NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #SuicidePrevention : @ozprodcom issues paper on #MentalHealth in Australia is now available. It asks a range of questions which they seek information and feedback on. Submissions or comments are due by Friday 5 April.

 ” Many Australians experience difficulties with their mental health. Mental illness is the single largest contributor to years lived in ill-health and is the third largest contributor (after cancer and cardiovascular conditions) to a reduction in the total years of healthy life for Australians (AIHW 2016).

Almost half of all Australian adults have met the diagnostic criteria for an anxiety, mood or substance use disorder at some point in their lives, and around 20% will meet the criteria in a given year (ABS 2008). This is similar to the average experience of developed countries (OECD 2012, 2014).”

Download the PC issues paper HERE mental-health-issues

See Productivity Commission Website for More info 

“Clearly Australia’s mental health system is failing Aboriginal people, with Aboriginal communities devastated by high rates of suicide and poorer mental health outcomes. Poor mental health in Aboriginal communities often stems from historic dispossession, racism and a poor sense of connection to self and community. 

It is compounded by people’s lack of access to meaningful and ongoing education and employment. Drug and alcohol related conditions are also commonly identified in persons with poor mental health.

NACCHO Chairperson, Matthew Cooke 2015 Read in full Here 

Read over 200 Aboriginal Mental Health Suicide Prevention articles published by NACCHO over the past 7 years 

Despite a plethora of past reviews and inquiries into mental health in Australia, and positive reforms in services and their delivery, many people are still not getting the support they need to maintain good mental health or recover from episodes of mental ill‑health. Mental health in Australia is characterised by:

  • more than 3 100 deaths from suicide in 2017, an average of almost 9 deaths per day, and a suicide rate for Indigenous Australians that is much higher than for other Australians (ABS 2018)
  • for those living with a mental illness, lower average life expectancy than the general population with significant comorbidity issues — most early deaths of psychiatric patients are due to physical health conditions
  • gaps in services and supports for particular demographic groups, such as youth, elderly people in aged care facilities, Indigenous Australians, individuals from culturally diverse backgrounds, and carers of people with a mental illness
  • a lack of continuity in care across services and for those with episodic conditions who may need services and supports on an irregular or non-continuous basis
  • a variety of programs and supports that have been successfully trialled or undertaken for small populations but have been discontinued or proved difficult to scale up for broader benefits
  • significant stigma and discrimination around mental ill-health, particularly compared with physical illness.

The Productivity Commission has been asked to undertake an inquiry into the role of mental health in supporting social and economic participation, and enhancing productivity and economic growth (these terms are defined, for the purpose of this inquiry, in box 1).

By examining mental health from a participation and contribution perspective, this inquiry will essentially be asking how people can be enabled to reach their potential in life, have purpose and meaning, and contribute to the lives of others. That is good for individuals and for the whole community.

Background

In 2014-15, four million Australians reported having experienced a common mental disorder.

Mental health is a key driver of economic participation and productivity in Australia, and hence has the potential to impact incomes and living standards and social engagement and connectedness. Improved population mental health could also help to reduce costs to the economy over the long term.

Australian governments devote significant resources to promoting the best possible mental health and wellbeing outcomes. This includes the delivery of acute, recovery and rehabilitation health services, trauma informed care, preventative and early intervention programs, funding non-government organisations and privately delivered services, and providing income support, education, employment, housing and justice. It is important that policy settings are sustainable, efficient and effective in achieving their goals.

Employers, not-for-profit organisations and carers also play key roles in the mental health of Australians. Many businesses are developing initiatives to support and maintain positive mental health outcomes for their employees as well as helping employees with mental illhealth continue to participate in, or return to, work.

Scope of the inquiry

The Commission should consider the role of mental health in supporting economic participation, enhancing productivity and economic growth. It should make recommendations, as necessary, to improve population mental health, so as to realise economic and social participation and productivity benefits over the long term.

Without limiting related matters on which the Commission may report, the Commission should:

  • examine the effect of supporting mental health on economic and social participation, productivity and the Australian economy;
  • examine how sectors beyond health, including education, employment, social services, housing and justice, can contribute to improving mental health and economic participation and productivity;
  • examine the effectiveness of current programs and Initiatives across all jurisdictions to improve mental health, suicide prevention and participation, including by governments, employers and professional groups;
  • assess whether the current investment in mental health is delivering value for money and the best outcomes for individuals, their families, society and the economy;
  • draw on domestic and international policies and experience, where appropriate; and
  • develop a framework to measure and report the outcomes of mental health policies and investment on participation, productivity and economic growth over the long term.

The Commission should have regard to recent and current reviews, including the 2014 Review of National Mental Health Programmes and Services undertaken by the National Mental Health Commission and the Commission’s reviews into disability services and the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

The Issues Paper
The Commission has released this issues paper to assist individuals and organisations to participate in the inquiry. It contains and outlines:

  • the scope of the inquiry
  • matters about which we are seeking comment and information
  • how to share your views on the terms of reference and the matters raised.

Participants should not feel that they are restricted to comment only on matters raised in the issues paper. We want to receive information and comment on any issues that participants consider relevant to the inquiry’s terms of reference.

Key inquiry dates

Receipt of terms of reference 23 November 2018
Initial consultations November 2018 to April 2019
Initial submissions due 5 April 2019
Release of draft report Timing to be advised
Post draft report public hearings Timing to be advised
Submissions on the draft report due Timing to be advised
Consultations on the draft report November 2019 to February 2020
Final report to Government 23 May 2020

Submissions and brief comments can be lodged

Online (preferred): https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/current/mental-health/submissions
By post: Mental Health Inquiry
Productivity Commission
GPO Box 1428, Canberra City, ACT 2601

Contacts

Inquiry matters: Tracey Horsfall Ph: 02 6240 3261
Freecall number: Ph: 1800 020 083
Website: http://www.pc.gov.au/mental-health

Subscribe for inquiry updates

To receive emails updating you on the inquiry consultations and releases, subscribe to the inquiry at: http://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/current/mentalhealth/subscribe

 

 Definition of key terms
Mental health is a state of wellbeing in which every individual realises his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community.

Mental illness or mental disorder is a health problem that significantly affects how a person feels, thinks, behaves and interacts with other people. It is diagnosed according to standardised criteria.

Mental health problem refers to some combination of diminished cognitive, emotional, behavioural and social abilities, but not to the extent of meeting the criteria for a mental illness/disorder.

Mental ill-health refers to diminished mental health from either a mental illness/disorder or a mental health problem.

Social and economic participation refers to a range of ways in which people contribute to and have the resources, opportunities and capability to learn, work, engage with and have a voice in the community. Social participation can include social engagement, participation in decision making, volunteering, and working with community organisations. Economic participation can include paid employment (including self-employment), training and education.

Productivity measures how much people produce from a given amount of effort and resources. The greater their productivity, the higher their incomes and living standards will tend to be.

Economic growth is an increase in the total value of goods and services produced in an economy. This can be achieved, for example, by raising workforce participation and/or productivity.

Sources: AIHW (2018b); DOHA (2013); Gordon et al. (2015); PC (2013, 2016, 2017c); SCRGSP (2018); WHO (2001).

An improvement in an individual’s mental health can provide flow-on benefits in terms of increased social and economic participation, engagement and connectedness, and productivity in employment (figure 1).

This can in turn enhance the wellbeing of the wider community, including through more rewarding relationships for family and friends; a lower burden on informal carers; a greater contribution to society through volunteering and working in community groups; increased output for the community from a more productive workforce; and an associated expansion in national income and living standards. These raise the capacity of the community to invest in interventions to improve mental health, thereby completing a positive reinforcing loop.

The inquiry’s terms of reference (provided at the front of this paper) were developed by the Australian Government in consultation with State and Territory Governments. The terms of reference ask the Commission to make recommendations to improve population mental health so as to realise higher social and economic participation and contribution benefits over the long term.

Assessing the consequences of mental ill-health

The costs of mental ill-health for both individuals and the wider community will be assessed, as well as how these costs could be reduced through changes to the way governments and others deliver programs and supports to facilitate good mental health.

The Commission will consider the types of costs summarised in figure 4. These will be assessed through a combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis, drawing on available data and cost estimates, and consultations with inquiry participants and topic experts. We welcome the views of inquiry participants on other costs that we should take into account.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @IndigenousPHAA #Prevention : Download @_PHAA_ Report : Saving lives a million at a time: Australia’s #top10publichealth successes over the last 20 years

As we edge closer to the federal election, it’s critical our parties consider what public health successes we must achieve next, and how they can lead on issues such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, obesity, nutrition, environmental and ecological issues such as climate change, and advancing health equity.”

PHAA CEO Terry Slevin

Today the Public Health Association Australia (PHAA) launched its new report, the Top 10 Public Health Successes Over the Last 20 Years at Australian Parliament House.

PHAA CEO Terry Slevin stated, “Public health initiatives have prevented an extraordinary amount of ill health and death in our communities – there is a saying in our field that nurses and doctors save lives, and public health professionals also save lives – they just do so a million at a time.”

The report has been compiled by Australia’s leading public health experts, and the top ten achievements are presented in no particular order as they are all considered to have been of equal importance to Australian public health.

The top ten public health successes include:

  • Folate: reduced neural tube defects
  • Immunisation and eliminating infectious disease
  • Containing the spread of HPV and its related cancers
  • Oral health: reduced dental decay
  • Reduced incidence of skin cancer
  • Tobacco control: reduced deaths caused by smoking
  • Reduced the road death and injury toll
  • Gun control: reduced gun deaths in Australia
  • Contained the spread of HIV
  • Prevented deaths from bowel and breast cancer

Download the PHAA report HERE 

PHAA Top 10 Public Health Successes_FINAL

“This report paints a clear picture of exactly which programs and initiatives have had the greatest impact – from cancer screening to vaccines, from road safety to tobacco control. These have all saved thousands of lives and protected the health of millions of Australians.”

“Public health is about preventing or minimising harm – it is always better than cure. We aim to intervene before illness, death or injury occurs, creating safe and healthy environments for all Australians. This is why in public health, we’re for birthdays,” Mr Slevin said.

“We aspire to give Australians more birthdays (five more for each person is our starting goal) and other important celebrations – weddings, births, graduations – all of the significant milestones we value in life. Perhaps most importantly, we want Australians to be healthy enough to really enjoy these extra years and milestones,” Mr Slevin said.

“So the next question we ask is, who will be the policy leaders and decision makers to help us achieve this aspiration? The report acknowledges key decision makers at the federal, state and territory government levels who were instrumental in making the top ten public health successes happen.”

“As we edge closer to the federal election, it’s critical our parties consider what public health successes we must achieve next, and how they can lead on issues such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, obesity, nutrition, environmental and ecological issues such as climate change, and advancing health equity.”

The UK has just released a new preventive health vision statement proving that western conservative governments can prioritise prevention. This is key not just because it is the most effective form of public health practice, but also the most economically sound.

“Preventive public health measures are often cheap to implement and more than pay for themselves through reduced health care costs and increased productivity through keeping people out of hospitals.”

“Public health investment in Australia currently amounts to less than 2% of the national health budget, and has been generally declining since at least 2001. It is essential we allocate adequate resources to public health programs and initiatives to build a healthier population, stem the tide of chronic disease that is enveloping the nation, and reduce future health expenditure,” Mr Slevin said.

“We owe it to ourselves and to our children to look back in twenty years’ time and say we did all we could.”

NACCHO Aboriginal #RefreshtheCTGRfresh and #FASD2018 @GregHuntMP and @KenWyattMP unveil a new National Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Strategic Action Plan 2018- 2028 and more than $7 million in new funding.

“Success is underpinned by a team effort, with collaboration between families, communities, service providers and governments.

FASD requires a national approach, linking in closely with local solutions. We are acknowledging the scale of the issue in Australia and intensifying efforts to address it.”

The Minister for Indigenous Health and Minister for Aged Care, Ken Wyatt AM, said the Government’s approach to FASD was to invest in activities which have been shown to be effective.

“This plan will show us the way forward to tackle the tragic problem of FASD – guiding future actions for governments, service providers and communities in the priority areas of prevention, screening and diagnosis, support and management, and tailoring needs to communities.

Alongside the plan’s release, I am pleased to announce a new investment of $7.2 million to support activities that align with these priority areas.

This funding will enable work to start immediately and help protect future generations and give children the best start possible.

Minister for Health Greg Hunt said the Government is committed to reducing the impact of FASD on individuals, families and communities.

Download a PDF copy of Plan 

National Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Strategic Action Plan 2018-2028

The forum delegates agreed that there was an urgent need for action to prevent FASD in our Top End communities, and across the Northern Territory.

It is essential that our responses do not stigmatise women or Aboriginal people.

It is important that we don’t lay blame, but instead work together, to support our women and young girls.

Everyone is at risk of FASD, so everyone must be informed the harmful effects of drinking while pregnant.

Our men also need to step up and support our mothers, sisters, nieces and partners, to ensure that we give every child the best chance in life.”

A landmark Top End Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) forum* was held in Darwin on 30-31 May 2018

Read over 25 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and FASD articles published over 6 years

The Federal Government is stepping up its fight against Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) today by unveiling a new national action plan and more than $7 million in new funding.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder is the term used to describe the lifelong physical and neurodevelopmental impairments that can result from fetal alcohol exposure.

FASD is a condition that is an outcome of parents either not being aware of the dangers of alcohol use when pregnant or planning a pregnancy, or not being supported to stay healthy and strong during pregnancy.

This funding will enable new work to get underway and build on proven programs – to help protect future generations and give children the best possible start in life.

Key Points of action plan

FASD will be tackled across a range of fronts – including prevention, screening and diagnosis, support and management, and priority populations at increased risk of harm.

PREVENTION: $1.47 million including new consumer resources and general awareness activities – including national FASD Awareness Day, translation of awareness materials into a variety of First Nations languages, and promotion of alcohol consumption guidelines, and bottle shop point of sale warnings.

SCREENING: $1.2 million to support new screening and diagnosis activities, which will include reviewing existing tools and developing new systems and referral pathways, to assist professionals in community settings.

MANAGEMENT: $1.2 million goes to management and support activities, including tailored resources for people working in the education, justice and police sectors.

LOCAL TARGETING: $1.27 million to develop targeted resources, to meet local cultural and community needs.

BUILDING ON SUCCESS: $1.55 million to continue proven activities – with support for Australia’s FASD Hub, a one-stop shop containing the FASD Register and public awareness campaigns.

The Strategic Action Plan also establishes an expert FASD Advisory Group – which will report to the National Drug Strategy Committee on the progress being made, while promoting successful models and highlighting emerging issues and evidence.

From the FASD Workshop in Perth this week 

The plan is committed to breaking FASD’s impact on

  • Encounters with the law
  • Family breakdowns
  • Deaths in custody
  • Suicides and chronic health conditions

FASD requires a national approach, linking in closely with local solutions.

We are acknowledging the scale of the issue in Australia and intensifying efforts to address it.

The activities and actions outlined in the priority areas of the Plan are intended to guide future action – they are not compulsory and can be adopted as needed, along with other interventions and programs, based on local needs.

Activities should be evidence informed and based on best available research and data – actions should be tailored to individual communities and regions.

Since 2014, the Liberal National Government has provided almost $20 million in direct funding to tackle

Aboriginal Health Alcohol and Other Drugs : Minister @KenWyatt and John Havnen #NACCHO deliver #NIDAC18 keynotes : What is currently being done to reduce the high levels of alcohol and other drug use within Aboriginal communities? 

 ” All of us want to see better health for First Nations Australians. 

We know that the excessive consumption of drugs and alcohol is associated with health problems in all societies.

It has been linked to chronic conditions such as cancer and liver disease, the spread of hepatitis and HIV, injuries and deaths from motor vehicle accidents and assaults, increased encounters with the law, deaths in custody, suicides and family breakdown.

The reasons why First Nations’ people engage in high risk drug and alcohol consumption are indeed, complex.

When families, communities, local organisations and governments join hands, we are powerful together.

Alcohol and other drugs, tobacco, lifestyle risk factors and social determinants represent more than half of the quest for health and life equality.

It’s now been 10 years since the launch of the Closing the Gap initiative.

The agenda is being refreshed and it’s time to refresh our approach – including by acknowledging the complexity of the drug and alcohol challenge and making even greater efforts to address it.

This conference NIDAC18 will be an important part of that solution – and I look forward to hearing the outcomes. ” 

Minister Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt see full speech Part 2 below

Read over 200 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alcohol and Other Drugs articles we have published over past 6 years 

Part 1 NACCHO Keynote by John Havnen Senior Policy Officer 

The harmful use of alcohol is a problem for the Australian community as a whole – alcohol misuse and alcohol-related disease remains a recognised as a nationwide problem.

It is estimated that in 2011 alcohol misuse caused 5.1% of the total burden of disease in Australia.

Alcohol related harm has clear social and economic determinants and it is closely related to disadvantage.

As such Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, which as we all know rate disproportionately in all measures of disadvantage, experience higher rates of alcohol misuse and alcohol-related harm than non-indigenous Australians.

This discrepancy leads to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experiencing significant health and social problems in a rate unequal to non-Indigenous Australians. But not all of us drink, in the 2016 National Drug Strategy Household Survey, Indigenous Australians aged 14 and over were more likely to abstain from drinking alcohol than non-Indigenous Australians.

This abstinence rate has been increasing over the last decade with more and more of us deciding not to drink.

So although there are proportionately more Indigenous people than non-Indigenous people who refrain from drinking, those of us who do drink are more likely to do so at high-risk levels.

In 2014-15 the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey found 19% of Indigenous Australians over the age of 15 exceeded the lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol consumption.

This is no more than 2 standard drinks per day on average or no more than 4 drinks per occasion.

Even though the rate of harmful drinking has declined in recent years, this has been mainly in non-remote areas, so there is still high rates of harmful drinking in remote areas and drinking at risky levels puts a person at risk of medical and social problems.

Due to these high levels of risky drinking, Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders are more likely to be hospitalised for alcohol-related conditions and accidents than non-Indigenous Australians including acute intoxication, liver disease, injuries, suicide or self-harm and cancer.

There is big differences in the rates with Indigenous males over 9 times more likely to need hospitalisation and Indigenous females 13 times more than non-Indigenous Australians.

These drinking patterns highlight that it is possible that risky drinking and binge drinking has been normalised within some communities and this could potentially act as a barrier to seeking treatment when needed.

However, alcohol is not the only substance that presents a major concern for in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

In 2014-15, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey stated that 30% of Indigenous Australians over the age of 15 years reported using an illicit substance in the previous 12-months.

This was an increase from 23% in 2008. The substances most commonly used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders were cannabis with 19% reporting, non-prescription analgesics and sedatives (such as painkillers, sleeping pills and tranquillisers) at 13%, and amphetamines or speed with a rate of 5%.

Smoking has overtime become common place in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander communities and whilst tobacco smoking is declining in Australia, rates remain disproportionately high among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Indigenous Australians more than twice as likely to be current daily smokers as non-Indigenous Australians.

Despite declines in rates of smoking in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the last 20 years there appears to have been no change to the gap in smoking prevalence between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian adult population.

Tobacco-related disease is responsible for between 1.5 and 8 times more deaths in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander community than in non-Indigenous Australians.

The harmful use of alcohol, in addition to tobacco and other drugs, are both the cause and effect of serious harm to physical health.

The health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is considerably lower than for non-Indigenous Australians with 71.0% of Indigenous Australians reporting having a long-term health condition compared with 55.3% of non-Indigenous Australians.

Those with long-term health conditions are also more likely to be a daily smoker or misuse alcohol and other drugs. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who experience multiple diagnoses are more likely to have more difficulty accessing treatment and have poorer outcomes when they do receive treatment than either a physical health condition or an alcohol or other drug disorder alone.

There is a well-known high rate of co-morbidity of substance use disorders with other mental health / social and emotional wellbeing issues, and medical conditions in particular chronic diseases.

These issues tend to cluster in individuals and communities along with other markers of social, economic and intergenerational disadvantage.

These high rates of comorbidity contribute to complexities in the treatment and causality of disorders and remains a significant challenge for the delivery of effective healthcare services for our people.

This is in part due to the complexity of the mental and physical health issues individuals display, and in part because of the burden of multiple disadvantages including; poverty and intergenerational disadvantage and this can reduce the capacity to engage consistently and meaningfully in treatment.

So, what is currently being done to reduce the high levels of alcohol and other drug use within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities?

Existing mainstream models of practice in the alcohol and other drug field have been developed within Western systems of knowledge and focus on a biomedical model with an emphasis on biological factors and discounts any psychological, environmental, and social influences. As a result, it is not generalisable to Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander culture and ignores important indigenous perspectives and needs.

Including the need for access to culturally appropriate and comprehensive services to address multiple problems, and the need for local links with Indigenous services.

Western alcohol and other drug services are based on an abstinence model and focuses on residential rehabilitation which is aimed more on the needs of alcohol users and not illicit drug users.

Residential alcohol and drug programs provide care and support for people within a residential community setting and can be medium to long-term duration of anywhere from 4 weeks to 12 months and but again only supports residents’ psychological needs only.

This model also lacks consideration to the prevention and early intervention strategies of risky drinking and drug use, lacks acknowledgement of family, culture and community which we know are important aspects in the holistic model of care.

Despite a paucity of data, the knowledge of how to prevent alcohol misuse among the general population – while not consistently translated to policy and practice – is extensive.

The evidence for the effectiveness of such programs for Indigenous Australians, however, remains scant.

Racism is still present in mainstream services so many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders might have limited access to mainstream health services.

Systemic racism in the health system directly influences Indigenous Australians’ quality of and access to healthcare.

The severity of this impact intensifies levels of psychological stress, which is closely linked to poorer mental and physical health outcomes.

Racism not only provides a major barrier to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ access to health care but also to receiving the same quality of healthcare services available to non-Indigenous Australians.

There is also a tendency to stereotype Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders as ‘drunks’ or ‘alcoholics’ which, as I have previously discussed today is not necessarily the case.

So, what will work if mainstream alcohol and other drug services have limited evidence for our people?

Historically, reactions to the concerns of alcohol and other drug misuse among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were driven not by governments, but by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people themselves who recognised the fact that mainstream services were non-existent or largely culturally inappropriate.

Today, Indigenous Australians are acutely aware of the impacts of alcohol and other drugs and have been actively involved in responding to alcohol and other drugs misuse in their communities.

Any initiative to reduce the harmful effects of alcohol and other drugs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities should be developed with, and led by, those communities.

There is value in supporting these communities, including the evaluation of strategies implemented so that communities can learn from their own and from other communities’ experience.

Any action that attempts to treat alcohol and other drugs needs to come from a holistic model of care that is comprehensive and culturally appropriate.

Awareness of the land, the physical body, clan, relationships, and lore, it is the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole community and not just the individual.

This is why western models of treatment just won’t work.

Comprehensive primary health care is a key strategy for improving the health of Indigenous Australians and is an important platform from which to address the complex health and social issues associated with alcohol and drug misuse.

A holistic approach locally designed and operated by Indigenous people is favoured in its ability to be tailored to community needs and in a cultural context that is owned and supported by the community. 

Despite inadequate funding and resources, the ACCHOs sector has been identified as having a unique role in making alcohol and other drug treatment services more accessible.

One of the unique attributes of Aboriginal controlled drug and alcohol services is that they are a practical expression of Aboriginal peoples’ self-determination, reflected in their governance and treatment models.

A recent example of what works is the pilot of an integrated model of care within Central Australian Aboriginal Congress based in Alice Springs.

Congress developed an integrated non-residential treatment model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with alcohol and other drug issues and it is based on providing care for all aspects of health through three streams of care:

Social and cultural support – which is delivered by Indigenous workers with cultural knowledge, language skills and an in-depth knowledge of the Aboriginal community alongside social workers. This stream includes case management and care coordination, advocacy on behalf of clients, social support, cultural support, access to medical care, and opportunistic alcohol and other drug counselling and brief interventions.

Psychological therapy – which is carried out by qualified therapists delivering evidence-based treatments including cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and related psychological therapies and access to neuropsychological assessment and treatment. And:

Medical treatment – which is provided by Congress GPs and other members of the primary health care team, and includes medical assessments of alcohol and other drug clients, management of chronic disease and prescription of pharmacotherapies where appropriate to assist with alcohol withdrawal.

This model recognises the comorbidities that occur with alcohol and other drug clients and sought to address within a holistic approach that is adaptable based on needs of individuals.

In 2016-17, in the presenting alcohol and other drug clients, 28% received only one stream of care, 59% received two-streams and the remainder, 13% received all three streams of care.

The Congress ‘three streams model’ of care for alcohol and other drug treatment has been developed over many years to provide a single, integrated multidisciplinary service organised around social and cultural support; psychological therapy; and medical care.

In doing so, it reduces demands on clients presenting with alcohol and other drug issues to navigate multiple health care providers, and attempts to address their holistic needs, including advocacy and support around the social determinants of health and wellbeing including housing, welfare and employment, criminal justice, and basic life needs.

This is a great example of how well it can work when the system is correct and can be used as a model for other ACCHOs to learn from.

The diversity of Aboriginal Australia means that no service model can be simply transferred from one place to another. Instead, the strength of Aboriginal community-controlled health services is their capacity to adapt successful models to the particular needs, strengths and histories of the communities they serve.

But funding is a barrier in implementing optimal services in many regions.

A recent report on organisations conducting Indigenous-specific alcohol and other drug services found that a lack of government commitment to funding community-controlled organisations has compromised the capacity of Indigenous Australians to address alcohol and other drug issues within their own communities.

In addition, the capacity of Aboriginal community-controlled organisations to deliver services was severely constrained by staff shortages, lack of trained and qualified staff, and very limited access to workforce development programs.

Treatment is also not the only key, continuing to increase the community awareness and education about the effects of alcohol and other drugs and the treatment options for dealing with issues is vital.

Including a range of health promotion activities and groups including exercise and nutrition programs, tobacco use treatment and preventions groups to address the holistic needs is essential and well help to reduce the levels of risky drinking and the efficacy of treatment once in treatment.

We need to enable our people to have control over their health and improve health literacy on risky behaviours to help stop the impacts of alcohol and other drugs.

 Part 2 Minister Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt keynote 

Good morning. In West Australian Noongar language I say “kaya wangju” – hello and welcome.

I acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which we’re meeting, the Kaurna people, and pay my respects to Elders past and present.

The 5th National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Conference is a positive opportunity to make progress on a difficult issue.

The conference theme is Responding to Complexity – and there certainly is no one-size-fits-all solution to the challenges our people face.

This is why we have to attack the scourge of drug and alcohol dependency and abuse on multiple fronts.

To form new partnerships.

To speak and to listen, with open minds and hearts.

All of us want to see better health for First Nations Australians.

We know that the excessive consumption of drugs and alcohol is associated with health problems in all societies.

It has been linked to chronic conditions such as cancer and liver disease, the spread of hepatitis and HIV, injuries and deaths from motor vehicle accidents and assaults, increased encounters with the law, deaths in custody, suicides and family breakdown.

The reasons why First Nations’ people engage in high risk drug and alcohol consumption are indeed, complex.

Working together, we are making progress, reducing binge drinking rates among our people from 38 per cent to 31 per cent between 2008 and 2014–15.

But there is still much work to be done.

As we see in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework report, social determinants are estimated to make up 34 per cent of the gap in health outcomes between First Nations’ people and other Australians.

Together, with behavioural risk factors, such as alcohol, drug and tobacco use, they account for 53.2 per cent of the health gap.

Alcohol and drug abuse has a broad and insidious impact.

We have a moral and social imperative to work together to put an end to violence and dysfunction and the drug- and alcohol-driven neglect of children in our communities.

Our Government is committed to working with families and individuals to address substance misuse and to break the cycle of disadvantage that prevents children from attending school, and adults from going to work.

Particularly for the protection of children, we have invested over $10 million to provide better diagnosis and management, develop best practice interventions and services to support high-risk women.

A 10-year FASD Strategic Action Plan is in the final stage of development.

Just as important, we see outstanding examples of local warriors for health – like June Oscar and her team in Fitzroy Crossing – who have tackled alcohol in their communities, with life-changing results for children and families.

We must try harder to understand and address the underlying causes of alcohol and drug misuse.

The percentage of First Nations’ people who drink is no greater than for other Australians – in fact, there are many of our people who do not drink at all.

Equally, the impacts of trauma on the health of our communities cannot be ignored, because they add to the complexity of the challenge.

Trauma is no excuse for substance abuse, violence or neglect – but understanding its history can help us reduce its impact.

It reaches across generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and must be acknowledged and addressed.

Significant health impacts have resulted from displacement from family and country, institutionalisation, racism, abuse and neglect.

This has led to increasingly high rates of incarceration and juvenile detention, suicide, family violence, children being taken into care, and poorer physical and mental health.

63 per cent of First Nations’ prisoners are incarcerated as a result of violent crimes and offences that cause harm.

First Nations’ offenders are also more likely to be under the influence of alcohol when they offend.

It’s a sad fact, that alcohol was involved in 80 per cent of cases of domestic homicide, where both the offender and the victim were First Nations’ people.

That’s more than three times the level of domestic homicides involving other Australians.

It’s also known that First Nations people who engage in alcohol-related crime are themselves more likely to be the victims of such offences.

The question is, how do we reduce high-risk levels of alcohol consumption?

Harm reduction programs can minimise the immediate danger posed by alcohol misuse; but our broader aim should be to reduce alcohol intake.

Our Government is investing in a series of activities which have been shown to be effective.

These range from alcohol restrictions to treatment and rehabilitation.

Under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, the Government has committed around $70 million in 2017–18 to support over 80 Indigenous alcohol and other drug treatment services.

They are located in places with high First Nations’ populations, in capital cities and regional centres as well as outer regional and remote areas.

Alcohol is a particular problem in the Northern Territory.

Our Government recognises this and is providing more than $91 million over seven years for targeted local action to reduce alcohol related harm.

A significant part of our national support to reduce risk also includes primary healthcare and population health programs addressing smoking and alcohol, in urban, regional and remote locations across Australia.

Poor mental health as a result of drug and alcohol problems is a huge issue and one which I am pleased will be addressed during this important conference.

It is equally high on our Government’s agenda.

The Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council recently endorsed the National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2017–2023.

The council has prioritised development of a national Indigenous Health and Medical Workforce Plan, which aims to increase the number of Aboriginal doctors, nurses and health workers on country and in our towns and cities.

Primary Health Networks across Australia also have mental health and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health among their priorities.

I am very keen to ensure Primary Health Networks provide a strong platform for culturally comfortable drug, alcohol and mental health services.

To that end, we have targeted more than $85 million to improve access for integrated, culturally appropriate and safe mental health services for First Nations people.

Our Primary Health Networks are also currently investing a further $79 million on the provision of alcohol and other drug services specifically designed to meet the needs of First Nations people, at the local level.

While the effects of alcohol and drugs can be dire, the insidious damage caused by tobacco is significant.

Statistics show that smoking is responsible for 23 per cent of the gap in health outcomes between First Nations’ people and other Australians.

That is why reducing smoking rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is central to our efforts to close the gap.

By supporting locally linked projects within a national campaign, we are seeing some success.

The daily smoking rate for First Nations’ people aged 15 years and over has declined from 49 per cent in 2002 to 39 per cent in 2014–15, with most of this since 2008, when targeted measures commenced.

However, the daily smoking rate in remote areas is still 47 per cent, and worryingly, the number of First Nations’ women smoking while pregnant remains far too high, at 46 per cent.

To continue supporting change for the better – through funding certainty and proven programs – we have gone to a four-year, $300 million funding commitment for the successful Tackling Indigenous Smoking program.

We are supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific education programs, as part of the National Tobacco Campaign.

“Don’t Make Smokes Your Story” targets First Nations’ smokers aged 15 years and over.

Since its third phase concluded at the end of June, evaluation has shown its effectiveness.

86 per cent of First Nations smokers were aware of the campaign.

7 per cent had quit and 26 per cent said they had reduced the amount they smoke.

If we can maintain this sort of momentum, I am we will see significant improvements in health in future.

We have also had significant success in reducing petrol sniffing, which can cause brain damage and even death.

Independent research undertaken since 2005 indicates that in communities with low aromatic fuel, petrol sniffing has dropped by 88 per cent.

Low aromatic fuel, subsidised by the Government, has now replaced regular unleaded in around 175 outlets in the Northern Territory, Queensland, Western Australia and South Australia.

There were special factors related to petrol sniffing which make it impractical to apply the same approach to alcohol and drug misuse.

But there is one big lesson from that success.

When families, communities, local organisations and governments join hands, we are powerful together.

Alcohol and other drugs, tobacco, lifestyle risk factors and social determinants represent more than half of the quest for health and life equality.

It’s now been 10 years since the launch of the Closing the Gap initiative.

The agenda is being refreshed and it’s time to refresh our approach – including by acknowledging the complexity of the drug and alcohol challenge and making even greater efforts to address it.

This conference will be an important part of that solution – and I look forward to hearing the outcomes.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Alcohol : Creating safer communities with roll out of the floor price legislation designed to tackle alcohol related violence and crime by targeting problem drinkers. Comments from @FAREAustralia @DoctorBoffa and @DonnaAhChee1

Over 30 years of working as a GP in Central Australia it is clear that grog, priced cheaper than water, is more like a form of poison in terms of the harm that it generates. The harm is a factor of price, not product type

There have been various attempts over the years to remove this really cheap alcohol from the market, all with some success, but the holy grail has always been the achievement of a floor price, so this is a great development for public health in the Northern Territory.”

 Dr John Boffa, spokesperson for the Peoples Alcohol Action Coalition ( PAAC ) says his organisation has been advocating for many of these alcohol policy reforms since 1995 with a continued focus on the harm being caused by really cheap alcohol. See Full PAAC Press Release Part 2 below

Listen to Congress ACCHO Alice Springs : CEO Donna Ah Chee Radio National Interview  

http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2018/09/bst_20180927_0651.mp3

Part 1 Territory Labor Government press release

The Territory Labor Government is creating safer communities with the commencement of the floor price legislation from Monday 1st  October, designed to tackle alcohol related violence and crime by targeting problem drinkers.

The case for tackling alcohol abuse is clear:

  • Territorians drink more than anyone else in Australia per capita, and are even amongst the highest in the world.
  • Data from 2009 shows that alcohol related violence and crime is costing Territorians upwards of $640 million a year. That’s about $4,197 per adult, compared to $943 nationally.
  • The Territory has the highest rates of hospitalisations related to alcohol abuse in Australia
  • 40% of all Territory road fatalities involve an illegal blood alcohol concentration.

The floor price is just one of the 219 recommendations from the Riley Review, designed to tackle alcohol related violence and crime stemming from alcohol abuse.

Comments attributable to Minister for Health and Attorney General, Natasha Fyles:

The Territory Labor Government is creating safer communities by introducing some of the most signification alcohol reforms in the Territory’s history

There is simply too much alcohol fuelled crime, anti-social behaviour and social dysfunction in the Northern Territory.

Floor price legislation targets cheap bulk alcohol favoured by at-risk drinkers, without punishing those of us who enjoy a drink responsibly.

This means that a standard drink cannot be cheaper than $1.30. Products that will see a price increase will be cheap, high alcohol content cask, bottled, and fortified wine.

In order to ensure bottle shops don’t increase the vast majority products that already meet the floor price, we have informed consumer affairs to keep a close watch on price changes as this initiative rolls out.

The majority of Territorians enjoy a drink responsibly, but there are many in the Territory whose abuse of alcohol is hurting our community, it’s hurting our businesses and it’s destroying individuals and families.

Part 2 Fare / PAAC Press release 

With the introduction of Minimum Unit Price (MUP) in the Northern Territory, the People’s Alcohol Action Coalition (paac) and the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) say the Gunner Government is to be congratulated for putting the evidence first, and in turn prioritising the health, welfare and safety of the people of the NT.

The successful introduction of a floor price on alcohol in the NT now opens the door to its introduction across Australia, and should positively impact the development of the Commonwealth Government’s draft National Alcohol Strategy.

FARE Chief Executive Michael Thorn stresses the legislation will provide universal benefits to all Territorians, and is another important step towards tackling the NT’s severe alcohol problems.

“A floor price is a win for the people of the NT. World-high rates of drinking are finally being addressed with a world-leading alcohol policy intervention; an evidence-based solution that will have no impact on light and moderate drinkers, but will lead to decreased alcohol consumption among the Top End’s heaviest drinkers,” Mr Thorn said.

Mr Thorn said it was important to remember that the MUP was just one part of a comprehensive package of evidence-based reforms that would prioritise health and welfare throughout the Territory, and commended the Gunner Government on its resolve to tackle the Territory’s long-standing problems with heavy drinking.

“There is no doubt that the introduction of the floor price in the NT is a landmark achievement, but we must remember that is just one part of a comprehensive plan that also includes measures such as the Banned Drinkers Register and efforts to curb aggressive alcohol marketing, that once implemented will result in less alcohol violence, crime, hospitalisations and death in the Territory, Mr Thorn said

Dr Boffa says that in 2006, the Alice Springs Liquor supply plan effectively doubled the minimum unit price by forcing products from the market, achieving a near 20 per cent reduction in alcohol consumption in the town and a significant cut in harm, including about 120 fewer hospital admissions per year for Aboriginal women for assault.

“We know that increasing the price works and it is very likely that the MUP combined with the other measures being implemented by the NT government will see drinking levels in the NT drop below the national average, which will be a great outcome for the people of the Northern Territory,” he concluded.

The WHO Global status report on alcohol and health 2018 released last week, highlighted the gap between drinking rates in the Territory and the rest of the world, with the NT’s average per capita alcohol consumption almost double the world average of 6.4 litres of pure alcohol.

“Our aspiration should be to halve the Territory’s alcohol consumption levels and to knock the Territory off the world leader board for most dangerous drinking jurisdiction. In doing so, we will reduce the alcohol burden that weighs so heavily on communities throughout the Top End,” Mr Thorn said.

Mr Thorn stresses that there are also significant national implications.

“In the absence of a willingness at the Commonwealth level to address the availability of cheap alcohol through meaningful taxation reform, it is up to the States and Territories to follow the lead of the NT,” Mr Thorn said.

“Indeed the Western Australian Government is currently doing just that. And on the national stage, there is the opportunity to influence the National Alcohol Strategy so that it is informed by the range of evidence-based, life-saving measures being introduced into the NT, and not by an alcohol industry resistant to any measures that would impact its bottom line.”

.

NACCHO Aboriginal #Mentalhealth #SuicidePrevention and #RUOKday : If you ask #RUOK ? What do you do if someone says ‘no’? Plus Sponsorships for 10 #Indigenous young people to take participate #chatsafe campaign

R U OK Day today encouraging all of us to check in with others to see if they’re OK.

But what if someone says “no”? What should you say or do? Should you tell someone else?

What resources can you point to, and what help is available?

Read NACCHO Aboriginal Health articles over the past 6 Years

Mental Health 189 posts 

Suicide Prevention 124 Posts

Here is a guide 

Stop and listen, with curiosity and compassion

We underestimate the power of simply listening to someone else when they’re going through a rough time. You don’t need to be an expert with ten years of study in psychology to be a good listener. Here are some tips:

Listen actively. Pay attention, be present and allow the person time to speak.

Be curious. Ask about the person’s experience using open questions such as

what’s been going on lately?

you don’t seem your usual self, how are you doing/feeling?

Validate their concerns. See the situation from the person’s perspective and try not to dismiss their problems or feelings as unimportant or stupid. You can say things like

I can see you’re going through a tough time

it’s understandable to feel that way given everything you’ve been going through.

There are more examples of good phrases to use here.

Don’t try to fix the problem right now

Often our first instinct is wanting to fix the person’s problems. It hurts to see others in pain, and we can feel awkward or helpless not knowing how to help. But you don’t have to have all of the answers.

Instead of jumping into “fix it” mode right away, accept the conversation may be uncomfortable and allow the person to speak about their difficulties and experiences.

Sometimes it’s not the actual suggestion or practical help that’s most useful but giving the person a chance to talk openly about their struggles. Also, the more we understand the person’s experience, the more likely we are to be able to offer the right type of help.

Encourage them to seek help.

Ask:

how can I help?

is there something I can do for you right now?

Sometimes it’s about keeping them company (making plans to do a pleasant activity together), providing practical support (help minding their kids to give them time out), or linking them in with other health professionals.

Check whether they need urgent help

It’s possible this person is suffering more than you realise: they may be contemplating suicide or self-harm. Asking about suicidal thoughts does not worsen those thoughts, but instead can help ease distress.

It’s OK to ask them if they’re thinking about suicide, but try not to be judgemental (“you’re not thinking of doing anything stupid, are you?”). Listen to their responses without judgement, and let them know you care and you’d like to help.

Read more: How to ask someone you’re worried about if they’re thinking of suicide

There are resources and programs to help you learn how to support suicidal loved ones, and crisis support lines to call:

  • Contact the Social and Emotional team at your nearest ACCHO
  • Lifeline (24-hour crisis telephone counselling) 13 11 14
  • Suicide Callback Service 1300 659 467
  • Mental health crisis lines

If it is an emergency, or the person is at immediate risk of harm to themselves or others, call 000.

Encourage them to seek professional help

We’re fortunate to be living in Australia, with access to high quality mental health care, resources and support services. But it can be overwhelming to know what and where to seek help. You can help by pointing the person in the right direction.

The first place to seek help is the general practitioner (GP). The GP can discuss treatment options (psychological support and/or medication), provide referrals to a mental health professional or arrange access to local support groups. You can help by encouraging your friend to make an appointment with their GP.

There are great evidence-based online courses and self-help programseducational resources and free self-help workbooks that can be accessed at any time.

There are also online tools to check emotional health. These tools help indicate if a person’s stress, anxiety and depression levels are healthy or elevated.

What if they don’t want help?

People with mental health difficulties sometimes take years between first noticing the problem and seeking professional help. Research shows approximately one in three people experiencing mental health problems accesses treatment.

So even if they don’t want help now, your conversation may have started them thinking about getting help. You can try understanding what’s stopping them from seeking help and see if there’s anything you can do to help connect them to a professional. You don’t need to push this, but simply inviting the person to keep the options in mind and offering your ongoing support can be useful in the long run.

Follow up. If appropriate, organise a time to check in with the person again to see how they’re doing after your conversation. You can also let the person know you’re around and they are always welcome to have a chat with you. Knowing someone is there for you can itself be a great source of emotional support.

Read more: Five types of food to increase your psychological well-being

The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences bursary

Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence is seeking expressions of interest (EOI) from all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people who would like to share their expertise, advice, and ideas and contribute to the development of a suicide prevention social media campaign!

About the #chatsafe campaign

We would like to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to co-design a suicide prevention social media campaign specifically for the Aboriginal community. The campaign will focus on educating and empowering young people to support themselves and other young people within their online social networks. Rather than speaking on behalf of Aboriginal communities, we wish to draw on the expertise, cultural identities, and strengths of the community to inform campaign materials.

The co-design workshop will involve a yarning circle, where young people will be given the opportunity to share their experiences and express their needs. The yarning circle will be facilitated by an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person. The workshop will also involve working together, in groups, to generate ideas for a social media campaign (e.g., digital storytelling, drawing, etc.).

The workshop will be hosted in Perth, as a part of the The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences. The workshop will be conducted in the morning and breakfast will be provided. Young people will be reimbursed $30.00 per hour for their time.

Opportunity for financial support

Oyrgen would like to sponsor 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to take part in our co-design workshop and The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences, hosted from 20 to 23 November, in Perth, by providing a bursary.

SEE CONFERENCE WEBSITE

Eligibility

To be eligible for Orygen’s bursary funding, the applicant must be an Aboriginal and Torres Islander young person, aged between 18 and 25 years. We encourage young people from all geographic regions, across Australia, to apply.

Submitting your application

If you would like to be a part of the co-design workshop, please email your application to Jo at

The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences bursary

Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence is seeking expressions of interest (EOI) from all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people who would like to share their expertise, advice, and ideas and contribute to the development of a suicide prevention social media campaign!

About the #chatsafe campaign

We would like to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to co-design a suicide prevention social media campaign specifically for the Aboriginal community. The campaign will focus on educating and empowering young people to support themselves and other young people within their online social networks. Rather than speaking on behalf of Aboriginal communities, we wish to draw on the expertise, cultural identities, and strengths of the community to inform campaign materials.

The co-design workshop will involve a yarning circle, where young people will be given the opportunity to share their experiences and express their needs. The yarning circle will be facilitated by an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person. The workshop will also involve working together, in groups, to generate ideas for a social media campaign (e.g., digital storytelling, drawing, etc.). The workshop will be hosted in Perth, as a part of the The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences. The workshop will be conducted in the morning and breakfast will be provided. Young people will be reimbursed $30.00 per hour for their time.

Opportunity for financial support

Oyrgen would like to sponsor 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to take part in our co-design workshop and The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences, hosted from 20 to 23 November, in Perth, by providing a bursary.

Eligibility

To be eligible for Orygen’s bursary funding, the applicant must be an Aboriginal and Torres Islander young person, aged between 18 and 25 years. We encourage young people from all geographic regions, across Australia, to apply.

Submitting your application

If you would like to be a part of the co-design workshop, please email your application to Jo at jo.robinson@orygen.org.au. Submissions can be made on, or before Sunday, 30 September, 2018.

Selection process

In the first week of October, a panel consisting of Oyrgen staff, a Culture is Life representative, Professor Pat Dudgeon from the conference organising committee, Summer May Finlay (a Yorta Yorta woman), and young people will review all written applications and select 10 successful applicants. The selection panel will endeavour to select a diverse range of young people. The 10 successful applicants will be notified by email by mid-October. The success applicants will have until 31 October, 2018 to accept the bursary offered.

Requirements

The successful recipients of the bursaries are required to attend a half-day co-design workshop. Recipients will also be asked to complete and submit a ‘Wellness Plan’, ‘Bank Details Form’, and ‘Consent Form’ prior to participation in the w

. Submissions can be made on, or before Sunday, 30 September, 2018.

Selection process

In the first week of October, a panel consisting of Oyrgen staff, a Culture is Life representative, Professor Pat Dudgeon from the conference organising committee, Summer May Finlay (a Yorta Yorta woman), and young people will review all written applications and select 10 successful applicants. The selection panel will endeavour to select a diverse range of young people. The 10 successful applicants will be notified by email by mid-October. The success applicants will have until 31 October, 2018 to accept the bursary offered.

Requirements

The successful recipients of the bursaries are required to attend a half-day co-design workshop. Recipients will also be asked to complete and submit a ‘Wellness Plan’, ‘Bank Details Form’, and ‘Consent Form’ prior to participation in the w

Anyone seeking support and information about mental health can contact beyondblue on 1300 22 46 36. For information about suicide and crisis support, contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or the Suicide Callback Service on 1300 659 467

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health #Nutrition #Obesity : @IndigenousPHAA The #AFL ladder of sponsorships such as soft drinks @CocaColaAU and junk food @McDonalds_AU endangers the health of our children

 “Aboriginal and Non- Aboriginal kids are being inundated with the advertising of alcohol, junk food and gambling through AFL sponsorship deals according to a new study.

With obesity and excessive drinking remaining a significant problem in our communities, it’s time for the AFL ladder of unhealthy sponsorship (see below) to end,

Children under the age of eight are particularly vulnerable to advertising because they lack the maturity and mental skills to evaluate the messages. Therefore, in the case of the AFL, they begin to associate unhealthy products with their favourite sport and players

We need to ask ourselves why Australia’s most popular winter sport is serving as a major advertising platform for soft drink, beer, wine, burgers and meat pies. It’s sending the wrong message to Australians that somehow these unhealthy foods and drinks are linked to the healthy activity of sport,”

Says the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA).

Read all NACCHO Aboriginal Health Nutrition / Obestity articles over 6 years HERE 

In the study published this week in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Australian researchers looked at the prevalence of sponsorship by alcohol, junk food and gambling companies on AFL club websites and on AFL player uniforms.

The findings were used to make an ‘AFL Sponsorship Ladder’, a ranking of AFL clubs in terms of their level of unhealthy sponsorships, with those at the top of the ladder having the highest level of unhealthy sponsors.

The study clearly demonstrated that Australia’s most popular spectator sport is saturated with unhealthy advertising.

Download PDF Copy of report NACCHO Unhealthy sponsors of sport

Ainslie Sartori, one of the authors involved in the research confirmed, “After reviewing the sponsorship deals of AFL clubs, we found that 88% of clubs are sponsored by unhealthy food and beverage companies. A third of AFL clubs are also involved in business partnerships with gambling companies.”

Recommendation 

Sponsorship offers companies an avenue to expose children and young people to their brand, encouraging a connection with that brand.

The AFL could reinforce healthy lifestyle choices by shifting the focus away from the visual presence of unhealthy sponsorship, while taking steps to ensure that clubs remain commercially viable.

Policy makers are encouraged to consider innovative health promotion strategies and work
with sporting clubs and codes to ensure healthy messages are prominent

 

The study noted that children are often the targets of AFL advertising. This is despite World Health Organization recommendations that children’s settings should be free of unhealthy food promotions and branding (including through sport) due to the known risk it poses to their diet and chances of developing obesity.

PHAA CEO Terry Slevin commented, “When Australian kids see their sports heroes wearing a uniform plastered with certain brands, they inevitably start to associate these brands with the player they look up to and with the positive and healthy experience of the sport.”

He added, “The AFL is in a unique position to positively influence the health of Australian kids through banning sponsorship by alcohol, junk food and gambling companies. It could instead reinforce the importance of a healthy lifestyle for them.”

“Australian health policy makers need to consider innovative health promotion strategies and work together with sport clubs and codes to ensure that unhealthy advertising is not a feature. We successfully removed tobacco advertising from sport and we can do it with junk food and gambling too,” Mr Slevin said.

The recently released Sport 2030 plan rightly identifies sport as a positive vehicle to promote good health. But elite “corporate sport” plays a role of bypassing restrictions aimed at reducing exposure of children to unhealthy product marketing.

“The evidence is clear – it’s time for Australia to phase out all unhealthy sponsorship of sport,” Mr Slevin conclude

NACCHO Aboriginal Health NEWS : @AIHW report : The consumption of #alcohol, #tobacco and other #drugs is a major cause of preventable disease and illness in our communities

The consumption of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs is a major cause of preventable disease and illness in our comminities

There are a wide range of data sources available that contribute to our understanding of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use.

This web report from AIHW is intended to be a general reference for contemporary data on alcohol, tobacco and other drugs in Australia.

SEE Full Report 

This report consolidates the most recently available information regarding the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, meth/amphetamines and other stimulants, the non-medical use of pharmaceutical drugs, illicit opioids (heroin) and new (and emerging) psychoactive substances (NPS).

Key trends in the availability, consumption, harms and treatment are identified and detailed data are presented for vulnerable populations.

These population groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, homeless people, older people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or queer (LGBTIQ), people in contact with the criminal justice system, people with mental health conditions, young people and people who inject drugs

Key findings Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 

  • There has been significant declines in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people smoking and consume alcohol that exceeds lifetime risk guidelines (consuming more than two standard drinks per day on average).
  • The prevalence of smoking by Indigenous people has declined from 55% in 1994 to 45% in 2014–15.
  • The proportion of Indigenous people that consume alcohol as levels that exceed lifetime risk guidelines has reduced from 19% in 2008 to 15% in 2014–15.
  • In 2011, tobacco use accounted for 12% of the burden of disease for Indigenous Australians. This accounts for 23.3% of the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.
  • In 2016, more than 1 in 4 (27%) Indigenous Australians used an illicit drug in the last 12 months. This was 1.8 times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians (15.3%).
  • The most commonly used illicit drug by Indigenous Australians is cannabis (16.7%), followed by the non-medical use of pharmaceutical drugs (11.0%).
  • Of clients of alcohol and other drug, treatment services, 15% were Indigenous Australians aged 10 and over, which is an overrepresentation relative to their population size.

Currently there are almost 800,000 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people (see Box ATSI1) living in Australia, accounting for 2.8% of the Australian population [1]. There are substantial differences in measures of health and welfare between Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians.

Box ATSI1: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The terms ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’ is preferred in Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) publications when referring to the separate Indigenous peoples of Australia. However, the term ‘Indigenous’ Australians is used interchangeably with ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander’ in order to assist readability.

The Australian Burden of Disease Study identified that Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people experience a burden of disease that is 2.3 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians [2]. The gap in the disease burden is due to a range of factors including disconnection to culture, traditions and country, social exclusion, discrimination and isolation, trauma, poverty, and lack of adequate access to services [3]. Tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs are key risk factors contributing to the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians [2].

Box ATSI2. Data sources examining tobacco, alcohol and other drug use by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

There are a number of data sources that provide information about tobacco, alcohol and other drug use by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey (NATSISS) [4] and the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (AATSIHS) [5] collected by the ABS are designed to obtain a representative sample of Indigenous Australians. In relation specifically to tobacco smoking, the ABS has consolidated data from six large, national, multistage random household surveys to identify trends between 1994 and 2014–15 [6].

The AIHW’s National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) uses a self-completion questionnaire to capture information about drug and alcohol use among the general Australian population; however it is not specifically designed to obtain reliable national estimates for Indigenous people. In 2016, 2.4% of the NDSHS (unweighted) sample aged 12 and over (or 568 respondents) identified as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin. The estimates produced by the NDSHS should be interpreted with caution due to the low sample size [7].

There are also other data sources that provide information relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

  • Australia’s Burden of Disease study analyses the impact of nearly 200 diseases and injuries in terms of living with illness (non-fatal burden) and premature death (fatal burden). In 2015, a report was released that provides estimates of burden of disease between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians [8].
  • The National Perinatal Data Collection covers each birth in Australia and includes information on Indigenous mothers and their babies [6].
  • The Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Dataset (AODTS-NMDS) contains information on treatment provided to clients by publicly funded alcohol and other drug services including Indigenous clients [9].
  • The Online Services Report (OSR) contains information on the majority of Australian Government-funded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander substance use services [6].

Tobacco smoking

While tobacco smoking is declining in Australia, it remains disproportionately high among Indigenous Australians. Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has shown:

  • In 1994, the Indigenous Australian survey data showed that 55% of Indigenous Australians aged 18 and over were smokers; 20 years later, in 2014–15, this had declined to 45% (Table S3.4).
  • Over a similar 20-year period, the National Health Survey (NHS) the proportion of non-Indigenous smokers aged 18 and over declined, from 24% in 1995 to 16% in 2014–15 (Table S3.5).
  • There appears to have been no change to the gap in smoking prevalence between the Indigenous Australian adult population and the non-Indigenous Australian adult population from 1994 to 2014–15. Even though the Indigenous Australian smoking rates are declining, the non-Indigenous rate is declining at a similar rate, therefore the gap remained constant [6] (Figure ATSI1).

Most of the decline in smoking occurred in non-remote areas. Over the 20-year period, the proportion of Indigenous Australians aged 18 and over in non-remote areas who were smokers declined from 55% to 42%, while the proportion in remote areas remained relatively stable at between 54% and 56% (Table S3.4).

In 2014–15, Indigenous males were more likely than Indigenous females to be smokers (47% compared with 42%) [1].

Geographic trends

The 2014–15 NATSISS provides estimates of tobacco smoking for Indigenous Australians by jurisdiction. According to the 2014–15 NATSISS, 39% of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over smoked daily. Those from the Northern Territory (45%) and Western Australia (42%) surpassed this national average, while Indigenous Australians from South Australia (35%) were the least likely to be a current daily smoker [4] (Table S3.3).

Tobacco smoking in pregnancy

Indigenous Australians are at an elevated risk of smoking during pregnancy compared with non-Indigenous Australians. The National Perinatal Data Collection showed that:

  • Indigenous mothers accounted for 19% of mothers who smoked tobacco at any time during pregnancy in 2015, despite accounting for only around 4% of mothers.
  • The age-standardised rate of Indigenous mothers smoking during pregnancy has decreased from 50% in 2009 to 45% in 2015.
  • Almost 1 in 2 (45%) Indigenous mothers reported smoking during pregnancy—compared with 12% of non-Indigenous mothers (age-standardised).
  • The age-standardised rate of Indigenous mothers quitting smoking during pregnancy (14%) is about half that of non-Indigenous mothers (25%) (based on mothers who reported smoking in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy and not smoking after 20 weeks of pregnancy) [10].

Alcohol consumption

Abstinence (non-drinkers)

  • The 2016 NDSHS found that Indigenous Australians aged 14 and over were more likely to abstain from drinking alcohol than non-Indigenous Australians (31% compared with 23%, respectively) and abstinence among Indigenous Australians has been increasing since 2010 when it was 25% [7] (Table S3.1).
  • This pattern is consistent with data from the 2012–13 AATSIHS, where 28% of Indigenous Australians reported abstaining from drinking compared with 18% of non-Indigenous Australians [5].

Lifetime risk

  • The 2014–15 NATSISS found that the proportion of Indigenous Australians aged 15 years and over who exceeded the NHMRC lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol consumption (consuming more than 2 standard drinks per day on average) decreased between 2008 and 2014–15 (19% compared with 15%; non age-standardised proportions). The overall change is largely due to a decline in non-remote areas (19% in 2008 to 14% in 2014–15) [4] (Table S3.6).
  • Comparisons between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are only available using age-standardised data from the 2012–13 AATSIHS and is not comparable to the 2014–15 NATSISS. The findings showed that lifetime risky drinking of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over was similar to that of non-Indigenous Australians (9.8% compared with 9.7%; age-standardised) [5] (Table S3.7).

Single occasion risk

  • According to the 2014–15 NATSISS, 30% of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over exceeded the single occasion risk guidelines for alcohol consumption (non age-standardised proportions), which is a decline since 2002 (35%).
  • Comparisons between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are only available using age-standardised data from the 2012–13 AATSIHS and is not comparable to the 2014–15 NATSISS. The 2012–13 AATSIHS reported that 1 in 2 (50%) Indigenous Australians exceed the single occasion risky drinking guidelines (more than 4 standard drinks on a single occasion in past year). This was 1.1 times the rate that non-Indigenous Australians (44%) that exceeded these guidelines [5] (Table S3.7).

Risky alcohol consumption

  • According to the 2016 NDSHS, almost 1 in 5 Indigenous Australians (18.8%) consumed 11 or more standard drinks at least once a month. This was 2.8 times the rate that non-Indigenous Australians (6.8%) consumed this amount of alcohol [7] (Table S3.1).

Geographic trends

Between 2002 and 2014–15 there was a decline in the proportion of Indigenous Australians that resided in New South Wales Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory that exceeded the lifetime and single occasion risk guidelines (Figure ATSI2). Indigenous Australians residing in Tasmania (36%), the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) (35%), Queensland (33%) and Western Australia (33%) had higher rates of exceeding the single occasion drinking guidelines than the national average [4] (Table S3.8).

Indigenous Australians residing in Western Australia (16%), New South Wales (16%) and Queensland (15%) surpassed the national average for exceeding lifetime risk guidelines [4] (Table S3.9).

Illicit drug use

In the 2014–15 NATSISS, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 and over were asked whether they had used illicit substances in the last 12 months, and the types of illicit substances they had used during that period [4]. The data showed that:

  • Almost one-third (30%) of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over reported having used illicit substances in the last 12 months, up from 22% in 2008.
  • Males were significantly more likely than females to have used illicit substances (34% compared with 27%), as were people in non-remote areas compared with those in remote areas (33% compared with 21%).
  • Cannabis was the most commonly reported illicit drug used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the last 12 months at 19% (25% of males compared with 14% of females).
  • The non-medical use of analgesics and sedatives (such as painkillers, sleeping pills and tranquilisers) was also relatively common (13%), with females (15%) being more likely than males (11%) to have used analgesics and sedatives.
  • One in twenty (5%) Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over reported having used amphetamines or speed in the last 12 months (6% of males compared with 3% of females) [4] (Figure ATSI3).

The 2016 NDSHS data showed that (other than ecstasy and cocaine), Indigenous Australians aged 14 and over recent used of illicit drugs was at a higher rate than non-Indigenous Australians (Table S3.1). Rates of illicit drug use in 2016 for Indigenous Australians aged 14 and older were:

  • Over one in four (27%) used any illicit drug in the last 12 months—1.8 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (15.3%)
  • One in five (19.4%) used cannabis in the last 12 months—1.9 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (10.2%)
  • Around one in 10 (10.6%) used a pharmaceutical for non-medical use—2.3 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (4.6%) [7] (Table S3.1)
  • 3.1% used meth/amphetamines in the last 12 months—2.2 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (1.4%).

The differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians were still apparent even after adjusting for differences in age structure (Figure ATSI4). There were no significant changes in illicit use of drugs among Indigenous Australians between 2013 and 2016, however due to the small sample sizes for Indigenous Australians, the estimates of the NDSHS should be interpreted with caution.

Geographic trends

Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over residing in the Northern Territory (22%) were the least likely to report substance use, while those from the Australian Capital Territory (41%) and Victoria (40%) were the most likely to report using substances.

Indigenous Australians from the Northern Territory (22%) and Queensland (29%) were the only jurisdictions below the national average (30%) [4] (Table S3.3).

Health and harms

The health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are considerably lower than for non-Indigenous Australians. For instance:

  • 35.1% of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people compared with 58.3% of non-Indigenous Australia self-assessed their health as ‘excellent’ or ‘very good’ (age-standardised per cent).
  • 32.5% of Indigenous Australians compared with 12.3% of non-Indigenous Australians reported high/very high psychological distress (age-standardised per cent).
  • 71.0% of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people reported having a long-term health condition compared with 55.3% of non-Indigenous Australians (age-standardised per cent) [4] (Table S3.6).

Almost 1 in 2 Indigenous Australians with a mental health condition were a daily smoker (46%) and about 2 in 5 (39%) to have used substances in the last 12 months. This was higher than for Indigenous  Australians with other long-term health conditions (33% and 24%, respectively) or those with no long term health condition (39% and 29% respectively) [4] (Table S3.11).

The Australian Burden of Disease Study provides an indication of the risk factors that contribute to the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. In 2011, tobacco use accounted for 23.3% of the gap, and alcohol and drug use contributed to 8.1% and 4.1% of the gap, respectively [8] (Table S3.12).

Treatment

Indigenous Australians are also overrepresented in drug and alcohol treatment services. In 2016–17, the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Dataset (AODTS-NMDS) showed that 15% of clients were Indigenous Australians aged 10 and over (Table S3.13). Indigenous Australians (3,313 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely to receive AOD treatment services than non-Indigenous Australians (430 per 100,000 population) were. Specifically where:

  • Amphetamines was the principal drug of concern, Indigenous Australians (1,204 per 100,000 population) were 8 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (155 per 100,000 population).
  • Heroin was the principal drug of concern Indigenous Australians (911 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (123 per 100,000 population) were.
  • Cannabis was the principal drug of concern Indigenous Australians (867 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (126 per 100,000 population) were.
  • Alcohol was the principal drug of concern Indigenous Australians (136 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (26 per 100,000 population) [9] (Table S3.14).

Dependence on opioid drugs (including codeine, heroin and oxycodone) can be treated with pharmacotherapy therapy using substitute drugs such as methadone or buprenorphine. The National Opioid Pharmacotherapy Statistics Annual Data collection (NOPSAD) provides information on clients receiving opioid pharmacotherapy treatment on a snapshot day each year. For jurisdictions where data was provided, in 2017:

  • Around 1 in 10 clients (9%) were Indigenous, an overrepresentation relative to their population size.
  • Indigenous Australians were almost 3 times as likely (70 clients per 10,000 population) to receive pharmacotherapy treatment as non-Indigenous Australians (26 clients per 10,000 population) [11] (Table S3.15).

Data from the OSR shows that 2015–16, there were 80 organisations around Australia that provided alcohol and other drug treatment services to around 32,700 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients [6]. The OSR data also shows that:

  • All 80 organisations reported that alcohol was one of the top five common substance-use issue, followed by cannabis (94%) and amphetamines (70%)
  • Treatment episodes were more likely to be to occur in non-residential settings (87%)
  • One third of all treatment episodes were in Very remote areas (32%) and the highest proportion of clients were located in Major cities (35%).

Policy context

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 includes a suite of products that give the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according to a range of 68 performance measures across 3 tiers: Tier 1—health status and outcomes, Tier 2—determinants of health, and Tier 3—health system performance. The measures are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework and cover data that has been collected on the entire health system, including Indigenous-specific services and programs, and mainstream services [12].

National Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Peoples Drug Strategy 2014–2019

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Drug Strategy 2014–2019 was a sub-strategy of the National Drug Strategy 2010–2015 and remains a sub-strategy under the National Drug Strategy 2017–2025. The overarching goal of this sub-strategy is to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by preventing and reducing the harmful effects of alcohol and other drugs (AOD) on individuals, families and their communities [13].

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Alcohol : ” Deceive Deny and Delay ” : Alcohol industry lies exposed in @FAREAustralia analysis of 17 industry submissions to the National Alcohol Strategy (NAS) 2018-2026

An examination of alcohol industry efforts to self-regulate, whether it be in the area of alcohol advertising or health warning labels highlights how the alcohol industry is unwilling and ultimately unable to place the interests of the Australian public ahead of its shareholders and the pursuit of profit.

Plans to distribute the campaign to GP surgeries nationally has been shelved, but only after health professionals raised concerns about the campaign collateral, including a false statement that read, “it’s not known if alcohol is safe to drink when you are pregnant.”

The DrinkWise campaign is a textbook example of just how reckless and negligent the alcohol industry is prepared to be, stepping into an area ordinarily the responsibility of government, solely in an effort to stave off the threat of responsible and effective regulation.

The industry will lie, deny and mislead at every opportunity, and in this particular case, with no regard for the pregnant women and their unborn children that would be harmed as a result,”

FARE Chief Executive Michael Thorn see Part 2 Press Release

Download copy of the Fare Report Here 

National-Alcohol-Strategy-Industry-Submissions-Report

 

Part 1 NACCHO Submission National Alcohol Strategy (NAS) 2018-2026

Summary

Implementation of the draft strategy requires investment in ACCHOs for the expansion of early intervention, prevention and alcohol treatment services and co-occurring mental health, social and emotional wellbeing services. As the established leaders in Aboriginal primary health care service delivery, ACCHOs must be the preferred providers for alcohol harm reduction services and programs for Aboriginal people.

NACCHO contends that initiatives, like those under draft strategy, will continue to fail Aboriginal people and communities if ACCHOs are not the preferred providers, and if Aboriginal leadership and self-determination is not supported and embraced by Governments. Aboriginal health needs to be in Aboriginal hands

NACCHO recognises that certain regulatory measures, when implemented through genuine planning and consultation with Aboriginal communities, can be effective strategies for reducing alcohol harms. Notwithstanding this, NACCHO asserts that genuine consultation with ACCHOs, Aboriginal people and communities is imperative to ensure the draft strategy actions are culturally secure, sustainable and effective. Moreover, investment is required in ACCHOs to plan and establish complementary health and treatment approaches, and therapeutic jurisprudence diversionary programs.

There are some priority areas have been missed, these are:

  1. Capacity building in Aboriginal primary health care – training opportunities for Aboriginal Health Workers to upskill;
  2. better coordination of service providers, multi-sectoral – both national and in jurisdictions; and
  3. use of electronic screening tools – feasibility, validated for Aboriginal populations.

Recommendation

NACCHO recommends that the Commonwealth engage in genuine and meaningful dialogue with NACCHO, ACCHOs, Aboriginal people and communities before progressing further with the draft strategy implementation.

In this way the future risks posed by the draft strategy can be addressed, and further disadvantage and criminalisation of Aboriginal peoples and communities can be avoided.

Download 38 – National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations

We welcome the opportunity to discuss this submission in further detail.

Part 2 Fare Press Release

A newly released analysis of alcohol industry submissions to the National Alcohol Strategy (NAS) consultation has exposed the lengths the alcohol industry will go to attack, undermine and subvert the development of alcohol policy measures that would reduce harm and save lives.

Its release follows the discovery, criticism and subsequent withdrawal of a misleading and inaccurate alcohol and pregnancy health campaign, which was developed by the alcohol industry front organisation, DrinkWise, for distribution to doctors surgeries nationally.

The industry analysis by leading public health organisation, the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE), and the discovery of the flawed DrinkWise campaign come as the Government prepares for the National Alcohol Strategy (NAS) Roundtable on Tuesday, and highlight the risks and very real danger of giving the industry a seat at the table.

Analysis of the 17 alcohol industry submissions to the NAS consultation revealed four prominent and problematic claims by industry; none of which stand up to scrutiny when examined against the evidence base.

FARE Chief Executive Michael Thorn says the examination of the 17 industry submissions including those from the Australian Hotels Association, Alcohol Beverages Australia, DrinkWise, Winemakers’ Federation of Australia, and Brewers Association of Australia reveal in their consistency a high level of coordination and a common willingness to deceive the public, deny the evidence and further delay the advancement of life-saving alcohol policy reform.

“Australia has been without a National Alcohol Strategy since 2011, yet the alcohol industry is causing further delay and falsely claiming that the evidence base is inadequate. This is an industry that is even prepared to lie about its own credentials with DrinkWise, the alcohol industry front organisation, falsely claiming that “DrinkWise is not an industry body”.

Mr Thorn says it is critical that the alcohol industry’s attempts to deceive and mislead the Australian public do not go unchallenged.

“It is clear upon reading the alcohol industry submissions that the industry believes that simply committing a statement to the public record, no matter how outrageous or false, is enough to further an agenda that places profit ahead of public health and safety. But these dangerous claims cannot be allowed to stand,” Mr Thorn said

Nor do the alcohol industry’s claims to be a willing collaborator in implementing awareness and prevention messages stand up to scrutiny.

Mr Thorn says that by any measure the industry’s voluntary labelling scheme has been an abject failure with fewer than half of all packaged alcoholic beverages available for sale displaying some type of pregnancy warning label.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #YouthJustice : Download @aihw report : Highlighting Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander young people under youth justice supervision over-represented in treatment for alcohol and other drug use

” Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander young people were over-represented among the study cohort. Of the just over 17,000 young people who received either an alcohol or other drug treatment episode or youth justice supervision, 3 in 10 were Indigenous.

In particular, Indigenous young people were over-represented among the ‘dual-service’ client population. During the 4-year period, Indigenous young people were 14 times as likely to experience both youth justice supervision and drug and alcohol services as their non-Indigenous counterparts.” 

Extract from AIHW Overlap between youth justice supervision and alcohol and other drug treatment services: 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2016

AIHW INFO PAGE and Data etc 

Download Copy HERE

aihw-youth justice system

1 in 3 young people under youth justice supervision receive treatment for alcohol and other drug use

Young people under youth justice supervision are 30 times as likely to receive an alcohol or other drug treatment service as young Australians generally, according to a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, Overlap between youth justice supervision and alcohol and other drug treatment services, shows 1 in 3 young people aged 10–17 under youth justice supervision during the 4 years to June 2016 also received alcohol and other drug treatment services at some point during the same period.

‘Today’s report highlights the considerable overlap between young people under youth justice supervision and those receiving drug and alcohol treatment services. Through bringing together data on both services, we have been able to determine that there were just over 2,500 ‘dual service’ clients – that is, young people that accessed both youth justice supervision and drug and alcohol services within the study period’ said AIHW spokesperson Anna Ritson.

Nearly 1 in 4 (23%) young people under youth justice supervision received treatment for cannabis as their principal drug of concern, 1 in 12 (8%) for alcohol and 1 in 20 (5%) for amphetamines. Less than 1% of young Australians in the general population received treatment for each of these principal drugs of concern.

Dual-service clients were, overall, more likely than other young people in the study to receive multiple alcohol and other drug treatment services and have multiple drugs of concern.

‘For dual service clients, almost half (47%) received 2 or more alcohol or other drug treatment episodes over the 4-year study period. However, where the young person was not under youth justice supervision, this falls to just under 1 in 5 (19%),’ Ms Ritson said.

Today’s report builds on established evidence about the overlaps that exist among young people who experience child protection, youth justice supervision, homelessness, mental health disorders, and use of alcohol and other drugs.

The high level of overlap between clients of the youth justice and alcohol and other drug treatment service sectors indicates a need for more integrated services and person-centered service delivery, to reduce future reliance on health and welfare services and improve outcomes for young people.

Summary

Some young people are vulnerable and experience multiple levels of disadvantage. Evidence shows that overlaps exist among young people who experience child protection, youth justice supervision, homelessness, mental health disorders, and problematic use of alcohol and other drugs. Understanding the pathways and interactions with the health and welfare sectors for these young people is crucial for effective service delivery and targeted early intervention services.

Despite the relationship between youth offending and the use of alcohol and other drugs, data about the overlap between the services provided to young people by these 2 sectors in Australia has not been previously available.

This report presents information on young people aged 10–17 who were under youth justice supervision (both in the community, and in detention) and/or received an alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment service between 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2016. Those who received both these services are referred to in this report as dual service clients.

Young people under youth justice supervision were 30 times as likely as the young Australian population to receive an alcohol and other drug treatment service

Of young people who were under youth justice supervision from 1 July 2012 to

30 June 2016, 1 in 3 (33%) also received an AOD treatment service at some point during the same 4-year period, compared with just over 1% of the general Australian population of the same age.

Nearly 1 in 4 (23%) young people under youth justice supervision received treatment for a principal drug of concern of cannabis, 1 in 12 (8%) for alcohol, and 1 in 20 (5%) for amphetamines. Less than 1% of young Australians in the general population of the same age received an AOD treatment for each of these principal drugs of concern. This means that compared with the Australian population, young people under youth justice supervision were 33 times as likely to receive an AOD treatment for cannabis, 27 times as likely to be treated for alcohol, and more than 50 times as likely to be treated for amphetamines.

Young people who received an alcohol and other drug treatment service were 30 times as likely as the Australian population to be under youth justice supervision

Of young people who received an AOD treatment service, 1 in 5 (21%) were also under youth justice supervision at some point during the same 4-year period, compared with 0.7% of the Australian population of the same age. About 1 in 4 (26%) young people who received an AOD treatment as a diversion (police and court referrals) in 2012–13 subsequently spent time under youth justice supervision within 3 years.

Young people who received an alcohol and other drug treatment service for volatile solvents or amphetamines were the most likely to also have youth justice supervision

Of the 11,981 young people who received an AOD treatment service, those whose principal drug of concern was volatile solvents or amphetamines were the most likely to have also been under youth justice supervision.

Dual service clients were more likely than those who only received alcohol and other drug treatment services to have multiple treatment episodes and drugs of concern

Nearly half (47%) of dual service clients received more than 1 AOD treatment episode in the 4-year period, compared with about 1 in 5 (19%) of those who received only an AOD treatment service. One in 5 (20%) dual service clients received services for multiple principal drugs of concern, compared with 4% of those who received only an AOD treatment service.

Young Indigenous Australians were 14 times as likely as their non-Indigenous counterparts to receive both services

Young Indigenous Australians were over-represented among the dual service clients—

2% of young Indigenous Australians had contact with both services during the 4-year period, compared with 0.1% of non-Indigenous young people.