NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Alcohol and other #drugs : New online tools for the Aboriginal #AOD Sector

The Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre (AODKC) have added a suite of online resources which are now available on the website.

Read over 170 NACCHO Alcohol and other Drugs articles published over past 5 years  

Designed to inform and educate the sector these new resources include:

1.Two short animated films on illicit drug use and volatile substance use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

2.Two infographics providing the key facts about illicit drug use and volatile substance use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

2.1 Download as PDF  Key facts illicit drug use

2.2  Download as PDF  Key facts illicit drug use

3. Two HealthInfoBytes; one about the Knowledge Centre’s tobacco web resources and the other about the latest Volatile substance use review.

These resources are in addition to two recently published eBooks and webinar recordings on topics which include ice and alcohol harm reduction.

HealthInfoNet Director, Professor Neil Drew says ‘These latest additions to our digital communication media takes into account the many ways people learn, what their level of education is and how much time they have or how much detail they need.

These new AOD resources complement our existing suite of digital tools and new platforms to deliver knowledge and information to the sector.

We know that there is a need for up to date evidence-based information to assist those working in the AOD sector.’

You can view all of the Knowledge Centre HealthInfoBytes and Webinars on the HealthInfoNet YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/c/healthinfonet

The Knowledge Centre provides online access to a comprehensive collection of relevant, evidence-based, current and culturally appropriate alcohol and other drug (AOD) knowledge-support and decision-support materials and information that can be used in the prevention, identification and management of alcohol and other drug use in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

A yarning place, a workers portal and community portal are other key resources.

The work of the Knowledge Centre is supported by a collaborative partnership with the three national alcohol and other drug research centres (the National Drug Research Institute, the National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction, and the National Drug and

Drug and Alcohol Research Centre). www.aodknowledgecentre.net.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #FASD Workshop dates : Development of the National #FASD Strategy 2018 – 2028

The Australian Government Department of Health is undertaking consultations to inform the development of the National FASD Strategy 2018– 2028.

The Strategy will provide a national approach for all levels of government, organisations and individuals on strategies that target the reduction of alcohol related harms relating to FASD, reducing the prevalence of FASD in Australia and provide advice and linkages on the support which is available for those affected by the disorder.

The objectives of the National FASD Strategy 2018 – 2028 are:

  • strengthen efforts and address the whole-of-life impacts of FASD;
  • address the whole-of-population issues;
  • support collaborative cross sectoral approaches required to prevent FASD in Australia; and
  • provide information and support those living with and affected by the disorder.

The Department has engaged Siggins Miller Consultants Pty Ltd (Siggins Miller) to undertake the development of the National FASD Strategywhich includes consultation with stakeholders and the development of a national strategy which provides a national holistic approach to reducing the prevalence of FASD; support Australians living with the disorder; guide the activities of individuals and communities as well as all levels of government, the public and research sectors, Not-For-Profit organisations which can adapted and implemented across Australia.

Siggins Miller is an experienced Australian consultancy company providing services for over 20 years in policy and program research, evaluation and management consultancy. The Siggins Miller project team is led by Professor Mel Miller (Director) and Mr James Miller (Senior Consultant).

As part of the consultation process, Siggins Miller will be conducting face-to-face strategy development workshops. There will also be other opportunities to provide feedback including through supplementary telephone interviews and written submissions.

The consultation period will run from 1st July, 2017 and conclude on the 1st September, 2017.

The workshops will be attended by with individuals and organisations working on FASD, individuals and organisations working with people affected by FASD, public health organisations and representatives of State and Territory Departments including: Health, Corrections and Juvenile Justice and Education and National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Affiliates.

The workshops will be catered and run from 9:30am – 3:30pm. Face-to-face strategy development workshops will be held in and on:

Sydney: Tuesday, August 1, 2017.

Canberra: Thursday August 3, 2017.

Melbourne: Tuesday,August 8, 2017.

Hobart: Thursday, August 10, 2017.

Brisbane: Tuesday,August 15, 2017.

Cairns: Thursday, August 17, 2017.

Perth: Tuesday,August 22, 2017.

Broome: Thursday, August 24, 2017.

Darwin: Tuesday,August 29, 2017.

Alice Springs: Thursday, August 31, 2017.

Adelaide: Monday, September 4, 2017.

Exact addresses of venues are in the process of being finalised and will be communicated to all stakeholder by Siggins Miller in the coming weeks.

It should be noted that due to capacity of venues, spaces to attend the face-to-face strategy development workshops are limited in each location. Invited participants will also be responsible for any costs associated with attending the face-to-face workshop in each location.

Siggins Miller will be in contact with you by email in the coming weeks with an invitation for you to attend one of the face-to face strategy development workshops.

In the meantime, should you have any questionsabout the consultation and written submission process, please contact Siggins Millerby email on fasdstrategy@sigginsmiller.com.au or by phone on: 1800 055 070.

Please note that the 1800 number provided is a message bank service in which you can leave your inquiry, a senior Siggins Miller staff member will endeavour to return your call within 72 hours.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Illicit Drug Use : FREE eBook teaches and Informs Alcohol and Other Drug sector

The Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre (AODKC) this week launched a new eBook about illicit drug use.

The interactive electronic version is a powerful learning tool and is based on the 2016 Review of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

HealthInfoNet Director, Professor Neil Drew says ‘This is our second eBook as we continue to expand our suite of digital tools and new platforms to deliver knowledge and information to the sector.

The eBook is a tactile, sensory tool which provides multiple ways of utilising the latest technology to assist learning about this important topic. We received positive feedback from stakeholders to the first e book and know that there is a need for a resource of this kind.’

The eBook has been created for Apple devices such as iPads, iPhones, laptops and desktop computers.

It is free to download from iTunes and via the AODKC https://itunes.apple.com/au/book/illicit-drug-use/id1226941831?mt=11&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

Users can read it, listen to it, make notes and copy/paste content.

Embedded in the eBook are short films and links to the original source of references.

Once downloaded, the eBook can be accessed and used multiple times in any way that the user determines.

In addition, you can also access from the AODKC site, a short an animated infographic of the eBook which provides another learning opportunity.

Illicit drug use is an issue of concern to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians.

The purpose of the review is to provide a comprehensive synthesis of key information for people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health in Australia. The eBook is the review in another dynamic format.

NACCHO INFO

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Drug Strategy 2014-2019 (NATSIPDS) is a sub-strategy of the National Drug Strategy 2010-2015 (NDS). The NDS aims to build safe and healthy communities by minimising alcohol, tobacco and other drug related health, social and economic harms among individuals, families and communities.

Download

FINAL National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Drug Strategy 2014-2019

The overarching goal of the NATSIPDS is to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by preventing and reducing the harmful effects of alcohol and other drugs (AOD) on individuals, families, and their communities.

NACCHO Previous 170 posts Alcohol and other drugs

More information: The Knowledge Centre provides online access to a comprehensive collection of relevant, evidence-based, current and culturally appropriate alcohol and other drug (AOD) knowledge-support and decision-support materials and information that can be used in the prevention, identification and management of alcohol and other drug use in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre (AO

A yarning place, a workers portal and community portal are other key resources. The work of the Knowledge Centre is supported by a collaborative partnership with the three national alcohol and other drug research centres (the National Drug Research Institute, the National Centre for Education and Training

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #WorldNoTobaccoDay : Cape York mob are saying “Don’t Make Smokes Your Story.”


“Wasting a lot of money to buy cigarettes and it was making me sick, coughing a lot, and getting up late, and it smells on your clothes a lot. So I said to myself I would have to cut down smoking.”

“You don’t have to buy cigarettes, you don’t have to afford cigarettes for other people, you don’t have to get cigarettes. Just be strong and stand up for yourself and say no!”

Selena Possum, who has lived in Pormpuraaw for the last 20 years, is now a non-smoker. She says smoking affected her a lot

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #smoking #ACCHO events 31 May World #NoTobacco Day #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #NSW

May 31st is World No Tobacco Day and people from Cape York are saying “Don’t Make Smokes Your Story.”

Apunipima Cape York Health Council Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) staff have been engaging with Cape York communities to develop an anti-smoking campaign.

The locally appropriate ‘Don’t Make Smokes Your Story’ campaign aims to raise awareness of the harms of smoking and passive smoking, the benefits of a smoke-free environment, and available quit support.

The Cape York ‘Don’t Make Smokes Your Story’ Campaign enables community members to share on film their stories about quitting, trying to quit and the impact of smoking on families and communities. It is hoped that by sharing their stories, others will be encouraged to share their stories too.

Coen local Amos James Hobson has never smoked in his life. He sees many young people start smoking “Just to be cool, to pick up a chick.” He says to all the young people out there, “Our people didn’t smoke, don’t smoke, it’s not good. It’s not our culture and it’s not our way.”

WATCH AMOS VIDEO STORY HERE HERE

Thala Wallace from Napranum has tried to quit three times and says “Every time it gets easier.” Her strategy is to “Try to find ways to occupy myself, snack-out on fruit or go to the gym, getting out and hanging out more with people who don’t smoke.”

Watch Thala story video here

The stories, as well as posters, social media posts and radio advertisements will be released from May 31st as Apunipima launches the Cape York ‘Don’t Make Smokes Your Story’ campaign.

The videos, including those featuring Amos, and Thala, will be distributed on the ‘What’s Your Story, Cape York?’ Facebook page and will be available on the Apunipima YouTube Channel here.

Apunipima received a Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) Regional Tobacco Control Grant as part of the National Tackling Indigenous Smoking program.

To effectively reduce smoking rates in Cape York, Apunipima TIS staff have been engaging with communities to develop and implement a locally appropriate social marketing campaign to influence smoking behaviours and community readiness to address smoke-free environments. The Cape York campaign will align with a national ‘Don’t Make Smokes Your Story’ campaign.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Smoking #WNTD @AMAPresident awards #NT Dirty Ashtray Award for World #NoTobacco Day

“Research shows that smoking is likely to cause the death of two-thirds of current Australian smokers. This means that 1.8 million Australians now alive will die because they smoked.

The Northern Territory, a serial offender in failing to improve tobacco control, has been announced as the recipient of the AMA/ACOSH Dirty Ashtray Award for putting in the least effort to reduce smoking over the past 12 months.

But it seems that the Northern Territory Government still does not see reducing the death toll from smoking as a priority. Smoking is still permitted in pubs, clubs, dining areas, and – unbelievably – in schools.

The NT Government has not allocated funding for effective public education, and is still investing superannuation funds in tobacco companies.

“It is imperative that Governments avoid complacency, keep up with tobacco industry tactics, and continue to implement strong, evidence-based tobacco control measures.”

Ahead of World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, announced the results today at the AMA National Conference 2017 in Melbourne.

Previous NACCHO Press Release Good News :

NACCHO welcomes funding of $35.2 million for 36 #ACCHO Tackling Indigenous Smoking Programs

The Northern Territory, a serial offender in failing to improve tobacco control, has been announced as the recipient of the AMA/ACOSH Dirty Ashtray Award for putting in the least effort to reduce smoking over the past 12 months.

It is the second year in a row that the Northern Territory Government has earned the dubious title, and its 11th “win” since the Award was first given in 1994.

AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, said that it is disappointing that so little progress has been made in the Northern Territory over the past year.

“More than 22 per cent of Northern Territorians smoke daily, according to the latest National Drug Strategy Household Survey, well above the national average of 13.3 per cent,” Dr Gannon said.

“Smoking will kill two-thirds of current smokers, meaning that 1.8 million Australian smokers now alive will be killed by their habit.

“But it seems that the Northern Territory Government still does not see reducing the death toll from smoking as a priority. Smoking is still permitted in pubs, clubs, dining areas, and – unbelievably – in schools.

“The Government has not allocated funding for effective public education, and is still investing superannuation funds in tobacco companies.”

Victoria and Tasmania were runners-up for the Award.

“While the Victorian Government divested from tobacco companies in 2014, and has made good progress in making its prisons smoke-free, its investment in public education campaigns has fallen to well below recommended levels, and it still allows price boards, vending machines, and promotions including multi-pack discounts and specials,” Dr Gannon said.

“It must end the smoking exemption at outdoor drinking areas and the smoking-designated areas in high roller rooms at the casino.

Learn more about the great work our Tackling Indigenous Smoking Teams are doing throughout Australia 100 + articles HERE

“Tasmania has ended the smoking exemption for licensed premises, gaming rooms and high roller rooms in casinos, but still allows smoking in outdoor drinking areas.

“While Tasmania has the second highest prevalence of smoking in Australia, the Tasmanian Government has not provided adequate funding to support tobacco control public education campaigns to the evidence-based level.  It should provide consistent funding to the level required to achieve reductions in smoking.”

Tasmania should also ban price boards, retailer incentives and vending machines, and divest the resources of the Retirement Benefits Fund (RBF) from tobacco companies, limit government’s interactions with the tobacco industry and ban all political donations, ACOSH said.

It should also ban all e-cigarette sale, use, promotion and marketing in the absence of any approvals by the Therapeutic Goods Administration.

Promotion

Download the app today & prepare to quit for World No Tobacco Day

Queensland has topped the AMA/ACOSH National Tobacco Control Scoreboard 2017 as the Government making the most progress on combating smoking over the past 12 months.

Queensland narrowly pipped New South Wales for the Achievement Award, with serial offender the Northern Territory winning the Dirty Ashtray Award for putting in the least effort.

Judges from the Australian Council on Smoking and Health (ACOSH) allocate points to each State and Territory in various categories, including legislation, to track how effective government has been at combating smoking in the previous 12 months.

“Disappointingly, no jurisdiction scored an A this year, suggesting that complacency has set in,” Dr Gannon said.

“Research shows that smoking is likely to cause the death of two-thirds of current Australian smokers. This means that 1.8 million Australians now alive will die because they smoked.

“It is imperative that Governments avoid complacency, keep up with tobacco industry tactics, and continue to implement strong, evidence-based tobacco control measures.”

The judges praised the Queensland Government for introducing smoke-free legislation in public areas, including public transport waiting areas, major sports and events facilities, and outdoor pedestrian malls, and for divesting from tobacco companies.

However, they called on all governments to run major media campaigns to tackle smoking, and to take further action to protect public health policy from tobacco industry interference.

31 May is World No Tobacco Day Tweet using “Protect health,reduce poverty, promote development”

Aboriginal Health : 2017 @AlcoholDrugFdn Excellence Innovation Awards close 22 May

The 2017 National Alcohol and Drug Excellence and Innovation Awards

Download First Australians Award nomination form

First-Australians-Award-Nomination-Form

First Australians Award

The First Australians Award recognises an individual/community as having made a significant and/or meaningful commitment and contribution to reducing the impact and negative effects of alcohol and other drug use in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities.

Judging criteria

  • Was the effort collaborative with communities and other key stakeholders
  • Culturally appropriate in design and implementation
  • Were efforts evaluation and found to have a measurable impact on alcohol and other drug use
  • Did efforts contribute to increasing community awareness and perceptions on alcohol and other drug issues.

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page.

The 2017 Alcohol and Other Drug Excellence and Innovation Awards

The 2017 Alcohol and Other Drug Excellence and Innovation Awards encourage, recognise and celebrate the achievements of the incredible people and organisations that do exceptional work to reduce the harm and impact of alcohol and other drugs in Australia.

Photo above Supplied

The Alcohol and other Drug Excellence and Innovation Awards (National AOD Awards) are supported by the Alcohol and Drug Foundation and the Australian Government.

There is terrific work and important innovative practices happening in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) sector that benefit the entire community and we want these to be shared and celebrated.

The National Alcohol and other Drug Excellence and Innovation Awards commenced in 2004 and were established by the Alcohol and Other Drug Council of Australia, Australian National Council on Drugs, Ted Noffs Foundation and the Alcohol and Drug Foundation (formerly the Australian Drug Foundation).

Why?

The Alcohol and Drug Foundation (ADF) and the Australian Government know how important it is to acknowledge and reward the people and organisations who demonstrate excellence and innovation in their commitment to building a healthier future for our Nation.

We want to promote the nominated organisations as leaders within the AOD field, building their reputation and credibility within their communities.

We want to raise awareness across the country about effective projects and initiatives which are having a positive impact in the prevention and reduction of AOD harms.

Who can enter?

The National AOD Awards are open to all people and organisations working across the health and wellbeing sectors in Australia.

The Awards are designed for all sectors within the health and wellbeing industry. There are categories to recognise and celebrate the achievements of individuals and organisations.

Each category has its own eligibility requirements, but there are some general rules and principles to keep in mind.

  1. The work must have taken place in Australia.
  2. Entrants may enter more than one category but must complete a submission for each category separately.
  3. If your entry mentions a particular organisation, you must have permission from the organisation to mention them – and this should be accompanied by a letter of support.
  4. With the exception of the National Honour Roll, work or achievements outside (2015 – 3/4/2017) cannot be considered.
  5. The selection panel may choose to present an award for excellence and an award for innovation in appropriate categories.

When?

Nominations for the National AOD Awards are open now and close at midnight 22 May 2017.

The awards ceremony will be held in Canberra, on 16 June 2017.

How to enter

To enter the National AOD Awards email your submission to aodawards@adf.org.au. Ensure your submission correctly addresses the criteria for the category you are nominating for. You can nominate yourself, your organisation, someone else or a different organisation.

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Prime Minister’s Award

The Prime Minister’s Award recognises an individual as having made a significant commitment and contribution to reducing the impact and negative effects of drug and alcohol use. Only individuals can be nominated for this award.

Judging Criteria

Please highlight how the individual has made a significant commitment and contribution to reducing the impact and negative effects of alcohol and other drugs use in Australia. A Curriculum Vitae for the nominee should also be provided.

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page

Prime Ministers Award Nomination Form
Nomination Form 57.31 KB PDF

Law Enforcement and Supply Reduction

This award recognises a program, policy or resource that makes a significant contribution to law enforcement efforts designed to reduce the harmful impact of alcohol and other drug use. This award includes broad based policing and other criminal justice interventions at any level which demonstrably enhances the capacity of the community and/or the health sector to impact on alcohol and other drug use.

Judging criteria –
that the program, policy or resource is:

  • Based on a demonstrated need
  • Includes an appropriate level of consultation
  • Demonstrates a measurable positive impact

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page.

Law Enforcement and Supply Reduction Nomination Form
Nomination Form 60.21 KB PDF

Prevention and Education

There are two different criteria for this award, the criteria used will be determined by the type of nomination. Please choose which criteria best supports your nomination.

Option OneThis award recognises a program, policy or resource that makes a significant contribution to the prevention and any type of drug use or drug-related harm. This award is not just limited to alcohol and other drug specific interventions, it includes broad based prevention programs aimed at addressing risk and protective factors and building resilience, which can be demonstrated to impact on alcohol and other drugs use.

Judging criteria –
that the program, policy or resource is:

  • Based on good practice and/or research (is evidence-based, is appropriately targeted and sustainable)
  • Based on a demonstrated need
  • Developed with the target audience and other key stakeholders
  • Evaluated and found to have a measurable impact.

Option Two

This award recognises the school that demonstrates innovation and successful outcomes in school drug education to address drug and alcohol issues. ‘School drug education’ encompasses all policies, practices, programmes and initiatives/events in schools connected with the prevention and reduction of drug-related harm. The award is open to schools in all sectors: primary and secondary levels; and government and non-government schools. Schools need to address the Australian Government Principles for School Drug Education within their nomination.

Judging criteria –
the 12 principles used are:

  • School practice based in evidence
  • A whole school approach
  • Clear educational outcomes
  • Safe and supportive environment
  • Positive and collaborative relationships
  • Culturally appropriate and targeted drug education
  • Recognition of risk and protective factors
  • Consistent policy and practice
  • Timely programs within a curriculum framework
  • Programs delivered by teachers
  • Interactive strategies and skills development
  • Credible and meaningful learning activities

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page.

Prevention and Education Nomination Form
Nomination Form 69.05 KB PDF

 Treatment and Support

This award recognises a treatment or support program or service that makes a significant contribution to treatment and support efforts designed to assist those impacted by alcohol and other drug use. This award is not just limited to alcohol and other drug specific treatment and support plans, it includes broad based policing and other treatment and support interventions at any level which provide appropriate support and treatment to individuals, families and communities impacted by alcohol and other drug use.

Judging criteria –
that the program or service is:

  • Based on established scientific evidence
  • Able to provide evidence of consumer input into program and organisational policies and practices
  • Committed to process and outcome evaluation – both internal and external – and contributing to the broader scientific discourse around best practice services
  • Designed to address a current gap in knowledge or service delivery
  • Endeavouring to provide a creative solution to a problem/service gap and fostering a culture that promotes innovation
  • Going above and beyond business as usual

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page.

Treatment and Support Nomination Form
Nomination Form 62.08 KB PDF

 Reduction of Harm

This award recognises a program, policy or resource that makes a significant contribution to harm reduction efforts. This award includes broad based policies and programs, as well as community level interventions which demonstrably protects the health of the community and/or enhances the capacity of the health sector to address some of the harms associated with alcohol and other drug use.

Judging criteria –
that the program, policy or resource is:

  • Based on an identified need
  • Includes an appropriate level of consultation, particularly with affected communities
  • Demonstrates a clear reduction in harm

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page.

Reduction of Harm Nomination Form
Nomination Form 60.24 KB PDF

Research

Nominations in this category should be supported by sound evidence which recognises the significance of the research and its relevance and benefit to the community as a whole.

Judging criteria –
please detail how the body of research:

  • Is contributing and adding practical value to alcohol and other drug practice
  • Is of sound design and method
  • Meets ethical standards for research practice
  • Is being effectively disseminated
  • Provide details of support which recognises the importance of this research within the AOD field.

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page.

Research Nomination Form
Nomination Form 62.30 KB PDF

Media Reporting

This award recognises the important role that the media plays in informing and shaping the community’s knowledge and perceptions on drug issues. It may be given to an individual journalist or a media organisation (print, radio or television), either regional or metropolitan. The award can be given for an individual media piece, or for a series of pieces over a period of time.

Judging criteria –
address the following points

  • Informing and shaping community knowledge and perceptions of alcohol and drug issues
  • How was the storyline developed and researched
  • Relevance of interviews and impact achieved by article/program
  • Accurate information about alcohol and other drugs and their harms
  • Program and press articles aired/published on or after 1 December 2009

After completing your online nomination, send four labelled copies of your piece/s (photocopy, audiotape, CD/DVD or video tape) to the address detailed on the nomination form.

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page.

Media Reporting Nomination Form
Nomination Form 59.00 KB PDF

First Australians Award

The First Australians Award recognises an individual/community as having made a significant and/or meaningful commitment and contribution to reducing the impact and negative effects of alcohol and other drug use in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities.

Judging criteria

Please highlight how the individual/community has made a significant and/or meaningful commitment and contribution to reducing the impact and negative effects of alcohol and other drugs use in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities.

Judging criteria –
other considerations

  • Was the effort collaborative with communities and other key stakeholders
  • Culturally appropriate in design and implementation
  • Were efforts evaluation and found to have a measurable impact on alcohol and other drug use
  • Did efforts contribute to increasing community awareness and perceptions on alcohol and other drug issues.

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page.

First Australians Award Nomination Form
Nomination Form 62.68 KB PDF
National Honour Roll

A National Honour Roll for individuals who have made a significant contribution, over a considerable time period, to the alcohol and other drug field has been established to acknowledge and publicly recognise the exceptional work which is done by some people who have worked tirelessly over a number of years in this sector.

Judging criteria

The judging criteria for nominations will be restricted to those who have made an outstanding contribution to addressing alcohol and other drug issues over a substantial period of time. Nominations may be made for people who are or are currently working directly in the alcohol and other drug field, or in the many related fields.

It is expected that the number of inductees into the Alcohol and Other Drug Honour Roll will be limited to ensure it only truly acknowledges those that have made a sustained and significant contribution.

The short statement outlining the rationale for a nomination should not exceed 100 words, with the text for each judging criteria being kept to no more than half an A4 page.

National Honour Roll Nomination Form
Nomination Form 59.72 KB PDF


Judging

Independent panels will be convened for each category with invitations extended to experts within each field to lend a hand in selecting the winners.

Programs and employees of the ADF are not eligible for the National AOD Awards.

More information

For more information or to ask a question about the National AOD Awards, please contact the ADF.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Alcohol @FareAustralia 2017 annual alcohol poll report released #ALCpoll2017

 

FARE has released its 2017 annual alcohol poll : Attitudes and behaviours today. The Poll is now in its eighth yearr of publication and explores Australia’s attitudes towards alcohol, drinking behaviours, awareness and experience of alcohol harms, and opinions on alcohol policies.

This year the results of the Poll have shown that Australians are concerned about and impacted by alcohol harm, and they are suspicious and deeply cynical about the alcohol industry.
Key findings include:

• 81% of Australians believe that more needs to be done to reduce the harm caused by alcohol-related illness, injury, death, and related issues (up from 78% in 2016).

• 44% of Australian drinkers (five million Australians) consume alcohol to get drunk (up from 37% in 2016).
• 92% of Australians think that there is a link between alcohol and family and domestic violence.
• 68% of Australians support a ban on alcohol advertising on television before 8.30pm.

The Poll is available at http://www.fare.org.au , along with a series of short videos.

FARE will be promoting the Poll and using supporting collateral on Twitter and Facebook over the course of the day.

Why not check out the findings, share the link and join the conversation using #alcpoll2017.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #FASD : #Prevention and #HealthPromotion Resources Package

 ” The Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Package – ‘the Package’

 Is designed to equip Australian health professionals with the knowledge and skills needed to develop, implement and evaluate community-driven solutions to reduce alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking and substance misuse during pregnancy, and to cut down on the number of unplanned pregnancies in their communities.

During 2015–17, the Package was delivered to staff from participating New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services (NDMBS), a national program to increase access to child and maternal health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.”

Download the 4 Page brochure

FASD_Resources_Package_Summary

And read the 20+ FASD NACCHO articles published

Why are these resources needed?

Although high rates of alcohol consumption have been reported across all Australian populations, research shows that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are more likely to consume alcohol at harmful levels during pregnancy, thereby greatly increasing the risk of stillbirths, infant mortality and infants born with an intellectual disability.

Addressing the effects of alcohol consumption during pregnancy, and in particular FASD, requires both an understanding of how the cultural context, historical legacy and social determinants affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and the importance of working in partnership with communities and relevant organisations.

When surveyed, most health professionals reported they did not ask their clients about alcohol use in pregnancy, or provide women with information about the effects of alcohol on the fetus.2 Challenges included limited knowledge and resources among health professionals to tackle the issue, along with a lack of confidence in advising clients. As such, we determined that resourcing and educating health professionals were critical factors to implementing a whole-of-community approach to preventing FASD in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Piloting the Package

We piloted two days of training with 80 health professionals from 40 participating NDMBS sites, with the aim of increasing:

  1. awareness and understanding of alcohol, tobacco and other substances use during pregnancy and of FASD
  2. awareness of existing FASD health promotion resources and of how best to use these resources within primary health care services in line with their community needs
  3. knowledge and skills to develop, implement and evaluate community-driven solutions to reduce alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking and substance misuse during pregnancy, and reduce unplanned pregnancies

What’s in the Package?

Health promotion resources targeted at five key groups:

  1. Pregnant women
  2. Women of child-bearing age
  3. Grandmothers and aunties
  4. Men
  5. Health professionals

Five discrete training modules to assist health professionals share FASD prevention information and use the resources effectively within their community:

  • Introduction: FASD Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Package
  • Module 1: What is Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder?
  • Module 2: Brief Intervention and Motivational Interviewing
  • Module 3: Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Module 4: Sharing Health Information

Training support materials to assist health professionals in delivering their own FASD training:

  • Facilitator manual
  • Participant workbook

Download the 4 Page brochure

FASD_Resources_Package_Summary

For more information

Dr Christine Hannah  07 3169 4201

christine.hannah@menzies.edu.au

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : @aihw Report #Alcohol and other #drug #treatment

 ” For the 25,200 clients receiving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health-care services, alcohol and cannabis were among the top 5 most common substance-use issues “

Read or download previous 170 + NACCHO Alcohol and other Drug article HERE

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: alcohol and other drug treatment

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health-care services provide a variety of health care services, including extended care roles (for example, diagnosis and treatment of illness and disease, 24-hour emergency care, dental/hearing/optometry services), preventive health care (for example, health screening for children and adults), health-related community support (for example, school-based activities, transport to medical appointments) and support in relation to substance-use issues.

Information on the majority of Australian Government-funded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander substance use services are available from the Online Services Report (OSR) data collection.

While the number of treatment episodes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is reported through the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set (AODTS NMDS), it does not represent all alcohol and other drug treatments provided to Indigenous people in Australia.

The OSR and AODTS NMDS have different collection purposes, scope and counting rules (see Box 1 for details).

Key data from the 2014–15 OSR relevant to substance-use issues are provided below.

Substance use issues

The 5 most common substance-use issues reported by organisations providing substance-use services in 2014–15, in terms of staff time and organisational resources, were alcohol, cannabis or marijuana, amphetamines, multiple drug use and tobacco or nicotine (Table 1). In 2014–15, almost all (96%) of 67 organisations reported alcohol as one of their 5 most common substance-use issues and 88% reported cannabis or marijuana. Organisations reporting amphetamines as a common substance-use issue increased from 45% in 2013–14 to 70% of organisations in 2014–15. This pattern was consistent across remoteness areas.

Table 1: Number of organisations reporting common substance-use issues, by remoteness area, 2014–15
Substance use issue Major
cities
Inner regional Outer regional Remote Very
remote
Total
Alcohol 15 8 12 13 16 64
Cannabis/marijuana 13 6 12 13 15 59
Amphetamines 12 8 14 5 8 47
Multiple drug use 11 7 13 4 8 43
Tobacco/nicotine 7 3 8 10 10 38

Note: Organisations were asked to report on their 5 most important substance-use issues in terms of staff time and organisational resources.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: Online Services Report—key results 2014–15. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services report No. 7. IHW 168. Canberra: AIHW.

Continued here

Alcohol and other drug treatment National Minimum Data set (AODTS NMDS 2015–16)

Key findings

Alcohol and other drug treatment services assist people to address their problematic drug use through a range of treatments. Treatment objectives can include reduction or cessation of drug use as well as improvements to social and personal functioning. Assistance may also be provided to support the family and friends of people using drugs.

Following are highlights from the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set (AODTS NMDS).

AODTS NMDS data cubes

Data cubes for 2015–16 are now available.

The data cubes are a set of interactive tables. They provide a comprehensive set of data from which the majority of the variables in the AODTS NMDS can be interrogated, allowing users to create their own custom data tables, or to re-create data presented in this report.

In the following web pages, where data—either in text or in a Figure—relate to a data cube, a link has been provided to the relevant data cube for your reference.

Note, there is a small set of supplementary tables containing information on treatment setting and length by principal drug of concern. This information is not provided in the data cubes to ensure client confidentiality.

Key findings in 2015–16


 

Agencies

  • A total of 796 publicly-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided services to clients seeking treatment and support for alcohol and other drug problems, an increase of 17% over the 5-year period to 2015–16.

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Clients

  • An estimated 133,895 clients received just over 206,000 treatment episodes from alcohol and other drug treatment agencies.
  • 2 in 3 clients were male (67%), just over half were aged 20–39 (55%), and around 1 in 7 clients were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (14%).
  • The AOD client group is an ageing cohort, with a median age of 33 years in 2015–16, up from 31 in 2006–07. Since 2006–07 there has been a decline in the proportion of 20–29 year olds being treated (from 33% to 28% of treatment episodes), while the proportion of those aged 40 and over rose from 26% to 32%.
  • The proportion of episodes where clients were receiving treatment for amphetamines (23%) has continued to increase over the last 10 years, from 12% of treatment episodes in 2006–07, and from 20% in 2014–15.

Trendline shows 40% growth in closed treatment episodes from 147,325 in 2006-07 to 206,635 in 2015-16.

Treatment

  • There was an increase in the number of closed treatment episodes between 2006–07 and 2015–16, from 147,325 to 206,635—a 40% increase over the 10-year period. While for Indigenous clients the number of episodes has almost doubled, with a 90% increase over the same period (from 14,823 to 28,410).
  • In 2015–16, the top principal drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (32% of treatment episodes), amphetamines (23%), cannabis (23%) and heroin (6%).
  • Across most states and territories, alcohol was also the top principal drug of concern that led clients to seek treatment, except for SA and WA where amphetamines were the highest reported (36% and 35% of episodes) and Qld where it was cannabis (39%).
  • Treatment for the use of amphetamines increased over the 5 years to 2015–16 (from 11% of closed treatment episodes to 23%).
  • Over the 10 years since 2006–07, treatment types received by clients have not changed substantially, with counselling, assessment only, support and case management only, and withdrawal management being the most common types of treatment—this was the same for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous clients.

Table of contents

Data sources

The AODTS NMDS

The Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set (AODTS NMDS) is the primary source used in this analysis. It provides information on the treatment provided by publicly-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies in Australia. These services are available to people seeking treatment for their own drug use and people seeking treatment for someone else’s drug use. Data are available from 2003–04 onwards.

In the AODTS NMDS, the main counting unit is a closed treatment episode, which is defined as a period of contact between a client and a treatment provider (or team of providers) that is closed when treatment is completed or has ceased, or there has been no further contact between the client and the treatment provider for 3 months. Since 2012–13, a statistical linkage key (SLK) has been collected which means the number of clients receiving treatment can now be estimated .

Other data sources

A number of other data sources include information not available in the AODTS NMDS. Using these additional data sets supports more comprehensive reporting of alcohol and other drug treatment in Australia. These include the National Opioid Pharmacotherapy Statistics Annual Data Collection (NOPSAD), the National Hospital Morbidity Database, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: Online Services Report Database, the Specialist Homelessness Services (SHS) Collection and the National Prisoner Health Data Collection (NPHDC).

In 2014–15:

In 2015, of the 1,011 prison entrants in the National Prisoner Health Collection (NPHDC), two-thirds (67%) reported using illicit drugs in the previous 12 months—1 in 2 (50%) reported using methamphetamines, and 2 in 5 (41%) cannabis.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : NT Government invests in safer and healthier families / communities: cuts grog to problem drinkers

Budget 2017 is delivering on the Territory Labor Government’s election commitments, investing $33 million in our communities and tackling the causes of domestic, family and sexual violence to ensure that Territorians feel safe

“The Northern Territory has the highest rates of domestic and family violence in Australia, and that comes at an enormous social and economic cost.

Minister for Territory Families Dale Wakefield (see article 1 below )

 ” The BDR supported police in stopping alcohol related crime and antisocial behaviour and its return will make a difference. Police previously described it as one of the best tools for combating antisocial behaviour.

“We know that 60% of domestic violence incidents are alcohol related – this is simply unacceptable and cutting grog to problem drinkers will help address this blight.”

Chief Minister Michael Gunner today said returning the Banned Drinker Register (BDR) on September 1 is the number one thing the Territory Labor Government can do to tackle antisocial behaviour and crime – including the devastating rates of domestic violence.         (see article 2 below )

 ” The Territory Labor Government says the new Banned Drinkers Register will help ease pressures on frontline health workers by reducing the supply of alcohol to those who cause so much harm.

We’ve listened to concerns from medical professionals and community that critical resources are being diverted to deal with alcohol related harm and violence.

While every Territorian is entitled to have a drink and enjoy that responsibly, we know too many people are drinking at dangerous levels, harming themselves, their families and their communities.”

The Minister for Health Natasha Fyles ( See Article 3 below )

Article 1

More than $33 million will be invested in frontline services, infrastructure and strategies to support the prevention of domestic and family violence that will help keep Territorians safe.

Minister for Territory Families Dale Wakefield said Budget 2017 acknowledges the cost and serious impact that domestic and family violence has on our society, and today’s announcement will improve services and facilities for Territorians.

“Budget 2017 is delivering on the Territory Labor Government’s election commitments, investing in our communities and tackling the causes of domestic, family and sexual violence to ensure that Territorians feel safe,” Ms Wakefield said.

“The Northern Territory has the highest rates of domestic and family violence in Australia, and that comes at an enormous social and economic cost.

“This budget will address both infrastructure and policy issues to ensure we have the necessary foundations to firstly reduce the rates of domestic and family violence, but also to provide victims essential support.”

This includes:

  • $6.2 million to continue current domestic violence services in the Territory, left unfunded by the CLP government
  • $3 million to refurbish Alice Springs Domestic Violence Court to improve the safety, experience and outcomes for people affected by domestic and family violence
  • $6 million for the replacement of the Alice Springs Women’s Shelter, so that women can establish independence and recover from trauma
  • $1 million to establish a remote women’s safe house in Galiwinku.

The Territory Labor Government is restoring trust in Government, creating jobs, investing in children and building safer, fairer and stronger communities – right across the Territory.

The Minister also reaffirmed additional investments being made right now into domestic and family violence programs that allow for community led solutions, including:

  • $700,000 over two years to expand the “NO MORE” violence prevention campaign
  • $350,000 to Charles Darwin University and Menzies School of Research to review key domestic and family violence reduction programs in the NT, particularly their impact and effectiveness in remote communities
  • $150,000 to NTCOSS to build the capacity of the domestic and family violence sector
  • $80,000 to improving services provided by the Gove Crisis Accommodation service
  • $30,000 to NPY Women’s Council towards a sexual violence research project.

Minister Wakefield said Budget 2017 is investing in the Territory’s future through jobs, children and community.

“We are going through a challenging economic period – everyone knows this and we have been very upfront about it,” Ms Wakefield said.

“This budget will create and support jobs, deliver on our election commitments and be a fair plan for our future

Article 2 : A BETTER BDR TACKLING SECONDARY SUPPLY AND CUTTING RED TAPE

Chief Minister Michael Gunner today said returning the Banned Drinker Register (BDR) on September 1 is the number one thing the Territory Labor Government can do to tackle antisocial behaviour and crime – including the devastating rates of domestic violence.

Mr Gunner today announced that the new BDR would address weaknesses in the old version by better addressing the problem of secondary supply and cutting red tape.

“We have listened to Police, the community and local businesses and taken action – we will introduce tougher punishment for secondary suppliers to banned drinkers,” Mr Gunner said.

“It will now be a criminal offence to intentionally supply alcohol to a person known to be on the BDR. Once charged with this offence police have the power to place the secondary supplier on the BDR. The offence can also carry significant fines.

“Another improvement cutting red tape is that once given a Banned Drinker Order, a person will go straight onto the BDR and will not require a tribunal hearing or appearance.

“Importantly, Banned Drinker Orders issued by Police will be automatically processed through the Integrated Justice Information System to immediately place problem drinkers on the BDR. This will happen within 48 hours which will help both Police and victims in urgent domestic and family violence situations.”

Mr Gunner said the Territory Labor Government introduced the BDR in July 2011 and the chaotic CLP Government scrapped it in 2012 for political reasons.

“Territorians hated that the chaotic CLP Government scrapped the BDR and they want it returned because it worked – we have listened and taken action,” he said.

“The BDR supported police in stopping alcohol related crime and antisocial behaviour and its return will make a difference. Police previously described it as one of the best tools for combating antisocial behaviour.

“We know that 60% of domestic violence incidents are alcohol related – this is simply unacceptable and cutting grog to problem drinkers will help address this blight.”

Mr Gunner said alcohol related crime and antisocial behaviour in our city centres is an issue facing many businesses and is hindering efforts to revitalise these areas.

“We want to make our city centres a vibrant place and the BDR will combat antisocial behaviour, in turn encouraging tourists and locals back into these areas,” he said.

“Undoing the CLP’s failed replacement scheme and bringing back the BDR is a significant piece of work and new legislation will be introduced into Parliament in May we are working as fast as we can because we know this will make a difference.”

Mr Gunner said Government is taking action on the causes of crime because every Territorian has the right for them and their homes and business to be safe.

He said measures including the recent $18.2 million overhaul of the broken youth justice system (which includes 52 Youth Diversion Workers, more funding for boot camps, supporting the enforcement of bail conditions and victims conferencing), greater powers for police (including electronic monitoring bracelets), more police officers and better training for staff in youth justice facilities showed his Government was taking crime very seriously.

Article 3 FRONTLINE HEALTH WORKERS TO BENEFIT FROM BDR (NT)

The Territory Labor Government says the new Banned Drinkers Register will help ease pressures on frontline health workers by reducing the supply of alcohol to those who cause so much harm.

The Minister for Health Natasha Fyles said Territorians have the right to access the high quality services our hospitals offer.

“We’ve listened to concerns from medical professionals and community that critical resources are being diverted to deal with alcohol related harm and violence,” Ms Fyles said.

“We’re empowering Territorians by creating more pathways to the BDR.

“The new BDR unveiled this week will have new provisions allowing medical officers, families and carers to refer problem drinkers to the BDR and to the rehabilitation they need.

“While every Territorian is entitled to have a drink and enjoy that responsibly, we know too many people are drinking at dangerous levels, harming themselves, their families and their communities.

“Our paramedics and hospital staff are dealing with the highest rates of alcohol related harm and injury at rates not seen in any other jurisdiction across the country

“The Territory continues to have the highest rates of alcohol related injury and disease in the nation – the number of deaths related to alcohol in the NT is three times the national average.

“Alcohol related harm costs the Territory more than $642 million a year and that is continuing to grow.

“The BDR was scrapped by the chaotic former CLP government in 2012 – delivering a sharp spike in alcohol related harm over the two most violent years on record.

“Department records show alcohol related Emergency Department presentations peaked at over 3000 across the Territory in 2013.

“We made an election promise to Territorians that we would bring back the BDR and we are delivering on that promise

“Seventy per cent of alcohol sold in the Territory is takeaway, so we know cutting supply to problem drinkers is a key way to curb alcohol fuelled violence and crime.

From September 1 the BDR will be reinstated, with Territorians and tourists having to show ID to purchase takeaway alcohol.

Those identified as being on the BDR won’t be able to buy takeaway alcohol.

More than a thousand people will be automatically included on the BDR from day one.

That figure is expected to grow to around 2500 by Christmas.

The legislation will be introduced to parliament next month.