NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealthWeek News : 1.Download Report Monitoring #mentalhealth and #suicideprevention reform 2.Government has announced a new Productivity Commission Inquiry into the role of mental health in the Australian economy

“As background to this development, the National Mental Health Commission has published its sixth national report – Monitoring Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Reform: National Report 2018 – which provides an analysis of the current status of Australia’s core mental health and suicide prevention reforms, and their impact on consumers and carers.”

Part 1 Download a copy of report 

Monitoring Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Reform National Report 2018

Engaging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in regional planning

” One of the priorities for PHNs is engaging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and community controlled organisations in co-designing all aspects of regional planning for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and suicide prevention services.

There has been some early success in building partnerships between PHNs and Aboriginal community controlled organisations (see Case study). In contrast, some PHNs have primarily commissioned mainstream providers rather than community controlled health services to provide services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Leading Aboriginal organisations consider this approach to be flawed, and believe it will result in poorer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

It is important for PHNs to recognise and support the cultural determinants of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and social and emotional wellbeing, in addition to clinical approaches.26 Recent research by the Lowitja Institute highlights the need for a specific definition of mental health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, as mental illness is more likely to occur when social, cultural, historical and political determinants are out of alignment.27

Extract from Page 20 of Report 

Read over 150 NACCHO Aboriginal Mental Health artices published over 6 years

Part 2

 ” The Government has announced a new Productivity Commission Inquiry into the role of mental health in the Australian economy. 

This move is significant recognition of the considerable impact of mental health challenges on individuals and the wider community.”

The Productivity Commission’s inquiry will take 18 months and will scrutinise mental health funding in Australia, which is estimated at $9 billion annually across federal, state and territory governments. Last week the Australian Bureau of Statistics revealed 3,128 people committed suicide in 2017, which is up from 2,866 people in 2016.

The commission will be expected to recommend key priorities for the Government’s long-term mental health strategy and will accept public submissions. AHCRA looks forward to meaningful and authentic consumer engagement by the Inquiry.

The inquiry was welcomed by many, including Labor’s mental health spokeswoman, Julie Collins. Beyond Blue CEO Georgie Harman also praised the inquiry. “There have been numerous investigations and reviews into mental health in Australia, but this is the first time the Productivity Commission will take the lead. It is a significant step forward and one that has the potential to drive real change,” Ms Harman said in a media release.

AHCRA highlights the 2018 Report as a valuable source of information that outlines the size of the problem and the prevalence and impact of mental illness and suicide in Australia.

ABC News item: https://ab.co/2E725r5
Guardian coverage: https://bit.ly/2IKNYqh
Media release: https://bit.ly/2E9Bxpo

The Mental Health Commission website is here: https://bit.ly/2pJ216U
The 2018 report link: https://bit.ly/2C30YpM

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and events : This week #WorldMentalHealthDay #WMHD2018 #MentalHealthPromise #10OCT This Month : Register and Download #NACCHOagm2018 Oct 30 – Nov 2 Program @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay @June_Oscar #WomensVoices #IndigBizMth

 

This week 

World Mental Health Day Oct 10

World Mental Health Week Oct 7- 13 

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week (ATSIHAW) 28th November to 5th December : Expression of Interest open but close 26 October

This Month

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open : Download the Program 

Future events /conferences

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October
National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project. 

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference 20-21 November Perth

2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
This week 

This World Mental Health Day – on Wednesday 10 October – will be the biggest yet in Australia, with more than 700 organisations, companies, community groups and charities taking part, as well an official Guinness World Record Attempt in Wagga Wagga to raise awareness and reduce stigma.

The ‘Do You See What I See?’ campaign encourages people to make a #MentalHealthPromise and shed a more positive light on mental health in a bid to reduce stigma for the one in five Australians who are affected by mental illness annually.

More than 700 organisations have engaged with the campaign already this year, which has also seen more than 20,000 mental health promises made by individuals at http://www.1010.org.au .

Five days out from World Mental Health Day itself, on Wednesday 10 October, Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan says this year’s response has been the biggest ever.

“Year-on-year the interest in World Mental Health Day continues to grow and to me that’s a clear sign that we are reducing stigma, and more and more people are prepared to talk and hopefully seek help,” said Mr. Quinlan.

“We’ve seen a huge increase in the participation of workplaces over the last two years, and have tailored our messaging accordingly to encourage people to shed a more positive light on mental health at work.”

“We know from our recent Investing to Save Report with KPMG that investment in workplace initiatives could save the nation more than $4.5 billion, and to see some of the biggest employers in the country engage with this year’s campaign, is a clear sign that people are becoming more and more aware of just how important it is to look after mental health and wellbeing in the workplace.”

To help celebrate this year’s World Mental Health Day, and to add to the success of the campaign, Mental Health Australia has also linked up with the Wagga Wagga City Council and Bunnings Warehouse to attempt a Guinness World Record for the most number of people wearing high visibility vests in one location.

Aimed to again shed a positive light, and raise the visibility and awareness of mental health in a community, particularly amongst young men, tradies, farmers and their families, the high-viz world record attempt in Wagga on World Mental Health Day has already seen the people of the Riverina come together.

“We often speak about mentally healthy communities and this fun Guinness World Record Attempt has been a great opportunity to engage with, and unite the people of Wagga Wagga for a common goal,” said Mr. Quinlan.

“Thanks to the fantastic support of Bunnings and the Wagga Wagga City Council, as well as 3M and Triple M Riverina, we can’t wait to see a sea of high visibility vests in the Bunnings carpark next Wednesday morning, and who knows we might even break the current record of 2,136.”

To find out more or to register for the Guinness World Record Attempt go to www.1010.org.au/wagga (link is external)

Mental Health Australia would like to thank all the organisations who have shown their support this year and will be helping to raise awareness and reduce stigma next Wednesday 10 October on World Mental Health Day.

To find our more go to www.1010.org.au

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week (ATSIHAW) 28th November to 5th December : Expression of Interest open but close 26 October

In 2017 we supported more than 60 ACCHS to run community events during ATSIHAW.

We are now seeking final EOIs to host 2018 ATSIHAW Events

EOI’s will remain open until 26th October 2018

ATSIHAW coincides each year with World AIDS Day- our aim is to promote conversation and action around HIV in our communities. Our long lasting theme of ATSIHAW is U AND ME CAN STOP HIV”.

If you would like to host an ATSIHAW event in 2018, please complete the EOI form here Expression of Interest 2018 and then send back to us to at  atsihaw@sahmri.com

Once registered we will send merchandise to your service to help with your event.

For more information about ATSIHAW please visit http://www.atsihiv.org.au/hiv-awareness-week/merchandise/

ATSIHAW on Facebook     https://www.facebook.com/ATSIHAW/

ATSIHAW on Twitter          https://twitter.com/atsihaw

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations still open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Download Draft Program as at 2 October

NACCHO 7 Page Conference Program 2018_v3

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

Dr Puggy Hunter was the NACCHO Chair 1991-2001

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 144 + Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996. He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council. He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

The scheme provides scholarships for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people studying an entry level health course.

Applications for PHMSS 2019 scholarship round are now open.

Click the button below to start your online application.

Applications must be completed and submitted before midnight AEDT (Sydney/Canberra time) Sunday 14 October 2018. After this time the system will shut down and any incomplete applications will be lost.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not available for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

A significant number of applications are received each year; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The scholarships are funded by the Australian Government, Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing. The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

The RACGP and NACCHO invite you to a workshop to be held prior to GP18, that
will support your practice team to maximise the opportunity for the prevention of
disease at each health service visit.

A National Guide contributor and a cultural educator will discuss how best to utilise
the third edition of the National Guide when providing care for Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people.

The workshop will also include a focus group exploring implementation of the
National Guide in both mainstream and Aboriginal Community Controlled Primary
Health Care Services (ACCHSs), as well as the characteristics of a culturally
responsive general practice.

Program

• Background and purpose of the National Guide
• Features of the National Guide, including:
• Recommendation tables
• Good practice points
• Evidence base
• Lifecycle wall chart
• Putting the National Guide

Date
Wednesday 10 October 2018

Time
Registration and lunch 12.00 pm
Workshop 12.30–4.00 pm

Venue
Jellurgal Aboriginal Cultural Centre
1711 Gold Coast Highway, Burleigh Heads

Cost
Free of charge

RSVP
Friday 5 October 2018

Registration essential

Registration
Email daniela.doblanovic@racgp.org.au
or call Daniela Doblanovic on 03 8699 0528.

We will then contact you to confirm

 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

This grant opportunity is designed to assist existing approved residential and home care providers in regional, rural and remote areas to invest in infrastructure. Commonwealth Home Support Programme services will also be considered, where there is exceptional need. Funding will be prioritised to aged care services most in need and where geographical constraints and significantly higher costs impede services’ ability to invest in infrastructure works.

Up to $500,000 (GST exclusive) will be available per service via a competitive application process.

Eligibility:

To be eligible you must be:

  • an approved residential or home care provider (as defined under the Aged Care Act 1997) or an approved Commonwealth Home Support Program (CHSP) provider in exceptional circumstances (refer Frequently asked Questions) ; and
  • currently operating an aged care service located in Modified Monash Model Classification 3-7 or if a CHSP provider, the service is located in MMM 6-7. (MMM Locator).

More Info Apply 

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

Throughout October, twenty national Indigenous Business Month events will take place showcasing the talents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs from a variety of business sectors. These events aim to ignite conversations about Indigenous business development and innovation, focusing on women’s roles and leadership.

Indigenous Business Month is an initiative driven by the alumni of Melbourne Business School’s MURRA Indigenous Business Master Class, who see business as a way of providing positive role models for young Indigenous Australians and improving quality of life in Indigenous communities.

Since the launch of Indigenous Business Month in 2015, [1] the Indigenous business sector is one of the fastest growing sectors in Australia delivering over $1 billion in goods and services for the Australian economy.

Jason Eades, Director, Consulting at Social Ventures Australia and Indigenous Business Month 2018 host said:

It is a privilege to be involved in Indigenous Business Month, to be able to take the time to celebrate and acknowledge the great achievements of our Indigenous entrepreneurs and their respective businesses. Indigenous entrepreneurs are showing the rest of the world that we can do business and do it well, whilst maintaining our strong cultural values.”

The latest ABS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2014-15 shows that only 51.5 percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women participate in the workforce compared to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men at 65 percent.

The Australian Government has invested in a range of initiatives to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs in the work-placeincluding: [2) Continued funding for girls’ academies in high schools, so that young women can realise their leadership potential, greater access to finance and business support suited to the needs of Indigenous businesses with a focus on Indigenous entrepreneurs and start-ups, and expanding the ParentsNextprogram and Fund pre-employment projects via the new Launch into Work program providing flexibility to meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Michelle Evans, MURRA Program Director AND Associate Professor of Leadership at the University of Melbourne said:

The Indigenous Business Month’s aim is to inspire, showcase and engage the Indigenous business community. This year it is more significant than ever to support the female Indigenous business community and provide a platform for them to network and encourage young Indigenous women to consider developing a business as a career option.”

Indigenous Business Month runs from October 1 to October 31. Check out the website for an event near you (spaces are limited).

The initiative is supported by 33 Creative, Asia Pacific Social Impact Centre at the University of Melbourne, Iscariot Media, and PwC.

For more information on Indigenous Business Month visit

·         The Websitewww.indigenousbusinessmonth.com.au

·         Facebook

·         Twitter

·         LinkedIn

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

 

Download HERE

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018.

This Forum will bring together Indigenous and First Nation presenters and panellists from across the world to discuss shared experiences and practices in building, supporting and retaining an Indigenous allied health workforce.

This full-day event will provide a platform to share information and build an integrated approach to improving culturally safe and responsive health care and improve health and wellbeing outcomes for Indigenous peoples and communities.

Delegates will include Indigenous and First Nation allied health professionals and students from Australia, Canada, the USA and New Zealand. There will also be delegates from a range of sectors including, health, wellbeing, education, disability, academia and community.

MORE INFO 

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference 20-21 November Perth

” The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference Committee invite and welcome you to Perth for the second National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference, and the second World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference.

Our Indigenous communities, both nationally and internationally, share common histories and are confronted with similar issues stemming from colonisation. Strengthening our communities so that we can address high rates of suicide is one of these shared issues. The Conferences will provide more opportunities to network and collaborate between Indigenous people and communities, policy makers, and researchers. The Conferences are unique opportunities to share what we have learned and to collaborate on solutions that work in suicide prevention.

This also enables us to highlight our shared priorities with political leaders in our respective countries and communities.

Conference Website 

2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
Indigenous Eye Health and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) are pleased to announce the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019 which will be held in Alice Springs, Northern Territory on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 at the Alice Springs Convention Centre.
The 2019 conference will run over two days with the aim of bringing people together and connecting people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, ACCOs, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.
More information available at: go.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities #HealthPromotion #AUSTPH2018 #NSW @AHMRC #WA @TheAHCWA #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @Deadlychoices @Wuchopperen @QAIHC @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima Plus FYI @NATSIHWA @IAHA_National Allied Health

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 ACCHO Job/s of the week 

Wuchopperen ACCHO Sexual Health Nurse Cairns FNQ Closing 2 October

Wuchopperen ACCHO Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Environmental Health Coordinator Carnarvon ACCHO WA

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council Project Officer

General Practitioner _ Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative

1.2 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland

2.Queensland 

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

1. 1 ACCHO Job/s of the week

1.Wuchopperen ACCHO Sexual Health Nurse Cairns FNQ Closing 2 October 

‘Keeping Our Generations Growing Strong’

Wuchopperen is a Community controlled Aboriginal Health Organisation providing holistic health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cairns.

Sexual Health Nurse

Full Time – Temporary 30 June 2020

Based in Cairns

The Sexual Health Nurse position co-ordinates the clinical sexual health programs targeting at risk clients, in both outreach and Wuchopperen Health Service clinic settings. The position will provide support and specialised sexual health education for all clinical services to improve the care of at risk clients.

The Sexual Health Nurse (RN) must have current registration as a Registered Nurse (Division 1) with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency, with a minimum of five years’ experience in direct clinical nursing care and/or community Health nursing.

Benefits of working with Wuchopperen:

* Generous salary sacrifice benefits

* 5 Weeks annual leave

* Commitment to professional development

* Private Health Care Corporate Rate

* 11.5% Superannuation Contribution

Applicants for the above position will:

* Demonstrate relevant experience and/or qualifications

* Possess a current driver’s licence

* Possess, or be eligible for, a Blue Card (for suitability to work with children and young people)

* Consent to a broader criminal history check, where relevant

Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Do Not Apply Through Seek

How to apply:

For information about this position, or for a recruitment package, please refer to www.wuchopperen.org.au/careers

Closing date for applications: 9am on Tuesday, 02 October 2018

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

2. Wuchopperen ACCHO Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Wuchopperen is a Community controlled Aboriginal Health Organisation providing holistic health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cairns.

Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Full Time Permanent

Based in Cairns

The Registered Nurse, Child Health is responsible for working with clinic teams to improve the standard of health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families.

The successful applicant is required to have a minimum of 5 years’ experience in a similar role, hold a Registered Nursing degree, qualification of Child Health and be Immunisation Endorsed.

Benefits of working with Wuchopperen:

* Generous salary sacrifice benefits

* 5 Weeks annual leave

* Commitment to professional development

* Private Health Care Corporate Rate

* 11.5% Superannuation Contribution

Applicants for the above position will:

* Demonstrate relevant experience and/or qualifications

* Possess a current driver’s licence

* Possess, or be eligible for, a Blue Card (for suitability to work with children and young people)

* Consent to a broader criminal history check, where relevant

How to apply:

For information about this position, or for a recruitment package, please refer to www.wuchopperen.org.au.

Closing date for applications: 9am on, 2 October 2018

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

Environmental Health Coordinator Carnarvon ACCHO WA

Location: Carnarvon, WA
Location: Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC), Carnarvon WA
Employment Type: Full time / Permanent
Remuneration: $77,026 – $86,694 + superannuation + salary sacrifice

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

To find out more about CMSAC please click here

About the Opportunity

CMSAC has an opportunity for a motivated and professional Environmental Health Coordinator to join their team and take the lead in the development, monitoring and evaluation of environmental health initiatives.

As the Environmental Health Coordinator, you will be predominantly responsible for reducing the risk and incidents of environmental health issues for the Aboriginal communities in the North West Gascoyne region of WA. This includes (but is not limited to) drinking water, waste management, solid waste, housing supply and maintenance, power supply, animal management, food safety and supply, pest and mosquito control, dust control and emergency management.

To be successful in this position, your skills, experience and qualifications will include:

  • Qualifications and experience as a practicing Environmental Health / Health Promotion Officer or equivalent;
  • Sound knowledge and understanding of environmental health related legislation;
  • Competency in the use of environmental and public health monitoring tools and equipment;
  • Ability to evaluate, mediate, negotiate and achieve results in environmental and public health context;
  • Knowledge of Aboriginal culture and key relationship issues

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please click here.

About the Benefits

$77,026 – $86,694 + superannuation + salary sacrifice

In addition, you will have access to a number of fantastic benefits including:

  • 5 weeks annual leave
  • Vehicle provided for operational purposes
  • Support to further invest in your career through additional training
  • Study leave options
  • Annual leave loading
  • Employee assistance program

A relocation allowance can be negotiated with the right candidate, to find out more about Carnarvon and the community please click here

Applications close at 5pm, Friday 5 October 2018

For further information about this position please call Sarah Calder on 08 6145 1049.

As per section 51 of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA) CMSAC seeks to increase the diversity of our workforce to better meet the different needs of our clients and stakeholders and to improve equal opportunity outcomes for our employees.

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) WA 4 positions

Are you a dynamic team member who thrives on a challenge, loves working with people and has a genuine passion for client service delivery? A team player who appreciates the value of an energetic team environment and respects cultural diversity?

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) is currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants. If you have any questions please contact (08) 9022 5591 or email recruitment@bega.org.au

All advertised positions may require one or more of the following:

Please Note: Applications received via indeed.com; other Recruitment Agencies and without a cover letter will not be accepted.


Health Practitioner – Mobile Clinic

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Health Practitioner (Mobile Clinic)

  • As the Health Practitioner you will provide health clinical assessment and treatment, care coordination, client support and community development activities to clients and families of the Goldfields.
  • You must be able to undertake scheduled travel within the Goldfields region on a regular basis, up to 4-5 days at a time and have an interest in developing and maintaining effective networks, alliances and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and other Health Organisations.
  • Due to the remote nature of this work, we require our Mobile Clinic team to have at least 2 years Primary Health Care experience.
  • You must hold a current AHPRA registration as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Enrolled Nurse or Registered Nurse; hold a current “MR” or higher WA drivers licence (or willing to obtain); police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check.

View position description

Apply for position


Health Practitioner – New Directions

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Health Practitioner (New Directions).

  • As a Health Practitioner – New Directions you will involved in Maternal and Child health clinical assessment and treatment, care coordination, client support and community development activities.
  • You must have a current registration with AHPRA as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Enrolled or Registered Nurse; police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check; current WA drivers licence.
  • This position may require you to travel on Outreach as required.

View position description

Apply for position


Registered Nurse – Mobile Clinic

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Registered Nurse (Mobile Clinic).

  • The Registered Nurse is responsible for the delivery of quality primary health care to clients and families of the Goldfields.
  • You must be able to undertake scheduled travel within the Goldfields region on a regular basis, up to 4-5 days at a time and have an interest in developing and maintaining effective networks, alliances and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and other Health Organisations.
  • Due to the remote nature of this work, we require our Mobile Clinic team to have at least 2 years Primary Health Care experience.
  • You must hold a current AHPRA registration as a Registered Nurse, hold a current “MR” or higher WA drivers licence (or willing to obtain); police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check;

View position description

Apply for position


Manager Primary Health

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and experienced candidates with a proven track record in clinical management to fill the role of Manager Primary Health.

  • The Manager Primary Health is a key leadership role reporting to the Chief Operations Officer (COO) and is supported by the Assistant Manager Primary Health.
  • The core function is to provide clinical governance oversight and ensure clinical services are conducted in accordance with best practice, including all relevant clinical and regulatory legislation.
  • An integral component of this function is to ensure contractual reporting obligations of funding bodies are met in a timely manner while ensuring staff compliance with organisational and operational policies across all levels of clinical programs.
  • It is expected that you will be an exemplary leader who provides guidance, mentoring and coaching to all clinical staff in the pursuit of maintaining a workplace cultural that is free from unhealthy behaviours.
  • To be considered for this role, you will hold tertiary qualifications in health care and business management with at least five (5) years senior management experience in an Aboriginal Primary Health or similar setting.

Please continue with this link to read more

View position description

Apply for position

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council Project Officer – AOD Our Way Program

We are seeking two experienced AOD project officers to undertake program support in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $84,150 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* Cairns location

* Temporary position till 30th June 2020

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 29 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ATSICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The AOD Our Way program is designed to increase capacity in communities, families and individuals to better respond locally to problematic Ice and other drug use. The Project Officer position is based in Cairns but will have a state-wide focus to support this program. Reporting directly to the Manager, AOD, you will be responsible for ensuring that QAIHC meets its AOD Our Way program obligations and commitments under its Agreement with Queensland Health. The role includes ensuring services are engaged, supported and provided with the opportunity to participate in the AOD Our Way program.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Alcohol and Other Drugs program delivery.

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders.

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* A current drivers licence

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 7th October 2018

General Practitioner _ Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative

Organisational Profile

GEGAC is an Aboriginal Community organization based in Bairnsdale Victoria. Consisting of about 160 staff, GEGAC is a Not for Profit organization that delivers holistic services in the areas of Primary Health, Social Services, Elders & Disability and Early Childhood Education.

Position Purpose

The General Practitioner position will provide medical services to the population served by GEGAC Primary Health Care. This will include the management of acute and chronic conditions and assistance with the delivery and promotion of primary health care. The role will be part of a multidisciplinary team; including Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Koori Maternity Services, Dental and visiting allied health/Specialists.

Qualifications and Registrations Requirement (Essential or Desirable).

Relevant and Australian recognised medical degree Essential 

Registration with AHPRA; Fellowship of the College of General Practitioners or similar or be eligible of such Essential

Training in CPR, undertaken with the past three years Essential

A person of Aboriginal / Torres Strait Islander background Desirable

How to apply for this job

A copy of the position description and the application form can be obtained below, at GEGAC reception 0351 500 700 or by contacting HR@gegac.org.au.

Or by following the below links –

Position Description – https://goo.gl/iTiSGg

Application Form – https://goo.gl/xVbf3w

Applicants must complete the application form as it contains the selection criteria for shortlisting. Any applications not submitted on the Application form will not be considered.

Application forms should be emailed to HR@gegac.org.au, using the subject line:  General Practitioner

Or posted to:

Human Resources

Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative
PO Box 634
Bairnsdale Vic 3875

Applications close 29th September 5.00pm.

No late applications will be considered.

A valid Working with Children Check and Police check is mandatory to work in this organisation.

“this advertisement is pursuant to the ‘special measures’ provision at section 8 of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth)”.

 

Aboriginal Health Practitioner Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO 

  • Are you an Aboriginal Health Practitioner or Worker wanting to contribute to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal people?
  • Join a well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
  • Identified position for Aboriginal candidates

The Clinic

Primary Care Services (PCS) provides comprehensive primary health care to the Aboriginal community. The multi-disciplinary team consists of Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, a Clinical Services Officer, Enrolled and Registered Nurses, and General Practitioners and Registrars. Services are augmented by a range of visiting medical specialists and allied health professionals. The PCS team liaises and works closely with the Women, Children and Family Health program, the Social and Emotional Wellbeing program and the Community Health Promotion and Education program to ensure a high standard of integrated and coordinated client care.

The Opportunity

As an Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) or Aboriginal Health Worker (AHW) you will be required to work collaboratively with PCS staff and other members of Health Services teams to provide best practice client care. As a vital team member your role will contribute to the high quality and culturally appropriate client care that Nunkuwarrin Yunti is known to provide.

In order to deliver this, some of your key responsibilities will include:

  • Undertake client assessments and follow -up care, care plans and referrals from other members of the multi-disciplinary team
  • Provide health education and brief intervention counselling to improve health outcomes for individual clients
  • Promote the importance and benefits of general preventative health assessments and immunisations and ensure access to these services for clients

About you

  • Both AHP and AHW are required to have a Cert IV in Aboriginal Primary Health Care (Practice) or equivalent.
  • As an AHP you will be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Registration Authority (AHPRA); and bring a minimum of three (3) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a Primary Health Care setting.
  • As an AHW you will bring a minimum of two (2) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a relevant health field, preferably Primary Health Care.

As a suitably qualified AHP or AHW you will have well developed clinical skills and a sound knowledge of best practice approaches to comprehensive primary health care with broad knowledge of existing health and social issues within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. You will have the ability to resolve conflict, solve problems and negotiate outcomes. Organisational skills, self-confidence and the ability to work independently and autonomously, assess priorities, organise workloads and meet deadlines is critical to success.

Click here to download the AHP Job Description

Click here to download the AHW Job Description

Click here to download the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Application Form

Please note: It is a requirement of all roles that successful candidates have a current driver’s licence and are willing to undergo a National Police Check prior to commencing employment. 

Both roles are identified Aboriginal positions; exemption is claimed under Section 8 (1) of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975.

The Benefits

Classified under the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Enterprise Agreement of 2017 you will be entitled to the following dependent on qualifications and experience:

  • AHP – Health Services Level 4 with a starting salary of $69,255.98, plus super
  • AHW – Health Services Level 3 with a starting salary of $61,430.62, plus super

You will have access to salary sacrificing options which allow you to significantly increase your take home pay.

In addition, you will have access to generous leave allowances, including additional paid leave over the Christmas period, on top of your annual leave benefits!

Our organisation has a strong focus on professional development so you will have access to both internal and external training and development opportunities to enhance your career and self-care.

To apply

Please forward your CV, a Cover Letter and Application Form addressing the assessment questions to hr@nunku.org.au

Candidates who do not complete and submit the Application Form, Cover Letter and CV will not be considered further for this position.

We encourage and thank all applicants for their time, however only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Should you have any queries or for further information please contact HR via hr@nunku.org.au

Applications close Monday 1st October 2018 at 10am Adelaide time

Miwajt Health ACCHO : Coordinator Regional Renal Program

Are you passionate about improving health care to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in remote Northern Territory?

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is a regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Our Values

  • Compassion care and respect for our clients and staff and pride in the results of our work.
  • Cultural integrity and safety, while recognising cultural and individual differences.
  • Driven by evidence-based practice.
  • Accountability and transparency.
  • Continual capacity building of our organisation and community.

We have an exciting opportunity for a self-motivated hard working individual who will coordinate Miwatj Health’s Regional Renal Program across East Arnhem Land. Renal services are contracted to a partner organisation and the Regional Renal Program Coordinator will provide a central point of contact between services, foster and strengthen links between PHC programs and renal services, develop and implement an Aboriginal workforce model for the program, and coordinate and drive the aims of the community reference groups.

Key responsibilities:

  • Implement and coordinate renal program plan as per renal program statement and principles.
  • Manage program budgets and investigate funding opportunities.
  • Establish, support and engage regularly with the regional community reference groups and patient groups in Darwin.
  • Drive action on identified priorities of community reference groups.
  • Coordinate with WDNWPT regarding patient preceptor work plans.

To be successful in this role you should have current registration with AHPRA as Registered Nurse / Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner / other relevant qualified health professional.

More info APPLY

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland


Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

Dr Puggy Hunter was the NACCHO Chair 1991-2001

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 144 + Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996. He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council. He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

The scheme provides scholarships for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people studying an entry level health course.

Applications for PHMSS 2019 scholarship round are now open.

Click the button below to start your online application.

Applications must be completed and submitted before midnight AEDT (Sydney/Canberra time) Sunday 14 October 2018. After this time the system will shut down and any incomplete applications will be lost.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not available for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

A significant number of applications are received each year; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The scholarships are funded by the Australian Government, Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing. The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

2.1 There are 6 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 There are 7 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

 

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 24 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3 There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

 

Current Vacancies
  • Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Clinical)

  • Intake Officer / Support Worker

  • Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Senior)

  • Counsellor (Specialised) / Social Worker – Various Roles

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

 

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

General Practitioner (Swan Hill)Mental Health Nurse (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Mildura)Alcohol and Other Drugs Support WorkerCaseworker, Kinship ReunificationPractice Nurse – Chronic Care CoordinatorAboriginal Family-Led Decision-making Caseworker (Swan Hill)First Supports Caseworker (Swan Hill)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Mildura)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Health Worker (1)Team Leader, Early Years (Swan Hill)General Practitioner (Mildura)

MDAS Jobs website 

 

 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

Check website for current Opportunities

 

8. Tasmania

Are you interested in Chronic Disease Management?

Do you have a qualification as an Aboriginal Health Worker, Enrolled Nurse, or Registered Nurse?

We have a part time position at the

Aboriginal Health Service in Hobart,

for immediate start, to 30th June 2019.

 

Please provide a covering letter outlining your desire to work in this area and a current resume to payroll@tacinc.com.au

or email raylene.f@tacinc.com.au for further information.

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR (INDIGENOUS APPLICANTS ONLY)

The LIME Network – Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Only Indigenous Australians are eligible to apply as this position is exempt under the Special Measure Provision, Section 12 (1) of the Equal Opportunity Act 2011 (Vic).

Salary: $88,171 – $95,444 p.a. (pro rata) plus 9.5% superannuation

The Event and Project Coordinator will take a lead in the coordination, planning and implementation of key projects and events of the LIME Network.  These include the LIME Connection international conference, stakeholder meetings, seminars and other events.

Close date: 14 Oct 2018

Position Description and Selection Criteria

0046502.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to: https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/selection-criteria

Advertised: AUS Eastern Standard Time
Applications close: AUS Eastern Daylight Time

Website 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : National @CPMC_Aust #ACT @WinnungaACCHO celebrates 30 years #NSW @Galambila #QLD @IUIH_ @DeadlyChoices @Apunipima #RUOKDay #NT @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.1 National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

Winnunga last night celebrated its 30th anniversary , as it continues to go from strength to strength – providing responsive, appropriate services, tailored to the needs of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in Canberra

Picture above : Wally Bell welcome to country at dinner celebrating 30 years of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health : Pictures below Geoff Bagnall

  

The Ngunnawal people are the Traditional Owners of the lands that the ACT is located on. However, there are many Aboriginal people from other parts of the country living in and visiting Canberra.

This is mainly due to the mobility of people generally, connecting with family, the histories of displacement, and employment opportunities particularly in the Commonwealth public service.

Winnunga was established in 1988 by local Aboriginal people inspired by the national mobilisation of people around the opening of the new Parliament House in May and the visit by the Queen.

The late Olive Brown, a particularly inspirational figure who worked tirelessly for the health of Aboriginal people, saw the need to set up a temporary medical service at the Tent Embassy site in Canberra and this proved to be the beginning of Winnunga.

Mrs Brown enlisted the support of Dr Sally Creasey, Carolyn Patterson (registered nurse/midwife), Margaret McCleod and others to assist. Soon after ACT Health offered Mrs Brown a room in the office behind the Griffin Centre to run a clinic twice a week (Tuesday and Thursday mornings) and on Saturday mornings. Winnunga operated out of this office from 1988 to 1990. The then Winnunga Medical Director, Dr Peter Sharp, began work at Winnunga in 1989.

Other staff worked as volunteers. In January 1990 the t ACT Minister for Health at the time, Wayne Berry, provided a small amount of funding. By 1991 the clinic was operating out of the Griffin Centre as a full time medical practice. In that same year the ACT attained self-government.

In 2004 Winnunga moved to its current premises at Boolimba Cres in Narrabundah, and employs over 60 staff. Winnunga has grown into a major health service resource for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the ACT and surrounding region, and delivers a wide range of wholistic health care services.

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

Today I visited Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and it was beaut to get a tour of the new clinic with manager Catherine Hampton.

The clinic at North Side Shopping Complex will provide comprehensive primary health care services for all Aboriginal people living in the North Side area

Warren Snowdon is the local Federal member for Lingiari

People living in the north of Alice Springs will now have access to a new clinic as primary health care service Central Australian Aboriginal Congress expands its network.

The new Congress Northside Clinic in the Northside Shopping Centre held an open day on Saturday September 8 and begin providing services from Wednesday September 12.

It will cater for nearly 2000 clients living in the town’s north, including Trucking Yards, Charles Creek and Warlpiri Camp.

Congress chief executive officer Donna Ah Chee said the clinic would have doctors, Aboriginal health practitioners, nurses, podiatry services, a dietician, a diabetes educator and also offer care coordination and social and emotional well-being help.

Ms Ah Chee said it would also provide advocacy and other support to families in the northside area.

“Providing a smaller clinic closer to our clients is an exciting development and builds on the success of our Larapinta and Sadadeen clinics that opened in 2016,” she said.

The new clinic has nine consultation rooms, a double treatment room and two allied health treatment rooms.

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress said it had found that smaller, multidisciplinary teams delivered better continuity of care, access and chronic disease outcomes.

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

Our Quit Support Team had a great weekend at Freedom Day Festival
KWHB were a proud sponsor to make the festival smoke free 🚭to protect everyone from harmful cigarette smoke.

Check out the AFL and Basketball teams next to our deadly archway!

What’s your smoke free story?


National Best Practice Unit Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

SHPA caught up with Chris Braithwaite, a pharmacist with the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Northern NSW.

Chris spoke to us about:

  • his journey to working with indigenous communities
  • what an average day looks like
  • the challenges posed by existing funding models for home medicines reviews
  • cultural competence and institutional racism

Listen to the Podcast HERE 

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

The number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months since the introduction of a new online birth registration system by the NSW Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages (BDM).

Attorney General Mark Speakman announced the success of the online registration form as a result of the Our Kids Count campaign which aims to increase Aboriginal birth registrations through better access to information about the birth registration process.

“The number of unregistered Aboriginal births has traditionally been too high, but we’re closing the gap by highlighting the importance of registration and making the process faster and easier to complete,” said Mr Speakman.

“A birth certificate allows people to fully participate in society and without one, many of the basic opportunities we take for granted such as enrolling in school, sport or getting a driver licence, become unnecessarily complicated and out of reach.”

New figures show the average number of children registered to Aboriginal mothers since March 2018 has increased 82 per cent since the last quarter of 2017, and a 101 per cent increase since 2016.

NSW Registrar for Births Deaths & Marriages, Amanda Ianna said the new online birth registration has been popular among all sections of the community since it was introduced in April 2018.

“The take up rate for the online form has exceeded all our expectations with over 90 per cent of all NSW birth registrations now being made through the online system. The form is intuitive and people can complete it at a time and place that suits them,” Ms Ianna said.

BDM has spread the message about the benefits of birth registration during visits to Aboriginal communities and through brochures and online material, including an educational video.

For more information about Our Kids Count, visit: www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/Aboriginal

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

This partnership will bring life-changing benefits for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples right across Australia,

The Sharks players will assist in educating youth about the importance of taking a preventative approach to their health, and living healthy lifestyles. This includes reducing the negative impacts of smoking and drinking alcohol, and advocating consistent attendance at school.

It provides the kids a chance to make positive decisions around being a deadly student. It’s about our young ones looking at the opportunities available, with education being the passport towards achieving their dreams.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson.

Club stalwart and 2001 Dally M Player of the Year, Preston Campbell returned to his former NRL club recently, as the Cronulla Sharks announced a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

As a Deadly Choices Ambassador, Campbell has been instrumental in assisting to bring about better health and educational outcomes among Indigenous communities in Australia; a formula which the Sharks will now implement to boost existing and future community programs within its Sharks Have Heart portfolio.

A huge thank you to Deadly Choices and local elder Aunty Deanna Schreiber for designing and creating our farewells gifts to JT

“The Deadly Choices – Cronulla Sharks partnership will help reinforce those positive mental and physical health outcomes among communities, through the promotion of healthy eating, active participation in sport, and emphasising the importance of a good education,” said Campbell.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices.

“When you have kids at such an impressionable age it’s important to direct plenty of positive messaging and ensuring they create good habits for themselves.

“I’ve had a chance to speak with the boys today about the Deadly Choices programs and they’re excited about the impact they’ll have on our young kids”

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back.”

As explained by Sharks Have Heart General Manager George Nour, empowering youth within communities is exactly what the Sharks intend to achieve through the Deadly Choices partnership.

“Sharks Have Heart are extremely proud to launch our partnership with Deadly Choices,” Nour said. “To be associated with such a strong and respected brand within the Indigenous community is only going to strengthen our programmes within our diversity pillar.”

At the launch, the Sharks were provided a snapshot of what it means to make Deadly Choices and be role models for community, with Campbell joined by fellow long-term Deadly Choices Ambassador and former league international Steve Renouf in discussing their roles.

Sharks Co-Captain Wade Graham, a member of the Australian World Cup squad last year and twice an Indigenous All Star in 2016 and 2017, was joined by Indigenous teammates Andrew Fifita, Jesse Ramien and Edrick Lee at the program launch.

Graham was excited by the Sharks new partnership and to be teaming up with Deadly Choices.

“I think staying fit is extremely important in this day and age, particularly for the youth and if the Sharks and Deadly Choices can encourage as many people as possible to get the body moving, to eat healthy and to have an active lifestyle, it is going to be extremely beneficial to the Indigenous community,” Graham said.

“I am looking forward to working with Deadly Choices who do outstanding work in the Indigenous community and to be helping to spread their important messages,” he added.

In 2016-17 in South East Queensland alone, the Deadly Choices team delivered 145 education programs to more than 1860 participants. The team also held 10 community and sporting events, with almost 1500 attendees and participants.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

WATCH HERE

Today and every day is RU OK Day? Start a conversation and support your friends, colleagues, family and community.

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch


This innovative project began with Kalyakool Moort research. The highly collaborative project has embodied passion and commitment to improve perinatal wellbeing and engagement for women and men at this significant time.

The ‘Baby Coming-You Ready?” Rubric has been developed, digitised and designed by Aboriginal women, men and researchers.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Governor-General visits @WinnungaACCHO Plus #NSW #StrokeWeek2018 Events @Galambila @ReadyMob @awabakalltd #Tamworth #VIC #BDAC #BADAC #QLD @Apunipima #NT @AMSANTaus @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

2.QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service was honoured and pleased by a visit on September 3 from his Excellency the Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove and Lady Cosgrove.

Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs briefed their Excellency’s on the range of services which are provided to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Canberra and the region.

Sir Peter was particularly interested in the range and breadth of services which are provided to the community and learn that of the almost 7000 clients which Winnunga sees each year that almost 20% are non- Indigenous.

Sir Peter was also very interested to explore with Julie Tongs the rationale for the decision that has been taken in the ACT by the ACT Governmnet and Winnunga Nimmityjah to establish an autonomous Aboriginal managed and staffed health clinic within the Alexander Maconochie Centre to minister to the health needs of Aboriginal prisoners.

Following the briefing Sir Peter and Lady Cosgrove joined all staff for afternoon tea.

It was Chris Saddler an Aboriginal Health Practitioner at Winnunga and Lieutenant Nam’s birthday so the visitors sang happy birthday to both . Sir Peter  gave Chris and Julie a medal with the inscription Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia with the Crown and a wattle tree.

2.1 QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

The current guidelines recommend that a stroke risk screening be provided for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people over 35 years of age. However there is an argument to introduce that screening at a younger age.

Education is required to assist all Australians to understand what a stroke is, how to reduce the risk of stroke and the importance be fast acting at the first sign of stroke.”

Dr Mark Wenitong, Public Health Medical Advisor at Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima), says that strokes can be prevented through a healthy lifestyle and Health screening, and just as importantly, a healthy pregnancy and early childhood can reduce risk for the child in later life.

Naomi Wenitong  pictured above with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media and celebrate Stroke Week in your community.

Listen to the new rap song HERE  or Hear

The song, written by Cairns speech pathologist Rukmani Rusch and performed by leading Indigenous artist Naomi Wenitong, was created to boost low levels of stroke awareness in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said the rap packed a punch, delivering an important message, in a fun and accessible way.

“The Stroke Rap has a powerful message we all need to hear,’’ Ms McGowan said.

“Too many Australians continue to lose their lives to stroke each year when most strokes can be prevented.

“Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song, remember and act on its stroke awareness and prevention message – it could save their life.”

Ms McGowan said the song’s message was particularly important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities who were over represented in stroke statistics.

Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islanders are twice as likely to be hospitalised for stroke and are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians. These alarming figures were revealed in a recent study conducted by the Australian National University.

There is one stroke every nine minutes in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are overrepresented in stroke statistics. Strokes are the third leading cause of death in Australia.

Apunipima delivers primary health care services, health screening, health promotion and education to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people across 11 Cape York communities. These health screens will help to make sure you aren’t at risk  .

We encourage you to speak to an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health Practitioner or visit one of Apunipima’s Health Centres to talk to them about getting a health screen.

What is a stroke?

A stroke occurs when the blood flow to the brain is interrupted, depriving an area of the brain of oxygen. This is usually caused by a clot (ischaemic stroke) or a bleed in the brain (haemorrhagic stroke).

Brief stroke-like episodes that resolve by themselves are called transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs). They are often a sign of an impending stroke, and need to be treated seriously.

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

What to do in case of stroke?

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

The Australian National Stroke Foundation promotes the FAST tool as a quick way for anyone to identify a possible stroke. FAST consists of the following simple steps:

Face – has their mouth has dropped on one side?

Arm – can they lift both arms?

Speech – Is their speech slurred? Do they understand you?

Time – is critical. Call an ambulance.

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

The @Galambila ACCHO and @ReadyMob staff  hosting #strokeweek2018 on Gumbaynggirr country ( Coffs Harbour ) : Special thanks to Carroll Towney, Leon Williams and Katrina Widders from the Health Promotion team #ourMob#ourHealth #ourGoal #fightstoke @strokefdn

Recently released Australian National University research, found around one-third to a half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their 40s, 50s and 60s were at high risk of future heart attack or stroke. It also found risk increased substantially with age and starts earlier than previously thought, with high levels of risk were occurring in people younger than 35.

The good news is more than 80 percent of strokes can be prevented,’’ said Colin Cowell NACCHO Social Media editor and himself a stroke survivor.

“This National Stroke Week, we are urging all Australians to take steps to reduce their stroke risk.

“As a first step, I encourage all the mob to visit to visit one of our 302 ACCHO clinics , their local GP or community health centre for a health check, or take advantage of a free digital health check at your local pharmacy to learn more about your stroke risk factors.

“Then make small changes and stay motivated to reduce your stroke risk. Every step counts towards a healthy life,” he said.

Top tips for National Stroke Week:

  • Stay active – Too much body fat can contribute to high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Get moving and aim exercise at least 2.5 to 5 hours a week.
    •Eat well – Fuel your body with a balanced diet. Drop the salt and check the sodium content on packaged foods. Steer clear of sugary drinks and drink plenty of water.
    • Drink alcohol in moderation – Drinking large amounts of alcohol increases your risk of stroke through increased blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, obesity and irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation). Stick to no more than two standard alcoholic drinks a day for men and one standard drink per day for women.
    • Quit smoking – Smokers have twice the risk of having a stroke than non-smokers. There are immediate health benefits from quitting.
    • Make time to see your doctor for a health check.  Ask for a blood pressure check because high blood pressure is the key risk factor for stroke. Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and atrial fibrillation are also stroke risks which can be managed with the help of a GP.National Stroke Week is the Stroke Foundation’s annual stroke awareness campaign.

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

WHEN Aboriginal elder Aunty Pam Smith first had a stroke she had no idea what was happening to her body.

On her way back to town from a traditional smoking ceremony, she became confused, her jaw slack and dribbling.

FROM HERE

Picture above : CARE: Coral and Bill Toomey at National Stroke Awareness Week.

“I started feeling headachey, when they opened up the car and the cool air hit me I didn’t know where I was – I was in LaLa Land,” she said.

A guest speaker at the Stroke Foundation National Stroke Awareness Week event in Tamworth, Ms Smith has created a cultural awareness book about strokes for other Aboriginal people.

Watch Aunty Pams Story

She hopes it will teach others what to expect and how to look out for signs of a stroke, Aboriginal people are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-Indigenous people.

But, most still don’t go to hospital for help.

“Every time we went to a hospital we were treated for one thing, alcoholism – a bad heart or kidneys because of alcohol,” Ms Smith said.

“We were past that years ago, we’re up to what we call white fella’s things now.”

Elders encouraged people to make small changes in their daily lives, to quit smoking, eat a balanced diet and drink less alcohol.

For Bill Toomey it was a chance to speak with people who understood what it was like to have a stroke. A trip to Sydney in 2010 ended in the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital when he was found unconscious.

Now in a wheelchair, Mr Toomey was once a football referee and an Aboriginal Health Education Officer.

“I wouldn’t wish a stroke on anyone,” Mr Toomey said.

“I didn’t have the signs, the face didn’t drop or speech.”

His wife Coral Toomey cares for him, she was in Narrabri when he was rushed to hospital.

“Sometimes you want to hide, sit down and cry because there’s nothing you can do to help them,” she said.

“You’re doing what you can but you feel inside that it’s not enough to help them.”

Stroke survivor Pam Smith had a message for her community.

“Please go and have a second opinion, it doesn’t matter where or who it is – go to the hospital,” she said.

“If you’re not satisfied with your doctor go to another one.”

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

Did you know that Aboriginal people are up to three times more likely to suffer a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians, and twice as likely to die from a stroke?

This week is National Stroke Week, so make sure you know the signs of a stroke and call 000 if you suspect someone is experiencing a stroke.

Common risk factors for stroke include:
– High blood pressure
– Increasing age
– High cholesterol
– Diabetes
– Smoking

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

Veronica and Meagan had the opportunity to work closely with a group of the women in town. The ladies got to work on their paintings whilst participating in the Family Wellbeing training which focused on dealing with conflict and recognising personal strengths.


The week ended with a delicious lunch out bush and lots of smiles!

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

Chair of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance [AMSANT], Donna Ah Chee, said it wasn’t just the arrival of spring in the deserts of Central Australia to be welcomed today as the Aboriginal community-controlled health sector celebrated the graduation of 10 future leaders in receiving Diplomas in Leadership and Management.

“This is of course a wonderful achievement for each of the graduates who have put in a lot of hard work while still holding on to their full-time jobs,” said Ms Ah Chee.

“But just as important is what it means for the entire Aboriginal community controlled health sector—these women and men are the future, they are our future leaders in what are difficult, complex roles, they are role models for younger people, they are role models for their families and communities.

“Already organisations are moving graduates into managerial and team leader roles, and we are looking towards future intakes of students across a range of training opportunities in the sector— in management, administration, cultural leadership, community engagement and research.”

John Paterson, CEO of AMSANT reflected at the graduation ceremony in Alice Springs that while the work in the sector was very challenging, it was extraordinarily fulfilling.

“It really is the best sector to work in, no two ways about it.

“These new graduates are at the heart of what Aboriginal community control in comprehensive primary health care is about, it’s about people with lived experience in their own communities and families and having the strength and tenacity to take on the challenges we face in Aboriginal primary health care here in the Northern Territory.”

The graduates were drawn from the Katherine West Health Board, Anyinginyi Health, Miwatj Health and the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress).

Anyinginyi graduate, Nova Pomare, said that it hadn’t always been easy to get through the course.

“It was pretty hard working full time, studying and having to leave home away from family to attend the face-to-face course work in Darwin,” she said.

“But we were supported by our work places who have shown faith in our abilities and committed to our futures.”

Graduates of Diploma in Leadership and Management:

Anita Maynard Congress Velda Winunguj Miwatj Health

Carlissa Broome Congress Stan Stokes Anyinginyi Health

Glenn Clarke Congress Mahalia Hippi Anyinginyi Health

Samarra Schwarz Congress Nova Pomare Anyinginyi Health

John Liddle Congress Lorraine Johns Katherine West Health Board

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

 

 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

National Child Protection week began for VACCHO and the Victorian Aboriginal Children and Young People’s Alliance (Alliance) at the 2018 Victorian Protecting Children Awards on Monday 3 September 2018.

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) annual awards recognise dedicated teams and individuals working within government and community services who make protecting children their business.

We are pleased to announce that two of the 13 award winners were Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations and Members of VACCHO and the Alliance.

Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

This award was established by DHHS in partnership with the Victorian Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People, in memory of Aunty Walda Blow – a proud Yorta

Yorta and Wemba Wemba Elder who lived her life in the pursuit of equality.

Aunty Walda was an early founder of the Dandenong and District Aboriginal Cooperative and worked for over 40 years improving the lives of the Aboriginal community. This award recognises contributions of an Aboriginal person in Victoria to the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people.

Karen ensures the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people are always front and centre.

Karen has personally committed her support to the Ballarat Community through establishing and continuously advocating for innovative prevention, intervention and reunification programs.

As the inaugural Chairperson of the Alliance, Karen contributions to establishing the identity and achieving multiple outcomes in the Alliance Strategic Plan is celebrated by her peers and recognised by the community service sector and DHHS.

Karen’s leadership in community but particularly for BADAC, has seen new ways of delivering cultural models of care to Aboriginal children, carers and their families, ensuring a holistic service is provided to best meet the needs of each individual and in turn benefit the community.

The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

This award is for a team within the child and family services sector who has made an exceptional contribution to directly improve the lives of children, young people and families,

BDAC have lead the way, showing the Alliance member organisations what it takes to run the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18) program. BDAC have adapted a child protection model to incorporate holistic assessment and an Aboriginal cultural lens to support the children and families.

They have evidence that empowered decision making improves outcomes, particularly family reunification. The BDAC CEO, Raylene Harradine and Section 18 Pilot team have shown dedication, empathy and long term commitment in getting the program right for their organisation and clients, so that they can share their learning and program model with other ACCOs.

Their leadership in community has created waves of innovation in delivering cultural models of care to vulnerable Aboriginal children, carers and their families, achieving shared outcomes for all.

VACCHO and the Alliance walk away feeling inspired by all to do the best we can for our Koori children and young people, congratul

 

NACCHO Press Release Aboriginal Male Health Outcomes : #OchreDay2018 The largest ever gathering for a NACCHO male health conference : View 15 #NACCHOTV interviews with speakers

 ” We, the Aboriginal males  gathered at the Ochre Day Men’ Health Summit, nipaluna (Hobart) Tasmania in August 2018; to continue to develop strategies to ensure our  roles as grandfathers, fathers, uncles, nephews, brothers, grandsons, and sons  caring for our families.

We commit to taking responsibility for pursuing  a healthy, happier,  life for  our families and ourselves, that reflects the opportunities experienced by the wider community.

We acknowledge the NAIDOC theme “Because of her we can”We celebrate the relationships we have with our wives, mothers, grandmothers,  granddaughters,  aunties, nieces  sisters and daughters.

We also acknowledge that our male roles embedded in Aboriginal culture as well as our contemporary lives  must value the importance of the love,  companionship, and support of our Aboriginal women, and other partners.

We will pursue the roles and practices of Aboriginal men grounded in their  cultural as  protectors, providers and mentors. “

Our nipaluna (Hobart) Ochre Day Statement:  That our timeless culture still endures 

All NACCHO reports from #Ochre Day

For so many of the men at Ochre Day, healing had come about through being better connected to their culture and understanding, and knowing who they are as Aboriginal men. Culture is what brought them back from the brink.

We’ve long known culture is a protective factor for our people, but hearing so many men in one place discuss how culture literally saved their lives really brought that fact home.

It made me even more conscious of how important it is that we focus on the wellbeing side of Aboriginal health. If we’re really serious about Closing the Gap, we need to fund male wellbeing workers in our Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations.

In Victoria, the life expectancy of an Aboriginal male is 10 years less than a non-Aboriginal male. Closing the Gap requires a holistic, strength- based response. As one of the fellas said, “you don’t need a university degree to Close the Gap, you just need to listen to our mob”.

I look forward to next year’s Ochre Day being hosted on Victorian country, and for VACCHO being even more involved.

Trevor Pearce is Acting CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Health Organisation (VACCHO) Originally published CROAKEY see in full part 2 below  : Aboriginal men’s health conference: “reclaim our rightful place and cultural footprint “

Download our Press Release NACCHO Press release Ochre Day

The National Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chairperson John Singer, closed recent the Hobart Ochre Day Conference-Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It!

View interview with NACCHO Chair John Singer

Ochre Day is an important Aboriginal male health initiative to help draw attention to Aboriginal male health in a holistic way. The delegates fully embraced the conference theme, many spoke about their own journeys in the male health sector and all enjoyed participation in conference sessions, activities and workshops.

More than 200 delegates attended and heard from an impressive line-up of speakers and this year was no exception.

Delegates responded positively to The Hon. Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health funding of an Aboriginal Television network.

View Minister Ken Wyatt speech

Mr John Paterson CEO of AMSANT spoke about the importance of women as partners in men’s health

View interview with John Paterson

and Mr Rod Little from National Congress delivered a brief history on the progress of a Treaty in Australia as a keynote address for the Jaydon Adams Oration Memorial Dinner. The winner of the Jaydon Adams award 2018 was Mr Aaron Everett.

View interview with Rod Little

A comprehensive quality program involving presentations from clinicians, researches, academics, medical experts and Aboriginal Health Practitioners were delivered.

Delegates listened to passionate speakers like Dr Mick Adams, Dr Mark Wenitong, Patrick Johnson.

View all interview here on NACCHO TV 

Joe Williams, Deon Bird, Kim Mulholland and Karl Briscoe. Topics included those on suicide, Deadly Choices, cardiovascular and other chronic diseases as well as family violence impacting Aboriginal Communities. Initiatives to address these problems were explored in workshops that were held to discuss how to make men’s health a priority and how to support the reaffirmation of cultural identity.

Speeches by Ross Williams, Stan Stokes and Charlie Adams addressed the establishment of Men’s Clinics within the Anyinginiyi Aboriginal Health Service and Wuchopperen Aboriginal Health Service, which demonstrated the positive impact that these facilities have had on men’s health and their emotional wellbeing.

These reports as well as the experiences related by delegates highlighted the urgent need for more Aboriginal Men’s Health Clinics to be established especially in regional, rural and remote areas.

As a result of interaction with a broad cross section of delegates the NACCHO Chairman
Mr John Singer was able to put forward a range of priorities that he believed would go some way to addressing some of the concerns raised.

These priorities were the acquisition of funds to enable the;

  • Establishment of 80 Men’s Health Clinics in urban, rural and remote locations and
  • The employment of both a Male Youth Health Policy Officer and Male (Adult) Health Policy Officer by NACCHO in Canberra.

Delegates also welcomed the funding of $3.4 million for the Aboriginal Health Television network provided that the programs were culturally appropriate and supported a
strength-based approach to Men’s Health.

Our Thanks to the Sponsors 

 

 

Part 2 Trevor Pearce is Acting CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Health Organisation (VACCHO) Originally published CROAKEY 

 Aboriginal men’s health conference: “reclaim our rightful place and cultural footprint “

I’ve just returned from my first NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference in Hobart, and it was so deadly, it most definitely won’t be my last.

About 260 Aboriginal men from the Kimberleys to urban environments and everywhere in between attended. White Ochre Day started as an Aboriginal response to White Ribbon Day. For Aboriginal people, White Ochre has significant cultural and ceremonial values for Aboriginal people.

It’s not just about the aesthetics of painting white ochre on to our skin, there are strong cultural elements to the ceremony and identity. Ochre Day is a gathering of Aboriginal men for sharing ideas of best practice and increasing access to better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men for us to deal with family violence, and with spiritual healing, as Aboriginal men.

I was privileged to attend this conference with all the male Aboriginal staff members from VACCHO, who represented a diversity of ages and backgrounds. They work at VACCHO in areas including cultural safety, mental health, policy, sexual health and bloodborne viruses, telehealth, and alcohol and other drugs. It was a great bonding experience for us, and fantastic to be part of this national conversation.

Aboriginal men die much younger than Aboriginal women, and we die an awful lot younger than the non-Aboriginal population. We have the highest suicide rates in the world, and suffer chronic disease at high rates too.

We walk and live with poor health every day, and much of this is down to the symptoms that colonisation has brought us. We didn’t have these high rates of illness and suicide pre-colonisation, when we had strength in our culture, walked on our traditional homeland estates and we all spoke our languages. And we certainly didn’t have incarceration before contact.

A rightful place

The Ochre Day Conference covered all aspects of health and wellbeing for Aboriginal men; physical, mental, social and emotional wellbeing. It was about our need to reclaim our rightful place and cultural footprint on the Australian landscape.

It is a basic human right to be healthy and have good wellbeing, as is our right to embrace our culture. Improving our health is not just about the absence of disease, it’s about developing our connection to Country, our connection to family, and feeling positive about ourselves.

This position of reclamation of our right place within Australia society is critical given the current political landscape, and the challenges that Aboriginal people face. Victoria has an election in November, and a national election to come soon too. As Aboriginal people we know that race relations will be a tool used against us, and our lives will often be portrayed from the deficit point of view that will focus on what’s wrong with us.

In light of the above, it was good to hear about all the positive things Aboriginal men are doing across the country to help their families and communities, from the grassroots to the national level.

Rightfully, we talked a lot about mental health issues. There was a lot of personal sharing; men talking about their own issues; men who had attempted suicide speaking openly about it. There were survivors of abuse, of family violence. For any man, Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal, these are big things to get up and talk about.

I was so impressed and moved by what these Aboriginal men had to share. There was such generosity of spirit from these men in sharing their stories, and I’m not ashamed to say some of these brought me to tears.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health #Nutrition #Obesity : @IndigenousPHAA The #AFL ladder of sponsorships such as soft drinks @CocaColaAU and junk food @McDonalds_AU endangers the health of our children

 “Aboriginal and Non- Aboriginal kids are being inundated with the advertising of alcohol, junk food and gambling through AFL sponsorship deals according to a new study.

With obesity and excessive drinking remaining a significant problem in our communities, it’s time for the AFL ladder of unhealthy sponsorship (see below) to end,

Children under the age of eight are particularly vulnerable to advertising because they lack the maturity and mental skills to evaluate the messages. Therefore, in the case of the AFL, they begin to associate unhealthy products with their favourite sport and players

We need to ask ourselves why Australia’s most popular winter sport is serving as a major advertising platform for soft drink, beer, wine, burgers and meat pies. It’s sending the wrong message to Australians that somehow these unhealthy foods and drinks are linked to the healthy activity of sport,”

Says the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA).

Read all NACCHO Aboriginal Health Nutrition / Obestity articles over 6 years HERE 

In the study published this week in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Australian researchers looked at the prevalence of sponsorship by alcohol, junk food and gambling companies on AFL club websites and on AFL player uniforms.

The findings were used to make an ‘AFL Sponsorship Ladder’, a ranking of AFL clubs in terms of their level of unhealthy sponsorships, with those at the top of the ladder having the highest level of unhealthy sponsors.

The study clearly demonstrated that Australia’s most popular spectator sport is saturated with unhealthy advertising.

Download PDF Copy of report NACCHO Unhealthy sponsors of sport

Ainslie Sartori, one of the authors involved in the research confirmed, “After reviewing the sponsorship deals of AFL clubs, we found that 88% of clubs are sponsored by unhealthy food and beverage companies. A third of AFL clubs are also involved in business partnerships with gambling companies.”

Recommendation 

Sponsorship offers companies an avenue to expose children and young people to their brand, encouraging a connection with that brand.

The AFL could reinforce healthy lifestyle choices by shifting the focus away from the visual presence of unhealthy sponsorship, while taking steps to ensure that clubs remain commercially viable.

Policy makers are encouraged to consider innovative health promotion strategies and work
with sporting clubs and codes to ensure healthy messages are prominent

 

The study noted that children are often the targets of AFL advertising. This is despite World Health Organization recommendations that children’s settings should be free of unhealthy food promotions and branding (including through sport) due to the known risk it poses to their diet and chances of developing obesity.

PHAA CEO Terry Slevin commented, “When Australian kids see their sports heroes wearing a uniform plastered with certain brands, they inevitably start to associate these brands with the player they look up to and with the positive and healthy experience of the sport.”

He added, “The AFL is in a unique position to positively influence the health of Australian kids through banning sponsorship by alcohol, junk food and gambling companies. It could instead reinforce the importance of a healthy lifestyle for them.”

“Australian health policy makers need to consider innovative health promotion strategies and work together with sport clubs and codes to ensure that unhealthy advertising is not a feature. We successfully removed tobacco advertising from sport and we can do it with junk food and gambling too,” Mr Slevin said.

The recently released Sport 2030 plan rightly identifies sport as a positive vehicle to promote good health. But elite “corporate sport” plays a role of bypassing restrictions aimed at reducing exposure of children to unhealthy product marketing.

“The evidence is clear – it’s time for Australia to phase out all unhealthy sponsorship of sport,” Mr Slevin conclude

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities #Doctors wanted #Rural and Remote @Walgett_AMS Plus #NT@AMSANTaus @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #NSW @ahmrc #QLD @ATSICHSBris @DeadlyChoices @IUIH_ @Apunipima #VIC @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 ACCHO Job/s of the week 

1.2 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Aboriginal Male Health 20 Scholarships Closing August 31

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland

2.Queensland 

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 Rumbalara ACCHO  PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2  South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

7.3 Yerin : Permanent Full Time Aboriginal Permanency Support Manager (OOHC)

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

University of Melbourne in Indigenous Eye Health.

Project Officer UNSW

CRANAplus Policy and Stakeholder Coordinator closes 31 August 

ABS Engagement Manager closes 2 September

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

1. 1 ACCHO Job/s of the week

Miwajt Health ACCHO : Coordinator Regional Renal Program

Are you passionate about improving health care to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in remote Northern Territory?

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is a regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Our Values

  • Compassion care and respect for our clients and staff and pride in the results of our work.
  • Cultural integrity and safety, while recognising cultural and individual differences.
  • Driven by evidence-based practice.
  • Accountability and transparency.
  • Continual capacity building of our organisation and community.

We have an exciting opportunity for a self-motivated hard working individual who will coordinate Miwatj Health’s Regional Renal Program across East Arnhem Land. Renal services are contracted to a partner organisation and the Regional Renal Program Coordinator will provide a central point of contact between services, foster and strengthen links between PHC programs and renal services, develop and implement an Aboriginal workforce model for the program, and coordinate and drive the aims of the community reference groups.

Key responsibilities:

  • Implement and coordinate renal program plan as per renal program statement and principles.
  • Manage program budgets and investigate funding opportunities.
  • Establish, support and engage regularly with the regional community reference groups and patient groups in Darwin.
  • Drive action on identified priorities of community reference groups.
  • Coordinate with WDNWPT regarding patient preceptor work plans.

To be successful in this role you should have current registration with AHPRA as Registered Nurse / Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner / other relevant qualified health professional.

More info APPLY

Practice Manager Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-Operative

Organisational Profile

GEGAC is an Aboriginal Community organization based in Bairnsdale Victoria. Consisting of about 160 staff, GEGAC is a Not for Profit organization that delivers holistic services in the areas of Primary Health, Social Services, Elders & Disability and Early Childhood Education.

Position Purpose

The Practice Manager is responsible for the day to day delivery of the Primary Health Service & Dental Clinic, overseeing programs and supervision of staff to ensure all patients receive a quality and culturally appropriate service regarding their health care needs. The role also involves development of action plans, reports and review of data to maximise revenue and to manage quality improvement activities and prepare for accreditation.

Qualifications and Registrations Requirement (Essential or Desirable).

Drivers Licence Essential

At least 3 years of management experience  Essential       

Experience in either an Aboriginal health service or a community health service/GP practice  Essential  

A person of Aboriginal / Torres Strait Islander background Desirable    

Previous budgeting experience or managing a divisional budget including grant funding Desirable                             

How to apply for this job

A copy of the position description and the application form can be obtained below, at GEGAC reception 0351 500 700 or by contacting HR@gegac.org.au.

Or by following the below links –

Position Description – https://goo.gl/XzK2G5

Application Form – https://goo.gl/TEwMwV

Applicants must complete the application form as it contains the selection criteria for shortlisting. Any applications not submitted on the Application form will not be considered.

ctitioner / GP VMO / Doctor – Walgett

Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service Limited (WAMS) is an innovative, dynamic, fully managed GP practice, providing high quality healthcare to the Walgett community. The first AMS in NSW to be accredited with the QIC, WAMS is committed to providing an innovative model of healthcare that incorporates practice nursing, allied health and preventative healthcare.

Professional Benefits

  • Varied presentations will challenge your skills and ensure that your continued professional development is maintained.
  • Innovative models of care
  • Working in Walgett may fast-track your 10 Year Moratorium by as much as 7 years.
  • VMO subject to LHD credentialing
  • Outreach clinics in Brewarrina, Goodooga and Pilliga
  • Be supported by Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers and Allied Health staff

Highly attractive remuneration and conditions

  • Attractive remuneration structure to suit your experience – potential to earn more than $300k+ annually
  • Immediate patient base
  • Flexible work hours and arrangements
  • Practice is open Monday to Friday
  • Access to the GP Rural Incentive Program for eligible doctors
  • Access to NSW RDN’s Transition Grant for eligible doctors
  • Quality accommodation and car included in package
  • State of the art purpose-built service with an Administration Building, General Practice and Dental Practice
  • Services including –  Men’s Health, Ear Health, Eye Health, Drug & Alcohol, Family Health, Chronic Disease, Speech Pathology, Aboriginal Maternal and Infant Health Strategy and Early Childhood Family Health Nurse

Selection Criteria:

  • Must have current specialist medical registration with AHPRA or be eligible for Category 1 pathway with RACGP or ACRRM
  • Demonstrated experience working in the field of Aboriginal health
  • Full Medical Indemnity
  • WWCC / NCRC Clearances
  • Full Australian drivers licence
  • Demonstrated interest in training junior doctors
  • Willingness to contribute positively within a team environment

Helping communities in remote NSW

  • RDN is a not-for-profit organisation. Neither you nor the practice is charged a fee to use our services.

If you have vocational registration or hold FRACGP/FACRRM we’d love to hear from you.

To discuss possibilities please contact:

Mark Muchiri, Medical Workforce Consultant

NSW Rural Doctors Network:

Tel: +61 2 4924 8076
Email: mmuchiri@nswrdn.com.au

Christine Corby OAM, Chief Executive Officer

Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service Limited

Email: ChristineC@walgettams.com.au

 

Rural GP – Aboriginal Health Service – Coastal South Australia

The RDWA is working with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service (CKAHS) to recruit a full time GP. This is a highly rewarding role and would suit a GP who thrives on a broad scope of practice and is committed to improving the health outcomes of the community. An excellent package is on offer and includes housing, generous remuneration between $240,000 – $260,000, relocation assistance, and top tier Commonwealth Government funded financial incentives.

The Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service is located on South Australia’s spectacular Eyre Peninsula. The practice provides a culturally appropriate service to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the township of Ceduna and surrounding outreach services.

Ceduna is a busy regional hub with a population of over 3,500. Boasting beautiful beaches and excellent fishing waters, it is a popular tourist spot and a hub for aquaculture including oyster farming. The town is well serviced with schools, government agencies and retail shops. There are daily flights to Adelaide.

The team at CKAHS consists of Aboriginal Health Workers, a Practice Manager, Practice Nurse and Clinical Coordinator and is well supported by regular visiting Specialist and Allied Health workers. The Ceduna District Health Service (Hospital) and GP Plus Health Care Centre are co-located with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service. Inpatient care and emergency on-call is managed by the town GPs as part of a shared roster. Doctors are well supported by excellent retrieval services and support networks for immediate specialist advice via phone or video link.

Criteria

  • 4 years of general practice experience
  • Emergency medicine experience

For more detailed information or to apply, contact the RDWA Recruitment Team on 08 8234 8277 or via email: recruitment@ruraldoc.com.au

(CKAHS) to recruit a full time GP. This is a highly rewarding role and would suit a GP who thrives on a broad scope of practice and is committed to improving the health outcomes of the community. An excellent package is on offer and includes housing, generous remuneration between $240,000 – $260,000, relocation assistance, and top tier Commonwealth Government funded financial incentives.

The Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service is located on South Australia’s spectacular Eyre Peninsula. The practice provides a culturally appropriate service to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the township of Ceduna and surrounding outreach services.

Ceduna is a busy regional hub with a population of over 3,500. Boasting beautiful beaches and excellent fishing waters, it is a popular tourist spot and a hub for aquaculture including oyster farming. The town is well serviced with schools, government agencies and retail shops. There are daily flights to Adelaide.

The team at CKAHS consists of Aboriginal Health Workers, a Practice Manager, Practice Nurse and Clinical Coordinator and is well supported by regular visiting Specialist and Allied Health workers. The Ceduna District Health Service (Hospital) and GP Plus Health Care Centre are co-located with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service. Inpatient care and emergency on-call is managed by the town GPs as part of a shared roster. Doctors are well supported by excellent retrieval services and support networks for immediate specialist advice via phone or video link.

Criteria

  • 4 years of general practice experience
  • Emergency medicine experience

For more detailed information or to apply, contact the RDWA Recruitment Team on 08 8234 8277 or via email: recruitment@ruraldoc.com.au

1.3 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

1. Aboriginal Male Health 20 Scholarships Closing 31 August 

 

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland


 

 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

2.1 There are 10 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 There are 14 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

 

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 24 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3 There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

 

Current Vacancies
  • Administration Support Officer – SIF

  • Counsellor (Specialised) / Social Worker – Various Roles

  • Support Worker (Community Services)
  • Clinic Receptionist

  • Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

 

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

Mental Health Clinician (three positions)
General Practitioner Swan Hill
Team Leader, Alcohol and Other Drugs and Mental Health
Kinship caseworker (Mildura)
Kinship caseworker (Swan Hill)
Kinship Reunification Caseworker (Mildura)
Kinship Reunification Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Home-Based Care Caseworker (Mildura)
Home-Based Care Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Aboriginal Family-Led Decision-making Caseworker (Swan Hill)
First Supports Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Caseworker, Prevention and Early Intervention (Swan Hill)
Koori Pre School Assistant (Mildura)
Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Service (ACSASS) case worker (Swan Hill)
Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Service (ACSASS) case worker (Robinvale)
Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Mildura)
Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Swan Hill)
Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Robinvale)
Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Mildura)
Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Service (ACSASS) case worker (Mildura)
Mental Health Nurse
General Practitioner Mildura

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 Rumbalara ACCHO  PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

New Position – Full time – 38 Hours per week 

The position exists to ensure that the management of the general practice:

  • Fully supports the delivery of quality clinical care by all clinicians working in the practice

  • Provides for the self-sustained operation of the practice (break-even at minimum)

Key Selection Criteria:

  • Understanding of, and commitment to, Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander culture

  • Understanding of general practice

  • Management experience in a small business, ideally general practice management

  • Demonstrated leadership capabilities

  • Development, implementation, and monitoring of policies and processes that ensure effective and efficient operation of a healthcare service

  • Experience in leading healthcare service accreditation

  • Quality management experience

  • Commitment to continuing professional education

  • Valid driver’s license

For further information on this role contact Mr. Soenke Tremper or Ms Cindy McGee on 03- 58200 – 035

Salary Packaging is available

You will be required to hold a valid Victorian Employee Working with Children Check and a current police check completed within the last 2 weeks prior to commencement.

For consideration for an interview, you must obtain a Position Description from Marieta on (03) 5820 6405 or email: marieta.martin@raclimited.com.au and address the Key Selection Criteria, include a current resume, copies of qualifications and a cover letter.

Applications close at 4pm on Tuesday, 28th August 2018 and are to be addressed to:

Human Resources Dept. Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative
PO Box 614
Mooroopna Vic 3629

Koorie Supported Playgroups Facilitator

New Position – 0.5 FTE – 2.5 days (19 hours) per week

Develop and deliver two culturally safe supported playgroups for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families & children (aged from birth to starting primary school) with the aim of improving parent/child interactions, parental skill development & capacity, child development & school readiness, supporting cultural knowledge & connectedness and providing information and facilitating links to other relevant services.

Key Selection Criteria:

* Demonstrated knowledge and/or understanding of early years developmental milestones for children.

* A sound knowledge of and understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, values, family networks, parenting practices and issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.

* Proven planning and organisational skills.

* Proven employment history/experience in related field.

* Current Drivers licence.

* Minimum Diploma in Early Childhood, Social Work, Community Services or related field.

Salary Packaging is a benefit available for Part or Full Time Employees

You will be required to hold a valid Victorian Employee Working with Children Check and a current police check obtained within the last 2 months.

For consideration for an interview, you must obtain a Position Description from Marieta on (03) 5820 6405 or email: marieta.martin@raclimited.com.au and address the Key Selection Criteria, include a current resume, copies of qualifications and a cover letter.

Applications close at 4pm on Friday, 14th September 2018 and are to be addressed to:

Human Resources Dept.

Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative PO Box 614 Mooroopna Vic 3629

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community are encouraged to apply

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

 

AHMRC Job WEBSITE

7.2  South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

 

The Community Support Officer will be responsible for supervising and reporting on family contact, transport of children, young people and their families to supervised contacts, respite and other scheduled activities. The Community Support Officer may also be required to engage in mentoring activities.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Qualifications, Knowledge and Experience

Essential

* A tertiary qualification in Social Work / Welfare / Community Services / Disability Services or related fields or equivalent experience in a relevant sector

* Demonstrated ability in working with Aboriginal people, their communities and organisations

* The ability to develop and maintain effective working relationships with stakeholders, other agencies and service providers

* Proficiency in report writing and demonstrated ability to develop, organise and maintain records and reports in a timely manner

* Demonstrated computers skills, including the use of all Microsoft Office applications

* Ability to work autonomously under limited supervision, exercising sound professional judgement and seeking advice and consultation when appropriate as well as working as part of a wider team

* Personal organisation skills including time management and ability to prioritise competing demands

* Understanding of the importance of handling sensitive and confidential client or service information

* Clear Working with Children Check and National Police History Check

* Current, valid Driver’s Licence and willingness to transport clients, and travel overnight in regional and interstate areas if required

Desirable

* Aboriginality*

PERSONAL QUALITIES AND ATTRIBUTES

* Effective conflict resolution skills, negotiation, mediation and decision making skills

* Demonstrates initiative and an ability to problem solve

* Good literacy skills

* Effective communication skills including written and verbal communication with the ability to exercise these skills with people at all levels

For a full Position Description and an Application form, please email hr@southcoastams.org.au

7.3 Yerin : Permanent Full Time Aboriginal Permanency Support Manager (OOHC)

Permanent Full Time Aboriginal Permanency Support Manager (OOHC)

Yerin is seeking a suitability qualified Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander individual who will manage the Permanency Support Program (OOHC) team and work with other service providers to ensure high quality service. This role will see you working as part of a team and at times in isolation.

The successful applicant will have Tertiary Qualifications in Community Services or equivalent and a minimum 2 years’ experience managing Permanency Support Programs (OOHC), current working with Children’s Check and current NSW Drivers Licence and undergo a National Criminal History Check.

You’ll also have access to salary sacrificing options up to $15,950 to increase the value of your take home pay.

All applicants MUST obtain an application pack and complete all information contained in the pack, prior to lodging your application for the position. DO NOT APPLY VIA SEEK

This is an identified Position under Section 9A of the NSW Anti-Discrimination Act 1977.

For a confidential discussion about the position please contact Belinda Field, CEO Ph: 02 43511040.

To obtain an application pack – contact Jo Stevens E: recruitment@yerin.org.au or Ph: 02 43511040.

Applications close 5pm 1 September 2018

8. Tasmania

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

University of Melbourne in Indigenous Eye Health.

We currently have a position advertised for a PA/Administrator to join our team in Melbourne. We are really keen to have this job included in your communique for tomorrow. Is this a possibility? Job link below:

http://jobs.unimelb.edu.au/caw/en/job/897300/personal-assistant-indigenous-eye-health

10.2 Project Officer UNSW

UNSW Medicine is a national leader in learning, teaching and research, with close affiliations to a number of Australia’s finest hospitals, research institutes and health care organisations. With a strong presence at UNSW Kensington campus, the faculty have staff and students in teaching hospitals in Sydney as well as regional and rural areas of NSW including Albury/Wodonga, Wagga Wagga, Coffs Harbour and Port Macquarie.

The National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) was established at the University of New South Wales by the Commonwealth Government in 1986 to extend the knowledge base required for effective treatment of individuals with alcohol and other drug related problems and to enhance the overall research capacity in the drug and alcohol field. The Centre is highly regarded, both nationally and internationally, for its contribution to drug and alcohol research.

The Project Officer will oversee project planning, coordination, monitoring and reporting within The Centre of Research Excellence in Mental Health and Substance Use (CREMS). In particular the Project Officer will assist with the adaptation, development, evaluation and dissemination of culturally-appropriate evidencebased information about crystal methamphetamine (“ice”) for and in collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The role of Project Officer reports to a Senior Research Fellow

More INFO APPLY 

CRANAplus Policy and Stakeholder Coordinator closes 31 August 

CRANAplus is the peak professional body for health professionals working in remote and isolated areas across Australia.

We currently have an exciting opportunity for an individual experienced in policy and stakeholder engagement to join our team and drive our organisations advocacy agenda.

The successful candidate will preferably be based in Canberra.

Click here for a copy of the position description or for further information please

email crana@crana.org.au or phone our head office in Cairns on 07 4047 6409.

Applications should include a letter addressing the qualification and experience required and be sent to crana@crana.org.au  by COB Friday 31st August 2018 

ABS Engagement Manager closes 2 September

Are you someone who enjoys making and helping others make informed decisions? At the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) we are seeking to fill a number of Engagement Manager (APS 6) or Engagement Officer (APS 5) roles in NSW, TAS and WA.

Over the next 12 months additional vacancies may be identified in VIC, NT, QLD and SA. This recruitment will be used to develop an order of merit.

https://www.apsjobs.gov.au/SearchedNoticesView.aspx?Notices=10732266%3A1&mn=JobSearch

NARI Research Officer/Fellow Closes 31 August

Part Time 0.8FTE until 31st December 2019

Salary $62,995 – $82,083

The National Ageing Research Institute (NARI) is an independent, non-profit, medical research organisation recognised internationally as a centre of excellence in gerontology and geriatrics research.  Located in the grounds of the Royal Park Campus of the Royal Melbourne Hospital in Parkville, NARI is a vibrant and dynamic work environment where research is brought to life through rapid translation into policy and practice. NARI’s multi-disciplinary team of researchers are committed to improving the life and health of older people through research.

We are seeking a Research Officer/Fellow to work on a project examining the way art centres in remote communities are supporting older aboriginal people and those living with dementia. The successful applicant will work closely with other members of the “Remote Art Centres and Older People” project to ensure all activities are able to be effectively implemented to a high standard.

The successful applicant will have a Bachelor degree with Honours or PhD qualifications in a relevant field, although previous relevant experience in aged care, health care or health research will be considered. Previous experience in remote communities or working with Aboriginal Controlled Organisations would be highly desirable.

Please see the position description for a full list of responsibilities and selection criteria.

Applicants should include a Cover Letter, CV and addressed Selection Criteria when responding.

For position description, visit:          http://www.nari.net.au

Pleassend application to:                hr@nari.unimelb.edu.au

For enquirieplease contact Dr. Scott Fraser at: s.fraser@nari.edu.au

Applicationclose Friday 31 August 2018

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health News Alert : Our #OchreDay2018 Conference opens in Nipaluna (Hobart ) today with theme Aboriginal Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It!

 “The National Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chairperson John Singer, will today 27 August open the Ochre Day Conference -Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It! in Hobart 

The two-day conference will discuss how the sector that has an Aboriginal male population of over 350,000 can continue to Close the Gap in Aboriginal men’s health across Australia.

Ochre Day is an important Aboriginal male health initiative to help raise awareness as well as provide an opportunity to draw national public awareness to Aboriginal male health and social and emotional wellbeing.”

Picture above VACCHO mob flying to Hobart and Oliver Tye NACCHO Conference Team 

Download the full #OchreDay2018 Program here or read Keynote speakere Bio’s below

NACCHO Ochre Day Program_WEB 2018

NACCHO Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek and #OchreDay2018 Launch : Download 30 years 1988 – 2018 of Aboriginal Male Health Strategies and Summit recommendations

Read over 350 Aboriginal Male Health articles published by NACCHO last 6 years

Over the years, Ochre Day have had an impressive line-up of speakers and this year is no exception, some of the country’s leading Aboriginal Male Health thinkers, policymakers, clinicians, researchers, academics and practitioners are joined by health workers interested in learning about the latest medical advice, solutions and the practical aspects of cultural safety for our patients who still suffer institutional racism in our hospital system.

The annual event for almost 200 delegates, will feature NACCHO Chairperson John Singer will open the Conference, then delegates will hear an address from The Hon. Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health, then Mr John Paterson CEO of AMSANT will be speaking about the importance of women as partners in men’s health and Mr Rod Little from National Congress will discuss the progress of a treaty in the Australia as a keynote address for the Jaydon Adams Oration Memorial Dinner.

See Keynote Speaker Bio’s below or program for all

Ken Wyatt AM MP

Dr Mick Adams

John Singer

Dr Mark Wenitong

John Paterson

Deon Bird

Charlie Jia

Joe Williams

Rod Little

Kim Mulholland

Karl Briscoe

Last year 144 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) provided nearly 3 million episodes of care to over 340,000 clients.

It is clear that putting Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands is working. “Now we need to see more Aboriginal people have access to our culturally appropriate services that have been proven to be effective, efficient and affordable in more areas around Australia” Mr Singer said.

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/aboriginal-malemens-health/

Part 1 Our special thanks to our sponsors

Fred Hollows Foundation

MSD

NPS Medicinewise

Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

Heart Foundation

Tonic Health Media

ACT Government

Part 2 Speaker Bio’s noting Picture below 2017 Darwin 

 

Ken Wyatt AM MP

The Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP is the Federal Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health. He was born at Roelands Mission Farm, a former home for young Aboriginal children removed from their families, located near Bunbury in Western Australia (WA).

Ken’s heritage is Yamatji, with Irish ancestry on his father’s side, and Wongi and Noongar ancestry on his mother’s side. In 2015, Ken became the first Aboriginal member of the Federal Executive after being sworn in as the Assistant Minister for Health and Aged Care.

He made history again in 2016, as the first Aboriginal Minister to service in a Federal Government after being appointed as the Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

Ken is an active member of the Health and Human Rights Committees and is the Chair of the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

Dr Mick Adams

Dr Mick Adams is Senior Research Fellow at the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet and Kurongkurl Katitjin at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia.

He is a descendent of the Yadhaigana/Wuthathi people of Cape York Peninsula in Queensland, the Gurindji people of central western Northern Territory with extended family relationships with the people of the Torres Straits.

Dr Adams is recognised and credited as one of the leading Aboriginal researchers on male health. Mick has worked in the health sector for over 30 years and has experiencing working in both government and community-controlled health service sector.

John Singer

John Singer was appointed as the Chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) in November 2017.

John is an experienced administrator and visionary thinker.

He worked in Community Administration from 1989 to 1996 at Iwantja, Fregon, Pukatja and Papunya. In 1997, he became the Manager of Iwantja Clinic, which is one of Nganampa Health Council’s 6 clinics.

In 2000, he was appointed Executive Director of the Nganampa Health Council and still holds this position today.

Mr Singer’s family is from Ngaanjatjarra, Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara Lands, which is the cross-border area of Northern Territory, South Australia and Western Australia.

He began working in community control at the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service where he started his health worker training, later completed in the late 1980s.

Dr Mark Wenitong

Mark is from the Kabi Kabi tribal group of South Queensland and is passionate about improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

To complement this passion and energy, Mark has extensive expertise and experience and has been involved in both clinical and policy work throughout his career. He is currently the Aboriginal Public Health Medical Officer at Apunipima Cape York Health Council, where he is working on health reform across the Cape York Aboriginal communities.

Mark has also previously been a Senior Medical Officer at Wuchopperen Health Services in Cairns, a Medical Advisor for the Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (OATSIH) in Canberra, the acting CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), and has worked in community development with World Vision in Papunya, Northern Territory.

Mark is a past president and founder of the Australian Indigenous Doctors Association and sits on numerous councils and committees. Previously a member on the National Health Committee  of the National Health and Medical Research Council, he is Chair of Andrology Australia – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health Advisory Committee, board member of Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and the AITHM.

Mark is heavily involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and has helped develop several national workforce documents and sat on the COAG Australian Health Workforce Advisory Council. He is also involved in several research projects, and has worked in prison health, refugee health in East Timor, as well as studying and working in Indigenous health internationally.

In recognition of his achievements, Mark received the 2011 AMA Presidents Award for Excellence in Healthcare, the Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council Hall of Fame award in 2010 and more recently, was one of the chief investigators awarded the MJA best research journal article for 2012.

John Paterson

John Paterson is a born and bred Territorian, John’s family is affiliated with the Ngalakan tribe, located in the Roper River region.

John was appointed as the EO of AMSANT in June 2006 and immediately outlined his priorities for the organisation in the coming years.

“John’s goal is to strengthen and enhance our community-controlled health services in the NT so we can improve both the quality and duration of life for Aboriginal people,”

John says. “I’m particularly keen to help improve the mental health of the people in our region, with a holistic approach to primary health care.

“His other important agenda is to advocate vigorously for the further roll-out of the Primary Health Care Access program (PHCAP) to improve the access of Aboriginal people to comprehensive primary health care services.”

Deon Bird

Deon has been a part of the Institute of Urban Indigenous Healths (IUIH) MomenTIM program since 2015 as Facilitator and more recently has moved into a Workforce Development Role.

A proud Wakka Wakka man, Deon has developed an unwavering passion for this work around mens mental health, which has seen him become an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Mental Health.

Trainer as a part of his role with IUIH. Formerly, Deon was the Founder & CEO of the Australian Indigenous Youth Academy Inc.

AIYA was established in 2010 as a not-for-profit organization, which existed to ‘inspire future generations’ of Indigenous youth to achieve higher educational outcomes through a school-based traineeship program & healthy lifestyle initiatives.

Prior to his move to the not-for-profit and health services sector, Deon played professional rugby league in the English Super League for 11 years from 1996 to 2006.

Charlie Jia

Charlie is a proud Yindinji man (Cairns, North Queensland) and Torres Strait Islander. Charlie Jia has worked in private and public positions at local, state and national levels. His drive, commitment and passion are with his community, its people, friends and family.

Charlie sits on various committees representing his immediate community and is a founding member of the South East Queensland Indigenous Chamber of Commerce (SEQICC) and the inaugural President from 2006 to 2011.

He recently returned to the Chamber after moving to North Stradbroke Island to live and set up his small business, CJ’s Island Pizza which he still owns, being managed by his eldest son.

Charlie is the Regional Coordinator Men’s Mental Health overseeing MomenTIM which is one of many health-related programs delivered by the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health.

Joe Williams

Joe Williams is a Wiradjuri, 1st Nations man born in Cowra, raised in Wagga, NSW, having lived a 15-year span as a professional sports person, playing in the NRL for South Sydney Rabbitohs, Penrith Panthers and Canterbury Bulldogs before switching to professional Boxing in 2009.

As a boxer he is a 2x WBF World Jnr Welterweight champion and also won the WBC Asia Continental Title. Although forging a successful professional sporting career, Joe has battled the majority of his life with suicidal ideation and Bi Polar Disorder.

After a suicide attempt in 2012, he felt his purpose was to help people who struggle with mental illness.

Recently Joe developed a cultural wellbeing program which concentrates on First Nations people becoming the best version of themselves and released his autobiography titled Defying The Enemy Within; which not only tells his story, but offers practical wellbeing tips that anyone can implement in their lives to keep themselves mentally well.

Rod Little

Rod Little is from the Wilunyu-Amangu and Wajuk peoples of Geraldton and Perth areas of Western Australia and lives in Canberra.

He is the Co-chair of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples. Before this role he was a Director at Congress and has previously been an elected member and Chairperson of the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body since its inception in 2008.

He is a native title applicant and a member of a negotiation team of traditional owners’ negotiating long lasting outcomes for his mob through an alternative settlement agreement process with the Western Australian Government.

Rod has a long employment history in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs in education and senior leadership positions in social policy areas and has represented first peoples at international forums including the United Nations. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and the Commonwealth Peoples Forum.

He is passionate and committed to our peoples and improving their lives, particularly through advocating for our rights; equal education and health; and through consulting, encouraging and collaborating with our leaders, professionals and institutions.

Kim Mulholland

An Aboriginal descendant of the Larrakia Nation and Yanyuwa Clan group of the Northern Territory, Kim has lived a contrast between traditional Yanyuwa and contemporary Larrakia, granting him a unique insight and depth of understanding the rich tapestry that is our modern Aboriginal Australia.

Kim has a wealth of experience in community development & Aboriginal social & emotional wellbeing, and works from a unique integrative perspective with deep respect, drawing on lessons from his traditional cultural knowledge, and forging with principles in western education.

Karl Briscoe

Karl Briscoe is a proud Kuku Yalanji man from Mossman — Daintree area of Far North Queensland and has worked for over 17 years in the health sector at various levels of government and non-government including local, state and national levels which has enabled him to form a vast strategic network across Australia.

Karl has taken up the position as the Chief Executive Officer of NATSIHWA to progress and represent the invested interests of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Previous to NATSIHWA Karl was the Clinical Services Manager at the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Coffs Harbour.

He has a vast array of experience at Senior Executive levels including previous positions as the Executive Director of Indigenous Health and Outreach Services in Cape York and Torres Strait Hospital and Health Service, which provided the skills and knowledge to coordinate strategic intent to address the health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #MyHealthRecord @GregHuntMP Parliament speech ” Strengthening Privacy ” Bill : and @WinnungaACCHO #MyHealthRecord has a very positive role to play in improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people

This Government has listened to the recent concerns and, in order to provide additional reassurance, is moving quickly to address them through this Bill.

I appreciate the constructive consultations with the Australian Medical Association and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners and I welcome the recently reaffirmed support from all state and territory governments for this important health reform, for the opt-out process and for the strengthened privacy provisions at the recent COAG Health Council meeting.

The Bill will remove the ability of the System Operator – that is, the Australian Digital Health Agency – to disclose health information to law enforcement agencies and other government bodies without a court order or the consumer’s express consent. This is consistent with the System Operator’s current policy position, which has remained unchanged and has resulted in no My Health Records being disclosed in such circumstances.”

Minister for Health Greg Hunt

SECOND READING SPEECH MY HEALTH RECORDS AMENDMENT (STRENGTHENING
PRIVACY) BILL 2018 see part 1 Below 

We’ve been providing training and awareness sessions to health professionals to embed My Health Record use across health care providers, including Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services. We’ve also been out and about in the community actively engaging with consumers to increase their awareness of My Health Record.”

Mr Kelsey said the Australian Digital Health Agency has engaged with the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) about how to communicate with health care providers and consumers, and has established partnerships with NACCHO and each of its State and Territory Affiliates.

For all Aboriginal people this is a great initiative. I will be encouraging our clients to stay with My Health Record,

We have 790 transient clients so if, for example, a client from the Northern Territory visits us, it is not easy to get hold of their doctor. Having a My Health Record means our GP can access their important information quickly.

What’s really exciting now is that more and more information is being uploaded into records. The more information you have, particularly medicines information, the more useful My Health Record is.

Maintaining privacy is paramount and I am glad that concerns about privacy have been addressed. So my advice now is to jump on board and support it. At the end of the day it will be worth it.”

Julie Tongs OAM, who is the CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services in Canberra has seen a significant rise in her clients’ use of My Health Record and is calling on more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people around Australia to also consider the benefits of having one.

Material available on the My Health Record website See Part 2 Below for links 

Read Over 40 NACCHO E Health and My Health Records published over 6 years 

“It’s really, really important”. Find out how Esther manages her chronic health conditions using

Watch video

Part 1 SECOND READING SPEECH MY HEAL TH RECORDS AMENDMENT (STRENGTHENING
PRIVACY) BILL 2018

I am pleased to introduce the My Health Records Amendment (Strengthening Privacy) Bill 2018. The Australian Government takes seriously the security of health information.

This Bill will make amendments to the legislation underpinning the My Health Record system to strengthen its privacy protections.

A My Health Record puts consumers at the centre of their healthcare by enabling access to important health information, when and where it is needed, by consumers and their healthcare providers. Consumers can choose whether or not to have a My Health Record and can set their own access controls to limit access to their whole My Health Record or to particular documents in it.

The intent of the My Health Records Act has always been clear- to help improve the healthcare of all Australians.

The My Health Record system aims to address a fundamental problem with the Australian health system – consumers’ health information is fragmented because it is spread across a vast number of locations and systems.

A My Health Record does not replace the detailed medical records held by healthcare providers; rather it provides a summary of key health information such as information about allergies, medications, diagnoses and test results like blood tests.

The My Health Records system will improve health outcomes by providing important health information when and where it is needed so that the right treatment can be delivered safer and faster. It enables individual consumers to access all their own individual healthcare records privately and security for the first time.

The My Health Record system has now been operating for more than 6 years.

More than 6 million Australians have a My Health Record and more than 13,000 healthcare provider organisations are participating in the system.

Almost 7 million clinical documents, 22 million prescription documents and more than 745 million Medicare records have been uploaded.

In June 2012 the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Records, or PCEHR, Act took affect and the PCEHR system began operating in July 2012. This Act contained the provisions around disclosure to third parties and the archiving of cancelled records that are being amended by this Bill.

In November 2013 the Coalition Government announced a review into the PCEHR system that subsequently recommended a move to an opt-out system.

In November 2015 the Health Legislation Amendment (eHealth) Bill came into effect. This changed the name of the system from PCEHR to My Health Record and enabled the opt-out approach. The Bill passed with unanimous support in both houses.

On 24 March 2017 the COAG Health Council agreed to a national opt-out model for long-term participation arrangements in the My Health system. This support was reaffirmed in August 2018.

In May 2017 the Government announced national implementation of opt-out as part of the 2017-18 Budget.

On 30 November 2017 I made the My Health Records (National Application) Rules 2017 to apply the opt-out model of registration to all consumers in Australia, and to specify the period in which consumers could opt-out. The opt-out period commenced on 16 July 2018 and will end on 15 November 2018.

As part of the 2017-18 Budget, this Government announced that, in order to achieve the benefits sooner, the My Health Record system would transition to an opt-out system whereby every Australian will get a My Health Record by the end of this year, unless they’ve opted out.

The opt-out period started on 16 July this year, and the Australian Digital Health Agency, together with many partner organisations, has been working closely with the healthcare sector to inform consumers about the purpose and benefits of My Health Record, the privacy settings for restricting access, and the right to opt-out.

Soon after the opt-out period concerns were raised by some groups – specifically, that My Health Record information could be disclosed for law  enforcement purposes, and that health information would continue to be retained in the system after a consumer has cancelled their My Health Record.

The system has operated for six years and no material has been released for law enforcement purposes. In any event, the policy has been that there would be no release of information without a court order. I think it ‘s important to be very clear about this – the My Health Record system has its own dedicated privacy controls which are stronger in some cases than the protections afforded by the Commonwealth Privacy Act. The operation and design of the My Health Record system was developed after consultation with consumers, privacy advocates and experts, health sector representatives, health software providers, medical indemnity insurers, and Commonwealth, state and territory government agencies. Further, the system has been operating without incident since July 2012.

Nonetheless, this Government has listened to the recent concerns and, in order to provide additional reassurance, is moving quickly to address them through this Bill. I appreciate the constructive consultations with the Australian Medical Association and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners and I welcome the recently reaffirmed support from all state and territory governments for this important health reform, for the opt-out process and for the strengthened privacy provisions at the recent COAG Health Council meeting.

The Bill will remove the ability of the System Operator – that is, the Australian Digital Health Agency – to disclose health information to law enforcement agencies and other government bodies without a court order or the consumer’s express consent. This is consistent with the System Operator’s current policy position, which has remained unchanged and has resulted in no My Health Records being disclosed in such circumstances.

The Bill will also require the System Operator to permanently delete health information it holds for any consumer who has cancelled their My Health Record. This makes it clear that the Government will not retain any health information if a person chooses to cancel at any time. The record will be deleted forever.

In addition to these amendments I have already extended the opt-out period by a further month to end on 15 November. This will provide more time for consumers to make up their own mind about opting out of My Health Record.

Even after this period a consumer can choose not to participate at any time and cancel their My Health Record – their record will then be cancelled and permanently deleted.

These legislative changes reinforce the existing privacy controls that the system already gives each individual over their My Health Record. Once they have a My Health Record, individuals can set a range of access controls. For example, they can set up an access code so that only those organisations they elect can access their record, and they can be notified when their record is accessed. They can also elect if they don’t want their Medicare or other information included in their My Health Record.

The My Health Record system will provide significant health and economic benefits for all Australians through avoided hospital admissions, fewer adverse drug events, reduced duplication of tests, better coordination of care for people seeing multiple healthcare providers, and better informed treatment decisions.

The Australian Government is committed to the My Health Record system because it is changing healthcare in Australia for the better. The Australian Government is equally committed to the privacy of individual’s health information. These measures to strengthen the privacy protections demonstrate this commitment.

My Health Record system

On 15 August 2018, the Senate referred the following matter to the Senate Community Affairs References Committee for inquiry and report:

The My Health Record system, with particular reference to:

  1. the expected benefits of the My Health Record system;
  2. the decision to shift from opt-in to opt-out;
  3. privacy and security, including concerns regarding:
    1. the vulnerability of the system to unauthorised access,
    2. the arrangements for third party access by law enforcement, government agencies, researchers and commercial interests, and
    3. arrangements to exclude third party access arrangements to include any other party, including health or life insurers;
  4. the Government’s administration of the My Health Record system roll-out, including:
    1. the public information campaign, and
    2. the prevalence of ‘informed consent’ amongst users;
  5. measures that are necessary to address community privacy concerns in the My Health Record system;
  6. how My Health Record compares to alternative systems of digitising health records internationally; and
  7. any other matters.

Submissions are sought by 14 September 2018. The reporting date is 8 October 2018.

Committee Secretariat contact:

Committee Secretary
Senate Standing Committees on Community Affairs
PO Box 6100
Parliament House
Canberra ACT 2600

Phone: +61 2 6277 3515
Fax: +61 2 6277 5829
community.affairs.sen@aph.gov.au

PART 2

My Health Record has a very positive role to play in improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people according to leading health practitioners who work with Indigenous communities.

My Health Record is an online summary of a person’s key health information. It allows them to share and control their health information with doctors, hospitals and other healthcare providers from anywhere, at any time.

Julie Tongs OAM, who is the CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services in Canberra has seen a significant rise in her clients’ use of My Health Record and is calling on more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people around Australia to also consider the benefits of having one.

The Australian Digital Health Agency’s CEO, Tim Kelsey and Chief Medical Adviser, Professor Meredith Makeham today visited Winnunga at Narrabundah in Canberra.

Winnunga has more than 7,000 clients, many with multiple chronic conditions. It was an early adopter of My Health Record and now has more than 2,430 clients with a registered My Health Record.

According to the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Measures Survey 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience more chronic disease overall and they tend to develop it at younger ages. Compared to non-Indigenous people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were more than four times as likely to be in the advanced stages of a chronic kidney disease and more than three times as likely to have diabetes. They are also more likely to have more than one chronic condition.

“Having a My Health Record can be particularly beneficial for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who may have chronic health conditions, those who move around a lot and those who live in remote areas of Australia,” said Professor Meredith Makeham, Chief Medical Adviser at the Australian Digital Health Agency.

“It can save lives in emergency situations, which is why people should consider having one.

“We know people struggle to remember important details about their own medical history, including what medicines they have been prescribed or when they received medical treatment – My Health Record can do this for you. By ensuring your medical history is up-to-date and shareable with your healthcare providers, it can help reduce adverse drug events and unnecessary hospital admissions.”

Capital Health Network, which is the ACT’s primary health network, has been actively supporting the expansion of My Health Record in the ACT.

“ACT PHN’s Digital Health Team has been actively training and engaging with general practice, community pharmacy, allied health and medical specialists,” said Chief Executive of Capital Health Network, Adj. Prof Gaylene Coulton.

“We’ve been providing training and awareness sessions to health professionals to embed My Health Record use across health care providers, including Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services. We’ve also been out and about in the community actively engaging with consumers to increase their awareness of My Health Record.”

Mr Kelsey said the Australian Digital Health Agency has engaged with the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) about how to communicate with health care providers and consumers, and has established partnerships with NACCHO and each of its State and Territory Affiliates.

“My Health record will help to close the gap by being available for people across health providers, when they travel, go into hospital or see a specialist,” said Mr Kelsey.

All 146 NACCHO member organisations that provide clinical services have received at least one education session on My Health Record. The Agency has also invited collaboration from the Indigenous Allied Health Association (IAHA), the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM), the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association (NATSIHWA), and the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA).

More information on My Health Record can be found at www.myhealthrecord.gov.au. People who do not want a My Health Record can opt out by visiting the My Health Record website or by calling 1800 723 471 for phone-based assistance. Additional support is available to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, people from non‐English speaking backgrounds, people with limited digital literacy, and those living in rural and remote regions.

Material available on the My Health Record website also includes:

ENDS