NACCHO Aboriginal Health This Weeks Events #NRW2018 #TopEndFASD18 @Wuchopperen #LawYarn #WorldNoTobaccoDay #IHMayDAY18 @TheLongWalkOz #WeWalktogether #BecauseOfHerWeCan #NACCHOagm2018 , @NATSIHWA , @AIDAAustralia , @CATSINaM @hosw2018

May 27  – 3 June National Reconciliation Week

National Reconciliation Week Ad Campaign Hits Screens

A new ad campaign that questions how much the average Australian knows about the country’s history will hit screens today in the lead up to National Reconciliation Week.

The 30-second and 60-second ads show a non-Indigenous man enjoying a game of football, before he starts to address the audience.

View HERE

“Oh g’day, I’m just your average Australian. I’m just doing average Australian things like watching Australian football with my Australian Shepherd,” he says.

The man says he knows quite a bit about our country – including that we have the “tastiest coat of arms in the world” – before he is interrupted by an Aboriginal woman.

“There’s also a bit that you don’t know. We’ve got the longest surviving culture on earth,” the woman says.

“Just your average artists,” an Aboriginal man chimes in.

“Warriors,” another Aboriginal woman says.

“Inventors,” a third Aboriginal woman offers.

The ad campaign highlights some of the lesser known aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and achievements, to prompt Australians to ask themselves: what are some of the things I don’t know about our shared history?

Australians will be asked to ponder that question during this year’s National Reconciliation Week (27 May – 3 June), which is themed Don’t Keep History a Mystery: Learn. Share. Grow.

Many Australians are unaware of, or reject, fundamental aspects of history, according to the Australian Reconciliation Barometer.

The biennial survey commissioned by Reconciliation Australia and conducted by Polity social research consultancy explores the perceptions of a representative sample of Australians in order to gauge progress towards reconciliation.

The most recent Barometer survey revealed that:

  •  Almost one in three Australians do not accept that government policy enabled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to be removed from their families without permission until the 1970s.
  •  More than one in three Australians do not accept that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were subject to mass killings, incarceration, forced removal from land and restricted movement, throughout the 1800s.

Reconciliation Australia CEO Karen Mundine said National Reconciliation Week would raise awareness of the fact that historical acceptance is key to reconciliation.

“It’s essential that we know each other, and that we share an understanding of the history that has shaped the relationship between wider Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as it stands today,” she says.

“Only by acknowledging, accepting and addressing our shared history can we become a more just and equitable Australia.”

The National Reconciliation Week ads will be screened on SBS, NITV, Foxtel and ICTV, in cinemas nationally, on Qantas in-flight entertainment, and on big screens in Brisbane’s Queen St Mall and King St Mall, Melbourne’s Federation Square, and Sydney’s Pitt Street mall.

To find out how to get involved in National Reconciliation Week, visit reconciliation.org.au/national-reconciliation-week

May 28 Launch #LawYarn at Wuchopperen Cairns FNQ

 

 

May 30-31Top End Foetal Alcohol Syndrome Forum Darwin

APO NT is hosting a forum to raise awareness about FASD for Aboriginal communities in the Top End, share experiences and develop a top-end network

Follow on Twitter  #TopEndFASD18

Download the Full Program

NT TOP END FASD PROGRAM

May 31  Tom Calma World No Tobacco day

WorldNoTobaccoDay is coming up! But you don’t have to wait, start now: make every day a tobacco-free day

In the lead up to World No Tobacco Day, IAHA will host a live online webinar with Patron and National Coordinator Tackling Indigenous Smoking Professor Tom Calma to discuss the role of allied health in tackling Indigenous smoking.

To register follow this link –

31 May Reconciliation in the ACT : Are we there yet

DATE: Thursday 31 May 2018

TIME: 12.30pm – 1.30pm

VENUE: Function Room, Theo Notaras Multicultural Centre, 180 London Circuit, CANBERRA CITY

ABOUT: On 27 May 2018 the residents of Canberra will enjoy a public holiday, Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

This seminar will explore the extent to which genuine and sustainable progress has been made in achieving reconciliation in the ACT. Discussion will centre on a range of data, summarised below, which reflects the extent to which Aboriginal people in Canberra continue to experience disadvantage and of the adequacy of the local response to these matters, including the degree of self-determination accorded the Aboriginal community.

  • Native title has been completely extinguished in the ACT;
  • Canberra’s Indigenous students fall two years behind their non-Indigenous peers in educational outcomes;
  • Canberra’s Indigenous people are 21 times more likely to be incarcerated compared to non-Indigenous people, and the ACT has the second highest rate of Indigenous incarceration in Australia;
  •  An Aboriginal child in Canberra is 12 times more likely than a non-Aboriginal child to be removed, under a care and protection order, from its parents and the ACT has the second highest rate of removal of Aboriginal children in Australia;
  •  7.6% of Canberra’s Aboriginal community report that they live in housing in which they do not have access to working sewerage facilities;
  • 46% of Indigenous males and 39% of indigenous females in the ACT over the age of 15 used an illicit drug or other substance in the last year; and
  • 35% of Aboriginal children in Canberra live in poverty;

This IGPA seminar is co-sponsored by Winnunga Nimmityjah AHCS and is jointly convened by Professorial Fellow Jon Stanhope AO and Adjunct Professor Dr Khalid Ahmed PSM.

Download the Brochure and Speaker Bio’s HERE

RECONCILIATION IN THE ACT ARE WE THERE YET (003)

May 31 : This year’s theme ‘Stepping Out into Our Future’

 

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Island peoples share their voice, aspirations, hopes, dreams, pathways, taking the steps further for our future.

IHMAYDAY WEBPAGE

June 2 The Long Walk

Come and join us on the 2nd of June down at Federation Square from 2:00pm – 5:30pm for The Long Walk 2018. As we embark on our 14th year since Michael Long began his walk towards Canberra we are as excited as ever to celebrate our event.
You will be entertained by some of Australia’s best Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander talent including our MC Leila Gurruwiwi, crowd favourites The Indigenous Hip Hop Crew, enjoy some classics from Blackfire, Birdz, Soul Chic, Russell Robertson & Phil Cebrano and the Brolga Boys.
There will be a range of Sporting and Cultural activities as well as a delicious community BBQ.

Then “We Walk Together” with Michael Long for the annual Walk to “G” for the Dreamtime Game at 5:30pm sharp.

More Info Register

June 11 .New : Finding Common Ground and a Way Forward for Indigenous Recognition 

Written submissions should be received by Monday 11 June

Above NACCHO Library image

A new committee met yesterday, to further consider matters regarding recognition of Australia’s indigenous people, and will be co-chaired by Senator Patrick Dodson, Senator for Western Australia, and Mr Julian Leeser MP , Member for Berowra.

The Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition Relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples is expected to report by the end of November this year, with an interim report due in July.

The Committee is calling for submissions and is considering options for public meetings and hearings.

Co-Chairs Senator Dodson and Mr Leeser MP said: ‘As a committee, we are looking for common ground and ways forward on these critical matters for Australia’s future. We hope to hear from Australians about the next steps for recognition of First Nations peoples.

We plan to consult widely, starting with First Nations leadership. We understand that a great deal of work has already been done: the job of this committee is to build on that work and to now take the next steps.’

The Committee website has details of Committee membership, and will be the first point of information about the work of the Committee.

Written submissions should be received by Monday 11 June, to assist with planning meetings and hearings, but the Committee may accept submissions after this date.

For background:

Please contact the Committee secretariat on 02 6277 4129

or via email at jsccr@aph.gov.au

Interested members of the public may wish to track the committee via the website.

WEBSITE

Click on the blue ‘Track Committee’ button in the bottom right hand corner and register

19 June 21 St Century Aboriginal Health Research

21st Century Aboriginal Health Research

The Aboriginal Health College is thrilled to be hosting a showcase of Aboriginal Health Research projects. This event is the first in a series of educational seminars promoting best practice in Aboriginal Health Research by exploring community engagement, Aboriginal Governance, evidence-based practice and how researchers achieved success working with community.

Please join us to hear from the SEARCH team at the Sax Institute, the POCHE Centre’s Adjunct Associate Professor Kylie Gwynne and University of Wollongong’s Professor Kathleen Clapham.

Bookings

Download HERE

October 30 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day

Hobart  Aug 27 –28

More Info soon

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WorldHypertensionDay @strokefdn High #bloodpressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob with 47% having high #stroke risk

 

 ” But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

A staggering 82 percent of those, found to have high blood pressure, were not aware prior to taking the health check and were referred to their doctor for a further assessment.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are between two and three times as likely to have a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians which is why increasing stroke awareness is crucial.

Too many Australians couldn’t spot a stroke if it was happening right in front of them.

We know that in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities this awareness is even lower.

We want all Australians, regardless of where they live or what community they’re from, to learn the signs of stroke.”

Stroke Foundation and Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Project

 ” Naomi and Rukmani’s stroke rap runs through vital stroke awareness messages, such as lifestyle advice, learning the signs of stroke, and crucially the need to seek medical advice when stroke strikes.

Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song and remember the FAST message – it could save their life,”

Stroke Foundation Queensland Executive Officer Libby Dunstan 

Naomi Wenitong  pictured with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media

Listen to the new rap song HERE

                                       or Hear

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated

NACCHO has published over 90 articles Aboriginal health stroke prevention and recovery READ HERE

“It can happen to anyone — stroke doesn’t discriminate against colour, it doesn’t discriminate against age “

Photo above Seith Fourmile, Indigenous stroke survivor campaigns for culture to aid in stroke recovery

” Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who experience and die from cardiovascular disease at much higher rates than other Australians.

What you don’t know can hurt you. Heart disease and strokes are the biggest killers of Australians, and the biggest risk factor for both of them is high blood pressure.

But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

John Kelly CEO-National, Heart Foundation

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, when compared with other Australians, are:

  • 1.3 times as likely to have cardiovascular disease
  • three times more likely to have a major coronary event, such as a heart attack
  • more than twice as likely to die in hospital from coronary heart disease
  • 19 times as likely to die from acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart Disease
  • more likely to smoke, have high blood pressure, be obese, have diabetes and have end-stage renal disease.

It was World Hypertension Day yesterday  and the Stroke Foundation is determined to slash stroke numbers in Australia – with your help.

Today kicks off Australia’s Biggest Blood Pressure Check for 2018 and communities are being urged to take five minutes out of their day for a potentially life-saving blood pressure check.

More than 4.1 Million Australians are living with hypertension or high blood pressure, putting themselves at serious and unnecessary risk of stroke.

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.

The major concern with high blood pressure is many people don’t realise they have it. It has no immediate symptoms, but over time, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of stroke and heart disease.

How you can help?

  • Encourage your family and friends to take advantage of a free check.
  • Help spread the word via social media:  Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.
  • Get your free health check today! https://bit.ly/2ps1UOn #WorldHypertensionDay

  • I am urging you – no matter what age you are – to have a blood pressure check regularly with your ACCHO GP (General Practitioner), pharmacist or via a digital health check machine.
  • Stroke strikes in an instant, attacking the brain. It kills more women than breast cancer and more men than prostate cancer and leaves thousands with an ongoing disability, but stroke is largely preventable by managing blood pressure and living a healthy lifestyle.
  • Stroke Foundation and SiSU Wellness conducted more than 520,000 digital health checks throughout 2017, finding 16 percent of participants had high blood pressure putting them at risk of stroke

Given there will be 56,000 strokes in Australia this year alone, if we can reduce high blood pressure we will have a direct and lasting impact on the rate of stroke in this country.Yours sincerely,

Sharon McGowan
Chief Executive Officer
Stroke Foundation

NACCHO Aboriginal Health supports @fam_matters_au campaign #WeBelieveFamilyMatters @IndigenousX Every child has the right to be safe : Plus @SNAICC Submission: #ClosingtheGap ‘Refresh’ Process

 

”  I am a proud advocate for change – because things need to change. Change can be uncomfortable and it can cause anxiety.

 But I see a near future where change can bring positive outcomes to our nation. I play a small role at SNAICC – National Voice for our Children, the national advocacy body fighting for the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

I say only small because there are plenty of stronger and louder voices in the national conversation speaking up about the changes that need to happen for our people. So I will only speak for myself and the changes that I dream of.”

Maylene Slater-Burns is Kamilaroi/Wiradjuri/Djungan/Gangalidda woman. Seeker of some real change : Continued Part 2 below

Or Read in full HERE

Hosting this week IndigenousX : Guardian Australia is proud to partner with IndigenousX to showcase the diversity of Indigenous peoples and opinions from around the country

Read over 300 Aboriginal Children’s Health articles published by NACCHO over past 6 years

 Part 1 SNAICC Submission: Closing the Gap ‘Refresh’ Process – April 2018 ( added by NACCHO )

SNAICC put it simply in its recent submission to the Closing the Gap “refresh”:

“We have a shared responsibility to ensure the right of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child to be safe and thrive in family, community and culture.”

It has been 10 years since COAG’s Closing the Gap strategy began.

In that time, only three of the seven national targets are reported as being on track and four are due to expire in 2018. COAG is currently undertaking the Closing the Gap ‘refresh’ process.

This process is a unique opportunity to influence the next phase of the CTG agenda, which will form the framework over the next 10 years for all Australian governments to advance outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It will also provide the framework for how government funding is prioritised to meet the targets.


SNAICC’s Key Calls

We have a shared responsibility to ensure the right of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child to be safe and thrive in family, community and culture. To achieve this:

  • an additional Closing the Gap target should be included to eliminate the overrepresentation of our children in out-of-home care by 2040, with sub-targets that address the underlying causes of child protection intervention; and
  • the current Closing the Gap target on early childhood education should be  strengthened to encompass early childhood development and  expanded to close the gap in outcomes for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from birth to 4 years by 2030

Download the SNAICC Submission HERE

SNAICC_Brief-CTG_Refresh-Apr._2018

Part 2 Every child has the right to be safe. Will you speak up with me?

Upon the delivery of the federal budget last week, it is clear that change for our people is not a priority for the federal government – but the government of the day has never scared me into thinking change is impossible. I, in tune with how I was raised by my family in Naarm, believe that real change happens from within community, by community and for community.

My mum, Sharon Slater, and my dad, Mel Burns, have lived and worked in the Melbourne Aboriginal community for decades. As I grew up, it was a normal part of life to be at work with them. My parents were foster carers, youth workers, basketball coaches, community drivers, fundraisers, and health workers – and completed their own admin at the end of the day. I am proud to follow in their footsteps. All I’ve ever known is my community from within.

SNAICC has been part of my life since early childhood, as Mum worked in administration and bookkeeping. Family was always centre at SNAICC – the best memory I have is my twin Marjorie and I mucking around with the photocopier.

In the late 1980s, following the first child survival seminar held in Naarm, community leaders called for the establishment of a national peak body to represent Aboriginal child care agencies, which led to the creation of SNAICC. Despite the ongoing harsh climate of constant political change that impacts a great number of our Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, SNAICC continues to be the voice of its members and the voice for our children.

For me, SNAICC’s work answers a natural calling in this journey to realise the changes that our children, families and communities deserve.

Today, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are over-represented in the child protection system at a rate of more than 10 times that of other children. We are losing our children and we must speak up right now, because enough is enough.

The Family Matters campaign is the coming together of organisations and individuals across the nation to reduce the over-representation of our children removed from family.

Family Matters is an approach that trusts Aboriginal people to deal with Aboriginal business, one that includes genuine collaboration and partnership, empowers communities and involves long-term, all-of-government support across the country.

It all comes down to trusting in the legacy of my role models, family members and past leaders who have paved the way before us. Our community knows what works best for our community, and the best way forward when it comes to reunifying the 17,664 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living away from home with their community, heritage and culture.

Community is bringing the Family Matters campaign to the doorstep of Australia.

SNAICC put it simply in its recent submission to the Closing the Gap “refresh”: “We have a shared responsibility to ensure the right of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child to be safe and thrive in family, community and culture.”

Now is the time for healing and restoration through connecting with other dreamers and change-makers to move forward together. Will you walk with me? Will you speak up with me? Our children are trusting us with their futures. Our work starts now.

NACCHO #Budget2018 Coverage 4 of 5 : Government Press Releases @GregHuntMP #HealthBudget18 @senbmckenzie #RuralHealthBudget @KenWyattMP #IndigenousHealth @NigelScullion #IndigenousAffairs #Budget2018NACCHO

 

1.Minister Health Greg Hunt

1.1 Guaranteeing essential services – record investment in health

1.2 Guaranteeing Medicare with record funding

1.3 More choices for a longer life

1.4 Providing record access to life-saving and life-improving medicines

1.5 Record Commonwealth funding for public hospitals

1.6 Supporting better mental health for all Australians

1.7 Boosting essential infant and maternal health services

1.8 Promoting a healthy and active Australia

2.Minister Rural Health Bridget McKenzie

2.1 Stronger Rural Health Strategy to deliver high quality care

3.Minister Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt

3.1 Better targeting support to improve Indigenous health

3.2 : Close to Country: $25 million for remote area dialysis

4. Minister Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion

4.1: 2018-19 Budget to strengthen economic, employment and health opportunities for First Australians

 “ This Budget confirms the Coalition Government’s continued investment of $5 billion over four years through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy which is making targeted investments in the three priorities fundamental to improving outcomes – getting kids to school, adults to work and making communities safer. Importantly, the number of Indigenous organisations delivering services has drastically increased under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy from 30 to 45 per cent now. “

Post 1 of our NACCHO Posts on #Budget2018 NACCHO

Post 2 will be the NACCHO Chair Press Release

Post 3 will be Health Peak bodies Press Release summary

Post 4 will be Government Press Releases

Post 5 Opposition responses to Budget 2018

ALL NACCHO BUDGET COVERAGE HERE

1.Minister Health Greg Hunt

1.1 Guaranteeing essential services – record investment in health

Download Health Budget HERE  NACCHO Budget INFO

The 2018–19 Budget is guaranteeing the essential health services that Australians rely on, with a $12.4 billion increase in the Health Budget and a $414.5 billion investment in health, aged care and sport.

We will increase:

Medicare funding by $4.8 billion;

public hospital funding by more than $30 billion;

investment in new medicines by $2.4 billion; and

funding for aged care by $5.0 billion.

We will invest in a National Health and Medical Industry Growth Plan of $1.3 billion, including a ground-breaking $500 million Australian Genomics Health Futures Mission.

The Government is also delivering the More Choices for a Longer Life Package to help Australians maximise the opportunities that a longer life brings.

1.2 Guaranteeing Medicare with record funding

The Turnbull Government will continue our absolute rock-solid commitment to Medicare with an additional $4.8 billion investment, building on the Medicare Guarantee Fund we established last year.

For 2017-18, $34.4 billion has been credited to the Fund. A further credit of $35.3 billion will be made to meet the estimated Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) expenditure for 2018-19.

Medicare spending is guaranteed and increasing every year from $24 billion in 2017-18 to $28.8 billion in 2021-22 to support healthcare for every Australian.

Indexation of the Medicare Benefits Schedule, which the Government reintroduced in last year’s Budget will deliver an additional $1.5 billion for Medicare services through to 2021-22.

Following recommendations from the expert MBS Review Taskforce and the independent Medical Services Advisory Committee we will provide new Medicare support for renal dialysis in remote communities, MRI scans for prostate cancer checks, a new cutting edge 3D mammography test for the early detection of breast cancer and new genetic testing for cystic fibrosis.

1.3 More choices for a longer life

The 2018-19 Budget will deliver the More Choices For a Longer Life package which will support older Australians to live longer and be better prepared, healthier, more independent and connected to their communities,

The Package gives older Australians more choices and greater flexibility, including:

An additional 14,000 high-level home care packages so older Australians can stay in their homes longer if they want to;

Allowing pensioners to earn more without reducing their pension;

Greater flexibility to use home equity to increase retirement incomes.

Since the last Budget, the Turnbull Government has delivered an extra 20,000 high-level home care packages, to support people to live at home longer.

We will provide 13,500 new residential aged care places and 775 short-term restorative places to be made available where they are most needed, plus $60 million for capital investment.

We will also invest $40.0 million to support aged care providers in regional, rural and remote Australia for urgent building and maintenance works.

More than $105 million will improve access to culturally safe aged care services in remote Indigenous communities.

The Turnbull Government will establish an Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission to create a tough cop on the beat to ensure older Australians receive the best possible care, with an additional $50 million to assist providers implement the new standards.

MyAged Care will be improved with an investment of $61.7 million to make it easier to use, along with simplifying the forms required to apply for aged care services, and $7.4 million to trial navigators to assist people to choose the aged care services that suit their needs.

We will invest $32.8 million to improve palliative care for older Australians living in residential aged care, filling current gaps in support services, $5.3 million for innovations in managing dementia, and $102.5 million for mental health programs for older Australians.

And people over 65 will be assisted to undertake more physical activity, with locally-based sporting organisations receiving grants totalling $22.9 million to deliver new programs for older Australians.

The Government is helping Australians to work for as long as they want, laying the foundations for a secure retirement. We will provide up to $10,000 in Restart wage subsidies for employing Australians aged 50 and over. The Skills and Training incentive will provide up to $2,000 to fund up-skilling opportunities for mature aged workers.

The 2018-19 Budget delivers measures to boost living standards and expand retirement income options to give retirees confidence in their financial security.

We are increasing the Pension Work Bonus to allow age pensioners to earn an extra $50 per fortnight without reducing their pension. The Pension Loans Scheme will be expanded giving greater flexibility to use home equity to boost retirement incomes, e.g. up to $17,787 a year for a full rate age pensioner (couple).

1.4 Providing record access to life-saving and life-improving medicines

The Turnbull Government will invest $2.4 billion on new medicines to build on our commitment to guarantee those essential services that all Australians rely on. This includes a new $1 billion provision to maintain our commitment to listing all new medicines recommendation by the independent Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee.

Unlike Labor, we list and will continue to list, every single drug recommended by the medical experts – the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee – with approximately $9 billion of investment in new drug listings since coming into government.

In particular, the Government will provide $703.6 million for the listing of Kisqali ® on the PBS to support women with breast cancer. Without subsidy, patients would pay $71,820 per year.

We will also list Spinraza ® on the PBS, a life-changing medicine which treats the devastating illness Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Without subsidy, patients would pay more than $367,850 per year. These new listings mean patients will have access to these medicines paying a maximum of $39.50 per script. Concessional patients, including pensioners, will pay just $6.40.

The Turnbull Government has also signed a landmark agreement with Medicines Australia to improve access to life saving medicines for rare diseases through key reforms to the Life Saving Drugs Program.

1.5 Record Commonwealth funding for public hospitals

The Government will deliver more than $30 billion in additional public hospital funding under a five-year National Health Agreement, with funding increasing for every state and territory, every year.

From 2020-21 to 2024-25, the new agreement will deliver a record $130.2 billion in public hospital funding, with six of Australia’s eight states and territories now covered by this new agreement, including three Labor governments and three Liberal governments.

This represents a more than doubling of public hospital funding under the Coalition Government, rising from $13.3 billion in 2012-13 to $28.7 billion in 2024-25.

1.6 Supporting better mental health for all Australians

The Turnbull Government will deliver an increase of $338.1 million in mental health funding, with a focus on suicide prevention, research and older Australians and advancing the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan.

We will expand the beyondblue Way Back Support Service across Australia, which provides outreach, follow-up care and practical support to people discharged from hospital after a suicide attempt. This will see an investment of $37.6 million.

We will provide Lifeline Australia $33.8 million to support its phone counselling services, and SANE Australia will receive $1.2 million for the Better off With You campaign.

The Government will fund a new Million Minds Mission through the Medical Research Future Fund. Over the next 10 years, $125 million will be invested in new research to support an additional million people with mental illness, through new research, diagnosis and treatment.

Men over 85 years of age have the highest risk of suicide for all ages. That’s why the Government will deliver $82.5 million for psychological services in residential aged care, while mental health nurses will help develop and deliver a $20 million program to support older Australians in the community who are isolated and at risk.

The National Mental Health Commission will receive an increase of $12.4 million to oversee mental health reform and take an expanded role under the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan. Funding of $4.7 million will support the continued operation of Head to Health, the new digital gateway for mental health services.

We will also fund the Royal Flying Doctor Service for mental health outreach, which will receive $20.4 million to ensure regional and rural Australians get care wherever they are.

1.7 Boosting essential infant and maternal health services

To give Australian children the best possible start in life, we are investing $77.9 million in infant and maternal health and for the first 2,000 days of a child’s life.

This includes $17.5 million for maternal and infant health medical research.

Health professionals will give parents-to-be simple and effective guidance on staying healthy during pregnancy with a $3.0 million program.

The Government will extend the childhood immunisation education campaign, targeting areas with low vaccination rates.

Every mother will be given the opportunity to vaccinate against whooping cough, with $39.5 million to fund the pertussis vaccine to all pregnant women.

To help parents keep track of their children’s health from birth, the Government will introduce a national digital baby book with $5.0 million of funding, replacing state and territory hard copy baby books, and giving children their passport to a lifelong health record.

We will invest $6.2 million to subsidise the cost of more insulin pumps for children with type 1 diabetes.

With injury the leading cause of death of children aged one to 16 years, the Government will fund $0.9 million for the development of a new National Injury Prevention Strategy aimed at reducing childhood injuries. In addition, funding of $1.0 million for the SeeMore Safety Program will support preschool and kindergarten children and their families to reduce the number of preventable childhood injuries.

We will also roll out a new $1 million program to assist GPs to learn more about endometriosis, so they can better diagnose and treat the condition, which can affect around one in ten women and is a key contributor to infertility.

1.8 Promoting a healthy and active Australia

The Turnbull Government will invest $230 million to implement a range of sport and physical activity initiatives that will see more Australians, more active, more often.

This investment builds on our national strengths and will provide more opportunities for Australians to participate in sport and physical activity and promote healthy, active life styles.

The Government will invest $28.9 million in participation grants targeted at less active Australians.

This includes an extension of the Local Sporting Champions grants program which will see more than 3,000 additional young athletes receiving support, including for young athletes in the regions to attend competitions.

The Government will also provide $41.7 million towards extending the popular Sporting Schools Program which provides opportunities for children to participate in sport by reducing the financial burden for parents and building a culture of the enjoyment and benefits of sport for a digitally focused generation.

The Government is acting to reduce drowning at Australia’s beaches, rivers and waterways, as well as improving safety on our snow fields through the Water and Snow Safety Program, with a total investment of $48.5 million.

Participation in sport is vital for the health and wellbeing of all Australians, and is foundational to the Government’s sport plan which will be released later this year.

The Turnbull Government is delivering a strong economy which means we can guarantee the essentials that Australians rely on like Medicare, hospitals, lifesaving medicines and aged care.

2.1 Stronger Rural Health Strategy to deliver high quality care

The Turnbull Government will deliver the most comprehensive rural health package in decades, which will improve access to doctors, nurses and other health care services for all Australians, especially those in the regions.

The Stronger Rural Health Strategy will improve the delivery of healthcare by ensuring we have the right health care professionals located in the regions. It will provide greater opportunities for Australian doctors through better teaching, training, recruitment and retention. The package will see growth in multidisciplinary care and increased access to nursing and allied health services.

This comprehensive strategy has been developed in close consultation with the AMA, RACGP, ACRRM and other rural medical leaders.

In order to support teaching in the regions, we will invest $95.4 million to create the new Murray Darling Medical Schools Network comprising of the University of NSW (Wagga Wagga), University of Sydney (Dubbo), Charles Sturt University/Western Sydney University (Orange), Monash University (Bendigo, Mildura), and University of Melbourne/La Trobe University (Bendigo, Wodonga, Shepparton). The Government will also include Curtin University (for medical training) and La Trobe University (for nursing and allied health training) in the Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training (RHMT) program.

This will be done while retaining the existing number of Commonwealth Supported Places for medical students.

This is a fundamental change in the teaching and supply of rural and regional doctors and will transform rural training schools, enabling students to undertake most of their education and training in rural areas to provide a continuum for doctors to learn, train and work in the regions.

The Stronger Rural Health Strategy will mean more Australian doctors for the regions.

3.1 Better targeting support to improve Indigenous health

The Budget provides ever greater support for our effort to Close the Gap and better targets funding to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with funding for Indigenous Health of $3.9 billion from 2018-19 to 2021-22 and $10 billion over a decade.

In particular, the Turnbull Government will deliver $33.4 million for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce, and provide funding to prevent and treat complex and chronic health conditions including eye disease ($34.3 million), hearing loss ($30.0 million), and crusted scabies ($4.8 million).

3.2 : Close to Country: $25 million for remote area dialysis

The Australian Government is funding a $25 million expansion of remote renal clinics, so more Aboriginal people in Central Australia who suffer from kidney disease can receive dialysis on country or as near to their communities as possible.

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said the Government was proud to support the highly successful Western Desert Nganampa Walytja Palyantjaku Tjutaku, also known as Purple House, to complete four new clinics and extend a fifth.

“Purple House is making a huge difference to the physical, mental and spiritual health of people across Central Australia, by allowing them to receive care while remaining connected to their land and their people,” Minister Wyatt said.

“This expansion will take the number of remote clinics in the region to 17 and builds on this community driven project’s outstanding record.

“Purple House now provides 70 per cent of Central Australian dialysis services and is not only changing lives, its vast program has saved many lives, because patients don’t have to leave their families and communities for treatment.”

Recent clinical data shows the mortality rate for people on dialysis in Central Australia is now less than half the rate of the rest of the nation.

The funding will allow completion of clinics this year at Utopia, Ampilawatja, Kalkarindji and Ernabella, plus the expansion of the Lajamanu clinic. It will also support the operating costs of another three clinics

The expansion will take the number of remote dialysis machines from 36 to 54 and increase the remote patient group from around 250 to more than 400.

Chronic kidney disease is a significant health challenge among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. More than 1,800 First Nations people are currently receiving dialysis, with almost 60 per cent of these starting dialysis before they were 55 years old.

Minister Wyatt said reducing the misery and death caused by kidney disease was a key Turnbull Government priority.

“Following a recent roundtable in Darwin, development of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander renal health road map is underway,” said the Minister.

“Prevention is crucial and it starts during pregnancy, with low birthweight babies born with weaker kidneys.

“Organisations like Purple House are showing the way, through community based, holistic services and strong and effective Aboriginal governance.

“An independent study has shown Purple house delivers remote renal services at a cost comparable to or even lower than the standard Australian hospital dialysis cost.”

Purple House was formed in 2003, following years of work by Aboriginal leaders and supporters that culminated in a million-dollar fundraising auction of local art to establish the project.

The Commonwealth Government has previously provided $17.6 million over four years to Purple House for renal support services in the NT and Western Australia, including $6.45 million to enable the Purple House to build and expand renal infrastructure in Central Australia at six locations in the NT and one in South Australia.

The new funding, under the Government’s Indigenous Australians’ Health Program, will apply for three years from July 2018.

4.1: 2018-19 Budget to strengthen economic, employment and health opportunities for First Australians

 

First Australians right across the nation will benefit from a stronger economy, more jobs and guaranteed essential services through the 2018-19 Federal Budget.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said this year’s Budget is delivering for First Australians across the board by investing in health, safety and security through economic and employment opportunities.

“The Coalition Government’s economic plan has already delivered over 400,000 jobs last year – the highest number of any year on record.

“We are delivering tax relief to hard-working Australian families, guaranteeing the essential services in health, education and community safety that all Australians rely upon, returning the Budget to a credible trajectory to surplus, while setting the stage for a return of business confidence and the jobs boom. We are also ensuring that First Australians have their fair share of this economic success.”

The Coalition Government’s cross-portfolio investment in initiatives to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians include:

  • The Community Development Programme (CDP) reforms to ensure remote job seekers are further supported on their pathway to employment. It will now be a simpler, more streamlined program, with less interactions with the national welfare system for remote job seekers. This is being complemented by a government-funded employment program for 6,000 jobs in remote Australia.
  • A new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land and Sea Future Fund (ATSILSFF) will replace the $2 billion Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land Account (Land Account) leaving the Fund up to $1.5 billion better off, over 20 years, compared to the current investment mandate.
  • $550 million over five years ($110 million per annum) to support remote housing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across the Northern Territory. This funding will be matched by Northern Territory Government contributions. Negotiations remain ongoing with Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland however the Commonwealth remains hopeful of reaching an agreement with these jurisdictions soon.
  • $3.8 billion investment to the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP) from 2018‑19, an increase of over $800 million compared with the previous four years.
  • $38.1 million, over five years, to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students who need to travel away from home for education, in recognition of the 50th anniversary of ABSTUDY.
  • $105 million for better access to aged care Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • $18.2 million to support domestic violence prevention and protection programs for women and girls including maintaining the current DV alert service and 1800RESPECT trauma counselling service.
  • $34.8 million over four years to support the delivery of dialysis by nurses, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers in remote areas, under a new Medicare Benefits Schedule item.
  • $23.2 million over four years for Healthy Active Beginning Package which includes a policy to reduce the traumatic injury rate among young Indigenous Australians, who are 4.5 times more likely to sustain serious injury than non-Indigenous children.
  • $200 million for a third round of the Building Better Regions Funding to support rural, regional and remote community infrastructure projects.
  • $28.3 million over four years for Remote Airstrip Upgrade works supporting air access to remote towns and Indigenous communities.
  • $2 million over three years to the Australian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) for a program of preservation and celebration of Indigenous languages and culture.

This Budget confirms the Coalition Government’s continued investment of $5 billion over four years through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy which is making targeted investments in the three priorities fundamental to improving outcomes – getting kids to school, adults to work and making communities safer. Importantly, the number of Indigenous organisations delivering services has drastically increased under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy from 30 to 45 per cent now.

Minister Scullion said efforts across the government would build on the success of initiatives such as the Indigenous Procurement Policy, which has seen over 1,000 Indigenous businesses win Australian Government contracts worth more than $1 billion since the policy’s inception in July 2015.

The IPP stands in stark contrast to the pathetic $6.2 million to just 30 Indigenous businesses in Labor’s last year in government.

“The Indigenous Grants Policy (IGP) we unveiled in February will see services intended specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to be delivered by local Indigenous organisations.

The policy will be trialled later this year for grants administered by the Department of Communications and the Arts, the Department of Social Services and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

“The IGP builds on the Coalition’s efforts to deliver more grant funding through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations.

We are now delivering 55 per cent of grants through First Australian owned or controlled organisations compared with 35 per cent under Labor.

“To drive greater change and to close the gap, we need to harness greater opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples across all areas of government expenditure and investment and that is precisely what we are doing,” Minister Scullion said.

“Through the Indigenous Business Sector Strategy, the Employment Parity Initiative, the Vocational Training and Employment Centre programme and the Indigenous Rangers Programme we are supporting First Australians realise their economic aspirations.

“Our strategic partnerships with First Nations’ representative bodies like the New South Wales Aboriginal Land Council in Western Sydney to include procurement and employment targets as part of the $5 billion Western Sydney Airport, and with the Northern Land Council on remote housing in the Northern Territory, demonstrates our strong commitment to putting First Australians at the heart of our economic plan for the nation,” Minister Scullion said today.

 

“The IGP builds on the Coalition’s efforts to deliver more grant funding through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations. We are now delivering 55 per cent of grants through First Australian owned or controlled organisations compared with 35 per cent under Labor.

“To drive greater change and to close the gap, we need to harness greater opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples across all areas of government expenditure and investment and that is precisely what we are doing,” Minister Scullion said.

“Through the Indigenous Business Sector Strategy, the Employment Parity Initiative, the Vocational Training and Employment Centre programme and the Indigenous Rangers Programme we are supporting First Australians realise their economic aspirations.

“Our strategic partnerships with First Nations’ representative bodies like the New South Wales Aboriginal Land Council in Western Sydney to include procurement and employment targets as part of the $5 billion Western Sydney Airport, and with the Northern Land Council on remote housing in the Northern Territory, demonstrates our strong commitment to putting First Australians at the heart of our economic plan for the nation,” Minister Scullion said today.

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NACCHO Aboriginal #HealthBudget18 Press Release @KenWyattMP Federal Government announces new funding model for ACCHS Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services #Budget2018NACCHO

 

 ” It is important to strengthen and expand our Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services  role as primary care providers in our communities as there will be 1 million Aboriginal people 2030, ”

NACCHO Chair Mr John Singer believes ‘that funding certainty is critical to ACCHSs achieving good health outcomes.

 

See our live interviews on NACCHO Facebook

Picture above : Day after Budget night and NACCHO Chair faces media at Parliament House

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) has welcomed the Budget announcement of a new needs based funding formula model for the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program (IAHP).

Although this new model requires further refinement, feedback and work.

Download this NACCHO Press Release

NACCHO Press Release Government announces new funding model for ACCHS

This new model for our 144 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) provides funding for our primary health care services and now excludes 7 inconsistent data points related to NKPIs.

NACCHO Chair Mr John Singer believes ‘that funding certainty is critical to ACCHSs achieving good health outcomes.

Mr John Singer called on the government to ensure there was no adverse impact on our Model of Care.

NACCHO welcomes the 5-year funding agreements and grandfathering arrangements under this new model.

NACCHO welcomes the new money for preventing and treating complex chronic health conditions such as Eye disease ($34.3 million) hearing loss ($30.0 million) and crusted scabies ($4.8 million).

Acknowledges the new investment in remote renal services and infrastructure with a MBS item for dialysis.

Also, the $105.7 over four years to deliver additional residential aged care places and home care packages in remote Indigenous communities.

The Government has advised that the new funding model can be varied up to July 2019 and NACCHO will continue work in consultation with the Funding Model committees.

Aboriginal controlled health services provide about three million episodes of care each year for about 350,000 people and employ about 6,000 staff.

Post 1 of our NACCHO Posts on #Budget2018 NACCHO HERE

Post 2 will be the NACCHO Chair Press Release and Analysis above

Post 3 will be Health Peak bodies press release summary

Post 4 will be Government Press Releases

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #HealthBudget18 : Will the #Budget2018NACCHO Improve health outcomes for Indigenous Australians ?

 

” A greater focus on outcomes and transparency of funding will support our ongoing commitment to Closing the Gap in Indigenous health with a total of $10 billion for Indigenous health over the next decade.”

Extract from Health budget papers See Part 2 below Improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians : download full copy of Health Budget

 ” Funding for a key Aboriginal health program will climb $200 million to nearly $4 billion as the Turnbull government negotiates with the states over other investments.

The government will implement a new primary care funding model for the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program to provide greater transparency of funding and improve health outcomes.

This new transparency initiative would be based on patient numbers, episodes of care and the remote nature of the treatment and be designed to ensure resources are directed to the right areas, minimising waste.

The contribution will total $3.9bn over four years from 2018-19 and the budget papers state that extra funding could also be provided under the Medicare system.”

From the Australian see Part 1 Below

Post 1 of our NACCHO Posts on #Budget2018 NACCHO below

Post 2 will be the NACCHO Chair Press Release and Analysis

Post 3 will be Health Peak bodies press release summary

Post 4 will be Government Press Releases

See our live interviews on NACCHO Facebook

 ” National Congress welcomes the renewal of funding for our health organisations and programs. In particular, we appreciate the recognition of the crucial role which the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce plays in delivering positive health outcomes for our peoples.

However, we note that the provision of culturally safe and appropriate healthcare must also be integrated into the mainstream health system.

We also acknowledge the Government’s commitment to provide new funding to aged care, but unless the large gap in life expectancy is resolved, many of our peoples may not enjoy the longevity to benefit from these services.”

National Congress Press Release see Part 3 Below

Part 1 The Australian Continued

Existing eye health initiatives will be bolstered by $34m to provide further health checks and address the issue of vision loss. The government has pledged more than $33m to bolster the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce.

Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion also earmarked $550m over five years for remote housing in the Northern Territory, with matched funding from the territory government.

“Local Aboriginal decision-making, local Aboriginal employment and local Aboriginal procurement are at the heart of our investment,” he said.

Senator Scullion said the government was in negotiations with the Queensland, South Australian and West Australian governments about future funding.

The budget would support 6000 jobs in remote areas, with so-called tailored support to indigenous jobseekers.

The overhaul of the Community Development Program would start from early next year, cutting income reporting demands to Centrelink.

Senator Scullion said the new system would ensure that all jobseekers — regardless of their location — would face the same compliance framework

Part 2 From Health Budget Papers : Improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians

 

Download the 472 Page Health budget here

NACCHO Budget INFO

 Funding for the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IHAP) will increase by $200 million to total $3.9 billion over four years from 2018-19.

As part of the Closing the Gap agenda, the Government will implement a new primary care funding model for IHAP to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Greater transparency of funding based on patient numbers, episodes of care and remoteness will assist in ensuring resources are directed to areas of need.

The program will be introduced in consultation with the community and overall funding is retained, while increased opportunities will exist for additional funding under Medicare.

The Government will target specific health conditions that disproportionately affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, including a focus on avoiding hearing loss and vision impairment.

The Government will allocate approximately $30 million to expand hearing assessments. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children have high rates of otitis media and subsequent hearing loss.

Poor vision is a barrier to education and employment, and impacts mobility, independence and social interaction.

The Government will boost existing eye health initiatives, investing $34.3 million to provide eye health checks and target the major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The detection, treatment and management of crusted scabies in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Northern Australia will also be improved through an investment of $4.8 million.

The measure will help eliminate the highly infectious condition, which can lead to acute rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease and renal disease.

This initiative builds on a successful pilot in East Arnhem, which achieved a 44 per cent reduction in recurring crusted scabies over four years.

Funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Professional Organisations will also be boosted, with funding of $33.4 million over four years to enable further increases to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

This will assist with meeting increased demand for services and will also help non-Indigenous Australians develop cultural understanding and capability.

The Government will also expand the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care (NATSIFAC) program to improve access to culturally safe aged care services in remote Indigenous communities.

From 2018-19 to 2021-22, the Government will provide $105 million to better support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Part 3 National Congress

 

The Government’s priority for First Australians focuses primarily on economic prosperity. While many would welcome this outcome, the Government’s roadmap to accomplishing this prosperity is fanciful, incoherent and sorely lacking in the detail necessary for success.

Although the Government has listened to a few of our concerns regarding the Community Development Program, major issues largely remain unresolved in this budget.

The harsh and discriminatory penalty system is largely intact. In fact, penalties have worryingly been strengthened in cases involving participants who need the greatest amount of support. For this reason alone we renew our call for the CDP to be replaced with a wage-based program which provides meaningful employment and training for our peoples.

We are deeply concerned by the Government’s proposal to withhold income support payments from individuals who default on fines. This is a recipe for ensuring that the poorest and most vulnerable members of our society will remain so, with unpaid fines likely leading to increased rates of incarceration rather than pathways to prosperity. Our peoples cannot achieve economic prosperity if we cannot meet our basic needs.

In claiming that it will provide $550 million in new funding for remote housing in the Northern Territory, the Government has attempted to hide its abandonment of a national housing strategy.

The National Partnership Agreements on Remote Indigenous Housing have expired. Prospects of renewal are slim, particularly if negotiations with state and territory governments are unsuccessful.

If Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are forced to live in insecure, overcrowded and unsafe homes, or are homeless, the barriers to economic empowerment are overwhelming.

The Federal Budget fails to address the shameful over-incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. We make up 3% of Australia’s population, but 27% of its prisoners.

If anything, the Government’s callous disregard for our basic human rights to equality and quality health, education, housing and employment opportunities makes this problem worse.

These factors are also responsible for child removal rates being ten times greater than for non-Indigenous Australians, which threatens to create a new Stolen Generation and perpetuates intergenerational trauma.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander legal services have highlighted gross inadequacies in government funding for civil cases.

As Centrelink breaches, inability to repay fines and housing tenancy disputes become more commonplace due to Budget measures, the demand for legal services will only increase and these inadequacies are likely to become more severe.

Attempts to Close the Gap appear to have stalled, with Minister Scullion making no reference to the program in his media release.

No new funding has been allocated to the strategy, despite a dire need for further community consultation and national co-operation between governments and our organisations.

The Government’s failure to Close the Gap must not be used as an excuse to abandon the targets altogether, lower expectations and wide the life expectancy gaps or shift responsibilities to state and territory governments.

We note in this budget that $50 million has been allocated for the memorialisation of the 250th Anniversary of Captain Cook’s voyage to Australia. Whilst gaining pockets of local support, this appears a controversial investment in the Treasurer’s own electorate.

Our preference would be to redirect these funds into community based Closing the Gap initiatives to address the negative impacts of the European invasion of Australia.

National Congress welcomes the renewal of funding for our health organisations and programs. In particular, we appreciate the recognition of the crucial role which the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce plays in delivering positive health outcomes for our peoples.

However, we note that the provision of culturally safe and appropriate healthcare must also be integrated into the mainstream health system.

We also acknowledge the Government’s commitment to provide new funding to aged care, but unless the large gap in life expectancy is resolved, many of our peoples may not enjoy the longevity to benefit from these services.

We reiterate our call for the Government to work collaboratively with us. The need for an independent and well funded national representative body to inform Governments is greater now than ever.

Our organisations are in the best position to provide culturally safe and appropriate services to our peoples. However, we cannot achieve this without adequate resources and support.

On reflection this budget leaves so many of us uncertain of the true value of our extensive consultations with Government over the past year. So little of what we have said, like so little of what we have recommended, has been taken up by this Government in this underwhelming budget.

Our political leaders have seemingly exhibited an attention deficit; one proportional to the surplus evident in their own self-interest.

NACCHO Guide to Aboriginal Health and the #Budget2018NACCHO : What @NACCHOAustralia @AMAPresident @RACP @CroakeyNews and 21 peak health groups would like to see in tonight’s #Healthbudget18 ?

 

We need political will to #CloseTheGap. There are volumes of research, strategies and action plans sitting with governments – but they are not being properly resourced and funded. Make it right in tonight’s Budget “

AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, said that the culmination of key reviews, under the guidance of Health Minister Greg Hunt, provides the Government with a rare opportunity to embark on a new era of ‘big picture’ health reform – but it will need significant long-term investment.

Also read NACCHO Aboriginal Health @AMAPresident Download AMA Pre-Budget Submission 2018-19 #Indigenous health reform – needs significant long-term investment

 ” The Federal Government must provide long-term funding certainty for the Medical Outreach Indigenous Chronic Disease Program, which is focused on preventing, detecting and managing chronic disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

RACP President Dr Catherine Yelland

Download the full submission here or read Aboriginal health extracts below

racp-2018-19-pre-budget-submission

Historical background RACP Associate Professor Noel Hayman

 “I’ve been working in the field of Indigenous health for 20 years now. The major changes, trends that I’ve seen over the years, has been improvements in infant mortality. But the one that contrasts that is the worsening mortality in middle age—we see high rates of mortality in Aboriginal people in their 40s and 50s. And this is due to chronic disease, particularly diabetes, ischaemic heart disease and chronic kidney disease.

Associate Professor Noel Hayman, Clinical Director of the Inala Indigenous Health Service in Brisbane.

He was the first Aboriginal GP in Queensland, and the first Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person to become a Fellow of the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine at the RACP.

From Interview June 2016 Listen HERE

RACP Press Release

Doctors are calling for the Federal Government to provide long-term funding to programs that prevent, detect and manage chronic disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
As detailed in the Royal Australasian College of Physicians’ pre-budget submission, these programs could help ensure better health outcomes and close the gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes and those of the non-Indigenous community.

The RACP recommends that the Australian government :

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

• Allocate secure long-term funding to progress the strategies and actions identified in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP) Implementation Plan.

• Provide secure, long-term funding for the Rural Health Outreach Fund (RHOF) and Medical Outreach Indigenous Chronic Disease Program (MOICDP).

• Build and support the capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders by committing secure long-term funding to the Indigenous National Health Leadership Forum.

• Reinstate funding for a clearinghouse modelled on the previous Closing the Gap clearinghouse, in line with the recommendations of the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan. Allocate sufficient funding for the implementation of the Fifth National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Blood-Borne Viruses (BBV) and Sexually Transmissible Infections (STI) Strategy.

• Fund the syphilis outbreak short-term action plan and coordinate this response with long term strategies.

• Allocate long-term funding for primary health care and community- led sexual health programs to embed STI/BBV services as core primary health care (PHC) activity, and to ensure timely and culturally supported access to specialist care when needed, to achieve low rates of STIs and good sexual health care for all Australians.

• Invest in and support a long-term multi-disciplinary sexual health workforce and integrate with PHC to build longstanding trust with communities.

• Allocate funding for STI and HIV point of care testing (POCT) devices, the development of guidelines for POCT devices and Medicare funding for the use of POCT devices.

Extract from Pre budget submission

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continue to experience poorer health outcomes than non-Indigenous Australians.

The latest ‘Closing the Gap’ report found that Australia is not on track to close the life expectancy gap by 2031 – with the gap remaining close to ten years for both men and women.

The gap for deaths from cancer between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians has in fact widened in recent years, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer death rates increasing by 21 percent between 1998 and 2015, while there was a 13 per cent decline for non-Indigenous Australians in the same period8.

To address these inequities and improve access to care, continuing and strengthened focus and appropriate long-term funding is required. It is imperative that there is secure funding for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 (NATSIHP) Implementation Plan.

Funding uncertainty and frequent changes create significant issues that impact the continuity of services to patients and organisations in their ability to retain and build their capacity.

Read in full NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Sexual Health @TheRACP 2018-19 Pre-#budget submission : Long-term funding needed to improve #Indigenous health

 

”  A December 2017 report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) shows that the mortality gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are widening, not narrowing.

Urgent action is needed to reverse these trends to have any prospect of meeting the Council of Australian Governments’ goal to Close the Gap in life expectancy within a generation (by 2031).

The following submission by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) in relation to the Commonwealth Budget 2018 aims to reverse the widening mortality gaps.

The following policy proposals are divided into four areas below and summarised in the following table:

  1. Proposals that strengthen and expand ACCHOs’ capacity and reach to deliver health services for Indigenous people
  2. Proposals that improve responsiveness of mainstream health services for Indigenous people
  3. Proposals that address specific preventable diseases
  4. Proposals that build in an Indigenous position into policy considerations that impact on health.

NACCHO is committed to working with the Australian Government to further develop the proposals, including associated costings and implementation plans and identifying where current expenditure could be more appropriately targeted ”

Download the full NACCHO submission HERE or part 3 below

NACCHO-Pre-budget-submisson-2018

Connect tonight with NACCHO #Budget2018NACCHO

Live coverage and interviews


NACCHO Communique   Visit Communique

Twitter @NACCHOAustralia  Visit us on Twitter 

Facebook #NacchoAboriginalHealth Visit us on Facebook

YouTube #NACCHOTV  Visit us on YouTube

Besides our NACCHO live and recorded interviews

What will the 2018 Federal Budget mean for the health sector and consumers?

Consumers Health Forum of Australia Policy Team will be holding a free public webinar next Wednesday 16 May, 12:30pm AEST, to discuss the key health measures in the budget from a consumer perspective.

They will share our position on them, and take participants’ feedback and questions.

To join , register herehttps://chf.org.au/events/budget-2018-consumer-perspective

Part 2 Federal Budget 2018/19 – Preview and review of 21 health sector submissions

What is the number one health issue that the Government should address in tonight’s  Federal Budget?  Jennifer Doggett from Croakey analyses the pre-Budget Submissions from 21 health groups and finds surprising agreement among them on the urgent need for action in one key area.

Read on to find out what this issue is and the six key measures the Government should announce on Tuesday night if it wants to keep the health sector onside.  Check back on Wednesday to see how closely the Federal Government has followed the proposals from health and medical groups in this (possibly) pre-election Budget.

Bookmark this link for our coverage of the Federal Budget, and please use the hashtag #HealthBudget18 to share health-related budget news.

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2018/19 Federal Budget priorities

So what do this year’s crop of Pre-Budget submissions tell us about the current priorities of the health sector? After reviewing a slew of health-related pre-Budget submissions it is clear that there is one stand-out issue that has the overwhelming support of the health sector, with virtually every submission supporting action on this issue in some form or other.

That issue is prevention.  The clear message emerging from the submissions was that preventive health is the glaring gap in health policies at the federal level and the most pressing issue that needs to be addressed to improve the health of our community.

Almost every health-related pre-Budget submission included a strong focus on prevention, in particular those from the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA), the Consumers Health Forum (CHF), the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA), the Australian Medical Association (AMA), the Complementary Medicines Association (CMA), the Victorian Healthcare Association (VHA) and the Royal Australian College of Physicians (RACP).

The most strongly supported proposal overall was for the establishment of a national preventive health body to oversee and coordinate preventive health policies across all sectors and level of government.

The AMA’s submission reflected the reasons expressed in many submissions for such a national body: Obesity, nutrition, alcohol, tobacco and physical activity are health policy areas desperately in need of funded national strategies and measurable targets. These are best delivered through an independent, dedicated organisation.

Obesity was the most commonly mentioned health issue with a number of groups supporting a sugar tax, junk food advertising restrictions and physical activity programs.

Indigenous health

There was broad agreement across the submissions that we need to do more to close the health and life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and that supporting Indigenous community-controlled initiatives and services are the best way to achieve this.

Supporting and growing the Indigenous health workforce was a key feature of NACHHO’s submission, along with establishing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commonwealth Advisory Group to support consideration, implementation and monitoring of an Indigenous position in efforts to Close the Gap and on jurisdictional agreements that have high impact on Indigenous peoples.

The AHHA and the AMA called for funding to implement the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan and the AMA also called for the Government to support the Redfern Statement.

Six key actions

After reviewing these submissions, the message is clear.  If the Government wants to win over the health sector on Tuesday night it needs to do the following:

  1. Establish a National Preventive Health Body (although this could be slightly awkward for the Government, given it abolished a similar body, the Australian National Preventive Health Agency in 2014)
  2. Announce a national obesity strategy
  3. Set up a Productivity Commission review of private health insurance
  4. Increase funding for the community-controlled Indigenous health sector
  5. Increase funding for public dental services
  6. Take action on mental health

Part 3

Widening mortality gaps require urgent action

The life expectancy gap means that Indigenous Australians are not only dying younger than non-Indigenous Australians but also carry a higher burden of disease across their life span, impacting on education and employment opportunities as well as their social and emotional wellbeing.

Preventable admissions and deaths are three times as high in Indigenous people yet use of the main Commonwealth schemes, Medicare Benefits Scheme (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) are at best half the needs based requirements.

It is simply impossible to close the mortality gaps under these conditions. No government can have a goal to close life expectancy and child mortality gaps and yet concurrently preside over widening mortality gaps.

Going forward, a radical departure is needed from a business as usual approach.

Funding considerations, fiscal imbalance and underuse of MBS/PBS

The recent Productivity Commission Report found that per capita government spending on Indigenous services was twice as high as for the rest of the population.

The view that enormous amounts of money have been spent on Indigenous Affairs has led many to conclude a different focus is required and that money is not the answer.

Yet, the key question in understanding the relativities of expenditure on Indigenous is equity of total expenditure, both public and private and in relation to need.

In terms of health expenditure, the Commonwealth spends $1.4 for every $1 spent on the rest of the population, notwithstanding that, on the most conservative assumptions, Indigenous people have at least twice the per capita need of the rest of the population because of much higher levels of illness and burden of disease.

This represents a significant market failure. The health system serves the needs of the bulk of the population very well but the health system has failed to meet the needs of the Indigenous population.

A pressing need is to address the shortfall in spending for out of hospital services, for which the Commonwealth is mainly responsible, and which is directly and indirectly responsible for excessive preventable admissions funded by the jurisdictions – and avoidable deaths.

The fiscal imbalance whereby underspending by the Commonwealth leads to large increases in preventable admissions (and deaths) borne by the jurisdictions needs to be rectified.

Ultimately, NACCHO seeks an evidenced based, incremental plan to address gaps, and increased resources and effort to address the Indigenous burden of disease and life expectancy.

The following list of budget proposals reflect the burden of disease, the underfunding throughout the system and the comprehensive effort needed to close the gap and ideally would be considered as a total package.

NACCHO recommends initiatives that impact on the greatest number of Indigenous people and burden of preventable disease and support the sustainability of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (ACCHO) sector – see proposals 1. a) to e) and 3. a) and b) as a priority.

NACCHO is committed to working with the Australian Government on the below proposals and other collaborative initiatives that will help Close the Gap.

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

NACCHO is the national peak body representing 144 ACCHOs across the country on Aboriginal health and wellbeing issues

In 1997, the Federal Government funded NACCHO to establish a Secretariat in Canberra, greatly increasing the capacity of Aboriginal peoples involved in ACCHOs to participate in national health policy development.

Our members provide about three million episodes of care per year for about 350,000 people. In very remote areas, our services provided about one million episodes of care in a twelve-month period.

Collectively, we employ about 6,000 staff (most of whom are Indigenous), which makes us the single largest employer of Indigenous people in the country.

The following proposals are informed by NACCHO’s work with Aboriginal health services, its members, the views of Indigenous leaders expressed through the Redfern Statement and the Close the Gap campaign and its engagement and relationship with other peak health organisations, like the Australian Medical Association (AMA).

Guiding principles

Specialised health services for Indigenous people are essential to closing the gap as it is impossible to apply the same approach that is used in health services for non-Indigenous patients.

Many Indigenous people are uncomfortable seeking medical help at hospitals or general practices and therefore are reluctant to obtain essential care. Access to healthcare is often extremely difficult due to either geographical isolation or lack of transportation.

Many Indigenous people live below the poverty line so that services provided by practices that do not bulk bill are unattainable. Mainstream services struggle to provide appropriate healthcare to Indigenous patients due to significant cultural, geographical and language disparities: ACCHOs attempt to overcome such challenges.

An ACCHO is a primary health care service initiated and operated by the local Aboriginal community to deliver holistic, comprehensive, and culturally appropriate health care to the community which controls it, through a locally elected Board of Management.

They form a critical part of the Indigenous health infrastructure, providing culturally safe care with an emphasis on the importance of a family, community, culture and long-term relationships.

Studies have shown that ACCHOs are 23% better at attracting and retaining Indigenous clients than mainstream providers and at identifying and managing risk of chronic disease.

Indigenous people are more likely to access care if it is through an ACCHO and patients are more likely to follow chronic disease plans, return for follow up appointments and share information about their health and the health of their family.

ACCHOs provide care in context, understanding the environment in which many Indigenous people live and offering true primary health care. More people are also using ACCHOs.

In the 24 months to June 2015, our services increased their primary health care services, with the total number of clients rising by 8%. ACCHOs are also more cost-effective providing greater health benefits per dollar spent; measured at a value of $1.19:$1.

The lifetime health impact of interventions delivered our services is 50% greater than if these same interventions were delivered by mainstream health services, primarily due to improved Indigenous access.

If the gap is to close, the growth and development of ACCHOs across Australia is critical and should be a central component to policy considerations.

Mainstream health services also have a significant role in closing the gap in Indigenous health, providing tertiary care, specialist services and primary care where ACCHOs do not exist.

The Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme accounts for about 13% of government expenditure on Indigenous health.

Given that other programs are responsible for 87% of expenditure on Indigenous health, it reasonable to expect that mainstream services should be held more accountable in closing the gap than they currently are.

Greater effort is required by the mainstream health sector to improve its accessibility and responsiveness to Indigenous people and their health needs, reduce the burden of disease and to better support ACCHOs with medical and technical expertise.

The health system’s response to closing the gap in life expectancy involves a combination of mainstream and Indigenous-specific primary care providers (delivered primarily through ACCHOs) and where both are operating at the highest level to optimise their engagement and involvement with Indigenous people to improve health outcomes.

ACCHO’s provide a benchmark for Indigenous health care practice to the mainstream services, and through NACCHO can provide valuable good practice learnings to drive improved practices.

NACCHO also acknowledges the social determinants of health, including housing, family support, community safety, access to good nutrition, and the key role they play in influencing the life and health outcomes of Indigenous Australians.

Elsewhere NACCHO has and will continue to call on the Australian and state and territory governments to do more in these areas as they are foundational to closing the gap in life expectancy.

Addressing the social determinants of health is also critical to reducing the number of Indigenous incarceration. Comprehensively responding to the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory must be a non-negotiable priority.

Proposals

The following policy proposals are divided into four areas below and summarised in the following table:

  1. Proposals that strengthen and expand ACCHOs’ capacity and reach to deliver health services for Indigenous people
  2. Proposals that improve responsiveness of mainstream health services for Indigenous people
  3. Proposals that address specific preventable diseases
  4. Proposals that build in an Indigenous position into policy considerations that impact on health.

NACCHO is committed to working with the Australian Government to further develop the proposals, including associated costings and implementation plans and identifying where current expenditure could be more appropriately targeted

Continued HERE NACCHO-Pre-budget-submisison-2018

NACCHO Aboriginal #Heart Health : @HeartAust #HeartWeek2018 Download @RoyalFlyingDoc Report : Cardivascular health in #remote and #rural communities

 

” The over-representation of males and Indigenous Australians in aeromedical transports for CVD, compared with females and non-Indigenous Australians, is unacceptable.

It suggests that prevention, early intervention and ongoing treatment for people with CVD should target all remote and rural males and Indigenous Australians of all ages.

The data shows that Indigenous patients were picked up from a wide spatial distribution but with a focus on Queensland and some specific centres including Rockhampton and Alice Springs.

That suggests early intervention, prevention and treatment services should be prioritised in these areas.”

This latest RFDS publication is a valuable addition to the data available for policy decisions : Download HERE

Royal Flying Doctors _Cardiovascular_Disease_Research_Report_D3

CVD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among Indigenous Australians : See Part 2 below

The Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) is one of the largest and most comprehensive aeromedical organisations in the world. It provides primary health care through general practice and nursing clinics to people in remote and rural Australia who are beyond reasonable access to medical infrastructure in more urbanised areas.

In 2016–17, the RFDS delivered 5,615 general practice clinics to 37,689 patients and 3,429 nursing clinics to 18,909 patients.

The RFDS has established a Research and Policy Unit whose role is to gather evidence about, and recommend strategies for improving health outcomes and health service access for patients and communities cared for by RFDS programs.

This latest publication is a valuable addition to the data available for policy decisions. https://bit.ly/2HImal9

The research indicates there is an opportunity for the RFDS to review its data collection procedures and to develop a national data collection policy. This would enable better reporting of programs, facilitate direct comparisons of data across Australia, and enable better assessment of outcomes, and evaluations of, RFDS delivered programs.

More specifically, the RFDS has an opportunity to review its own data collection processes to ensure all relevant data around aeromedical transports are collected.

Data linkage between the RFDS and state, territory and national clinical datasets has commenced and as linkages grow, longitudinal data on patients initially transported by the RFDS, and treated in hospital for CVD, will enable the RFDS to access comprehensive information on a patient’s prognosis, treatment, recovery, and rehabilitation.

Data linkage with local service providers that operate in areas where the RFDS delivers services, such as local GPs, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations or local hospitals would also assist in providing a more complete picture of the health outcomes of people from remote and rural Australia.

Part 2 :  3.4 CVD in Indigenous Australians

“CVD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among Indigenous Australians. It is more common in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, and occurs at much younger ages compared to the non-Indigenous population” (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b, p. 157) (Figure 3.8).

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2016b, p. 159).

Figure 3.8 demonstrates that in 2011 the burden from CVD among Indigenous Australians was low in childhood but increased rapidly from about age 30 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b).

Specifically, CHD and stroke contributed significantly to the burden of CVD from age 40 onwards (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b).

The burden from CHD peaked at around ages 45–54, and then declined (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b). The burden from stroke peaked at around ages 50–64, and then declined (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b).

In 2011, CVD burden was greater in Indigenous males than females (58% versus 42%), but this varied by type of CVD disease (Figure 3.9) (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b).

“Indigenous males experienced the majority of burden from aortic aneurysm (77%), hypertensive heart disease (72%) and CHD (67%), whereas Indigenous females experienced the majority of burden due to peripheral vascular disease (68%), rheumatic heart disease (61%), and stroke (58%)” (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b, p. 160).

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and events : 2018 SAVE A DATE : @HeartAust #HeartWeek2018 #Prevention2018 #FamilyMattersWeek @AbSecNSW @fam_matters_au #BecauseOfHerWeCan #NACCHOagm2018 , @NATSIHWA , @AIDAAustralia , @CATSINaM @hosw2018

In 2018, Heart Week is celebrated from 29 April–6 May. It will focus on the benefits of physical activity and empower Australians to get moving.

What’s a heart health check?

  • All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples over the age of 35 should have regular heart health checks. These are simple and painless.
  • A heart health check can be done as part of a normal check up with your ACCHO doctor or health practitioner.
  • Your ACCHO doctor will take blood tests, check your blood pressure and ask you about your lifestyle and your family (your grandparents, parents, brothers and sisters).

See Previous NACCHO HEART WEEK POST

You might be shocked to know:

  • over half of Australians (52%) are not active enough
  • almost two in three Australian adults are overweight or obese
  • one in four children are overweight or obese
  • 5,000 Australians die per year from physical inactivity

Australia is an inactive nation. Increasingly greater numbers of us are spending too much time sitting or being inactive – travelling to school or work by car, sitting at work and using screens for leisure.

So, this Heart Week our ‘Don’t get the sits’ campaign encourages all Australians to get moving and keep your heart strong, because like any other muscle your heart needs exercise.

Learn more about how physical activity keeps the heart healthy.

You might be shocked to know:

  • over half of Australians (52%) are not active enough
  • almost two in three Australian adults are overweight or obese
  • one in four children are overweight or obese
  • 5,000 Australians die per year from physical inactivity

Australia is an inactive nation. Increasingly greater numbers of us are spending too much time sitting or being inactive – travelling to school or work by car, sitting at work and using screens for leisure.

So, this Heart Week our ‘Don’t get the sits’ campaign encourages all Australians to get moving and keep your heart strong, because like any other muscle your heart needs exercise.

2. This week follow #Prevention2018

The Public Health Prevention Conference is a newly established conference, convened by the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA).

In 2018, the Public Health Prevention Conference will focus on prevention and protection, consistent with the World Federation of Public Health Associations’ (WFPHA)’s Global Charter for the Public’s Health.

Download the full program

NACCHO Save a date Prevention 2018 Program

This conference will provide a platform to engage, challenge and exchange ideas, where pivotal issues for building prevention in Australia will be discussed and where delegates will learn from the experience, opinions and perspectives of sector leaders and their peers.

In 2018 the Conference vision is that ‘We can do more and we must’. Three Conference Themes will guide the program:

  • Systems thinking;
  • Translation of research and evidence into action;
  • Advocacy and where our efforts should be focused in order to strengthen prevention.

The themes are designed to set the new prevention agenda for Australia. They draw attention to the fragmented nature of prevention in Australia and the imperatives to move forward to strengthen systems and actions for prevention.

The Conference will have high quality national experts presenting various aspects of this rapidly moving and exciting era of public health prevention. The conference will have a focus on cross sector, multilevel interventions to build a healthier Australia through prevention.

We hope that you can be a part of this vibrant scientific program showcasing exciting and innovative work in public health prevention.

CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES

  • Create an environment for knowledge sharing, collaboration and relationship building;
  • Promote collaboration, knowledge sharing and facilitate engagement by delegates to work together to achieve better health outcomes for Australians;
  • Engage professionals in public health prevention;
  • Provide guidance and insight into capacity building and strengthening prevention;
  • Provide conference delegates with new and innovative ideas that can be applied to local settings and systems to help create and improve health systems for local communities.

TARGET AUDIENCE  The target audience for the Public Health Prevention Conference 2018 is stakeholders able to effect and/or influence change at the systems and/or practice level including:

  • Researchers and Academics;
  • General practice sector;
  • Health care professionals engaged in prevention (doctors, nurses, allied health, dentists, pharmacists);
  • Commonwealth and state policy staff including Ministers/ministerial staff, and health and social sector department representatives;
  • Local government;
  • NGO/community and social sector provider and advocacy organisations
3.The next Family Matters Week of Action Monday 14 May.
The Week of Action is an annual opportunity to shine a light on the 17,000+ Aboriginal kids in the child protection system across the country.
It’s a time to remind our politicians as well as members of the public that it’s not acceptable for child protection authorities to remove Aboriginal kids from their families 10 times more than non-Indigenous children.
But it’s also a time for optimism, because we have promising solutions to build a better system based on self-determination.
In NSW, we’re offering sponsorships of up to $500 to people, groups or organisations hosting local events.
The application form is available on our website and must be returned to us no later than Friday 4 May.
Please look out for Family Matters on social media during the Week of Action and add your voice to our call for a better system! Visit our social profiles below to like and follow us ahead of the big week.
4.On Federal Budget night 8 May follow our NACCHO  extensive media coverage
Follow #Budget2018NACCHO on Twitter , FACEBOOK , Instagram and NACCHO TV for live and recorded interviews /analysis of Aboriginal Health issues

Download PDF copy 2018 Calendar

NACCHO Save a date Master 17 April

1.National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference 11-12 July

It is with great excitement that Ngiyani Pty Ltd as the host of the National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference with Project Management support from Christine Ross Consultancy proudly announce Registrations have officially OPENED. Please see the link below

https://www.ngiyani.com/because-of-her-we-can/

The dates for the conference are the 11 – 12 July 2018 at UNSW Kensington Campus in Sydney.

Please note the $350 Conference Registration for 2 days or $175 for one day is non- refundable or transferrable.

The Conference Dinner is optional on Wednesday 11 July 2018 at 7.00 – 11.00pm cost is an additional $80.00. food and entertainment will be provided (this is an alcohol free event). The Dinner is open to all Conference Delegates including Sponsors (so blokes are welcome) Details will be posted at a later date.

You will be able to choose your Workshops when you Register so please take the time to read Workshop outlines.

This Conference is incredibly popular and seats are limited, it will book out so to ensure you don’t miss out BOOK SOON.

Please note if you wish to purchase tickets to the National NAIDOC Awards Ceremony to be held Friday 13 July 2018 in Sydney. This is a seperate event to the Conference and first release tickets go on sale through Ticketek at 9.00 am AEST on Thursday 3 May 2018.Second release tickets go on sale at 9.00 am AEST 10 May 2018. Cost of tickets is $185.00 or $1,850.00 per table.

It will be a massive week in Sydney as we celebrate the theme:
‘Because of Her, We Can’

A huge thanks to our Sponsors: Reconciliation Australia, UNSW, Rio Tinto, JobLink Plus, Lendlease, Westpac, Veolia, NSWALC, Griffith Business School, Macquarie University, Accor Hotels, Warrikal, PwC Indigenous Consulting, Gilbert and Tobin and National Library of Australia.

2. Sir Michael Marmot in Alice Springs 4 May : Health equity : Taking Action

3.New : Finding Common Ground and a Way Forward for Indigenous Recognition 

Written submissions should be received by Monday 11 June

Above NACCHO Library image

A new committee met yesterday, to further consider matters regarding recognition of Australia’s indigenous people, and will be co-chaired by Senator Patrick Dodson, Senator for Western Australia, and Mr Julian Leeser MP , Member for Berowra.

The Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition Relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples is expected to report by the end of November this year, with an interim report due in July.

The Committee is calling for submissions and is considering options for public meetings and hearings.

Co-Chairs Senator Dodson and Mr Leeser MP said: ‘As a committee, we are looking for common ground and ways forward on these critical matters for Australia’s future. We hope to hear from Australians about the next steps for recognition of First Nations peoples.

We plan to consult widely, starting with First Nations leadership. We understand that a great deal of work has already been done: the job of this committee is to build on that work and to now take the next steps.’

The Committee website has details of Committee membership, and will be the first point of information about the work of the Committee.

Written submissions should be received by Monday 11 June, to assist with planning meetings and hearings, but the Committee may accept submissions after this date.

For background:

Please contact the Committee secretariat on 02 6277 4129

or via email at jsccr@aph.gov.au

Interested members of the public may wish to track the committee via the website.

WEBSITE

Click on the blue ‘Track Committee’ button in the bottom right hand corner and register

4. 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

5. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day

Hobart  Aug 27 –28

More Info soon

6. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.
10.Study Question: What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

The Australian National University is seeking partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families.  We want to partner and work with local organisations and communities to make sure the research benefits the community.

Who are we?

We work at the Australian National University (ANU).  The study is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers.  Professor Victoria Hovane (Ngarluma, Malgnin/Kitja, Gooniyandi), along with Associate Professor Raymond Lovett (Wongaibon, Ngiyampaa) and Dr Jill Guthrie (Wiradjuri) from NCEPH, and Professor Matthew Gray of the Centre for Social Research and Methods (CSRM) at ANU will be leading the study.

 Study Question:  What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

 How are we going to gather information to answer the study question?

A Community Researcher (who we would give funds to employ) would capture the data by interviewing 100 community members, running 3 focus groups for Men /  Women / Youth (over 16).  We would interview approx. 5 community members to hear about the story in your community.

We know Family Violence happens in all communities.  We don’t want to find out the prevalence, we want to know what your communities needs to feel safe. We will also be mapping the services in your community, facilities and resources available in a community.  All this information will be given back to your community.

What support would we provide your service?

We are able to support your organisation up to $40,000 (including funds for $30 vouchers), this would also help to employ a Community Researcher.

Community participants would be provided with a $30 voucher to complete a survey, another $30 for the focus group, and another $30 for the interview for their time.

 What will we give your organisation?

We can give you back all the data that we have captured from your community, (DE identified and confidentialised of course). We can give you the data in any form you like, plus create a Community Report for your community.  There might be some questions you would like to ask your community, and we can include them in the survey.

 How long would we be involved with your community / organisation?

Approximately 2 months

How safe is the data we collect?

The data is safe. It will be DE identified and Confidentialised.  Our final report will reflect what Communities (up to 20) took part in the study, but your data and community will be kept secret.  Meaning, no one will know what data came from your community.

Application close April 27

If you think this study would be of benefit to your community, or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Victoria Hovane, or the teamon 1300 531 600 or email facts.study@anu.edu.au.

11.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Sugartax : @4Corners #Tippingthescales: #4corners Sugar, politics and what’s making us fat #rethinksugarydrinks @janemartinopc @OPCAustralia

On Monday night Four Corners investigates the power of Big Sugar and its influence on public policy.

“How did the entire world get this fat, this fast? Did everyone just become a bunch of gluttons and sloths?”  Doctor

The figures are startling. Today, 60% of Australian adults are classified as overweight or obese. By 2025 that figure is expected to rise to 80%.

“It’s the stuff of despair. Personally, when I see some of these young people, it’s almost hard to imagine that we’ve got to this point.”  Surgeon

Many point the finger at sugar – which we’re consuming in enormous amounts – and the food and drink industry that makes and sells the products fuelled by it.

Tipping the scales, reported by Michael Brissenden and presented by Sarah Ferguson, goes to air on Monday 30th of April at 8.30pm. It is replayed on Tuesday 1st of May at 1.00pm and Wednesday 2nd at 11.20pm.

It can also be seen on ABC NEWS channel on Saturday at 8.10pm AEST, ABC iview and at abc.net.au/4corners.

See Preview Video here

 ” In 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2 years and over consumed an average of 75 grams of free sugars per day (equivalent to 18 teaspoons of white sugar)1. Added sugars made up the majority of free sugar intakes with an average of 68 grams (or 16 teaspoons) consumed and an additional 7 grams of free sugars came from honey and fruit juice. “

NACCHO post – ABS Report abs-indigenous-consumption-of-added-sugars 

Amata was an alcohol-free community, but some years earlier its population of just under 400 people had been consuming 40,000 litres of soft drink annually.

The thing that I say in community meetings all the time is that, the reason we’re doing this is so that the young children now do not end up going down the same track of diabetes, kidney failure, dialysis machines and early death, which is the track that many, many people out here are on now,”

NACCHO Post : Mai Wiru, meaning good health, and managed by long-time community consultant John Tregenza.

See Previous NACCHO Post Aboriginal Health and Sugar TV Doco: APY community and the Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation

4 Corners Press Release

“This isn’t about, as the food industry put it, people making their own choices and therefore determining what their weight will be. It is not as simple as that, and the science is very clear.” Surgeon

Despite doctors’ calls for urgent action, there’s been fierce resistance by the industry to measures aimed at changing what we eat and drink, like the proposed introduction of a sugar tax.

“We know about the health impact, but there’s something that’s restricting us, and it’s industry.”  Public health advocate

On Monday night Four Corners investigates the power of Big Sugar and its influence on public policy.

“The reality is that industry is, by and large, making most of the policy. Public health is brought in, so that we can have the least worse solution.”  Public health advocate

From its role in shutting down debate about a possible sugar tax to its involvement in the controversial health star rating system, the industry has been remarkably successful in getting its way.

“We are encouraged by the government here in Australia, and indeed the opposition here in Australia, who continue to look to the evidence base and continue to reject this type of tax as some sort of silver bullet or whatnot to solve what is a really complex problem, and that is our nation’s collective expanding waistline.” Industry spokesperson

We reveal the tactics employed by the industry and the access it enjoys at a time when health professionals say we are in a national obesity crisis.

“We cannot leave it up to the food industry to solve this. They have an imperative to make a profit for their shareholders. They don’t have an imperative to create a healthy, active Australia.”  Health advocate

NACCHO post – Sixty-three per cent of Australian adults and 27 per cent of our children are overweight or obese.

 “This is not surprising when you look at our environment – our kids are bombarded with advertising for junk food, high-sugar drinks are cheaper than water, and sugar and saturated fat are hiding in so-called ‘healthy’ foods. Making a healthy choice has never been more difficult.

The annual cost of overweight and obesity in Australia in 2011-12 was estimated to be $8.6 billion in direct and indirect costs such as GP services, hospital care, absenteeism and government subsidies.1 “

 OPC Executive Manager Jane Martin 

BACKGROUND

 ” This campaign is straightforward – sugary drinks are no good for our health. It’s calling on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks.’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Cape York experience a disproportionate burden of chronic disease compared to other Australians.’

‘Regular consumption of sugary drinks is associated with increased energy intake and in turn, weight gain and obesity. It is well established that obesity is a leading risk factor for diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease and some cancers. Consumption of sugary drinks is also associated with poor dental health.

Water is the best drink for everyone – it doesn’t have any sugar and keeps our bodies healthy.’

Apunipima Public Health Advisor Dr Mark Wenitong

Read over 48 NACCHO articles Health and Nutrition HERE

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/nutrition-healthy-foods/

Read over 24 NACCHO articles Sugar Tax HERE  

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/sugar-

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @VACCHO_org @Apunipima join major 2018 health groups campaign @Live Lighter #RethinkSugaryDrink launching ad showing heavy health cost of cheap $1 frozen drinks

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Junkfood #Sugarydrinks #Sugartax @AMAPresident says Advertising and marketing of #junkfood and #sugarydrinks to children should be banned