Emma Hossack said.

Health Informatics Society of Australia (HISA) CEO Dr Louise Schaper welcomed the Strategy’s focus on workforce development.

“If our complex health system is to realise the benefits from information and technology, and become more sustainable, we need clinical leaders with a sound understanding of digital health,” Dr Schaper said.

The Strategy was developed by all the governments of Australia in close partnership with patients, carers and the clinical professionals who serve them – together with leaders in industry and science.

The Strategy draws on evidence of clinical and economic benefit from many sources within Australia and overseas, and emphasises the priority of patient confidentiality as new digital services are implemented.

The ADHA has established a Cyber Security Centre to ensure Australian healthcare is at the cutting edge of international data security.

The ADHA, which has responsibility for co-ordinating implementation of the Strategy, will now be consulting with partners across the community to develop a Framework for Action. The framework will be published later this year and will detail implementation plans for the Strategy.

The National Digital Health Strategy Safe, seamless and secure: evolving health and care to meet the needs of modern Australia is available on

https://www.digitalhealth.gov.au/australias-national-digital-health-strategy (https://www.digitalhealth.gov.au/australias-national-digital-health-strategy)

Greg Hunt Press Conference

Topics: COAG Health Council outcomes; The Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan; support for doctors and nurses mental health; hospital funding; same-sex marriage

GREG HUNT:
Today was a huge breakthrough in terms of mental health. The Fifth National Mental Health Plan was approved by the states.

What this is about is enormous progress on suicide prevention. It has actually become the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan, so a real focus on suicide prevention.

In particular, the focus on what happens when people are discharged from hospital, the group in Australia that are most likely to take their own lives.

We actually know not just the group, but the very individuals who are most at risk. That’s an enormous step.

The second thing here is, as part of that plan, a focus on eating disorders, and it is a still-hidden issue. In 2017, the hidden issue of eating disorders, of anorexia and bulimia, and the prevalence and the danger of it is still dramatically understated in Australia.

The reality is that this is a silent killer and particularly women can be caught up for years and years, and so there’s a mutual determination, a universal determination to progress on eating disorders, and that will now be a central part of the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan.

And also, as part of that, we’ve included, at the Commonwealth’s request today, a real focus on early intervention services for young people under 16. Pat McGorry has referred to it as CATs for Kids, meaning Crisis Assessment Teams, and the opportunity.

And this is a really important step because, for many families, when they have a crisis, there’s nowhere to turn. This is a way through. So those are all enormous steps forward.

The other mental health area where we’ve made big, big progress is on allowing doctors to seek routine mental health treatment.

There’s an agreement by all of the states and territories to work with the Commonwealth on giving doctors a pathway so as they can seek routine mental health treatment without being reported to the professional bodies.

JOURNALIST:
What has led to the increased focus on eating disorders? Has there been an uptick in the number of suicides resulting from that, or has there been an uptick in the number of cases?

GREG HUNT:
No, this has been silently moving along. It’s a personal focus. There are those that I have known, and then when we looked the numbers shortly after coming in, and dealt with organisations such as the Butterfly Foundation, they explained that it’s been a high level issue with the worst rate of loss of life amongst any mental health condition.

And so that’s a combination both of suicide, but also of loss of life due to physical collapse. And so it’s what I would regard as a personal priority from my own experience with others, but then the advocacy of groups like Butterfly Foundation has finally landed. It should’ve happened earlier, but it’s happening on our watch now.

JOURNALIST:
That would be my next question, is that I’m sure advocacy groups will say this is great that it’s happened, but it’s taken the Government so long. Why is it that you’re focussing on it now as opposed to…?

GREG HUNT:
I guess, I’ve only just become Minister. So from day one, this is one of the things I’ve wanted to do, and I’m really, personally, deeply pleased that we’ve made this enormous progress.

So I would say this, I can’t speak for the past, it is overdue, but on our watch collectively we’ve taken a huge step forward today.

Then the last thing is I’ve seen some reports that Queensland and Victoria may have been upset that some of their statistical anomalies were referred to what’s called IHPA (Independent Hospital Pricing Authority).

The reason why is that some of their figures simply didn’t pass the pub test.

The independent authority will assess them, but when you have 4000 per cent growth in one year in some services, 3300 per cent growth in some years in other services, then it would be negligent and irresponsible not to review them.

It may be the case that there was a more than 40-fold increase in some services, but the only sensible thing for the Commonwealth to do is to review it.

But our funding goes up each year every year at a faster rate than the states’ funding, and it’s gone up by $7.7 billion dollars since the current health agreement with the states was struck.

JOURNALIST:
Is that, sorry, relating to private health insurance, or is that something separate?

GREG HUNT:
No, that’s just in relation to, a couple of the states lodged claims for massive growth in individual items.

JOURNALIST:
Thank you. So was there a directive given today regarding private health policies to the states? Was that something that was discussed or something that …?

GREG HUNT:
Our paper was noted, and the states will respond. So we’ve invited the states to respond, they’ll respond individually.

JOURNALIST:
And regarding that mental health plan, besides their new focus on eating disorders, how is it different from previous mental health plans?

GREG HUNT:
So, a much greater focus on suicide prevention, a much greater focus on eating disorders, and a much greater focus on care for young children under 16.

JOURNALIST:
Is that something that you can give more specific details about? You’re saying there’s a much greater focus, but is there any specific information about what that would mean?

GREG HUNT:
As part of the good faith, the Commonwealth, I’ve written to the head of what’s called the Medical Benefits Schedule Review, so the Medicare item review, Professor Bruce Robinson and asked him and their team to consider, for the first time, specific additional treatment, an additional treatment item and what would be appropriate for eating disorders.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

1.National : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations pharmacist Special Interest Group ( SIG )  launched

2.NT : Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service $2.4 million for culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services

3. WA : AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox speaks about cashless welfare cards

 4. WA  : Wrongful conviction shines light on lack of translators

 
 5. QLD Deadly Choices calls  for volunteers for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival

6. SA :  Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO promotes World Hepatitis Day.

7.VIC :  VAHS mob promotes Healthy Lifestyle message  at World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

8. QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council  Growing Deadly Families

9. NSW Redfern National Children’s Day Celebration

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

National : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations pharmacist Special Interest Group ( SIG )  launched

“For too long Aboriginal people have suffered shorter lifespans, been sicker and poorer than the average non-Indigenous Australian, however, highly trained pharmacists have a proven track record in delivering improved health outcomes when integrated into multidisciplinary practices,

“Strong international evidence supports pharmacists’ ability to improve a number of critical health outcomes, including significant reductions in blood pressure and cholesterol and improved diabetes control. A number of studies have also supported pharmacists’ cost-effectiveness.

Some ACCHOs have already shown leadership in the early adoption of pharmacists outside of any national programs or support structures. NACCHO and PSA are committed to supporting ACCHOs across Australia to meet the medicines needs in their communities by enhancing support for those wishing to embed a pharmacist into their service.”

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner said disparities in the health between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are confronting SEE Previous NACCHO post

Pictured above Mike Stephens Director of Medicines Programs and Policy in Cover Photo

See previous NACCHO Pharmacy posts

See previous NACCHO QUMAX posts

In recognition of the growing number of pharmacists working in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs), the peak national body for pharmacists, the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) has launched the ACCHO Special Interest Group (SIG).

The ACCHO SIG was launched on 30 July at PSA17 in Sydney during theAboriginal Health Service Pharmacist forum.

PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson said pharmacists working in ACCHOs have specific needs and skills and having a Special Interest Group with the primary role of supporting them will assist PSA to drive the growth of this career path.

“In many cases pharmacists working in these positions are providing innovative and diverse services that have the potential to be informative and relevant to the evolution of pharmacy services and inter-professional care.

“Consultation with these pharmacists and services about their needs is vital to ensure PSA and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) deliver relevant and meaningful benefits to PSA members and the wider pharmacy and health sectors,” Dr Jackson said.

A key role of the National ACCHO SIG Committee will be to provide up-to-date information to NACCHO and PSA on relevant issues that relate to both organisations.

This will include input on improvements to PSA’s professional development and practice support programs that benefit ACCHO pharmacists. The SIG will also provide NACCHO with input on pharmacy-related trends and practices that affect ACCHOs.

It is a joint committee to be run by PSA and NACCHO to foster collaboration, inform relevant policy and strengthen the relationships between these organisations with a shared commitment to embedding pharmacists in ACCHOs nationally.

PSA also welcomed the announcement of a trial to support Aboriginal health organisations to integrate pharmacists into their services.

The ACCHO SIG will support pharmacists participating in this trial.

Dr Jackson said having a culturally responsive pharmacist integrated within anAboriginal health service builds better relationships between patients and staff, leading to improved results in chronic disease management and Quality Use of Medicines.

 NT : Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service $2.4 million for culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services.

The Federal Government will provide up to $2.4 million for a tailored project to address family violence experienced by Indigenous women and children in Katherine.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said the funding formed part of the $25 million Indigenous-focused package under the Third Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

“I am pleased to announce this support for Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service, a local community service with specialist experience in supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families,” Minister Scullion said.

“The funding will deliver culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services.”

Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service CEO, Suzi Berto, said the project would provide intensive family-focused case management delivered within a trauma-informed framework to address behaviour often associated with domestic violence. It would also aim to break the cycle of domestic and family violence and child removals from families.

“Wurli welcomes this new program and would like to thank the Federal Government for selecting Wurli to take on this particular project,” Ms Berto said.

Minister Scullion said community-based, culturally-appropriate solutions were required to reduce the rate of family violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children.

“In total, $18.9 million will be invested in eight Indigenous community organisations across Australia to deliver a range of services, including trauma-informed therapeutic services for children, services for perpetrators to prevent future offending and intensive family-focused cased management.

“We have actively sought the views of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on how best to address family violence.

“Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service has been identified based on its expertise, as well as local needs in the community.

3. WA : AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox speaks about cashless welfare cards

” Targeting welfare is not, by itself, a panacea but it just might give Roebourne the circuit-breaker it needs to allow the state government to build a safe and resilient community.

There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the group did not support the “ill-conceived idea” that cashless welfare cards could turn the tide on child abuse.

FROM NEWS LTD

Paedophiles in Western Australia’s Pilbara region are allegedly using welfare payments to bribe children for sex, prompting the police commissioner to call for an expansion of the cashless welfare program.

But the Aboriginal Health Council of WA says the commissioner should be more concerned about policing in remote communities rather than advocating further disempowerment of indigenous people.

Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan said in an opinion piece in The West Australian newspaper on Tuesday that welfare cash was also being used for drugs, alcohol and gambling at Roebourne and surrounding Aboriginal communities.

He said in an area of about 1500 people, there were 184 known child sex abuse victims, with police charging 36 people with more than 300 offences since the operation began late last year, plus another 124 suspects.

Mr O’Callaghan, who will retire this month after 13 years as police commissioner, said that in 2014 the previous government noted 63 government and non-government providers delivering more than 200 services to Roebourne.

“Despite all of this effort, we have failed to protect the most vulnerable members of that community and have witnessed sufferers of abuse grow up and become offenders, and so the cycle continues,” he said.

“We often find children sexually abusing children.”

The commissioner said the problem was so widespread that some families had normalised it and he described the hopelessness as a “cancer quickly spreading throughout the community”.

“Given the longstanding issues in Roebourne, we ought now to be looking at more fundamental structural reform around welfare and income to reduce the opportunity for offending,” he said.

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the group did not support the “ill-conceived idea” that cashless welfare cards could turn the tide on child abuse.

“There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse,” she said.

“Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

Ms Nelson-Cox also said the commissioner’s admission that officers could not protect children in remote communities was gravely concerning.

Imagine if you were taken into custody to be questioned over a crime you did not commit in a language you could not even read and write in — and were then charged with murder.

4. WA  : Wrongful conviction shines light on lack of translators

It sounds like a third world travel nightmare.

But this actually happened in Australia to Gene Gibson, a shy young man from the tiny Gibson Desert community of Kiwirrkurra.

As reported ABC

While there were many complex factors which led Mr Gibson to being jailed for the manslaughter of Josh Warneke in 2014, after a conviction which was quashed earlier this year, it might never have ended up that way if he had a skilled interpreter to steer him through crucial meetings with police.

Mr Gibson’s first language is Pintupi, with Kukutja his second.

He has a limited understanding of English and his cognitive impairment makes it difficult for him to comprehend complex information.

Today the Court of Appeal outlined its reasons for quashing his conviction, explaining that Mr Gibson’s problems with language were one reason why “the plea was not attributable to a genuine consciousness of guilt”.

It gives many examples of how Mr Gibson often did not understand his own lawyer, who in turn could not understand what the interpreter was telling Mr Gibson about important matters like how to plead.

He was originally charged with murder but pleaded guilty to manslaughter after police interviews were deemed inadmissible for several reasons, including the lack of a qualified interpreter.

Stranger in your own land

Mr Gibson, like many Indigenous Australians who do not speak English as a first language, is somewhat like a foreigner in his own justice system.

It is something which concerns WA’s chief justice Wayne Martin.

Earlier this month, he told a conference of criminal lawyers in Bali that language was causing “significant disadvantage” for Indigenous people in the justice system, with WA’s translation services not reaching everyone who needed them.

“If we do not have properly resourced and effective interpreter services for Aboriginal people, then they will continue to fare badly in the criminal justice system,” he wrote in a submission to a Senate committee inquiry last year.

The interpretation and translation of Indigenous languages for the WA justice system is undoubtedly a niche industry.

There are about 45 Indigenous languages in the Kimberley, many of them considered highly endangered. Fewer than 600 people speak Pintupi, according to the Australian Indigenous Languages Database.

So not only do you have to find an interpreter who speaks Pintupi, but you also need someone who is trained to understand police and court proceedings, and relay them to a defendant.

It is a massive problem, according to Faith Baisden, the coordinator of First Languages, which helps Indigenous communities maintain their languages.

“Particularly in those small community groups we’re talking about, we’re not necessarily going to find someone who’s got the skill and the confidence to be trained. It takes really specialised training,” she said.

Another problem is that WA’s only Indigenous language interpreting service is struggling for funding.

The Kimberley Interpreting Service (KIS) is dependent on federal money after being stripped of funding by the WA Government in recent years.

But its chief executive Dee Lightfoot said she was hopeful of securing money from the new WA Government in September’s budget, with Treasurer Ben Wyatt writing to inform her he was reviewing her request.

She said Mr Gibson needed an interpreter to help him navigate the justice system from the very start

5. QLD Deadly Choices calls  for volunteers for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival

 

Volunteers aged 16+ years are needed for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival! More details are below! To register your interest please email admin@murrirugbyleague.com.au.

6. SA :  Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO promotes World Hepatitis Day. 

World Hepatitis Day. Nunkuwarrin Yunti provides treatment, Specialists, prevention, advocacy and information support for people with Hepatitis. Here is Jorge from our Harm Minimisation Team #showyourface

OR VIEW HERE

7.VIC :  VAHS mob promotes Healthy Lifestyle message  at World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

Check out our newest healthy lifestyle local sport champions!

These deadly women make up the Maal-Ya Indigenous Basketball team. They are off to Vancouver, Canada on Sunday to play in the World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

So proud to see these women represent their mobs and proudly display our Healthy Lifestyle Values: staying smoke free, healthy eating, active living, drinking water and being deadly role models!

With Georgia Bamblett, Courtney Alice, Thamar Atkinson, Montanna Hudson, Sophie Atkinson, Klarindah Hudson-Proctor, Edward Bryant, Tyler Atkinson and June Bamblett.

Good luck Maal-Ya! Can’t wait to hear how you go! Stay tuned to this page and Sports Carnival for updates throughout the week!

#StaySmokeFree #Gofor2and5 #DrinkWaterUMob

Sportcarnival VicHealth Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc

8. Apunipima Cape York Health Council  Growing Deadly Families

Apunipima Cape York Health Council Region Two Manager Johanna Neville and Maternal and Child Health Worker Florida Getawan will head to Brisbane today to deliver a presentation on the Baby One Program to the Queensland Clinical Senate’s Growing Deadly Families Forum.

Johanna and Florida will focus on the Baby One Program, an integral part of antenatal care in Cape York

‘Apunipima’s award winning, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander – led home visiting Baby One Program runs from pregnancy until the baby is 1000 days old,’ Florida said.

‘Baby Baskets – an integral feature of the Baby One Program – are provided to Families at key times during pregnancy and the postnatal period. The Baskets act as both an incentive to encourage families to engage with health care providers, as a catalyst for health education and as a means to provide essential items to families in Cape York.’

‘It’s well known that best practice care during pregnancy and baby’s early years has been proven to provide positive health outcomes. There is a still a gap in the maternal and child health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders compared to other Australians. It’s this gap we are trying to bridge with the Baby One Program which sees Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers visit families in their homes to deliver health care and health education.’

Florida Getawan helps deliver the Baby One Program in Cairns and Kowanyama and said home visiting makes the difference when it comes to mums getting care.

‘As a Maternal and Child Health Worker I spend time in Cairns and Kowanyama, educating pregnant women about healthy eating, what’s good and what’s not good for them during pregnancy such as the dangers of smoking, and safe sleeping for bubba,’ she explained. ‘I love doing home visits and yarning with mothers about healthy parenting and being a support person for them in their own space.

I love being there for families who are too shy to come to the clinic so if I can engage with them in their own environment, families feel safe to access health information I love watching mothers grow because I’ve had seven pregnancies myself and can relate to what they are going through and I’m able to develop a healthy relationship with them.’
Johanna and Florida will deliver their presentation at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre 10:50 am on Thursday 3 August 2017.

About the Growing Deadly Families Forum

The Queensland Clinical Senate – which provides clinical leadership by developing strategies to safeguard and promote the delivery of high quality, safe and sustainable patient care – is holding the Growing Deadly Families Forum which will focus on improving the health of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and families, through a healthier start to life.

The Forum runs from 3 – 4 August.

 

9. NSW Redfern National Children’s Day Celebration

AMS Redfern will be celebrating ‘National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day’ come along and share stories about the importance of staying connected to culture and having strong positive family relationships
Friday 4th August from 2:30 pm-4:30 pm
#BBQ will be provided
#Value our rights, Respect our Culture, Bring us home.
#Limited Giveaways

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conference : Our #NACCHOagm17 Registrations , Partnerships , Speakers Expressions of Interest are now OPEN

 

We welcome you to attend the 2017 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference.

On this page you find links to

1.Registrations now open

2. Booking Your Accommodation

3. Book Your Flights

4. Expressions of Interest Speakers, case studies and table top presentations Close

5. Social Program

6.Conferences Partnership Sponsorship Opportunities

7. Conference Poster : Jimmy Clements 1927- 2017

8. NACCHO Conference Website

9. #NACCHOAgm17 and social media

10.NACCHO Conference HELP Contacts

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Where :Hyatt Hotel Canberra

Dates : Members’ Conference: 31 October – 1 November 2017
Annual General Meeting: 2 November 2017

Register HERE

2. Booking Your Accommodation

The NACCHO 2017 Members’ Conference and Annual General Meeting will be held at the Hyatt Hotel Canberra. Our Accommodation Partners have secured discounted conference accommodation rates at both the Hyatt Hotel Canberra as well other nearby hotels. These rates are exclusive to attendees of the NACCHO Conference.

Hurry, as these rates are for a limited time only. Be sure to book early to secure your room!

Booking Your Accommodation HERE

3. Book Your Flights To Attend The NACCHO 2017 Conference

Take advantage of the dedicated NACCHO conference Flight Booking Portal, where you can book best fare of the day flights across all major carriers with zero booking fees!

Book Your Flights HERE

4. Expressions of Interest Speakers, case studies and table top presentations Close

NACCHO is now calling for Expressions of Interest (EOI) from Member Services for speakers, case studies and table top presentations for the 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference.

This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level. In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

You will receive a 10% discount to the Conference, either full or day registration however this (does not include voting-member registration) if your EOI is successful.

We are seeking EOIs for the following Conference Sessions:

Day 1 (31st October 2017)

Concurrent Session 1 (3.15 – 4.15 pm) – A historical legacy of our Member services, the health sector today and building capacity for the future.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Rural or Remote services. Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes.

Concurrent Session 2 (3.15 – 4.15 pm) – Workforce Innovation, Harnessing member resources in the sector, new Challenges and Opportunities to enhance our services.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Rural or Remote services. Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes.

Day 2 (1st November 2017)

Concurrent Session 3 (10.45-11.30 am) – Best Practice Primary Health Care for Clients with Chronic Disease

This concurrent session will present will present Case Studies on best practice primary health care for clients with chronic disease. EOIs on the following topics will be considered;

  • Engagement/Health Promotion
  • Models of Primary Health Care and
  • Clinical and Service Delivery.

OR

Table Top Presentations (2.05-3.00 pm)

Presenters will rotate to each conference table and provide a brief presentation on a key project or program currently being delivered in their service. Presentation will be 10 minutes – 5 minutes to present and then a 5 minute discussion. Tabletop presentations will be more of an informal yarning session with up to 10 participants at each table.

How to submit an EOI

Please provide the following information and submit via email to NACCHO-AGM@naccho.org.au by COB Monday 21st August 2017.

  • Name of Member Service
  • Name of presenter(s)
  • Name of program
  • Name of session
  • Contact details: Phone | Mobile | Email

Provide the key points you want to cover – in no more than 500 words outline the program/ project/ topic you would like to present on. Describe how your presentation/case study supports the 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference theme ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

Submit an EOI HERE

5. Social Program

Continue reading

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Events / Workshops #SaveADate #NACCHOAgm17 @IAHA_National @AIDAAustralia

4 August : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s day

7 August Victorian Aboriginal Health Education Conference

8-9 August 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis Alaska in August 2017

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

20-23 September AIDA Conference 2017

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra Details to be released soon (July 2017)

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

If you have a Conference, Workshop Funding opportunity or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media

mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

Developed in consultation with NACCHO and produced by the Mental Health Professionals’ Network a federally funded initiative

Join our interdisciplinary panel as we explore a collaborative approach to reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services.

The webinar format will include a facilitated question and answer session between panel members exploring key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities.

The panel will discuss strategies to enhance cultural awareness and develop responsive services for Indigenous communities affected by incarceration. Strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing of individuals will also be explored.

When: Wednesday 13th September, 2017

Time: 4.30pm – 5.45pm (AEST)

Where: Online – via your computer, tablet or mobile

Cost: Free

Panel:

  • Dr Mark Wenitong (Medical Advisor based in QLD)
  • Dr Marshall Watson (Psychiatrist based in SA)
  • Dr Jeffrey Nelson (Clinical Psychologist based in QLD)
  • Julie Tongs (OAM) (CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service – Narrabundah ACT)

Facilitator:

  • Dr Mary Emeleus (General Practitioner and Psychotherapist based in QLD)

Read more about our panel.

Learning Outcomes:

Through an exploration of incarceration, the webinar will provide participants with the opportunity to:

  • Describe key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities
  • Develop strategies to enhance culturally aware and responsive services for Indigenous people and communities affected by incarceration
  • Identify strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing

Before the webinar:

Register HERE

4 August each year, Children’s Day

SNAICC has announced the theme for this year’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s day

Held on 4 August each year, Children’s Day has been celebrated across the country since 1988 and is Australia’s largest national day to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

The theme for Children’s Day 2017 is Value Our Rights, Respect Our Culture, Bring Us Home which recognises the 20th anniversary of the Bringing them Home Report and the many benefits our children experience when they are raised with strong connections to family and culture.

The ‘Children’s Day’ website is now open

7 August Victorian Aboriginal Health Education Conference

See above for registration links

8-9 August 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis Alaska USA

2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis in Anchorage Alaska in August 2017 after the 1st which was held in Alice Springs in 2014.

Download Brochure Save the date – World Indigenous Hepatitis Conference Final
Further details are available at https://www.wipcvh2017.org/

20-23 September AIDA Conference 2017

The AIDA Conference in 2017 will celebrate 20 years since the inception of AIDA. Through the theme Family. Unity. Success. 20 years strong we will reflect on the successes that have been achieved over the last 20 years by being a family and being united. We will also look to the future for AIDA and consider how being a united family will help us achieve all the work that still needs to be done in growing our Indigenous medical students, doctors, medical academics and specialists and achieving better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This conference will be an opportunity to bring together our members, guests, speakers and partners from across the sector to share in the reflection on the past and considerations for the future. The conference will also provide a platform to share our individual stories, experiences and achievements in a culturally safe environment.

Conference website

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

catsinam

Contact info for CATSINAM

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

We are pleased to announce the 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference will be held at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa in Broome, Western Australia, from 18 to 20 October 2017.

THE FUTURE OF REMOTE HEALTH AND THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY

Since the organisation’s inception in 1982 this event has served to create an opportunity for likeminded remote and isolated health individuals who can network, connect and share.

It serves as both a professional and social resource for the Remote and Isolated Health Workforce of Australia.

We aim to offer an environment that will foster new ideas, promote collegiate relationships, provide opportunities for professional development and celebrate remote health practice.

Conference Website

 

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

‘Translation at the Centre’ An educational symposium

Alice Springs Convention Centre, Alice Springs

This year the Symposium will look at research translation as well as the latest on diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.  The event will be run over a day and a half.
The Educational Symposium will feature a combination of relevant plenary presentations from renowned scientists and clinicians plus practical workshops.

Registration is free but essential.

Please contact the symposium coordinator on 1300 728 900 (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) or via email at events@baker.edu.au  

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

Details to be released

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

iaha

Abstracts for the IAHA 2017 National Conference are now open!

We are calling for abstracts for concurrent oral presentations and workshops under the following streams:
– Care
– Cultures
– Connection

For abstract more information visit the IAHA Conference website at: https://iahaconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

Aboriginal Sexual Health #NAIDOC2017@sahmriAU Launches new initiative to prevent the spread of syphilis in remote #Indigenous communities

“ This multifaceted approach to educate young people is well overdue. The resources that have been developed and focus tested with young people will go a very long way in improving outcomes in the community.”

Associate Professor James Ward, Head of Infectious Disease Research – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health at SAHMRI said that education and awareness about syphilis transmission and its consequences is vital if we are to make a difference.

Consider this fact

Since 2011, there has been a sustained outbreak of infectious syphilis occurring in remote areas spanning northern, central and South Australia among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people predominantly aged between 15 and 35 years.

The South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute’s (SAHMRI) Infection and Immunity Theme has launched  a new multifaceted community education and awareness program in the fight against syphilis in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The campaign, entitled ‘Young, Deadly, Syphilis Free’, will utilise mediums including two television commercials.

TV Commercial 1 View Here

TV Commercial 2 View Here

social media, local radio and a new website to communicate to young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who live in remote communities the importance of being tested for syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection (STIs) that when left untreated, can have devastating effects.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/youngdeadlysyphilisfree/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/youngdeadlysyphilisfree/

Website: http://youngdeadlyfree.org.au/young-deadly-syphilis-free/

Why is this campaign so important?

This project, funded by the Commonwealth Government Department of Health, has the ultimate objective of increasing testing rates among young Aboriginal people in the affected areas so that rates of syphilis are reduced in these communities.

Since 2011, there has been a sustained outbreak of infectious syphilis occurring in remote areas spanning northern, central and South Australia among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people predominantly aged between 15 and 35 years.

The accrued number of cases is now over 1,400 including four neonatal deaths and several other cases of congenital syphilis notified. Worryingly, syphilis continues to spread into new areas, and this needs to be stopped.

In addition to targeting young people, this campaign will have focus on healthcare services and providers, through the use of supporting resources and education materials, such as videos, posters and animations.

Clinicians will play an important part in the success of this project and they are encouraged to consider talking more broadly about the syphilis outbreak among people of influence in their community to raise awareness.

Furthermore, the project will trial social media ambassadors, who will be young people from remote communities to help spread the campaign and its objectives.

Attached is also the Email signature jpeg which some members may be willing to use to help promote testing

Thank you for sharing

 

Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 Week : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #SA #NT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD #Act #Tas

 1.QLD : WuChopperen Health Service new Family Wellbeing Service for Cairns families

2. QLD  :Gold Coast Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service has launched its annual calendar  to encourage people to eat more fruit and vegetables.

3. NSW : Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service  additional case management services for First Australians in Batemans Bay, Bega and Narooma

      4.WA : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia and 22 Aboriginal Medical Services across WA. on the agenda during NAIDOC Week      

        5. VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) and Peter Mac, the Women’s, the Royal Melbourne and the Royal Children’s Hospital have come together for a NAIDOC Week

6. QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council has been recommended for ISO 9001:2008 recertification for three years to 2020.

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.QLD : WuChopperen Health Service new Family Wellbeing Service for Cairns families

A new Family Wellbeing Service now underway in the Cairns region will strengthen support for vulnerable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities.

Minister for Child Safety Fentiman visited the WuChopperen Health Service in Manoora today (11 July) while in Cairns for Governing for the Regions week.

“WuChopperen Health Services has already been supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the region through a range of health services and the addition of the Family Wellbeing Service further strengthens their support,” she said.

The Queensland Government will provide more than $2.6million this financial year to the health service to undertake the Family Wellbeing Service.

The new service will help local Indigenous families in the Cairns region stay safe and together and is part of an overall funding package across the state for new community-run services to better support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities.

“It’s about providing culturally-responsive, community-led support to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families safely care for their children at home,” she said.

“We are committed to reducing the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families in the child protection system, and we know we will achieve the best results if we work in partnership with Indigenous communities.”

Family Wellbeing Services are rolling out in 20 locations across Queensland, as part of up to $150 million investment over five years, to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families have access to the best possible family support.

Ms Fentiman said the services would give Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families access to targeted support to improve their social, emotional, and physical wellbeing and safety.

“By 2018, we are aiming to have these services offer more than 6000 families a coordinated approach to support them, address multiple needs and build family and community capacity,” she said.

Ms Fentiman also announced $124,000 in funding over the next two years for WuChopperen to provide an Early Childhood Development Coordinator (ECDC) within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Wellbeing Service to increase early childhood educational access for children in contact with the child protection system.

“These investments will delivering better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families and help to address their overrepresentation in the child protection system,” she said.

The Queensland Government has worked in partnership with key stakeholders, including the Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Protection Peak (QATSICPP), to capture the voices of community, children, families and Indigenous service providers in the establishment of the Family Wellbeing Services.

For more information go to http://www.communities.qld.gov.au/gateway/reform-renewal/child-family

2. QLD  :Gold Coast Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service has launched its annual calendar  to encourage people to eat more fruit and vegetables.

Bush tucker is being used to encourage people to eat more fruit and vegetables.

The Gold Coast Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service has launched its annual calendar featuring local bush tucker foods.

Watch video here

The 12-month calendar has recipes featuring native foods such as kangaroo, lemon myrtle, finger lime, lemon aspen, warrigal greens, wattle seed, lilli pilli, pig face and pippis.


Dietician Maxine Daley said the unit had worked alongside Indigenous elders to create the recipes.

“The calendar is based on fruit and vegetables, so we are using the cultural appeal of bush tucker foods to promote fruit and vegies to our clients,” she said.

“Everything in this calendar is from the Gold Coast. It suits our environment, it suits our climate.

“You can grow it in a pot or a backyard or polystyrene box on your balcony.

“The idea was born out of a focus group in which people expressed an interest in knowing more about bush tucker foods.

“There’s been such an impact on Aboriginal culture in general. Food culture has also changed,” Ms Daley said.

“When we did the focus groups people were really interested in learning more about bush tucker foods.”

3. NSW Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service  additional case management services for First Australians in Batemans Bay, Bega and Narooma

’Koori Health in Koori Hands’, is Katungul’s moto and we take the approach of ensuring that not only our clients physical health is being address but also their spiritual and social wellbeing, as without recognising that these go hand in hand we cannot offer true holistic care.

We are truly ecstatic that we have been recognised for our efforts to date and look forward to striving to meet the Governments priority of making a difference in the lives of Indigenous Australians,”

Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service CEO, Robert Skeen (pictured above )  said the injection of funds would go a long way to strengthen their frontline services to help the most vulnerable in their communities.

The Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service will be able to provide additional case management services in Batemans Bay, Bega and Narooma, with a focus on social and health support needs, thanks to a $749,092 grant from the Coalition Government.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said that Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service would receive funding to provide case management services through until 30 June 2019.

“The Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service program will deliver an early detection and intervention health and wellbeing initiative to around 200 preschool and primary school aged children,” Minister Scullion said.

“Improving the safety of Indigenous families and communities is one of the highest priorities for the Coalition Government – and this investment will enable the Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service to provide additional support to people who need it the most.”

Minister Scullion said that through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS), the Government was providing targeted investment to those working on the ground to make a difference in the lives of First Australians.

“This project is a great example of the Coalition working with Indigenous Australians to improve outcomes for First Australians living in Batemans Bay, Bega and Narooma,” Minister Scullion said.

Federal Member for Gilmore, Ann Sudmalis said: “Thousands of Indigenous Australians call Gilmore home and I thank Minister Scullion for this recognition and investment.”

“Supporting the needs of Indigenous Australians in our region by further resourcing Katungal Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service for another two years, provides certainty and continuity,” Mrs Sudmalis said.

The Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service project is one of 43 recently funded under the IAS. Services have been funded to provide intensive support to Indigenous people most affected in the following areas: alcohol and drugs, domestic violence, mental health and wellbeing, and youth offending.

Existing service providers will share $18,697,510 million in Government funding through until 30 June 2019 to transition from the Indigenous Community Links programme to new place-based, intensive support services that address specific safety and wellbeing needs. A further $4,239,664 million will be provided until 30 June 2019 for new services in areas where a safety and wellbeing service gap has been identified.

The final year of funding is dependent on the projects providing strong outcomes for their clients.

Providers will be asked to collect service data to assess the impact of the service, to better understand what works to overcome Indigenous disadvantage and contribute to the evidence base.

4.WA : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia and 22 Aboriginal Medical Services across WA. on the agenda during NAIDOC Week

• Implementation Guide for the WA Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing Framework launched

• Two-year $1 million pilot project to address social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people to help prevent self-harm and suicide

The McGowan Labor Government is committed to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people in Western Australia, including helping to prevent self-harm and suicide.

The Aboriginal Family Wellbeing project, a two-year pilot project, aims to address the risk factors to social and emotional wellbeing in Aboriginal people across WA.

The project includes an accredited six-month Certificate II training program, developed by Aboriginal people, for Aboriginal people, and will be delivered in collaboration with the Mental Health Commission, Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia and 22 Aboriginal Medical Services across WA.

Health and Mental Health Minister Roger Cook also launched the Implementation Guide for the WA Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing Framework 2015-2030 as part of NAIDOC Week celebrations.

NAIDOC Week celebrations are held across Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture, and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Comments attributed to Health and Mental Health Minister Roger Cook:

“The McGowan Government acknowledges poor social and emotional wellbeing is a significant contributor to the unacceptably high rate of illness and suicide among Aboriginal people in WA.

“The delivery of the Aboriginal Family Wellbeing project with the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia will ensure all Aboriginal Medical Services in WA will have at least one representative capable of delivering and administering the program to Aboriginal communities.

“Furthermore, the Implementation Guide for the WA Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing Framework 2015-2030 is a how-to manual to take meaningful, and measurable actions, towards improvements.

“The framework set the agenda for one of the most important challenges we face in this country, improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people, and is supported by WA Health’s Strategic Intent, which made Aboriginal health services, and addressing the health inequalities faced by Aboriginal people, a priority.”

5. VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) and Peter Mac, the Women’s, the Royal Melbourne and the Royal Children’s Hospital have come together for a NAIDOC Week

Jill Gallagher AO, Chief Executive Officer of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO)

Jill Gallagher AO, Chief Executive Officer of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), spoke and called on health services to be bold, lead change from within and also support employment and training opportunities for Aboriginal people.

“I’d like to highlight an important aspect of the work that will ‘close the gap’, but isn’t as obvious to everyone – This is employment and training,” Ms Gallagher said.

“Aboriginal employment is a critical link in improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.”

Ms Gallagher said employing more Aboriginal people would improve the health sector’s “cultural competency” and “when we have a culturally safe place for Aboriginal people, we will improve access to services and improve health for individuals”.

The event included a Q&A session – led by Dr Steve Ellen, Peter Mac’s Director of Psychosocial Oncology – and a panel including Elder and Yorta Yorta woman Aunty Pam Pedersen, Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer Moira Rayner and Peter Mac’s Director of Wellbeing Geri McDonald.

The panel discussed practical measures to reflect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture in a healthcare setting, including the possum skin cloak recently unveiled at Peter Mac. This was made recently by Aboriginal breast cancer survivors and is now available for use by other Aboriginal cancer patients at Peter Mac.

Ms Gallagher described initiatives like this, which brought Aboriginal culture into the healthcare environment, was “medicine for the spirit” for Aboriginal people.

The event provided an opportunity for the precinct partners to renew their joint commitment to providing a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island patients, families and carers.

“NAIDOC week is a time to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture and achievements and is an opportunity to recognise the contributions that Indigenous Australians make to our country and our society,” Peter Mac Chief Executive Dale Fisher said on opening the event.

“It brings together our Parkville Precinct partners – the Royal Women’s Hospital, the Royal Children’s Hospital and the Royal Melbourne Hospital – to talk about the importance of a culturally responsive environment in our health services.”

The Parkville Precinct is committed to healing and closing the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-indigenous people, and providing health services and information in culturally safe, accessible and welcoming environments.

6. QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council has been recommended for ISO 9001:2008 recertification for three years to 2020.

ISO certification means Apunipima’s quality management systems (which underpin best practice business performance) meet the international standard.

The ISO audit took place from 8 – 12 May 2017.

Auditors Scott Walker and Peter Jensen visited Apunipima’s Cairns, Napranum, Mapoon, Aurukun offices and facilities and looked at management systems including roles and responsibilities, risk management processes, document control, internal audit outcomes, continuous improvement processes, resource management, policy and procedures, service planning and records management.

Acting Quality and Risk Manager Elizabeth Whitehead said recertification meant Apunipima was working to an internationally accepted standard.

‘Apunipima has received ISO certification for three year periods before – a reflection of how well we have worked, and how well we are working now. The auditors are able to issue 12 month certificates so ongoing three year certification is a definite achievement.’

‘The auditors recognised the complex environment, difficulties and challenges that we face in delivering services every day and commended Apunipima on the good work occurring in the communities they visited.’

‘The audit results, and the recommendation for a further three years recertification, reflects the passion, commitment and dedication of our staff.’

Image L-R: Primary Health Care Manager Mapoon Debra Jia, Program Support Officer – Baby One Program Daphne De Jersey, Region 1 Primary Healthcare Manager Aletia Twist, Quality and Risk Manager Roberta Newton, Auditor Peter Jensen, Health Worker – Project Officer Jennifer Sellick and Administration Officer Temaleti Matasia

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News : Indigenous Health Minister @KenWyattMP visits , promotes and engages with our ACCHO’s during #NAIDOC2017 week

 

 “ This week, celebrating and acknowledging the power of our languages, the importance of language, but even where we’ve think we’ve lost languages I’m often surprised with the older people within our communities who can still speak the language.

And in my own country there are people teaching Noongar language and reviving the veracity of the language. Now language often is an identifier of who we are and what country we’re associated with.

NAIDOC Week is about celebrating, enjoying ourselves within our community, having fun, but also reflecting. 

Alice Springs : Ken Wyatt being interviewed by Kyle Dowling from CAAMA radio about Congress ACCHO Alice Springs and  the 11 organisations partnering in the new Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre SEE PART 3 Below

Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 : New Aboriginal-led collaboration has world-class focus on boosting remote Aboriginal health

Victoria / VACCHO / VAHS

APY LANDS

Kowanyama /Cairns QLD  :

“I am closely involved with the Darwin and Kimberley suicide prevention trials, part of the Federal Government’s $192 million commitment to addressing regional mental health issues,

“What we learn from those sites, which have acute suicide rates, will be made available as appropriate for North Queensland, in close collaboration with local communities.”

Mr Wyatt, in was Cairns  speaking at the myPHN Conference (see Part 3 for PHN Press Release ) said close engagement with the community and respecting locally endorsed solutions to guard against suicide was the way forward

Part 1  : Minister rolls out mental health action plan for Kowanyama

FINDINGS from suicide prevention trials being carried out in Western Australia will be implemented in the Far North to help lower the rising suicide rate in indigenous communities.

From The Cairns Post

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt says he is “very concerned” about reports of the suicide rates in the region’s remote indigenous population growing to become one of the highest in the world.

The Weekend Post has reported concerns by community leaders at Kowanyama that the mental health crisis was sparked by the tragedy in the community in October, when a vehicle rammed into a house full of mourners, resulting in one death and 25 people being serious injured.

There had been more than 20 suicides or attempts at Kowanyama, which has a population of about 1200, since the ­October tragedy.

Mr Wyatt, was Cairns  speaking at the myPHN Conference, said close engagement with the community and respecting locally endorsed solutions to guard against suicide was the way forward.

“I am closely involved with the Darwin and Kimberley suicide prevention trials, part of the Federal Government’s $192 million commitment to addressing regional mental health issues,” he said.

“What we learn from those sites, which have acute suicide rates, will be made available as appropriate for North Queensland, in close collaboration with local communities.”

An experienced social work has been flown into Kowanyama to join a mental health clinical nurse consultant who travels to the remote Cape York community for four-day visits.

Mr Wyatt said further emergency action was underway with the federally-funded Northern Queensland Primary Health Network working with the Royal Flying Doctor Service to expand mental health services at Kowanyama.

“This additional commitment has already ensured an extra clinician for the community, to provide support and targeted suicide prevention activities with this full-time position starting on Tuesday, July 11,” he said.

If you or someone you know needs assistance please call Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14.

Cairns Apunipima

 Part 2  : Working with communities to deliver better health is our primary aim
The nation’s Primary Health Networks (PHNs) are being encouraged to work closely with communities to tackle health challenges and improve the wellbeing of all Australians.
Aged Care Minister and Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt said he hoped opening the 2nd annual myPHN Conference in Cairns today would help guide a new era in effective and efficient care.
 
This year’s conference theme of ‘Transforming Healthcare Together’ challenges current beliefs on the best ways to improve patient outcomes,” said Minister Wyatt.
“PHNs are leading the charge in this space. After undertaking detailed analysis of their regions’ specific health needs, they are now commissioning services to fill these gaps.
 
“These range from building the capacity of General Practitioners (GPs) and tackling mental health, chronic conditions and obesity, to engaging with consumers in disease prevention.
The Minister said the first stage of the national trial of Health Care Homes was another example of the fresh approach to the care of people with complex conditions.
“Participating GPs and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services will work closely with patients and specialists, pharmacists and allied health care to empower patients to take an active role in health improvements,” he said.
 
Minister Wyatt said primary health providers had a vital role in helping improve Indigenous health and that of older Australians.
“Despite the progress we’ve made to date, Indigenous people still have a shorter life expectancy and are more likely to develop chronic conditions such as diabetes  kidney and cardiovascular diseases than non-Indigenous Australians,” Minister Wyatt said.
 
We have to do better, and primary health professionals are well placed to develop innovative new programs that can make a real difference.”
A good example is the Northern Queensland PHN workforce investment, including funding more than 100 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to become qualified indigenous health workers. 
 
The conference also focuses on how social and cultural influences can effect  health outcomes, promising new hope for closing the life expectancy gap for Indigenous Peoples.
 
Innovation and new thinking will help deliver a stronger health and aged care system,” said Minister Wyatt.
 
“Learning from the experiences of other communities and nations will also keep older Australians healthier for longer, and give them more flexibility on when and how they access care as they age.
“Better health is a partnership between governments, the health sector, and the consumer. Greater collaboration and new models of care promise positive outcomes.”

Part 3 Transcript of Interview on CAAMA Radio with Kyle Dowling on 5 July 2017

Ken Wyatt:What I like about the centre is that it is an alliance of organisations that have been heavily involved in research around many of the health issues impacting on our people. But what’s more important significant is that Congress is the lead agency or the lead player in all of this and having that Aboriginal leadership working so closely with the expertise and knowledge and skills and capability of research is fantastic.

Kyle Dowling: Ken Wyatt, the Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care, recently congratulated the 11 organisations partnering in the new Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre.

Ken Wyatt: Any of us have the capability and capacity to take leading voices. It’s whether we have the confidence and courage to do it at times. And I think Congress has really set a framework for showing that they are leaders. That they are prepared to go and fight for the things they believe in, but equally they work very closely with people who’ve got a like-minded thinking who want to make a difference.

I think the other part that is important in this is their voices are also about translating research into real change on the ground in the community with families. And that’s an important translation of research into practice. And they’ve been around a long time so their knowledge of the health of people within the area, but not only the area, but nationally has been well-based on being involved with the community, listening to community, but treating community for the range of illnesses that they’ve seen over the years. So I want to complement them on their vision, but also being a leader to demonstrate that our voices do count. That they are important.

Kyle Dowling: : So Ken, can you just talk to us about the actual role of the Central Australia Academic Health Centre and the importance of the collaboration between Aboriginal community-controlled health services and leading medical researchers.

Ken Wyatt:What’s important about the centre is that it’s now recognised as a centre of excellence for research. That means it gives them access to Commonwealth funding out of the Futures Research Fund, but also NHMRC funding as well. They’re also recognised as being of a national standing in the quality of what they are capable of doing, but the team they have within that alliance. So you’re really saying that you- you’ve brought together this incredible group of skills, resources and thinking that will be used to tackle some of those complex issues on the ground.

Yesterday, Alan Cass talked about renal disease and the work that affected him into making the decision to look at the whole issue of progression to dialysis and what we still need to do. And he talked about some of the alarming figures here that- when you think about the number of Aboriginal people within the Territory- those figures are extremely high. So we’ve got to do something about it and that’s what he’s talking about when he is involved in this collaborative centre.

Kyle Dowling: Why Central Australia? Why was this area the right place for the centre?

Ken Wyatt: Look, I think it’s just natural to expect it to be here because you’ve got an incredible organisation like Congress. You have Aboriginal leadership here whose thinking and whose passion for making a difference for people here and across Australia. But you’ve also got these incredible alliances with Flinders Uni, Baker IDI, and there’s other collaborative members of that group who are also deliverers of services. And if we think of the history of the Territory, there have been some outstanding individuals that have been involved. So you only have to look at the Menzies Research Centre, the work that they have done. It’s a natural fix and it’s a good mix of bringing some incredible people together to work on these issues.

Kyle Dowling: Now the partners in the CAAHSC have identified research priorities. Can you touch on a little bit of those?

Ken Wyatt: The five areas that they have identified are good, but the one that excites me is the whole issue of workforce and development of capacity. But developing of capacity for Aboriginal research- there was a young woman I met yesterday who has become a researcher and her passion for that work now is growing. It’s- and she becomes an example for others that research is an important area and that I can do it, so can you. And that workforce capacity also means that they will be looking at, not only what’s needed today, but the type of skills we’ll need for tomorrow and the future. And aged care is in that mix.

I had a good meeting with Congress this morning about older people who live in this area that I need to have a look at the issues around their needs, but equally be made aware of the number of older people now living in community and what we have to do for them.

Kyle Dowling: Now, Central Research has been dubbed a hub of hope for Indigenous health. How would you describe Central Research as in fact being a hub of help for Indigenous hope.

Ken Wyatt: That whole hub of hope I see in an optimistic sense. I see it as a group of people believing what they do, but then wanting to turn that into having access to further work they have to do to find and identify reasons. And I use the term causes of the cause.

So what are the causes that cause an illness or what are the causes that cause renal failure. And then to look at how do we go upstream and prevent that from happening. So if it’s skin diseases, if it’s other factors that result in kidney failure, then how do we address and tackle those. But equally what they’ll be looking at is what treatment can we provide and what treatment can we also think about providing at the local community level because the problem with dialysis is that you really need to live with the chairs are that provide you with that life-saving support. But ultimately if we can find a cure for kidney failure then that makes it far more expecting of pushing out life, but also preventing kidney failure and giving people in any individual hope for a future, hope for a longer life because the point I want to make is that every person we lose out of our community is a history book.

We never write our histories, we never write our stories on paper. We only learn in transmission in conversation, art, the stories we tell dance. Now when we take one of those people out, that’s the end of that story. We can never go back and re-read it, and that’s why that the work that this centre does is critical in keeping people alive longer because young people like you will need the knowledge of the stories, but also the history and every aspect that gives us what is important spiritually, culturally, but as an identity as an individual within our community.

Kyle Dowling: Before I do let you go, I did just want to get a quick message from you. It is NAIDOC Week. Your message to everyone across the country on NAIDOC weekend, what NAIDOC means to you as an Aboriginal person?

Ken Wyatt: This week, celebrating and acknowledging the power of our languages, the importance of language, but even where we’ve think we’ve lost languages I’m often surprised with the older people within our communities who can still speak the language. And in my own country there are people teaching Noongar language and reviving the veracity of the language. Now language often is an identifier of who we are and what country we’re associated with.

NAIDOC Week is about celebrating, enjoying ourselves within our community, having fun, but also reflecting.

Kyle Dowling: Yes, well on that note, Ken thank you for taking out your time to have a chat with us here on CAAMA Radio and thank you for tuning in.

That’s going to be it for Strong Voices today. Thank you for tuning in. I hope you enjoyed the program. Make sure you check out our CAAMA webpage. It’s caama.com.au. Make sure you check out our social media as well -our Facebook and Twitter. And we’ll be back the same time tomorrow.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @DiabetesAus #NDW2017 #ItsAboutTime for National #Diabetes Week

 

 “It is National Diabetes Week from 9-15 July and Diabetes Australia’s “It’s About Time” campaign aims to raise awareness about the importance of early detection and early treatment for all types of diabetes.

Too many Australians are being diagnosed with diabetes too late. The is true for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The delay in diagnosis is putting many people at risk of major life threatening health problems.

It’s About Time  we detected all types of diabetes earlier and save lives.

 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes.

Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.”

See full Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander diabetes info below Part 1

Read over 120 NACCHO published articles about Diabetes  in past 5 years

 ” New research has found that only 5% of Australians aged over 40 have had a type 2 diabetes risk check in the past two years.

Also, more than half of people surveyed were unable name any diabetes related complication despite type 2 diabetes being a leading cause of vision loss, kidney damage, heart attacks, stroke and limb amputation.

The release of the research comes at the start of National Diabetes Week as Diabetes Australia launches a new campaign, It’s About Time, to raise awareness of the seriousness of the type 2 diabetes, and urge 500,000 Australians who could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes to get checked  ”

IT’S ABOUT TIME WE DETECTED  SILENT UNDIAGNOSED TYPE 2 DIABETES see Part 2 below

Part 1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander diabetes info

Watch the short video below for a quick guide to the benefits of the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) ”

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.

The following information is from the ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ flipcharts for Indigenous Australians.

It is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

The ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ resource was originally developed by Healthy Living NT with funding provided by the Department of Health and Ageing through Diabetes Australia. The reprinting and distribution of the most recent addition has been made possible with funding by the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) – an initiative of the Australian Government administered by Diabetes Australia.

How do you feel? (Symptoms)

If you have any of the following symptoms you should talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.

  • Feeling tired or weak
  • Go to the toilet a lot
  • Feeling thirsty
  • Leg cramps
  • Feeling itchy
  • Sores and boils that won’t heal
  • Blurry vision
  • Pins and needles
  • Feeling grumpy or angry.

Through a simple test, a doctor can find out if they’re the result of diabetes.

What is it? (About diabetes)

Sugar (glucose) gives your body energy. The sugar (glucose) moves from your blood into your muscles with something called insulin. With diabetes your insulin isn’t working properly, so the sugar (glucose) doesn’t get into your muscles and body easily and there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood.

Everyone has a little bit of sugar (glucose) in their blood. The optimum sugar (glucose) level is between 4 to 6 mmol/L (after fasting).

Sugar (glucose) is fuel that comes from some of the food you eat and drink. It gives your body energy to do all sorts of things:

  • Walk
  • Think
  • Play sports
  • Hunt
  • Work
  • Rake
  • Gardening
  • Resting.

To help the sugar (glucose) move into your muscles and body cells your body needs something called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas – a body part which is near your stomach.

Insulin helps keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

With diabetes, the insulin isn’t helping the sugar (glucose) move from your body into your muscles and body cells. So it stays and builds in your body, making your blood sugar (glucose) level high.

Type 2 Diabetes

There are different types of diabetes. A lot of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is when your body stops the insulin working properly.

Fat bellies, not being active enough, eating a big mob of fatty food can stop the insulin working properly in your body.

Being active, eating healthy and being a healthy weight can help your insulin work better to keep your sugar (glucose) normal. Sometimes people might need to take tablets and insulin everyday to keep their sugar (glucose) levels normal.

Gestational Diabetes

Another type of diabetes is gestational diabetes. This happens when you are pregnant, but not all women get it. It goes away after pregnancy but you and your baby can get type 2 diabetes later in life.

Pre Diabetes

There is also Pre Diabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT). This happens when your sugar (glucose) level is high, but not high enough to be called diabetes. It doesn’t mean you have diabetes now, but it does mean you might get it later. Being active and eating healthy you can slow down the start of type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes

Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 1 diabetes. This usually happens in kids and teenagers. Type 1 diabetes is when your body kills the insulin making part in the pancreas and no insulin is made in your body. To give the body the insulin it needs, insulin injections are needed every day for the rest of their life.

What do I do? (Management of diabetes)

When there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood it damages your heart, kidneys, feet, eyes and nerves.

You can keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal by:

Eating healthy

  • Have plenty of bush tucker and have shop foods and home cooked meals that are low in fat, sugar and salt.
  • Have something from each of the core food groups every day. They give you energy, fight sickness and help care for your body to keep it strong.
  • Drink plenty of water.

Avoiding and eat less fat, sugar and salt

  • Eat less fat as it makes you put on weight and gives you problems with your heart.
  • Pick meat with no fat or only small bits of fat on it. Cut the fat off the meat and take the skin off chicken.
  • Drain the juices (fat) after cooking meat and scoop out the fat from the top of stews.
  • Avoid cooking with or having fats like butter, oil, margarine or dripping.
  • It is better to boil, steam, stew, grill, microwave or stir-fry food.

Being a healthy weight (not too fat and not too skinny)

  • Do this by eating less, eating healthy and being more active.

Keeping active

  • It helps you lose weight and keep it off and it keeps you healthy.
  • It helps your insulin to work properly.
  • Walk, job, play sport, hunt, garden, work around the place.
  • Be active for 30 minutes or more every day OR do 10 minutes 3 times a day.

Taking your medicine

  • Take your medicine at the times the doctor tells you.
  • Take them with or after eating in the morning, afternoon and supper time every day.
  • Refill your medicine box in the morning (get some more medicine before it gets low and so you don’t run out).
  • Take your medicine with you when you go to see family, walkabout or away from home.
  • Put your medicines somewhere cool, dry and safe so they won’t go bad.
  • Keep your medicines out of reach of kids.

Remember to:

  • Have your check-ups with your doctor, health worker or nurse. Have regular check-ups for your eyes, feet, kidneys, blood pressure, skin and teeth. If you notice anything different about your body talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.
  • Check your sugar (glucose) levels at the times your doctor, health worker or nurse tells you.
  • See your doctor, health worker or nurse straight away if you feel sick.
  • Check your feet and skin for sores and/or cracks every day.

Why take medicine for? (Medications for diabetes)

Indigenous  

Diabetes medicine helps to keep your body strong and well and it helps to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

When eating healthy, being active and being a healthy weight isn’t working at keeping your sugar (glucose) levels normal, you might need to take tablets and/or insulin.

The doctor might put you on tablets called Metformin to help your insulin work better and to lower the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood.

After a while the pancreas gets tired from working too hard and can’t make enough insulin, so your doctor might put you on tablets called Sulphonylurea. This medicine helps your body make more insulin.

Or, after awhile, the doctor might need to add another lot of tablets called Glitazone or Acarbose.

Remember to have your medicine with or after eating, in the morning, afternoon or supper time. Take them at the time the doctor tells you to.

All tablets work differently and some can have side effects.

If the following problems don’t go away or if you are still worried about them, then talk to your doctor.

  • Feel sick like you want to vomit (nausea)
  • A sore belly
  • Diarrhoea
  • Sugar (glucose) levels going too low
  • Have fluid build-up (retention)

When your sugar (glucose) levels get too high and stays high the doctor might put you on tablets and give you insulin.

  • Having insulin doesn’t mean you have type 1 diabetes.
  • Insulin isn’t like tablets so it shouldn’t be swallowed.
  • You inject the insulin under your skin in different places on your belly.

Talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse about insulin and what is right for you.

Having too much insulin or taking too many Sulphonylurea tablets can make your sugar (glucose) levels go too low (under 3) and make you hypo (hypoglycaemia).

You can also go hypo (hypoglycaemia) if you are:

  • Not eating, not eating enough or eating too late
  • Being extra active
  • Drinking grog (alcohol).

You might not feel anything when you have a hypo (hypoglycaemia), but sometimes you might feel:

  • Shaky
  • Hungry
  • Get headaches
  • Weak
  • Confused
  • Angry
  • Talk like you’re drunk when you’re not
  • Sweaty.

When you have these feelings or think you are having a hypo (hypoglycaemia), get your sugar (glucose) level up fast by drinking or eating something sweet.

Keep your sugar (glucose) level normal and stop having another hypo (hypoglycaemia) by eating a sandwich or meal after you have something sweet.

Remember, after taking your tablets or insulin:

  • Keep them somewhere cool, dry and safe (maybe in the fridge at home or at the clinic) so that they won’t go bad
  • Keep them out of reach of children
  • Get rid of your syringes/needles and finger pricking needles by putting them in a “sharps container” or “hard plastic” empty container with a lid (see if the clinic has one).

Remember when you go see family, walkabout or are away for home take your tablets and/or insulin with you.

Why me? (Risk factors)

Nobody knows how or why some people get diabetes but there are some things we know that can add to your chances of getting it. You have more chance of getting it when you are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, but not all Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islande people have diabetes.

Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people live different to how they used to live. Changes that add to your chances of getting diabetes are:

  • Not as active
  • More overweight
  • Eating fatty salty, sugary foods.

People living the old way were:

  • Active
  • Leaner and fit
  • Eating healthy food (bush tucker).

Other chances of getting diabetes include:

  • It is in your family tree or when someone in your family has diabetes
  • You had diabetes when pregnant
  • You get older
  • You eat too much and you eat too many fatty and sugary foods
  • You are overweight
  • You are not active enough
  • You have pancreatitis (a sickness of the pancreas).

There are things you can’t change or stop you from getting diabetes:

  • It’s in your family
  • You are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
  • You are pregnant with diabetes
  • You are getting older.

The things you can do to slow down the start of diabetes:

  • Eat healthy and be a healthy weight
  • Be active
  • Don’t drink too much grog.

Nobody knows why or how people get diabetes. After a while it can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves making you really sick.

Talk to your doctor, clinic, nurse or health worker about having a test to find out if you have diabetes.

You can’t always feel it or see it happening, so you might not know you have it.

Part 2 :IT’S ABOUT TIME WE DETECTED  SILENT UNDIAGNOSED TYPE 2 DIABETES

New research has found that only 5% of Australians aged over 40 have had a type 2 diabetes risk check in the past two years.

Also, more than half of people surveyed were unable name any diabetes related complication despite type 2 diabetes being a leading cause of vision loss, kidney damage, heart attacks, stroke and limb amputation.

The release of the research comes at the start of National Diabetes Week as Diabetes Australia launches a new campaign, It’s About Time, to raise awareness of the seriousness of the type 2 diabetes, and urge 500,000 Australians who could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes to get checked.

Diabetes Australia CEO Professor Greg Johnson said there was great concern about the length of time many people have silent, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes without it being diagnosed.

“It’s about time we detected silent undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Many people have type 2 diabetes for up to seven years before being diagnosed and during that time up to half begin to develop a diabetes-related complication,” Professor Johnson said.

“The tragedy is that much of the damage to the body that causes diabetes-related complications like vision loss, kidney damage, heart attack, stroke and limb amputation is preventable.

“AUSDRISK is a free, online risk assessment you can take to determine your risk of type 2 diabetes. Despite over 60% of Australians having risk factors for type 2 diabetes, the research shows only 5% of Australians over the age of 40 have done the type 2 diabetes risk assessment in past two years” he said.

The survey found:

  •  Only 21% of Australians over the age of 40 had heard of the Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk (AUSDRISK) Assessment;
  •  Only 5% of Australians over the age of 40 had completed the AUSDRISK assessment in the past two years; and
  •  More than 51% of people over the age of 18 were unable to name any serious diabetes-related complication despite type 2 diabetes being a leading cause of vision loss and blindness, limb amputation, kidney damage, heart attacks and stroke.

Diabetes NSW & ACT CEO Sturt Eastwood urged people take the free type 2 diabetes risk assessment today.

“Type 2 diabetes is the single biggest challenge confronting Australia’s health system and it’s time we did a better job of detecting type 2 diabetes earlier,” Mr Eastwood said.

“The earlier a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes occurs, the sooner a management plan can be put in place delivering better outcomes for the individual and the community.

“The AUSDRISK check only takes about five minutes. If you take the check and get a high score, see your doctor so they can determine if you have type 2 diabetes.

“If you are diagnosed there is a lot of support and advice, and many effective treatments available to help you manage type 2 diabetes and reduce the risk of developing diabetes-related complications.”

Professor Lesley Campbell from St. Vincent’s Hospital said front line health professionals were spending more and more time treating patients who present with type 2 diabetes complications. Diabetes was often still undiagnosed until admission for heart attack, stroke or lung or heart transplantation.

“Unfortunately we are seeing people with type 2 diabetes diagnosed too late and the impact of late diagnosis and lack of treatment is filling our hospital beds,” Professor Campbell said.

“Diabetes is ranked in the top ten causes of death in Australia and is the leading cause of preventable blindness, limb amputation and end stage kidney disease.

“Much of this can be avoided with early diagnosis and optimal treatment.”

For Sydney woman Belinda Nakauta, having her toe amputated because of type 2 diabetes was a major wake up call.

“I went to the doctor about a urinary tract infection and he suggested I get checked for type 2 diabetes. I was shocked when it came back positive and the scary thing is I have no idea about how long I was living with type 2 diabetes before I was assessed,” Ms Nakauta said.

“Having a toe amputated a couple of years ago was a wakeup call. Having a part of your body cut off, no matter how small, is a scary experience. With the help of a dietitian and regular gym visits, I’ve lost more than 20 kilograms and dramatically cut back on the medication I need to manage my type 2 diabetes.

“I wish I had done something five or ten years ago. I don’t want to be that person in the ICU on dialysis. I don’t want to have foot complications or lose my eye sight. I don’t want to be that person.

“It was about time I started taking my diabetes seriously and I hope my story helps convince all Australians that it is about time we do something about diabetes.”

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