Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NACCHOagm2017 #NSW #TAS #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

1.1 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference abstracts / Expressions of Interest close 21 August

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations

2.WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) officially launches the ‘Pink Box’

3. 1 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Medical serice  very active campaign in testing the ear health of preschool and school-age Aboriginal children

3.2 NSW : Governor of NSW visits Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services

4. NT : Miwatj Health had a HUGE presence at the 2017 Garma Festival

5.VIC : KIRRAE Health Services at Framlingham Aboriginal Reserve funded to fight ice

6.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service Mt Isa supports another cataract blitz

6.2 QLD : Jobs and health benefits in $120M boost for Indigenous infrastructure

7.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Health Workers out to break HEP.C stigma

8. Deadly Choices QLD trains up the Nganampa health team

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference abstracts / Expressions of Interest close 21 August

NACCHO is now calling for Expressions of Interest (EOI) from Member Services for speakers, case studies and table top presentations for the 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

Register HERE

2.WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) officially launches the ‘Pink Box’

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) have officially launched the ‘Pink Box’, a free vending machine that allows a discrete way for women to obtain sanitary products.

In partnership with Share the Dignity charity, the suppliers of the Pink Box, the launch took place at DYHS head office in East Perth.

Mrs Gail Yarran delivered the Welcome to Country followed by Jenny Bedford, DYHS’s new CEO who officially opened the launch. The audience listened to speeches from Maternal & Child Health worker, Jillian Taylor and the Founder of Share the Dignity charity, Rochelle Courtenay before the official ribbon cutting ceremony.

Also see : Indigenous girls missing school during their periods: the state of hygiene in remote Australia

3. 1 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Medical serice  very active campaign in testing the ear health of preschool and school-age Aboriginal children

This time last year, Harrison Faley was struggling to make sense of daycare.

Stuck hearing as if he were underwater, his parents thought he was simply a typical, inattentive two-year-old. But in reality, otitis media, a very common middle ear disease for young children, was blocking his conductive hearing.

Report from HERE

“We were alerted by his daycare that his speech was lagging a bit and he was getting constant ear infections,” mother Harnah Faley recalled.

“The specialist asked us to wait until he had all his teeth, and when that happened we had him tested again, and he was down to 10 per cent function.”

Within two months, Harrison had grommets (tiny tubes) inserted to allow air to reach his middle ear.

“The improvement was pretty much instant,” Mrs Faley said, adding that along with his hearing, Harrison’s speech and development progressed significantly.

“If you ask him, he got the potatoes out of his ears,” she said.

Harrison was just one of 51 children to have a free ear check up at the Inverell Shire Public Library on Tuesday, August 1 as part of the first local otitis media awareness day.

Two audiometry nurses were present to do the screening, one from Armajun Aboriginal Health Service.

Of those screened, 25 per cent had middle ear fluid and a further 22 per cent had a Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, which can lead to otitis media.

Only half the children screened on the day had a ‘normal’ reading for ear health.

Although Aboriginal children are ten times more likely to have otitis media and 70 percent more likely to have recurring otitis media; there was a higher percentage of ‘normal’ readings in Inverell’s Aboriginal children (13 per cent of those screened).

Organisers believe this was due to Armajun’s very active campaign in testing the ear health of preschool and school-age Aboriginal children in this area.

Hearing Support Teachers from the NSW Department of Education talked on factors that contribute to otitis media and how parents can help reduce the risks.

The morning period was very busy, with one local preschool bringing twenty seven students aged 3-5 for screening. The rest of the children were brought in by their parents or grandparents throughout the day.

Library staff were proactive and kept the children entertained with craft activities as they waited. Volunteers from the Inverell branch of Quota International also helped make the day a success.

With so many children having indications of either otitis media or Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, conductive hearing loss teacher Beverly Walls said it was a timely reminder to parents to be vigilant when their children complain of ear ache or have difficulty understanding instructions.

3.2 NSW : Governor of NSW visits Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services

Another great afternoon at our Batemans Bay clinic with community and His excellency David Hurley, Governor of NSW and wife. Pictured above with CEO Robert Skeen .Many thanks to Aunty Muriel Slockee for her Welcome to Country and the deadly Koori Choir from the Batemans Bay Primary School. Another thank you to Marty Thomas who enchanted all on the Didgeridoo.

4. NT : Miwatj Health had a HUGE presence at the 2017 Garma Festival

Did you pay us a visit at Garma 2017!?

Miwatj Health had a HUGE presence at the 2017 Garma Festival. From Clinicians, to our Raypirri Rom team, we were everywhere!

Our clinic was a great success, with 26 staff assisting over the four days, including 3 Aboriginal Health Practitioners and an admin staff member from Galiwin’ku (Elcho Island). Thank you to everyone to dedicated their time (and long weekend) to help provide a much needed service for the festival.

Miwatj Health would also like to thank Captain Starlight for coming all the way from Darwin to entertain the children; the clinic would not have been the same without you.

Our #YakaNgarali Team also went out to Garma to educate community members on the harmful affects of smoking. They tested approximately 40 people using the Smokerlyzer (check out our videos to see how the Smokerlyzer works), while also quizzing participants of the festival to gain a greater understanding of their knowledge around smoking facts.


Overall, we had a super successful weekend and cannot wait for Garma 2018!

5.VIC : KIRRAE Health Services at Framlingham Aboriginal Reserve funded to fight ice

KIRRAE Health Services is one of just 13 Victorian community groups to receive state government funding to help in the fight against ice.

The health service based at the Framlingham Aboriginal Reserve will receive $10,000 for an early intervention and prevention program targeting males aged eight to 17.

The state government funding is aimed at tackling ice through “a range of localised activities, including workshops, forums, social media, music events and education programs aimed at sporting communities”.

Kirrae Health Services will use the funding through its Koko Blokes program. “Koko” is a Kirrae Whurrong word meaning “younger brother”.

The program deals with positive role-modelling and issues around drug and alcohol use, domestic violence and respect.

6.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service Mt Isa supports another cataract blitz

Seventeen patients were in Mount Isa this month for the north-west Queensland city’s latest “cataract blitz”.

Not –for-profit organisation Check UP funded the North west Hospital and Health Service (NWHHS) to provide the eye surgery, targeted at Indigenous people form remote communities.

It follows a cataract surgery “blitz” last October. Patients travelled from Doomadgee, Mornington Island, Normanton, Cloncurry and Camooweal this month. Their pre-surgery clinics were conducted by telehealth, a first for cataract surgery, according to outreach coordinator Amy Davy.

“Providing Telehealth as an option for our patients from outlying communities reduces the number of trips or length of stay during their surgical procedures, so we’re pleased with the success of this, and will be utilising telehealth in similar situations,” she said.

Ms Davy praised the work Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service Gidgee healing’s Blake Fagan, who provided transport for the patients, and NWHHS Indigenous liaison officer Melissa Nathan, who assisted the patients through their eye surgery.

Visiting ophthalmologist Andrew Foster conducted 19 operations in 2 days, completing a cataract surgery every half hour.

“This blitz” is a very good system for getting patients treated,” he said.

“Doing it in a group like this is very effective as they support each other, and know each other. It works very well, with no “fail to attends”.

Dr Foster is based on the Sunshine Coast and flies into Mount Isa every month to do eye surgery.

6.2 QLD : Jobs and health benefits in $120M boost for Indigenous infrastructure

Indigenous communities across Queensland are set to benefit from critical infrastructure upgrades, with a $120 million boost over four years to improve water, wastewater and solid waste infrastructure.

Visiting Mornington Island, Aurukun and Pormpuraaw this week, Minister for Local Government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Mark Furner said the Indigenous Councils Critical Infrastructure Program funding was vital for the health of communities.

“I’m extremely proud to announce the Palaszczuk Government’s commitment to strengthen indigenous communities has been backed with our $120 million investment,” Mr Furner said.

“The program is about ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote communities have infrastructure to improve living conditions and provide a sustainable future.

“This funding will be tailored to each community, supporting the infrastructure they need now and into the future, helping to close the gap on disadvantage.

“One of the great things about this program is that the councils actually develop the skills locally to manage the infrastructure and projects moving forward.”

Minister Furner said for councils in remote locations, access, distance and logistics meant the cost of the projects could be up to seven times higher than mainland and metropolitan areas.

“The level of funding provided for the Indigenous Councils Critical Infrastructure Program is crucial to meet the additional challenges many of these communities face.

“Communities will be pleased to know that the first stage of project approvals are already underway and some of the most vital infrastructure projects will commence shortly.”

On-site condition assessments have been conducted to help prioritise projects that are necessary to the health and safety of communities and designed to meet the specific needs of each location.

7.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Health Workers out to break HEP.C stigma

By Jillian Mundy

Don’t be shamed to be screened or treated for hepatitis C. It is now curable in as little as eight weeks with the latest medicine, which is really available in Australia. That’s the message Aboriginal health worker Aaron Everett and land manager Jarrod Edwards want to spread. The two Tasmanian Aboriginal men, spoke at the second World Indigenous Peoples, Conference on Viral Hepatitis in Alaska thi month, want to break the stigma around viral hepatitis.

Mr Edwards is keen to share the journey of his own diagnosis treatment and recovery from hep-C. “I want to encourage other Aboriginal people to get screened and if they test positive have the treatment, “he told the Koori Mail.

“The advances in the treatment have come a long way and the side –effects I got don’t exist now”.

Mr Edwards encouraged people to also talk about hep-C to break the stigma. He said he was shocked when an Aboriginal health check in 2006 returned positive for the illness.

“I was an intravenous drug user at the time, but I was always really clean and careful with injecting equipment. I really don’t know how I got it. The diagnosis hit me for a six,” he said.

At first he did not seek treatment attributing the reluctance to his lifestyle.

“It was a stigma thing. I felt dirty,“ he said. “It was a long journey though. It took me five years.

“It was the holistic, community approach of the Aboriginal health service that gave me the ability to begin my healing journey, which included working on country”.

Mr Edwards said treatment at the time took 12 months and included weekly injections, daily pills, anti-depressants and regular visits to a psychiatrist.

There were also side-effects such as hair loss, fatigue to the point of passing out and very fragile and dry skin.

Mr Edwards has no doubt that without treatment he would be dead. “My liver would have packed it in,“ he said.

Mr Edwards is now cured and, coupled with his lifestyle changes, is proud to be a father and productive member of his community.

He also attributes his healing to the support of his partner, Aboriginal health practitioner Candy Bartlett.

“I wanted to have a long-term relationship, a family, a home of our own and be able to come back and on country”, he said.

DON’T HESITATE

These days Mr Edwards urges people not hesitate in seeking treatment.

“Don’t be ashamed of it. It doesn’t matter how you got it; just go and treat it,” he says.

Mr Everett, one of the clinical team working with patients during screening and treatment for hepatitis C at the Aboriginal health service in Hobart, said people are often shamed about the virus.

“it’s not a highly spoken about virus, because of the stigma on how it might have been contracted, often through sharing injecting equipment,” he said.

Mr Everett wants people to be open about being screened and treated, to help break the stigma surrounding viral hepatitis and in turn help eliminate it.

“Come in and be checked. Don’t be ashamed. It is not a death sentence,“ he said. “But it’s a different story if left untreated, especially when combined with an unhealthy lifestyle or other health issues it can be an extra burden, yet can be totally cured.”.

New direct-acting antiviral medicines which were added to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) last year have revolutionised hep-C treatment by increasing the cure rate to close to 100% and reducing treatment duration and side-effects.

Viral Hepatitis is usually transmitted through the re-use of contaminated injecting equipment. It can be spread through unscreened blood transfusions and inadequate sterilisation of medical equipment (highly unlikely in Australia these days), It can also be transmitted sexually, from mother to child and through contaminated sharp grooming equipment.

People with hepatitis can be unaware, and unknowingly pass on the virus.

The conference Mr Edwards and Mr Everett are attending aims to ensure Indigenous communities around the world are given the same access to prevention, testing and treatment as other people.

The World Hepatitis Alliance aims to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030

8. Deadly Choices QLD trains up the Nganampa health team

Just like the Nganampa Health Service staff, you can eat healthy and be the best version of yourself.

Some great photos from when Deadly Choices were up in Umuwa to share their experiences, wisdom and host training for the Nganampa team

Please share

 

Aboriginal Health this weeks TOP 35 #jobalerts @MiwatjHealth @NATSIHWA @CATSINaM

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1-5 : Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (CKAHSAC)

6.Aboriginal Coordinator -Aboriginal Quitline Program

7.Aboriginal Health Worker/Practitioner , Maternal and Child health( Strong Mums Solid Kids program)

8-9 : Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA \ Program caseworker /counsellor

10.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

11. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

12.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

13. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

14. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

15.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

16 – 35 Employment at Miwatj Health NT Nurses Health Workers etc

 

  Register or more INFO

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1-5 : Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (CKAHSAC)

 

As a Community Controlled Aboriginal Health Service, Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (CKAHSAC) provides a range of culturally safe and high quality services specifically designed to improve the wellness and health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

CKAHSAC is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to ensuring there is no discrimination in the workplace. For further information please visit our website www.ckahsac.org.au

These position will be based with Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service Aboriginal Corporation. The successful applicant will be required to undertake duties specified in the Job and Person Specification.

All enquiries and requests for Job Descriptions must be directed to Lee-Ann Miller, Human Resources Coordinator via

Email: Lee-Ann.Miller@ckahsac.org.au  or telephone 8626 2500

How to Apply:

Applications in writing should address the selection criteria contained in the Job Description and include a cover letter outlining your suitability to the position.

Applications should be addressed to: Lee-Ann Miller, Human Resources Coordinator, CKAHSAC, PO Box 314, CEDUNA SA 5690.

CLOSING DATE: 5.00PM ON WEDNESDAY 6th SEPTEMBER 2017

Please note: Late applications will not be considered.

  1. ABORIGINAL HEALTH PRACTITIONER/WORKER – several positions available
  • Aboriginal Health Practitioner/Worker – Connected Beginnings (0 – 4 Years
  • – 12 months with possibility of extension – Subject to funding
  • Aboriginal Health Practitioner/Worker – New Directions (5 – 14 Years)
  • – 12 month employment contract – Subject to funding
  • Fixed Term Contract , subject to funding
  • AHW 4 – salary range $67,635.00 to $70,762.00 per annum
  • Essential – Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care qualifications
  • Full Time 1.0 FTEThe position of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner/Worker is to provide flexible, holistic and culturally sensitive health services to clients and community, and to improve health outcomes and better access to health services.

2.Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner – sexual health

3.ABORIGINAL TORRES Strait Islander Health Practitioner/WORKER – Outreach – Female

4.ABORIGINAL TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PRACTITIONER/WORKER – clinic – MALE

  • Full Time , Up to 12 month contract SUJECT TO FUNDING
  • AHW 4 – salary range $67,635.00 to $70,762.00 per annum
  • Essential – ABORIGINAL AND/OR TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PRACTITIONER Certificate 4 – Sexual Health
  • Essential – ABORIGINAL AND/OR TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER
  • HEALTH PRACTITIONER Certificate and/or 4 Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care – Outreach – Female and Clinic Male
  • Several position available

The position of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner – Sexual Health is to provide flexible, holistic and culturally sensitive health services to clients and community, and to improve health outcomes and better access to health services.

The position of Aboriginal  and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner/Worker – Outreach – Female and Clinic – Male is to provide flexible, holistic and culturally sensitive health services to clients and community, and to improve  health outcomes and better access to health services.

5.Registered Nurse – Mother’s and Babies Coordinator

Up to 12 month employment contract with a possible extension

RN 2 , Level 1 (Depending on qualifications)

Essential – Register Nurse with a current practicing certificate and a current Immunisationprovider

Full Time 1.0 FTE

The position of Registered Nurse – Mother’s and Babies Coordinator is to provide flexible, holistic and culturally sensitive health services to clients and community, and to improve health  outcomes and better access to maternal women & child health services.

6.Aboriginal Coordinator -Aboriginal Quitline Program

 

We’re passionate about nurturing careers.

We support new innovation and thinking, and openly collaborate and share new ideas. We’re healthy and active in our lives and wellbeing is encouraged at every level.  Our people play an important role in the future of health and healthcare and we believe that working together, we’re stronger.

About Us

Medibank is a leading private health insurer with 40 years of experience delivering better health to Australians. We look after the health cover needs of millions of customers and deliver a wide range of programs to support health and wellbeing in the community.

The Opportunity

Medibank is delivering the best possible smoking cessation outcomes for Aboriginal clients in NSW and ACT on behalf of Quitline, the Cancer Institute of NSW and Healthdirect Australia.

The Aboriginal Quitline Program provides both inbound and outbound calls to Aboriginal clients who are considering smoking cessation. We have a dedicated team of counsellors who provide specific interventions such as delivering one off counselling, focusing on quit planning, supporting with quitting (including managing withdrawal symptoms), providing strategies for relapse prevention and providing outbound milestone checks.

Joining our Relationship Management team, the Aboriginal Coordinator will provide team leadership and program direction in relation to Quitline, specifically focused on the delivery of the program to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Clients. This is a 12 month maternity leave contract and will be critical in promoting the service & liaising with Aboriginal Health workers & key Aboriginal Health & Community Controlled Services to ensure strong partnerships. The role will have a distinct community focus and will be key in the promotion of the program amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. This is a satisfyingly broad role with a range of responsibilities including:

  • Develop and implement Aboriginal Health Community Engagement Strategies for the NSW and ACT Aboriginal Quitline program
  • Foster relationships within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to promote awareness of services by travelling to identified communities;
  • Represent NSW Quitline at Aboriginal Health community events, organising and hosting promotional stalls as required;
  • Lead Aboriginal Advisory Groups with participation from key influencers in Aboriginal health groups to inform service design and the delivery of service improvement initiatives;
  • Lead engagement efforts to increase the variety of services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities;
  • Support the development and delivery of cultural education and training across the business and contribute to the Aboriginal Employment Strategy.

About You

You have exceptional communication and stakeholder engagement skills which enable you to build strong and lasting relationships across a range of internal and external stakeholders/clients and community groups. Critical thinking, decision making and problem solving skills are your strong suit as is your ability to lead and motivate others to achieve shared goals and objectives. You will also have the following skills and experience:

  • Strong community engagement experience with Aboriginal communities, ideally in health, welfare or similar;
  • Strong delivery focus; project management skills will be highly regarded;

This position will only be open to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander applicants – Medibank considers this to be a genuine occupational requirement under the relevant anti-discrimination legislation.

What We Offer

In return for your hard work we offer a range of great benefits. Furthermore, we take the health and wellbeing of our employees seriously, offering flexible working conditions and encouraging well-being at all levels of life.

Medibank is an equal opportunity employer committed to providing a working environment that embraces and values diversity and inclusion. If you have any support or access requirements, we encourage you to advise us at the time of application to assist you through the recruitment process.

A Career at Medibank adds up to more. More achievement. More progress. More passion and more innovation for health.

For a career option that will suit you better, click to apply.

 

 

7.Aboriginal Health Worker/Practitioner , Maternal and Child health( Strong Mums Solid Kids program)
                       
 
Opportunity to Improve Child and Maternal Health Outcomes.
·         Join a well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in South Australia!
·         A Full-time and A part-time position available!
·         $59,045 – $66,566 (pro-rata for part time) depending on qualifications and experience PLUS super, salary sacrifice options and more!
About the Organisation
Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia, providing a range of health care and community support services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and advance their social, cultural and economic status. The organisation places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcome for clients.  The Women, Children and Family Health Service aims to support safe nurturing environments for pregnant women, infants and children, increase uptake and utilisation of services with an emphasis for clients to encourage continued engagement with services.

About the Opportunity
Nunkuwarrin Yunti now has two opportunities for Aboriginal Health Workers /Practitioners (Maternal and Child Health) to join their multidisciplinary team based in Adelaide, on a full-time and part-time (0.5FTE) basis.
Reporting to the Maternal Child Health Coordinator, you’ll be responsible for communicating information about maternal, infant and child health messages, facilitating internal and external referral and ongoing engagement with a range of social and specialist services and supporting the engagement of individuals and families in opportunities to access information and resources.
Some of your key responsibilities will include (but will not be limited to):
·         Providing up to date information and education to individuals, groups and the wider Aboriginal community;
·         Providing client care in line with agreed best practice guidelines and service protocols;
·         Linking families to child care and early learning environment programs;
·         Attending multi-disciplinary meetings;
·         Contributing to case review and case conferences;
·         Contributing to the development and review of care plans; and
·         Developing and maintaining effective internal and external networks in a professional manner.
To be successful in this role, you will hold a Certificate IV in Aboriginal Primary Health Care (Practice), have previous demonstrated vocation experience in maternal, infant and/or child health and an understanding of best practice approaches to comprehensive primary health care.
You will also need to have a sound knowledge of the issues effective Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and an ability to participate in the development and coordination of care plans.
Candidates will need to have experience in the use of computer software, especially Patient Information Recall Systems and other databases.
A current Medicare Provider Number, or eligibility to obtain one are essential to this role.
While not essential, candidates with professional registration with AHPRA, a Certificate IV in Aboriginal Primary Health Care (Aboriginal Maternal and Infant Care) and qualifications and/or training with immunisation will be highly regarded.
To download the full-time position description, please click here.
To download the part-time position description, please click here.
Further information from
Clare levy, Coordinator SMSK
Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc
182-190 Wakefield Street, ADELAIDE SA 5000
T: 08 8406 1600 | F: 08 8232 0949

8-9 : Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program caseworker /counsellor

Two New Vacancies are available within the Link Up Program.

Both positions are 12 month Contract position that may be extended subject to funding.

Link Up Caseworker:   (Click for more information)

Link Up Counsellor: (Click for more information)

Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program is funded by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (Federal), and also receives reunion funding from the Department of Premier & Cabinet, Aboriginal Affairs & Reconciliation (State).

Link Up provides family tracing, reunion and counselling services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their families who have been separated under the past policies and practices of the Australian Government. Assistance is also provided to people over the age of 18 years who have been adopted, fostered or raised in institutions.

For more information about Link Up (Click here)

Please feel free to communicate this opportunity through your networks.

10.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

For over 30 years, Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service has provided essential and culturally appropriate medical, preventive, allied and oral health services to Aboriginal communities.  Located in the Macleay and Nambucca valleys on the Mid North Coast of NSW.  Durri is committed to making health care and education accessible to improve the health status and wellbeing of our community.

An exciting opportunity has arisen for a Aboriginal Health Worker with an interest in the area of Drug & Alcohol to join the passionate team at our Nambucca Heads clinic site.

This challenging role would suit an experienced and motivated Aboriginal Health Worker with a desire to achieve positive outcomes in indigenous health.  You will work with a dedicated team of healthcare professionals.

The successful candidate will enjoy beautiful beaches, World Heritage Rainforest, and relaxed lifestyle of the mid north coast whilst making a real difference in the community.

Benefits include 9.5% super, attractive salary sacrifice, training and access to an employee assistance program.

To apply to to our website:  www.durri.org.au, download a copy of the Application Pack and submit this along with your resume not exceeding 4 pages, and your submission for each of the selection criteria to: hr@durri.org.au, or mail to:

Application

Chief Operations Officer

Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Services

PO Box 136

Kempsey  NSW 2440

Applications close: 21 August 2017 at 5.00 pm 

Applicants must have a current Police and Working with Children Check Clearance and Confirmation of Aboriginality.

Pursuant to Section 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) Australian Aboriginality is a genuine occupational qualification for this position.

Applications that do not attach a completed selection criteria submission will not be considered. 

Contact: Paula 02 65602360

11. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

The Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service is a fast growing and innovative health service that aims to provide the local Aboriginal community with culturally appropriate, high quality care. The following position is now available:-

Aboriginal Health Worker
Part Time 22.8 hours per week (Ongoing)

The successful applicant will be part of a service aimed at providing intensive case work and direct support to Aboriginal people.  You will facilitate clinical assessments, work in partnership with the clinical practice, and provide cultural expertise to ensure the provision of holistic and culturally appropriate health care. You will also assist Aboriginal people to access appropriate primary care services, and liaise with internal and external practitioners to assist in the delivery of culturally appropriate services. You will work in North Geelong and also in Colac.   Qualifications as an Aboriginal Health Worker are desirable or a willingness to undertake study to achieve the qualification.

This is an identified position, open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants only.

If you have extensive experience in related areas of work and a solid understanding of the issues confronting Aboriginal communities then we want to hear from you.

A Position Description is available from www.wathaurong.org.au

A police check, Working with Children Card and a driving license are required for all positions.

Applications to be sent to Human Resources preferably via email jobs@wathaurong.org.au or post to Wathaurong Aboriginal Cooperative, PO Box 402, North Geelong 3215.  Applications that fail to answer the key selection criteria will not be considered.

Closing date for these positions is 20 August 2017

Wathaurong is a Child Safe organisation

Wathaurong is a smoke free workplace

12.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Salary: Level B $98,775 – $117,290 p.a. plus 9.5% superannuation or Level C $120,993 – $139,510 p.a. plus 9.5%superannuation

Indigenous Eye Health in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne has developed and is supporting implementation of the Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision. The work is of national and international significance and is demonstrating effective translational research through the systematic implementation of evidenced-based, sustainable public health reform in Indigenous eye health.

You will support the regional implementation of The Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision from a health system perspective and contribute to and lead improvements in Indigenous eye health across Australia. As part of a small, strategic and responsive team, you will collaborate with stakeholders within regions, jurisdictions and nationally to implement the Roadmap recommendations and provide technical advice and support. You will contribute to Roadmap advocacy and support submission of national and international peer reviewed publications and be actively involved in conference and meeting presentations.

To be successful in the position, you must have:
-Leadership experience or demonstrated potential for leadership and engagement in research or health systems
-Demonstrated understanding and knowledge of key issues related to Indigenous health
-Demonstrated experience working, communicating and engaging effectively with Indigenous communities
-Demonstrated capacity to maintain and contribute to industry partnerships and collaborations with a broad range of stakeholders.

This could be the next great step in your career. In addition, you will have access to many benefits enjoyed by our staff. To learn more about the benefits and working at the University, see http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/working/benefits and http://joining.unimelb.edu.au

This is a re-advertised position. Previous applicants need not re-apply.

Close date: 3 Sep 2017

Position Description and Selection Criteria

Download File 0043281_REVISED_Level B or C_July 2017.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/search/info/selection-criteria

13. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this exciting role.

The AMA

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) is the most influential membership organisation representing registered medical practitioners and medical students of Australia.

The AMA exists to promote and protect the professional interests of doctors and the health care needs of patients and communities.

The Federal Secretariat of the AMA contributes to the achievement of this Mission through reinforcing the AMA’s peak status in the development and implementation of health policy and identifying and acting upon the main issues affecting members.

The Federal Secretariat also delivers relevant member services and works with members directly to grow and value membership of the AMA.

Public Health

The AMA’s Public Health team is responsible for the AMA’s work on population and community health issues, including prevention, substance abuse, child and youth health and Indigenous health. The Secretariat assists in developing the AMA’s policies and political advocacy on Public Health issues of national importance.

The Role 

The Policy Adviser (maternity leave cover, part-time) will provide high level policy and strategic advice to the AMA President on Indigenous health issues. The Policy Adviser will write policy responses and take a lead in the development of AMA policy on all Indigenous health issues.

The Policy Adviser will develop policy positions for consideration by the Task Force on Indigenous Health and resolutions informed by research and input from within the AMA and when required from other medical organisations and health stakeholders.

The Policy Adviser will take a lead in the development of strategies to advocate AMA policies and prepare written material to support AMA campaigns and advocacy on Indigenous health.

The Policy Adviser will manage the AMA Indigenous Medical Scholarship and coordinate support for scholarship recipients, and will also coordinate the production of the AMA’s annual Report Card on Indigenous Health,

The Policy Adviser will provide secretariat support for the AMA Taskforce on Indigenous Health, represent the AMA at meetings and on external committees such as the Close the Gap Campaign Steering Committee.

Selection Criteria

  • demonstrated experience in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the ability to communicate in a culturally sensitive manner
  • knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health issues
  • experience working as a Policy Adviser or similar type of role on Indigenous health issues;
  • established networks in the Indigenous health sector;
  • relevant qualifications or a combination of qualifications and experience relevant to the role;
  • demonstrated ability to contribute to policy development;
  • an ability to identify relevant issues and to collate and present information to substantiate policy advice;
  • demonstrated ability to work independently, using initiative to solve problems and produce high quality accurate work with a minimum of supervision and under tight deadlines;
  • excellent communication skills both written and verbal;
  • the ability to liaise effectively and build collaborative working relationships with stakeholders;
  • demonstrated ability to work effectively as part of a small team, including the ability to supervise staff;
  • experience in using modern computer software and office systems to analyse data, produce documents dealing with complex issues, and maintain accurate records;
  • an enthusiastic and flexible approach.

To apply for this role please submit a cover letter and an up to date resume via SEEK. For further information or for a confidential discussion in respect of this role please contact Alyce on 02 6270 5482. Remuneration for this role will be determined after assessment of relevant skills, experience and qualifications.

Closing Date for Applications – Tuesday 22 August 2017 – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

APPLY HERE

 

14. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

To find out more, visit http://www.cmsac.com.au/about-us/

About the Opportunity

Exciting opportunities exist for 2 Full-Time, experienced and passionate Aboriginal Health Workers / Practitioners to join the CMSAC team.

Reporting directly to the Senior Registered Nurse, the Aboriginal Health Worker will be responsible for providing supportive, effective and efficient Primary Health Care services to clients in the clinic and within the community.

As an Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner, your responsibilities will include (but not limited to):

  • Work with members of the clinical team to deliver Primary Health services to clients
  • In collaboration with the multidisciplinary team, conduct health checks on clients
  • Using the Therapeutic Guidelines, perform consultations with clinic clients, including listening to their story, providing a basic physical examination and consulting with more experienced clinical staff as necessary, and to advise on the treatment and management of a client’s health problems
  • Assist the Senior Registered Nurse and Program Nurses to address areas of improvement
  • Provide education to clients and families on health care and health promotion
  • Demonstrate leadership in maintaining infection control principles
  • Have an understanding of CMSAC reporting requirements

About You

The successful applicant will have a demonstrated ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. You will have a sound understanding of the unique issues impacting the health of Aboriginal peoples whilst have experience in the provision of health promotion programs.

In addition to the above, the successful applicant will possess:

  • Certificate IV Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice
  • Current Apply First Aid certificate, or willingness to obtain
  • Current, unencumbered C-Class Manual Drivers Licence
  • Working with Children Check and a National Police Clearance, or willingness to obtain
  • The ability to pass a pre-employment drug and alcohol test

About the Benefits

CMSAC is dedicated to recognising and rewarding dedication. As such, you will enjoy an attractive remuneration package including salary sacrificing options!

In addition:

  • CMSAC will negotiate relocation assistance with the right candidate
  • You’ll enjoy a fantastic work/life balance, with Monday – Friday hours, 8:30am – 5.00pm and 5 weeks annual leave!

Applications close Monday 21 August at 5pm.

APPLY FOR THIS JOB

15.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

The Role
Cornerstone Medical are seeking Vocationally Registered Doctor for an exciting permanent position within an Aboriginal Medical Service in the NT. You be will be responsible for providing holistic primary health care services alongside an experienced team of Registered Nurses and visiting specialists.The Centre
You will work alongside an experienced team of 1 additional GP, 14 nurses, allied health workers, and an experienced support team. The hours of work are 5pmwith no on call or after hours. There is a pharmacy onsite, numerous health programs and visiting specialists weekly.The location
You will be located on the beautiful and untouched coastline of NT; right on the coast. This is an is an indigenous community in one of the largest most remote towns of Australia’s Northern Territory. The renowned fishing town is the major service centre for the population of 2,300 as well as more than 30 outstations or homelands, with a school, health clinic, multiple food outlets, two supermarkets, service station, arts centre, créche and a tarmac airport with daily commercial flights to Darwin.The Criteria 
To be eligible for this position you must meet the following criteria:

  • MBBS
  • Vocational AHPRA registration
  • Interest in indigenous health, Chronic Disease and remote GP work

The Package
On appointment for this position, you will be offered:

  • OTE $240-350,000 per annum including
  • Free Accommodation and full relocation assistance
  • Quarterly return flights to Darwin with accommodation
  • Yearly retention allowance lump sum $35,000
  • Salary sacrificing up to $30,000
  • Professional development allowance and Attraction allowance
  • 4 return trips to Darwin per annum incl accommodation
  • House, vehicle, laptop and phone
  • Indemnity insurance reimbursed
This really is a fantastic opportunity to expand your career in Indigenous Health as a part of a supportive and community focused organisation.  For more information on this or other exciting opportunities please phone Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe today on 07 3171 2929 or email aoife@cmr.com.au
Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe
07 3171 2929

16.Employment at Miwatj Health NT

Miwatj Health offers a wide range of employment opportunities for health and other professionals, in a unique primary healthcare environment.

We offer satisfying career paths for doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Practitioners, allied health staff, public/population health practitioners, health informatics specialists, administrative, financial and management personnel.

If you are suitably qualified and are looking for a rewarding and challenging experience in one of the most diverse, beautiful and interesting regions of Australia, we invite you to apply for any of the current vacancies listed below.

All applications for current vacancies must include:

  • a current Resumé,
  • names and contact details of at least two referees, at least one of whom must be a employment referee.

We encourage applications from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly those with links to and knowledge of local communities in the region.

Separately from the list of current vacancies, you may also submit a general expression of interest, with a current Resume, and we shall retain it on file for future reference if an appropriate vacancy arises.

Miwatj strongly prefers that all applications and expressions of interest submit your application via our recruitment platform by clicking the link below.

You may contact HR via recruitment@miwatj.com.au. However, if that is not possible, EOI or resume may be mailed or faxed, to arrive by the closing date, to:
Miwatj Health – Human Resources Department
PO Box 519
Nhulunbuy NT 0881
Fax number (08) 8987 1670

See Website for all details and APPLY

https://miwatj.applynow.net.au/

 

Aboriginal #Nutrition Health and #Sugar : @healthgovau Health Star Rating System review closes 17 August

 ” The Health Star Rating System has been marred by anomalies. Milo powder (44% sugar) increased its basic 1.5 Stars to 4.5 by assuming it will be added to skim milk. About one in every seven products bearing health stars goes against the Department of Health’s own recommendations.

Those of us working in public health question why obvious junk foods get any stars at all.”

See Sugar, sugar everywhere MJA insight article in full Part 3 below

  ” In 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2 years and over consumed an average of 75 grams of free sugars per day (equivalent to 18 teaspoons of white sugar)1. Added sugars made up the majority of free sugar intakes with an average of 68 grams (or 16 teaspoons) consumed and an additional 7 grams of free sugars came from honey and fruit juice. “

ABS Report abs-indigenous-consumption-of-added-sugars 

See Part 1 below for Aboriginal sugar facts

The Health Star Rating (HSR) Advisory Committee (HSRAC), responsible for overseeing the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the HSR system is undertaking a five year review of the HSR system.

The five year review of the system is well underway, with a public submission process opening on 8 June 2017 on the Australian Department of Health’s online Consultation Hub.

Since the consultation period has been opened there has been strong interest in the system from stakeholders representing a diverse range of views.

To ensure that as much evidence as possible is captured, along with stakeholders’ views on the system, a further two week extension to the consultation period has been agreed and it will now close on 17 August 2017

See full survey details Part 2 Below

Part 1 Aboriginal sugar facts

ABS Report

abs-indigenous-consumption-of-added-sugars

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consume around 14 per cent of their total energy intake as free sugars, according to data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that free sugars contribute less than 10 per cent of total energy intake.

Director of Health, Louise Gates, said the new ABS report showed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are consuming an average of 18 teaspoons (or 75 grams) of free sugars per day (almost two cans of soft drink), four teaspoons more than non-Indigenous people (14 teaspoons or 60 grams).

OTHER KEY FINDINGS

    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people derived an average of 14% of their daily energy from free sugars, exceeding the WHO recommendation that children and adults should limit their intake of free sugars to less than 10% of dietary energy.
    • Free sugars made the greatest contribution to energy intakes among older children and young adults. For example, teenage boys aged 14-18 years derived 18 per cent of their dietary energy from free sugars as they consumed the equivalent of 25 teaspoons (106 grams) of free sugars per day. This amount is equivalent to more than two and a half cans of soft drink. Women aged 19-30 years consumed 21 teaspoons (87 grams) of free sugars, which contributed 17 per cent to their total energy intake.
    • The majority (87%) of free sugars were consumed from energy dense, nutrient-poor ‘discretionary’ foods and beverages. Two thirds (67%) of all free sugars consumed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people came from beverages, led by soft drinks, sports and energy drinks (28%), followed by fruit and vegetable juices and drinks (12%), cordials (9.5%), and sugars added to beverages such as tea and coffee (9.4%), alcoholic beverages (4.9%) and milk beverages (3.4%).
    • Intakes were higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in non-remote areas where the average consumption was 78 grams (18.5 teaspoons), around 3 teaspoons (12 grams) higher than people living in remote areas (65 grams or 15.5 teaspoons).
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed 15 grams (almost 4 teaspoons) more free sugars on average than non-Indigenous people. Beverages were the most common source of free sugars for both populations, however Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people derived a higher proportion of free sugars from beverages than non-Indigenous people (67% compared with 51%).

Part 2 @healthgovau Health Star Rating System review closes 17 August

Introduction

The Health Star Rating (HSR) Advisory Committee (HSRAC), responsible for overseeing the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the HSR system, is undertaking a five year review of the HSR system. The HSR system is a front-of-pack labelling (FoPL) scheme intended to assist consumers in making healthier diet choices. The findings of the review will be provided to the Australia and New Zealand Ministerial Forum on Food Regulation (Forum) in mid‑2019.

In parallel with this consultation on the HSR system five year review, the HSRAC is conducting a dedicated investigation of issues and concerns raised about the form of the food (‘as prepared’) rules in the Guide for Industry to the HSR Calculator. These enable additional nutrients to be taken into account when calculating star ratings based on foods prepared according to on-label directions. A specific consultation process seeking input into this investigation opened on 19 May 2017 and will close at 11.59 pm 30 June 2017. The form of the food (‘as prepared’) consultation can be viewed on the Australian Department of Health’s Consultation Hub.

The HSR system

The HSR system is a public health and consumer choice intervention designed to encourage people to make healthier dietary choices. The HSR system is a voluntary FoPL scheme that rates the overall nutritional profile of packaged food and assigns it a rating from ½ a star to 5 stars. It is not a system that defines what a ‘healthy’ or ‘unhealthy’ food is, but rather provides a quick, standardised way to compare similar packaged foods at retail level. The more stars, the healthier the choice. The HSR system is not a complete solution to assist consumers with choosing foods in line with dietary guidelines, but should be viewed as a way to assist consumers to make healthier packaged food choices.  Other sources of information, such as the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the New Zealand Eating and Activity Guidelines, also assist consumers in their overall food purchasing decisions.

The HSR system aims to:

1. Enable direct comparison between individual foods that, within the overall diet, may contribute to the risk factors of various diet related chronic diseases;

2. Be readily understandable and meaningful across socio-economic groups, culturally and linguistically diverse groups and low literacy/low numeracy groups; and

3. Increase awareness of foods that, within the overall diet, may contribute positively or negatively to the risk factors of diet related chronic diseases.

The HSR system consists of the graphics, including the words ‘Health Star Rating’, the rules identified in the HSR system Style Guide, the algorithm and methodology for calculating the HSR identified in the Guide for Industry to the HSR Calculator, and the education and marketing associated with the HSR implementation.

The HSR system is a joint Australian, state and territory and New Zealand government initiative developed in collaboration with industry, public health and consumer groups. The system is funded by the Australian government, the New Zealand government and all Australian jurisdictions during the initial five year implementation period.

From June 2014, food manufacturers started to apply HSRs to the front of food product packaging. Further information on the HSR system is available on the HSR website. The New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) website also provides information on the HSR system in New Zealand.

Purpose and scope of the review
The five year review of the HSR system will consider if, and how well, the objectives of the HSR system have been met, and identify options for improvements to and ongoing implementation of the system (Terms of reference for the five year review).

With a focus on processed packaged foods, the objective of the HSR system is:

To provide convenient, relevant and readily understood nutrition information and /or guidance on food packs to assist consumers to make informed food purchases and healthier eating choices.

The HSRAC has agreed that the areas of communication, system enhancements, and monitoring and governance will be considered when identifying whether the objectives of the HSR system have been achieved.

Although HSRAC will need to be a part of the review process, a degree of independence is required and independent management and oversight of the review is an important factor to ensure credible and unbiased reporting. An independent consultant will be engaged to undertake the review. Specific detail about the scope of the review will be outlined in the statement of requirement for the independent consultant. A timeline for the five year review of the HSR system has been drafted and will be updated throughout the review.

Next steps in the review process

As part of the five year review, HSRAC is seeking evidence based submissions on the consultation questions provided in this discussion paper.

This consultation is open to the public, state and territory governments, relevant government agencies, industry and public health and consumer groups.

Making a submission

The HSRAC is seeking submissions on the merits of the HSR system, particularly in response to the consultation questions below. The aim of the questions is to assist respondents in providing relevant commentary. However, submissions are not limited to answering the questions provided.  Please provide evidence or examples to support comments. Some areas of this review are technical in nature therefore comments on technical issues should be based on scientific evidence and/or supported by research where appropriate. Where possible, please provide citations to published studies or other sources.

While the HSRAC will consider all submissions and proposals put forward, those that are not well supported by evidence are unlikely to be addressed as part of the five year review.

Enquiries specifically relating to this submission process can be made via email to: frontofpack@health.gov.au. Please DO NOT provide submissions by email.

After the consultation period closes the HSRAC will consider the submissions received and will prepare a summary table of the issues raised which will be published on the HSR website. All information within the summary table will be de-identifiable and will not contain any confidential material.

HSRAC will treat information of a confidential nature as such. Please ensure that material supplied in confidence is clearly marked ‘IN CONFIDENCE’ and is provided in a separate attachment to non-confidential material. Information provided in the submissions will only be used for the purpose of the five year review of the HSR system and will not be used for any other purpose without explicit permission.

Please see the Terms of Use and Privacy pages at the bottom of this page for further information on maintaining the security of your data.

For further information about the HSR system, including its resources and governance structure, please refer to the Australian HSR website and the New Zealand MPI website.

Part 3 Sugar Sugar MJA Insights

Originally published Here

IT’S hard to escape sugar, not only in what we eat and drink, but also in the daily news and views that seep into so many corners of our lives.

There’s nothing new about concern over sugar. I can trace my own fights with the sugar industry back to the 1960s, and since their inception in 1981, the Australian Dietary Guidelines have advised limiting sugary foods and drinks. The current emphasis in many articles in newspapers, magazines, popular books and online blogs, however, go further and recommend eliminating every grain of the stuff from the daily diet.

Taking an academic approach to the topic, the George Institute for Global Health has published data based on the analysis of 34 135 packaged foods currently listed in their Australian FoodSwitch database. They found added sugar in 87% of discretionary food products (known as junk foods in common parlance) and also in 52% of packaged foods that can be described as basic or core foods.

The George Institute’s analysis is particularly pertinent to the Department of Health’s Health Star Rating System, and found that some of the anomalies in the scheme could be eliminated by penalising foods for their content of added sugars rather than using total sugars in the product, as is currently the case.

The definition of “added sugars” used in Australia also needs attention, a topic that has been stressed in the World Health Organization’s guidelines. I will return to this later.

In Australia, the nutrition information panel on the label of packaged foods must include the total sugars present. This includes sugars that have been added (known as extrinsic sugars) as well as any sugars present naturally in ingredients such as milk, fruit or vegetables (intrinsic sugars).

There is no medical evidence to suggest that intrinsic sugars are a problem – at least not if they occur in “intact” ingredients. If you consume fruit, for example, the natural dietary fibre and the bulk of the fruit will limit the amount of the fruit’s intrinsic sugars you consume. However, if the sugar is extracted from the structure of the fruit, it becomes easy to consume much larger quantities. Few people could munch their way through five apples, but if you extract their juice, the drink would let you take in all the sugar and kilojoules of five apples in less than a minute.

The Australian Dietary Guidelines do not include advice to restrict fruit itself because there is high level evidence of its health value. The guidelines do, however, recommend that dried fruit and fruit juice be restricted – the equivalent of four dried apricot halves or 125 mL juice consumed only occasionally.

Contrary to the belief of some bloggers, Australia’s dietary guidelines have never suggested replacing fat with sugar. That was a tactic of some food companies who marketed many “low” or “reduced” fat foods where the fat was replaced with sugars or some kind of refined starch.

The wording of Australia’s guideline on sugar has changed. The initial advice to “avoid too much sugar” led to the sugar industry’s multimillion dollar campaign “Sugar, a natural part of life”. This included distributing “educational” material to the general public, politicians, doctors, dentists, pharmacists and other health professionals discussing the importance of a “balanced diet”.

In spite of fierce lobbying by the sugar industry, the next revision of the guidelines retained a sugar guideline, although it was watered down to “eat only moderate amounts of sugars”. Some school canteen operators reported that they had been confronted by sweet-talking sellers of junk foods omitting the word “only” from this guideline.

The evidence for sugar’s adverse effects on dental health have long been known, but the evidence against sugar and its potential role in obesity and, consequently, in type 2 diabetes and other health problems has grown stronger. The most recent revision of the National Health and Medical Research Council’s Dietary Guidelines, therefore, emphasises the need to “limit” added sugars and lists the foods that need particular attention.

Sugary drinks have been specifically targeted because the evidence against them is strong and extends beyond epidemiological studies. Double-blind trials now clearly link sugary drinks with weight gain, the only exceptions being a few trials funded by the food industry.

Added sugar is not the only topic for public health concern, and hence the government’s Health Star Rating System was set up to introduce a simple front-of-pack labelling scheme to assist Australians reduce their intake of saturated fat, salt and sugars from packaged foods.

A specially commissioned independent report (Evaluation of scientific evidence relating to Front of Pack Labelling by Dr Jimmy Chun Yu Louie and Professor Linda Tapsell of the School of Health Sciences, University of Wollongong) found that added sugars were the real problem, but the food industry argued that the scheme should include total sugars because this was already a mandatory inclusion on food labels and routine chemical analysis couldn’t determine the source of sugars.

This was a strange argument since food manufacturers know exactly how much sugar they add to any product, just as they know how many “offset” points the Health Star Rating System allows for the inclusion of fruit, vegetable, nuts or legumes. The content of these ingredients is only disclosed on the food label if used in the product’s name.

The Health Star Rating System has been marred by anomalies. Milo powder (44% sugar) increased its basic 1.5 Stars to 4.5 by assuming it will be added to skim milk. About one in every seven products bearing health stars goes against the Department of Health’s own recommendations.

Those of us working in public health question why obvious junk foods get any stars at all.

How can caramel topping or various types of confectionery, such as strawberry flavoured liquorice, each get 2.5 stars? Why do some chocolates sport 3.5 stars, while worthy products such as Greek yoghurt without any added sugars get 1.5 and a breakfast cereal with 27% sugar gets four stars?

The fact that over a third of Australian’s energy intake comes from discretionary products (40% for children) is the elephant in the room for excess weight. We need to reduce consumption of these products and allotting them health stars is not helping.

It’s clearly time to follow our dietary guidelines and limit both discretionary products and added sugar. Of the nutrients used in the current algorithm for health stars, the George Institute’s analysis shows that counting added rather than total sugars has the greatest individual capacity to discriminate between core and discretionary foods.

However, in moving to mandate added sugars on food labels and using added sugars in health stars, it’s vital to define these sugars. The World Health Organization has done so: “Free sugars refer to monosaccharides (such as glucose, fructose) and disaccharides (such as sucrose or table sugar) added to foods and drinks by the manufacturer, cook or consumer, and sugars naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates”.

Regular sugar in Australia could be described as cane juice concentrate. It has no nutrients other than its carbohydrate. Fruit juice concentrates are also just sugars with no nutrients other than carbohydrates. At present the Health Star Rating System allows products using apple or pear juice concentrate to be counted as “fruit” and used to offset the total sugars. This is nonsense, and gives rise to confectionery, toppings and some breakfast cereals scoring stars they do not deserve.

Other ways to boost health stars also need attention. Food technologists boast they can manipulate foods to gain extra stars (Health Star Rating Stakeholders workshop, Sydney, 4 August 2016). For example, adding wheat, milk, soy or other protein powder, concentrated fruit purees or a laboratory-based source of fibre such as inulin will all give extra “offset” points to reduce adverse points from saturated fat, sugar or salt. Indeed, some food technologists have even suggested they could revert to using the especially nasty trans (but technically unsaturated) fatty acid from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils to replace naturally occurring saturated fat.

My alternative is to go for fresh foods and minimise packaged foods. If the stars look too good to be true, check the ingredient list. But remember that Choice found sugar may go by more than 40 different names. Buyer beware!

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Immunisation : Health Minister @GregHuntMP launches a $5.5 #GetTheFacts campaign encouraging parents to vaccinate their children.

” Free vaccinations under the National Immunisation Program can be accessed through community controlled Aboriginal Medical Services, local health services or general practitioners (see part 2 below)

 Health disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians continue to be a priority for Australian governments.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are significantly more affected by: low birth weight, chronic diseases and trauma resulting in early deaths and poor social and emotional health.

Historically, immunisation has been and remains, a simple, timely, effective and affordable way to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health, delivering positive outcomes for Australians of all ages.

Reports that focus on vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs) and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are published regularly by the National Centre for Immunisation Research (NCIRS).

From NACCHO Post  #Aboriginal Health and #Immunisation @AIHW reports Aboriginal children aged 5 national immunisation rate of 94.6% 

Download Healthy Communities:

AIHW_HC_Report_Imm_Rates_June_2017

See Previous NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WorldImmunisationWeek : @healthgovau Vaccination for our Mob

The federal government is spending $5.5 million to encourage parents to vaccinate their children.

Specific info about Aboriginal health and Immunisation see part 2

Health Minister Greg Hunt says while more than 93 per cent of five-year-olds are fully vaccinated, immunisation rates in some parts of Australia remain low.

The “Get Facts about Immunisation” campaign, launched at Melbourne’s Royal Children’s Hospital yesterday , will target parents in these areas through child care centres and social media.

Immunologist Ian Frazer says vaccinating a child protects not just them but the wider community.

“We still see cases of disease outbreaks, particularly in areas of low immunisation coverage, so it’s important immunisation rates are as high as possible,” he said in a statement.

“A parent will never know when their child may come into contact with someone who has got one of these infections.”

What is immunisation?

Immunisation is a safe and effective way of protecting your child against serious diseases.

Immunisation protects your child from harmful infections before they come into contact with them. It uses their body’s natural defences to build resistance to specific infections. When they come in contact with that disease in the future, their immune system remembers it, and responds quickly to prevent the disease from developing.

After immunisation, your child is far less likely to catch the disease. If your child does catch the disease, their illness will be less severe and their recovery quicker than an unimmunised child.

Immunisation or vaccination – what’s the difference?

‘Vaccination’ means getting a vaccine – either as an injection or an oral dose.

‘Immunisation’ is the term for both the process of getting the vaccine and becoming immune to the disease as a result.

Australia’s National Immunisation Program 

The Australian Government funds the National Immunisation Program , which provides vaccines against 17 diseases, including 15 diseases important in childhood.

How immunisation works

Vaccines stimulate the body’s natural defences

Children come into contact with many germs, including bacteria and viruses each day and their immune system responds in various ways to protect the body. Vaccines strengthen the body’s immune system by training it to quickly recognise and clear out germs (bacteria and viruses) that the vaccination has made them familiar with.

When you’re vaccinated, your body produces an immune response. This is how your body defends itself against bacteria and viruses and other harmful substances.

When you come in contact with that disease in the future, your immune system remembers it. Your immune system responds quickly to prevent the disease from developing.

Without a vaccine, a child can only become immune to a disease by being exposed to the germ, with the risk of severe illness. Sometimes your child will need more than one dose of a vaccine. This is because a young child’s immune system does not work as well as an older child or adult. The immune system of young children is still maturing.

Vaccination helps to protect the community from contagious diseases.

The National Immunisation Program has further details about how vaccines help immunity.

Part 2 : Aboriginal health and Immunisation

A number of immunisation programs are available for people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent. These programs provide protection against some of the most harmful infectious diseases that cause severe illness and deaths in our communities.

Immunisations are provided for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander in the following age groups:

  • Children aged 0-five
  • Children aged 10-15
  • People aged 15+
  • People aged 50+

Free vaccinations under the National Immunisation Program can be accessed through community controlled Aboriginal Medical Services, local health services or general practitioners.

Children aged 0-five

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0-five should receive the routine vaccines given to other children. You can see a list of these vaccines in the Children 0-five page.

In addition, children aged 0-five of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent can receive the following additional vaccines funded under the National Immunisation Program:

Pneumococcal disease

An additional booster dose of pneumococcal vaccine is required between the ages of 12 and 18 months. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in Queensland, the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia continue to be at risk of pneumococcal disease for a longer period than other children.

This program does not apply to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania or the Australian Capital Territory, where the rate of pneumococcal disease is similar to that of non-Indigenous children.

Hepatitis A

This vaccination is given because hepatitis A is more common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in in Queensland, the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia than it is among other children. Two doses of vaccine are given six months apart starting over the age of 12 months.

The age at which hepatitis A and pneumococcal vaccines are given varies among the four states and territories.

Influenza (flu)

From 2015, the flu vaccine will be provided free for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged six months to five years is available under the National Immunisation Program. The flu shot will protect your children against the latest seasonal flu virus.

Some children over the age of five years with other medical conditions should also have the flu shot to reduce their risk of developing severe influenza.

Children aged 10 – 15

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 10-15 should receive the following routine vaccines given to other children aged 10-15:

  • Varicella (chickenpox)
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (whooping cough) (dTpa)

People aged 15+

Pneumococcal disease

Pneumococcal vaccines are free for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from 50 years of age, as well as those aged 15 to 49 years who are at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease.

Influenza (Flu)

Due to disease burden influenza vaccines are free for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged six months to five years old and 15 years old or over. The flu shot will protect you against the latest seasonal flu virus.

More information:

NACCHO This weeks top Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts : #Aboriginal Health Workers #Dental #Pharmacy #Doctors #TacklingSmoking

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

2. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

3.Aboriginal Program Project Officer Cancer Council Victoria Closes 14  August

4.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

5. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

6- 7 Congress Senior Policy Officer and Media Communications Officer

8.Pharmacist – FIFO to Maningrida – Arnhem Land

9. ATSICHS Dental Services Brisbane : Oral Health Therapist

10.Tackling Indigenous Smoking Support Officer (OVAHS) close 16 August

11. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

12.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

13.Senior Research Fellow, CREATE Adelaide

14.Employment at Miwatj Health NT

15.Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program added 10 August

  Register or more INFO

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

For over 30 years, Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service has provided essential and culturally appropriate medical, preventive, allied and oral health services to Aboriginal communities.  Located in the Macleay and Nambucca valleys on the Mid North Coast of NSW.  Durri is committed to making health care and education accessible to improve the health status and wellbeing of our community.

An exciting opportunity has arisen for a Aboriginal Health Worker with an interest in the area of Drug & Alcohol to join the passionate team at our Nambucca Heads clinic site.

This challenging role would suit an experienced and motivated Aboriginal Health Worker with a desire to achieve positive outcomes in indigenous health.  You will work with a dedicated team of healthcare professionals.

The successful candidate will enjoy beautiful beaches, World Heritage Rainforest, and relaxed lifestyle of the mid north coast whilst making a real difference in the community.

Benefits include 9.5% super, attractive salary sacrifice, training and access to an employee assistance program.

To apply to to our website:  www.durri.org.au, download a copy of the Application Pack and submit this along with your resume not exceeding 4 pages, and your submission for each of the selection criteria to: hr@durri.org.au, or mail to:

Application

Chief Operations Officer

Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Services

PO Box 136

Kempsey  NSW 2440

Applications close: 21 August 2017 at 5.00 pm 

Applicants must have a current Police and Working with Children Check Clearance and Confirmation of Aboriginality.

Pursuant to Section 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) Australian Aboriginality is a genuine occupational qualification for this position.

Applications that do not attach a completed selection criteria submission will not be considered. 

Contact: Paula 02 65602360

2. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

The Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service is a fast growing and innovative health service that aims to provide the local Aboriginal community with culturally appropriate, high quality care. The following position is now available:-

Aboriginal Health Worker
Part Time 22.8 hours per week (Ongoing)

The successful applicant will be part of a service aimed at providing intensive case work and direct support to Aboriginal people.  You will facilitate clinical assessments, work in partnership with the clinical practice, and provide cultural expertise to ensure the provision of holistic and culturally appropriate health care. You will also assist Aboriginal people to access appropriate primary care services, and liaise with internal and external practitioners to assist in the delivery of culturally appropriate services. You will work in North Geelong and also in Colac.   Qualifications as an Aboriginal Health Worker are desirable or a willingness to undertake study to achieve the qualification.

This is an identified position, open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants only.

If you have extensive experience in related areas of work and a solid understanding of the issues confronting Aboriginal communities then we want to hear from you.

A Position Description is available from www.wathaurong.org.au

A police check, Working with Children Card and a driving license are required for all positions.

Applications to be sent to Human Resources preferably via email jobs@wathaurong.org.au or post to Wathaurong Aboriginal Cooperative, PO Box 402, North Geelong 3215.  Applications that fail to answer the key selection criteria will not be considered.

Closing date for these positions is 20 August 2017

Wathaurong is a Child Safe organisation

Wathaurong is a smoke free workplace

3.Aboriginal Program Project Officer Cancer Council Victoria Closes 14  August

 
 
Description of position:
Cancer Council Victoria is looking for an Aboriginal Programs Project Officer to join the Screening, Early Detection and Immunisation Program.
The successful applicant will work in partnership with stakeholders to deliver community-based projects, support the implementation of innovative media and communications activities and engage with the workforce sector to support participation in cancer screening, early detection and immunisation programs and reduce the impact of cancer in the Victorian Aboriginal community.
This is a part-time (0.6 or 0.8 FTE) fixed term position until March 2018.
Applications for this role close at the end of the day on Monday 14th August.
Cancer Council Victoria has a Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan and is strategically working to help Close the Gap.
 
 

4.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Salary: Level B $98,775 – $117,290 p.a. plus 9.5% superannuation or Level C $120,993 – $139,510 p.a. plus 9.5%superannuation

Indigenous Eye Health in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne has developed and is supporting implementation of the Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision. The work is of national and international significance and is demonstrating effective translational research through the systematic implementation of evidenced-based, sustainable public health reform in Indigenous eye health.

You will support the regional implementation of The Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision from a health system perspective and contribute to and lead improvements in Indigenous eye health across Australia. As part of a small, strategic and responsive team, you will collaborate with stakeholders within regions, jurisdictions and nationally to implement the Roadmap recommendations and provide technical advice and support. You will contribute to Roadmap advocacy and support submission of national and international peer reviewed publications and be actively involved in conference and meeting presentations.

To be successful in the position, you must have:
-Leadership experience or demonstrated potential for leadership and engagement in research or health systems
-Demonstrated understanding and knowledge of key issues related to Indigenous health
-Demonstrated experience working, communicating and engaging effectively with Indigenous communities
-Demonstrated capacity to maintain and contribute to industry partnerships and collaborations with a broad range of stakeholders.

This could be the next great step in your career. In addition, you will have access to many benefits enjoyed by our staff. To learn more about the benefits and working at the University, see http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/working/benefits and http://joining.unimelb.edu.au

This is a re-advertised position. Previous applicants need not re-apply.

Close date: 3 Sep 2017

Position Description and Selection Criteria

Download File 0043281_REVISED_Level B or C_July 2017.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/search/info/selection-criteria

5. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this exciting role.

The AMA

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) is the most influential membership organisation representing registered medical practitioners and medical students of Australia.

The AMA exists to promote and protect the professional interests of doctors and the health care needs of patients and communities.

The Federal Secretariat of the AMA contributes to the achievement of this Mission through reinforcing the AMA’s peak status in the development and implementation of health policy and identifying and acting upon the main issues affecting members.

The Federal Secretariat also delivers relevant member services and works with members directly to grow and value membership of the AMA.

Public Health

The AMA’s Public Health team is responsible for the AMA’s work on population and community health issues, including prevention, substance abuse, child and youth health and Indigenous health. The Secretariat assists in developing the AMA’s policies and political advocacy on Public Health issues of national importance.

The Role 

The Policy Adviser (maternity leave cover, part-time) will provide high level policy and strategic advice to the AMA President on Indigenous health issues. The Policy Adviser will write policy responses and take a lead in the development of AMA policy on all Indigenous health issues.

The Policy Adviser will develop policy positions for consideration by the Task Force on Indigenous Health and resolutions informed by research and input from within the AMA and when required from other medical organisations and health stakeholders.

The Policy Adviser will take a lead in the development of strategies to advocate AMA policies and prepare written material to support AMA campaigns and advocacy on Indigenous health.

The Policy Adviser will manage the AMA Indigenous Medical Scholarship and coordinate support for scholarship recipients, and will also coordinate the production of the AMA’s annual Report Card on Indigenous Health,

The Policy Adviser will provide secretariat support for the AMA Taskforce on Indigenous Health, represent the AMA at meetings and on external committees such as the Close the Gap Campaign Steering Committee.

Selection Criteria

  • demonstrated experience in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the ability to communicate in a culturally sensitive manner
  • knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health issues
  • experience working as a Policy Adviser or similar type of role on Indigenous health issues;
  • established networks in the Indigenous health sector;
  • relevant qualifications or a combination of qualifications and experience relevant to the role;
  • demonstrated ability to contribute to policy development;
  • an ability to identify relevant issues and to collate and present information to substantiate policy advice;
  • demonstrated ability to work independently, using initiative to solve problems and produce high quality accurate work with a minimum of supervision and under tight deadlines;
  • excellent communication skills both written and verbal;
  • the ability to liaise effectively and build collaborative working relationships with stakeholders;
  • demonstrated ability to work effectively as part of a small team, including the ability to supervise staff;
  • experience in using modern computer software and office systems to analyse data, produce documents dealing with complex issues, and maintain accurate records;
  • an enthusiastic and flexible approach.

To apply for this role please submit a cover letter and an up to date resume via SEEK. For further information or for a confidential discussion in respect of this role please contact Alyce on 02 6270 5482. Remuneration for this role will be determined after assessment of relevant skills, experience and qualifications.

Closing Date for Applications – Tuesday 22 August 2017 – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

APPLY HERE

6- 7 Congress Senior Policy Officer and Media Communications Officer

Work for Congress! Congress is currently seeking a Senior Policy Officer, Media Communications Officer to work full-time at our new headquarters in Canberra.

Check out the job descriptions below and apply today

3.Media and Communications Officer

Apply HERE

4.Senior Policy Officer

Apply HERE

8.Pharmacist – FIFO to Maningrida – Arnhem Land

We are seeking an enthusiastic professional pharmacist passionate about providing quality services to the people of Maningrida in western Arnhem Land. This onsite position presents unique and rewarding challenges as part of the primary health care team.

About the Role

The position is full-time (40 hours per week) providing direct dispensing and counselling about medicines to clients of the Aboriginal Health service.

  • The pharmacist also acts as advisor to medical, nursing and allied health staff including Aboriginal staff on the safe and effective use of medicines in the community.
  • Dose administration aid packing is minimal as this is co-ordinated offsite

Skills and Requirements

  • A degree in pharmacy and registration as a pharmacist with the Australian Health Professional Registration Authority is essential
  • Experience and high level of performance in clinical pharmacy.
  • Demonstrated ability, or willingness to acquire the ability, to interact with Aboriginal people in a sensitive and culturally safe way.
  • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively in a multidisciplinary health care team
  • Ability to plan, negotiate and implement changes to day to day practice to ensure the highest standard of care possible to clients of the service.

Benefits

There is potential to increase the impact of clinical services for the people of Maningrida for the innovative person who can develop professional services to suit the population and the health service.

Other benefits include

  • Generous salary including remote living and relocation allowances
  • Conditions are negotiable and can be by fly in fly out from Darwin or living in the community
  • Professional support and mentoring is available from the co-ordinating pharmacy in Darwin

For further information please contact

Shelley Forester Ph: 0412700560

Email: shelley.forester@udcp.com.au

  • Applicants are required to provide a current CV and contact details for at least two referees.
  • Applicants are asked to submit a one page summary of how they meet the above criteria.

9. ATSICHS Dental Services Brisbane : Oral Health Therapist

Position Title
Oral Health Therapist
Department/Team
Department/Team Dental
Location
ATSICHS Dental Services
Salary Range
$70,835 – $80,508 base salary, plus Superannuation
Employment Status
12 month contract role with view to permanency
Reports To
Dental Services Manager
Direct Reports
Nil

Organisational History and Structure      

ATSICHS Brisbane is a not-for-profit community owned health and human services organisation delivering on the unique health and wellbeing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in greater Brisbane and Logan. We are the largest, most comprehensive Aboriginal Medical Health Service in Queensland, and Australia’s second oldest. We are determined to create a flourishing future and lasting legacy for our people and our community.

Our services include medical and dental clinics, mums and bubs programs, an aged care facility, family and child safety services, foster and kinship care, social and emotional wellbeing services, kindergarten programs and a youth service.

We have five core values which shape the way that we work:

  • Community
  • Respect
  • Collaboration
  • Quality
  • Accountability

Our vision for the future is that we are world leaders in Indigenous health and social support services provided in an urban setting. To do this we are focussing on four strategic priorities:

  1. Work smarter, work together
  2. Ensure easy to access services for every stage of life
  3. Champion healthy individuals and thriving families
  4. Build a strong and sustainable organisation.

Position Outline               

As a key member of the ATSICHS Brisbane team, the Oral Health Therapist is expected to personally contribute to the shaping and achievement of ATSICHS vision and goals. The Oral Health Therapist will provide three (3) key functions:

Supports dental care delivery:

Supports dental care delivery by providing general and emergency oral health care to Murri School Students as well as other eligible clients; diagnosing dental decay and gum diseases, provide dental examinations, cleaning, scaling and extracting, taking X-Rays and impressions for mouthguards, and brining complex dental items to the attention of Dentist. Educates students and patients by giving oral hygiene, plaque control, and postoperative instructions. Assist in encouraging students and patients to make an active change to their oral care with the aid of ATSICHS approved oral health educational material.

Operates within CQI and clinical governance framework:

Oral Health Therapists support processes that ensure the delivery of dental care is performed within the highest quality. Included activities involve CQI, contributing to policy implementation, audits and reporting of clinical incidents.

Actively contributes in developing a flourishing team:

Support fellow staff in a team environment to build collegiality and a sense of belongingness within the team and ATSICHS family. Staff will actively participate in team activities and contribute to a flourishing workplace culture that promotes the ethos and values of ATSICHS Brisbane as a long standing Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation.

Skills, Competencies, Qualifications, Education and Experience

Essential:

  • Certificate, Diploma or Degree in Oral Health Therapy and be eligible to register with AHPRA
  • Hold a current radiation licence
  • Demonstrated experience that demonstrates practical skills and knowledge in the provision of dental care to clients
  • Demonstrated ability to meet targets and performance outcomes
  • Ability to support a continuous improvement model for achieving outcomes
  • Proven ability to prioritise workload and meet deadlines
  • Effective communication skills – both in writing ad verbal
  • Working with Children’s Card (Blue Card) or be eligible to apply.

Desirable, but not mandatory:

  • Previous experience working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Knowledge of EXACT

How to Apply    

Applications can only be submitted through seek link

Applications must be submitted before 14th August 2017

ATSICHS HR on 07 3240 8900

APPLY HERE

10.Tackling Indigenous Smoking Support Officer (OVAHS) close 16 August

11. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

To find out more, visit http://www.cmsac.com.au/about-us/

About the Opportunity

Exciting opportunities exist for 2 Full-Time, experienced and passionate Aboriginal Health Workers / Practitioners to join the CMSAC team.

Reporting directly to the Senior Registered Nurse, the Aboriginal Health Worker will be responsible for providing supportive, effective and efficient Primary Health Care services to clients in the clinic and within the community.

As an Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner, your responsibilities will include (but not limited to):

  • Work with members of the clinical team to deliver Primary Health services to clients
  • In collaboration with the multidisciplinary team, conduct health checks on clients
  • Using the Therapeutic Guidelines, perform consultations with clinic clients, including listening to their story, providing a basic physical examination and consulting with more experienced clinical staff as necessary, and to advise on the treatment and management of a client’s health problems
  • Assist the Senior Registered Nurse and Program Nurses to address areas of improvement
  • Provide education to clients and families on health care and health promotion
  • Demonstrate leadership in maintaining infection control principles
  • Have an understanding of CMSAC reporting requirements

About You

The successful applicant will have a demonstrated ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. You will have a sound understanding of the unique issues impacting the health of Aboriginal peoples whilst have experience in the provision of health promotion programs.

In addition to the above, the successful applicant will possess:

  • Certificate IV Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice
  • Current Apply First Aid certificate, or willingness to obtain
  • Current, unencumbered C-Class Manual Drivers Licence
  • Working with Children Check and a National Police Clearance, or willingness to obtain
  • The ability to pass a pre-employment drug and alcohol test

About the Benefits

CMSAC is dedicated to recognising and rewarding dedication. As such, you will enjoy an attractive remuneration package including salary sacrificing options!

In addition:

  • CMSAC will negotiate relocation assistance with the right candidate
  • You’ll enjoy a fantastic work/life balance, with Monday – Friday hours, 8:30am – 5.00pm and 5 weeks annual leave!

Applications close Monday 21 August at 5pm.

APPLY FOR THIS JOB

12.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

The Role
Cornerstone Medical are seeking Vocationally Registered Doctor for an exciting permanent position within an Aboriginal Medical Service in the NT. You be will be responsible for providing holistic primary health care services alongside an experienced team of Registered Nurses and visiting specialists.The Centre
You will work alongside an experienced team of 1 additional GP, 14 nurses, allied health workers, and an experienced support team. The hours of work are 5pmwith no on call or after hours. There is a pharmacy onsite, numerous health programs and visiting specialists weekly.The location
You will be located on the beautiful and untouched coastline of NT; right on the coast. This is an is an indigenous community in one of the largest most remote towns of Australia’s Northern Territory. The renowned fishing town is the major service centre for the population of 2,300 as well as more than 30 outstations or homelands, with a school, health clinic, multiple food outlets, two supermarkets, service station, arts centre, créche and a tarmac airport with daily commercial flights to Darwin.The Criteria 
To be eligible for this position you must meet the following criteria:

  • MBBS
  • Vocational AHPRA registration
  • Interest in indigenous health, Chronic Disease and remote GP work

The Package
On appointment for this position, you will be offered:

  • OTE $240-350,000 per annum including
  • Free Accommodation and full relocation assistance
  • Quarterly return flights to Darwin with accommodation
  • Yearly retention allowance lump sum $35,000
  • Salary sacrificing up to $30,000
  • Professional development allowance and Attraction allowance
  • 4 return trips to Darwin per annum incl accommodation
  • House, vehicle, laptop and phone
  • Indemnity insurance reimbursed
This really is a fantastic opportunity to expand your career in Indigenous Health as a part of a supportive and community focused organisation.  For more information on this or other exciting opportunities please phone Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe today on 07 3171 2929 or email aoife@cmr.com.au
Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe
07 3171 2929

13.Senior Research Fellow, CREATE Adelaide

SAHMRI146
FTC – Full-time Contract
SAHMRI North Terrace

Applications close Friday 11, August 2017

12 Month Contract

Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit

The Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Chronic Disease Knowledge Translation and Exchange (CREATE)

At the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), we are committed to achieving innovative, ground-breaking health and medical research that fundamentally improves the quality of life for all people.

The Aboriginal Research Unit (Wardliparingga  Unit) within SAHMRI conducts health and well-being research that is of direct relevance to, and in partnership with, Aboriginal people in South Australia. Our research is focused on the significant difference between the health status and life opportunities available to Aboriginal people and other Australians. Our research is broad in nature, including epidemiology, health services research, evaluation and clinical trials.

The Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Chronic Disease Knowledge Translation and Exchange (CREATE) focuses on translating research to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, with particular focus on the prevention, treatment and management of chronic diseases. The Centre is a collaborative enterprise between The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), the Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit, SAHMRI; The Joanna Briggs Institute, University of Adelaide, and The School of Public Health, University of Adelaide.

The aim of CREATE is to assist the Aboriginal health sector to use existing knowledge (published and unpublished) on best practice chronic disease prevention and treatment as well as service delivery models to improve the coverage and appropriateness of their services and care.

CREATE is guided by a Leadership Group comprising of senior representatives from Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations around Australia.

The Senior Research Fellow, CREATE will provide academic and operational leadership to the CREATE team, acting as a conduit between the CREATE Chief Investigators and the Adelaide based research and administration team. The position has the responsibility for day to day oversight and support of specified research projects and staff, providing expertise and supervision as required.

The Senior Research Fellow, CREATE is broadly responsible for the achievement of a range of determined project outcomes, and is required to apply high level qualitative analytical skills and demonstrated excellence in written and verbal communication. Dissemination strategies will require CREATE findings are published within peer-reviewed journals and to translate these findings to stakeholders with influence on Aboriginal health policy and practice.

SAHMRI has a strong commitment to employment Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into these roles. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are therefore strongly encouraged to apply.

Everything we do is underpinned by our core values and our institute is dedicated to grow a culture that pursues, enables and demands research excellence. We’re proud of the work we do and work hard as a team to make a positive difference to the community.  Excellence, Innovation, Courage, Integrity and Teamwork are what help us achieve our goals. If these are also your qualities and goals, apply today.

For a copy of the position description please click here

Applications close: 11 August 2017

APPLY HERE

14.Employment at Miwatj Health NT

Miwatj Health offers a wide range of employment opportunities for health and other professionals, in a unique primary healthcare environment.

We offer satisfying career paths for doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Practitioners, allied health staff, public/population health practitioners, health informatics specialists, administrative, financial and management personnel.

If you are suitably qualified and are looking for a rewarding and challenging experience in one of the most diverse, beautiful and interesting regions of Australia, we invite you to apply for any of the current vacancies listed below.

All applications for current vacancies must include:

  • a current Resumé,
  • names and contact details of at least two referees, at least one of whom must be a employment referee.

We encourage applications from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly those with links to and knowledge of local communities in the region.

Separately from the list of current vacancies, you may also submit a general expression of interest, with a current Resume, and we shall retain it on file for future reference if an appropriate vacancy arises.

Miwatj strongly prefers that all applications and expressions of interest submit your application via our recruitment platform by clicking the link below.

You may contact HR via recruitment@miwatj.com.au. However, if that is not possible, EOI or resume may be mailed or faxed, to arrive by the closing date, to:
Miwatj Health – Human Resources Department
PO Box 519
Nhulunbuy NT 0881
Fax number (08) 8987 1670

See Website for all details and APPLY

https://miwatj.applynow.net.au/

Two New Vacancies are available within the Link Up Program.

Both positions are 12 month Contract position that may be extended subject to funding.

Link Up Caseworker:   (Click for more information)

Link Up Counsellor: (Click for more information)

Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program is funded by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (Federal), and also receives reunion funding from the Department of Premier & Cabinet, Aboriginal Affairs & Reconciliation (State).

Link Up provides family tracing, reunion and counselling services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their families who have been separated under the past policies and practices of the Australian Government. Assistance is also provided to people over the age of 18 years who have been adopted, fostered or raised in institutions.

For more information about Link Up (Click here)

Please feel free to communicate this opportunity through your networks.

Applications close – COB Monday 14th August 2017.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #SaveAdate #NACCHOAgm2017 #IIPD2017 #WeAreIndigenous #InternationalIndigenousDay August 9 #DIPI2017

NEW August 9  : International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2017

NEW 3 September  : Clintons Walk for Justice arrives in Canberra

New 4 -10 September National Stroke Week, the Stroke Foundation’s annual awareness campaign is taking place

12 – 14 September SNAICC National Conference

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

20-23 September : AIDA Conference 2017

New 29 Sept : Closing the Prison Gap Focus on the Children Tweed Heads NSW

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

10 October  : CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

18 -20 October  : 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

NEW 20 October : ‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference

NEW 18- 20 October First 1000 Days Summit Abstracts close August 11

26-27 October  :Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

30 October2 Nov  :NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra ABSTRACTS close 21st August 2017

14- 15 November  : 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

15 -18 November  :National Conference on Incontinence Scholarship Opportunity close 1 September

27-30 November  :Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

11-12 April 2018  :6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium  Canberra call for extracts

If you have a Conference, Workshop Funding opportunity or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media

mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

Noting Abstracts close 21st August 2017

NACCHO CONFERENCE WEBSITE

August 9  : International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2017

By resolution 49/214 of 23 December 1994, the United Nations General Assembly decided that the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples shall be observed on 9 August every year. The date marks the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations in 1982.

This year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples will be commemorated on Wednesday, 9 August at UNHQ in New York from 3.00pm to 6.00pm in the ECOSOC Chamber.

This year is of particular importance, as it is the Tenth Anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), and at the same time the theme of the event.

The UNDRIP is partnering with Twitter on an International Day emoji to be launched on 8 August. The emoji will follow our branding and will be linked to the hashtags #WeAreIndigenous  #IamIndigenous #InternationalIndigenousDay #IIPD2017 #DIPI2017  The emoji will be launched on @UN4Indigenous and @UN on 8 August and will be available through 11 August.

3 September  : Clintons Walk for Justice arrives in Canberra

We all have come a long way and now it time we finish this off and do why we went on this journey in the first place.

I’m almost there at end of a amazing journey. It has been a great honour to walk in the foot step of my ancients and I walk with prouded for my people and walk on song line that my ancients made for us to follow and understand why they was created in the first place for my people.

I do not know what going to happen when I reach Canberra, but I do know in my heart an mind I must try because it need to be done to change this country and this world we live in. But I hope it well be something that this country will never forget and it well help change this country way to do better to build a better country and a better world we live in.

All that matter now is to speak the truth from the heart to make this men in suit and everyone else who live here to change they way and do better than they know them self now.

I hope in year to come people well talk about the walk for justice that a man who was just young walk across a land thought different country for his people and for everyone else. Walk all the way to the capital city call Canberra to speak the truth and send a message he collected from his people and from every one else on this journey that made him did it in the first place.

The walk well live on and the name the spirit walker well live on when I go and pass on. A man who walk across a country bring hope and change and all the way to capital city to tell men in suit to change they way because he believe and he believe in a dream could made a difference.

Clintons Facebook Page

4 -10 September National Stroke Week, the Stroke Foundation’s annual awareness campaign is taking place

National Stroke Week, the Stroke Foundation’s annual awareness campaign is taking place 4 to 10 September 2017.

Australians are being asked to join the FAST response team by knowing the signs of stroke. Paramedics, nurses and doctors can only treat stroke if Australians recognise the signs of stroke and call 000 immediately.

Could your community recognise the signs of stroke F.A.S.T?

Face – Check their face. Has their mouth drooped?
Arms – Can they lift both arms?
Speech – Is their speech slurred? Do they understand you?
Time – Time is critical. If you see any of these symptoms Act FAST and call 000.

Sharing the FAST message with those around you could save their life.

REGISTER online to get your FREE Stroke Week kit

Once you register you will be sent a FREE Stroke Week kit including posters, campaign booklet and resources to support your activity.

Click here to register now.

What does an awareness activity involve?

  • Set up a public awareness display in your local shopping centre.
  • Host a public morning/afternoon tea.
  • Organise a healthy event i.e. social walk around the park or a healthy bake sale.
  • You can also add a health check to your activity. We provide the tools to make this simple.

Visit www.strokefoundation.org.au/strokeweek for more details.

Join the FAST response team for National Stroke Week.

12 – 14 September SNAICC National Conference

Includes 2 pre-conference masterclasses, 3 plenaries, 56 concurrent sessions, and a social/cultural program.

Register now!

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

Developed in consultation with NACCHO and produced by the Mental Health Professionals’ Network a federally funded initiative

Join our interdisciplinary panel as we explore a collaborative approach to reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services.

The webinar format will include a facilitated question and answer session between panel members exploring key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities.

The panel will discuss strategies to enhance cultural awareness and develop responsive services for Indigenous communities affected by incarceration. Strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing of individuals will also be explored.

When: Wednesday 13th September, 2017

Time: 4.30pm – 5.45pm (AEST)

Where: Online – via your computer, tablet or mobile

Cost: Free

Panel:

  • Dr Mark Wenitong (Medical Advisor based in QLD)
  • Dr Marshall Watson (Psychiatrist based in SA)
  • Dr Jeffrey Nelson (Clinical Psychologist based in QLD)
  • Julie Tongs (OAM) (CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service – Narrabundah ACT)

Facilitator:

  • Dr Mary Emeleus (General Practitioner and Psychotherapist based in QLD)

Read more about our panel.

Learning Outcomes:

Through an exploration of incarceration, the webinar will provide participants with the opportunity to:

  • Describe key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities
  • Develop strategies to enhance culturally aware and responsive services for Indigenous people and communities affected by incarceration
  • Identify strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing

Before the webinar:

Register HERE

 

20-23 September AIDA Conference 2017

The AIDA Conference in 2017 will celebrate 20 years since the inception of AIDA. Through the theme Family. Unity. Success. 20 years strong we will reflect on the successes that have been achieved over the last 20 years by being a family and being united. We will also look to the future for AIDA and consider how being a united family will help us achieve all the work that still needs to be done in growing our Indigenous medical students, doctors, medical academics and specialists and achieving better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This conference will be an opportunity to bring together our members, guests, speakers and partners from across the sector to share in the reflection on the past and considerations for the future. The conference will also provide a platform to share our individual stories, experiences and achievements in a culturally safe environment.

Conference website

29 Sept : Closing the Prison Gap Focus on the Children Tweed Heads NSW

  • Emeritus Professor Judy Atkinson and Margaret Hayes will “Focus on the Children”, describing their work with young people excluded from mainstream schools due to their behaviour.
  • Leanne Phillips and Cathy Stillwell will talk about “Healing the Womyn Healing the Child”
  • Jyi Lawnton and Casey Bird will describe “Indigenous Policy and the Scientific Gaze”
  • Chris Lee and Associate Professor Helen Farley discuss “Making the Connection”, the use of technology to address the issues of literacy and numeracy in juvenile justice settings
  • Dr Anthea Krieg will talk about her work in Ceduna, South Australia, coordinating services to prevent incarceration of First Nations children.

More info bookings Website

30 Sept : The 2017 Human Rights Photography competition  Closes

The 2017 Human Rights Photography competition is now open to children and adults around the country, with a $600 camera prize up for grabs for the most outstanding image!

For almost a decade, the Australian Human Rights Commission has been holding photo competitions every couple of years. Our last competition attracted a record 450 entries.

Photography is a powerful medium with a long history in the promotion and advancement of human rights around the world. Photos foster empathy for the suffering and experience of others, community engagement and positive social change. No one can forget the impact of photos such as Nick Ut’s famous photo The Terror of War of child Kim Phuc after a napalm attack during the Vietnam War.

Our focus for this year’s competition will be the experiences of people at home. The theme for the 2017 competition is Home, inspired by Eleanor Roosevelt’s famous quote “Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home…

The shortlisted and winning photos to be displayed at the 2017 Human Rights Awards on 8 December in Sydney.

So, what are you waiting for?

About the competition

  • Enter at https://photocompetition.humanrights.gov.au/
  • There will be two categories for entries: Under 18 and 18 & over.
  • Overall winners will receive their prizes at the 2017 Human Rights Awards on December 8 in Sydney. A selection of photos from the Competition will also be on display.
  • Main prizes worth $600.
  • The competition will close on 30 September 2017.

If you have a query about the competition, please email photocomp@humanrights.gov.au

Photo Credit: Nimboi’s Bat by Sean Spencer, from the 2011 competition.

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

catsinam

Contact info for CATSINAM

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

We are pleased to announce the 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference will be held at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa in Broome, Western Australia, from 18 to 20 October 2017.

THE FUTURE OF REMOTE HEALTH AND THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY

Since the organisation’s inception in 1982 this event has served to create an opportunity for likeminded remote and isolated health individuals who can network, connect and share.

It serves as both a professional and social resource for the Remote and Isolated Health Workforce of Australia.

We aim to offer an environment that will foster new ideas, promote collegiate relationships, provide opportunities for professional development and celebrate remote health practice.

Conference Website

18- 20 October First 1000 Days Summit Abstracts close August 11

Abstract submissions for the First 1000 Days Australia Summit are now open. Get them in by August 11th!

The First 1000 Days Australia Summit is a three-day event that will bring together Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders, researchers, community members, front- line workers and policy makers involved in areas relevant to the work of First 1000 Days Australia. Lectures, panel discussions and workshops will address topics such as caring and parenting, infant and child development, family strengthening, implementation and translation, as well as a number of other areas.

The theme for the Summit is ‘Celebrating our leadership, strengthening our families’. We invite interested presenters to submit abstracts for oral presentations, workshops and posters that align with the aims, principles and research areas of First 1000 Days Australia, and of First 1,000 Days international.

20 October : ‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference 


‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference

RMA Presidents’ Breakfast
Friday 20 October 2017
Pullman Albert Park, Melbourne


www.ruralmedicineaustralia.com.au

Australia’s most influential health leaders will discuss critical health policy issues in a key Presidents’ Breakfast forum at the Rural Medicine Australia 2017 conference, to be held in Melbourne in October.Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), will host the forum and will be joined on the panel by Associate Professor Ruth Stewart, President of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM); Dr Bastian Seidel, President of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP); and Dr Tony Bartone, Vice President of the Australian Medical Association (AMA).

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

‘Translation at the Centre’ An educational symposium

Alice Springs Convention Centre, Alice Springs

This year the Symposium will look at research translation as well as the latest on diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.  The event will be run over a day and a half.
The Educational Symposium will feature a combination of relevant plenary presentations from renowned scientists and clinicians plus practical workshops.

Registration is free but essential.

Please contact the symposium coordinator on 1300 728 900 (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) or via email at events@baker.edu.au  

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

We welcome you to attend the 2017 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference.

On the new NACCHO Conference Website  you find links to

1.Registrations now open

2. Booking Your Accommodation

3. Book Your Flights

4. Expressions of Interest Speakers, case studies and table top presentations Close

5. Social Program

6.Conferences Partnership Sponsorship Opportunities

7.NACCHO Conference HELP Contacts

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Where :Hyatt Hotel Canberra

Dates : Members’ Conference: 31 October – 1 November 2017
Annual General Meeting: 2 November 2017

CLICK HERE

14-15 November : 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the Lowitja Institute, Australia’s national institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, are proud to be co-hosting the 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

This partnership indicates an alignment of priorities and a strong commitment from our two institutions to deliver a measurable, positive impact on the health and wellbeing of Australia’s First Peoples.

Under the theme “The Butterfly Effect: Translating Knowledge into Action for Positive Change”, the Symposium will be an opportunity to bring relevant expertise to the business of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research translation and put forward Indigenous perspectives that inform the most effective policies and programs. It will also be a forum to share knowledge of what successful research looks like at community level and what the key elements of success are.

We look forward to the participation of delegates with community, research and policy expertise, including outstanding keynote speakers Dr Carrie Bourassa (Canada) and Sir Mason Durie (New Zealand). We are confident that through our joint commitment to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, the Symposium will make a significant contribution to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, families and individuals. This commitment also signals the importance of working together as equal partners, Indigenous and non-Indigenous.

More info HERE

15 -18 November  :National Conference on Incontinence Scholarship Opportunity close 1 September

The Continence Foundation of Australia is offering 10 scholarships to support health professionals to attend the 26th National Conference on Incontinence. The conference will be held in Sydney on 15-18 November 2017.  The conference program and registration brochure can be found here.
This scholarship program is open to registered nurses and physiotherapists with an interest in continence care working in rural and remote areas of Australia. The scholarship includes full conference registration, including clinical workshops and social events, flights and accommodation. The top applicant also has the opportunity to participate in a placement at a Sydney continence clinic. Previous unsuccessful applicants are encouraged to apply.
 
Applications close Friday 1 September.
 
Applications are being taken online. Click here to find out more and to apply.  

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

iaha

Abstracts for the IAHA 2017 National Conference are now open!

We are calling for abstracts for concurrent oral presentations and workshops under the following streams:
– Care
– Cultures
– Connection

For abstract more information visit the IAHA Conference website at: https://iahaconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

11-12 April 2018 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium  Canberra call for extracts

About the Symposium

Drawing upon a tradition which commenced with the first rural and remote health scientific conference ‘Infront Outback’ held in Toowoomba in 1992, the 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium will be held in Canberra, 11-12 April 2018.

The Symposium will celebrate 20 years since the establishment of the first university department of rural health in 1997 and will highlight the research and knowledge that followed this innovation.

Outback Infront will celebrate the leadership that has emerged from the rural and remote health research community, while at the same time, support early career academics and the next generation of rural health researchers.

The Symposium will focus on rural and remote health research that informs strategic health policy and health service challenges in rural and remote Australia.

The Symposium will provide an opportunity to share and develop research that seeks to understand and deliver innovative change through building evidence that has the potential to transform health outcomes and service delivery.

Who should attend

The Symposium program will be designed to engage academics, policy makers, expert researchers in rural and remote health and clinician-researchers, as well as emerging and early career researchers.

It will also be relevant to policy makers, university departments of rural health, rural clinical schools, research collaborations and bodies, rural workforce organisations and health services delivery networks and providers.

Program

As well as key presentations from respected researchers in rural and remote health the Symposium will also feature Rogano presentations (scholarly debate on a current research project that answer “how to” questions and encourage scholarly thinking and debate) and a return of the popular Lightning Talk presentations to support early career academics and the next generation of rural health researchers.

Abstracts are now being sought for general presentations, Lightning talks and Rogano presentations

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Rural and Remote Health Research Alert : @RoyalFlyingDoc Health Care Access in the bush Survey

 

” The RFDS survey of country health consumer priorities was released 100 years to the day since the first patient was treated by a pioneering doctor in Western Australia, leading to the founding of the RFDS which is now recognised as Australia’s most reputable charity.

The survey of 450 country people drawn from every state and territory saw one-third of responses (32.5%) name doctor and medical specialist access as their key priority. Addressing mental health (12.2%) and drug and alcohol problems (4.1%) were second and third priorities

Around seven million Australians who reside in remote and rural areas.

Of these, more than half a million live in either remote, or very remote, areas of Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians are overrepresented in remote and very remote areas—almost half (45%) of all people in very remote areas and 16% in remote areas are Indigenous Australians, compared with a 3% Indigenous representation in the total population

The research paper “Health Care Access, Mental Health, and Preventative Health; Health Priority Survey Findings for People in the Bush

DOWNLOAD COPY HERE

RN032_Healths_Needs_Survey_Result_P1_U0FsohZ

Extract : 4.2.4 Indigenous health issues

Few respondents identified Indigenous health issues as important.

This was disappointing since across all remoteness areas, Indigenous Australians generally experience poorer health than non-Indigenous Australians (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2014) in relation to chronic and communicable diseases, mental health, infant health, and life expectancy (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, 2005).

However, this result is unsurprising considering the very low proportion of respondents who were Indigenous.

Indigenous Australians are five times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to die from endocrine, nutritional and metabolic conditions such as diabetes, and three times as likely to die from digestive conditions (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015b).

Age-adjusted data demonstrated that in 2014–2015 Indigenous Australians were more than twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to be hospitalised for any reason (Australian Institute of Health andWelfare, 2016b).

Indigenous Australians are twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to be hospitalised for an injury (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a), and 1.8 times as likely to die from an injury than non-Indigenous Australians (Henley & Harrison, 2015).

Indigenous Australians are three times as likely to die from chronic lower respiratory diseases and twice as likely to die as a result of self-harm (suicide) than non-Indigenous Australians (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016).

Compared to non-Indigenous Australians, Indigenous Australians demonstrate higher age standardised death rates for a number of illnesses and injuries (Australian Institute of Healthand Welfare, 2015c).

Indigenous Australians also experience higher prevalence rates of communicable diseases compared with non-Indigenous Australians, including shigellosis (2.6 times greater), pertussis (whooping cough) (54.3 times greater), and tuberculosis (6 times greater) (Abdolhosseini, Bonner, Montano, Young, Wadsworth, Williams, & Stoner, 2015).

Similarly, life expectancy is lower and mortality rates are higher among Indigenous Australians compared to non-Indigenous Australians.

In 2010–2012, the estimated life expectancy at birth was 10.6 years lower for Indigenous males (69.1 years) compared to non-Indigenous males (79.7 years) and 9.5 years lower for Indigenous females (73.7 years) compared to non- Indigenous females (83.1 years) (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015c).

Fatal burden of disease studies have also demonstrated the existence of health inequalities— the fatal burden of disease and injury in the Indigenous population is estimated to be 2.6 times that experienced by non-Indigenous Australians, with injuries (22%) and cardiovascular disease (21%) contributing the most to the fatal  burden of disease for Indigenous Australians (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015b).

Press Coverage : Rural and remote Australians remain deeply concerned about poor access to healthcare, and want the Federal Government to spend more to fix the problem.

That is the key finding from the latest Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) research, released last week as reported ABC

The RFDS surveyed more than 450 country Australians, and one-third nominated access to doctors and specialists as their single biggest healthcare concern.

A third of respondents called for more government funding of services, particularly for mental health and preventative care.

RFDS chief executive Martin Laverty said it raised a question for governments as to whether policies aimed at bridging that gap had failed.

“We have an oversupply of doctors in this country; the problem is, the doctors are simply not all working in areas where they’re most needed,” he said.

“It brings into question the success of repeated programs of Commonwealth governments to encourage doctors to work in remote and country Australia.

“The question for government is, are our incentives for doctors sending them to where they’re most needed?”

Access to doctors in remote areas a challenge

The survey found encouraging news in other areas.

Two-thirds of respondents said they needed to travel for one hour or less to see their GP or another non-emergency medical professional.

But for Australians living in more remote places, a visit to the doctor could mean a 10-hour round trip or more.

RFDS chief medical officer in Queensland Abby Harwood said governments could do other things to improve their access to care beyond putting more bodies on the ground.

“There is a lot of telephone and email consultation going on between people out bush and their GPs, but that requires actually having a pre-existing relationship with a healthcare provider who knows you,” she said.

“Technology such as video-conferencing is a fantastic opportunity, [but] currently the telecommunications infrastructure out in these areas is not quite sufficient to be able to do that reliably.”

GPs not paid by Medicare for teleconference consultations

Unlike specialists, who can bill Medicare for video-conferencing consultations with patients, GPs currently are not paid unless their patient attends a consultation in person.

Dr Harwood said that meant GPs who assisted remote patients over the phone or by teleconference were doing so on their own time and usually out of their own pocket.

“From my experience, most of us would just do it [for free] out of the service that we provide,” she said.

“At the moment it’s either the healthcare provider doing it for free, or the person accessing the GP is paying for it out of their pocket with no subsidy.

“When you consider the petrol bills, how much it costs in fuel to drive a 1,000km round trip, a lot of them would rather pay out of their own pocket to do that [if the doctor is not already doing it for free].”

Dealing with issues before crisis point

Dr Harwood seconded the call for a greater focus on preventative care for rural and remote patients, who were too often only dealing with medical issues once they had reached crisis point.

She said changing that made medical and economic sense.

“[When there’s a crisis] a patient then has to travel in and out of their regional centre or capital city, which obviously causes a lot of disruption and it’s expensive,” she said.

“I don’t think anyone has actually measured the full cost to Australia as a country, taking into account that social dislocation and the economic disruption when people need to leave their properties, leave their workplace.

“It’s been proven over and over again that good primary health care, delivered to people out there on the ground, can often prevent those crises from happening.”

 

Significant boost in GP numbers ‘in all areas’

Assistant Minister for Health David Gillespie, who has responsibility for regional health issues, is on leave.

But in a statement, a federal Department of Health spokeswoman said there had been a significant boost in GP numbers “in all areas of Australia” over the past decade.

“A 2017 budget announcement included funding of $9.1 million over four years from 2017-18 to improve access to mental health treatment services for people in rural and regional communities,” the statement read.

“Currently, Medicare provides rebates for up to 10 face-to-face consultations with registered psychologists, occupational therapists and social workers for eligible patients under the Better Access initiative.

“From 1 November 2017, changes to Medicare will take effect so that seven of the 10 mental health consultations can be delivered through online channels [telehealth] for eligible patients, that is, those with clinically diagnosed mental disorders who are living in rural and remote locations.

“Relevant services can be delivered by clinical psychologists, registered psychologists, occupational therapists and social workers that meet the relevant registration requirements under Medicare.”

Aboriginal Health #Garma2017 : #Makarrata ,canoes and the #UluruStatement @TurnbullMalcolm @billshortenmp Full Speech transcripts

 ” Djapiri said Bill and I are in the same canoe and on this issue we certainly are – but we are not alone, we are not alone in the canoe. We are in the same canoe with all of you as well and we need to steer it wisely to achieve our goal, to achieve that goal of Makarrata.

Beyond Constitutional Recognition, that work continues every day. I reflect on the Makarrata discussion of the late 70’s and 80’s. A list of demands was sent to the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs in 1981. It called for rights to land and resources, compensation, the creation of Aboriginal schools, medical centres and an Aboriginal bank.

Despite a final agreement not being reached at the time, we have achieved some of the policies called for. The Commonwealth provided $433 million to 137 Aboriginal Medical Services across the country last financial year.

As Prime Minister I will continue to do all I can to ensure that being an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian means to be successful, to achieve, to have big dreams and high hopes, and to draw strength from your identity as an Indigenous person in this great country.

That’s why, as we renegotiate the Closing the Gap targets with the various state and territory jurisdictions later this year, my Government has insisted on a strengths based approach.

Indigenous people are not a problem to be solved.

You are our fellow Australians. Your cultures are a gift to our nation.”

Selected extracts from the full Prime Minister Speech 5 August Garma see Part 2 Full Speech

Download full copy Garma 2017 PM full Speech

” Djapirri said, she told me of a dream of a canoe, paddled by the Prime Minister and myself.

That in itself is an arresting image. Two captains. But in all seriousness, we appreciated I think the power of that illusion, the power of that dream.

Here at Garma, on the lands of the Gumatj, we gather to talk about a Yolngu word. Makarrata.

It is not just now a Yolngu word – I put it to you it’s a national test.

Coming together, after a struggle.

And for the first Australians, it has been a very long struggle indeed.

– A struggle against dispossession and discrimination, exclusion and inequality.

– A struggle against violence and poverty, disease and diminished opportunity.

– A struggle for better health, for better housing, for safer communities, more jobs, for longer lives.

– A struggle against injustice and racism: from the sporting field to the courts of our land.

Above all, a struggle for a better future for their children: a struggle to be counted, to be heard, to be recognised.

At Uluru, you gave us the statement from the heart.

A call for:

– A voice enshrined in the Constitution

– A declaration to be passed by all parliaments, acknowledging the unique place of the first nations in Australian history, their culture, their connection.

And a Makarrata Commission to oversee a process of agreement-making and truth-telling.

All three of these objectives speak to the long-held and legitimate aspirations of our First Australians:

– A proper acknowledgment of Aboriginal histories and the dispossession that followed upon the arrival of the Europeans

– A bigger say in the issues which affect you – no more ‘solutions’ imposed without consultation or consent

And a more lasting settlement, a new way forward, a new pathway including through treaties.

These ideas are not new – but the Uluru statement did articulate these with new clarity, a new passion, a new sense of truth and purpose “

Selected extracts The Hon Bill Shorten speech  Garma 5 August 2017 see in full Part 3 Below

Download full speech Garma 2017 PM full Speech

Part 1 Media Coverage

View NITV Media coverage

When it comes to Aboriginal constitutional reform, picture Malcolm Turnbull and Bill Shorten sitting in a canoe – and the opposition leader thinks he’s the only one paddling.

The Labor leader has backed a referendum question on an indigenous voice to parliament, while the prime minister has failed to commit bipartisan support.

The two politicians are moving together downstream, struggling to balance the boat to achieve reconciliation, Gumatj leader Djapirri Mununggirritj has told Garma Festival in northeast Arnhem Land.

Mr Shorten called it an “arresting image” but said he was disappointed Mr Turnbull dismissed his end of year referendum question deadline as “very ambitious”.

“We support a declaration by all parliaments, we support a truth telling commission, we are not confronted by the notion of treaties with our first Australians,” he said.

Mr Turnbull acknowledged many Aboriginal leaders were disappointed the government didn’t give “instant fulfilment” to the Referendum Council’s recommendations.

He described the Yolgnu elder’s canoe analogy as apt, saying his cabinet will give the matter careful consideration to keep the aspiration of Makarrata, or coming together after a struggle, from capsizing.

An “all or nothing approach” to constitutional change risks rocking the boat, resulting in a failed referendum, and Mr Turnbull called for time to develop a winnable question to put to Australian voters.

“We are not alone in the canoe, we are in the canoe with all of you and we need to steer it wisely to achieve that goal of Makarrata,” he said.

Mr Turnbull said there’s still many practical questions about what shape the advisory body would take, whether it would be elected or appointed and how it would affect Aboriginal people around the country.

Specifically, he questioned what impact the voice to parliament would have on issues like child protection and justice, which are largely the legislative domain of state and territory governments.

But Mr Shorten said debate over Aboriginal recognition in the nation’s founding document has dragged on for the past decade.

“I can lead Mr Turnbull and the Liberal party to water but I can’t make them drink,” he said.

Having led the failed 1999 republic referendum campaign, Mr Turnbull warned that Australians are “constitutionally conservative”, with just eight out of 44 successful since federation.

But Mr Shorten said “Aboriginal Australians do not need a balanda [white person] lecture about the difficulty of changing the constitution”.

Mr Shorten’s proposal of a joint parliamentary committee to finalise a referendum question has been met with cynicism by indigenous leaders.

The Above AAP

 

 Part 2 PRIME MINISTER Garma SPEECH :

Ngarra buku-wurrpan bukmak nah! Nhuma’lanah.

Ngarra Prime Minister numalagu djal Ngarra yurru wanganharra’wu nhumalangu bukmak’gu marrigithirri.

Ngarra ga nhungu dharok ga manikay’ ngali djaka wanga’wu yirralka.

I acknowledge and pay respect to your country, and your elders.

As Prime Minister, I’m here to talk to you and learn from you.

I acknowledge and respect your language, your song lines, your dances, your culture, your caring for country, and your estates.

I pay my respects to the Gumatj people and traditional owners past, present and future, on whose land we are gathered.

I also acknowledge other Yolngu people, First Peoples from across the country and balanda here today including Bill Shorten, Nigel Scullion and all other Parliamentary colleagues but above all I acknowledge our Parliamentary colleagues, Indigenous Parliamentary colleagues. Truly, voices of First Australians in the Parliament. Thank you for being here today and for the wisdom you give us, you together with my dear friend Ken, so much wisdom in the Parliament.

I offer my deep respect and gratitude to the Chairman of the Yothu Yindi Foundation, Dr Galarrwuy Yunupingu for hosting Lucy and me with your family. It was lovely to camp here last night and the last music was beautiful, serene and like a lullaby sending us all off to our dreams. Thank you. Emily was the last singer – beautiful.  And of course we woke here to the beautiful sounds of Gulkala.

I again as I did yesterday extend our deep condolences to the family of Dr G Yunupingu at this very sad time. He brought the Yolngu language to the people of Australia and his music will be with us forever.

I’ve come here to North East Arnhem Land to learn, participate respectfully and can I thank everyone so far I’ve had the chance to talk with. I am filled with optimism about our future together as a reconciled Australia.

Last month scientists and researchers revealed new evidence that our First Australians have been here in this land for 65,000 years.

These findings show that Indigenous people were living at the Madjedbebe rock shelter in Mirarr Country, at Kakadu east of Darwin, 18,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Among the middens, rock paintings, remains, plants and ochre, was the world’s oldest-known ground-edge axe head.

These findings place Australia on centre stage in the story of human origin, including mankind’s first long-distance maritime voyage – from Southeast Asia to the Australian continent.

Our First Peoples are shown as artistically, as technologically advanced, and at the cutting edge of technology in every respect.

Importantly, they confirm what Aboriginal people have always known and we have known – that your connection, your intimate connection to the land and sea are deep, abiding, ancient, and yet modern.

This news is a point of great pride for our nation. We rejoice in it, as we celebrate your Indigenous cultures and heritage as our culture and heritage – uniquely Australian.

As Galarrwuy said yesterday as he spoke in Yolngu, he said: “I am speaking in Australian.” Sharing, what a generosity, what a love, what a bigness he showed there as he does throughout his life and his leadership.

I want to pay tribute to the work of so many of you here today, who are leading the healing in communities, building bridges between the old and new, and looking for ways to ensure families and communities are not just surviving, but thriving.

Particularly the Indigenous leaders who every day wear many hats, walk in both worlds, and yet give tirelessly for their families and their communities. You often carry a very heavy load, and we thank you.

Where western astronomers look up at the sky and look for the light, Yolngu astronomers look also deep into the dark, using the black space to uncover further information, to unravel further mysteries.

So while we are both looking at the night sky, we are often looking at different parts. And yet through mutual respect, sharing of knowledge and an openness to learning, together we can see and appreciate the whole sky.

Those same principles are guiding us toward Constitutional Recognition.

The final Referendum Council report was delivered, as you know, on the 30th of June. Bill Shorten and I were briefed by the Referendum Council two weeks ago. The report was a long time coming and I know some would like an instant fulfillment of its recommendations.

Let me say, I respect deeply the work of the Referendum Council and all of those who contributed to it, and I respect it by considering it very carefully and the Government is doing so, in the first instance with my colleagues, including Ken Wyatt the first Indigenous Australian to be a Federal Minister, and together we consider it with our Cabinet. That is our way, that is our process, that is how we give respect to serious recommendations on serious matters.

And I do look forward to working closely and in a bipartisan way with the Opposition as we have done to date.

Djapiri said Bill and I are in the same canoe and on this issue we certainly are – but we are not alone, we are not alone in the canoe. We are in the same canoe with all of you as well and we need to steer it wisely to achieve our goal, to achieve that goal of Makarrata. Thank you again Galarrwuy for that word.

We share a sense of the significance of words. I love words and language. There is a great definition. What is the difference between poetry and prose? The best definition of poetry that I have ever found is that which cannot be translated, it can only be felt.

The Referendum Council’s report as Marcia reminded us is the fourth major report since that time and it adds immensely to the depth of knowledge. It gave us the Uluru Statement from the Heart, and I congratulate all those who attended on reaching an agreement. That was no small task.

It tells us that the priority for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is to resolve the powerlessness and lack of self-determination experienced – not by all, but certainly by too many.

I have been discussing it with leaders, the leaders of our First Australians and will continue to do so as we develop the next steps.

But there are still many questions:

What would the practical expression of the voice look like? What would the voice look like here for the Yolngu people? What would it look like for the people of Western Sydney, who are the largest population of Aboriginal peoples in Australia?

Is our highest aspiration to have Indigenous people outside the Parliament, providing advice to the Parliament? Or is it to have as many Indigenous voices, elected, within our Parliament?

What impact would the voice have on issues like child protection and justice, where the legislation and responsibility largely rest with state and territory governments?

These are important questions that require careful consideration. But the answers are not beyond us.

And I acknowledge that Indigenous Australians want deeper engagement with government and their fellow Australians, and to be much better consulted, and represented in the political, social and economic life of this nation.

We can’t be weighed down by the past, but we can learn from it.

Australians are constitutionally conservative. The bar is surmountable, you can get over it but it is a high bar. That’s why the Constitution has often been described as a frozen document.

Now many people talk about referendums, very few have experienced leading a campaign. The 1999 campaign for a Republic – believe me, now, one of the few subjects on which I have special knowledge – the 1999 campaign for a Republic has given me a very keen insight into what it will take to win, how hard it is to win, how much harder is the road for the advocate for change than that of those who resist change. I offer this experience today in the hope that together, we can achieve a different outcome to 1999. A successful referendum.

Compulsory voting has many benefits, but one negative aspect is that those who for one reason or another are not interested in an issue or familiar with it, are much more likely to vote no – it reinforces an already conservative constitutional context.

Another critical difference today is the rise of social media, which has changed the nature of media dramatically, in a decade or two we have a media environment which is no longer curated by editors and producers – but freewheeling, viral and unconstrained.

The question posed in a referendum must have minimal opposition and be clearly understood.

A vital ingredient of success is popular ownership. After all, the Constitution does not belong to the Government, or the Parliament, or the Judges. It belongs to the people.

It is Parliament’s duty to propose changes to the Constitution but the Constitution cannot be changed by Parliament. Only the Australian people can do that.

No political deal, no cross party compromise, no leaders’ handshake can deliver constitutional change.

Bipartisanship is a necessary but far from a sufficient condition of successful constitutional reform.

To date, again as Marcia described much of the discussion has been about removing the racially discriminatory provisions in the Constitution and recognising our First Australians in our nation’s founding document.

However, the Referendum Council has told us that a voice to Parliament is the only option they advise us to put to the Australian people. We have heard this, and we will work with you to find a way forward.

Though not a new concept, the voice is relatively new to the national conversation about constitutional change.

To win, we must all work together to build a high level of interest and familiarity with the concept of a voice, and how this would be different, or the same, as iterations of the past like the National Aboriginal Conference or the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission.

We also need to look to the experience of other countries, as we seek to develop the best model for Australia.

The historic 1967 Referendum was the most successful in our history because of its simplicity and clarity. The injustices were clearly laid out – Indigenous people were not enjoying the rights and freedoms of other citizens. The question was clearly understood – that the Commonwealth needed to have powers to make laws for Indigenous Australians. And the answer seemed obvious – vote yes to ensure the Commonwealth gave Indigenous people equal rights.

To succeed this time around, we need to develop enough detail so that the problem, the solution and therefore the question at the ballot box are simple, easily understood and overwhelmingly embraced.

One of the toughest lessons I learnt from the Referendum campaign of ‘99 was that an ‘all or nothing’ approach sometimes results in nothing. During the campaign, those who disagreed with the model that was proposed urged a “no” vote, arguing that we could all vote for a different Republic model in a few years. I warned that a “no” vote meant no republic for a very long time.

Now, regrettably, my prediction 18 years ago was correct. We must avoid a rejection at a referendum if we want to avoid setting Makarrata reconciliation back.

We recognise that the Uluru statement is powerful because it comes from an Indigenous-designed and led process. And because it comes from the heart, we must accept that it is grounded in wisdom and truth.

It is both a lament and a yearning. It is poetry.

The challenge now is to turn this poetry that speaks so eloquently of your aspiration into prose that will enable its realisation and be embraced by all Australians.

This is hard and complex work. And we need to take care of each other as we continue on this journey. We need to take care of each other in the canoe, lest we tip out of it.

Yesterday afternoon was a powerful show of humanity. As we stood together holding hands – Indigenous and non-Indigenous people – we stood together as Australians. As equals.

And we will have the best chance of success by working together. This cannot be a take it or leave it proposal. We have to come to the table and negotiate in good faith, and I am committed to working with you to find a way forward.

Galarrwuy – you gave us your fire words yesterday, thank you again. We will draw on them as we look to light the path forward for our nation.

And when considering how to do that, we are inspired by the success of the Uluru process. The statement that emerged from Uluru was designed and led by Indigenous Australians and the next steps should be too.

To go to a referendum there must be an understanding between all parties that the proposal will meet the expectations of the very people it claims it will represent.

Now we have five Aboriginal members of our Parliament. They will be vital in shaping and shepherding any legislation through the Parliament. They too are bridge builders, walking in both worlds, and their contribution to the Parliament enriches us all.

The Australian Parliament and the nation’s people – Indigenous and non-Indigenous – must be engaged as we work together to find the maximum possible overlap between what Indigenous people are seeking, what the Australian community overall will embrace and what the Parliament will authorise.

I have been learning that the word Makarrata means the ‘coming together after a struggle’— Galarrwuy told us a beautiful story this morning about a Makarrata here in this country. And a Makarrata is seen as necessary, naturally, if we are to continue our path to reconciliation.

But just like the night sky, reconciliation means different things to different people. This complexity convinces me that our nation cannot be reconciled in one step, in one great leap. We will only be reconciled when we take a number of actions, both practical and symbolic.

Beyond Constitutional Recognition, that work continues every day. I reflect on the Makarrata discussion of the late 70’s and 80’s. A list of demands was sent to the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs in 1981. It called for rights to land and resources, compensation, the creation of Aboriginal schools, medical centres and an Aboriginal bank.

Despite a final agreement not being reached at the time, we have achieved some of the policies called for. The Commonwealth provided $433 million to 137 Aboriginal Medical Services across the country last financial year. Indigenous Business Australia provides low interest loans to help Indigenous Australians secure economic opportunities including home ownership with 544 new housing loans made last year. The Aboriginal Benefits Account supports Northern Territory Land Councils and provides grants for the benefit of Aboriginal people living in the Territory.

We now spend $4.9 billion on the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

And we are empowering communities through our Indigenous Procurement policy.

I am pleased to announce today the Commonwealth has officially surpassed half a billion dollars in spending with Indigenous businesses all over Australia. I am looking forward to sharing the full two-year results in October. This is a spectacular increase from just $6.2 million being won by Indigenous businesses only a few years ago under former policies.

Since 2008 the Commonwealth has been helping improve remote housing and bring down rates of overcrowding, with $5.4 billion to build thousands of better homes over ten years.

And the land is returning to its traditional owners.

More than 2.5 million square kilometres of land, or about 34 per cent of Australia’s land mass is today recognised under Native Title. Another 24 per cent is covered by registered claims and by 2025, our ambition is to finalise all current Native Title claims.

So we are standing here on Aboriginal land – land that has been rightfully acknowledged as yours and returned to you. And we are standing here near the birthplace of the land rights movement. A movement of which the Yolngu people were at the forefront.

As a nation we’ve come a long way.

In the Northern Territory, more than 50 per cent of the land is now Aboriginal land, recognised as Aboriginal land.

Just like the land at Kenbi which, on behalf of our nation, I returned to the traditional owners, the Larrakia people last year.

Earlier this year I appointed June Oscar AO, who has been acknowledged earlier, as the first female Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, who has agreed to report on the issues affecting Indigenous women and girls’ success and safety.

And all of that work contributes to a better future for our First Australians.

But there is much more to be done in not just what we do, but how we do it – as we work with our First Australians. We are doing things with our First Australians, not to them.

Now Galarrwuy – I have read and read again your essay Rom Watungu. It too is a story from the heart, of your father, of his life and when his time came, how he handed his authority to you, the embodiment of continuity, the bearer of a name that means “the rock that stands against time”

But rocks that stand against time, ancient cultures and lore, these are the strong foundations on which new achievements are built, from which new horizons can be seen – the tallest towers are built on the oldest rocks.

You, Galarrwuy, ask Australians to let Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders breathe and be free, be who you are and ask that we see your songs and languages, the land and the ceremonies as a gift.

As Prime Minister I will continue to do all I can to ensure that being an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian means to be successful, to achieve, to have big dreams and high hopes, and to draw strength from your identity as an Indigenous person in this great country.

That’s why, as we renegotiate the Closing the Gap targets with the various state and territory jurisdictions later this year, my Government has insisted on a strengths based approach. Indigenous people are not a problem to be solved. You are our fellow Australians. Your cultures are a gift to our nation.

There’s so much more work to be done.

But in doing so, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and all Australians, continue to connect with pride and optimism – with mabu liyan, in Pat’s language from the Yawuru people – the wellbeing that comes with a reconciled harmony with you, our First Australians, our shared history truthfully told and a deeper understanding of the most ancient human cultures on earth, and the First Australians to whom we have so much to thank for sharing them with us.

Thank you so much.

Part 3 Opposition Leader’s Garma Speech

Good morning everybody.

I’d like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land upon which we meet, I pay my respects to elders both past and present.

I recognise that I stand on what is, was and always will be Aboriginal land.

I acknowledge the Prime Minister and his wife Lucy.

I wish to thank Gallarwuy and the Gumatj for hosting us – and on behalf of my Labor team who are here, Senator Pat Dodson, Senator Malarndirri McCarthy, the Hon Linda Burney, the Hon Kyam Maher, supported also by local Members of Parliament the Hon Warren Snowden and Luke Gosling, and Territory Minister Eva Lawler.

We are very grateful to be part of this gathering.

Also Clementine my daughter asked me to thank you for letting her join in the bunggul yesterday afternoon, she loved it.

At the opening yesterday, we were privileged, all of us, to be at a powerful ceremony, where we remembered Dr G Yunupingu, a man who was born blind – but helped Australians see.

From his island, his words and his music touched the world.

But I also understand that the words of our host were about setting us a test, reminding all of us privileged to be here that there is serious business to be done.

Here at Garma, on the lands of the Gumatj, we gather to talk about a Yolngu word. Makarrata.

It is not just now a Yolngu word – I put it to you it’s a national test.

Coming together, after a struggle.

And for the first Australians, it has been a very long struggle indeed.

– A struggle against dispossession and discrimination, exclusion and inequality.

– A struggle against violence and poverty, disease and diminished opportunity.

– A struggle for better health, for better housing, for safer communities, more jobs, for longer lives.

– A struggle against injustice and racism: from the sporting field to the courts of our land.

Above all, a struggle for a better future for their children: a struggle to be counted, to be heard, to be recognised.

In 2015, the Referendum Council was created with a very clear mission.

To consult on what form Constitutional Recognition should take – how it should work.

To listen to Aboriginal people and to be guided by their aspirations.

And to finally give them a say in a document from which too long they been excluded.

Since then, thousands of the first Australians have explained to the rest us what

Recognition means – for all of us, for our children and indeed for all of our futures.

We asked for your views, we sought your counsel – and, in large numbers, it was answered.

At Uluru, you gave us the statement from the heart.

A call for:

– A voice enshrined in the Constitution

– A declaration to be passed by all parliaments, acknowledging the unique place of the first nations in Australian history, their culture, their connection.

– And a Makarrata Commission to oversee a process of agreement-making and truth-telling.

All three of these objectives speak to the long-held and legitimate aspirations of our

First Australians:

– A proper acknowledgment of Aboriginal histories and the dispossession that

followed upon the arrival of the Europeans

– A bigger say in the issues which affect you – no more ‘solutions’ imposed without consultation or consent

– And a more lasting settlement, a new way forward, a new pathway including through treaties.

These ideas are not new – but the Uluru statement did articulate these with new clarity, a new passion, a new sense of truth and purpose.

And let me speak truthfully on behalf of Labor, the Opposition.

I cannot be any more clear than this: Labor supports a voice for Aboriginal people in our Constitution, we support a declaration by all parliaments, we support a truth-telling commission.

We are not confronted by the notion of treaties with our first Australians.

For us the question is not whether we do these things, the question is not if we should do these things but when and how.

The Parliament needs to be engaged.

The Parliament needs to be engaged now.

The Parliament needs to start the process of engaging with the people of Australia now.

It does not come as a surprise to me, that following upon a report of the

Referendum Council, the Parliament’s next step must be to consider this report.

And in doing so, we must carry its message from the heart of Australia into our hearts as parliamentarians. With optimism, with understanding, not with a desire to find what is wrong, but to find the desire to make these concepts work in the interests of all.

If we were all gathered here now, back in 1891 and 1894 and 1897 to write the Constitution, we would never dream of excluding Aboriginal people from the Census.

But in 1901, they did.

If we were starting the Constitution from scratch, we would not diminish the independence of Aboriginal people – with racist powers.

But in 1901, they did.

And if we were starting on an empty piece of paper, we would, without question, recognise the First Australians’ right to a genuine, empowered voice in the decisions that govern their lives.

Now as you know, we cannot unmake history. We do not get the change to start all over again – but it doesn’t mean that we are forever chained to the prejudices of the past.

The Prime Minister’s observations though are correct about the difficulties of constitutional change. But I ask also that we cannot let the failure of 1999 govern our future on this question.

Voting for a constitutional voice is our chance to bring our Constitution home, to make it better, more equal and more Australian.

A document that doesn’t just pay respect to the weight of a foreign crown, but also recognises the power and value of the world’s oldest living culture, recognises that

Aboriginal people were here first.

And of course, let us reject those who say that symbolic change is irrelevant because dealing with these questions does not mean walking away from the real problems of inequality and disadvantage.

– Talking about enshrining a voice does not reduce our determination to eradicate family violence

– It doesn’t stop us creating good local jobs, training apprentices, treating trachoma or supporting rangers on country.

– It doesn’t distract us from the crisis in out-of-home care, youth suicide or the shocking, growing number of Aboriginal people incarcerated for not much better reason than the colour of their skin.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples don’t have to choose between historical justice and real justice, you don’t have to choose between equality in society and equality in the Constitution – you have an equal right to both.

The Uluru Statement has given us a map of the way forward – and today I finally want to talk about how we follow it, how we take the next step.

Not the obstacles ahead, not the problems, real as they are.

Aboriginal Australians don’t need a balanda lecture about the difficulty of changing the Constitution, our inspiration friends, should not be the 1999 referendum, it should be the 1967 referendum.

You have lived that struggle, every day.

Let me be very clear. In my study of our history, in my experience, nothing has ever been given to Aboriginal people – everything that is obtained has been fought for, has been argued for, has been won and built by Aboriginal people.

Think of the Freedom Riders

Think of the Bark Petition, which Gallarwuy was witness to

Think of the Gurindji at Wave Hill

Eddie Mabo and his fight for justice

Nothing was ever sorted by simply waiting until someone came along said let me do it for you. It is not the way the world is organised.

Every bit of progress has been driven by pride, by persistence by that stubborn refusal to not take no for an answer when it comes to the pursuit of equality.

Now making the case for change and encouraging Australians to vote yes for a recognition, reconciliation, and truth – this is not easy.

But before we can do that we surely must agree on the referendum question that has to be the long overdue next step.

I have written to our Prime Minister, we’ve proposed a joint parliamentary committee – which they’re taking on board, having a look at – to be made up of Government, the Opposition and crossbench MPs – to work with Aboriginal leaders right across Australia.

This committee will have two key responsibilities.

One – advising the Parliament on how to set-up a Makarrata Commission and create a framework for truth-telling and agreement making, including treaties.

Two – what would a voice look like. Whilst there are many questions, none of these are insurmountable.

And three, as a matter of overdue recognition – to endeavour to finalise a referendum question in a timely fashion. There’s no reason why that couldn’t be done by the end of this year.

The issues have been traversed for a decade.

Now friends this is not a committee for the sake of a committee, it’s not another mechanism for delay. It is the necessary process of engagement of the Parliament.

But we have had ten years plus of good intentions, but it is time now perhaps, for more action.

The Parliament does have a key role to play here, in setting the question.

The Parliament could agree on the question this year if we all work together so that the people could vote not long after that.

Voting to enshrine a voice in a standalone Referendum – free from the shadow of an election, or the politics of other questions.

It may seem very hard to imagine, it may seem very hard to contemplate.

But it is possible to imagine a great day, a unifying day, a famous victory, a Makaratta for all.

As I said yesterday, we’ve heard plenty of speeches, there are many fine words… but perhaps people have a right to be impatient after ten years – indeed after 117 years.

So the test I set isn’t what we say here, in this beautiful place.

It’s what we do when we leave.

It’s the honesty of admitting that after the event, what is it that we do.

The test I set for myself is can I come here at future Garmas and look you in the eye and say I have done everything I can, because if I cannot say to you that I have done everything I that I can, then I can’t be truthful with my heart.

Yesterday Gallarwuy spoke with a tongue of fire, he told a powerful truth.

He said that for more than two centuries we had been two peoples – living side-by-side, but not united.

I think that is the challenge for politics too.

Djapirri who just spoke up before me, she’s talked about hope. There is the hope that you refer to, you have the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition. We are here side-by-side, and now we need to be united, not to kick the can down the road, but united on a process that says this parliament will respect what we have heard from Aboriginal people.

Not just at Uluru, but for decades.

In 1967, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were counted. In 2017, you are being heard.

There is no reason why we can’t enshrine a voice for Aboriginal people in our Constitution.

Djapirri said, she told me of a dream of a canoe, paddled by the Prime Minister and myself. That in itself is an arresting image. Two captains. But in all seriousness, we appreciated I think the power of that illusion, the power of that dream.

My party is ready.

I think Australia is ready.

The fine words that we heard at the opening yesterday, they remind me of the fire dreaming symbol, which is in the front of the Parliament of Australia.

Fire.

That fire dreaming symbol is from central Australia but it is connected isn’t it, by the word of Djapirri yesterday.

Again, that spirit of fire it is a gift from Indigenous people to all Australians and I sincerely will endeavor to make sure that spirit of fire infuses our Parliament.

Aboriginal Health : Rhetoric to Reality: Devolving decision-making to Aboriginal communities

Delivering services to Aboriginal communities, in a way that involves them as genuine partners and produces effective results, remains an ongoing challenge for public services across Australia.

 ” There are three ways of dealing with people: you can do TO them, FOR them or WITH them. The historic experience for Aboriginal people is the done to, or done for, experience. We need to be doing it WITH them.”

As one of the participants in the research said:

Download the report here : rhetoric-to-reality-report

Delivering services to Aboriginal communities, in a way that involves them as genuine partners and produces effective results, remains an ongoing challenge for public services across Australia.

A new publication, developed by ANZSOG students in conjunction with the NSW Department of Aboriginal Affairs, looks at how the NSW public service can change the way it works with Aboriginal people and better devolve decision making to local communities.

Rhetoric to Reality: Devolving decision-making to Aboriginal communities focuses on what structural and attitudinal changes might be required to deliver better collaborative relationships with Aboriginal communities.

Interactions between Australian public services and Indigenous communities have historically been hampered by a lack of respect, trust and understanding.

The report finds that devolving decision-making to Aboriginal communities should not be seen as an end in itself. It should be a means of practising different ways of working with Aboriginal people that involve sharing knowledge and power, collaborating, and responding to local contexts. If this is done the ultimate result will be better shared outcomes for communities.

Whilst the Australian and international literature highlights many barriers to effective collaboration with Indigenous communities there are very few specific recommendations which go beyond ‘rhetoric’. Rhetoric to Reality provides a range of concrete approaches that NSW Government departments can consider.

 

Shift 1: Connecting to culture, connecting to Country

Key findings

The theme which emerged most clearly from our research was how important it is for public servants to develop and maintain genuine cultural competence. Almost all participants raised some aspect of cultural awareness or competence training as an example of what works and what does not.

Participants felt strongly that the current approach to cultural competence in the public service can be ad hoc, tokenistic, generic and static. Similarly, we found that ideas about cultural awareness, competence, safety or intelligence are not well articulated or understood in the NSW public service. The following statements provided by participants highlight these ideas:

“We’re underdone on comprehensive support for developing cultural competency.”

“I think we can all put our hand up, ‘Yep, job done,’ but then not actually spending any time with Aboriginal communities or adding on that extra layer to think about them.”

“Cultural competency training must be delivered in the most authentic way possible. It has to be real, practical and relevant for staff in their roles.”

“It needs to be honest and delivered by Aboriginal people.”

Research participants considered genuine cultural competence to be critical to changing public sector attitudes and structures. This finding is supported by the literature, which shows that cultural understanding (Zurba et al 2012) and culturally appropriate or safe service delivery (Thomas et al 2015) are important to building relationships with Aboriginal people. Studies have shown that a combination of practices can change structural racism in organisations (Abramovitz & Blitz 2015).

literature also supports the provision of cultural training for staff (Downing & Kowal 2011, Fredericks 2006, Paradies et al 2008). The limitations of cultural awareness training as a stand-alone activity were noted by our research participants and have been noted in previous research (e.g. Downing & Kowal 2011), including the risk of stereotyping, promoting ‘otherness’ and ignoring systemic responses. However, studies have shown it is possible to change prejudiced attitudes towards Aboriginal people through specific education activities (Finlay & Stephan 2000; Pendersen et al 2000 & 2004).

The local decision-making framework recognises that public servants need a level of cultural competence to participate. The Premier’s Memorandum M2015-01 Local Decision Making, states that “NSW agencies will adhere to the principles of local decision-making and ensure staff are educated to respond to the needs of Aboriginal communities in a culturally sensitive and appropriate manner”.

While cultural competence was recognised by our research participants and supported by the literature as a key enabler, the lack of a current framework for the development of genuine cultural competence by public servants persists as a dominant issue in shifting public service structural and attitudinal frameworks.

“The key is having a culturally competent NSW government.”

Below we note a number of recurring ideas for improvement in the understanding and the application of cultural competence in the public service that were raised by research participants.

Accepting that racism and paternalism still exist in the attitudes and structures of the public service and which may be manifested in ‘unconscious bias’ was noted by many participants: “It’s hard to accept we have unconscious bias because people in the public sector are values driven.”

Participants were candid about what they perceive as paternalistic views and subtle forms of racism and bias shown by individuals and institutions: “I believe government and its agencies a lack of faith and trust in Aboriginal people’s ability to make sound decisions in the best interest of their communities.”

Understanding history and the historical trauma experienced by Aboriginal people was viewed as critical. “From a community perspective there is a lot of historical hurt or pain from previous government decisions… You have to let them vent their anger and frustration of the historical decisions that have been made that have had a significant impact on their communities.”

“[A] lot of our staff don’t understand the stolen generation.”

Re-conceptualising cultural competence in the public service as a lifelong journey was seen by many participants as necessary for meaningful change. This includes real experience of working alongside Aboriginal people and communities, and ongoing reflective learning. “We need our staff to keep asking, ‘Why is that the case?’” This finding is supported by the literature, which notes that enhancing a person’s awareness of their biases is critical in reducing modern forms of prejudice and discrimination (e.g. Perry et al 2015).

Building trust was seen as vital. For example, participants talked about public servants, including senior public servants, taking the time before getting down to business to build relationships with Aboriginal people, by having a cuppa on neutral ground, listening and building rapport: “It may take a couple of meetings before you get down to the nitty gritty of developing your relationship with that community.” Building trust and developing genuine relationships were also a strong theme in the literature (Closing the Gap Clearinghouse 2015; Taylor et al 2013; Zurba et al 2012).

Including Country as critical to the development of cultural competence was a universal theme. Participants provided examples of how this could be achieved, including through site-based training, localised activities, travelling

The report’s three key recommendations are that:

  • Cultural competence is most effective when it is localised, ongoing and taught on-Country. Local communities could benefit from being engaged in this teaching.
  • Public-sector leaders who are fully committed to cultural competence are most likely to establish collaboration with Aboriginal communities as a routine approach within government. Examples of successful leadership of this kind should be recognised and publicised across the public sector.
  • Aboriginal public servants should be supported and nurtured, and should be seen as critically important for a culturally competent NSW public service.

Rhetoric to Reality was prepared as part of the capstone Work Based Project subject by ANZSOG Executive Master of Public Administration students Laura Andrew, Jane Cipants, Sandra Heriot, Prue Monument, Grant Pollard and Peter Stibbard. It exemplifies the quality of applied research conducted by ANZSOG’s EMPA students and the potential impact when our students partner with a government agency to help drive change.

The research involved interviews and focus groups with senior executives and frontline public servants in Sydney and regional NSW, to get their perspective on what needed to change to lift the impact of programs on the Aboriginal community.

All recognised the importance of cultural change, and the value of ensuring that successful programs, designed in partnership with local communities, were used as examples to improve results elsewhere.

Rhetoric to Reality will be available across the NSW public service as a valuable resource to ensure that government support for Aboriginal people delivers benefits to those communities.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

1.National : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations pharmacist Special Interest Group ( SIG )  launched

2.NT : Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service $2.4 million for culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services

3. WA : AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox speaks about cashless welfare cards

 4. WA  : Wrongful conviction shines light on lack of translators

 
 5. QLD Deadly Choices calls  for volunteers for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival

6. SA :  Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO promotes World Hepatitis Day.

7.VIC :  VAHS mob promotes Healthy Lifestyle message  at World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

8. QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council  Growing Deadly Families

9. NSW Redfern National Children’s Day Celebration

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

National : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations pharmacist Special Interest Group ( SIG )  launched

“For too long Aboriginal people have suffered shorter lifespans, been sicker and poorer than the average non-Indigenous Australian, however, highly trained pharmacists have a proven track record in delivering improved health outcomes when integrated into multidisciplinary practices,

“Strong international evidence supports pharmacists’ ability to improve a number of critical health outcomes, including significant reductions in blood pressure and cholesterol and improved diabetes control. A number of studies have also supported pharmacists’ cost-effectiveness.

Some ACCHOs have already shown leadership in the early adoption of pharmacists outside of any national programs or support structures. NACCHO and PSA are committed to supporting ACCHOs across Australia to meet the medicines needs in their communities by enhancing support for those wishing to embed a pharmacist into their service.”

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner said disparities in the health between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are confronting SEE Previous NACCHO post

Pictured above Mike Stephens Director of Medicines Programs and Policy in Cover Photo

See previous NACCHO Pharmacy posts

See previous NACCHO QUMAX posts

In recognition of the growing number of pharmacists working in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs), the peak national body for pharmacists, the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) has launched the ACCHO Special Interest Group (SIG).

The ACCHO SIG was launched on 30 July at PSA17 in Sydney during theAboriginal Health Service Pharmacist forum.

PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson said pharmacists working in ACCHOs have specific needs and skills and having a Special Interest Group with the primary role of supporting them will assist PSA to drive the growth of this career path.

“In many cases pharmacists working in these positions are providing innovative and diverse services that have the potential to be informative and relevant to the evolution of pharmacy services and inter-professional care.

“Consultation with these pharmacists and services about their needs is vital to ensure PSA and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) deliver relevant and meaningful benefits to PSA members and the wider pharmacy and health sectors,” Dr Jackson said.

A key role of the National ACCHO SIG Committee will be to provide up-to-date information to NACCHO and PSA on relevant issues that relate to both organisations.

This will include input on improvements to PSA’s professional development and practice support programs that benefit ACCHO pharmacists. The SIG will also provide NACCHO with input on pharmacy-related trends and practices that affect ACCHOs.

It is a joint committee to be run by PSA and NACCHO to foster collaboration, inform relevant policy and strengthen the relationships between these organisations with a shared commitment to embedding pharmacists in ACCHOs nationally.

PSA also welcomed the announcement of a trial to support Aboriginal health organisations to integrate pharmacists into their services.

The ACCHO SIG will support pharmacists participating in this trial.

Dr Jackson said having a culturally responsive pharmacist integrated within anAboriginal health service builds better relationships between patients and staff, leading to improved results in chronic disease management and Quality Use of Medicines.

 NT : Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service $2.4 million for culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services.

The Federal Government will provide up to $2.4 million for a tailored project to address family violence experienced by Indigenous women and children in Katherine.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said the funding formed part of the $25 million Indigenous-focused package under the Third Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

“I am pleased to announce this support for Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service, a local community service with specialist experience in supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families,” Minister Scullion said.

“The funding will deliver culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services.”

Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service CEO, Suzi Berto, said the project would provide intensive family-focused case management delivered within a trauma-informed framework to address behaviour often associated with domestic violence. It would also aim to break the cycle of domestic and family violence and child removals from families.

“Wurli welcomes this new program and would like to thank the Federal Government for selecting Wurli to take on this particular project,” Ms Berto said.

Minister Scullion said community-based, culturally-appropriate solutions were required to reduce the rate of family violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children.

“In total, $18.9 million will be invested in eight Indigenous community organisations across Australia to deliver a range of services, including trauma-informed therapeutic services for children, services for perpetrators to prevent future offending and intensive family-focused cased management.

“We have actively sought the views of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on how best to address family violence.

“Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service has been identified based on its expertise, as well as local needs in the community.

3. WA : AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox speaks about cashless welfare cards

” Targeting welfare is not, by itself, a panacea but it just might give Roebourne the circuit-breaker it needs to allow the state government to build a safe and resilient community.

There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the group did not support the “ill-conceived idea” that cashless welfare cards could turn the tide on child abuse.

FROM NEWS LTD

Paedophiles in Western Australia’s Pilbara region are allegedly using welfare payments to bribe children for sex, prompting the police commissioner to call for an expansion of the cashless welfare program.

But the Aboriginal Health Council of WA says the commissioner should be more concerned about policing in remote communities rather than advocating further disempowerment of indigenous people.

Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan said in an opinion piece in The West Australian newspaper on Tuesday that welfare cash was also being used for drugs, alcohol and gambling at Roebourne and surrounding Aboriginal communities.

He said in an area of about 1500 people, there were 184 known child sex abuse victims, with police charging 36 people with more than 300 offences since the operation began late last year, plus another 124 suspects.

Mr O’Callaghan, who will retire this month after 13 years as police commissioner, said that in 2014 the previous government noted 63 government and non-government providers delivering more than 200 services to Roebourne.

“Despite all of this effort, we have failed to protect the most vulnerable members of that community and have witnessed sufferers of abuse grow up and become offenders, and so the cycle continues,” he said.

“We often find children sexually abusing children.”

The commissioner said the problem was so widespread that some families had normalised it and he described the hopelessness as a “cancer quickly spreading throughout the community”.

“Given the longstanding issues in Roebourne, we ought now to be looking at more fundamental structural reform around welfare and income to reduce the opportunity for offending,” he said.

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the group did not support the “ill-conceived idea” that cashless welfare cards could turn the tide on child abuse.

“There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse,” she said.

“Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

Ms Nelson-Cox also said the commissioner’s admission that officers could not protect children in remote communities was gravely concerning.

Imagine if you were taken into custody to be questioned over a crime you did not commit in a language you could not even read and write in — and were then charged with murder.

4. WA  : Wrongful conviction shines light on lack of translators

It sounds like a third world travel nightmare.

But this actually happened in Australia to Gene Gibson, a shy young man from the tiny Gibson Desert community of Kiwirrkurra.

As reported ABC

While there were many complex factors which led Mr Gibson to being jailed for the manslaughter of Josh Warneke in 2014, after a conviction which was quashed earlier this year, it might never have ended up that way if he had a skilled interpreter to steer him through crucial meetings with police.

Mr Gibson’s first language is Pintupi, with Kukutja his second.

He has a limited understanding of English and his cognitive impairment makes it difficult for him to comprehend complex information.

Today the Court of Appeal outlined its reasons for quashing his conviction, explaining that Mr Gibson’s problems with language were one reason why “the plea was not attributable to a genuine consciousness of guilt”.

It gives many examples of how Mr Gibson often did not understand his own lawyer, who in turn could not understand what the interpreter was telling Mr Gibson about important matters like how to plead.

He was originally charged with murder but pleaded guilty to manslaughter after police interviews were deemed inadmissible for several reasons, including the lack of a qualified interpreter.

Stranger in your own land

Mr Gibson, like many Indigenous Australians who do not speak English as a first language, is somewhat like a foreigner in his own justice system.

It is something which concerns WA’s chief justice Wayne Martin.

Earlier this month, he told a conference of criminal lawyers in Bali that language was causing “significant disadvantage” for Indigenous people in the justice system, with WA’s translation services not reaching everyone who needed them.

“If we do not have properly resourced and effective interpreter services for Aboriginal people, then they will continue to fare badly in the criminal justice system,” he wrote in a submission to a Senate committee inquiry last year.

The interpretation and translation of Indigenous languages for the WA justice system is undoubtedly a niche industry.

There are about 45 Indigenous languages in the Kimberley, many of them considered highly endangered. Fewer than 600 people speak Pintupi, according to the Australian Indigenous Languages Database.

So not only do you have to find an interpreter who speaks Pintupi, but you also need someone who is trained to understand police and court proceedings, and relay them to a defendant.

It is a massive problem, according to Faith Baisden, the coordinator of First Languages, which helps Indigenous communities maintain their languages.

“Particularly in those small community groups we’re talking about, we’re not necessarily going to find someone who’s got the skill and the confidence to be trained. It takes really specialised training,” she said.

Another problem is that WA’s only Indigenous language interpreting service is struggling for funding.

The Kimberley Interpreting Service (KIS) is dependent on federal money after being stripped of funding by the WA Government in recent years.

But its chief executive Dee Lightfoot said she was hopeful of securing money from the new WA Government in September’s budget, with Treasurer Ben Wyatt writing to inform her he was reviewing her request.

She said Mr Gibson needed an interpreter to help him navigate the justice system from the very start

5. QLD Deadly Choices calls  for volunteers for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival

 

Volunteers aged 16+ years are needed for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival! More details are below! To register your interest please email admin@murrirugbyleague.com.au.

6. SA :  Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO promotes World Hepatitis Day. 

World Hepatitis Day. Nunkuwarrin Yunti provides treatment, Specialists, prevention, advocacy and information support for people with Hepatitis. Here is Jorge from our Harm Minimisation Team #showyourface

OR VIEW HERE

7.VIC :  VAHS mob promotes Healthy Lifestyle message  at World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

Check out our newest healthy lifestyle local sport champions!

These deadly women make up the Maal-Ya Indigenous Basketball team. They are off to Vancouver, Canada on Sunday to play in the World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

So proud to see these women represent their mobs and proudly display our Healthy Lifestyle Values: staying smoke free, healthy eating, active living, drinking water and being deadly role models!

With Georgia Bamblett, Courtney Alice, Thamar Atkinson, Montanna Hudson, Sophie Atkinson, Klarindah Hudson-Proctor, Edward Bryant, Tyler Atkinson and June Bamblett.

Good luck Maal-Ya! Can’t wait to hear how you go! Stay tuned to this page and Sports Carnival for updates throughout the week!

#StaySmokeFree #Gofor2and5 #DrinkWaterUMob

Sportcarnival VicHealth Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc

8. Apunipima Cape York Health Council  Growing Deadly Families

Apunipima Cape York Health Council Region Two Manager Johanna Neville and Maternal and Child Health Worker Florida Getawan will head to Brisbane today to deliver a presentation on the Baby One Program to the Queensland Clinical Senate’s Growing Deadly Families Forum.

Johanna and Florida will focus on the Baby One Program, an integral part of antenatal care in Cape York

‘Apunipima’s award winning, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander – led home visiting Baby One Program runs from pregnancy until the baby is 1000 days old,’ Florida said.

‘Baby Baskets – an integral feature of the Baby One Program – are provided to Families at key times during pregnancy and the postnatal period. The Baskets act as both an incentive to encourage families to engage with health care providers, as a catalyst for health education and as a means to provide essential items to families in Cape York.’

‘It’s well known that best practice care during pregnancy and baby’s early years has been proven to provide positive health outcomes. There is a still a gap in the maternal and child health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders compared to other Australians. It’s this gap we are trying to bridge with the Baby One Program which sees Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers visit families in their homes to deliver health care and health education.’

Florida Getawan helps deliver the Baby One Program in Cairns and Kowanyama and said home visiting makes the difference when it comes to mums getting care.

‘As a Maternal and Child Health Worker I spend time in Cairns and Kowanyama, educating pregnant women about healthy eating, what’s good and what’s not good for them during pregnancy such as the dangers of smoking, and safe sleeping for bubba,’ she explained. ‘I love doing home visits and yarning with mothers about healthy parenting and being a support person for them in their own space.

I love being there for families who are too shy to come to the clinic so if I can engage with them in their own environment, families feel safe to access health information I love watching mothers grow because I’ve had seven pregnancies myself and can relate to what they are going through and I’m able to develop a healthy relationship with them.’
Johanna and Florida will deliver their presentation at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre 10:50 am on Thursday 3 August 2017.

About the Growing Deadly Families Forum

The Queensland Clinical Senate – which provides clinical leadership by developing strategies to safeguard and promote the delivery of high quality, safe and sustainable patient care – is holding the Growing Deadly Families Forum which will focus on improving the health of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and families, through a healthier start to life.

The Forum runs from 3 – 4 August.

 

9. NSW Redfern National Children’s Day Celebration

AMS Redfern will be celebrating ‘National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day’ come along and share stories about the importance of staying connected to culture and having strong positive family relationships
Friday 4th August from 2:30 pm-4:30 pm
#BBQ will be provided
#Value our rights, Respect our Culture, Bring us home.
#Limited Giveaways

 

 

 

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