NACCHO Alert June 22 todays @ahmrc and @NSWHealth 5 th #IndigenousHealthSummit : Download the full program : Aboriginal Health “ Is it time to reset?”

 ” The NSW Government committed to reset its relationship with Aboriginal communities following the release of its Aboriginal affairs plan OCHRE: Opportunity, Choice, Healing, Responsibility, Empowerment in 2013.

This commitment came in response to overwhelming community sentiment that services to First Peoples must be provided “with” First Peoples, not “to” or “at” them. This is as true for health services, as it is other services.

First Peoples have long called for co-design of services and programs delivered or funded by Government. Preventative and early intervention measures that are co-designed and delivered by Aboriginal communities are essential to achieving better health outcomes.

The Aboriginal community-controlled health sector in Australia is leading the way in this regard, and must meet the challenge of sustaining these approaches.”

Jason Ardler will be one of five Aboriginal panelists for the Summit session on: “Why do we need to reset?”

As Head of NSW Aboriginal Affairs, he is  responsible to the Secretary of the NSW Department of Education, and was recognised in the recent Queen’s Birthday Honours for outstanding public service to Indigenous people in NSW. He talked to Croakey ahead of the Summit. You can follow him on Twitter at @JasonArdler.

“With the theme ‘Aboriginal Health – It’s Time to Reset’, we acknowledge that we need new ways of working to achieve meaningful change in the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people must be leading conversations about health and wellbeing and this requires government agencies to make space for this to happen”.

Welcome message from Elizabeth Koff, Secretary of NSW Health, who acknowledges the need to privilege Aboriginal voices.

The need for new ways of working and for government agencies to make space so Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can lead the conversations on health and wellbeing is the focus of a major national Indigenous Health Summit to be held this Friday (22 June) in Sydney.

The 5th Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Summit – a biennial event of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Standing Committee, established by the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council (AHMAC) – is being co-hosted by the NSW Ministry of Health’s Centre for Aboriginal Health and the Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of NSW (AH&MRC).

Download the full program and see all the speakers and panelists

IndigenousHealthSummitProgram

Summer May Finlay, a Yorta Yorta woman, public health researcher and Croakey contributing editor, is covering the #IndigenousHealthSummit for the Croakey Conference News Service and sets the scene for the day’s agenda in the article below.

See also below a quick Q&A with Jason Ardler, Head of NSW Aboriginal Affairs, on what he hopes will emerge from the Summit – including the strong message that he says came from NSW Aboriginal communities to the state’s health system to “prioritise healing”, in order to keep people out of the service system in the first place.

Finlay will live tweet from each of the sessions on Friday, conduct live interviews on Periscope (via Twitter) at @ontopicaus, and later file a big wrap of the discussions.

Among those speaking and presenting at the Summit are Federal Indigenous Health and Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt, NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard, journalist Stan Grant, researcher Dr Gregory Phillips, Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) CEO Janine Mohamed, and University of Tasmania Pro-Vice Chancellor (Aboriginal Research and Leadership) Professor Maggie Walter and University of Sydney Acting Pro-Vice Chancellor Professor Juanita Sherwood.

Click here for the full program or see all the speakers and panelists at the bottom of this post.

Summer May Finlay writes:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have poorer health and wellbeing than other Australians. This is well known. The ongoing gap is despite increased investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, under the Closing the Gap Framework, which was introduced by the Coalition of Australian Governments in 2009.

So what is happening? What needs to be done? Why are the current solutions not working? And what policies need to be in place to see real and meaningful change? Ultimately the lack of substantive change means it’s time to “reset” the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health approach. This cannot and should not be done without Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Aboriginal health – it’s time to reset” is the theme for the 5th National Health Summit being held in Sydney on Friday 22 June. The summit is hosted by the New South Wales Ministry of Health and the Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of NSW.

With a program that features almost entirely Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, the Summit will be a meeting of the top policymakers in the country, both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous, and from the government and the non-government sectors. They are the people who can drive a reset agenda.

One summit will not and cannot address the health outcomes and change policy overnight. What it can do is assist in shifting the approach. Shift the underlying ideology away from being government-led to community-led. And a shift is what is required. There is no hiding that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, the country’s first peoples, the traditional owners of this land, have always fared worse than those who have subsequently migrated here.

To call for a reset is brave. The agenda is bold, courageous even. The first panel discussion, with only Aboriginal presenters, will outline why a reset is required. An all-Aboriginal panel is making a statement: that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people need to be leading the way if we are to indeed reset.

The second panel, which is mostly Aboriginal, asks “How do we reset?” with a focus on Aboriginal community-led ways to wellness and health. Since the National Aboriginal Health Strategy, the first national attempt to address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, there has been a call from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities for community-led solutions.

The concept of community-led solutions is not new; however, rarely have we seen policy that genuinely embraces this approach, which is why it is essential it is on the agenda for the National Summit.

Where to from here?

The afternoon session includes a short update on the Closing the Gap Refresh by Professor Ian Anderson, the Deputy Secretary for Indigenous Affairs, Prime Minister and Cabinet. With much of the consultation already completed, it will be interesting to see how the Refresh will align with the approaches suggested during the National Summit.

The meat of the day, however, and probably the most challenging session will be the last: “Where to from here?” This will be led by Professor Kerry Arabena, Chair for Indigenous Health and Director of the Indigenous Health Equity Unit at the University of Melbourne, and journalist, author and filmmaker Dr Jeff McMullen.

Change is challenging. It means that each individual needs to look at their own ways of working and consider how they are contributing to the status quo, i.e. the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health disparity.

It is in the uncomfortable that I believe we will see real change. The uncomfortable is where we start to question and review our own underlying beliefs and attitudes. It is through this process that we can shift our own ways of doing business to assist in creating a better future for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Some of the attendees, an invitation-only group from across government, health and social sector organisations, and research institutions, may be stretched beyond their comfort zones; however, there is no doubt that all levels of governments and non-government sectors want to work towards better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Those who are there on Friday hopefully will walk away feeling reset themselves and with a renewed vigour for the work ahead.

Resetting the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health agenda: it’s not an easy task but a necessary one for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and all Australians.

Part 2 Q&A with Jason Ardler, Head of NSW Aboriginal Affairs

Summer May Finlay

Q: Why is the theme important to you?

Jason Ardler:

A: The NSW Government committed to reset its relationship with Aboriginal communities following the release of its Aboriginal affairs plan OCHRE: Opportunity, Choice, Healing, Responsibility, Empowerment in 2013.

This commitment came in response to overwhelming community sentiment that services to First Peoples must be provided “with” First Peoples, not “to” or “at” them. This is as true for health services, as it is other services.

First Peoples have long called for co-design of services and programs delivered or funded by Government. Preventative and early intervention measures that are co-designed and delivered by Aboriginal communities are essential to achieving better health outcomes.

The Aboriginal community-controlled health sector in Australia is leading the way in this regard, and must meet the challenge of sustaining these approaches.

Summer May Finlay

Q: What is the one point you hope to get across at the Summit?

Jason Ardler:

A: When the NSW Government asked Aboriginal communities in 2011 what a new Aboriginal affairs plan should include, Aboriginal people across the state warned us that if we continued to focus on providing services to fix people up, we would continue to achieve the same poor outcomes.

Instead, we were told to prioritise keeping people out of the service system in the first place – and that means prioritising healing.

Intergenerational trauma is a significant issue for First Nations’ families and communities and healing is essential to improved health and wellbeing outcomes. As one young person said in the National Youth Healing Forum Report: “We need increased focus on positive programs that keep people happy and healthy rather than only targeting them at crisis point.”

Healing is a process that is necessarily different for every individual, family and community – which is why “co-design” with the First Peoples is critical.

Summer May Finlay:

Q: What do you recommend people read or watch in the lead up to the event?

Jason Ardler:

Healing: www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au/healing-and-reparations/healing

Local decision making: www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au/working-differently/local-decision-making

About our research agenda: https://www.aboriginalaffairs

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #CloseTheGap Workforce and Training : @IAHA_National and the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance #NT @AMSANTaus launch the Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Academy #NTAHA

 

“Investment and support from our local organisations, employers and governments will ensure the success of the Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Academy (NTAHA)

Schools, students and community need to know this will be a secure and sustainable approach to building our local workforce, many of whom will stay in our communities’ long term

A key principle of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan is Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community control and engagement, with culture the main overarching priority.

 The NT Aboriginal Health Academy has been unsuccessful in gaining the financial support it requires. However, we have had strong support from key stakeholders such as NT Department of Education, NT Department of Health, Charles Darwin University, Flinders University and the Industry Skills Advisory Council NT “

AMSANT CEO John Paterson

Picture above Creating a strong pathway for their 20 deadly Indigenous youth in to health

 ” This partnership with AMSANT to grow and develop the nation’s future leaders in health is critical to the success of the Academy. Growing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce is critically important in providing sustainable, culturally-responsive holistic healthcare.

An increase in the number of qualified Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals is needed to positively address workforce shortages in rural and remote communities across the NT.

Already, we are seeing students and their families engaging, and young mothers re-engaging in education through the Academy. They see it as a more flexible and meaningful pathway to sustainable employment in our communities .

If Governments are truly committed to Closing the Gap then there needs to be greater support shown for community-driven initiatives like the NT Aboriginal Health Academy,”

IAHA CEO Donna Murray.

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) and the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT)  launch the Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Academy (NTAHA).

The Health Academy will increase the number of young Aboriginal people completing year 12 and entering into the health workforce.

This project is an innovative community led learning model that is about re-shaping and redesigning how training is delivered to Aboriginal students in high school years.

The model is strengths based and centered on ensuring training and education is delivered in a way that embeds the centrality of culture and has a holistic approach to health and wellbeing.

The model is designed to work collaboratively across health disciplines and sectors. There is an urgent, real need for health professions in sectors such as primary health care, disability, mental health, allied health, medicine and aged care; for providing a sustainable education, training and workforce development approach in the Northern Territory.

From Wednesday opening

“If Governments are truly committed to Closing the Gap then there needs to be greater support shown for community-driven initiatives like the NT Aboriginal Health Academy,” said Ms Murray.

ENDS

Indigenous Allied Health Australia is a national member-based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health organisation.

AMSANT is the peak body for Aboriginal community-controlled health services (ACCHSs) in the Northern Territory and has played a pivotal role in advocating for and supporting the development of community-controlled health.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #Sexualhealth #WorldAidsDay #UANDMECANSTOPHIV Community embraces Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2017 #HIV Awareness Week

Ahiv

 ” With diagnoses and rates of HIV in Aboriginal communities at an all-time high since 1992, this year’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week (ATSIHAW) is more important than ever. Now in its fourth year, the role of ATSIHAW is to engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across Australia in HIV prevention.

ATISHAW is an opportunity to promote action, awareness and advocacy at all levels of government and community, to provide much needed resources to address the rising rates of HIV,

Action is required in policy, programming, clinical service delivery; awareness is required across communities and in clinical settings; and advocacy is required at all levels of health service delivery and governments.”

Associate Professor James  Ward

Ajw

The theme of this year’s National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week is ‘U and Me Can Stop HIV’ and we know that education and awareness are vitally important in our battle against HIV and STIs,”

We have had a variety of media resources available but until now, only a small number have been culturally appropriate for Indigenous people.

With messages like ‘Looking after our mob starts with looking after ourselves’, these new videos are more likely to cut through, especially to younger Aboriginal people, who are most vulnerable to these infections.”.

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, this week officially released the videos, and an accompanying range of social and print media resources, at the launch of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week.

Three animated education and awareness videos focus on HIV, STIs and PrEP (a daily medication that can prevent HIV), which aim to enhance awareness of HIV prevention. These are housed on the website  www.atsihiv.org.au,

Watch 1 of 3 Videos HERE

ATSIHAW 2017 runs from Monday, 27 November to Sunday, 3 December. The Federal Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt AM, MP, officially launched ATSIHAW on Wednesday, 29 November at a breakfast hosted by Senator Dean Smith, Chair of the Parliamentary Friends of HIV/AIDS, Blood Borne Viruses and Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

file-5

Other dignitaries in attendance included : Senator Richard Di Natale, Leader of the Australian Greens; Professor Sharon Lewin, Chair of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on Blood Borne Viruses and Sexually Transmissible Infections; Dr Dawn Casey, Deputy Chief Executive Officer of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO);

Ms Michelle Tobin, Chair of the Positive Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Network (PATSIN) – a group representing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with HIV); as well as other members of the Australian Parliament.

Concerning statistics

Recently released national data shows the rate of HIV diagnoses among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is now more than double the rate for the non-Indigenous Australian-born population. This rate has increased by 33 per cent during the last five years, while the rate in the non-Indigenous Australian-born population has decreased by 22 per cent in the same period – creating a new gap in health between the two populations.

Associate Professor James Ward, Head Infectious Diseases Research Aboriginal Health at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), and ATSIHAW committee member, said that this is absolutely unacceptable.

Over the last five years, significant differences have appeared in the HIV epidemic between the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population and the non-Indigenous Australian-born population. Although men who have sex with men make up the majority of cases in both groups (51 per cent vs 74 per cent), a greater proportion of Indigenous cases are because of injecting drug use (14 per cent vs three per cent) or through heterosexual sex (20 per cent vs. 14 per cent).

Ms Michelle Tobin said that more work is required to ensure there are strategies for all of these groups of people in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities rolled out, and that these have impact.

The other unique issue occurring in Australia is the continuing increase in HIV rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people each year, despite the major advances in HIV testing, diagnostics and treatment. Innovative HIV test-and-treat strategies and large-scale pre-exposure HIV prophylaxis trials (PrEP) trials have successfully engaged the gay community and are resulting in reductions across jurisdictions, but but to date, have had little impact in Aboriginal communities.

“We need to make sure that these strategies have impact on all of the Australian population – not just some”, Associate Professor Ward added.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are generally not benefiting from these advances.”

Community support; an important part of ATSIHAW

The overarching theme of ATSIHAW is ‘U AND ME CAN STOP HIV’. This highlights the strengths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and the role we can all play in preventing new HIV cases and improving the outcomes for people living with HIV.

This year, ATSIHAW is holding over 55 community events across Australia at Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and other community services. The number of ATSIHAW events and strong social media engagement, demonstrates the growing sense of community responsibility for spreading awareness of the importance of HIV prevention.

Alice Springs this week

High-profile ambassadors for ATSIHAW have also been recruited, including Steven Oliver from ABC’s Black Comedy. Steven said that he’s involved in ATSIHAW because he wants to help fight and break down the stigma associated with HIV and those living with it.

Professor Kerry Arabena and Dr Pat Anderson AM are also Ambassadors for ATSIHAW, alongside 30 other community members who are all concerned about HIV in the communities.

New HIV resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

A new set of resources will be launched by the Honourable Ken Wyatt AM, MP, Minister for Indigenous Health, including three animated education and awareness videos focusing on HIV, STIs and PrEP (a daily medication that can prevent HIV), which aim to enhance awareness of HIV prevention. These are housed on the website www.atsihiv.org.au, als

New animated videos voiced by young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are the latest weapons in the fight again HIV and sexually transmitted infections in Indigenous communities.

Part 2 Minister’s Press release

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, this week  officially released the videos, and an accompanying range of social and print media resources, at the launch of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week.

The videos have been developed specifically to counter the shame and stigma that can be associated with HIV.

“World Aids Day is on 1 December and it is important we take this opportunity to talk about the rates of HIV diagnosis in our Indigenous communities,” Minister Wyatt said.

“In the past 30, years Australia has made progress in reducing the rates of STIs, however, despite advances in testing and treatment we continue to see Indigenous STI and HIV diagnoses on the rise.”

In 2016, it was estimated that the HIV notification rate for Indigenous people was more than double the rate among non-Indigenous people, with a greater proportion of newly diagnosed HIV infection attributed to heterosexual contact and injecting drug use.

“Working together with Indigenous communities, the States, Territories and local health services, to counter these infections is a key Turnbull Government priority,” said Minister Wyatt.

“This includes $8 million to support a range of programs focussed on delivering culturally appropriate sexual health services, plus a further $8.8 million over three years to target priority areas including testing, education and awareness.

“We are also developing a long-term response to STIs and blood borne viruses in our Indigenous communities, with a proposed strategic approach and action plan due to be received by the Government in December.

“The ‘U and Me Can Stop HIV’ theme of this year’s National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week is a timely reminder of the need to work together to improve sexual health.”

ATSIHAW is administered by SAHMRI, with funding provided by the Commonwealth Department of Health

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Obesity : Download @AIHW report : A picture of overweight and obesity in Australia

Obesity

 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and adolescents are more likely to be overweight or obese than non-Indigenous children and adolescents.

In 2012–13, 30% of Indigenous children and adolescents aged 2–14 were overweight or obese, compared with 25% of their non-Indigenous counterparts. One in 10 (10%) Indigenous children and adolescents aged 2–14 were obese, compared with 7% of their non-Indigenous counterparts (ABS 2014a).

Prevalence among Indigenous children and adolescents see section 2 below

 ” In 2012–13, more than two-thirds (69%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults were overweight or obese (29% overweight but not obese, and 40% obese). Indigenous men (69%) and women (70%) had similar rates of overweight and obesity (ABS 2014a).

One-third (32%) of Indigenous men and more than one-quarter (27%) of Indigenous women were overweight but not obese, while 36% of Indigenous men, and 43% of Indigenous women were obese ”

Prevalence among Indigenous adults see section 3 below

Read over 30 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Obesity articles

afile-5

Download AIHW Report HERE

aihw-phe-216.pdf

 ” Australian food ministers expect parents to make healthier choices for their families, but take no action on giving them the tools to know how much added sugar is in food. Shameful, given AIHW stats showing obesity has doubled in 2-5 year olds in the last 20 years.

 Health Ministers acknowledge that added sugar labelling is an issue but delay taking any action. Added sugar labelling has been delayed since 2011, this is very disappointing.”

Communique : The Australia and New Zealand Ministerial Forum on Food Regulation (the Forum) met in Melbourne Friday 24 Nov . The Forum is chaired by the Australian Government Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie 

Download full Communique Forum Communique 24 November 2017

Sugar Labelling

In April 2017, the Forum Ministers agreed a work program on sugar that included:

  • ̵further evidence gathering activities by Food Standards Australia New Zealand on consumer understanding and behaviour;
  • ̵international approaches to sugar labelling; and
  • ̵an update of the policy context.

Noting the desire of Forum Ministers to take a whole-of-diet, holistic approach to food labelling, Forum Ministers considered that information about sugar provided on food labels does not provide adequate contextual information to enable consumers to make informed choices in support of dietary guidelines. Forum Ministers agreed to continue examining regulatory and non-regulatory options to address this issue.

Forum Ministers also noted the range of existing complementary initiatives outside of the food regulation system that address sugar intakes, such as the current review of the Health Star Rating system, policy work underway on the labelling of fats and oils, and the work of the Healthy Food Partnership.

Jane Martin Obesity Coalition updating our NACCHO Post from last week

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #sugar and #Sugardemic : Todays meeting of Health Ministers is a real chance to improve #HealthStarRatings for our Mob

Part 1 Executive summary

Overweight and obesity is a major public health issue in Australia. It results from a sustained energy imbalance—when energy intake from eating and drinking is greater than energy expended through physical activity.

This energy imbalance might be influenced by a person’s biological and genetic characteristics, and by lifestyle factors.

This report brings together a variety of information to create a picture of overweight and obesity in Australia.

It summarises factors that influence people’s energy intake and expenditure and contribute to the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity, as well as some approaches aiming to reduce its prevalence.

It presents the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children, adolescents, and adults, and includes trends over time, differences among population groups, and the health and economic impact of overweight and obesity.

One-quarter of children and adolescents are overweight or obese

In 2014–15, 1 in 5 (20%) children aged 2–4 were overweight or obese—11% were overweight but not obese, and 9% were obese.

About 1 in 4 (27%) children and adolescents aged 5–17 were overweight or obese—20% were overweight but not obese, and 7% were obese.

For both children aged 2–4 and 5–17 years, similar proportions of girls and boys were obese. For children aged 5–17, the prevalence of overweight and obesity rose from 21% in 1995 to 25% in 2007–08, then remained relatively stable to 2014–15.

Nearly two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese, and obesity is on the rise

In 2014–15, nearly two-thirds (63%) of Australian adults were overweight or obese. The prevalence of overweight and obesity has steadily increased, up from 57% in 1995—which has largely been driven by a rise in obesity.

The prevalence of severe obesity among Australian adults has almost doubled over this period, from 5% in 1995 to 9% in 2014–15.

In 2014–15, 71% of men were overweight or obese, compared with 56% of women. A greater proportion of men (42%) than women (29%) were overweight but not obese, while a similar proportion of men (28%) and women (27%) were obese.

More men than women were overweight or obese in 2014–15; a similar proportion were obese overweight or obese overweight but not obese

For children aged 5–17, the prevalence of overweight and obesity rose from 1995 to 2007–08 and remained relatively stable to 2014–15

Some groups are more likely to be overweight or obese than others

Compared with non-Indigenous Australians, Indigenous adults are more likely to be overweight or obese, and Indigenous children and adolescents are more likely to be obese.

Those who live outside of Major cities, or who are in the lower socioeconomic groups are more likely to be overweight or obese than others.

Overweight and obesity has high health and financial costs

Among adults, overweight and obesity has adverse health and economic impacts, including a higher risk of developing many chronic conditions, and of death (due to any cause).

Overweight and obesity was responsible for 7% of the total health burden in Australia in 2011, 63% of which was fatal burden. In 2011–12, obesity was estimated to have cost the Australian economy $8.6 billion.

Small changes, big health gains

If all Australians at risk of disease due to overweight or obesity reduced their body mass index by just 1 kilogram per metre squared, or about 3 kilograms for a person of average height, the overall health impact of excess weight would drop substantially.

Maintaining any weight loss is critical for long-term health gains.

Indigenous Australians and those living outside Major cities or who are in lower socioeconomic groups are more likely to be overweight or obese

Approaches for reducing overweight and obesity

Population health approaches to address overweight and obesity provide an opportunity for widespread benefit. They include laws and regulations, tax and price interventions, community-based interventions—including those in schools and workplaces—and public education through platforms such as social marketing campaigns.

Individual-level approaches are also important, and may either be preventive, or incorporate treatment strategies such as weight loss surgery.

Part 2 Prevalence among Indigenous children and adolescents

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and adolescents are more likely to be overweight or obese than non-Indigenous children and adolescents.

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In 2012–13, 30% of Indigenous children and adolescents aged 2–14 were overweight or obese, compared with 25% of their non-Indigenous counterparts. One in 10 (10%) Indigenous children and adolescents aged 2–14 were obese, compared with 7% of their non-Indigenous counterparts (ABS 2014a).

At age 15–17, 35% of Indigenous adolescents were overweight or obese, compared with 24% of non-Indigenous adolescents of the same age, and 14% of Indigenous adolescents were obese, double the proportion (7%) of non-Indigenous adolescents.

Indigenous boys and girls were most likely to be overweight but not obese at age 10–14 (26% for boys, and 25% for girls) (Figure 3.4), and they were most likely to be obese at age 15–17 for boys (17%), and 5–9 for girls (13%).

Part 3 Prevalence among Indigenous adults

In 2012–13, more than two-thirds (69%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults were overweight or obese (29% overweight but not obese, and 40% obese). Indigenous men (69%) and women (70%) had similar rates of overweight and obesity (ABS 2014a).

file3-1

One-third (32%) of Indigenous men and more than one-quarter (27%) of Indigenous women were overweight but not obese, while 36% of Indigenous men, and 43% of Indigenous women were obese.

Indigenous men were most likely to be overweight but not obese at age 45–54 (38%), and to be obese at 55 and over (47%). Indigenous women were most likely to be overweight but not obese at 55 and over (32%), and were more likely to be obese, rather than overweight but not obese, at all ages. This was most noticeable in women aged 45–54, who were more than twice as likely to be obese (51%) than overweight but not obese (25%) (Figure 4.7).

In 2012–13, after adjusting for differences in age structure, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults were 1.2 times as likely to be overweight or obese as non-Indigenous adults, and 1.6 times as likely to be obese (ABS 2014a).

Part 4 Prevalence by Primary Health Network area

There are 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas across Australia, and reporting at these smaller, local areas can provide results that could be masked in national-or state/territory-level results.

PHNs commission and connect health services within PHN area boundaries, which are defined by the Department of Health (Department of Health 2016). The information in this section relates to the population living within the area covered by a particular PHN.

In 2014–15, of measured PHN areas, the Country South Australia PHN area had the highest prevalence of overweight and obesity, at almost three-quarters of adults (73%) (Figure 4.8). The Northern Sydneyfile-5

PHN area had the lowest prevalence, with just over half of adults being overweight or obese (53%). Four PHN areas had proportions of overweight and obese adults of 70% or more—Country South Australia, Western New South Wales, Darling Downs and West Moreton (Queensland), and Western Victoria.

The prevalence of overweight and obesity among adults varied between metropolitan and regional PHN areas. In 2014–15, regional PHN areas had higher proportions of adults who were overweight and obese (69%) than metropolitan PHN areas (61%).

There was no significant difference between the proportion of overweight but not obese adults in metropolitan (36%) and regional (34%) PHN areas. But the difference was significant for obesity alone—more than one-third (35%) of adults in regional PHN areas were obese, compared with about one-quarter (24%) in metropolitan PHN areas (AIHW 2016e).

Structure of this report

  • Chapter 2 describes the factors that influence overweight and obesity in Australia, including food and nutrition, physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and the ‘obesogenic environment’.
  • Chapters 3 and 4 present the most recent Australian data on prevalence and trends in overweight and obesity, including breakdowns by remoteness area, socioeconomic group, and Indigenous status, as well as international comparisons of obesity prevalence, and data on overweight and obesity for Australian mothers during pregnancy.
  • Chapter 5 presents data on the health impacts of overweight and obesity in Australia, including chronic conditions, death, and the burden of disease associated with overweight and obesity, as well some of the direct and indirect economic impacts.
  • Chapter 6 describes approaches that have been implemented in Australia to target overweight and obesity at the individual level, such as weight loss surgery, and population level, including laws and regulations, tax and price interventions, community-based interventions, and health promotion measures.
  • Supplementary data tables for the data presented in figures throughout this report are available on the AIHW website at: <https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/overweight-obesity/ a-picture-of-overweight-and-obesity-in-australia/data>.

Table of contents

1 Introduction

  • Defining overweight and obesity
  • Measuring overweight and obesity in children
  • Structure of this report

 

2 Factors leading to overweight and obesity

◦Food and nutrition

◦Physical activity

◦The obesogenic environment ◾Schools

◾Workplace

◾Home and neighbourhood

◾Media influence

◾Increase in convenience foods and portion sizes

3 Overweight and obesity among children and adolescents

◦Prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents

◦Trends in prevalence

◦Prevalence by birth cohort

◦Prevalence by remoteness area

◦Prevalence by socioeconomic group

◦Prevalence among Indigenous children and adults

4 Overweight and obesity among adults

◦Prevalence of overweight and obesity in adults

◦Body mass index

◦Waist circumference

◦Trends in prevalence

◦Prevalence by birth cohort

◦Prevalence by remoteness area

◦Prevalence by socioeconomic group

◦Prevalence among Indigenous adults

◦Prevalence by Primary Health Network area

◦International comparisons

◦Maternal overweight and obesity

5 Impact of overweight and obesity

◦Health impacts

◾Chronic conditions

◾Mortality

◾Burden of disease

◦Economic impacts

6 Approaches for reducing overweight and obesity

◦Laws and regulations

◦Tax and price interventions

◦Community-based interventions

◦Health promotion

◦Weight loss surgery

  • Appendix A: Classification of overweight and obesity for children and adolescents
  • Appendix B: Defining socioeconomic groups
  • Appendix C: Measuring overweight and obesity
  • rates at Primary Health Network area level
  • Appendix D: State and territory policy actions and infrastructure support actions
  • Glossary
  • References
  • List of tables
  • List of figures
  • List of boxes
  • Related publications

Obesity

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WhiteRibbonDay : @HealingOurWay @WhiteRibbonAust Report calls for overhaul of #violenceprevention programs for #Indigenous men and boys

 

 

Awr

 Australia needs to overhaul violence prevention programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and boys .

  A discussion paper released today by White Ribbon and the Healing Foundation said, “inappropriate and ill-targeted strategies” are not working to change the behaviour of violent Indigenous men.

Co-author Dr Mark Wenitong, a respected Aboriginal GP and men’s health expert from North Queensland, said generational trauma was not being addressed.”

Report

Download the Report Here

HF_Violence_Prevention_Framework_Report_Oct2017_V9_WEB 

“I think if you look at the current discourse in Australia it’s just heavier prison sentences and better policing,” he said.

“We can build lots more women’s shelters, but that’s not the point, we want it to stop.

Dr Wenitong, who works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in prison, said programs in jails did not appear to be effective.

“The prison offender programs are mostly mainstream programs … I talk to men in prison who go ‘that anger management program doesn’t mean anything when I go back to my community’,” he said.

The report said an urgent priority was “elevating the voice of men in family violence prevention”.

“Men do need to lead this, because it’s men who are the main perpetrators of violence,” Healing Foundation chief executive Richard Weston said.

The paper recommend that Indigenous men and women have a greater say over new behaviour-change programs — including consulting with reformed perpetrators of domestic violence.

“We have high levels of violence, we have high levels of substance abuse, we have a whole range of challenging social issues in our community,” Mr Weston said.

“Mainstream programs are failing us because we’re not involved in the design.”

Dr Wenitong said Indigenous mothers and children were often left in unsafe situations.

“When there’s violence in a community — in a household — why do we take the women and children out of the house for their safety, why aren’t we taking the men out?”

The paper said there had been “little opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to influence the policies and programs designed to improve safety for them and their children”.

“Arguably, the voice and perspective of men is absent, and sometimes excluded in this domain,” Dr Wenitong said.

Aside from family breakdown, alcohol and drug abuse was the most significant factor associated with family violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, the report said.

An effective framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and boys to prevent and reduce family violence needs to include the following critical elements:

  • violence should be understood within a historical context, recognising the effects of foundational and structural violence, and the wide ranging continued impacts on the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and boys
  • the many strong Aboriginal and Torres Islander men must be supported to lead work with men and boys, and reconnect men to their core cultural practices and protocols as a central factor to creating change
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women should be involved in the design and development, and evaluation of the effectiveness of the framework
  • prevention strategies must be positioned within broader community strategies that address intergenerational trauma through individual, family and community healing approaches – drawing from both local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and western therapeutic practice
  • all work should be developed in partnership with communities through a genuine co-design process that respects and supports local cultural governance and self-determination, and empowers communities to drive change
  • a focus on collective wellbeing should be supported through referral pathways to trauma-informed holistic health and wellbeing services. Crucially, any strategy must be adequately resourced; implemented in a safe

A taskforce led by the Victorian Aboriginal Children’s Commissioner in 2016 found that in nine-out-of-ten cases, family violence had been present in the home when an Indigenous child was removed.

Mr Weston said the discussion paper also refuted claims by some Aboriginal men that violence against women and children had “a cultural basis”.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #sugar and #Sugardemic : Todays meeting of Health Ministers is a real chance to improve #HealthStarRatings for our mob

Sugar

 ” Right now, there’s a Sugardemic threatening the health of our kids, with skyrocketing rates of obesity threatening to make this generation the first one to live shorter, less healthy lives than their parents.

But the food industry tries to bamboozle us with dozens of different names for sugar.  Busy shoppers can’t tell at a glance how much added sugar is in their food. It’s time for clear labeling of added sugar.

Health ministers from around the country will meet today November 24. This is our chance to get real change.

For once, it would be nice for the Health Ministers to make a decision that favours public health rather than the food manufacturers. “

See Choice Campaign

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” The consumption of sugar is much higher in Indigenous populations. In fact, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consume 15 grams (almost 4 teaspoons) more free sugars on average than non-Indigenous people.

Beverages is the most common source of free sugar for both populations. Two thirds of all the free sugars consumed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people came from beverages, mostly in the form of soft drinks, sports and energy drinks. “

See over 30 NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Nutrition # sugartax articles

 

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 ” The Sugary Drinks Proper No Good – Drink More Water Youfla campaign is a social marketing campaign developed with and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cape York. It aims to help children, young people and adults be more aware of the poor health outcomes associated with consumption of sugary drinks, as recommended by community members during initial consultations for this project.

Regular consumption of sugary drinks is a key contributing factor in development of tooth decay, overweight and obesity, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease for both young people and adults. 1-4

One of the key messages of this campaign is water is the best drink for everyone – it doesn’t have any sugar and keeps our bodies healthy.

The Sugary Drinks Proper No Good – Drink More Water Youfla campaign materials are designed to encourage Cape York community members to rethink drink choices and choose water or healthier options instead of sugary drinks like soft drinks, fruit drinks and sports drinks. This will help keep kids, families and communities healthy and strong. Campaign materials feature former professional rugby league player, Scott Prince, promoting the Sugary Drinks Proper No Good – Drink More Water Youfla messages.

This Cape York campaign is linked to the national Rethink Sugary Drink campaign through Apunipima’s membership of the Rethink Sugary Drinks Alliance. The Alliance aims to raise awareness of the amount of sugar in sugar-sweetened drinks and encourages all Australians to reduce their consumption.

untitledThe  ” PHAA is inviting members and other interested parties to a Forum on improving the Health Star Rating (HSR) on Monday 27 November 2017 at Mercure Canberra.

Most importantly, the overall goal will be to consider ways that the HSR can be used to improve diets in Australia and New Zealand.

More Info Here as

In Australia, food labels will only tell you the total sugar in a product, not the added stuff. And you can’t rely on the ingredient list because there are over 43 different names for added sugar.

It’s essential that people can easily tell the difference between foods with naturally occurring sugars, like lactose in yoghurt, and added sugars which have virtually no nutritional benefits. Currently this is virtually impossible.

The World Health Organisation and our Dietary Guidelines recommend we reduce our added sugar intake on the basis that overconsumption of added sugars presents serious health issues.

A CHOICE investigation found that added sugar labelling could help consumers avoid 26 teaspoons of unnecessary sugar per day – that’s up to 38 kilograms a year!

At their most recent meeting, Food Ministers renewed their commitment to improve the health of Australians. They want to help people make healthy food choices. Sugar labelling is a necessary step to achieving this.

Asugar 

 ” Aboriginal , Consumer and Public Health organisations are calling on Health Ministers to make a decision at their meeting today November 24, to ensure that food companies are required to clearly label added sugar on their products.”

Matthew Hopcraft is a clinical associate professor, dental public health expert, co-founder of SugarFree Smiles and the CEO of the Australian Dental Association (Victorian Branch). 

So far, more than 20,000 people have contacted their State or Territory Health Minister calling on them to support added sugar labelling (data collected by Choice).

This is a critical issue. The average Australian teenager consumes up to 22 teaspoons of added sugar per day, and one in 10 teenagers has a staggering 38 teaspoons of sugar daily. No wonder diet-related diseases are so prevalent. One third of Australian children have tooth decay by the age of six, rising to 40 percent by the age of 12-14 years, and one in four children are overweight or obese.

The problem for consumers is that there is no way for them to know how much added sugar is in the foods that they buy. The ingredient list on the packet seems like a good place to start — the higher up the list, the more sugar it is likely to contain. But added sugar can be disguised on the label under more than 40 different names, making it hard for the consumer to decipher.

We probably all know that sugar, sucrose and glucose are sugars. But do we really know or think of honey, fruit juice concentrate, agave nectar, panela, maltose or rice syrup as added sugars? Furthermore, the nutrition panel doesn’t distinguish added sugars from those sugars that are naturally occurring in food, such as fructose in fruit or lactose in milk.

It is this added sugar, over and above the naturally occurring sugar, that is causing these health problems. This was clearly identified by the World Health Organisation in their report on added sugars in 2015. They showed good evidence that reducing the amount of added sugar to less than 12 teaspoons per day reduces the risk of obesity and tooth decay, and a further reduction to less than six teaspoons per day would provide additional health benefits.

At present it is almost impossible for consumers to know whether they are exceeding these limits, because there is not sufficient information on the food labels to guide them.

Eating whole real foods is the simplest way to avoid added sugar, but the reality is that people are consuming more processed food than ever before.

Right now, the food industry is winning this debate because they don’t have to declare the amount of added sugar in their products, so Australian consumers are unable to make healthy choices for their families.

Naturally, industry will argue strongly against this proposed regulation, in the same way that they also oppose a sugar tax and regulations on advertising and marketing — all measures that would improve health outcomes.

For once, it would be nice for the Health Ministers to make a decision that favours public health rather than the food manufacturers.

Sugar

 

 

Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS

info@swams.com.auOct 25

1. National NACCHO CEO Pat Turner and @AMSANTaus @CAACongress respond #NTRC #DonDale Royal Commission demands sweeping change – But how can we make it happen

2.1 QLD : Deadly Choices : A re-elected Labor Government will provide $16 million for expansion of the Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program statewide

3.1 NSW Leonie Morcome celebrates 30 years at Biripi Aboriginal Medical Centre

3.2 Bulgar Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Service supports Camp ‘on country’ for men and boys

4.SA Nganampa Health Service desert war waged against deadly disease outbreak

5. ACT : ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK 2017 REPORT (ACT)

6. NT : ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK 2017 REPORT (NT)

7. VIC Message from VAHS CEO ” Congratulations one of our VAHS members Lidia Thorpe first Aboriginal Woman to be elected to a seat in the Victorian Parliament

8.Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Ida West Aboriginal Health Scholarship

9.WA : SWAMS celebrates two decades of Aboriginal health care

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National NACCHO CEO Pat Turner and @AMSANTaus @CAACongress respond #NTRC #DonDale Royal Commission demands sweeping change – But how can we make it happen

 

Read all press releases here

2.1 QLD : Deadly Choices : A re-elected Labor Government will provide $16 million for expansion of the Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program state wide

A re-elected Labor Government will provide $1.7 million to fund the expansion of the popular Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program for Indigenous communities in north west Queensland, Labor candidate for Traeger Danielle Slade announced.

The funding is part of a $16 million expansion of the Deadly Choices program statewide announced by Health Minister Cameron Dick.

Ms Slade said the Institute of Urban Indigenous Health would work with local Indigenous service providers across the State to roll out the successful preventive health and positive lifestyle choices program in Mount Isa and in Gulf communities.

“It is well known that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience poorer health outcomes than Queenslanders generally,” Ms Slade said.

“This is not acceptable. Encouragingly, however, things are starting to improve.

“Closing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Queenslanders across a range of performance areas has been a focus of the Palaszczuk’s Government’s efforts over the last three years.

“This is why the government has been to strengthen Indigenous health services and programs throughout the state.

“The Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program continues to be a powerful vehicle for positive change in Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“It is kicking goals when it comes to improving health knowledge, attitudes and lifestyle behaviours in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

Ms Slade said that since the start of the program in 2012–13, there had been a significant increase in the number of health checks undertaken by Indigenous Queenslanders.

“Deadly Choices focuses on increasing levels of physical activity, reducing smoking, better nutrition and regular health checks,” she said.

“The support of the Brisbane Broncos and prominent Indigenous ambassadors and sporting identities has proven to be a winning formula for the program.

“Research confirms that screening at Deadly Choices community days results in community members being twice as likely as other Indigenous people to engage with their local health service for a full health check.”

Ms Slade said the $1.7 million funding injection also provide employment opportunities for eight Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as program facilitators, personal trainers, data managers and multi-media officers.

“By working with Indigenous communities and service providers and programs such as Deadly Choices, we are gradually making headway in closing the gap of disadvantage in Indigenous communities.

“This is made possible by delivering better outcomes in health, life expectancy, education, employment and economic participation,” she said.

Mr Dick said as was the case for all Queenslanders, much of the chronic disease burden in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities was avoidable, and could be prevented through adopting healthy lifestyles and identifying health risks earlier.

The Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program will help Indigenous people have regular health assessments, learn about healthy lifestyles and make healthier choices. It will include activities such as:

  • community days and sporting events featuring rock climbing, jumping castle, Zumba, traditional Indigenous games, arts and crafts, sprint races, traditional food, physical activities for Elders, and Good Quick Tukka food choices.
  • tackling Indigenous smoking
  • sporting events including Murri Rugby League Carnival
  • Deadly Choices leadership camp
  • school education program – focusing on leadership and mentoring, chronic disease awareness, tobacco, nutrition, physical activity, harmful substances, healthy relationships and awareness of and access to health services.

The Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program also complements the Palaszczuk Government’s diabetes and chronic disease prevention focus of the My Health for Life program, which aims to reach 1600 Indigenous people across Queensland over four years.

CEO of the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Adrian Carson welcomed the new funding, saying it would bring life-saving and life-changing benefits for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders.

“More and more of our community are participating in Deadly Choicescommunity days and sporting events,” Mr Carson said.

“We know that people participating in Deadly Choices events are twice as likely as other Indigenous Queenslanders to engage with their local health clinic.

“This means more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are being exposed to health assessments and follow-up health care.

“We are encouraged by this recognition that health promotion and early identification of illness are vital to closing the health gap and welcome the Government’s commitment to supporting our preventive health efforts,” Mr Carson said.

“The size and scope of this initiative also means the creation of quite a number of jobs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through their involvement in delivering the Deadly Choices preventive health and health promotion program.”

CEO of Gidgee Healing in Mount Isa Dallas Leon said the Deadly Choicesprogram equipped young people with the knowledge to not only adopt healthy lifestyles themselves, but also to become healthy role models for family, friends and the broader community.

“This has proved to be by far the most effective way of influencing behaviour change,” Mr Leon said.

Mr Dick said a re-elected Labor Government would also provide $500,000 for expansion of multimedia, community engagement and education programs to promote the sexual health of Indigenous Queenslanders.

This would be be done through incorporating sexual and reproductive health promotion and screening for sexually transmissible infections into community events, school-based education activities and health checks.

Further, a Labor Government would provide a one-off $75,000 grant to the Queensland AIDS Council to work with Deadly Choices and the Queensland Injectors Gealth Network to develop strategies to reach LGBTIQ Indigenous people and injecting drug users.

3.1 NSW Leonie Morcome celebrates 30 years at Biripi Aboriginal Medical Centre.

“It’s a milestone I’ve reached in my life as I continue to strive to work in Aboriginal health which I take as a passion in my work and my community.”

These are the words of Leonie Morcome who has celebrated 30 years of work with the Biripi Aboriginal Medical Centre.

Leonie started in 1987 after being urged to become a trainee health worker.

“The following Monday I came into work and I haven’t looked back,” she said.

She later attended university to receive her first qualification in Aboriginal health before becoming a public health worker in 1991.

A stint in senior health work followed before becoming a cultural security and safety co-ordinator and a family health worker (working with domestic violence and sexual assault cases).

“We make sure we continue their journey with them along the way to get a better outcome for what they need,” she said.

Leonie said she has seen many changes in Aboriginal health over her career and inspires her cultural awareness students to do the same.

When she started in the profession, Leonie saw drug, alcohol, diabetes and AIDS as major health factor to Aboriginal people. Today, it’s health, nutrition, cancer and diabetes as leading health issues. Leonie added that she takes a “holistic approach” when discussing Aboriginal health.

“It’s not just the major health problems we face, it’s the deal with the social well-being of it all and holistically we look at other areas to do with housing, education and mental health,” she said.

Having worked in an assistant management role, Leonie said would like to be in a mentor/manager position in the future and act as a role model for the Biripi people.

She encouraged young people to take up a career as a health worker.

“I want them to strive to reach goals and be dedicated,” she said.

“They’re going to be our next generations and will be leading the way as we get older.”

She also encouraged health workers and nurses to continue to work together.

“We all work together side-by-side and we come across the same pathway but we walk down that pathway together,” she said

2.2 Bulgar Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Service supports Camp ‘on country’ for men and boys

INSPIRING VISIT: Michael Laurie and former NRL player Nathan Hindmarsh with two of the camp participants

GROUP of Aboriginal boys and young men recently got the chance to experience their Aboriginal culture “on country” at a camp at Woody Head in the heart of Yaegl country.The five-day camp featured a combination of cultural learning, sports, fishing, fun, fresh air, and good advice for the future.

Male elders (fathers, uncles, grandfathers and other prominent community members) provided cultural guidance to the 12 boys aged between eight and 16 years old. The older men told stories of growing up and of their life experiences.

HAPPY CAMPERS: Enjoying the five-day cultural camp at Woody Head.

The camp was held by Waanyji Yaegl Aboriginal Men’s Corporation, with the assistance of local businesses and community organisations, including CRANES, Social Futures, Bulgar Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Service, Birrigan Gargle Local Aboriginal Land Council, Yaegl Local Aboriginal Land Council, Maclean RSL Club, Maclean Bowling Club, Gurehlgam Corp, and Bi-Rite.

John Skinner, director of Waanyji Yaegl and a Police Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer at Grafton, said the camp taught the boys respect for themselves and for others. There was a focus on making smarter lifestyle choices which would help young people succeed in life. The older participants also learnt responsibility, as they were given the task of looking out for the younger boys.

The young people were introduced to various service providers, including Solid Mob, who run a quit smoking program, Bulgar Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Service, Aboriginal Community Health, Warruwi ,who advocate for responsible gambling, and Police Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers.

A guest appearance by former Parramatta Eels and Australian Kangaroos player Nathan Hindmarsh proved an inspiration. Nathan started by outlining his glory days as a champion rugby league player. He then described his descent into a nightmarish existence as his gambling addiction took control, and how he managed to take charge of his life once again.

This was the first camp that Waanyji Yaegl has held, and both organisers and participants considered it to be a great success. The organisers are keen to hold further camps next year.

The young participants were so energised by the camp that they later indicated they too, wished to set up their own group. This idea is wholeheartedly supported by the older Yaegl males.

Waanyji Yaegl was established in July 2016 to help meet the needs of Aboriginal men in the Lower Clarence area. They meet regularly in Maclean with chairman and Yaegl elder Lester Mercy organising the get-togethers.

Waanyji Yaegl is holding a community barbecue at Hillcrest Hall, Hillcrest Aboriginal Reserve, Maclean on Friday, November 24 from 9.30am-noon. Everyone is welcome to attend. The barbecue will give the public the opportunity to learn more about the great work the men are undertaking and their plans for the future.

4.SA Nganampa Health Service desert war waged against deadly disease outbreak

SA

An outbreak of a potentially deadly strain of meningococcal bacterial infection in remote South Australian Indigenous communities has been countered by an extraordinary vaccination program that covered almost 2500 people across 100,000sq km in just over a month.

Four cases of the W strain have been diagnosed in the vast Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands this year in an outbreak that has also hit communities in the southern Northern territory where health authorities have also been working against time and distance to protect vulnerable residents – especially children. At least three of the people diagnosed are aged under 12.

In the APY Lands, which cover much of far north South Australia , the Nganampa Health Service staffed by indigenous health workers used its own detailed population register to reach 2483 people in October and early November.

About 3000 people live on the lands and the program’s reach has included more than 600 transient people outside communities.

Two of the diagnosed cases were in Amata and there was one each in Fregon and Pukatja (formely Ernabella).

The most recent diagnosis was confirmed in early October and none has been found since.

Nganampa medical director Professor Paul Torzillo told the Advertiser that the local health organisation’s database was key to the building of an immunisation barrier against the disease.

“We have consistently achieved childhood immunisation rates which are higher than those of non-aboriginal children in SA and in fact across the country, “Prof Torzillo said.

The APT campaign initially focused on people aged 1 to 19, and was then extended to all people aged over two months. By early this month 84 per cent of the first target group were vaccinated as well as 76 per cent of all people.

North of the border, NT authorities have been immunising against the A,C, Y and W strains in remote communities.

Federal health authorities are considering a national immunisation program that covers these four strains, Free vaccination against the C Strain is already available for children aged 12 months.

Symptoms can include fever, headache, neck stiffness and aversion to bright lights joint pain and a rash. Babies may refuse food and drink.

5. ACT : ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK 2017 REPORT (ACT)

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The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has released a new reports today: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Australian Capital Territory.

See: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/indigenous-health-welfare/health-performance-framework-2017-act/contents/table-of-contents

 

6. NT : ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK 2017 REPORT (NT)

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has released a new report today: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Northern Territory. See: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/indigenous-health-welfare/health-performance-framework-2017-nt/contents/table-of-contents

7. VIC Message from VAHS CEO ” Congratulations one of our VAHS members Lidia Thorpe first Aboriginal Woman to be elected to a seat in the Victorian Parliament

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Dear Community

VAHS wishes to congratulate one of our VAHS members Lidia Thorpe following her election win on Saturday for the seat of Northcote.

As is reported in the news VAHS understands Lidia is the first Aboriginal Woman to be elected to a seat in the Victorian Parliament. It has come as no surprise.

As a descendent of a proud family, VAHS knows her mother and grandmother will be beaming with pride at what she has achieved.

VAHS knows Lidia will have the Aboriginal Community at heart. The Green’s Party has chosen wisely to endorse and support Lidia. Along with the Leader of the Greens at the National level (the Hon Richard Di Natale, a former Doctor of VAHS in the mid-2000’s) who no doubt backed her, Lidia will find her journey into politics at a local and state level challenging. However, she is a quick learner and will no doubt have the advice from her close followers and family and through that, she will prove to be a force.

I am sure that the Aboriginal Community and other people from across the State of Victoria will gain some and maybe many benefits from her time in the Victorian parliament.

As our National NAIDOC theme for 2018 says, “Because of her – we can”, VAHS recognises that our people have survived because some very strong women have supported us in our lives; I know Lidia’s family are proven in that respect and I am sure Lidia will follow in their footsteps.

VAHS wishes her well and are confident that she will be a great asset to the Greens party and the Victorian parliament.

Mick Graham
VAHS Chief Executive Officer

So please come and celebrate this momentous occasion with MP Lidia Thorpe, following her election win on Saturday for the seat of Northcote!

When: This THURSDAY 23 November
Time: 6pm-7:15pm
Where: VAHS Preston (238-250 Plenty Rd, Preston

8.Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Ida West Aboriginal Health Scholarship

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9.WA : SWAMS celebrates two decades of Aboriginal health care

SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival Flyer A4

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) is celebrating its milestone 20th birthday with a week-long festival of events being held across the South West from 16-22 December 2017.

SWAMS, an Aboriginal Community Controlled organisation, plays a pivotal role in improving the quality of life for Aboriginal people in the South West, through the delivery of culturally focused primary health care.

“Twenty years ago, no such service existed. Aboriginal people were dying from preventable disease, diabetes was rife, and a lack of cultural awareness in tertiary medicine made it difficult for Aboriginal people to get the specialist care needed,” SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said.

“All that has changed now. We are a thriving organisation with highly trained staff working across six clinics to improve the quality and quantity of life for thousands of Aboriginal people under our care,” Ms Nelson said.

“This isn’t just a celebration for SWAMS. This is a celebration for an entire community and for those community members who had a vision for better Aboriginal health care back in 1997.”

“We still have a long way to go, but I think it’s safe to say that they would be proud of the organisation SWAMS has become and the difference we make to the community.”

The celebrations will take place in Bunbury, Busselton, Manjimup, Collie and Harvey and will include a series of free family picnics in each town, featuring a BBQ lunch, birthday cake and entertainment.

The highlight of the festival programme is a ticketed 20th Anniversary Gala Evening at the Bunbury Regional Entertainment Centre, with live entertainment by The Merindas and comedian Kevin Kropinyeri.

Gala tickets can be purchased from http://www.trybooking.com/329821 or from the SWAMS administration building located at 3/30 Wellington Street, Bunbury (cash only).

SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival events:

Please refer to the attached schedule.

For more information on the SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival, contact the office on (08) 9791 1166 or email info@swams.com.au.

Oct 25

NACCHO Press Release : Aboriginal Health and #NTRC Download : The NT Govt. must work with #ACCHO’s in true partnership on Royal Commission recommendations

NT RC

The extent of this over-representation of Aboriginal children and young people compared with all other children and young people compels a special Aboriginal led response.

The Northern Territory Government must now sit down with Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations to work in true partnership on the implementation of the recommendations.”

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHO) have the greatest coverage across the Territory and work with Aboriginal children, young people and families everyday on child protection and youth justice system prevention and early intervention support.”

NACCHO Chief Executive Officer Ms Pat Turner

Download the Report : The Report of the Royal Commission and Board of Inquiry into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory was tabled in Parliament on 17 November 2017.

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) calls on the Northern Territory and Australian Governments to work with Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations on the implementation of recommendations of the Royal Commission and Board of Inquiry into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory released today.

It is clear from the report that the current system of detention in the Northern Territory is failing our children and young people, leaving many more damaged than when they entered. The system of detention is punitive, harsh, and not in keeping with modern rehabilitative standards. We also know that the child protection system in the Northern Territory is letting down children and their families and is inextricably linked to youth justice issues.

Aboriginal children and young people living in the Northern Territory are overwhelmingly impacted with ninety four per cent of children and young people in detention being Aboriginal.

Ms Turner called on the Northern Territory Government to show national leadership in responding to the recommendations, “The Northern Territory Government has a unique opportunity to lead the rest of the nation in developing a children and family centered public health approach to youth justice and child protection, responsive to Aboriginal people needs.”

NACCHO acknowledges the young people and their families who shared their stories of trauma and survival and the Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations that supported them.

“I particularly want to acknowledge the work of Danilla Dilba, led by Ms Olga Haven, in providing evidence based submissions to the Northern Territory Government and the Royal Commission to inform their considerations,” said Ms Turner.

“Danilla Dilba has also provided immense support to families and young people to share their own stories and experiences throughout this time, as well as ongoing health and wellbeing services to Aboriginal people across the top end.”

It is now time for the Northern Territory Government to take full responsibility and lead a change by working with Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations on the implementation of the Royal Commission recommendations

Background briefs

Link to briefing documents:

 

Royal Commission and Board of Inquiry into protection and detention systems of the Northern Territory has revealed systemic and shocking failures

Fundamental reform is needed to end approaches that continue to fail children, families and the community

The closure of the current Don Dale Youth Detention Centre, a new Children’s Court, implementation of an early intervention family support program and a Commission for Children and Young People are key elements of a comprehensive reform program aimed at restoring the failed detention and child protection systems in the Northern Territory.

Increasing the age of criminal responsibility to 12, closing the High Security Unit at Don Dale, improving the youth justice system including the approach to bail, only allowing children under 14 to be detained for serious offences and new models of secure detention are also proposed.

The Royal Commission and Board of Inquiry has found shocking and systemic failures occurred over many years and were known and ignored at the highest levels.

Children and young people were subjected to regular, repeated and distressing mistreatment in detention and there was a failure to follow the procedures and requirements of the law in many instances.

The detention system failed to comply with basic binding human rights standards in the treatment of children and young people and the Commission has found that children were denied basic needs, such as water, and that isolation continues to be used punitively and inconsistently with the Youth Justice Act (NT).

The child protection system has failed to provide the support needed to some children in care to assist them to avoid pathways likely to lead into the youth justice system, and the Northern Territory Government has failed to comply with the statutory requirements that all children in out of home care have timely care plans.

“The Northern Territory and Commonwealth Governments were right to commission this Inquiry and what we have found vindicates their decision,” said Commissioner Margaret White AO and Commissioner Mick Gooda.

“These things happened on our watch, in our country, to our children.

“The time for tinkering around the edges and ignoring the conclusions of the myriad of inquiries that have already been conducted must come to an end.

“Only fundamental change and decisive action will break the seemingly inevitable cycle we have found of many children in care continuing to progress into the youth justice system and detention.

“Perpetuating a failed system that hardens young people, does not reduce reoffending and fails to rehabilitate young lives and set them on a new course, is a step backwards.

“The failures we have identified have cost children and families greatly, they have not made communities safer and they are shocking.”

In detention, the Commission has found that:

  •  youth detention centres were not fit for accommodating, let alone rehabilitating, children and young people
  •  children were subject to verbal abuse, physical control and humiliation, including being denied access to basic human needs such as water, food and the use of toilets
  •  children were dared or bribed to carry out degrading and humiliating acts, or to commit acts of violence on each other
  •  youth justice officers restrained children using force to their head and neck areas, ground stabilised children by throwing them forcefully onto the ground, and applied pressure or body weight to their ‘window of safety’, being their torso area, and
  •  isolation has continued to be used inappropriately, punitively and inconsistently with the Youth Justice Act (NT) which has caused suffering to many children and young people and, very likely in some cases, lasting psychological damage.

In child protection, the Commission has found that:

  •  the Northern Territory Government has failed to comply with the statutory requirements that all children in out of home care have timely care plans
  •  there is a major shortage of available foster and kinship care placements
  •  Territory Families and its predecessors failed to provide the support needed to some children in care to assist them to avoid pathways likely to lead into the youth justice system, and
  •  the Office of the Children’s Commissioner is under-resourced to perform its full range of statutory functions in relation to the care and protection of vulnerable children in the Northern Territory.

To address the failed child protection, youth justice and detention systems, the Royal Commission and Board of Inquiry have recommended wide ranging reforms including:

1. Closing the current Don Dale Youth Detention Centre and High Security Unit.

2. Raising the age of criminal responsibility to 12 and only allowing children under 14 years to be detained for serious crimes.

3. Developing a 10 year Generational Strategy for Families and Children to address child protection and prevention of harm to children.

4. Establishing a network of Family Support Centres to provide place-based services to families across the Northern Territory.

5. A paradigm shift in youth justice to increase diversion and therapeutic approaches.

6. Developing a new model of bail and secure detention accommodation.

7. Increasing engagement with and involvement of Aboriginal Organisations in child protection, youth justice and detention

“Our recommendations are based on best practice and the proven experience of other jurisdictions that have experienced the same problems. They have taken bold steps and delivered paradigm change that has improved outcomes for children, families and communities.

“We recognise some of what we are proposing marks a profound shift from past practice in the NT. But it is necessary as what has been relied upon to date has and continues to simply fail the entire community.

“Increasing the age of criminal responsibility to 12, making greater use of diversion, ending detention for children under 14 unless there are exceptional circumstances and changing the model of secure detention are the bold but essential actions that must be taken if communities are to be safer and children protected.

“If no action is taken the financial cost to the Northern Territory will remain unsustainable in the short term, with detention costs rising from $37.3 million in 2016-17 to $113.4 million in 2026-27, according to Deloitte Access Economics.

“Conversely, changing the current approach to youth justice and detention as we recommend is estimated conservatively to deliver savings of $335.5 million by 2027.

“Human costs dwarf financial considerations and if no action is taken these will continue to escalate beyond the already unacceptable levels that are seen in the Northern Territory.

“The tragic conclusion we have drawn is that not only have the systems failed to address challenges faced by children and young people, that have in some cases made the problems worse.

“We now hope that both governments commit to a new course for child protection and detention based on our recommendations and the evidence that supports them,” said Commissioner White and Commissioner Gooda.

1. Key Detention recommendations in summary

The Northern Territory Government close the current Don Dale Youth Detention Centre and within three months report on the program for that closure.

  • Immediately close the High Security Unit at the current Don Dale Youth Detention Centre.
  • Prohibit the use of tear gas, and continue to prohibit the use of spithoods and the restraint chair.
  • Prohibit force or restraint being used for the purposes of maintaining the ‘good order’ of a youth detention centre or to ‘discipline’ a detainee.
  • Prohibit isolation for the purposes of behaviour management or punishment, and that isolation be permitted only in certain circumstances, such as to protect the safety of another person or restore order but only after all reasonable behavioural or therapeutic options have been attempted.
  • Prohibit extendable periods in isolation beyond 24 hours.
  • Investigate alternatives to strip searches, such as body scanners, pat down searches or metal detectors.
  • Retain CCTV footage for at least 12 months.
  • Introduce video and sound recording, in the form of body-worn video cameras, in youth detention centres.
  • No child under the age of 14 years be ordered to serve detention unless they have been convicted of a serious and violent crime against a person, present a serious risk to the community, and the sentence is approved by the President of the proposed Children’s Court.
  • The powers of the Commission for Children and Young People to be expanded to allow free and unfettered access to detention facilities, children and young people in detention, people who work with them and documents and records in the possession of the department.
  • Ensure that an initial health risk assessment of any young person in detention take place within 24 hours of admission.
  • Implement monthly medical checks for those in secure detention and provide specialist drug and alcohol treatment to detainees after release if needed.
  • The Commonwealth enable the payment of Medicare benefits for medical services provided to children and young people in detention in the Northern Territory, and ensure that supply of pharmaceuticals to children and young people in detention in the Northern Territory is provided under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme
  • Design, develop and construct a new model of secure accommodation.
  • Ensure that the selection criteria for a youth justice officer include demonstrated experience working with vulnerable young people, that youth justice officers be required to obtain a Certificate IV in Youth Justice in the first 12 months of their employment, and they be required to participate in induction training before commencing work in youth detention centres.
  • Develop an integrated, evidence-based throughcare service to deliver adequate planning for release of young people from detention.
  • Appoint a female youth justice officer in each youth detention centre as a ‘Girl’s Officer’, who is responsible for monitoring female detainees’ access to education, training, recreation, health and facilities.
  • Ensure that staff members working in education in youth detention are appropriately qualified to conduct special education.
  • Tutors proficient in major Aboriginal languages deliver at least once a week a literacy program in Aboriginal language.
  • Transfers over long distances to or between detention centres should be conducted by air transport. If transfers occur by road, sufficient breaks (including toilet breaks) should be given and drinking water must always be available to the detainee.
  • Only transfer detainees to an adult facility with the approval of a Judge.

2: Key Child Protection recommendations in summary

The Northern Territory Government:

o commit to a public health approach to child protection and the prevention of harm to children

o establish consultation procedures with the sector, organisations and communities

o carry out prevalence, needs, service mapping and service referral studies (the studies) to gather information about the needs of children, families and subpopulations, and what services are currently available to meet those needs

o create and maintain a Services Register containing information about the services available in communities

o establish an early support research unit, which would implement a research agenda relating to risk factors, service needs and evaluated outcomes, and

o develop and implement an outcomes and evaluation framework.

Develop a 10-year Generational Strategy for Children and Families.

Establish a network of no fewer than 20 Family Support Centres, their location to be based on information gathered in the studies and specified in the Generational Strategy for Children and Families, to:

o provide services to and support families and children

o help families understand the child protection system

o act as Recognised Entities, and

o act as an entry point in a dual pathway model.

Amend legislation to enable organisations that are qualified and meet relevant criteria to participate and advise in child protection matters and be heard relation to a proceeding about a child.

Only use residential care as a therapeutic placement option for children with complex behavioural needs or disabilities, in accordance with therapeutic care criteria.

Phase out the current model of purchased home-based care over a 24 month period.

Develop a strategy to address the current backlog of overdue investigations.

Develop and implement a campaign in conjunction with Foster Carers Association NT, current carers and other relevant organisations to recognise the contribution of existing foster and kinship carers, draw attention to the current shortage of carers and encourage people in the Northern Territory, particularly in remote areas, to apply to become carers

Review the financial support provided to carers in the Northern Territory.

Work with Aboriginal organisations to implement a joint program dedicated to increasing the number of Aboriginal foster and kinship carers, using community awareness and individualised community engagement.

Ensure that quality respite care is available to foster and kinship carers.

Improve access for children and young people in out of home care to effective rehabilitation and counselling services including the prevention and treatment of substance abuse.

Ensure that all young people between aged 15 and 18 have leaving care plans in compliance with the relevant legislation.

Develop a new accommodation service model which meets the specific needs of young people leaving out of home care to live independently. The service should be responsible for finding and securing acceptable accommodation for all young people who have left care and be available to those young people until they are 25 years old.

Undertake further research in the Northern Territory to understand the characteristics and needs of children and young people who have been in both out of home care and detention.

Ensure that child protection caseworkers

o have regular face-to-face contact with any child in detention who is also under care and protection orders

o monitor the wellbeing of children in detention and ensure that their needs are being met, and

o be involved in transition planning for a child in detention from the time of their entry into detention, in consultation with detention staff, key stakeholders and the child.

Establish a Crossover Unit employing specialised case managers employing with training in supporting children in child protection and youth detention contexts, who are to provide flexible and dynamic support personalised to children in the crossover group who experience both out of home care and detention.

Establish a Commission for Children and Young People, with jurisdiction for all children and young people in the Northern Territory.

3. Key youth justice recommendations in summary

Raise the age of criminal responsibility from 10 to 12 years.

Within the police, establish a specialist, highly trained Youth Division similar to New Zealand Police Youth Aid.

Expand the role of Aboriginal Community Police Officer to include the position of Youth Diversion Officer.

Ensure all police officers involved in youth diversion or youth engagement be encouraged to hold or gain specialist qualifications in youth justice and receive ongoing professional development in youth justice.

Amend the law so that a child or young person must not be interviewed by police until they have sought and obtained legal advice and assistance, or after exercising their right to silence.

Amend legislation to remove the restriction on police consideration of diversion.

Ensure that all police cells are made suitable for detaining children.

Ensure that appropriate facilities are available in Alice Springs for girls or young women who need to be held on remand.

Introduce a custody notification scheme requiring police to notify a lawyer from an appropriate legal service as soon as a child or young person is brought into custody.

Amend the bail legislation so that a child or young person is not denied bail unless:

(a) charged with a serious offence and a sentence of detention is probable if convicted

(b) they present a serious risk to public safety

(c) there is a serious risk of the youth committing a serious offence while on bail, or

(d) they have previously failed to appear without a reasonable excuse.

Provide bail support services for children and young people in Darwin, Alice Springs, Tennant Creek, Katherine and Nhulunbuy, together with other such locations as are appropriate, which include the following features:

o accommodation services in small homelike residences, and

o bail support plans developed with a specialist youth worker, covering education, employment, recreation and sporting goals.

Establish a separate court venue in Alice Springs for proceedings under the Youth Justice Act (NT) and Care and Protection of Children Act (NT) as a matter of urgency.

Establish a Children’s Court, which is independent of the Local Court, to hear and determine matters currently within the jurisdiction of the Youth Justice Court and the Family Matters Division of the Local Court.

The new Children’s court will have a President appointed by the Executive Council and who has extra judicial powers and functions modelled on those conferred on the President of the Children’s Court in NSW.

Ensure that all legal practitioners appearing in a youth court be accredited as specialist youth justice lawyers after training in youth justice which includes child and adolescent development, trauma, adolescent mental health, cognitive and communication deficits and Aboriginal cultural competence.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : @LowitjaInstitut #Disability #NDIS Research opportunities Closes 27 November

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  ” The Lowitja Institute Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health CRC (Lowitja Institute CRC) is seeking applications for research projects under the theme of ‘Understanding disability through the lens of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – challenges and opportunities’.

The research questions identified for funding are part of the Institute’s Community Capability and Social Determinants of Health program, and build on its current work. The work includes the positive impacts of cultural determinants, gender, and relationships on the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (for further details see www.lowitja.org.au/research-programs).”

Please note that applications may only be submitted by Lowitja Institute CRC Participant Organisations. Applications close 27 November 2017

Regional and remote communities background added by NACCHO for discussion

 ” We argue that two schemes may emerge under the NDIS “one in urban areas with robust markets, and a second (lesser) scheme subsidised by government in rural and remote areas that continues to offer little choice.”

Attention should be focused on the way that the NDIS works in remote and regional areas, and how to ensure that government subsidised care (which may prevent people with disability from being forced to relocate) remains of good quality and continues to offer choice and control to people with disability in remote and regional areas, many of whom are Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander people.”

Eleanor Malbon and Gemma Carey write in The Mandarin see Part 2 Below:

Funding

 While other institutions may partner in the research team, if successful, the Research Activity Funding must be administered by a Participant Organisation (the Administering Institution).

The Lowitja Institute recently held a workshop comprising of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with lived experience of disability, as well as policymakers, disability organisations, researchers, and advocates.

Background and literature scan

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander disability was identified as a high priority at a meeting of the combined Lowitja Institute Program Committees in December 2016. This priority covers all research program areas of the Institute, aligning closely with the social determinants of health program, particularly in the realm of agency and control at all levels for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability are often further disadvantaged by experiences of systemic and ongoing racism and ableism. Current government policies, particularly the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), are driving significant change by re-defining interactions and relationships between services and clients. This climate adds to the uncertainty and complexity of an already challenging reality for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability.

Below is a summary of themes and issues that are particular to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people with a disability:

Five research questions were identified as key research priorities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with a disability. More information is available in the overview document below.

Question 1

How are disability services and supports delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability?

– What type of supports are available (formal or informal)?

– What is the composition of the workforce (Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander staff /non-Indigenous staff)?

– What is the value in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations delivering disability services? What lessons can be taken from these to mainstream services?

Question 2

What are the lessons that can be learned from past and/or current supports and services that have attempted to shape the lives of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people with a disability?

– What were their outcomes?

– What impact has this had on self-agency and individual control over one’s life?

Question 3

How do we support the agency and leadership of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability?

– What are past and current cases of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability that demonstrate agency and leadership?

– What external factors have shaped their contribution or roles?

– How can these stories be shared?

Question 4

What are the concepts of health and wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability?

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– What are their expectations, aspirations and definitions of success?

Question 5

How can Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ values and knowledges be optimised and inform a policy system for people with a disability?

Research aim

To understand how disability intersects with broader health and wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Objective

Understanding the enablers and barriers that exist for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability.

 

Please note that applications may only be submitted by Lowitja Institute CRC Participant Organisations.

While other institutions may partner in the research team, if successful, the Research Activity Funding must be administered by a Participant Organisation (the Administering Institution).

Apply

Resources

Part 2 Discussion Paper added by NACCHO Originally published The Mandarin and CROAKEY

Eleanor Malbon and Gemma Carey write:

The NDIS has the potential to secure gains in health and wellbeing for thousands of Australians living with disability, but this can only be achieved with careful attention to the inequities that arise in the scheme. The NDIS has been beset with implementation issues due to a rushed implementation that has been noted by the Productivity Commission, amongst others.

New research, supported by the NHMRC Centre for Excellence in Disability and Health, shows that the use of the NDIS market to enable choice and control for people in the NDIS is vulnerable to unequal distribution. As the NDIS is structured, choice and control is reliant on the ability for participants to have new and better service providers to choose from. However the rushed implementation means that the danger of ‘thin markets’ – areas with only one or two providers of a disability service – is acute.

The NDIS is not one market, but rather a set of markets in different geographic locations, meaning that the health of markets in regional and remote areas is not reliant on market performance in cities. Markets in remote and regional communities are most at risk of becoming thin markets:

“Thin markets are also susceptible to market failure, where no new providers enter the market place due to high costs of entry or lack of business prospects, and existing providers are challenged by being paid retrospectively for business, gaining the necessary breadth and depth of expertise and business costs running higher than the funds collected via individuals.” (Carey et al., 2017).

The Productivity Commission’s position paper on costs in the NDIS also discusses the dangers of poor implementation for market failures. The Productivity Commission lists the groups that are mostly likely to experience persistently thin markets as people:

  • living in outer regional, remote and very remote areas
  • with complex, specialised or high intensity needs, or very challenging behaviours
  • from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • who are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • who have an acute and immediate need (crisis care and accommodation).

These are the people for whom the NDIS will not enable equitable access to choice and control of services.

Indigenous people may have to relocate from their homelands

Alarmingly, by analysing past documents the new research found that the original blueprint for the NDIS by the Productivity Commission (written in 2011) explicitly states that Indigenous people with complex needs will have to relocate from their communities – and geographical connections to kin and country – in order to receive care in metropolitan areas where the service market is stronger:

“…the diversity and level of care and support available in major cities cannot be replicated in very remote areas. In some cases, Indigenous Australians with complex needs will have to move to regional centres or major cities to receive appropriate care and support (as is also the case with non-Indigenous Australians)”

For the design of the NDIS to call for the relocation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disabilities from their country and communities is unacceptable in terms of health equity and fairness.

If the goal of the NDIS is to offer empowerment to Australians with disability through increased choice and control there must be a recognition that not all individuals will have access to robust or well functioning markets.

Our research notes that there is the suggestion that the federal government may provide continued block funding, contracts, or be a provider of last resort in areas that are facing thin markets or market failure.

We argue that two schemes may emerge under the NDIS “one in urban areas with robust markets, and a second (lesser) scheme subsidised by government in rural and remote areas that continues to offer little choice.”

Attention should be focused on the way that the NDIS works in remote and regional areas, and how to ensure that government subsidised care (which may prevent people with disability from being forced to relocate) remains of good quality and continues to offer choice and control to people with disability in remote and regional areas, many of whom are Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander people.

 

*Eleanor Malbon is a faculty member at UNSW Canberra in the Public Service Research Group. On Twitter @Ellie_Malbon Dr Gemma Carey is an National Health and Medical Research Council Fellow and Senior Lecturer at UNSW Canberra in the Public Service Research Group. On Twitter @gemcarey

This article was first published on November 8, 2017, at The Mandarin

*Eleanor Malbon is a faculty member at UNSW Canberra in the Public Service Research Group. On Twitter @Ellie_Malbon Dr Gemma Carey is an National Health and Medical Research Council Fellow and Senior Lecturer at UNSW Canberra in the Public Service Research Group. On Twitter @gemcarey

This article was first published on November 8, 2017, at The Mandarin

Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC

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1.1 International : Community Health Centres Survey 2017

2.1 National  : NACCHO and Heart Foundation Resources survey 2017

2.2 National : Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic

2.3 NACCHO Presents #FASD Poster at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

Members

3.QLD : TAIHS ACCHO Townsville leads the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­Indigenous families

4.NSW : Wellington ACCHO Health Choices and community the focus at inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout

5. WA : AHCWA Members complete training course

6. VIC : Mallee ACCHO #MDAS to hold Pamper and Pap event for women clients

7. SA: AHCSA Sexual Health and Maternal Health Tackling Smoking Teams

8. NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs CEO’s present at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 International Community Health Centres Survey 2017

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The International Federation of Community Health Centres (IFCHC) is seeking input from staff and board members of Community Health Centres (CHCs) around the world, as well as associations that represent CHCs. If this applies to you, we encourage you to answer the brief survey below. The survey takes approximately 5 minutes to complete. All questions with an * are required.
All other questions are optional. Survey responses will help IFCHC to focus its operational activities for the near future.

 

2.1 National  : NACCHO and Heart Foundation Resources survey

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The Heart Foundation is committed to improving the heart health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

In this survey, we are seeking your feedback on how we can improve the use and effectiveness of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources, for both health professionals and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

 
We would greatly appreciate your time and opinions on our information resources and tools, to better understand the:
– use and awareness of our resources,
– cultural appropriateness of our resources for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community,
– suitability of the language, format and style of our resources.
 
We recognise that your time is valuable and thank you for your help. Link below

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Resource Survey – ACCHO

 

2.2 National : Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic

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The Koori Mail latest edition on sale Nov 15 , features the The National Centre of Indigenous Excellence TATU – Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic.

The TATU Schools Program created the comic, encouraging students to discuss the benefits of a smoke free lifestyle, and develop community ideas to reduce the harm caused by tobacco use.

‘Traditional smoke heals – tobacco smoke kills.

2.3 NACCHO Presents #FASD Poster at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

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NACCHO Policy Officer Bridie Kenna pictured with symposium chair Professor Sandra Eades and FASD project members Dr Nikki Percival and Hayley Williams .Bridie was presenting  a poster on the FASD Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Project. A collaboration between NACCHO, Menzies School of Health Research and the Telethon Kids Institute.

3.QLD : TAIHS ACCHO Townsville leads the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­Indigenous families

 

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TOWNSVILLE will lead the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­indigenous families. The Townsville Aboriginal and Islander Health Service (TAIHS) will steer the new initiative, called the First Thousand Days Australia.

Picture Above : Heather Lee, TAIHS Integrated Services Manager/ Midwife of Maternal and Child Heath, Kerry Arabena, Chair of Indigenous Health at the University of Melbourne and new family, Emma Woods and Shane Mitchell with 5 month old twin girls Ahliyah and Shanielle, pictured at the TAIHS clinic for the launch of the first Australian trial of the First Thousand Days. Picture: Shae Beplate

It will be rolled out across North Queensland and focus on babies’ first two years of life beginning at conception. This period is when the foundations of optimum health, growth, and neurodevelopment across the lifespan are established.

This international movement, which ­focuses on nutrition, has been broadened by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander health researchers and practitioners to ­include child protection, early life ­literacy, the role and contribution of men and the range of other issues that impact on indigenous parents and infants in Australia.

TAIHS chair Morris Cloudy said ­although they had a successful record of ­providing quality health care and social ­services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait community, there remained many obstacles to ensuring kids received the best possible opportunities in life.

“We believe that this model will assist us in addressing these gaps,” he said.

Heather Lee, midwife and manager of TAIHS’ Child and Maternal Health services, said it was important for future generations.

“The aspiration for me personally is to have healthier women, children and dads in our community.”

Ms Lee said TAIHS aimed to ­decrease the number of chronic diseases within the community.

Chair of ­Indigenous Health at the University of ­Melbourne Professor Kerry Arabena, who heads the One Thousand Days initiative nationally, said it was a unique indigenous-designed and managed intervention that would improve co-ordination between services and organisations catering to Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander child and maternal health.

“It will also ensure that the so-called ­social determinants of health, including housing, education, employment and ­exposure to racism and discrimination, are addressed,” she said.

4.NSW : Wellington ACCHO Health Choices and community the focus at inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout

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History was made in Dubbo at the weekend with the inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout held at Apex Oval. More than 20 men’s and mixed teams competed across five divisions on Saturday and Sunday, with organisers Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) and NSW Touch hailing it a great success.

“We’ve certainly had a couple of thousand people through the gates,” WACHS marketing and communications manager Jodie Evans said.

“I think what we’ve proven is you can have all ages and all shapes and sizes actually playing and no one actually has any issues with that, and having mixed teams is great too, it just brings different elements into it.

“Next year we hope to build on the women’s sides and certainly bring the kids in.

NSW Touch game development officer Stacey Parker said she was impressed by the “outstanding” quality of play on show, with players coming from as far away as Western Australia.

“We look forward to what’s going to happen in 2018,” she said. “Hopefully we can double the numbers.”

Touch football wasn’t the only focus of the weekend, with the crew from QuitBFit on hand at the smoke and alcohol-free event to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Current and former NRL stars were on hand to help spread the message, including Scott Prince (who played with the All-Blacks), Timana Tahu, Nathan Merritt, Cody Walker and Will Smith.

“We’re trying to get that communication through from a young age that smoking isn’t great for you and drinking so much soft drink,” Evans said.

“It’s all about healthy eating and living, and sport is obviously vital to that.”

“Being at the inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout was something special and something I won’t forget,” Prince said. “It was great to see the family coming together to promote healthy choices.”

5. WA : AHCWA Members complete training course

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Staff from AHCWA, Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service – East Perth office, Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation and the Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service recently completed an Internal Auditor Training Course at AHCWA’s head office in Highgate.
The two-day training course enabled the participants with the skills and knowledge to prepare for and participate in a quality audit. The types of audits may include external or internal systems audit or process or products/service audits.
Participants were given the opportunity to work through the process of reviewing designated documentation; identifying and developing checklists and audit-related documentation; preparing audit schedules; gathering, analysing and evaluating information; and reporting findings to the lead auditor in a fun and interactive setting.
Thanks to Claire, the Quality & Compliance Officer at AHCWA and Christine from SAI Global for organising and delivering a very informative, interesting and useful course.

6. VIC : Mallee ACCHO #MDAS to hold Pamper and Pap event for women clients

AMMAFTER a successful pilot event last year, Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) will hold the second Pamper and Pap day on November 30 at MDAS Commun­ity Hall.

Prevention and health promotion officer Jade Klaebe said  MDAS had decided to make the event annual.

“We held this event at around the same time last year for the first time, and we had 67 Aboriginal women attend.

7. SA: AHCSA Sexual Health and Maternal Health Tackling Smoking Teams

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The team was up at Coober Pedy hosting a Womens Pamper Day….lots of fun, laughter & education.

8. NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs CEO’s present at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

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