NACCHO TOP10+ #JobAlerts #Awards #Scholarships This week in Aboriginal Health : Doctors, Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers @IUIH_ @LowitjaInstitut

This weeks featured scholarship and awards

1.AMA 2017 Public Health Awards Close on 19 April

2. There are 17 scholarships for Aboriginal and / or Torres Strait Islander Midwifery Student or Midwifes

3. HESTA Primary Health Care Awards close 2 June

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note before completing a job application check with the ACCHO that job is still available

1-3 The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH)

1.General Practitioner

2.Family Practitioner – Family Wellbeing Service

3.Family Wellbeing Worker – Family Wellbeing Service

4.Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service – GP

5-7 Employment opportunities Lowitja Institute (3 positions)

8.Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

9.Aboriginal Health Worker, Mental Health – Walgett AMS

10. Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Walgett AMS

11.Remote Area Nurses & Nurse-Midwives Nganampa Health Council SA

12. General Practitioner – Full Time :Durri ACMS NSW

13.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Mental Health Recovery Program

14. Indigenous Health Promotion Officer Mawarnkarra Health Service WA

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.AMA 2017 Public Health Awards Close on 19 April

NACCHO Chairperson Matthew Cooke and CEO Pat Turner wish to draw our member’s attention to the upcoming 2017 AMA Public Health Awards.

NACCHO encourages member services to nominate in five categories.

The recipients of the awards will be announced at the AMA National Conference to be held in Melbourne on 26-28 May 2017.

The presentation of the AMA Public Health Awards provides recognition of the extraordinary contribution doctors and associated health groups make to health care and public health.
Nominations only require a personal statement from the nominator about why the nominee meets the criteria for the award. Additional documentation supporting the nomination, including the nominee’s CV, can also be included.

All nominations must be received by 19 April 2017.
Last year, the AMA Excellence in Healthcare Award was presented jointly to A/Prof John Boffa and Ms Donna Ah Chee from Congress ACCHO in Alice Springs for their contribution to reducing harms of alcohol and improving early childhood outcomes for Aboriginal children.

The AMA Woman in Medicine Award was presented to A/Prof Diana Egerton-Warburton in recognition of her exceptional contribution to the development of emergency medicine, and her passion for public health.
In 2017, the AMA is calling for nominations for awards in the following categories:

  • AMA Excellence in Healthcare Award
  • Woman in Medicine Award (nominator and nominee must both be AMA members)
  • Women’s Health Award
  • Men’s Health Award
  • Youth Health Award.

In addition to considering your own nomination, please feel free to disseminate the attached call for nominations through your own networks. Presentation of these awards is dependent on a sufficient quality and number of nominations being received in each category.
A full description of the criteria for nominations is available on the AMA website at https://ama.com.au/article/ama-public-health-awards

2. There are 17 scholarships for Aboriginal and / or Torres Strait Islander Midwifery Student or Midwifes

Are you an Aboriginal and / or Torres Strait Islander Midwifery Student or Midwife?

Scholarships are available now! See http://indigenousmidwives.org.au/scholarships-awards/  for details.

Closes 5pm, Monday, 17 April 2017.

Apply now or encourage someone u know to apply!

3. HESTA Primary Health Care Awards close 2 June

Nominate now to recognise Australia’s primary health care leaders

The search for the nation’s best primary health care professionals has begun with nominations now open for the 2017 HESTA Primary Health Care Awards.

Presented in conjunction with the 12th National Allied Health Conference, the Awards recognise the dedication and professionalism of those working in all aspects of primary health care including health educators, medical practice managers, rehabilitation professionals, physios, osteopaths, dentists, pharmacists, GPs and other related therapists.

Employers, colleagues, patients/carers, and individuals can nominate online from now until 2 June 2017.

HESTA CEO, Debby Blakey, said the Awards are an opportunity to recognise the knowledge, skill and commitment of primary health care professionals, who provide some of the best health care services in the world.

“Primary health care professionals are often the first people Australians turn to when we are sick or injured. Their crucial work helps ensure individuals and communities receive quality, accessible health care,” Ms Blakey said.

“The Awards are our opportunity to give back. We’re proud to recognise primary health care teams and individuals who lead and innovate to develop initiatives associated with improvements in patient care, or organisational outcomes that are aimed at improving health outcomes for all Australians,”Ms Blakey said.

Proud Awards sponsor ME – the bank for you, provides the $30,000 prize pool, to be divided among the winners in three award categories — Young Leader, Individual Distinction and Team Excellence.

The different categories for these awards are as follows-
·         Young Leader – This award highlights the selfless dedication of a young leader who displays exceptional mentoring qualities.
·         Individual Distinction – This award recognises primary health care workers who have displayed a vision for the future, have delivered positive outcomes and have gone beyond the expectations of their role.
·         Team Excellence – This award acknowledges the achievements of primary health care teams that have demonstrated innovation by way of a collaborative and inclusive approach to their work.

Each winner will receive $10,000 in a ME Everyday Transaction account to use for further education or team development.

Finalists will receive complimentary registration for the 12th National Allied Health Conference, with interstate finalists flown to Sydney to attend the awards dinner on 28 August 2017.

Submit an online nomination today at hestaawards.com.au.

 

1-3 The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH)

The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) leads the planning, development and delivery of comprehensive primary health care services to the Indigenous population of South East Queensland (SEQ).

The Institute was established in 2009 by the four Community Controlled Health Services in SEQ to provide for the needs of Australia’s second largest Indigenous population.

Our regional network has since expanded to 18 multidisciplinary primary health clinics, with more clinics planned.

IUIH and its members are constantly looking for healthcare workers, GP’s, allied health professionals, medical and health related students to fill short or long term vacancies within their growing operations.

Check out the IUIH Current job opportunities for full details

1.General Practitioner

Applications close 9am on Tuesday 18 April 2017

We are seeking a General Practitioner to provide services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients and families as part of a multi-disciplinary team of medical and health staff, within the operational framework of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander community controlled Health Service.

The position is located at Strathpine clinic although the position may be required to work at other locations within the Moreton region from time to time, including Caboolture, Morayfield and Deception Bay.

EOI-Download

Enquiries about the position can be directed to Layla Scott by email at layla.scott@iuih.org.au

2.Family Practitioner – Family Wellbeing Service

Applications close 9am on Tuesday 18 April 2017

The purpose of the Family Practitioner position is to provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families a coordinated mix of services to address multiple levels of need and to build family and community capacity to safely care for and protect vulnerable children. This includes:

• the practical services and supports to build knowledge, strength and capacity of individuals and their families to provide the necessary environment to optimise the trajectory of health and wellbeing of children; and
• the delivery of support in a manner which ensures meaningful engagement of the person in all decision making, with a bias toward building individual capability to participate in and lead the coordination of their own supports.

EOI-Download

Enquiries about the position can be directed to Sam Wild by email at sam.wild@iuih.org.au or by phoning 07 3481 9700.

Applications (resume and covering letter addressing the key requirements in the EOI) are to be submitted via SEEK to be considered.

Go to Seek Ad

3.Family Wellbeing Worker – Family Wellbeing Service

Applications close 9am on Tuesday 18 April 2017

Based across the MATSICHS clinics, the position of Family Wellbeing Worker will work closely with the Family Practitioner in providing the practical services and supports to build knowledge, strength and capacity of individuals and their families and build individual capability to participate in and lead the coordination of their own supports and goals in improvement of relationships and/or family reunification or preservation and will support a positive cultural identity for all children through actions that enhance/encourage strong connections with kin, culture and country.

EOI-Download

Enquiries about the position can be directed to Sam Wild by email at sam.wild@iuih.org.au or by phoning 07 3481 9700.

Applications (resume and covering letter addressing the key requirements in the EOI) are to be submitted to hr@iuih.org.au

4.Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service – GP

Medical practice in rural and remote Australia

5-7 Employment opportunities Lowitja Institute (3 positions)

Become part of a leading national Aborginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation

Competititve salary with generous salary sacrifice options

For all enquiries please contact the Lowitja Institute reception on t: 03 8341 5555 or e: admin@lowitja.org.au 

Communications Officer

  • Full time
  • Melbourne-based

The Communications Officer will be a member of the Innovation and Business Development Team, working with the Communications Manager to establish and deliver the Institute’s communications agenda in service of enhancing the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm AEST, Wednesday 1 May 2017.

Position description

Apply online

Research Project Officer

  • Full time
  • Melbourne-based

The Research Project Officer will be a member of the Research and Knowledge Translation team, which is responsible for the creation and management of the research-related activities and products required to meet the strategic and operational objectives of the Institute. The Research Project Officer will work within one of the Lowitja Institute’s broader activities, Insight, which converts key elements of research findings into approaches for evidence-based decision making by policymakers, communities and service practitioners.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm AEST, Wednesday 1 May 2017.

Position description

Apply online

Product Innovation Specialist

  • Full time
  • Melbourne-based

The Product Innovation Specialist will be a member of the Innovation and Business Development Team, working with the Team Director to establish and deliver the Institute’s innovation pipeline agenda including consultancies to enhance the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm AEST, Wednesday 1 May 2017.

Position description

Apply online

8. Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

 

Galangoor Duwalami Primary Healthcare Service is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled primary health care service, operating in both Hervey Bay and Maryborough, servicing the entire Fraser Coast area.

Galangoor Duwalami collaborates with health and well-being partner agencies to enable integrated continuity of care for the community, and continue to work to contribute to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy and program reform in Queensland to address the Burden of disease and Close the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

General Practitioner (GP) two positions available

This is an exciting opportunity to join an innovative and flexible employer, enthusiastic and committed team and make a direct impact on improved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Fraser Coast area.

The Practice:

Galangoor Duwalami (meaning a ‘happy meeting place’) is located on the Fraser Coast in sunny Queensland, with two clinics (Hervey Bay and Maryborough). Originally established in 2007 we offer a comprehensive suite of Health Services within the Fraser Coast region.

The Hervey Bay clinic is situated at the beachside, while a newly built practice in the heart of Historical Maryborough, offers exceptional facilities with 10 consulting rooms including a mums and bubs room, new equipment and large reception. The practice is Community Controlled and has a well-established clientele and reports indicate continued growth.

This is a rewarding prospect for a compassionate, engaging, visionary and thorough General Practitioner with an ability to work within a diverse interdisciplinary team exhibiting admirable communication skills.

  • Two positions available – 2 Part Time – hours negotiable OR 1 Full Time and 1 Part Time
  • Well balanced working environment – Monday to Friday from 0830 to 1700.
  • No on-call requirements
  • Competitive Salary Package
  • Salary packaging
  • Annual Leave plus Study Leave
  • 9.5% Superannuation Entitlement

Key Requirements:

Must Have:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding current registration with the Medical Board of Australia
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number

Download this Information GP Advertisement

Application Process:

A Position Description is available by email. All applications, including a covering letter, are to be e-mailed to: ann.woolcock@gdphcs.com.au

For further details regarding this position please contact Ann Woolcock on 07 41945554.

9.Aboriginal Health Worker, Mental Health – Walgett AMS

Walgett is a nestled in north-central New South Wales. With a population of 2,300, Walgett is a regional hub for the wool, wheat and cotton industries. It is also the gateway to the New South Wales opal fields. Walgett Shire offers a friendly relaxed lifestyle and there are many sporting and recreational pursuits available.
The Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service (WAMS) will work with the Aboriginal Communities of the Walgett Shire area to provide a quality culturally appropriate health service.
The organisation has grown from strength to strength and we have shown all members of the community we are here to help in any way we can.
This position is a permanent full time position and reports through to the Chronic Disease Manager. Duties will include, but not limited to:
 Maintain Confidentiality and Privacy at all times;
 Develop, coordinate and implement community development activities;
 Develop and facilitate cross-cultural awareness training;
 Coordinate referrals to specialist and other agencies services e.g. psychiatrists, psychologists etc.
 Working with WAMS team to research, develop and implement, monitor and evaluate the Aboriginal Mental Health program.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE REQUIRED TO CARRY OUT THIS ROLE:

Essential:
– Aboriginality: a genuine requirement of this position, as per section 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977;
– Certificate four in Aboriginal Mental Health and/or relevant qualification;
– Experience working with rural and remote communities;
– Knowledge of current Aboriginal health issues;
– Experience researching, designing and implementing primary health care strategies and an Aboriginal Health program
– Demonstrated knowledge of Aboriginal Mental Health issues significant to Aboriginal people;

– Ability to liaise with both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal organisations and individuals;
– Ability to organise, co-ordinate and facilitate workshops and conferences;
– Sound knowledge of the application of community protocols and the Aboriginal Health Information Guidelines; and
– Current NSW driver’s license.
Desirable:
– Knowledge of Walgett and surrounding communities’ services by WAMS;
– Experience working in mental health and/or related fields;
– First Aid certificates; and
– Ability to create and maintain a client data base, analyse client data and adapt program according to client and community needs.
If you’re looking for a change of pace and the opportunity to gain a unique rural experience, then this is the role for you. Applicants must send through a copy of their resume along with a cover letter outlining their experience. Additional training may be provided to the right candidate.

APPLY HERE

10. Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Walgett AMS

Walgett is a nestled in north-central New South Wales. With a population of 2,300, Walgett is a regional hub for the wool, wheat and cotton industries. It is also the gateway to the New South Wales opal fields.  Walgett Shire offers a friendly relaxed lifestyle and there are many sporting and recreational pursuits available.

The Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service (WAMS) will work with the Aboriginal Communities of the Walgett Shire area to provide a quality culturally appropriate health service.

The organisation has grown from strength to strength and we have shown all members of the community we are here to help in any way we can.

This position is a permanent full time position and reports through to the Chronic Disease Manager.  Duties will include, but not limited to:

  • Maintain Confidentiality and Privacy at all times;
  • Increase community awareness of the effects of the abuse of alcohol and other addictive substances;
  • Increase community awareness of all diseases caused by alcohol and other drug substances;
  • Plan, implement and evaluate culturally appropriate programs;
  • Work with judicial and police system to give support to clients requiring counselling and rehabilitation as directed by these agencies;
  • Assist with transportation to outsourced facilities; and
  • Work and assist Doctors and fellow team members at WAMS.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE REQUIRED TO CARRY OUT THIS ROLE:

Essential:

  • Aboriginality: a genuine requirement of this position, as per section 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977;
  • Certificate three (3) in Aboriginal Mental Health and/or relevant qualification;
  • Certificate four (4) in Drug and Alcohol;
  • Experience working with rural and remote communities;
  • Knowledge of current Aboriginal health issues;
  • Experience researching, designing and implementing primary health care strategies and an Aboriginal Health program
  • Demonstrated knowledge of Aboriginal Mental Health issues significant to Aboriginal people;
  • Ability to liaise with both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal organisations and individuals;
  • Ability to organise, co-ordinate and facilitate workshops and conferences;
  • Sound knowledge of the application of community protocols and the Aboriginal Health Information Guidelines;
  • Current NSW driver’s license;
  • Clean NCC; and
  • Clean WWCC.

Desirable:

  • Knowledge of Walgett and surrounding communities’ services by WAMS;
  • Experience working in mental health and/or related fields;
  • First Aid certificates; and
  • Ability to create and maintain a client data base, analyse client data and adapt program according to client and community needs.

The successful candidate will need to provide to us, prior to the commencement of work:

  • Clean WCC (Working with Children Check)
  • Clean NCC (National Crime Check)
  • Undergo a Pre-Employment Medical Clearance.

If you’re looking for a change of pace and the opportunity to gain a unique rural experience, then this is the role for you.  Applicants must send through a copy of their resume along with a cover letter outlining their experience.  Additional training may be provided to the right candidate.

APPLY HERE

11.Remote Area Nurses & Nurse-Midwives Nganampa Health Council SA

Remote Area Nurses & Nurse-Midwives

Exciting and varied opportunities for Registered Nurses and Nurse – Midwives to join a highly recognised Aboriginal Health Service. If you have recent Medical/ A&E and Clinical experience, are passionate about making a difference and looking to be remunerated for your efforts – then read on..

Your new company

Nganampa Health Council is an Aboriginal owned and controlled health organisation operating on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands in the far north-western region of South Australia. The APY Lands cover roughly 103,000 square km, with a population of approx. 3,000 Anangu people. The region is freehold land controlled by the Anangu people.

Across this area, Nganampa Health operates seven clinics, an aged care facility and assorted health related programs including aged care, sexual health, environmental health, health worker training, dental, women’s health, male health, children’s health and mental health.

Nganampa Health Council is widely recognised as being an exemplar Aboriginal health service in the country. Their successes include significantly reducing the rates of sexually transmitted infections, increasing birth weights through their antenatal program, consistently keeping childhood immunisation rates at 100% and providing high quality residential and respite aged care at their Tjilpiku Pampaku Ngura aged care facility.

Further information can be found at www.nganampahealth.com.au

Your new career

Nganampa Health Council has opportunities for full-time clinic-based Registered Nurses and Registered Midwives to join their clinical teams, based in remote South Australia.

In these highly varied roles, you will be responsible for delivering primary health care according to the CARPA Standard Treatment Manual, and assisting in the early detection and management of chronic illness as part of a multi-disciplinary team. 

Working under the direction of the Medical Director and Clinical Service Manager, some of your areas of responsibility will include:

  • Working collaboratively with Medical Officers, Anangu Health Workers and other health staff to provide primary health care;
  • Treating acute illness and chronic medical conditions, and managing computerised recalls and patient follow-up care;
  • Child health monitoring and immunisations;
  • Patient health education;
  • Assessment and referral of social welfare issues;
  • Public health screening for STI, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis A, B & C;
  • Public health surveying and programs;
  • Antenatal and post natal care;
  • General education support for Anangu Health Workers; and
  • Day-to-day administration of the clinics.

On offer is an extremely attractive salary package circa $204,581 – $238,133, commensurate with remote area experience, (this includes estimated non-cash benefits of $37,615 – $47,141).

Successful candidates will also be supplied with rent-free modern accommodation, including all rent, electricity, gas and basic essentials! Benefits include:

  • District allowance;
  • Work allowance;
  • Superannuation;
  • Annual retention bonus;
  • Leave loading;
  • Annual airfare;
  • 12 days study leave;
  • Recreation leave allowance;
  • 12 weeks annual leave; and
  • Assistance with relocation costs (negotiable)

About you

Candidates need to be adaptable and flexible individuals who can display the initiative, discretion and cultural sensitivity needed to support and drive the organisation’s objectives and values. Your ability to communicate and participate effectively within a cross-cultural, multi-disciplinary health team will be a must.

Individuals who are open to change, accepting of Aboriginal people, comfortable living in a remote environment and who are willing to learn the ways of the people will be well suited to these roles. The ability to work under Aboriginal management and control will also be highly regarded, as will a demonstrated understanding of issues affecting Aboriginal health, the principles of Primary Health Care and relevant legislation. No two days will be the same and as a result, highly resourceful candidates will thrive!

To be considered, you will:

  • Be a Registered Nurse or an RN / Registered Midwife, and be registered with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency (AHPRA);
  • Have a minimum of three years post graduation/ post bridging course, along with recent acute Medical / A&E experience;
  • Have demonstrable experience working in a clinical environment and hospital-based general nursing experience in the past 5 years (both of which are essential);
  • Ideally hold post basic nursing qualifications in Emergency Care, Critical Care and or rural and remote area Nursing (not essential);
  • Be able to demonstrate a sound professional clinical background and an ability to manage their own tasks; and
  • Have a good degree of computer literacy — health records and organisational documentation is computerised

Midwives must have done some acute general work within the past 5 years.

These positions are based in busy community clinics that are open from 9am to 5:30pm Monday to Friday. Nurses do provide an after hours on-call service, and you will require advanced nursing clinical skills including excellent clinical assessment skills and confidence in managing diversity in presentations — trauma, acute and chronic medical conditions — across all age groups.

The successful candidates must also be willing to undergo a Police Check and a Working With Children Check. A manual driver’s licence is essential and it would be advantageous to have experience with 4WD vehicles, although a 2 day 4WD training course is provided in your orientation week.

If you have a diverse background in clinical experience, including in clinical acute medicine, A&E, paediatrics and/or Aboriginal health care – then we want to hear from you!

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

To receive regular updates from Nganampa Health including future job opportunities, follow Nganampa Health Council on Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nganampa-Health-Council/306940186003663

Apply Now

12. General Practitioner – Full Time :Durri ACMS NSW

For over 30 years, Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service has provided essential and culturally appropriate medical, preventive, allied and oral health services to Aboriginal communities.  Located in Kempsey and surrounds and the Nambucca Valley on the Mid North Coast of NSW. Durri is committed to making health care and education accessible to improve the health status and wellbeing of our communities.

Download the Selection Criteria Apply

Application Pack General Practitioner – Durri Nambucca

13.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Mental Health Recovery Program

Be part of a unique and significant Social Health program!

  • Enjoy fantastic work/life balance with generous leave entitlements!
  • Attractive remuneration package of $71,296 PLUS super and salary sacrifice!

 

About the Mental Health Recovery Program

Nunkuwarrin Yunti‘s Mental Health Recovery Program aims to provide members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities with accessible, culturally safe and therapeutically sound psychological and counselling services. Mental Health Recovery team members comprise a mix of Psychological Services Providers including Registered Psychologists, Mental Health Accredited Social Workers, Social and Emotional Wellbeing Counsellors and related roles who provide one-to-one therapy and group therapy for our client group.

The Program has close links to Social Health Case Work services, community health promotion programs, clinical health programs and Stolen Generations support services.

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is seeking a Team Manager to lead their Mental Health Recovery Program on a full-time basis.

You’ll be leading a team of highly trained and qualified Psychological Service providers including Psychologists, Mental Health Social Workers and Counsellors across a small number of offices in metropolitan Adelaide, as well as a team member in Murray Bridge. This is a new team and some initial work to on-board new staff will be required.

Reporting to the Middle Manager – Social and Emotional Wellbeing, you will be responsible for delivering key services in alignment with funding agreements and service relevant legislation, such as privacy, mandatory reporting, and collection and reporting of service statistics. Core service delivery will comprise maximising the number of face to face counselling and psychological service sessions delivered to the target client groups, as well as some service promotion to key referral and client groups.

More specifically, some of your key duties will include:

  • Providing high level leadership and support to staff within the Mental Health Recovery Program;
  • Managing staff rosters, leave approvals, recruitment and induction, and regular performance reviews;
  • Supporting staff continuing professional development and operating as a resource to support team members in ethical and professional decision making;
  • Ensuring program outcomes are achieved and that all service delivery meets legislative requirements;
  • Maintaining strong communication pathways between internal and external stakeholders, in particular promoting the service and developing networks to build community support;
  • Providing input to the strategic direction of Nunkuwarrin Yunti through developing and implementing annual program action plans;
  • Creating and managing program budgets in collaboration with Middle Management and the Finance Manager; and
  • Reviewing and evaluating the program in order to complete reports to the funding body, and undertaking continuous improvement.

The ideal candidate will hold a Diploma or higher in Management, Social Health or similar discipline. Professional registration with bodies such as AHPRA or AASW will be highly regarded, as will management experience within the Human Services sector, preferably within an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

An in-depth knowledge of contemporary challenges faced by members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, the history of past government policies designed to remove Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, alongside a demonstrated understanding of how to deliver accessible services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, will be paramount to your success. Additionally, the ability to effectively communicate to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in a culturally sensitive manner will ensure your success in this position.

You’ll have strong experience in staff management, with the ability to encourage and motivate team members. Confidence in using the Microsoft Office Suite and client database systems is essential.

Please note: It is a requirement of this role that the successful candidate has a current driver’s licence, and is willing to undergo a National Police Check prior to employment with Nunkuwarrin Yunti.

To view the full position description, please click here.

For further information, telephone Chris Howland on 8406 1693 or 0401 615 511.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are encouraged to apply.

About the Benefits

The successful candidate will be rewarded with an attractive salary circa $71,296, dependent on skills and qualifications, plus super. This package provides you with excellent flexible salary sacrificing options which will allow you to significantly increase your take home pay.

Your dedication to the organisation will also be rewarded with generous leave allowances, including 7 days paid leave over the Christmas period in addition to your four weeks of annual leave!

By joining the supportive Nunkuwarrin Yunti team, you will receive career and personal growth opportunities within a multicultural workforce, and ongoing professional development and training. The benefits of working for South Australia’s largest Aboriginal primary healthcare service will become apparent as you experience genuine opportunities to advance your career within the organisation!

Don’t miss this opportunity to give back to the community and enjoy a rewarding challenge – Apply Now!

Please Note: Applications will be reviewed by COB 17th April, 2017.

 Added

Nunkuwarrin Yunti has multiple positions on our Chronic Conditions Management team.

Here is the link to the advertisement.

https://www.seek.com.au/job/33171419?type=standard&tier=no_tier&pos=1&whereid=3000&userqueryid=633e3c0a1b7c540e57937f39f915feb3-1213354&ref=beta

 

14. Indigenous Health Promotion Officer Mawarnkarra Health Service WA

We are seeking an Indigenous Health Promotions Officer to enhance the holistic primary health care services provided to the Aboriginal people of the West Pilbara, by undertaking activities aimed to develop & implement a coordinated team-based approach to Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health, as well as facilitate working relationships and communication exchange between mainstream organisations, Aboriginal Medical Services, and their peak bodies.

The successful applicant must be willing to travel on a regular basis therefore will need to hold a “C” class driver’s license. The skills required include the ability to complete reporting duties into various computer programs, taking initiative and working within a team environment. Excellent communication, interpersonal skills and organisational skills is also mandatory. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

Interested applicants are encouraged to request a copy of the Position Description and Selection Criteria from our Human Resources team on (08)9182 0801 or via emailmailto:hrofficer@mhs.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Scholarships Alert : Indigenous health students – Win a @HESTASuper scholarship to #ruralhealthconf in Cairns

 “ Indigenous health students are encouraged to apply for a new scholarship to attend the National Rural Health Conference in Cairns, from 26-29 April 2017.

The scholarship covers return airfares to Cairns, four nights’ accommodation and conference registrations fees. “

The conference, hosted by the National Rural Health Alliance, is Australia’s pre-eminent event for people committed to better health and wellbeing in rural and remote communities.

Keynote speakers include Janine Mohamed, CEO of the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives, and Dr Mark Wenitong, Medical Director of the Apunipima Cape York Health Council.

There are 10 conference scholarships, provided by HESTA super fund in partnership with Rural Health Workforce Australia. They are for medical, nursing and allied health students who belong to Rural Health Clubs affiliated with the National Rural Health Student Network

HESTA Scholarship – Terms & Conditions

The HESTA National Rural Health Conference Scholarship will support 10 university health students to attend the 14th National Rural Health Conference in Cairns, Far North Queensland, from 26-29 April 2017.

At least one of the 10 HESTA scholarships will be reserved for a student with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander heritage.

Scholarship funding includes return airfares, 4 nights’ accommodation with breakfast at Rydges Cairns and conference registration.*

* Please note: Successful applicants will be responsible for airport transfers, any additional meals (3 dinners) not covered by the accommodation package and the conference program, plus any additional hotel expenses. Breakfasts are provided as part of the accommodation package while lunches, morning and afternoon teas and one dinner are provided at the conference.

Each applicant must be a current member of a Rural Health Club affiliated with the National Rural Health Student Network and currently enrolled in a medical, nursing or allied health course in Australia.

Applicants will be assessed on their response to a series of questions in the online application form – with a particular emphasis on their interest in and commitment to practising in rural Australia.

Student Undertaking

Successful applicants will:

  • Agree to take part in media and promotional activities highlighting the scholarship program with HESTA and RHWA
  • Ensure that they have obtained permission from their university to attend the National Rural Health Conference, 26-29 April 2017
  • Provide immediate notification of withdrawal from or changes to their course of studies in 2017
  • Conduct themselves in a professional and respectful manner throughout the conference
  • Repay scholarship funding received if they faily to comply with the conditions of this agreement

Key dates

  • Scholarship applications open: Wednesday 8 March 2017
  • Scholarship applications close: 5pm (AEDT) Monday 20 March 2017
  • Scholarship winners announced: Monday 27 March 2017

This is part of HESTA’s Reconciliation Action Plan that aims to increase equity between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians.

Applications close at 5pm (AEDT) on Monday 20 March. Find out more and apply at www.rhwa.org.au/hestascholarship

Hestas  vision for reconciliation

We’re committed to building community partnerships built on respect.

Increased confidence and choice in retirement for all members including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

We’ll advocate for equity outcomes between non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

On 31 July 2015, we launched our first Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP). It was a proud moment for HESTA, as we are the first industry super fund to implement a RAP. The HESTA team have really embraced the commitments and actions in our first RAP. And now, it’s time to review, reflect and challenge ourselves further.

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosingtheGap Run and Walk : 3 ways you can support Indigenous Marathon Foundation

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 ” IMP uses the marathon as a vehicle to promote healthy lifestyles to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Running is accessible to any age, ability and location and has the tremendous power to instil a sense of personal accomplishment when one has pushed beyond what they thought possible.

Robert De Castella Founder Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF)

You are invited by the Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF) support the project in 3 ways

  1. To participate in their Closing the Gap Run-and-Walk, held on the eve of the release of the Prime Minister’s 2017 Closing the Gap Report.
  2. Donate or assist in fundraising The Indigenous Marathon Foundation Ltd is a registered health promotion charity Donations over $2 are tax deductable and support our programs and inspirational Graduates celebrate Indigenous achievement, resilience and promote health and physical activity PO Box 6127 Mawson ACT 2607 (02) 6162 4750
  3. The search for the 2017 squad of the Indigenous Marathon Project : Promote to your community see 2017 Remaining try-out tour dates and locations below  

The IMF are a not-for-profit organisation that uses running to drive social change, create young leaders and address Indigenous health and social issues by celebrating Indigenous resilience and achievement.

Their program has inspired communities across Australia to take up running not just for exercise, but also to connect and share stories in a supportive environment.

Healthy lifestyle programs like those run by the IMF are a vital part of the Australian Government’s initiative to close the substantial gap in health, education and employment outcomes between Indigenous and other Australians.

Please come to join runners from the IMF and staff from the Department’s IAG Health Branch for a 5 kilometre run-and-walk to support the successful impact sport and recreation programs have in Indigenous communities and kick start the launch of the 2017 Closing the Gap Report.

1.Event details 

Date: Monday 13 February 2017 Time: 6:45 am arrival for a 7:00 am start

Location: Reconciliation Place, Lake Burley Griffin 

Please bring a water bottle or something to drink on the way. A light breakfast will be available after the run and a coffee van will also be present at the site.

Please RSVP to Rachael at Rachael.Norman@pmc.gov.au

3.The search for the 2017 squad of the Indigenous Marathon Project

The search for the 2017 squad of the Indigenous Marathon Project began in Canberra on February 1 when former world champion runner and IMP Founder Rob de Castella, and 2014 IMP Graduate and Head Coach Adrian Dodson-Shaw put applicants through their paces for a place on the life-changing project.

No running experience is required, as the project is not necessarily looking for athletes, but for young Indigenous men and women who show the potential to become community leaders.

The national tour will visit communities around Australia and select six men and six women in a trial that includes a 3km run for women and 5km run for men, in addition to an interview with Mr Dodson-Shaw. The group will also be expected to complete a Certificate III in Fitness, First Aid & CPR qualification and Level 1 Recreational Running coaching accreditation as part of the project’s compulsory education component.

There were a record number of applications in 2016, and high numbers are anticipated for the 2017 try-outs.

“There’ll be some pretty exciting times ahead as we begin the national IMP 2017 try-out tour, and what better place to start than the nation’s capital,’’ Mr Dodson-Shaw said.

“It’s going to be a busy two months on the recruitment drive but I’m looking forward to meeting the applicants and choosing the next squad to take on the New York City Marathon.”

Mr de Castella said the selection of a new squad is always an exciting time.

‘’The marathon is synonymous with struggle and achievement and it is one of the hardest things you can choose to do,’’ he said. ‘’Doing a full marathon from no running experience, on the other side of the world, in the biggest city in the world, in the biggest marathon in the world, is an incredible feat of hard work and determination.

‘’We are now recruiting a new squad to follow in the footsteps of the 65 IMP Graduates we have produced since 2010.

‘’I encourage every young Indigenous man and woman who wants to make change happen to come along and be part of this amazing life-changing and life-saving adventure!’’

Try-outs are open to all Indigenous men and women aged 18-30, and applications can be made on the day.

The IMP is a program of the Indigenous Marathon Foundation, a not‐for‐profit Foundation established by Rob de Castella. Each year IMP selects a squad of 12 young Indigenous men and women, to train for the New York City Marathon in November, complete a compulsory education component – a Certificate III in Fitness, media training and coaching accreditation – and through their achievements celebrate Indigenous resilience and success.

The IMP relies on the generous support of the Australian Government Department of Health, Department of PM&C, Department of Regional Australia, local Government, Arts and Sport, Qantas, ASICS, Accor and the Australian public.

For more information please contact Media Manager Lucy Campbell on (02) 6162 4750 or 0419 483 303. More information about IMP can be found at or visit our Facebook page, The Marathon Project. ABN 39 162 317 455

2017 Remaining try-out tour dates and locations

  • Newcastle  February 8  8am

Empire Park, Bar Beach

  • Sydney  February 10  6pm

Redfern Oval

  • Perth  February 14  8am

Lake Monger, between Leederville and Wembley

  • Karratha  February 15  5pm

Bulgarra Oval

  • Broome  February 16  5pm

Peter Haynes Oval (Frederick Street)

  • Adelaide  February 21  8am

Barratt Reserve, West Beach

  • Brisbane  February 28  8am

QSAC Track Kessels Road, Nathan

  • Townsville  March 1  8am

Muldoon Oval

  • Cairns  March 2  5pm

Pirate Ship, The Esplanade

  • Thursday Island  March 3  5pm

Mr Turtle

  • Alice Springs  March 8  5pm

Head Street Oval

  • Port Macquarie  March 11  11am

Westport Park

  • Darwin  March 20  6pm

Outside Darwin Military Museum, Alec Fong Lim Drive

  • Timber Creek  March 21  6pm

Timber Creek Oval

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Human Rights : Nomination open 2017 National Indigenous #HumanRights Awards

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 ” The National Indigenous Human Rights Awards recognises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who have made significant contribution to the advancement of human rights and social justice for their people.”

The awards were established in 2014, and will held annually. The inaugural awards were held at NSW Parliament House, and were welcomed by the Hon Linda Burney, MP and included key note speakers Dr Yalmay Yunupingu, Ms Gail Mabo, and Mr Anthony Mundine. A number of other distinguished guests such as political representatives, indigenous leaders and others in the fields of human rights and social justice also attended.

The Awards were presented by leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander elders, and leading Indigenous figures in Indigenous Social Justice and Human Rights. All recipients of the National Human Rights Award will be persons of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage.

To nominate someone for one of the three awards, please go to https://shaoquett.wufoo.com/forms/z4qw7zc1i3yvw6/
 
For further information, please also check out the Awards Guide at https://www.scribd.com/document/336434563/2017-National-Indigenous-Human-Rights-Awards-Guide

AWARD CATEGORIES:

 

DR YUNUPINGU AWARD – FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
 
To an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of Human Rights for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples. Dr Yunupingu is the first Aboriginal from Arnhem Land to achieve a university degree. In 1986 Dr Yunupingu formed Yothu Yindi in 1986, combining Aboriginal (Yolngu) and non-Aboriginal (balanda) musicians and instrumentation.

In 1990 was appointed as Principal of Yirrkala Community School, Australia’s first Aboriginal Principal. Also in that year he established the Yothu Yindi Foundation to promote Yolngu cultural development, including Garma Festival of Traditional Cultures Dr Yumupingu was named 1992 Australian of the Year for his work in building bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities across Australia.

THE EDDIE MABO AWARD FOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN SOCIAL JUSTICE

In memory of Eddie Koiki Mabo (1936-1992), this award recognises an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of Social Justice for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Eddie Koiki Mabo was a Torres Straits Islander, most notable in Australian history for his role in campaigning for indigenous land rights.

From 1982 to 1991 Eddie campaigned for the rights of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to have their land rights recognised. Sadly, he died of cancer at the age of 56, five months before the High Court handed down its landmark land rights decision overturning Terra Nullius. He was 56 when he passed away.

THE ANTHONY MUNDINE AWARD FOR COURAGE

 

To an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of sports among Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Anthony Mundine is an Australian professional boxer and former rugby league player. He is a former, two-time WBA Super Middleweight Champion, a IBO Middleweight Champion, and an interim WBA Light Middleweight Champion boxer and a New South Wales State of Origin representative footballer. Before his move to boxing he was the highest paid player in the NRL.

In 2000 Anthony was named the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Person of the Year in 2000. He has also won the Deadly Award as Male Sportsperson of the Year in 2003, 2006 and 2007 amongst others.

He has a proud history of standing up for Indigenous peoples, telling a journalist from the Canberra Times: “I’m an Aboriginal man that speaks out and if I see something, I speak the truth.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health scholarships: Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme close 15 January

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Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme

Applications open now; close 15 January 2017

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme (PHMSS) is available to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who are studying a course in ATSI health work, allied health, dentistry/oral health, medicine, midwifery or nursing.

It is an Australian Government initiative designed to encourage and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Dr Puggy Hunter – NACCHO Chairperson 1991-2001 BIO

Dr. Arnold “Puggy” Hunter was a pioneer in Australian Aboriginal health and recipient of the 2001 Australian Human Rights Medal.

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 150 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996.

He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council.

He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

Puggy had a long and passionate role in the struggle for justice for Aboriginal people. He was born in Darwin in 1951, where his parents had fled Broome and Western Australian native welfare policies.[1]

Numerous Australian scholarships are named in his honour.

He was quoted in Australian Parliament as saying: “You white people have the hearing problems because you do not seem to hear us

Application form

Online application form 

Applications are open now; close on 15 January 2017.

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course.
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

ACN receives high volume of applications; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship scheme is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Drug #Ice :Applications close 8 February for local community drug action teams to tackle ice

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“These Local Drug Action Teams will provide a structure to unite communities so they can work together more effectively, They will drive community action to reduce demand for drugs such as ice and reduce the harm associated with alcohol and other drugs more broadly.

“Stronger prevention action will help individuals and families to avoid the destruction that ice is causing, especially in rural and regional communities.”

Minister for Health, Sussan Ley

A program to help local communities tackle the impact of ice through 220 community-based local action teams across Australia over the next four years was announced just before Xmas by the Minister for Health, Sussan Ley, as part of the National Ice Action Strategy.

She said that local councils, schools, police, youth services, primary health and treatment services, community groups, non-government organisations (NGOs) and community members would be eligible to be members of a Local Drug Action Team.

More info : http://adf.org.au/community/our-programs/local-drug-action-teams/

Funding of $19.2 million has been provided to the Alcohol and Drug Foundation (formerly the Australian Drug Foundation) to administer the community-based action teams. Applications for communities wishing to form a local team opened  (23 December 2016) and will close on 8 February 2017.

Ms Ley said development of community-based teams was a direct response to the Government’s National Ice Taskforce’s call for more locally-tailored strategies to address local issues to strengthen prevention activities and reduce demand for drugs such as ice.

There will be ongoing opportunities through 2017 and 2018 for communities who want to form teams but miss out in the first application process. The first group of 40 local community teams will be determined by early 2017.

Interested groups and individuals can find more information on the program on the Alcohol and Drug Foundation’s website.

The Local Drug Action Team initiative is part of the Australian Government’s investment of $298 million investment over four years to reduce the impact of drugs and alcohol.

Alcohol and Drug Foundation chief executive officer John Rogerson welcomed the partnership with the Australian Government.

“Building community partnerships to develop locally-based and locally-delivered solutions is the key to reducing alcohol and drug related harm,” he said.

“These community teams will be on the ground in your neighbourhood playing a key role in implementing unique prevention programs that are tailored to their community’s issues.

“They will also give much-needed support to those impacted by ice, other illegal drugs and alcohol.”

Ms Ley has also announced funding for expansion of a program run by the Alcohol and Drug Foundation to tackle illegal drugs by providing education and awareness programs through 1200 local sporting clubs.

The new program is an extension of the Foundation’s successful grass-roots Good Sports program, which encourages cultural change in behaviours and attitudes to drug and alcohol use in sporting clubs. The program has helped more than 7,000 clubs nationwide.

“People aged 20 to 29 years are among the highest users of illicit drugs and many people in this age group are also members of local sporting clubs,” Ms Ley said.

“This program will be an important part of encouraging these young people to talk about drugs, as well as providing information for people who might need help and support.”

For more information on Local Drug Action Teams see www.adf.org.au/ldat

For more information on Good Sports see www.adf.org.au/good-sports

and from Team NACCHO

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For NACCHO Media Contact

Colin Cowell Editor 0401 331 251

Email mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Education Weekly Wrap of 5 articles and opportunities #rural, regional and remote

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In this edition of Aboriginal Health and Education News

1. ANU Graduate Dr Danielle Dries helps close the gap

2.Applications are being sought for the 2017 AMA Scholarship

3. Doctor on journey to find health answers

4. AMA flags no more medical schools

5. Doctors welcome Government focus on rural medical training

6. GPs can and must do more to tackle obesity crisis says ANU study

7. Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme

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Article I From ANU

ANU Graduate Dr Danielle Dries helps close the gap

Danielle Dries ( Pictured above ) a Kaurna woman from South Australia, has graduated with a Doctor of Medicine Doctor of Surgery with distinction from the ANU Medical School and now wants to close the gap on health and life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Dr Dries, who graduates this week, is well on her way, working on Indigenous health during her studies and landing a Board Director position with Indigenous Allied Health Australia.

“Honestly I was surprised when I saw I was graduating with distinction because I have been so busy working on projects outside of my studies,” Dr Dries said.

“Moving around the country for my undergraduate studies and ANU medical school placements has been an amazing experience. I got into medicine because I want to help people in rural and remote Australia and I have dreams to end up there one day,” she said.

Dr Dries was appointed as the Indigenous Health Officer for the National Rural Health Student Network (NRHSN) half way through her degree and has been flat out since.

“I have been able to encourage people to get involved in Indigenous communities and promote health careers to Indigenous youth, as well as promote Indigenous health awareness among my peers,” she said.

Through her role with the ANU Rural Medical Society, Dr Dries was able to transform the annual ANU Close The Gap Day event into a two-day conference, attracting more than 130 multidisciplinary health students from across the country each year.

“We ended up with a two-day conference with five or six speakers on the first day and workshops for health students on the second day,” Dr Dries said.

“This has been one of the most rewarding experiences for me at ANU because a lot of the time when we are talking about Indigenous health, we tend to be talking to an Indigenous crowd, but 90 per cent of the people who attend this conference are non-Indigenous people.

“It gives us the opportunity to talk about the strength of Indigenous people, what we have achieved, and what we continue to achieve.”

Dr Dries will complete her postgraduate internship year at The Canberra Hospital and Calvary Hospital, while she sits as a Director on the board of Indigenous Allied Health Australia.

“At the moment it feels right to stay in Canberra and spend time with my family while working closely with some really important Indigenous health organisations,” she said.

Dr Dries is the fourth person in her family to attend ANU, with three brothers having studied engineering at the university.

Whilst at ANU Dr Dries received the inaugural Peter Sharp Scholarship, funded by the ACT Health. The scholarship was established to continue Dr Peter Sharp’s legacy in improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living in the ACT.

Article 2

Applications are being sought for the 2017 AMA Scholarship 

The AMA recognises the critical importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors through the AMA Indigenous Peoples’ Medical Scholarship scheme. Applications are being sought for the 2017 Scholarship from eligible Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students who have entered an Australian university to study medicine.

Since 1994, the Scholarship has assisted over 20 Indigenous men and women become doctors, many of whom may not otherwise have had the financial resources to study medicine. Previous AMA Scholarship recipients have graduated to work in Indigenous and mainstream health services, and some have spent time providing care in their own communities. Read the stories and profiles of past winners on the Indigenous Peoples’ Medical Scholarship webpage.

The successful applicant will receive $10,000 each year for the duration of their course. Preference will be given to applicants who do not already hold any other scholarship or bursary. Applications must be received by 31 January 2017.

To receive further information on how to apply, please contact Sandra Riley, Administration Officer, AMA on 02 6270 5452 or email indigenousscholarship@ama.com.au. An application package can be also downloaded from the AMA website.

Article 3 From NIT

Doctor on journey to find health answers

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Indigenous elder Doseena Fergie has been awarded a prestigious Churchill Fellowship to further her research into Indigenous health.

Dr Fergie works in the School of Nursing and Midwifery and Paramedicine at the Australian Catholic University’s Melbourne campus.

She was among 106 Australians announced as recipients of a 2016 Churchill Fellowship.

The Fellowship provides an opportunity for recipients to travel overseas to conduct research in their chosen fields.

Dr Fergie will spend several weeks travelling to Finland, England, Canada, Hawaii and New Zealand next year where she will meet Indigenous elders, researchers, academics and health service providers.

“I hope to visit these Indigenous nations to find out the relationship between their intergenerational trauma through colonisation and culture and how they have managed to rejuvenate a sense of belonging and identity within their communities because we know the health disparities are just huge in all Indigenous Nations,” Dr Fergie said.

“I see a need to build relationships between the Indigenous communities I will visit and the Australian Indigenous community.

“We need to share our cultural ways and learn from each other and by doing so we can overcome the barriers of geographical isolation.”

Dr Fergie completed her PhD thesis on post-natal depression among Victorian Aboriginal women.

“If you have a passion for our own people and you’ve seen the needs out there, this passion should be expressed in a place of influence. I think academia is an important place for this work of advocacy,” she said.

Dr Fergie will be presented with her Churchill Fellowship at a ceremony at Government House in Melbourne in January.

Wendy Caccetta


Article 4 AMA Press Release

No more medical schools

The Federal Government has signalled a shift in policy focus from expanding medical school places to addressing shortcomings in the distribution of training opportunities as part of efforts to boost the number of doctors working in rural and regional areas.

Following sustained AMA advocacy on the issue, the Government has accepted that the country does not need more medical schools, and has instead identified the need to improve the spread of training places to enable more medical students and graduates to undertake their studies in rural and regional locations.

Assistant Minister for Rural Health Dr David Gillespie said a massive expansion in medical schools in the past decade meant the country was now producing more than enough medical graduates, and the challenge now was to increase the number choosing to train and practice outside the major cities.

“We’ve expanded medical undergraduate places by over 100 per cent since 2001, because we had an absolute shortage, but now predictions are that we’ll have 7,000 excess medical practitioners by 2030,” Dr Gillespie told ABC Radio. “So we want to look at the distribution of undergraduate training, see what works best, with the aim of addressing the shortage of medical practitioners in rural and regional Australia.”

The Health Department and the Department of Education and Training have been directed to undertake a joint assessment of the number and distribution of medical schools and medical student places.

“This assessment will be considered within the context of existing workforce modelling and data, two decades of workforce distribution policies, the expansion of higher education places, and the Government’s priorities to address the maldistribution of medical professionals across regional, rural and remote Australia,” Dr Gillespie said.

The move follows sustained pressure from the AMA, which has for several years argued that the nation does not need more medical school places, and should instead focus on boosting medical training opportunities in rural and regional Australia.

Delegates at the 2015 AMA National Conference unanimously passed a motion calling on the-then Abbott Government to reconsider its funding for the Curtin Medical School, and in mid-2015 the AMA presented the Government with a plan to increase prevocational training opportunities for junior doctors in rural and remote areas.

In its plan for improved rural health care launched in May 2016, the AMA detailed proposals to boost the country medical workforce by, among other measures, a Community Residency Program to provide prevocational GP placements and expanding the Specialist Training Program to 1400 places by 2018, with priority for rural and regional training places, as well as a greater rural focus for existing medical schools.

The AMA also jointly proposed with the Rural Doctors’ Association of Australia a comprehensive rural workforce incentive package, Building a sustainable future for rural practice: the rural rescue package.

Against this backdrop, AMA President Dr Michael Gannon welcomed the policy shift outlined by Dr Gillespie.

“The last thing we need are more medical schools,” the AMA President told ABC Radio. “What we need to see is an expansion of the investment in existing rural clinical schools and a serious look at the process of maybe reallocating numbers to those universities with rural clinical schools, or to schools that are in rural areas themselves.”

Dr Gillespie admitted that the current training structure, which provided limited opportunities for rural-based students and graduates, militated against increasing the number of doctors working in non-metropolitan areas, undermining access to care for rural and regional Australians.

“At key points in their training and development, the structure of the training system and a lack of advanced regional, rural and remote positions tend to force new doctors back to the cities, where they often settle,” he said. “The baggage one collects in one’s life, partner, mortgages, houses, friends, schools, children, if you’ve been there six or seven years, that’s where you more than likely stay.

“We must ensure access to high quality postgraduate training for the existing numbers of medical students and recent graduates in rural, regional and remote Australia.”

Article 5

Doctors welcome Government focus on rural medical training

The Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) has welcomed today’s announcement by the Federal Government that it will undertake a review of the distribution of medical school places in Australia, with a focus on encouraging more doctors to train and ultimately practise in rural and remote areas.

In announcing the review, the Federal Assistant Minister for Rural Health, Dr David Gillespie MP, emphasised the Government’s continuing priority to address the shortage of doctors in regional, rural and remote areas, and to develop ways in which this shortage can best be addressed.

“We strongly welcome this important review” RDAA President, Dr Ewen McPhee, said.

“It is clear that we already have more than enough doctors graduating from our universities to meet Australia’s overall doctor workforce needs now and into the future — but we still do not have enough young doctors choosing a career in rural and remote practice, whether that be as a general practitioner or another type of specialist.

“There is a pressing need to address this continuing maldistribution of doctors, and to shape both medical education policies and medical workforce policies to address this challenge at all stages of a doctor’s career — starting from the day they apply for a place in medical school.

“Research has shown repeatedly over many years that those who come from rural areas, or undertake medical studies or extended clinical placements in rural areas, are the most likely to return to rural or remote areas to work once they graduate from medical school.

“This is because they get to see how wonderfully rewarding a career as a rural doctor can be. To this end, the more medical school places that can be located in regional, rural and remote locations, the better. This could include expanding the existing Rural Clinical Schools across Australia.

“We also appreciate the strong recognition from Minister Gillespie of the challenges that young medical graduates face once they leave university and start to plan the next step in their medical career — this inevitably involves additional training in general practice or another specialty, and can be the point at which a young doctor gravitates to the city due to an often perceived lack of career opportunities in regional, rural and remote areas. We need to bust this myth.

“Queensland’s Rural Generalist Pathway is a prime example of the fact that advanced medical training can be delivered very successfully in regional, rural and remote areas — and it can actually lead to the reinvigoration of medical services like obstetrics in towns that had previously lost these services.

“We are very keen to see the Federal Government’s election promise of a National Rural Generalist Framework, and associated training pathway, implemented as soon as possible, so we can start to replicate the success of Queensland’s Rural Generalist Pathway right across the country.

“We look forward to working with Minister Gillespie, his Department and other stakeholders on this important review.”

Article 6

GPs can and must do more to tackle obesity crisis says ANU study

General practitioners (GPs) can and should do more to tackle the obesity epidemic in Australia, a new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has found.

Two in three Australians are overweight or obese but half of patients in obesity programs drop out before achieving any results.

Dr Liz Sturgiss from the ANU Medical School led a pilot study which found GPs were well placed on the health frontline to help patients manage their weight, but they did not have the confidence to do so effectively.

“More and more patients are coming to GPs with obesity problems, and we want to give GPs the tools to assist their patients. The current guidelines for obesity patients are to refer them to a dietician. However, this doesn’t work for everyone,” said Dr Sturgiss, who is a GP and health researcher.

Her team – which includes GPs, nurses and psychologists – developed a toolkit that guides GPs and their patients through an evidence-based weight management program.

Part of the toolkit is taken from the field of psychology and measures the effectiveness of a relationship between a GP and patient to manage weight problems.

“GPs and patients with warm and respectful relationships, shared goals and good agreement on what to do to achieve those goals got the best results,” Dr Sturgiss said.

Dr Mel Deery, whose practice in Canberra was involved in the pilot study, said the research helped the practice to treat weight and obesity problems.

“Through the research project we helped a number of patients lose five to eight kilograms, which is a significant amount, and we’re continuing to use these strategies with patients. This work is vital as obesity is a major public health problem that can lead to heart disease, stroke, arthritis and many mental health problems,” Dr Deery said.

Dr Sturgiss said the research team would use the pilot study results to conduct a randomised control trial, which could inform public policy on health and guidelines in GP clinics across Australia.

The research is published in Clinical Obesity.

Watch the video interviews with Dr Sturgiss and Dr Mel Deery on the ANU YouTube channel.

Article 7

Indigenous health scholarships

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme

Applications open now; close 15 January 2017

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme (PHMSS) is available to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who are studying a course in ATSI health work, allied health, dentistry/oral health, medicine, midwifery or nursing.

It is an Australian Government initiative designed to encourage and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Application form

Online application form

Australian College of Nursing apologises if the application form is not working at the moment. The problem is a hardware problem with our internet supplier, and not with ACN systems. We hope the problem will be rectified soon.

Applications are open now; close on 15 January 2017.

Please note the ACN office will be closed from midday December 23 and re-open on Monday 9 January 2017 at 9am. If you have any questions about the application or the process it is strongly recommended that you contact ACN prior to December 23 by email on scholarships@acn.edu.au or call 1800 688 628.

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course.
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

ACN receives high volume of applications; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship scheme is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Funding alert : $13.1m infrastructure grants for existing regional, rural and remote general practices.

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 ” Grants may be used for a range of infrastructure projects, including construction, fit-out and/or renovation of an existing general practice building, supply and installation of information and communication technology equipment or medical equipment.

Grants of up to $300,000 will be provided to successful applicants in 2017. All successful applicants will be required to match the Commonwealth funding contribution.”

Assistant Minister for Rural Health Dr David Gillespie

“Improved training facilities, such as communication technology, will also ensure that rural doctors can increase their own training opportunities, so they can continue to keep their skills current and maintain their practice at the high level that they strive for and that rural communities deserve.”

Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) see full press release below

The Australian Government has committed $13.1 million in funding under the Rural General Practice Grants Program (the Program) for grants up to $300,000 each to deliver improved health services through additional infrastructure, increased levels of teaching and training for health practitioners, and more opportunities to deliver ‘healthy living’ education to local communities.

The Program will provide an opportunity for general practices within Modified Monash Classification 2-7 to deliver increased health services in rural and regional communities.

The Program commences with a call for Expressions of Interest (EOI), in which suitable organisations will be identified and subsequently invited to submit a full application.

Project Officer Details Name: Health State Network
Ph: 02 6289 5600 E-mail: Grant.ATM@health.gov.au
Closing date 2:00 pm AEDST on 13 December 2016

Submit your detail here

Teaching, training and retaining the next generation of health workers in rural, regional and remote Australia is a priority for the Coalition Government.

Assistant Minister for Rural Health Dr David Gillespie said the Coalition Government has moved to streamline the former Rural and Regional Teaching Infrastructure Grants program to better respond to the needs of rural communities and support the work of rural general practices.

“A more streamlined and simplified two-step application process is now open through the new Rural General Practice Grants (RGPG) program,” Dr Gillespie said.

“General practice in rural Australia faces unique challenges in healthcare including the ability to attract and retain a health workforce.

“The RGPG program will enable existing health facilities to provide teaching and training opportunities for a range of health professionals within the practice and for practitioners to develop experience in training and supervising healthcare workers.

“I believe that strong, accessible primary care in regional Australia helps alleviate pressure on the public hospital system and at the same time it also provides opportunities for earlier intervention and better patient outcomes.”

“Our Government wants Australians, no matter where they live, to have access to quality health services,” Dr Gillespie said.

“I also want our health professionals who live and work in rural, regional and remote Australia to have access to teaching and training opportunities so they remain in general practice and in the communities that need them the most.”

Grant documentation will be available from the Department of Health’s Tenders and Grants page at www.health.gov.au/tenders.

Rural doctors congratulate government on new grants program

Australian rural doctors are today welcoming the announcement of a streamlined Rural General Practice Grants (RGPG) program, just announced by Dr David Gillespie, Assistant Minister for Rural Health.

Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), said that the announcement was a reflection of the importance the Coalition Government places on rural and remote health care.

“We are extremely pleased that Minister Gillespie has been so proactive in his Rural Health portfolio, and he has shown a great understanding of the need for increased training facilities to enable the education of the next generation of rural doctors,” Dr McPhee said.

“The RGPG will allow more of our highly skilled doctors in rural areas to improve their training capacity, allowing them to take on more young doctors in training and ensure they have access to quality educational opportunities in rural areas.

“Research shows us that young doctors who undertake training in rural areas, and have a good experience in their placement, are more likely to choose rural medicine as a career.

“Grants enabling doctors to improve and expand their training facilities will play a key role in the recruitment and retention of the rural doctor workforce of the future,” Dr McPhee said.

While infrastructure grants have been available for rural practices for some time, the application process was onerous, complicated and time consuming, putting it out of the reach of many small practices who did not have the time or expertise to successfully apply.

Grants can be used for a range of projects, including construction, fit-out and/or renovation of an existing general practice building, supply and installation of information and communication technology equipment or medical equipment.

“Simplifying and streamlining the process will ensure that these smaller clinics will no longer be disadvantaged by the system,” Dr McPhee said.

Many doctors enjoy the opportunity to engage with young doctors and be a part of their training journey. We look forward to more of our colleagues being able to participate in this way thanks to the Coalition’s commitment to rural health.

“Improved training facilities, such as communication technology, will also ensure that rural doctors can increase their own training opportunities, so they can continue to keep their skills current and maintain their practice at the high level that they strive for and that rural communities deserve.

“We thank Minister Gillespie for his recognition of the importance of this area.”

The third Rural Health Stakeholder Roundtable was held at Parliament House in Canberra on the 16 November 2016.

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Twenty years ago one of Australia’s greatest health challenges was a lack of doctors coming through the system.

Today, that challenge has been overcome with latest research predicting a surplus of 7000 doctors by 2030,” the Federal Minister for Rural Health, Dr David Gillespie, said today.

“The new challenge is no longer the number of doctors in our nation’s health workforce, but where they are distributed.

“This issue, along with the need for greater numbers of allied health professionals in the bush, are among the major topics to be discussed at the third Rural Health Stakeholder Roundtable at Parliament House in Canberra today,” Dr Gillespie said.

“The Roundtable was attended by an impressive representation of rural health stakeholders, from rural doctors associations, medical educators, rural health consumer and advocacy groups, Aboriginal medical services, rural and remote allied health organisations and health workforce professionals.

“We have an outstanding health workforce in the regional, rural and remote areas of this country and today’s roundtable is designed to get all the key players together with government to work out the very best strategies to support them and the work they do for our more isolated communities.”

Minister Gillespie said the Coalition Government is investing record funding in health as part of its commitment to strengthen the regional, rural and remote health system so that Australians living in these areas have access to the best care available.

“Our Government is working in partnership with these people to deliver health care to rural and remote communities through a broad range of initiatives as part of our record funding investment in the health portfolio.”

The Roundtable will discuss today the establishment of the National Rural Health Commissioner (the Commissioner), a new role to champion the cause of rural practice.

The Commissioner will work with rural, regional and remote communities, the health sector, universities, specialist training colleges and across all levels of Government to improve rural health policies.

Another priority item on the agenda is the development of the National Rural Generalist Pathway. This will improve access to training for doctors in rural, regional and remote Australia, and recognise the unique combination of skills required for the role of a rural generalist.

“General practitioners with advanced skills in areas such as general surgery, obstetrics, anaesthetics and mental health are commonly required in the bush also,” Dr Gillespie said.

“We want to make sure these skills are encouraged, developed and properly remunerated.”

Minister Gillespie said the Coalition Government had increased its investment in education and training initiatives both in medical and allied health professions to create a longer term ‘pipelines’ of boosting the rural health workforce.

“The new multidisciplinary training pipeline incorporating the Rural Clinical Schools and University Departments of Rural Health across regional Australia will be a critical component as we boost the capacity of training through our investment in Regional Training Hubs to bring more doctors and allied health professionals to the bush,” he said.

In response to recommendations put forward to the Rural Classification Technical Working Group, an independent group that has assisted the Government to implement the new geographical classification system, I announce today that more support will be provided to medical practitioners working in Cloncurry, Queensland and Roebourne, Western Australia.

“I am pleased to also announce an additional workforce support in the form of a rural loading will be applied to all doctors working in these two towns from 1 January 2017,”  Minister Gillespie said.

“The additional loading will be up to $25,000 per annum through the General Practice Rural Incentives Program and will recognise exceptional circumstances faced in attracting and retaining a workforce in these locations.

“The Coalition Government’s broader health reforms will have direct benefits for regional, rural and remote health, with the patient at the centre of care. Localised, integrated, community-driven health care is the order of the day,” Dr Gillespie said.

“The Rural Health Stakeholder Roundtable is a central part of informing policy reform in rural Australia and I am looking forward to fruitful discussions with participants today.”

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NACCHO Aboriginal Health Research : Ministers Ley and Wyatt invest $10.6 million in Aboriginal health research

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We know there is much work to be done with Indigenous health outcomes. This government is committed to making long-term improvements in Indigenous health and providing opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers,

The announcement of $10.6 million investment supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research includes $2.5 million for a Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) to build Indigenous research capacity and to find solutions to alcohol-related health problems

 This funding is part of NHMRC’s commitment to expend at least five per cent of its budget to support research to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.”

Minister for Health Sussan Ley pictured here consulting this week at QAIHC with Matthew Cooke NACCHO chair /QAIHC CEO and board members

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“These ECFs have been awarded to help Australian health and medical researchers early in their careers to establish themselves as independent, self-directed researchers.

It is essential that we build a vibrant future for Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers who will play a crucial role in addressing Australia’s health issues,”

Assistant Minister for Health Ken Wyatt said the Government was committed to providing opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers. Pictured above opening a Yulu-Burri-Ba Clinic in Brisbane this week

“Indigenous Australians are eight times more likely to suffer death or illness as a result of alcohol use, yet there is a critical shortage of Indigenous researchers with expertise in this field.

The team will generate new knowledge, integrating efforts along the continuum of treatment and prevention for unhealthy alcohol use. The Centre is designed to ensure that evidence will be readily translated into practice and policy.

Professor Kate Conigrave at the University of Sydney Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) 

The Turnbull Government has announced a further $190 million in health and medical research,

Minister for Health Sussan Ley said these new grants—awarded through the National Health and Medical Research Council—would help Australia’s research community to make discoveries that improve the diagnosis, treatment and cure of illnesses that can affect Indigenous Australians.

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The announcement includes $2.5 million for a Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) to build Indigenous research capacity and to find solutions to alcohol-related health problems.

The Centre, led by Professor Kate Conigrave at the University of Sydney, will build a strong network of Indigenous researchers with expertise in preventing and treating alcohol-related problems.

“The Centre will bring together senior Indigenous and non-Indigenous investigators at organisations including the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council South Australia and the Inala Indigenous Health Service,” Professor Conigrave said.

“Together, these investigators have an extensive track record in research, clinical work and policy development.”

Professor Conigrave brings significant experience working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to target substance misuse. She said this funding would provide a major pathway forward in research to reduce the harms from alcohol among Indigenous Australians.

“Indigenous Australians are eight times more likely to suffer death or illness as a result of alcohol use, yet there is a critical shortage of Indigenous researchers with expertise in this field.

“The team will generate new knowledge, integrating efforts along the continuum of treatment and prevention for unhealthy alcohol use. The Centre is designed to ensure that evidence will be readily translated into practice and policy.

“The CRE also offers a range of training and development opportunities to Indigenous research students and early-career researchers. It will provide pathways into postgraduate research study for Indigenous Australians, with comprehensive support and training at every step along the way,” Professor Conigrave explained.

Together with this CRE, NHMRC has committed to fund research targeting a range of other health issues for Indigenous Australians including:

  •  improving outcomes of Hepatitis B infection
  •  improving diet quality and food supply in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
  •  implementing interventions to improve health and justice outcomes for Indigenous offenders
  •  addressing the high rates of depression amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

Today’s announcement also includes three Early Career Fellowships (ECFs) for Indigenous researchers.

Assistant Minister for Health Ken Wyatt said the Government was committed to providing opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers.

“These ECFs have been awarded to help Australian health and medical researchers early in their careers to establish themselves as independent, self-directed researchers. It is essential that we build a vibrant future for Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers who will play a crucial role in addressing Australia’s health issues,” Mr Wyatt said.

Associate Professor James Ward from the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute is one of the Indigenous researchers to receive an ECF. His research seeks to establish interventions to improve outcomes for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with sexually transmissible infections or blood borne viruses and for people using methamphetamines.

This funding is part of NHMRC’s commitment to expend at least five per cent of its budget to support research to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

A total of $190 million across 320 grants funding health and medical research were announced today. This includes a $100 million investment in fostering career development and supporting leading health and medical researchers in full-time research. This comprises $58 million to support Research Fellowships and $38 million to fund ECFs.

Ms Ley reiterated these grants will play a vital role in funding new research for treatments of diseases that affect Australians.

“Health and medical research is a powerful investment and one that delivers immense benefits through better health and health care.

“The researchers we have funded are at the leading edge of health and medical research from which considerable benefits will flow.

“Congratulations to these grant recipients and I look forward to seeing the outcomes of this work in improving the health and wellbeing of all Australians,” Ms Ley said.

More information on the grants is available on the NHMRC website.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Research Opportunity : NHMRC Indigenous Internship program

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The National Health and Medical Research Council is pleased to invite all eligible applicants to apply to the Indigenous Internship program.

The NHMRC’s Indigenous internship program provides a wide range of opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to gain insight into the work of the NHMRC, as well as to enhance their educational experience through practical work experience. An internship with the NHMRC provides:

  • exposure to government processes and requirements in relation to funding health and medical research,
  • experience in developing guidelines, identifying and promoting resolution of ethical issues,
  • exposure to mechanisms and challenges of disseminating and increasing uptake of knowledge, and
  • better understanding of the rationale for, and demands of, public administration and accountability.

A limited number of paid placements for internships are available in our Canberra and Melbourne offices from November 2016 to February 2017.

Eligibility

To be eligible you must be: enrolled in an Undergraduate or Masters degree in a health or medical research related field; able to work independently and as part of a team; and can provide evidence to confirm that you are of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent.

Applications for the 2016-17 Indigenous Internship Program close on 1 October 2016.

To find out more please see our Indigenous Internship Information, which details eligibility and selection, as well as the terms and conditions of the program

https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/about/careers/nhmrc-indigenous-internship-program