NACCHO Aboriginal Health : #NTIntervention: Ten years on and what has been achieved?

 

” The intervention was a “debacle” and a new attempt with Indigenous involvement “couldn’t do any worse .

I suggest a “mark two of what was attempted under the intervention”: a 10-year “Marshall plan” between federal and territory governments but with Aboriginal people as expert advisers on a planning, oversight and implementation committee.

It’s not enough to pay us the cursory privilege of being consulted, where our voices are not listened to and where we have no role in decision-making,” she said. “We couldn’t do any worse than what’s being done today, surely.”

Olga Havnen, the chief executive of the Danila Dilba Aboriginal health service see Part 2 story below

 “I  describe the intervention as “a complete violation of the human rights of Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory.

The legacy is that Aboriginal people were completely disempowered.

They had the Army going into communities in their uniforms. They had no idea why the Army was there. People were terrified that they’d come to take the kids away.”

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation chief executive Pat Turner see story part 3 NT Intervention: Australia’s most costly ‘political stunt’

As the national representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples calls for a fundamental reset of government and community relations with us, beginning with the implementation of the Uluru Statement resolutions for constitutional reform. Congress stands ready to fill the role of the advisory body to parliament.”

“We also call for the immediate implementation of the Redfern Statement, which provides a roadmap for how governments can work collaboratively with us to develop efficient and effective programs”

Congress press release Part 1 Below

Part 1 The Northern Territory Intervention: Ten years on and what has been achieved?

As a federal election loomed a decade ago, facing disappointing polls the government of the day was scandalized by sexual abuse in Northern Territory Aboriginal communities and proposed an intervention to improve the life chances of Aboriginal children.

The program won bipartisan support and continued under a new name, Stronger Futures, when the government changed. Closing the Gap targets were announced and hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to improve the health, education, housing and employment status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people around the country, and especially those living in remote communities.

A decade on, it is timely to consider results:

  • The annual Closing the Gap report shows that six of the seven targets are not on track.
  •  We understand that there has not been a single prosecution for child sexual abuse as a result of these programs.
  •  Aboriginal men have been stigmatized as drunken, irresponsible pedophiles.
  •  Provisions of the Racial Discrimination Act have been ignored to allow the Intervention to proceed.
  •  Communities have been weakened by the downgrading of local self-government. Those who presume to know what is best for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have had their way.
  •  Tax payers are askance at the shocking waste of public monies on ineffective programs, for which many blame Aboriginal people.
  •  Most notably in the Northern Territory, but in the states as well, shocking abuses of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander juveniles have been uncovered.
  •  Incarceration rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, women and children have sky rocketed.
  •  United Nations representatives have issued reports critical of the Intervention and of government relations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • The 97 recommendations of the 2007 Ampe Akelyernemane Meke Mekarle (Little Children are Sacred) report have been ignored.

A longer list would add to the inevitable conclusion that there is a crisis in Indigenous Affairs.

“The rationale for the Intervention was to protect Aboriginal children and to provide them with a better future. Health, education and well-being statistics demonstrate failure of the Intervention. There have been very few positive outcomes to show for the hundreds of millions of dollars that have been spent on the Intervention and related programs,” he said.

Part 2 NT intervention a ‘debacle’ and second attempt should be made, commission told

from Helen Davidson The Guardian

A 10-year Northern Territory intervention “mark two” could address the failings of the first one, which has seen most of the money “squandered”, the Northern Territory royal commission has heard.

Olga Havnen, the chief executive of the Danila Dilba Aboriginal health service, said the intervention was a “debacle” and a new attempt with Indigenous involvement “couldn’t do any worse”.

Havnen, who is also a former coordinator general for remote services in the NT, made the comments before the royal commission into the protection and detention of children on Thursday.

The hearing has coincided with the 10-year anniversary of the federal government’s emergency intervention into the region, which has been criticised as draconian and removing self-determination from Indigenous communities while failing to address Indigenous inequality.

Havnen told the hearing the NT was still reliant on federal funds and still failing to involve Indigenous people and organisations properly.

This week the commission heard the rates of child protection cases and notifications has more than doubled in the 10 years since the intervention. Separately, NT budget estimates revealed the number of children in out of home care had tripled, while the proportion in had dropped 20%.

Havnen said many government contracts were still procured without proper assessment of whether the organisation had the capability to work with Indigenous communities.

“These arrangements are absolutely stunning and I think are largely a legacy of the intervention supposedly committed to improving Aboriginal communities,” she said.

“By any measure the vast majority of that money has been squandered, and the people who made those decisions need to be held to account in my view.

“Just on the very cursory amount of information we have access to, you have to go: what the hell is actually really going on here and why does this continue to happen?”

Earlier this week the commission heard evidence a private business, Safe Pathways, had charged the Northern Territory government $85,000 a month to run a residential home for a maximum of four children.

A former Safe Pathways manager, Tracey Hancock, told the commission the amount would include staff wages but she didn’t have any further information on what the money was for.

Safe Pathways reportedly told the ABC the charges had been approved and accepted by the NT government.

“We get held up to be accountable as Aboriginal service providers and our level of accountability and transparency – every dollar we spend and commit, including performance outcomes, is well and truly documented,” Havnen said on Thursday.

“But you go and look at these websites for a lot of these NGOs running out-of-home services, there’s no detail about their governance arrangement, there’s no annual report, there’s no financial transparency or accountability. How is this good for anybody?”

Havnen earlier told the commission governments treated large non-Indigenous organisations as equal partners more than they did Indigenous organisations. She also said there were Indigenous organisations across the NT that were “well placed” to provide services currently contracted to non-Indigenous NGOs.

Aboriginal health services across the NT would be asked by the department to provide client medical records when there was an investigation “and yet we seem to be completely invisible to them as a capable partner and potential resource” to assist the department and vulnerable families, she said.

She said it seemed ironic and suggested the commission look at where remote Aboriginal health services were located. “Many of them are in those communities where we know large numbers of Aboriginal children are being removed from.”

Story 3 NT Intervention: Australia’s most costly ‘political stunt’

THE Federal Government’s radical plan to forcibly intervene in Aboriginal communities and impose restrictions on individuals was a billion dollar “political stunt”, a former political head has said.

WATCH SKYNEWS COVERAGE

The Northern Territory Emergency Response, known as “the Intervention”, was launched unilaterally by the Howard Government 10 years ago today.

It saw widespread alcohol bans and other restrictions imposed on 73 remote indigenous communities, as well as forced land leases, and changes to welfare under the Northern Territory Response Act 2007. The Racial Discrimination Act was suspended by the Commonwealth so thousands of indigenous people could have their welfare payments put onto “basics cards” for essential items. The Army, federal police and medical professionals were deployed to the communities for logistical support and health checks. The community development employment projects (CDEP) scheme was disbanded which limited job prospects for locals and an already limited support of bilingual education was cut off.

Communities that boasted distinctive ways of life as the oldest living culture in the world were suddenly referred to as “prescribed areas”, then “towns”, with individuals in need of reform.

Mr Howard said the Commonwealth had “responded” because the NT government of the day had failed to take action as recommended by the Little Children are Sacred report on child sexual abuse in NT indigenous communities.

The Intervention has cost Australian taxpayers more than one billion dollars but has largely proved ineffective in making a positive impact on the lives of those it denigrated.

NT’s first Labor chief minister Clare Martin said it was nothing more than a “political stunt” that was rolled out without her consultation when she was in power.

“(Then Prime Minister John Howard) didn’t ring me to say ‘can we talk about a possible intervention’, he rang me and said ‘there is an intervention taking place, I’m not going to talk to you about it, and it’s a done deal’,’ she told Sky News earlier today.

“I was stunned. I had no idea it was going to happen. I don’t think most people in the Territory — Aboriginal people who were the subject of it — they didn’t know it was going to happen, and very quickly you worked out it was mostly a political stunt.”

Ms Martin told the program she offered to fly to Canberra to discuss the plan but Mr Howard told her he was ‘too busy’ to meet.

“I thought for six years I had worked reasonably well with John Howard,” she said.

“I wasn’t in the same party as John Howard, but we always seemed to manage to sort things out, and then to be used as a political strategy like it obviously was, I just felt really deflated.

“My first thought when Howard rang me was to say expletives and resign and then I thought ‘well that’s just not mature’, but I did after that plan when I would leave.”

Ms Martin kept her position in the 2007 federal election then resigned as chief minister in November of the same year.

But she wasn’t the only one critical of the Intervention with the full scale of the blunder quickly revealing itself. It has widely been criticised for not directly involving Aboriginal people and instead giving rise to a remarkable spurt of government-funded activity that went on around them.

Twenty thousand Territorians are now on income management, despite the scheme not meeting its aims, according to a report.

Earlier this week, royal commissioners were told child protection notifications, substantiations and out-of-home placements had all more than doubled since 2007.

About 50 per cent of indigenous children in the NT now come to the attention of the child protection system by the age of 10, the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory heard on Monday.

Aboriginal women from the remote Central Australian community of Ampilatwatja performing at a public ceremony in 2010 to protest against the Northern Territory intervention. Picture: Chris Graham.

Aboriginal women from the remote Central Australian community of Ampilatwatja performing at a public ceremony in 2010 to protest against the Northern Territory intervention. Picture: Chris Graham.Source:Supplied

Signs — like this one outside Alice Springs — were erected in many Aboriginal communities following the rollout of the NT Intervention.

Signs — like this one outside Alice Springs — were erected in many Aboriginal communities following the rollout of the NT Intervention.Source:News Limited

New figures by the Menzies School of Health research that were presented to the Royal Commission indicated the intervention has not made a difference.

“The data that we have shows that since the intervention rates of child protection notifications, substantiations and out of home care have all doubled and so if that’s an outcome we’re looking at, the intervention has really failed to make a difference for that particular outcome,” school spokesperson Sven Silburn said.

Professor Silburn said the lack of proper community engagement, which he said might have given the Intervention a better chance of success, was a “great mistake”.

Footage of children detained at Don Dale recently sparked a royal commission into the maltreatment of youths in detention. It came as the Territory’s incarceration rate hit a 15-year high — the highest per capita rate in Australia — with one per cent of the population behind bars and more than 85 per cent of inmates indigenous.

Federal indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion recently said the Intervention was flawed.

“I think it would have been far better to do some of the same things with the full compliance of the community rather than the community having the sense that it was imposed on us, so yes of course we could have done it better,” Mr Scullion said during a recent visit to the central Australian community of Mutitjulu, which was at the front line of the Intervention.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, community, families have to be at the centre of the decisions, if we’re going to make substantive and sustainable change.”

Central Australian Aboriginal leader Bess Price has been vocal about the high level of violence in central Australian indigenous communities and supported the Northern Territory intervention.

Central Australian Aboriginal leader Bess Price has been vocal about the high level of violence in central Australian indigenous communities and supported the Northern Territory intervention.Source:Supplied

 

Some high profile indigenous politicians and community members have expressed support for the Intervention.

Former Chair of the Northern Territory’s indigenous Affairs Advisory Council, Bess Price previously said the Intervention has “had an impact on the grog, the alcohol, and it’s made life a bit better for the children”.

“It’s gonna take years to fix not everything, but right now, it’s done a huge amount of, you know, change in the way people have thought about children as well in regards to their health and wellbeing,” Ms Price told the ABC in 2011.

Ms Price later came under attack for her comments from indigenous lawyer Larissa Behrendt who used her Twitter account to describe watching bestiality on TV as “less offensive than Bess Price”.

News.com.au has contacted Ms Price for comment.

megan.palin@news.com.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Stroke : New Report : Regional and rural health divide : #stroke treatment a cruel lottery

 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are between two and three times as likely to have a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians which is why increasing stroke awareness is crucial.

Too many Australians couldn’t spot a stroke if it was happening right in front of them. We know that in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities this awareness is even lower. We want all Australians, regardless of where they live or what community they’re from, to learn the signs of stroke.”

Stroke Foundation and Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Project

“It can happen to anyone — stroke doesn’t discriminate against colour, it doesn’t discriminate against age “

Photo above Seith Fourmile, Indigenous stroke survivor campaigns for culture to aid in stroke recovery

Regional and rural communities are bearing the brunt of Australia’s stroke burden, according to an updated Stroke Foundation report released today.

Download the Report here : NSF1586_Postcode2017_web

Read over 60 plus NACCHO stroke Articles HERE

“No Postcode Untouched: Stroke in Australia 2017”, found 12 of the country’s top 20 hotspots for stroke incidence were located in regional Australia and people living in country areas were 19 percent more likely to suffer a stroke than those living in metropolitan areas.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said due to limited access to best practice treatment, regional Australians were also more likely to die or be left with a significant disability as a result a stroke.

“In 2017, Australians will suffer more than 56,000 strokes and many of these will be experienced by people living in regional Australia,’’ Ms McGowan said.

“Advancements in stroke treatment and care mean stroke is no longer a death sentence for many, however patient outcomes vary widely across the country depending on where people live.

“Stroke can be treated and it can be beaten. It is a tragedy that only a small percentage of Australian stroke patients are getting access to the latest treatments and ongoing specialist care that we know saves lives.”

See Video from the Project

Stroke Foundation Clinical Council Chair Associate Processor Bruce Campbell said Australian clinicians were leading the way internationally in advancements in acute stroke treatment, such as endovascular clot retrieval. However, the health system was not designed to support and deliver these innovations in treatment and care nationally.

“It is not fair that our health system forces patients into this cruel lottery,’’ A/Professor Campbell said.

“There are pockets of the country where targeted investment and coordination of services is resulting in improved outcomes for stroke patients.

“Consistent lack of stroke-specific funding and poor resourcing is costing us lives and money. For the most part, doctors and nurses are doing what they can in a system that is fragmented, under-resourced and overwhelmed.”

No Postcode Untouched: Stroke in Australia 2017 report and website uses data compiled and analysed by Deloitte Access Economics to reveal how big the stroke challenge is in each Australian federal electorate.

This data includes estimates of the number of strokes, survivors and the death rate, as well as those living with key stroke risk factors. It is an update of a Stroke Foundation report released in 2014.

The report shows the cities and towns where stroke is having its biggest impact and pinpoints future hotspots where there is an increased need for support.

Ms McGowan said stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in Australia, having a huge impact on the community and the economy. Media release

“Currently, there is one stroke in Australia every nine minutes, by 2050 – without action – this number is set to increase to one stroke every four minutes,’’ she said.

“Stroke doesn’t discriminate, it impacts people of all ages and while more people are surviving stroke, its impact on survivors and their families is far reaching.

“It doesn’t have to be this way. Federal and state governments have the opportunity to invest in proven measures to change the state of stroke in this country.”

In the wake of the report Stroke Foundation is calling for a funded national action plan to address the prevention and treatment of stroke, and support for stroke survivors living in the community.

Key elements include: A national action campaign to ensure every Australian household has someone who knows

Key elements include:

  •  A national action campaign to ensure every Australian household has someone who knows FAST – the signs of stroke and to call 000. Stroke is a time critical medical condition. Time saved in getting people to hospital and treatments = brain saved.

  •  Nationally coordinated telemedicine network – breaking down the barriers to acute stroke treatment.
  •  Ensuring all stroke patients have access to stroke unit care, and spend enough time on the stroke unit accessing the services and supports they need to live well after stroke.

The No Postcode Untouched:Stroke in Australia 2017 report was funded by an unrestricted educational grant from Boehringer Ingelheim.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #SA #NT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD

1.SA Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA awarded $500,000 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services grant

2. NSW : Awabakal Medical Services “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” health workshops for students

3.1 QLD New partnership between AFL Gold Coast Suns and Deadly Choices 715 Health Checks

3.2 QLD : 90th anniversary of 270km walk to be marked by ceremony and re-enactment

4.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team , Deadly Dan and Smoke Free Super Heroes

5.WA : First National first Aboriginal Affairs roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress .

6.NT  Additional $1.6m for Indigenous language interpreters

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.SA Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA awarded $500,000 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services grant

Local Aboriginal families with young children will benefit from new services after Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service was successful in gaining a $500,000 grant earlier this month.

FROM Whyalla News

The New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services program is an initiative of the Commonwealth Government’s Department of Health, and aims to deliver antenatal, postnatal and early childhood services targeting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with children under five yearsn old. Nunyara plans to use the funding to improve the health care of children from antenatal care right through until they attend primary school.

The health service currently have a part time Aboriginal Maternal Infant Care (AMIC) Practitioner and access to a Midwife one day per week.

The funding would increase the hours of these two positions as well as create four new jobs.  Nunyara will employ a Child Health Coordinator, Child Health Nurse, AMIC Trainee and Transport Officer to support the new program.

Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service chief executive officer Cindy Zbierksi said the team anticipates they can “more than double” Nunyara’s service delivery outputs relating to improved access and outcomes for under five-year-olds.

“We can increase the child health checks by at least doubling them in the first six months and increase childhood immunisation by 20 percent,” she said.

The provision of a Transport Officer in the new program will also assist clients to attend specialist appointments in Port Augusta, who have more Paediatric and Obstetric services than Whyalla.

Mrs Zbierski said this has been an issue in the past, as travelling to Port Augusta is less than 100 kilometres away so clients do not qualify for the Patient Assistance Transport Scheme.

Nunyara is working on converting one of its buildings into a space for this service and plans to have the team fully operational by the end of 2017. Nunyara is located at 17/27 Tully St, Whyalla

2. NSW : Awabakal Medical Services “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” health workshops for students

IRRAWANG High School Indigenous students were treated to some famous faces this week, with some Indigenous stars visiting the school to run a health workshop with the students

From News of the Area

The workshop was all about “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” and has been generously funded by the Awabakal Medical Services and facilitated by No Limit Management.Students were treated to three special guests who spoke to the crowd.

Cody Walker, a professional footballer in the NRL with the Sydney Rabbitohs is a proud man of Bundjalung and Yuin Heritage.

George Rose, a former NRL player, played for Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles, with whom he won the 2011 NRL premiership, and also Melbourne Storm and Sydney Roosters.

He played for the Walgett Aboriginal Connection in several Koori knockouts and is a proud Kamilaroi man.

International Indigenous model Samantha Harris, a respected Dunghutti woman, joined the football stars to run the workshop group for the morning.

Each of the guests spoke of their life journeys and reinforced to the students the dangers of smoking, encouraging them to maintain a fit and healthy lifestyle and stand up to peer pressure.
The students took part in fun, but physical team and confidence building activities, working together to reach outcomes.

The guest stars gave the students an opportunity at the end of the workshop for photos and autographs.

Matt Chaffey, Year 10 student from Medowie said “I really appreciated the mentors coming to our school.”

“From what they told us, it makes me more determined to never smoke.”

Well done to the staff and students for another unique and creatively managed experience for the students at Irrawang High School.

3.1 QLD New partnership between AFL Gold Coast Suns and Deadly Choices 715 Health Checks

The Deadly Choices  Gold Coast SUNS jersey will be free for community members when they have a full 715 Health Check Kalwun on the Gold Coast

The Deadly Choices  Gold Coast SUNS jersey will be free for community members when they have a full 715 Health Check Kalwun on the Gold Coast

3.2 QLD : 90th anniversary of 270km walk to be marked by ceremony and re-enactment

On Wednesday 28 June more than 100 people, including a support crew of cooks, a nurse, counsellor, community workers and volunteers, will set out to walk from Taroom, 290km west of Maryborough, to Woorabinda – more than 270km to the north – over eight days.

The Trek will be kicked off by a Healing Ceremony on Bundulla Station, the site of the former Taroom Aboriginal Settlement, which was closed down in 1927 because of the threat of flooding from a nearby irrigation scheme.

See full history HERE

The Taroom Aboriginal Settlement, also known as Taroom Aboriginal Reserve, was established as a government-operated reserve on a site on the Dawson River, east of the township of Taroom in 1911. The settlement was established under the Aboriginals Protection and Restriction of the Sale of Opium Act 1897, which enabled direct government control over the lives of Aboriginal people in Queensland, including forced removals to designated reserves. Under the direction of a superintendent, the settlement housed Aboriginal people from different language groups and regions of Queensland, who lived within a highly regulated and tightly controlled institutional environment until its closure in 1927.[1]

Inhabitants at the time were forced to move to what is now Woorabinda Aboriginal Shire, 170km south west of Rockhampton.

Most of them walked.

The purpose of the Healing Ceremony is to pay respect to those hundreds of Elders, men, women and children and to lay wreaths at a memorial at the site.

Trek walkers are expected to travel from Woorabinda, Yarrabah, Palm Island, Cherbourg and other central Queensland communities, and will include non-Indigenous participants.

This year marks the 90th anniversary of the walk and the third year of re-enacting the walk.

Media is welcome to attend. For more information or to arrange interviews, please contact Christine Howes on 0419 656 277.

4.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team , Deadly Dan and Smoke Free Super Heroes

This week the VAHSHLT were hanging out at Yappera Children’s Service Co-Operative reading Deadly Dan at the League and talking about the importance of staying smoke free!

At our Coach program we are educating the kids about healthy lifestyles and are creating a next generation of smoke free super heroes!!

#youSmokeYouChoke #StaySmokeFree Aboriginal Quitline Quit Victoria Department of Health & Human Services, Victoria

 

 5.WA : First National first Aboriginal Affairs roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress .

State and territory Aboriginal affairs leaders say it is inevitable the federal government will need to have treaty negotiations with indigenous people.

Representatives from Western Australia, the ACT, the Northern Territory, South Australia and Victoria met on Friday for the first roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress on Aboriginal affairs.

WA Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt, who is indigenous, said each state faced similar issues including housing, treaties, Aboriginal representation and land tenure.

“It’s an opportunity now for states and territories to have a much better understanding of what we’re all doing, and co-operate a lot more to create more opportunities for Aboriginal people,” he told reporters on Friday.

“We’re seeing a lot more happening in the space of Native title, constitutional recognition and closing the gap.”

Mr Wyatt met with SA Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Minister Kyam Maher, ACT MLA Rachel Stephen-Smith, NT MLA Chansey Paech and Member for Geelong Christine Couzens.

Roundtable meetings are expected to continue once or twice a year, with discussions towards the end of 2017 to focus on how states and territories will use land vested in Aboriginal communities to better create economic development.

Mr Wyatt said treaty conversations were occurring with Nyoongar people from WA’s South West region, and acknowledged this was happening across Australia.

“What Uluru has shown is that Aboriginal Australia is very keen to have this conversation about treaties elevated,” he said.

“It has created a new pressure on the commonwealth government to engage in an area that perhaps, may be new to them.” Mr Maher said a state treaty could be announced by the end of the year and that bilateral agreement would have a federal impact.

“When states and territories talk with one voice it helps solve problems,” he said.

 

6.NT  Additional $1.6m for Indigenous language interpreters

The Coalition Government is providing the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) with an additional $1.6 million to expand its successful Indigenous Interpreting Project.

See Background  Health NT Research TeleinterpretingServices

Indigenous language interpreters play an essential role in ensuring First Australians have access to a fair legal system, as well as government and community services. Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said 11 per cent of First Australians spoke an Indigenous language as their main language at home.

“In some parts of Australia, English is the third or fourth language spoken, clearly demonstrating the need for widely available interpreting services,” Minister Scullion said.

“This $1.6 million investment will ensure the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters is able to meet the growing need for accredited Indigenous language interpreters in regional and remote Australia, particularly in the health and justice sectors.

“The authority’s Indigenous Interpreting Project has already enjoyed considerable success.

Since 2012, it has led to 96 accreditations being awarded to Indigenous interpreters across 25 languages.

 

NACCHO TOP 10 Aboriginal health #JobAlerts #Kimberleys #Brisbane #Adelaide #Grafton #Casino this week : #Aboriginal Health Workers / #Nurses

This weeks #Jobalerts 21 June

Please note  : Before completing a job application check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Nurse Supervisor (Registered Nurse / Midwife)

2. Broome Project Coordinator – Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial

3-6 Kimberley AMS Four Nurse positions

7. Grafton and Casino Registered Nurse (RN) & Early Childhood Nurse (ECN)

8-10 Brisbane :North Stradbroke Island part of the Yulu-Burri-Ba team?

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 

1.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Nurse Supervisor (Registered Nurse / Midwife)

Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program

  • Ongoing, full time position
  • Attractive remuneration package
  • Starting Salary $95,693.98 + Super + access to Salary Sacrifice
  • Significant career and training development opportunities

 

Nunkuwarrin Yunti works to promote and deliver improvement in the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and to advance their social, cultural and economic status. The Organisation places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best

The Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) is a program of sustained and scheduled home visiting for Aboriginal families that begins during the antenatal period and continues until the child is 2 years old. Based on the model developed by Professor David Olds in the USA, the AFNPP involves nurses and/or midwives and Aboriginal Family Partnership Workers working in partnership with women who are pregnant with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander baby, through an intensive home visiting program of evidence based interventions.

The position of Nurse Supervisor contributes by leading, modelling, coordinating and working with a team of 3 Nurse Home Visitors and 3 Aboriginal Family Partnership Workers. The position is located in Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Women Children and Family Health Unit and will be based at Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Mile End site. The position manages the team who will provide support to women and families who live within the catchment areas of Playford, Port Adelaide and Enfield (Adelaide Metro) including the two maternity hospitals (Women’s and Children’s Hospital and Lyell McEwin Hospital).

Key Duties

  • Coordinate the development and implementation of the ANFPP and model a strength-based, culturally safe and client-centred program to achieve operational outcomes.
  • Provide leadership to the team for practice governance and day to day operations of the ANFPP program in line with the national ANFPP program guidelines and relevant Nunkuwarrin Yunti Clinical and Practice Governance systems.
  • Develop and maintain a positive learning environment, taking a reflective approach to service, team and individual performance development inclusive of formal training, clinical supervision and regular team meetings.

 Key Requirements

  • Current AHPRA registration as a Registered Nurse and/or Midwife
  • Demonstrated high level of nursing practice in maternal and/or child and family health within a comprehensive primary health care context
  • Experience in the provision of mentoring and leadership to a team of health professionals, preferably including clinical supervision and reflective practice
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander co-workers, clients and communities

Click here to download the Job Description

Click her to download the Application Form

Enquiries about the role can be addressed to Virginia Healy at virginiah@nunku.org.au or on (08) 84061600.

Applications to include completed Application Form, Resume and Covering Letter including a brief overview against the key requirements above.

Applications to be forwarded to Ms Jynaya Smith, Human Resource Administration Officer C/o Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc, PO Box 7202, Hutt Street, Adelaide, SA 5000 or Email: jynayam@nunku.org.au

Note – current driver’s license and National Police Check required prior to employment

ABORIGINAL PEOPLE ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY

APPLICATIONS CLOSE DATE – FRIDAY 7th JULY 2017

2. Broome Project Coordinator – Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial

Job No: 90286
Location: Broome, WA
Employment Status: Full-time
Closing Date: 10 Jul 2017
  • Rewarding and varied role with the region’s leading provider of Aboriginal health services!
  • Attractive remuneration circa $81,682 – $96,948 base, PLUS district allowance AND accommodation allowances!
  • Do you want to really make a difference in your career? This is a unique opportunity to work with Indigenous communities in the spectacular Kimberley region!

About the Organisation

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services LTD (KAMS) is a well-established regional Aboriginal community controlled health service, founded in 1986, which provides centralised advocacy and resource support for 6 independent member services, as well as providing direct clinical services in a further 6 remote Aboriginal communities across the region.

KAMS has successfully delivered high-quality, accessible comprehensive primary health care services over its 30 years of operation and has provided innovation and national leadership in areas such as health information management and evidence-based best practice in primary health care.

About Broome

Broome is located 2,240km north of Perth and has a permanent population of 14,436. Broome promotes a relaxed and easy-going lifestyle, with nearby shopping centres, Sunday markets as well as a broad range of restaurants and entertainment options. It is founded on the traditional lands of the Yaruwu people and is rich in history, culture and beautiful surrounds.

Broome has a deep history in the pearling industry, spanning back to the 1800’s, with memorials throughout the town to commemorate those lost in the early years of pearling. Cable Beach is also a must-see, being named in honour of the Java-to-Australia undersea telegraph cable that reaches shore there. You can explore its beautiful scenery with a bit of 4WDing at low tide, or you can even take a camel ride every day at sunset!

Roebuck Bay is known as one of the most beautiful beaches that surround Broome, with its “Staircase to the moon” phenomenon drawing food and craft markets each time it occurs. The combination of a receding tide and rising moon create a natural phenomenon that can only be described as breath-taking.

About the Opportunity

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd (KAMS) has a truly rewarding opportunity for a Project Coordinator – Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial to join their team in Broome, WA. This is a full-time, fixed term role to 30 June, 2018.

This position has an indirect report to the Executive Steering Group of the Kimberley Suicide Prevention Working Group. The Working Group is charged to set strategy and oversee the Kimberley Suicide Prevention Trial in accordance with the parameters described in the National Suicide Prevention Trial Background and Overview, April 2017.

Reporting to the Deputy CEO, you will be responsible for delivering project deliverables and progress reports in accordance with the agreed project timeline set by the Steering Group. This will involve a range of project coordination and community development tasks.

Some of these tasks will include (but will not be limited to):

  • Identifying needs and service gaps, and community strengths and assets, and support for service mapping activities;
  • Facilitating stakeholder engagement;
  • Collecting and analysing local and regional data;
  • Developing detailed planning, schedules and resource requirements for identified projects;
  • Providing high-level reports, strategic policy, and advice;
  • Ensuring the Program works within the identified KAMS values and is culturally safe; and
  • Delivering the position’s work plan within the approved budget and financial delegations.

To be successful you will need:

  • A qualification in Community Development, Health or related discipline;
  • Demonstrated skill and experience in managing diverse and high level stakeholders at a regional level;
  • Demonstrated ability in project management and monitoring and evaluating a regional program using both qualitative and quantitative techniques, including participatory action research methodologies;
  • Self-motivation and the ability to organise own workload with minimal direction;
  • Excellent problem-solving skills including a high level of conceptual and analytical ability; and
  • Demonstrated commitment to the principles of Aboriginal Community Control and demonstrated knowledge of cultural safety principles and practices.

KAMS are looking for candidates with well-developed interpersonal and cross-cultural communication skills and the ability to maintain client confidentially at all times within and outside the workplace. Ideally, you will have experience working within an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation or an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Community Organisation and experience working in a mental health or social and emotional wellbeing role, however, this is not mandatory.

A ‘C’ Class Driver’s License, Federal Police Clearance and willingness to travel often by 4WD vehicle and light aircraft will be required.

To download a full position description, please click here. 

Please note: Candidates must address the selection criteria outlined in the position description. Please attach answers in a word document and upload with your application. 

About the Benefits

If you are looking for a change of routine, a change of lifestyle or a new adventure, this is the role for you. You will see and experience more of Australia’s real outback than most people ever will – and get paid to do it!

KAMS is an organisation that truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. In addition, staff development programs are not only encouraged but are often paid for by KAMS. This is a highly attractive opportunity for someone with a desire to develop their professional knowledge and experience in the area of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health!

While you will face diverse new challenges in this role, you will also enjoy an attractive remuneration package circa $81,682 – $96,948 + super. 

There is also a wide range of additional benefits for the role including:

  • District allowances – $2,920 single $5,840 double p.a;
  • Electricity allowance $1,440
  • Accommodation allowance $13,000;
  • Annual Airfares to the value of $1,285 pa (after 12 months of employment).   

Don’t miss this exciting and rewarding opportunity to have a positive impact on the mental health outcomes of Indigenous communities in the spectacular Kimberley region – Apply Now!

Please note: Candidates must respond to the questions below and attach a current resume to be considered.

3-6 Kimberley AMS Four Nurse positions

3. Registered nurse child health and midwife

http://kamsc-dahs.applynow.net.au/jobs/90282-registered-nurse-child-health-and-midwife

4.Registered nurse town clinic

http://kamsc-dahs.applynow.net.au/jobs/89298-registered-nurse-town-clinic

5.Remote schools registered nurse

http://kamsc-dahs.applynow.net.au/jobs/90281-remote-school-registered-nurse

6.Child health nurse

http://applynow.net.au/jobs/90283-child-health-nurse

About the Organisation

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services LTD (KAMS) is a well-established regional Aboriginal community controlled health service, founded in 1986, which provides centralised advocacy and resource support for 6 independent member services, as well as providing direct clinical services in a further 6 remote Aboriginal communities across the region.

KAMS has successfully delivered high-quality, accessible comprehensive primary health care services over its 30 years of operation and has provided innovation and national leadership in areas such as health information management and evidence-based best practice in primary health care.

7. Grafton and Casino Registered Nurse (RN) & Early Childhood Nurse (ECN)

Job No: 89222
Location: Grafton, NSW & Casino, NSW
Closing Date: 12 Jul 2017
  • Take on one of these uniquely rewarding roles and expand your career in Aboriginal Health!
  • Enjoy above award remuneration plus super & salary sacrificing options!
  • Enjoy great work/life balance with Monday to Friday, 35 hour week & family oriented work environment!

About Bulgarr Ngaru

Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (BNMAC) is a not-for-profit Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, providing primary health care services to Aboriginal people throughout the Clarence and Richmond Valleys through its’ network of clinics in Grafton, Casino and Maclean.

With a commitment to promoting health, wellbeing and disease prevention, involving a holistic approach to diagnosis, and the management of illness, Bulgarr Ngaru is a central part of the economic and social fabric of the region

Bulgarr Ngaru employs more than 50 people from local communities across the region including health professionals, clerical, and managerial staff. They are the leading employer of Aboriginal people and workers in the primary health sector in the region and more than 60% of staff members are Aboriginal people.

Building on their current regional network of health facilities and a significant client base, Bulgarr Ngaru looks forward to the next two decades of service development and innovation.

About the Opportunities

Registered Nurse – General Primary Health Care

Bulgarr Ngaru is looking for full-time Registered Nurses to join their teams in Grafton and Casino.

As a Registered Nurse, you will be responsible for assisting clients to address health issues in an holistic way. You’ll work collaboratively with Doctors and Health Workers to develop educational and intervention programs that address the contributory factors to wellness and empower clients to put in place a strategy that will improve their overall health and sense of wellbeing.

More specifically, some of your key duties will include:

  • Working within the treatment room and on outreach clinics taking and recording clinical data;
  • Performing patient recalls;
  • Undertaking Health Assessments and Care Plans;
  • Working alongside the Medical Officers to ensure efficient and effective primary health care to clients of the organisation, outreach clinics and in clients’ homes as required;
  • Implementing treatment room protocols to ensure optimum infection control, quality primary health care and patient monitoring and immunisations; and
  • Ensuring compliance with Accreditation procedures regarding cold chain monitoring, drug cabinet and doctor’s bag ordering and monitoring.

The successful RN candidates will be Registered Nurses with AHPRA Registration and relevant post-graduate experience in either an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation or General Practice. Knowledge of clinical accreditation is required, and experience with organisational accreditation processes will be highly regarded.

Importantly, you’ll have a comprehensive understanding of the primary health needs, early intervention, psychosocial and cultural issues impacting on Aboriginal families, and a genuine desire to further your experience in the area of Aboriginal Health. The ability to work closely with Aboriginal Health Workers as an integral part of the team will be well regarded.

Your highly developed interpersonal and liaison skills will ensure your ability to build strong working relationships with service providers, clients and other key stakeholders.

The ideal applicants will radiate patience and adaptability, and will be the type of person who thrives in busy, varied and often unpredictable work environment. Team players who are willing to jump into any task at hand will fit well within Bulgarr Ngaru‘s dynamic team.

Although not essential, knowledge of / experience with Practice Incentive and Service Incentive Payments (Diabetes and Asthma Cycles of Care) would be well regarded.

Early Childhood Nurse

Bulgarr Ngaru is also looking for a full-time Early Childhood Nurse to join their team in Casino.

Due to the nature of this role, applicants are required to be female. In this position, an applicant’s gender is a genuine occupational qualification and is authorised by section 31 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1997.

This position will be responsible for working within the New Directions Mothers and Babies Services – a service that provides Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with young children access to a range of child and maternal care.

You’ll be responsible for providing a coordinated assessment, identifying goals, planning strategies, and implementing and evaluating nursing care of children and families by:

  • Monitoring the growth, development and health status of the child (0 to 5 years of age) within the context of the family;
  • Providing pre and post-natal support, advice, health information, first line counselling (where appropriate) and referral of mothers and families to relevant service providers; and
  • Actively promoting and providing a holistic approach to care.

The successful ECN will be a Registered Nurse with AHPRA Registration, and will hold recognised qualifications in Child and Family Health Nursing. A background in working with families and young children, particularly within a community setting, will be essential for your success.

It is essential that you have the ability to effectively and sensitively communicate with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and have a comprehensive understanding of the primary health needs, early intervention, psychosocial and cultural issues impacting on Aboriginal families. Due to the nature of the role, you must also have demonstrated experience working specifically with Aboriginal children and their families.

Additionally, it’s important you have the ability to plan and coordinate client care, while operating effectively within a multidisciplinary team. Effective communication skills and competency in the use of computer programs will ensure your success.

Please note: Candidates for both roles must be willing to provide outreach services on a rotating roster, and a current driver’s license is required. Accreditation as a Registered Nurse Immuniser (or the willingness to obtain this qualification within six months of employment) is also a requirement for both positions.

About the Benefits

If you are looking for a new challenge, a change of lifestyle or a new adventure, this is the role for you. You’ll love being surrounded by stunning beaches on one side and glorious mountains and rivers on the other, with the Gold Coast, Brisbane and Sydney all a quick hop, skip and a jump away!

Bulgarr Ngaru truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. You will have access to genuine ongoing training opportunities and professional development.

In return for your hard work and dedication, you’ll be rewarded with an above award, attractive remuneration plus super, salary sacrificing and access to an employee assistance program.

Bulgarr Ngaru offers a family friendly, supportive workplace with strong community ties, and a 35-hour Monday to Friday week, ensuring you achieve a healthy work/life balance.

This is an excellent opportunity to enhance your cultural knowledge in a stunning location. Make a positive difference – Apply Now!

Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islanders are strongly encouraged to apply.

8-10 Brisbane :North Stradbroke Island part of the Yulu-Burri-Ba team?

Yulu-Burri-Ba, in collaboration with ATSICHS Brisbane will be providing Family Wellbeing Services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community within the North Stradbroke Island and Bayside catchment area.

The aim of this new service is to provide family wellbeing targeted interventions to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in our community who are experiencing family wellbeing challenges.

To deliver these new services, Yulu-Burri-Ba has created three new positions:

Click the position title to download the corresponding Position Description

  1. Family Wellbeing Care Coordinator / Lead Case Worker – Identified position*
  2. In-home Family Mentor – Identified position*
  3. Family Counsellor – Indigenous person preferred

Why work for Yulu-Burri-Ba?

We can offer you:

  • An opportunity to make a difference to the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families
  • Ability to salary sacrifice
  • A positive, supportive and learning work environment
  • Challenging and rewarding employment

 

How to apply

Please send us your resume and a covering letter addressing why you would be the best person for the job.

Applications close

Wednesday, 5 July 2017 – 9AM

Need more information?

Email us at mailto:HR@ybb.com.auor call the Human Resource Team on (07) 3409 9596

*This position is identified to be filled by an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Disability #NDIS : ACCHO Submissions to #NDIS close 12 July 2017

 ” This position paper outlines the Productivity Commission’s early thinking on NDIS costs. The purpose of this position paper is to seek feedback on the Commission’s preliminary conclusions, and on any additional issues that should be considered before the public release of the final study report.

This position paper was released on 14 June 2017. You are invited to examine the paper and to make a written submission or comment by Wednesday 12 July 2017.”

People who want to comment or make a submission for the final report, due to be released in September, can do so at pc.gov.au

Download the PC Overview and Position paper here

ndis-costs-position-overview

ndis-costs-position

or Download MS Word copies here

‘The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is a major, complex national reform — the largest social reform in Australia since the introduction of Medicare,’

Social Policy Commissioner Richard Spencer

 ” For Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people living with disability and their carers, this is a much-needed conversation.

FPDN estimates 60,000 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people will potentially be eligible for NDIS. Whilst there might be new opportunities for First Peoples through the NDIS, such as a growth in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health and disability services workforce, valid concerns are being raised.

Some of these include how effective NDIS rollout will be in rural and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and concerns of eligibility criteria not being inclusive or culturally relevant for First Peoples living with disabilities ”

See all NACCHO posts Disability NDIS

OR

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #disability and @NDIS : Your Top 10 Questions answered about the National Disability Insurance Scheme

 ” For many, language barriers can prevent meaningful engagement with planning processes. Neami National (sub. 63, p. 6) said that ‘consumers without English as their first language describe difficulties in participating in planning and in getting plans that they can fully implement on account of their language needs’.

This is an issue which disproportionately affects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: English is a second language for many Indigenous people in remote communities. The majority of participants in Barkly identify as being Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander and for 67% English is not their first language. Many have limited capacity to understand or read it.

This has a significant impact on their ability to have genuine input into the formulation of their plans and also impacts on decision making and choice. (Brain Injury SA, sub. 116, p. 3) “

From Page 172 Submission

.

In 2020, when the NDIS is fully rolled out, around 475 000 people with disability are expected to receive individualised supports, at an estimated cost of $22 billion per year.

In a position paper released today, the Commission finds that while it is early days in the transition to full scheme, the NDIS is on track in terms of costs.

KEY POINTS

  • The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is a complex and highly valued national reform. The scale, pace and nature of the changes it is driving are unprecedented in Australia. If implemented well, it will substantially improve the wellbeing of people with disability and Australians more generally.
  • The level of commitment to the success and sustainability of the NDIS is extraordinary. This is important because ‘making it work’ is not only the responsibility of the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA), but also that of governments, participants, families and carers, providers, and the community.
  • Based on trial and transition data, NDIS costs are broadly on track with the NDIA’s long-term modelling. While there are some emerging cost pressures (such as higher numbers of children entering the scheme), the NDIA has put in place initiatives to address them. The benefits of the NDIS are also becoming apparent. Early evidence suggests that many (but not all) NDIS participants are receiving more disability supports than previously, and they have more choice and control.
  • Nevertheless, the speed of the NDIS rollout, as specified in Bilateral Agreements between governments, has put the scheme’s success and financial sustainability at risk. It has resulted in the NDIA focusing too much on meeting participant intake estimates and not enough on planning processes, supporting infrastructure and market development.
    • This focus is manifest in poor outcomes such as confusion for many participants about planning processes; rushed phone planning conversations; inadequate pre-planning support for participants; problems for providers with registering, pricing and receiving payment; and a lack of effective communication with both participants and providers.
  • For the scheme to achieve its objectives, the NDIA must find a better balance between participant intake, the quality of plans, participant outcomes, and financial sustainability. Steps are now being taken by the NDIA to better balance these aspects. Greater emphasis is needed on pre-planning, in-depth planning conversations, plan quality reporting, and more specialised training for planners. The Commission is unable to form a judgment on whether such a refocus can be achieved while also meeting the rollout timetable.
  • The interface between the NDIS and other disability and mainstream services is also critical for participant outcomes and the financial sustainability of the scheme. Some disability supports are not being provided because of unclear boundaries about the responsibilities of the different levels of government. Governments must set clearer boundaries at the operational level around ‘who supplies what’ to people with disability, and only withdraw when continuity of service is assured.
  • A significant challenge is growing the disability care workforce required to deliver the scheme — it is estimated that 1 in 5 new jobs created in Australia over the next few years will need to be in the disability care sector. Present policy settings are unlikely to see enough providers and workers as the scheme rolls out. Some emerging shortages need to be mitigated by better price monitoring and regulation; better tailored responses to thin markets; formal and informal carers allowed to provide more paid care; and a targeted approach to skilled migration.
  • NDIS funding arrangements could better reflect the insurance principles of the scheme, including by allowing more flexibility around the NDIA’s operational budget and providing a pool of reserves. Funding contributions made ‘in-kind’ must be phased out.

 

‘While there are some emerging cost pressures, such as higher than expected numbers of children entering the scheme, the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) has put in place initiatives to address these cost pressures,’ Commissioner Angela MacRae said.

‘Given the extraordinary scale, pace and nature of the changes the scheme is driving, we are seeing some big challenges. A key concern is the speed of the rollout and its impact on the experience of participants and providers through the planning process, plan quality and market development,’ Mr Spencer said.

‘A real challenge is growing the disability care workforce needed to deliver the scheme. As many as one in five new jobs created in Australia over the next few years will need to be in the disability sector. There are unlikely to be enough providers and workers as the scheme rolls out under current policy settings,’ Mrs MacRae said.

The paper finds that the NDIA must place greater emphasis on pre-planning, in-depth planning conversations, plan quality reporting, and more specialised training for planners. And governments must set clearer boundaries around who supplies what, so that people with a disability are assured of continuity of service.

‘Everyone wants the NDIS to work, but there are challenges to be overcome and work is needed by all governments. Putting the enormous goodwill behind the NDIS into action is needed now more than ever,’ Mr Spencer said.

The Productivity Commission’s position paper is National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Costs.

People who want to comment or make a submission for the final report, due to be released in September, can do so at pc.gov.au

Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek @HeartAust @CancerCouncilOz : Make sure you have a regular #ACCHO health check fellas !

 ” Heart disease was the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who experience and die from cardiovascular disease at much higher rates than other Australians.

When compared with other Australians, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were 1.3 times as likely to have cardiovascular disease, three times more likely to have a major coronary event, such as a heart attack and more than twice as likely to die in hospital from coronary heart disease.”

Aboriginal Chronic Care Officer with Northern NSW Local Health District, Anthony Franks speaking at the #MensHealthWeek Heart Foundation sponsored workshop in Grafton : Workshop photos Colin Cowell NACCHO media

Part 1 Heart Foundation Aboriginal Resources

We have a a variety of information sheets about heart conditions and risk factors for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

View and download the PDFs here, or call our Health Information Service on 1300 36 27 87 to order copies.

Part 2 For Cancer Council info see separate NACCHO Men’s Health promotion below

Let’s face it, your nuts don’t get a lot of love.

Give them a bit of a feel, it’s the polite thing to do. If something doesn’t feel right, go see an ACCHO  doctor. It’s an important step in detecting testicular cancer early

See info below or here

Pictured above Dave Ferguson from NACCHO Member Service  Bulgarr Ngaru AMS : Below some of the workshop participants with trainee doctors from Wollongong University experiencing Aboriginal health prevention

ABORIGINAL and Torres Strait Islander men are 19 times more likely to die from chronic rheumatic heart disease, so a series of workshops in Ballina and Grafton was held to raise awareness of the risk factors for heart disease among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men.

It’s all part of a program across Northern NSW for Men’s Health Week which will run from June 12-19.

The workshops provided a comfortable environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men to learn and ask questions about ways to reduce their chances of experiencing heart disease.

All workshop participants had to complete a health questionnaire and have a blood pressure test

“The idea of these workshops is to raise awareness around the different signs and symptoms of heart disease, and also around prevention and management of the disease,” Mr Franks said,

“This is a new, collaborative approach to addressing this issue, working together with existing avenues such as healthy lifestyle and exercise programs to assist participants to make the most of what they’ll be learning.”

At the workshops men will learn about the importance of heart health checks, stress reduction, quitting smoking and healthy eating from community health practitioners, hospital cardiac nurses, and other health practitioners in a culturally safe environment.

Examples of Men’s Health Week International

 

See Link or read below

What is testicular cancer?

Testicular cancer is the second most common cancer in young men (aged 18 to 39).1

The most common type is seminoma, which usually occurs in men aged between 25 and 50 years. The other main type is non-seminoma, which is more common in younger men, usually in their 20s.

In 2013, 721 new cases of testicular cancer were diagnosed in Australia. For Australian men, the risk of being diagnosed with testicular cancer by age 85 is 1 in 218. The rate of men diagnosed with testicular cancer has grown by more than 50% over the past 30 years, however the reason for this is not known.

The five-year survival rate for men diagnosed with testicular cancer is close to 98%.

In 2014, there were 23 deaths from testicular cancer.


Testicular cancer symptoms

Testicular cancer may cause no symptoms. The most common symptom is a painless swelling or a lump in a testicle.

Less common symptoms include:

  • feeling of heaviness in the scrotum
  • swelling or lump in the testicle
  • change in the size or shape of the testicle
  • feeling of unevenness
  • pain or ache in the lower abdomen, the testicle or scrotum
  • back pain
  • enlargement or tenderness of the breast tissue (due to hormones created by cancer cells).

Causes of testicular cancer

Some factors that may increase a man’s risk of testicular cancer include:

  • undescended testicle (when an infant)
  • family history (having a father or brother who has had testicular cancer).

There is no known link between testicular cancer and injury to the testicles, sporting strains, hot baths or wearing tight clothes.


Diagnosis for testicular cancer

Tests used to diagnose testicular cancer include:

  • ultrasound (to confirm the presence of a mass) and
  • blood tests for the tumour markers alpha-fetoprotein, beta human chorionic gonadotrophin and lactate dehydrogenase.

However, the only way to definitely diagnose testicular cancer is by surgical removal of the affected testicle. While many other types of cancers are diagnosed by biopsy (removing a small piece of tissue from the tumour), cutting into a testicle could spread the cancer to other parts of the body. Hence the whole testicle needs to be removed if cancer is strongly suspected.


Treatment for testicular cancer

Staging

In addition to the results of the diagnostic tests above, a chest X-ray and CT scans of the chest, abdomen and pelvis are done to determine whether and how far the cancer has spread.

Stage 1 means the cancer is found only in the testicle, stage 2 means it has spread to the lymph nodes in the abdomen or pelvis, and stage 3 means the cancer has spread beyond the lymph nodes to other areas of the body such as the lungs and liver.

If the cancer is found only in the testicle (stage 1), removal of the testicle (orchidectomy) may be the only treatment needed. If the cancer has spread beyond the testicle, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy may be used as well.

Treatment team

Depending on your treatment, your treatment team may include a number of the following professionals:

  • GP who looks after your general health and coordinates specialist treatment
  • urologist who specialises in the treatment of diseases of the urinary system and male reproductive system
  • medical oncologist who prescribes chemotherapy treatment
  • radiation oncologist who prescribes radiation therapy
  • cancer nurses
  • endocrinologist who specialises in diagnoses and treatment of disorders of the endocrine system. For men who have had both testicles removed, this will include testosterone replacement
  • other health professionals such as dietitians, social workers and physiotherapists.

Palliative care

In some cases of testicular cancer, your medical team may talk to you about palliative care. Palliative care aims to improve your quality of life by alleviating symptoms of cancer.

As well as slowing the spread of testicular cancer, palliative treatment can relieve pain and help manage other symptoms. Treatment may include radiotherapy, chemotherapy or other drug therapies.


Screening for testicular cancer

There is no routine screening test for testicular cancer. While it is important to get to know the regular look and feel of your testicles and let your doctor know if you notice anything unusual, there is little evidence to suggest that testicular self-examination detects cancer earlier or improves outcomes.

 


Prognosis for testicular cancer

Prognosis means the expected outcome of a disease. An individual’s prognosis depends on the type and stage of cancer as well as their age and general health at the time of diagnosis. You may wish to discuss your prognosis and treatment options with your doctor, but it is not possible for any doctor to predict the exact course of your disease.

All testicular cancers can be treated and most testicular cancers are successfully treated.


Preventing testicular cancer

There are no proven measures to prevent testicular cancer.


Source

Understanding Testicular Cancer, Cancer Council Australia © 2016. Last medical review of source booklet: September 2016.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) 2017. Cancer in Australia 2017. Cancer series no. 101. Cat. no. CAN 100. Canberra: AIHW.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. ACIM (Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality) Books. Canberra: AIHW.

1) Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, which is the most commonly diagnosed cancer according to general practice and hospitals data, however there is no reporting of cases to cancer registries.

 

Aboriginal Health and #prevention : New report : @Prevention1stAU health : How much does Australia spend and is it enough?

 ” The verdict is in: Prevention is better than cure when it comes to tackling Australia’s chronic disease burden, but is Australia pulling its weight when it comes to tackling the nation’s greatest public health challenge?

A new economic report looking at what Australia invests in preventive health has found Australia ranks poorly on the world stage and has determined that governments must spend more wisely to contain the burgeoning healthcare budget.

Treating chronic disease costs the Australian community an estimated $27 billion annually, accounting for more than a third of our national health budget.

Yet Australia currently spends just over $2 billion on preventive health each year, or around $89 per person.

One in two Australians suffer from chronic disease, which is responsible for 83 per cent of all premature deaths in Australia, and accounts for 66 per cent of the burden of disease.”

The report, Preventive health: How much does Australia spend and is it enough? was co-funded by the Heart Foundation, Kidney Australia, Alzheimer’s Australia, the Australia Health Promotion Association and the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education.

Download the report HERE

Preventive-health-How-much-does-Australia-spend-and-is-it-enough_FINAL

Produced by La Trobe University’s Department of Public Health, the report examines trends in preventive health spending, comparing Australia’s spending on preventive health, as well as the funding models used, against selected Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries.

The report also explores the question: ‘how much should Australia be spending on preventive health?’

Treating chronic disease costs the Australian community an estimated $27 billion annually, accounting for more than a third of our national health budget.

Yet Australia currently spends just over $2 billion on preventive health each year, or around $89 per person. At just 1.34 per cent of Australian healthcare expenditure, the amount is considerably less than OECD countries Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, with Australia ranked 16th out of 31 OECD countries by per capita expenditure.

Michael Thorn, Chief Executive of the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE), a founding member organisation of the Prevention 1st campaign, says that when looking at Australia’s spend on prevention, it should be remembered that one third of all chronic diseases are preventable and can be traced to four lifestyle risk factors: alcohol and tobacco use, physical inactivity and poor nutrition.

“We know that by positively addressing and influencing lifestyle factors such as physical activity, diet, tobacco and   alcohol consumption, we will significantly reduce the level of heart disease, stroke, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, lung disease and type 2 diabetes; conditions that are preventable, all too common, and placing great pressure on Australian families and on Australia’s healthcare systems,” Mr Thorn said.

Report co-author, Professor Alan Shiell says we should not simply conclude that Australia should spend more on preventive health simply because we spend less than equivalent nations, and instead argues that Australia could and should spend more on preventive health measures based on the evidence of the cost effectiveness of preventive health intervention.

“The key to determining the appropriate prevention spend is to compare the added value of an increase in spending on preventive health against the opportunity cost of doing so.

“If the value of the increased spending on preventive health is greater than the opportunity cost, then there is a strong case to do so,” Professor Shiell said.

Professor Shiell says there is clear evidence that many existing preventive health initiatives are cost-effective.

“Studies suggest Australia’s health could be improved and spending potentially even reduced if government was to act on existing policy recommendations and increase spending on activities already considered cost-effective.

“We also suspect that the choice of funding mechanism, or how money is allocated to whom for prevention – is an important factor for the overall efficiency of health prevention expenditure,” Professor Shiell said.

The report highlights England’s efforts in evaluating and monitoring the cost effectiveness and success of its public health interventions and Mr Thorn believes Australia would do well to follow their lead.

“In the United Kingdom we have a conservative government no less, showing tremendous leadership to tackle chronic disease, with bold policy measures like the recently introduced sugar tax and broad-based physical activity programs, all of which are underpinned by robust institutional structures,” Mr Thorn said.

The report will be launched at a Forum at Parliament House in Canberra today, where public health experts, including the World Health Organization’s Dr Alessandro Demaio will explain how they would invest in preventive health if given $100 million to spend.

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Events / Workshops #SaveADate : #NACCHOAgm17@IAHA_National @NATSIHWA @AIDAAustralia #Health Conferences

 
14 June Prevention 1st program: Parliament House Canberra ( Bookings closed )

21 June Broadband for the bush Forum- Indigenous Focus Day

21 June Consumer Health Forum Australia Webinar Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) Review.

28 June National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers

1-2 July Aboriginal Health Conference  Perth

8 July Deadly Choices / The Long Walk Brisbane

2-9 July NAIDOC WEEK

8-9 July myPHN Conference 2017 – National health conference

7 July Awabakal 40th Anniversary Dinner

4 August : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s day

8-9 August 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis Alaska in August 2017

20-23 September AIDA Conference 2017

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

 18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra Details to be released soon (May 2017)

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

 

If you have a Conference, Workshop Funding opportunity or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media

mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

14 June   Launch Parliament House Canberra

One in two Australians are living with a chronic disease. Dealing with these diseases comes at an estimated $27 billion cost to the Australian community and accounts for more than a third (36 per cent) of our national health budget.

Join us at the Prevention 1st Forum to find out how much Australia spends on preventive health and what we need to do to address the looming health crisis of chronic disease.

Download the Program PREVENTION-1ST-PROGRAM-FINAL-2017

The forum will include a launch of the La Trobe University report, Preventive health: How much does Australia spend and is it enough? by health economist Professor Alan Shiell.

Hear leading public health experts make their pitch; how would they invest in preventive health if they had $100 million to spend?

Representatives from the Coalition, Labor Party and The Greens have been invited to outline their plans for preventive health measures to tackle our nation’s greatest health challenge.

Please call FARE on 02 6122 8600 if you have any questions about this event.

Bookings closed

21 June Broadband for the bush Forum- Indigenous Focus Day

Where:   Esplanade Hotel, 46-54 Marine Terrace, Fremantle WA
 
Cost:  Free (lunch provided)
 
RSVP:  By Friday 9 June to forum@broadbandforthebush.com.au 
Download the invitation Indigenous Focus Day-Invitation

 
Topic:   A day of sharing stories, experiences and ideas about the pathway to digital inclusion for remote and regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The day will be facilitated by Christine Ross, with a great program including Welcome to Country by Noel Nannup, Keynote by Professor Leonard Collard and 13 short presentations from across remote and regional Australia.

This will provide the background for four group discussions on the obstacles to digital inclusion, innovative solutions, and an action plan for a Indigenous Digital Inclusion Strategy for Remote and Regional Australia.

If you would like to be part of this conversation, we would love to hear from you.
 
For more information see: www.broadbandforthebush.com.au

21 June Consumer Health Forum Australia Webinar Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) Review

Join us for a webinar about the latest work and future directions of the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) Review. 12.00 Pm to 1.00 PM

In April 2015, the then Minister for Health established the MBS Review Taskforce to consider how the more than 5,700 services listed in the MBS can be aligned with contemporary clinical evidence and practice, and improve health outcomes for patients.
The Taskforce recently released its latest set of reports for public consultation until 21 July 2017. These six reports cover:  renal medicine; spinal surgery; dermatology, allergy and immunology; diagnostic imaging of the knee; diagnostic imaging for pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis; and urgent after-hours services.

Further details about the consultation process; copies of the six reports, their factsheets and summaries for consumers; and access to the online surveys are all available at:

The webinar will include a presentation from Professor Bruce Robinson, Chair of the MBS Review Taskforce, and a consumer representative involved in the Review process.
In order to participate in the webinar, you need to register on our website by COB on 20 June. Register here: https://chf.org.au/events/webinar-mbs-review

 28 June National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers
 

REGISTER NOW for Upcoming NATSIHWA Forums

PROGRAM

Join the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) for a one day CPD networking workshop focussed on current workforce development opportunities.

Upskill and strengthen your skill level in a specialised area and find out what is happening through program development, education and funding opportunities.

Hear from organisations such as: PHN Primary Heath Network, CranaPlus, Autism QLD, Rheumatic Heart, PEPA Program of Experience in the Palliative Approach, Aboriginal Learning Circle, Diabetes Australia, IBA Indigenous Business Australia, HESTA Superannuation, 1800 RESPECT, Hearing Australia and more to be annuonced in the coming months (tailored for your specific region).

Current topics on the agenda:

Who is NATSIHWA? – an update on what is happening on a national level.

NATSIHWA Membership Benefits – Why join? Access to online members portal, web resources, weekly eNewsletter and social media.

Scope of Practice – An update on the development of the national framework for the scope of practice for ATSIHW’s and ATSIHP’s.

AHPRA – Who is AHPRA and what do they do? Why register with AHPRA? CPD requirements of ongoing registration.

Modern Award – An update on the progress of the modern award process with Fair Work Australia.

Workforce Development – Career development, training opportunities, CPD Points, GNARTN Tool, Scholarships.

REGISTER – CAIRNS
REGISTER – DUBBO
REGISTER – DARWIN
REGISTER – BRISBANE
REGISTER – ADELAIDE
REGISTER – SHEPPARTON
 1-2 July Aboriginal Health Conference  Perth .
Join medical practitioners, health professionals, educators, researchers and Indigenous leaders who are committed to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Australians.

The 2017 Aboriginal Conference theme, champions | connection | culture, will be explored through inspiring keynote speakers, relevant clinical updates, educational workshops and clinical problem-based case study learning opportunities.

With a focus on chronic conditions that have a large impact on the health and quality of life for Aboriginal Australians, the program will also feature best practice updates, emerging trends, psychological wellbeing and support workshops, and hands-on training and clinical practice. The program will be available online soon!

For more information and to register, visit

www.ruralhealthwest.com.au/conferences or contact the Events team via email, events@ruralhealthwest.com.au.
8 July Deadly Choices / The Long Walk Brisbane

Did you know that each year the AFL holds an Indigenous round – the Sir Doug Nicholls Round – aimed at building bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians?

The Brisbane Lions had an away game for this year’s Sir Doug Nicholls round, so they’re holding their own home game Indigenous round during NAIDOC week, after the Long Walk.

Don’t miss out on this event! Register for the Long Walk now (via the AFL Queensland website) and get a free ticket to the football after the walk!

www.aflq.com.au

2-9 July NAIDOC WEEK
17_naidoc_logo_stacked-01

The importance, resilience and richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages will be the focus of national celebrations marking NAIDOC Week 2017.

The 2017 theme – Our Languages Matter – aims to emphasise and celebrate the unique and essential role that Indigenous languages play in cultural identity, linking people to their land and water and in the transmission of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, spirituality and rites, through story and song.

More info about events

8-9 July myPHN Conference 2017 – National health conference

 

myPHN Conference 2017: Transforming healthcare together will attract more than 40 expert health speakers and around 400 delegates from across the nation at the Pullman Reef Hotel Casino from 8-9 July.

The second annual national Primary Health Network (PHN) conference will explore the ever changing landscape of health across Australia, focusing on current health reforms, the future of digital health, and what they mean for healthcare providers and the wider community.

It will be officially opened by the Honourable Ken Wyatt MP, Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

Conference Chair, Professor Brian Dolan, will lead the interactive two-day program which also includes pre-conference workshops, a myPHN networking event, and a Digital Health Breakfast.

Key streams include social determinants of health, partnerships in primary health, and digital and data innovation.

myPHN Conference Steering Committee Chair Trent Twomey said the conference will deliver unique opportunities for health providers to access keynote speakers addressing a wide range of key health issues.

“We’re proud to once again bring the annual national PHN conference to the region, and it’s a real coup for Cairns to be able to welcome such an array of health experts,” said Mr Twomey.

“In one weekend, delegates will be able to get up to speed on crucial primary health topics by listening, engaging and connecting with fellow health industry professionals.

“myPHN Conference 2017 will address how we can work together to provide optimum service to patients through a series of purposeful workshops and presentations.

“After a sell-out inaugural event in 2016, myPHN Conference will this year deliver a bigger and even better program to help prepare healthcare providers for the future.”

myPHN Conference 2017, with registrations starting at just $75, is open to a wide range of health professionals, including:

  • general practitioners
  • pharmacists
  • dentists
  • nurses
  • allied health professionals
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers
  • medical administrators
  • policy makers
  • medical educators
  • local government and community advocates
  • medical allied health and nursing students.

“The conference is all about working together to improve the patient journey, ensuring that patients receive the right care, at the right time, and in the right place,” said Mr Twomey.

Advance Cairns Chief Executive Officer Kevin Byrne said the two-day conference was great news for the Cairns economy.

 

“We estimate that this conference will bring approximately $750,000 into the Cairns economy through visiting intrastate and interstate delegates, with local tourism and hospitality businesses set to benefit greatly,” said Mr Byrne.

 

“At this time of the year, Cairns and northern Queensland is a perfect destination for people to visit and experience our amazing natural wonders, and get a taste of the great North Queensland lifestyle.”

Some of the expert speakers presenting at the conference include:

  • Professor Brian Dolan (Director at UK-based organisation Health Service 360 and leader in health systems reform)
  • Michael Moore (CEO at Public Health Association of Australia)
  • Janet Quigley (Acting First Assistant Secretary, Department of Health).

“We would like to invite all health practitioners and their teams to Cairns in magnificent Far North Queensland for high-quality professional skilling and an engaging winter retreat,” added Mr Twomey.

For more information on the conference, including full details of the program, how to register, and trade/sponsorship opportunities, visit the official website at www.myphn.com.au or the conference’s Facebook, Twitter or Instagram pages.

 

4 August each year, Children’s Day

SNAICC has announced the theme for this year’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s day

Held on 4 August each year, Children’s Day has been celebrated across the country since 1988 and is Australia’s largest national day to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

The theme for Children’s Day 2017 is Value Our Rights, Respect Our Culture, Bring Us Home which recognises the 20th anniversary of the Bringing them Home Report and the many benefits our children experience when they are raised with strong connections to family and culture.

8-9 August 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis Alaska USA

2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis in Anchorage Alaska in August 2017 after the 1st which was held in Alice Springs in 2014.

Download Brochure Save the date – World Indigenous Hepatitis Conference Final
Further details are available at https://www.wipcvh2017.org/

20-23 September AIDA Conference 2017

The AIDA Conference in 2017 will celebrate 20 years since the inception of AIDA. Through the theme Family. Unity. Success. 20 years strong we will reflect on the successes that have been achieved over the last 20 years by being a family and being united. We will also look to the future for AIDA and consider how being a united family will help us achieve all the work that still needs to be done in growing our Indigenous medical students, doctors, medical academics and specialists and achieving better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This conference will be an opportunity to bring together our members, guests, speakers and partners from across the sector to share in the reflection on the past and considerations for the future. The conference will also provide a platform to share our individual stories, experiences and achievements in a culturally safe environment.

Conference website

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

catsinam

Contact info for CATSINAM

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

We are pleased to announce the 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference will be held at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa in Broome, Western Australia, from 18 to 20 October 2017.

THE FUTURE OF REMOTE HEALTH AND THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY

Since the organisation’s inception in 1982 this event has served to create an opportunity for likeminded remote and isolated health individuals who can network, connect and share.

It serves as both a professional and social resource for the Remote and Isolated Health Workforce of Australia.

We aim to offer an environment that will foster new ideas, promote collegiate relationships, provide opportunities for professional development and celebrate remote health practice.

Conference Website

 

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

‘Translation at the Centre’ An educational symposium

Alice Springs Convention Centre, Alice Springs

This year the Symposium will look at research translation as well as the latest on diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.  The event will be run over a day and a half.
The Educational Symposium will feature a combination of relevant plenary presentations from renowned scientists and clinicians plus practical workshops.

Registration is free but essential.

Please contact the symposium coordinator on 1300 728 900 (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) or via email at events@baker.edu.au  

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

Details to be released

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

iaha

Abstracts for the IAHA 2017 National Conference are now open!

We are calling for abstracts for concurrent oral presentations and workshops under the following streams:
– Care
– Cultures
– Connection

For abstract more information visit the IAHA Conference website at: https://iahaconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

 

save-a-date

NACCHO #Aboriginal Health and #Immunisation @AIHW reports Aboriginal children aged 5 national immunisation rate of 94.6%

 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffer a disproportionate burden from communicable diseases (diseases that can be transmitted from person to person), with rates of hospitalisation and illness due to these conditions many times higher than other Australians.1

Part 2  below presents results for children who were identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander on the AIR. “

 In 2015–16, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5 had an even higher national immunisation rate of 94.6%. However, there was wider variation across PHN areas, ranging from 98.8% in the Gold Coast (Qld) to 89.4% in Western Victoria.”

Download Healthy Communities:

AIHW_HC_Report_Imm_Rates_June_2017

See Previous NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WorldImmunisationWeek : @healthgovau Vaccination for our Mob

Part 1 Overview MORE INFO HERE

Immunisation is a safe and effective way to protect children from harmful infectious diseases and at the population level, prevent the spread of these diseases amongst the community.

Australia has generally high immunisation rates which have increased steadily over time, but rates continue to lag in some local areas.

This report focuses on local area immunisation rates for children aged 5 and shows changes in immunisation rates over time. It also presents 2015–16 immunisation rates for all children and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 1, 2 and 5.

Results are presented for the 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas. Where possible they are broken down into smaller geographic areas, including for more than 300 smaller areas and across Australian postcodes.

Further detailed rates are available in the downloadable Excel sheet and a new interactive web tool allows users to compare results over time by geography and age group.

This local-level information assists professionals to use their knowledge and context for their area, to target areas in need and develop effective local strategies for improvement.

The report finds:

  • Since 2011–12, childhood immunisation rates have improved nationally and across smaller areas, for all children and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Variation in rates still exists across local areas, however the gap between those areas with the highest and lowest rates is diminishing
  • Nationally 92.9% of all children aged 5 were immunised in 2015–16. All PHN areas achieved an immunisation rate of 90% or more, ranging from 96.1% in Western NSW to 90.3% in North Coast (NSW).

Summary

In 2015–16, childhood immunisation rates continued to improve nationally and in most local areas. Although rates vary across local areas, the gap in rates between the highest and lowest areas is diminishing.

This report focuses on immunisation rates for 5 year olds and presents results since 2011–12. It also provides the latest information for 1, 2 and 5 year olds for Australia’s 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas and smaller local areas.

From 2011–12 to 2015–16, there were notable improvements in rates for fully immunised 5 year olds. National rates increased from 90.0% to 92.9%. Rates increased for PHN areas too, as all areas reached rates above 90% in 2015–16.

Rates in smaller local areas (Statistical Areas Level 3, or SA3s) have also improved. In 2015–16, 282 of the 325 local areas had rates of fully immunised 5 year olds greater than or equal to 90%. This is up from 2011–12 when only 174 areas had rates in this range. Further, the difference in rates between the highest and lowest areas has decreased over time (Figure 1).

In 2015–16, the rate of fully immunised children varied across PHN areas for the three age groups:

  • 1 year olds – 95.0% to 89.8% (national rate 93.0%)
  • 2 year olds – 93.2% to 87.2% (national rate 90.7%)
  • 5 year olds – 96.1% to 90.3% (national rate 92.9%).

Part 2 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffer a disproportionate burden from communicable diseases (diseases that can be transmitted from person to person), with rates of hospitalisation and illness due to these conditions many times higher than other Australians.1

This section presents results for children who were identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander on the AIR. These data are based on Medicare enrolment records.

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, national immunisation rates in 2015–16 for 1 and 2 year olds were lower than the rates for all children (89.8% compared with 93.0% for 1 year olds, and 87.7% compared with 90.7% for 2 year olds).

In contrast, the national immunisation rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5 years was higher than the rate for all children (94.6% compared with 92.9%).

Primary Health Network areas

In 2015–16, the percentages of fully immunised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children varied across PHN areas for all three age groups as shown in Figure 6. The range in immunisation rates across PHN areas for the three age groups is outlined below.

  • 1 year olds – 94.2% in Tasmania to 76.1% in Perth North (WA)
  • 2 year olds – 93.4% in South Western Sydney (NSW) to 76.0% in Perth South (WA)
  • 5 year olds – 98.8% in Gold Coast (Qld) to 89.4% in Western Victoria.

Statistical Areas Level 4 (SA4s)

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, Statistical Areas Level 4 (SA4s) were used instead of SA3s as the smallest geographic areas. There are larger populations in SA4s and this allows more reliable reporting for smaller population groups such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Across more than 80 SA4s, the percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children fully immunised in 2015–16 varied considerably:

  • 1 year olds – ranged from 95.9% in Central Coast (NSW) to 72.4% in Perth–North West (WA)
  • 2 year olds – ranged from 96.0% in Coffs Harbour–Grafton (NSW) to 71.2% in Perth–South East (WA)
  • 5 year olds – ranged from 100% in Murray (NSW) to 87.6% in Perth–South East (WA).

Figure 6: Percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children fully immunised and numbers not fully immunised, by Primary Health Network area, 2015–16

# Interpret with caution: This area’s eligible population is between 26 and 100 registered children.

Notes

  • Components may not add to totals due to rounding.
  • Data are reported to one decimal place, however for graphical display and ordering they are plotted unrounded.
  • These data reflect results for children recorded as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander on the AIR. Levels of recording may vary between local areas.

Source Australian Institute of Health and Welfare analysis of Department of Human Services, Australian Immunisation Register statistics, for the period 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016, assessed as at 30 June 2016. Data supplied 2 March 2017.

ADDED June14

Influenza Vaccination During Pregnancy

Vaccination remains the best protection pregnant women and their newborn babies have against influenza.

Despite influenza vaccination being available free to pregnant women on the National Immunisation Program, vaccination rates remain low with only 1 in 3 pregnant women receiving the influenza vaccine.

Influenza infection during pregnancy can lead to premature delivery and even death in newborns and very young babies. Pregnant women can have the vaccine at any time during pregnancy and they benefit from it all through the year.

Health professional:

Pregnant women:

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : MBS Review Taskforce – Next round of public consultation now open

 ” As you are aware, the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) Review Taskforce is considering every one of the more than 5,700 items on the MBS, with a focus of how the items can be better aligned with contemporary clinical evidence and practice to improve health outcomes for all Australians.
 
Today, the recommendations were made available for public consultation for the following clinical committees:
  • Dermatology, Allergy & Immunology
  • Diagnostic Imaging – knee imaging
  • Diagnostic Imaging – pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis
  • Renal Medicine
  • Spinal Surgery
  • Urgent after-hours primary care services funded by the MBS

Examples

The online survey is open from today until Friday July 21, 2017.
 
It is important to note that these recommendations are not final and are being released publicly for the purpose of obtaining stakeholder feedback.

Your input as a stakeholder is critical in shaping the Review. Please use the online surveys (rather than emailing your comments directly) for accuracy and transparency when analysing your feedback.

 

If you have any questions or queries on the Review or the work of the Taskforce please contact the MBS Review Team.