NACCHO Aboriginal Health #VoteACCHO Post #Election2019 Wrap : @abcnews Pat Turner congratulates @ScottMorrisonMP Plus 5 key questions for incoming  government  incl: Future of #UluruStatement and #ClosingThe Gap

“ No one saw it coming. Polling had the election as a win for Labor. Internal polling from the parties had it this way and external polling also had it so.

Exit polls had a 13 seat majority for Labor on Saturday night. They were all wrong. As we saw with Trump and Brexit, polls don’t always know best. On the weekend the Coalition held on.

It secured an election comeback that would have been unbelievable a month ago. 

So based on the Coalitions current Indigenous Policy document what can we expect in the next 3 years

Pat Turner NACCHO CEO was asked this question on ABC New yesterday (19 May ) the day after the “miracle win by Scott Morrison    

We have also compiled from Social media 5 key questions for the PM and his incoming government 

1.Who is going to be the new Indigenous Affairs Minister with the retirement of Nigel Scullion ?

2. Who is going to be the new Indigenous Health Minister ?

3..What is the future of of our Closing the gap Partnership 

” The Morrison Government is working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to provide the same opportunities as for every other Australian.

We know and believe that, to deliver real outcomes, we need to work in partnership.

We’ve drawn a line in the sand in regard to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policies and programs.

We need to refresh what we’re doing because, while the 2019 Closing the Gap report highlighted successes across the country, only two of the seven targets are on track to be met.

The original targets were well-intentioned but developed without the collaboration and accountability of the states and territories or input from Indigenous Australians.

Under the Morrison Government, Australia’s Closing the Gap targets will be redeveloped in partnership with Indigenous Australians for the first time. ”

From the Liberal Party Website 

CLOSING THE GAP – A REFRESH

The Closing the Gap process that began in 2008 was born of good heart.

Despite this, it did not truly seek to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The driving belief was that a top-down approach could achieve the change that was rightly desired, through lofty goals and bureaucratic targets.

The Morrison Government has turned a new page.

We are committed to working together and deciding together how future policies are developed – especially at a regional and local level.

We have listened to what Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities have told us is important.

At COAG in December last year, all governments committed to share ownership of, and responsibility for, frameworks, targets and ongoing monitoring of a refreshed Closing the Gap Agenda with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at its heart.

And under the leadership of Prime Minister Morrison, the Commonwealth, state and territory and local governments in partnership with the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations signed an Agreement to change the way government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians work together on Closing the Gap.

We are providing $4.6 million to the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations to ensure an equal partnership with governments in designing and monitoring Closing the Gap.

2. How much money the new Morrison incoming government is going to invest in Closing the Gap Refresh

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner says at least $5bn and a commitment to work with communities is needed to get anywhere in Closing the Gap.

About 40 peak bodies from all avenues of Indigenous affairs came together last week ( May 13 )  to discuss a new Closing the Gap agreement.

The Peaks were the negotiators of the Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap last year, and have not sat face to face since.

They met to discuss what they want to achieve in a new Closing the Gap agreement, with NACCHO CEO Pat Turner calling for a bigger commitment from the government, whoever that may be following the election.

“Neither side of politics, either the Liberals, or the Nationals, or the ALP [have announced] the commitment they will make over the next 10 years to Close the Gap,” Ms Turner told NITV News.

“We need both sides of politics to come out in the last week and give us a very clear indication of how much money they’re going to invest in Closing the Gap, and that they’re going to continue to work in partnership with us.

“And that Aboriginal people are central to the co-design, the monitoring and the evaluation, but also making sure that government changes the way it works with our people.”

Ms Turner said that the partnership between Aboriginal people and the government needs to be at every level, and hopes this is implemented in a Close the Gap ‘refresh’.

“From the community level, to the regional level, to the state level, to the national level. If it doesn’t work in partnership with us, then it will be doomed to failure,” she said.

“They can start with $5 billion. That would be a good start, and a lot of that money needs to be invested directly into Aboriginal communities through our organisations and in terms of fixing up the infrastructure in our communities.”

They hope for a new agreement to be signed by the Coalition of Peaks and the Council of Australian Governments, and for it to be implemented later this year.

https://www.sbs.com.au/…/doomed-failure-close-gap-peak-bodi…

5. What is the future of the #UluruStatement and a Voice to Parliament

Updated Monday 20 May from ABC News report

Going into the election campaign, federal Labor had committed to a plan for a referendum on constitutional recognition for Indigenous people.

Senator Dodson said this, and the Indigenous voice to Parliament, seemed to be lost.

“Now we’ve gone back to potentially not having a voice to Parliament for First Nations people, no referendum on that matter.

“The removal of the Makarrata Commission, so no real interest in truth telling and agreement making.

“And certainly no regional assemblies to enable First Nations people to have a greater say in their own affairs.

“So, a real rolling back, and more of the draconian activities that have underpinned the CDEP program with penalties applying to people and treating First Nations people as mendicants and a drain on the public sector.”

Senator Dodson said he believed a reforming, visionary agenda had been destroyed with lies and creating fear, and a “misperception” of what Labor stood for.

Wyatt says Coalition win still gives Indigenous voice to Parliament

Ken Wyatt, who has been serving as Minister for Aged Care, and Australia’s first Minister for Indigenous Health, has rejected Senator Dodson’s claims.

Mr Wyatt said he considered Mr Dodson to be a friend, and said he would’ve made a great minister.

“I have no doubt about that,” he said.

“He and I and Linda [Burney] and Malarndirri [McCarthy] talk frequently, we set aside the political differences.

“We talk about the philosophical things we are aiming to achieve but at the same time we recognise our party positions are different.”

Mr Wyatt said Labor’s loss didn’t mean the end of an Indigenous voice to Parliament.

“It doesn’t set back the causes for a voice to Parliament of some form, certainly a better way of engaging with Aboriginal people.

“I know that in Aboriginal health we were establishing strong partnerships so I can’t see that diminishing.

“I have every faith in the Prime Minister to continue the work that we were proposing in the Aboriginal Affairs reform agenda.”

Mr Wyatt said he wanted a structure to which Indigenous people could bring their concerns, and then that body could work with relevant ministers, including the Prime Minister.

“If we do that, then that provides an avenue for people having a say in their future, but we’ve got to get it right at the community level,” he said.

Mr Wyatt said if he was offered the Aboriginal Affairs portfolio, he would “do it with great pride”, but said it was up to the Prime Minister and he wouldn’t seek to “circumvent” any decision.

“Any position you’re given in cabinet is an honour to serve in,” he said.

From previous NACCHO Post

Since 2013, the Liberal and Nationals Government has maintained the multi-partisan commitment to recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the Constitution.

We are listening to the recommendations of the bi-partisan Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition Relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (chaired by Julian Leeser MP and Senator Patrick Dodson).

The Joint Select Committee recommended that further work was needed to clarify a model for constitutional recognition and how it could best suit the needs and aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

See Policy Here

Coalition Policy Reviewed 

After the Uluru Statement from the Heart in 2017 there have been mounting talks about enshrining an Indigenous Voice to Parliament within the Australian Constitution.

Establishing a Voice to Parliament is not as visible in either the Liberal’s or the Nationals’ policies, however the Coalition did mention some support for the idea in this year’s Federal Budget.

If the Coalition is re-elected, the process for Voice to Parliament is likely to be a lengthy one.

The report 

“There is a national convergence between the aspirations of First Nations people, as reflected in the Uluru Statement, and the views of non-Indigenous Australians who overwhelmingly back a constitutionally enshrined First Nations voice in Parliament and a comprehensive process of truth telling.

This presents the next federal parliament with a rare mandate and opportunity to advance the national reconciliation agenda.

Read final report HERE 

“The Uluru Statement From the Heart encapsulates all of these policy aspirations of the Indigenous world, and I fail to see how it is not being fully supported across the political and administrative spectrum,”

“We need to be empowered to lift ourselves out of the state-imposed tangle of policies, programs and bureaucracy that excludes us and removes our agency. Only we can overcome, but you can help.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO #ClosetheGap #ClosingtheGap : @ScottMorrisonMP @KenWyattMP @LiberalAus Finally release an #Election2019 policy to support Indigenous Australia

” The Morrison Government is working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to provide the same opportunities as for every other Australian.

We know and believe that, to deliver real outcomes, we need to work in partnership.

We’ve drawn a line in the sand in regard to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policies and programs.

We need to refresh what we’re doing because, while the 2019 Closing the Gap report highlighted successes across the country, only two of the seven targets are on track to be met.

The original targets were well-intentioned but developed without the collaboration and accountability of the states and territories or input from Indigenous Australians.

Under the Morrison Government, Australia’s Closing the Gap targets will be redeveloped in partnership with Indigenous Australians for the first time.

From the Liberal Party Website 

When it comes to delivering the services needed, we believe Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations are best placed and we are increasing their number under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

Our Empowered Communities initiative, co-designed with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders, is a prime example of our reforms.

We are working with the Empowered Communities leaders and across each region to improve our engagement and delivery in partnership with local community leaders.

The Morrison Government has provided over $30 million to support local engagement and capacity building to eight Empowered Communities regional bodies throughout the country. Empowered Communities leaders are now directly involved in determining how funding is allocated in their regions.

We are also increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses winning contracts with the Commonwealth. From July 2019, the Indigenous Procurement Policy 2.0 will introduce a target of 3 per cent of the value of Commonwealth contracts to be awarded to Indigenous businesses within a decade. This builds on the highly successful IPP target that was introduced in 2015: where 3 per cent of the number of Commonwealth contracts are to go to Indigenous businesses.

We remain committed to recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the Constitution.

The recognition of First Australians in our nation’s founding document would acknowledge our shared history and the value we place on our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage.

We also acknowledge the importance of telling and sharing our nation’s story: especially the history and culture of the oldest living culture on Earth. Supporting a process of truth telling and healing is an important part of our nation’s journey to reconciliation.

OUR RECORD

The Liberal Nationals Government’s Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) delivers $5.2 billion in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities: ensuring children are attending school, adults are in jobs and communities are safe.

As partners with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, we have done a power of work.

Across the IAS, funding is increasingly delivered by Indigenous organisations operating in their communities, ensuring high quality and culturally appropriate services.

We have doubled the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations delivering services under the IAS – up from 30 per cent before its introduction to 60 per cent now.

Under our Government’s Indigenous Procurement Policy, over 1473 Indigenous businesses have won contracts delivering goods and services worth more than $1.83 billion, up from just 30 businesses receiving $6.2 million in 2012-13.

We have remained steadfast in our commitment to recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the Constitution.

We established a Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition (the Committee) to examine how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are consulted and engaged with and to consider options for constitutional change. We did this because the Referendum Council did not do its job – it did not provide a clear path to a successful referendum.

We are now working to implement the recommendations of the Joint Select Committee so this pathway can be achieved.

We have supported Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians sharing their stories, languages and cultures through national institutions such as the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and the National Museum of Australia. And we’ve committed an additional $10 million to support the revival and maintenance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians languages.

We are also helping our nation to heal with funding to deliver the support that is needed for surviving members of the Stolen Generations.

We are providing $20 million to the Healing Foundation to support their work, including a comprehensive needs-analysis to better understand the demography of the surviving Stolen Generations.

We are providing almost $50 million a year to fund more than 110 organisations nationwide: supporting social and emotional wellbeing activities, including for Stolen Generations members and their families.

The Morrison Government will continue our efforts to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the Constitution – and increase the involvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the design of policies and delivery of programs that benefit them.

CLOSING THE GAP – A REFRESH

The Closing the Gap process that began in 2008 was born of good heart.

Despite this, it did not truly seek to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The driving belief was that a top-down approach could achieve the change that was rightly desired, through lofty goals and bureaucratic targets.

The Morrison Government has turned a new page.

We are committed to working together and deciding together how future policies are developed – especially at a regional and local level.

We have listened to what Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities have told us is important.

At COAG in December last year, all governments committed to share ownership of, and responsibility for, frameworks, targets and ongoing monitoring of a refreshed Closing the Gap Agenda with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at its heart.

And under the leadership of Prime Minister Morrison, the Commonwealth, state and territory and local governments in partnership with the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations signed an Agreement to change the way government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians work together on Closing the Gap.

We are providing $4.6 million to the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations to ensure an equal partnership with governments in designing and monitoring Closing the Gap.

CONSTITUTIONAL RECOGNITION OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER AUSTRALIANS

Since 2013, the Liberal and Nationals Government has maintained the multi-partisan commitment to recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the Constitution.

We are listening to the recommendations of the bi-partisan Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition Relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (chaired by Julian Leeser MP and Senator Patrick Dodson).

The Joint Select Committee recommended that further work was needed to clarify a model for constitutional recognition and how it could best suit the needs and aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

We are committed to recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the Constitution at the same time as delivering practical outcomes to improve the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. But there needs to be more work done on what model we take to a referendum and what a voice to parliament would be – which is why we are funding a consultation process with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. This process will develop up a question for a referendum and what a referendum will deliver – because no one can answer what a voice to parliament actually is at the moment.

To deliver on this recommendation, the Morrison Government is providing $7.3 million for the comprehensive co-design of models to improve local and regional decision making and options for constitutional recognition. This work will commence immediately to provide a model and pathway to a successful referendum.

The key issue that we keep hearing is what is this Voice, the ALP cannot tell us what the Voice might look like and how it might operate. We believe if Australians don’t understand what they’re voting for in a referendum, they will vote no, and endanger this important issue for another generation.

The Government will engage and consult with Indigenous communities, organisations and leaders across Australia to deliver this important work.

A referendum will be held once a model has been settled, consistent with the recommendations of the Joint Select Committee.

And we have allocated $160 million in the Budget to run a referendum, with funding remaining in the Contingency Reserve until a referendum model has been determined.

NATIONAL RESTING PLACE

The Morrison Government supports the establishment of a National Resting Place for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander remains as a place of commemoration, healing and reflection. This is consistent with the recommendations of the Joint Select Committee.

The Government has committed $5 million to the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies to undertake a scoping study and consultation as a first step. This important memorial will recognise the unique contribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and history to our nation.

TRUTH TELLING

The Morrison Government supports a process of truth telling as part of our nation’s journey to reconciliation.

A truth telling process would acknowledge the history and experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians – and the impacts and consequences.

We will work with local Indigenous communities on this recognition and acknowledgment, supporting a process of local reconciliation for all Australians.

We are also investing almost $2 million in the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) to support the work of its Family History Unit. The unit works with local communities to identify and commemorate past trauma, dispossession and the separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. The family history research and services support the process of truth telling and healing.

Our Government’s commitment to a National Resting Place also supports the process of truth telling.

A National Resting Place would provide an important memorial for the whole nation to reflect on the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians since European settlement.

WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER AUSTRALIANS

The Morrison Government remains committed to working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

We will continue to work and expand our co-designed Empowered Communities initiative to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are involved in local and regional decision making.

In addition, we will continue to increase the number of Indigenous-owned and operated organisations delivering services to benefit Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

Under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, we have doubled the number of contracts held by Indigenous organisations from 30 to 60 per cent. We know Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations are best placed to deliver services to their communities.

We are committing to increase that by 10 per cent each year with an aspirational target of 100 per cent by 2023.

THE CHOICE

When last in office, Labor failed First Australians for six years.

Labor had no cohesive focus to address decades of entrenched disadvantage.

It delivered the symbolic apology to Indigenous Australians, but then dropped the ball on improving outcomes.

The hopes of many Indigenous people that Labor would deliver real, practical change on the ground on the back of the apology were dashed.

As Labor destroyed the economy and the Budget, leaving $240 billion in cumulative deficits, it turned its back on Indigenous Affairs.

Trapped in the mindset of academics and peak advocacy bodies, Labor lost sight of the urgent need to address poverty and dysfunction.

The process of co-design and listening to Indigenous Australians was what Labor supported last year in Senator Pat Dodson and Julian Leeser’s report and this issue is too important to get wrong.

Now, their only solution is to rush, without adequate consultation to establish The Voice to Parliament – a new national representative body that amounts to a Third Chamber of Parliament just for Indigenous Australians.

Currently there’s no model, and we’ve got the ALP proposing to go to a referendum, and we don’t support the position to go with an unknown referendum question.

The key issue that we keep hearing is what is this Voice, the ALP cannot tell us what the Voice might look like and how it might operate?

We believe if Australians don’t understand what they’re voting for in a referendum, they will vote no, and endanger this important issue for another generation.

This is something that is neither desirable nor likely to be supported by the Australian people.

By contrast, the Morrison Government will focus on real action to deliver better outcomes for Indigenous people – getting kids to school, adults to work and making communities safer.

We are focusing on genuine engagement directly with communities.

And we will work in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to deliver constitutional recognition and continue to improve our engagement through local and regional decision making.

We’re working with Traditional Owners, elders and communities to identify the fundamental priorities and policy approaches that will lead to greater engagement in schooling, training and work and lead to safer communities.

We support the representative bodies like Land Councils that Labor wants to ignore.

For the first time in years, we have a clear line of sight to where each and every Indigenous-specific dollar is being spent.

We are ensuring that funding is directed to areas of greatest need and that organisations delivering services are held to account for outcomes.

We have ended the passive racism of lower expectations in the delivery of services to Indigenous people.

We recognise that many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are thriving and making a positive contribution to our nation.

Only the Morrison Government can be trusted to deliver the practical change to address Indigenous disadvantage.

Only the Liberal Nationals Government, by keeping the economy strong, will be able to keep up the investment that is needed going forward.

Only the Morrison Government can be trusted to deliver the practical change to address Indigenous disadvantage.

COST

The Morrison Government’s policies to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are funded from the $5.2 billion Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

 

Welcome to our special NACCHO #Election2019 #VoteACCHO resource page for Affiliates, ACCHO members, stakeholders and supporters. The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is not a partisan political issue and cannot be sidelined any longer.

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

More info HERE 

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO #TheDrum : Watch @ABCtheDrum #Election2019 Health special debate with our CEO Pat Turner and 4 other health leaders @stephenjduckett @normanswan @georgeinstitute Dr Jenny May, Prof Ian Hickie

 ” In a special #Election2019 Health episode of the Drum broadcast on 9 May the expert panel discussed of Health how we can best promote equitable outcomes in our health system, Indigenous health #VoteACCHO  and community controlled organisations, private health insurance and policy

 Ellen Fanning was joined by CEO of NACCHO Pat Turner, co-director at UTS Brain & Mind Centre Prof. Ian Hickie, Health Report host Dr Norman Swan, director of UoN Dept of Rural Health Dr Jenny May AM, & Health Programme director at the Grattan Institute Stephen Duckett  “

ABC TV THE DRUM 

Or Watch HERE

 

TOP 10 Social media coverage of the event included

1. ACCHO’s have 50 years experience

2 : Funding

3. Life Expectancy 

4 .Burden of disease 

5. Dr Norman Swan talks about ACCHO Efficiency

“Aboriginal communities under-utilise Medicare compared to people who live in wealthy suburbs who over-utilise. They under-utilise according to their needs. If you rely on the current Medicare system, it’s got inequity fundamentally built in.” Dr Norman Swan

6.  Remote ACCHO Services

7. ACCHO Holistic Health

8. Feedback NRHA

9. Feedback about IUIH ACCHO

10. Feedback from Fran Baum

NACCHO has developed a set of policy  10 #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

The current health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are unacceptable. 65% of Indigenous people live in rural Australia.

We are calling on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

Our ACCHO TOP 10 key asks of a new Federal Government

Read all the 10 Recommendations HERE

 

NACCHO #VoteACCHO Aboriginal #Mental Health and #SuicidePrevention : For #Election2019 #AusVotesHealth Prime Minister @ScottMorrisonMP and Indigenous Health Minister @KenWyattMP  Announce a  further $42m on mental health initiatives for young and some for Indigenous Australians

Young Indigenous people face many barriers to accessing healthcare including finding services that are safe and tailored to meet their needs.

This work will help change the way we deliver general mental health services so they draw on the value of culture, community and country to enrich the care provided to our First Nations people ”  

 Indigenous Health minister, Ken Wyatt. See extensive FACT SHEETS Part 2 below

“Our government will do  whatever it takes and whatever we can to break the curse of youth suicide in our country and ensure young people get the support they need”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison

Read over 130 Aboriginal Health and Suicide Prevention articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years  

Read over 200 Aboriginal Mental Health articles published by NACCHO over the past 7 years 

Visit our NACCHO #VoteACCHO Election Campaign page HERE 

#VoteACCHO Recommendation 4.

The incoming Federal Government must invest in ACCHOs, so we can address youth suicide

Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities.

  • Fund new Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management.
  • Fund regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance.
  • Provide accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

#VoteACCHO Recommendation 6.

The incoming Federal Government must allocate Indigenous specific health funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.

● Transfer the funding for Indigenous specific programs from Primary Health Networks to ACCHOs.

● Primary Health Networks assign ACCHOs as preferred providers for other Australian Government funded services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples unless it can be shown that alternative arrangements can produce better outcomes in quality of care and access to services.

Part 1 : Coalition vows to ‘break the curse of youth suicide’ with mental health package

The Coalition has pledged a further $42m on mental health initiatives for young and Indigenous Australians, on top of $461m in the budget for mental health and suicide prevention.

Extracts from The Guardian

Of the new funding, $22.5m will be spent on research grants to help find better treatments for mental health problems and $19.6m on the Indigenous advancement strategy to prevent suicide, particularly in the Kimberley.

In the first three months of this year, there were at least 35 suicides among Indigenous people, three of whom were only 12 years old.

The findings of an inquest into 13 suicides among young Aboriginal people in the Kimberley, handed down in February, found that crushing intergenerational trauma and poverty, including from the harmful effect of colonisation and loss of culture, were to blame.

The Morrison government has made “securing essential services” central to its re-election pitch, using its projection of a surplus in 2019-20 and perceived strength of economic management to pre-empt Labor attacks that it is not spending enough on health and other social causes.

Labor is promising to not only build bigger budget surpluses but also outspend the Coalition in health, beginning with its $2.3bn cancer package that it announced in the budget reply.

The research component of the Coalition’s mental health package has been allocated to a series of grants, including about emergency department management of acute mental health crises and culturally appropriate mental healthcare for Indigenous Australians.

Past 2 #VoteACCHO

1. Indigenous Mental Health and Suicide Prevention

  • The rate of suicide among Australians, particularly young First Australians is one of the most heartbreaking challenges we face as a country.
  • We have provided $88.8 million for Indigenous-specific mental health services, as well as local, culturally-safe mental health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders through our $1.45 billion investment in PHNs.
  • The Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt MP, has championed new measures to address Indigenous suicide prevention measures. Under the Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan the Morrison McCormack Government is providing $14.5 million to support Indigenous leadership to help our health care system provide culturally safe and appropriate care, as well as new funding to enable young Indigenous people to participate in place-based cultural programs; build a centre of excellence in childhood wellness; and adapt psychological treatments to meet the needs of Indigenous Australians.
  • The Morrison McCormack Government is also making a new $19.6 million investment through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy to prevent Indigenous youth suicide, particularly in the Kimberley. This new $19.6 million investment will help build resilience and leadership skills in at-risk communities and provide new pathways for engagement, including some which the Kimberley Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Forum told us are needed to support fellow young people.

2. Mental Health

  • The mental health of Australians is a priority for the Morrison McCormack Government.
  • One in five people in Australia experience a common mental disorder each year. Nearly half of the Australian population will experience mental illness at some point in their lives, but less than half will access treatment.
  • We are doing more than any other previous government to safeguard the mental wellbeing of Australians, providing record funding of $4.8 billion in 2018-19.
  • We are delivering more frontline services that meet the specific needs of local communities through a record $1.45 billion investment in our Primary Health Networks. We are providing long-term support for local psychologists, mental health nurses, and social workers, ensuring that the right services are available in the right place and at the right time.
  • We have expanded the headspace network, boosted headspace services, and established the Mental Health in Education Initiative with Beyond Blue to provide young Australians with additional help and support.
  • We have pioneered Medicare telehealth services allowing Australians in rural areas to access care from their homes. We have also expanded free or low-cost digital services, accessible through our new head to health portal to cater for those who prefer to access support online.
  • We have been the first to fully recognise the need for intensive support for Australians with eating disorders – the deadliest of all psychiatric illnesses – by creating specific Medicare funded services, a National Helpline, and providing $70.2 million for new residential treatment centres.
  • We have introduced key reforms such as a Productivity Commission Inquiry into Mental Health, changes to private health insurance, and innovative models of care such as the $114.5 million trial of 8 mental health centres.
  • Investing in mental health and suicide prevention is not a choice, it is a must.
  • The Liberal and Nationals Government’s track record in delivering a strong economy ensures we can invest in essential services such as youth mental health and suicide prevention services.

3.Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention

  • The tragedy of suicide touches far too many Australian families. Suicide is the leading cause of death of our young people – accounting for one-third of deaths of Australians aged 15-24.
  • The Government will provide $503.1 million for a Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan to prevent suicide and promote the mental wellbeing of young Australians. This represents the single largest investment in youth suicide prevention in the country’s history.
  • We are prioritising three key areas as our nation’s best protection against suicide – strengthening the headspace network, Indigenous suicide prevention and early childhood and parenting support.
  • We will ensure young people get help where and when needed by investing an additional $375 million to expand and improve the headspace network. headspace provides youth-friendly services for the challenges facing young Australians: across physical health, alcohol and other drug use, vocational support and mental health.
  • To strengthen Indigenous youth suicide prevention, we will invest $34.1 million including support for Indigenous leadership that will help our health care system deliver culturally appropriate, trauma-informed care as well as services that recognise the value of community, cultural artistic traditions and protective social factors. Out support includes $19.6 million for measures to prevent Indigenous youth suicide, particularly in the Kimberley.
  • To support parents and their children we will invest $11.8 million in a range of initiatives to help parents recognise when their children are struggling, improve mental health skills training in schools, enhance peer support networks and boost counselling support services for young people.
  • We are also providing an additional $22.5 million in specific youth and Indigenous health research projects as part of our $125 million ‘Million Minds Mission’.
  • The Liberal and Nationals Government established this ten-year $125 million Mission through the Medical Research Future Fund. It will unlock key research into the cause of mental health as well as better treatments and therapies.
  • For Australians living in rural and regional we are ensuring that services are available where they are most needed by establishing more than 20 new headspace sites in rural and regional Australia, and by providing new mental health telehealth services funded through Medicare.
  • .

Natural Disasters

  • We are also addressing the mental health needs of those affected by natural disasters through:
    • $5.5 million for additional mental health services in Victoria, Queensland and Tasmania. This includes Medicare items for GPs to provide telehealth services to flood affected communities in Queensland.
    • $21.9 million for the Empowering our Communitiesinitiative to support community-led mental health programmes in nine drought-affected Primary Health Network regions.

Background

Mental Health Facts

  • One in five Australians aged 16 to 85 experiences a common mental illness (e.g. anxiety disorder, depression) in any year; nearly half (45 per cent) of all Australians will experience a mental health problem over the course of their lives. In 2016, one in seven children aged 4 to 17 years was assessed as having a mental health disorder in the previous 12 months.
  • Approximately 730,000 Australians experience severe mental health disorders. Another 4-6 per cent of the population (about 1.5 million people) are estimated to have a moderate disorder and a further 9-12 per cent (about 2.9 million people) a mild disorder.
  • Mental illness costs the Australian economy over $60 billion per year (around four per cent of Gross Domestic Product).

Suicide and Self-harm Facts

  • In 2017, 3,128 people died from intentional self-harm (12.6 deaths per 100,000 people), rising 9.1% from 2,866 in 2016. The 2017 rate is on par with 2015 as the highest recorded rate of suicide in the past 10 years. Most states saw an increase in their suicide rates, with Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory experiencing the largest rises. However, there were declines in Tasmania, South Australia and Victoria.
  • Suicide remained the leading cause of death among people aged between 15-44 years, and the second leading cause of death among those 45-54 years of age.
  • While intentional self-harm accounts for a relatively small proportion (1.9 per cent) of all deaths in Australia, it accounts for a higher proportion of deaths among younger people (36 per cent of deaths among people aged 15 to 24).

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #AusVotesHealth and #Budget2019 4 of 5 : Press Release from Ministers @GregHuntMP @KenWyattMP : But have the major health threats been ignored in this 2019/20 Federal Health Budget ?

This weeks NACCHO Budget Coverage 

Post 1: NACCHO Intro #AusVotesHealth #Budget2019

Post 2: NACCHO Chair Press Release

Post 3:  Health Peak bodies Press Release summary

Post 4 : Government Press Releases

Post 5 : Opposition responses to Budget 2019 

Read all Budget 2019 Posts 

Overview Health Expenditure Croakey and Sean Parnell The Australian

1.Guaranteeing Medicare

2.Strengthening primary care

3.Improving access to medicines Includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 

4.Supporting our hospitals

5.Addressing youth mental health and suicide prevention

6. Investing in life saving and job creating medical research

7.Patients

8.Investing in preventive health

9. Supporting senior Australians

10. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

More detailed information on various components of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander expenditure below  OR

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Overview Health Expenditure  Croakey and Sean Parnell The Australian

Back in Black or Highway to Hell? Major health threats ignored in 2019/20 Federal Budget

  “Prime Minister Scott Morrison may be ‘Back in Black’ but his 2019/20 Health Budget is unlikely to make him number one with the health sector.

While there are a few new numbers in the Budget’s hit parade, the bulk of the spending initiatives are a hackneyed playlist of old tunes that fail to deliver the reforms called for repeatedly by health groups and experts.

Warning bells are sounding all over the health sector – increased obesity levels, the health threats of climate change and record rates of chronic disease – yet the current government doesn’t appear to be listening.

Our health system already can’t cope with current levels of demand and there is little in tonight’s Budget that will relieve this pressure. Ignoring the calls from experts and health groups for a re-orienting of our health system away from acute care towards prevention and public health, this Budget provides a suite of short-term measures which barely deal with the symptoms of an ailing system, let alone address their underlying causes.

The frustration of health groups about this failure to acknowledge the looming threats to our health system was evident in many post-Budget statements, including the Public Health Association of Australia which stated that “the budget does little to prevent a future illness tsunami.”

Below, Jennifer Doggett revisits the songs from AC/DC’s classic album to highlight the positives and negatives of this important pre-election Budget. “

Read Croakey article Here

Overview Health Expenditure Sean Parnell The Australian

Doctors will get more funding to help older Australians manage chronic illness, mental healthcare providers will be able to reach more people in need, and researchers will benefit from a 10-year grants program.

In its $104 billion health budget, the Morrison government has made targeted investments in Medicare, but also brought forward the restoration of indexation for 176 GP items to July 1. Thawing that aspect of the Medicare freeze six months early will cost $187.2 million, but comes as the Coalition faces calls from health groups for higher rebates and the prospect of another Labor ­“Mediscare” campaign.

While the government has yet to decide the fate of the healthcare homes initiative, or respond to primary care proposals from its Medicare review, it has allocated $201.5m more for practice incentive payments.

Its most promising, yet underdeveloped, primary care announcement in the budget involves $448.5m over three years for a new model of funding chronic disease care. The approach, to be introduced in July 2020, will allow GPs to enter into agreements with patients over 70 and be given more personalised, co-ordinated care funded through Medicare.

The details will be subject to further consultation.

With Australia’s rising suicide rate, and continued concern over the comparatively high number of deaths in indigenous communities, the government has also allocated $736.6m to improve the nation’s mental health resources.

This will include 30 more headspace centres — most expected to be announced during the election campaign — to take the total number funded by the commonwealth to 145 by 2021, at an ongoing cost of $120m a year.

“It’s a national tragedy that we lose so many people to suicide and that so many people live a life of quiet desperation,” Josh Frydenberg said last night. “Tonight I say: we hear you and we are with you.”

There was funding for a further 23 MRI machines — taking the total to 53 — and continued investment in drug subsidies as recommended by a committee of experts.

With the Medical Research ­Future Fund to achieve its $20bn balance in 2020-21, the government has outlined a $5bn, 10-year funding plan, while maintaining its $3.5bn commitment to the ­National Health and Medical ­Research Council. The $5bn will come from MRFF distributions, established using savings from health cuts in the 2014 budget.

Health Minister Greg Hunt has already announced research ‘‘missions’’ into brain cancer, mental health, genomics, ageing, aged care and dementia, indigenous health, stem cells, cardiovascular disease and traumatic brain injury. Another $1.2bn will be dedicated to translation and commercialis­ation, taking ideas from the laboratory to hospital bedsides, while new institutes will also be funded.

Any perceptions of interference in the grants program will be addressed by the creation of a Health and Medical Research Office for the MRFF, at a cost of $20m over four years, although the NHMRC will have a small reduction in its budget next year.

The government has factored in the states agreeing to its public hospital funding proposal, even though Victoria and Queensland are holding out. The ­Coalition will continue to announce projects to benefit from its $1.25bn community health and hospitals program ahead of the election.

RECORD INVESTMENT ADVANCES LONG TERM NATIONAL HEALTH PLAN

Federal Treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, delivered his first Australian Government Budget on Tuesday evening, 2 April 2019.

The following links provide information on the Budget and its implications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Australian Government Budget details:

The Liberal National Government is investing a record $104 billion in 2019—20, up from

$75 billion in 2012—13, as part of a comprehensive, patient-focused investment of

$435 billion over the next four years. It guarantees Medicare, makes a range of life-saving medicines and services more accessible and affordable, reduces out-of-pocket costs, strengthens primary care and mental health and invests in breakthrough medical research.

The Budget consolidates and continues our health reform agenda. It reinforces the four pillars of our long term national health plan — guaranteeing Medicare and improving access to medicines, supporting our hospitals, prioritising mental health and preventive health and investing in health and medical research.

We are addressing community need through a range of investments under our $1.25 billion landmark Community Health and Hospitals Program (CHHP) to keep people healthy and out of hospital.

We are acting on aged care reform. Improvements to accessibility, quality and safety continue apace with a further investment of $7 billion since the last Budget.

The Government is investing record funding for Health:

  • Medicare boosted by $6 billion o with $1.1 billion for Primary Care Hospital funding boosted by $5 billion

0 on top ofthe $1.25 billion CHHP

  • Aged Care funding boosted by $7 billion
  • $40 billion for life-saving and life-changing medicines provisioned in the forward estimates
  • $5 billion for a 10 year Medical Research Future Fund investment plan
  • $736.6 million for mental health including youth suicide prevention
  • $1 billion for Indigenous health
  • Over $1 billion for child dental services

1.Guaranteeing Medicare

We are increasing Medicare funding by $6 billion, up from $19.5 billion in 2012—13, to $24.9 billion in 2018—19, to $30.7 billion in 2022—23. The Medicare Guarantee Fund, established in 2017—18, allocates $36.6 billion in guaranteed funds for spending on the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) in 2019-20.

We are increasing the Medicare rebate for important diagnostic services, including ultrasound and X-ray imaging to reduce the costs to patients. This will support Australians’ access to bulk-billed diagnostic imaging services. It will encourage radiologists, obstetricians, cardiologists and other specialties to maintain or increase their level of bulk-billing. The Government is investing $198.6 million in this initiative.

We are investing $151.9 million to expand the number of Medicare-eligible MRI machines to more than 50 newly funded units in the past 12 months. New MBS services for MRI of the breast, costing $32.6 million over four years, will help diagnosis for around 14,000 breast cancer patients each year.

The independent experts continue to recommend improvements to the MBS. New and amended Medicare-eligible services will support breast cancer, prostate cancer and brain        surgery patients, people having X-rays, and patients in private hospital emergency departments and intensive care units.

We are committed to reducing out-of-pocket health care costs for Australians. The

Government supports all the recommendations of, and will implement the first stage of our response to, the report of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on Out-of-Pocket Costs.

We will make publicly available the fees and resulting out-of-pocket costs charged by medical specialists, with an initial focus on specialist fees for gynaecology, obstetrics, and cancer services. This will be supported by a community awareness campaign, including a website. It will increase transparency, and enable people, particularly those with private health insurance, to be more informed about costs when choosing a specialist.

2.Strengthening primary care

Improving Indigenous health remains a key target of our refreshed Closing the Gap framework. Funding is boosted to $4.1 billion from 2019—20 to 2022—23 and more than $10 billion over a decade.

Download Budget Report

2019-20_Health_PBS_2.02_Outcome_2

We are delivering a $1.1 billion ‘Strengthening Primary Care’ package, building on the $512 million package in the 2018—19 MYEFO, to support Australia’s doctors and specialists to deliver improved access and outcomes for patients. The Government will invest

$448.5 million in increased funding to deliver a new population based funding approach to support GPs to provide enhanced care and services, initially focussing on Australians over 70 years.

Australians over the age of 70 will be able to voluntarily enter into an agreement with their general practiioner, and receive more personalised, coordinated care, with usual services continuing to be rebatable for the patient under Medicare. GPs and others in their practice will be able to provide consultations, referrals, scripts and test results remotely — without seeing patients face-to-face. This will make it easier and more convenient for people to access timely care and medical advice.

Our investment complements and strengthens Medicare. Doctors will be further supported by a $201.5 million boost for the Practice Incentives Program Quality Improvement Initiative, including retention of the Aged Care Access Incentive, and $187.2 million to increase rebates for 176 GP services from I July 2019.

We will further tackle the ever increasing burden of chronic disease through our Public Health and Chronic Disease program. Funding of $17.2 million over five years will develop several national strategic action plans aimed at improving the lives of Australians living with chronic conditions — specifically, osteoporosis, kidney health, rare diseases, heart disease and stroke, and children’s health. We will also provide a new heart health check under Medicare to better address cardiovascular disease.

Eligible Australian children will continue to be able to access basic dental services and claim up to $1 ,000 in benefits under the Child Dental Benefits Schedule, with the Government investing over $1.0 billion for the next three years from 1 January 2020.

We will spend $12 million over the next three years to extend the reach of the childhood immunisation education campaign to save lives by protecting children from serious diseases.

We are implementing a National Rural Generalist Pathway, allocating $62.2 million over five years to ensure rural generalists are trained, recognised and resourced to meet the critical health needs of rural Australians.

Improving Indigenous health remains a key target of our refreshed Closing the Gap framework. Funding is boosted to $4.1 billion from 2019—20 to 2022—23 and more than $10 billion over a decade.

3. Improving access to medicines

The Liberal National Government has provisioned $40 billion in the forward estimates for life-saving and life-changing medicines. We are averaging 31 new or amended listings per month — approximately one per day.

We continue our commitment to ensure people have affordable access to medicines when they need it, through listing all medicines on the PBS that have received a positive recommendation from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC).

From I May 2019, Ibrance@ will be available on the PBS for the treatment of inoperable advanced metastatic breast cancer. Patients will pay $6.50 or $40.30 for the drug. Without subsidy, they would pay $55,000 per year.

From 1 May 2019, Bavencio will be available on the PBS for the treatment of metastatic merkel cell carcinoma, a rare and highly aggressive type of skin cancer. Without subsidy, they would pay $150,000 per year.

From 1 May 2019, Besponsa@ will be available on the PBS for the freatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Without subsidy, they would pay $120,000 per year.

Tagrisso@ is now available on the PBS for the treatment of lung cancer, which would otherwise cost patients $88,000 per course of treatment.

Opdivo@ + Yervoy@ is now available on the PBS for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma, which would otherwise cost patients $254,200 per course of treatment.

Venclexta@ is now available on the PBS, in combination with rituximab for the treatment of adult patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, which would otherwise cost patients around $165,000 per course of treatment.

We are allocating $15 million for a one-off increase to community pharmacy to continue providing support to consumers, to improve the safe use of medication.

4.Supporting our hospitals

We have increased funding for the nation’s public hospitals by $5 billion, up from

$13.3 billion in 2012-13, to $21.7 billion in 2018-19, to $26.2 billion in 2022-23.

In addition, patients in every state and territory will have access to improved health and hospital services under our landmark $1.25 billion Community Health and Hospitals Program (CHHP).

Projects will be delivered through Primary Health Networks, grant funding, and transfer payments to state and territory governments. They include the Comprehensive Children’s Cancer Centre at Sydney’s Children’s Hospital, NSW; Centre for Excellence in Cellular

Immunotherapy at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria; James Cook University — Cairns Tropical Enterprise Centre, Queensland; Repatriation Hospital — Brain and Spinal Centre, South Australia; improved health outcomes for individuals living with brain and spinal cord injuries in Queensland; Peel Health Campus, Western Australia; Ambulatory Care Centre, Alice Springs, Northern Territory; Canberra Hospital Intensive Care Unit, Australian Capital Territory; and North West Cancer Centre linear accelerator, North West Regional Hospital, Tasmania.

The CHHP complements our record investment in public hospitals, which will more than double from $13.3 billion in 2012—13 to $29.1 billion in 2024—25. Our new five year National Health Reform Agreement will deliver more than $30 billion in additional public hospital funding from 2020—21 to 2024—25.

5.Addressing youth mental health and suicide prevention

The Government is boosting mental health funding by $736.6 million, with $461.1 million focused on addressing youth mental health and suicide prevention. The high rate of suicide, particularly among young people, is a national tragedy which we are taking strong action to address. Recognising that the causes of suicide are complex and extend into social services and finances, the Prime Minister will make suicide prevention a key personal priority by creating a Suicide Prevention Co-ordinator in his department to coordinate suicide prevention initiatives across the whole of Government.

The Government’s $461.1 million commitment to addressing youth mental health and suicide prevention is guaranteed, including by providing:

  • $15 million to ensure that communities and services can respond quickly to areas affected by high incidences of suicides and self-harm by creating a new national information system.
  • $15 million to empower Indigenous suicide prevention.
  • $111 million to expand the headspace network by 30 — from the current 115 services to 145 by 2021, to enable more young people to access support.
  • $152 million to reduce wait times at headspace centres around the country. This will bring our total investment in headspace to over $120 million a year.
  • $2 million investment in the Young Ambassadors for Mental Health project, which will enrich these services by enabling young ambassadors with lived experience of mental health issues to get out into the community to promote mental health literacy, and improve how people seek help.
  • $110 million to continue the Early Psychosis Youth Services program at 14 headspace centres to provide specialist clinical services for young people at the early stages of severe mental illness.

Our Government is also dedicated to supporting the mental health of adults around the country in order to promote wellbeing and prevent suicides. To improve how people access care, and the quality of services, we will deliver a trial of adult mental health centres in eight locations nationally, at a cost of $115 million. These will provide walk-in, coordinated care and advice for anyone with concerns, and will address what is seen by many as a missing gap in the health system. We will improve perinatal mental health services by providing $43.9 million to support Australians affected by perinatal mental illness during or after pregnancy, or experiencing grief after the death of an infant. By investing $11.5 million in a National Mental Health Workplace Initiative we will support businesses — from sole traders to multinationals — and workers to create a mentally healthy workplace, giving workers the opportunity to maintain the best possible mental health and wellbeing.

We are also investing an additional $112 million in mental health through the CHHP with a focus on youth and Indigenous mental health and suicide prevention, and integrated community mental health.

6.Investing in life saving and job creating medical research

The Government is ensuring record funding of $6 billion over the forward estimates for medical research, with $3.5 billion for the National Health and Medical Research Council, $0.5 billion for the Biotechnology Translation Fund, and $2.3 billion for the MRFF — up from $222 million in 2018-19 to $650 million in 2022-23.

The Government is committing to a new $5 billion 10-year MRFF investment plan across four themes Patients, Researchers, Missions and Translation. Under the Patients theme, the government will invest $614 million in the rare cancers, rare diseases clinical trials program.

The Government’s 10-year investment plan will give researchers and industry certainty and direction through the four key areas:

7.Patients

The Government will commit a further $931.0 million for a total of $1.3 billion allocated under the Investment Plan to improve the health of Australians through the development of new treatments and cures informed by the latest research and using cutting edge technology, which includes:

  • Clinical Trials for Rare Cancers, Rare Diseases and Unmet Needs – a further

$354.0 million for a total of $614.2 million;

  • Emerging Priorities and Consumer Driven Research – a further $554.0 million for a total of $633.0 million; and
  • Global Health – Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance and Drug Resistant Tuberculosis – a further $23.0 million for a total of $28.4 million.

Researchers

The Government will commit a further $444.6 millionfor a total of $792.8 million allocated under the Investment Plan to support our best health and medical researchers to make breakthrough discoveries, develop their skills and progress their careers in Australia, which includes:

  • Frontier Health and Medical Research – a further $330.0 million for a total of $570.0 million;
  • Industry Researcher Exchange and Training – existing allocation of $32.0 million; and Clinical Researchers – a further $114.6 million for a total of $190.8 million.

Missions

The Government will commit a further $1.2 billion for a total of $1.4 billion allocated under the Investment Plan for long tenn focused missions to address complex and sizeable health issues requiring a concerted effort to transition great ideas through to proof-of-concept and beyond, which includes:

  • Australian Brain Cancer Mission — a further $2.0 million for a total of $ 123.6 million (including $65.3 million in philanthropic contributions, $5.0 million in clinical trials funding and $3.4 million in research funding);
  • Million Minds Mental Health Research Mission – existing allocation of $125.0 million;

Genomics Health Futures Mission – a further $430.2 million for a total of $500.0 million;

  • Ageing, and Aged Care and Dementia Mission – a new investment of $ 185.0 million;
  • Indigenous Health Futures – a new investment of $125.0 million for a total of $160.0 million;
  • Stem Cell Mission – a new investment of $ 150.0 million;
  • Cardiovascular Mission – a new investment of $220.0 million; and Traumatic Brain Injury – a new investment of $50.0 million.

Translation

The Government will commit a further $1.2 billion for a total of $ I .5 billion allocated under the Investment Plan to progress research ideas from the lab to the clinic, ensuring new medical discoveries are part of the clinical practice of GPs, specialists and hospitals, which includes:

  • Preventive and Public Health Research – a further $60.0 million for a total of $260.4 million.
  • Primary Health Care Research – a new investment of $45.0 million;
  • Rapid Applied Research Translation Centres – a further $ 143.0 million for a total of $218.0 million;

Medical Research Commercialisation – a further $254.0 million for a total of $311.3 million;

  • National Critical Infrastructure – a new investment of $605.0 million; and Data Infrastructure – focus on registries, biobanks & linkage platforms – a new investment of $80.0 million.

8.Investing in preventive health

The Budget funds a range of preventive health initiatives to tackle some of Australia’s most pressing social and health challenges. These include lifestyle-related blood diseases, drugs, family and domestic violence, and unhealthy eating.

We are allocating $45.4 million to implement national awareness and prevention strategies to reduce the impact of blood borne viruses, such as HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C, and sexually transmissible infections, such as syphilis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia. These strategies focus on the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

More alcohol and other drug treatment and support services will be established in remote, rural and regional areas, costing $9.6 million. An additional 65 specialist service providers will operate after hours and on weekends across hundreds of under-serviced areas.

Funding of $4.3 million will provide local support for families and communities struggling with the impacts of illicit drug misuse, including ice.

We will also invest $7.2 million establishing a take-home naloxone program to reduce deaths associated with opioids. Naloxone is a proven treatment in reversing the effect of an opioid overdose.

Family and domestic violence has a profound impact on women and children’s health and wellbeing, families and communities, and society. A ‘Recognise, Respond, Refer’ pilot, already under way in Brisbane, will receive a $7.5 million boost to be extended across five Primary Health Network regions to train GPs and their staff to recognise and manage family violence. A complementary $2.1 million training initiative will further improve the domestic violence response of GPs and primary care workers nationally.

The Government will allocate $20 million for a pivotal anti-smoking campaign.

9.Supporting senior Australians

We have increased funding for aged care by $7 billion over the forward estimates, up from $13.3 billion in 2012-13 to $20.5 billion in 2018-19 to $25.4 billion in 2022-23.

We have increased the number of home care packages from 60,308 in 2012—13 to 124,032 in 2018—19 and 157,154 in 2022—23 as part of our ongoing response to senior Australians’ clear preference to receive aged care in their own homes and live independently for longer.

With the rapid growth in home care, the Government is providing $5.6 million to strengthen compliance to tackle the risk of poor quality service and fraud. The Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission — Australia’s new cop on the aged care beat — will have a key role, including increasing home care audits.

The Commonwealth Home Support Program will be extended for a further two years to

30 June 2022, representing an investment of $5.9 billion. This will give certainty to around 1500 organisations, such as meals-on-wheels, supporting almost one million older Australians as they age and start to require assistance while still living in their own home.

In residential aged care, the Government has invested $320 million in 2018—19 as a one-off increase to the general subsidy through to 30 June 2020. This will support the increase in residential places from 186,000 in 2012-13 to 212,000 in 2018-19 to 243,000 in 2022-23. We will also work to significantly improve monitoring and reporting of serious incidents involving residents, including incidents involving physical or chemical restraint.

Funding of $7.7 million will help to ensure the use of medication, in particular inappropriate use of psychotropics and antibiotics, in residential aged care is brought into line with best practice and community expectations. Clinical pharmacists will work directly with aged care providers to better inform them about appropriate use. Providers will be obliged to provide medication management data.

Building the aged care workforce for the future is a high Government priority. We are allocating $2.6 million to step up industry-led implementation of the Aged Care Workforce Strategy. This will improve capability, conditions and career opportunities for more than 366,000 aged care workers.

10. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

The Coalition Government has delivered a stronger economy that ensures we can make record investments in services and opportunities for First Australians.

The 2019-20 Budget includes measures across many Departments that delivers record investments into health, safety, education and employment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

For the first time in a decade the budget will be back in surplus and we are investing the dividends of our strong budget management to make lives better for First Australians.

“This Budget focusses on empowering communities and through job creation, through education and by continuing to deliver the services that keep communities safe, healthy and culturally prosperous.

“The Government’s investments announced in the Budget ensure Indigenous Australians can seize the opportunities we are creating for all Australians from a stronger economy.”

The budget continues the Coalition Government’s efforts to invest in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to deliver services for their communities. Since coming to government we have doubled the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service providers from 30 per cent to 60 per cent.

The cross-portfolio investment in initiatives to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians include:

  • The continued investment of $5.2 billion in the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS).
  • An additional $5.3 billion to support more than 224,000 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander students through the Indigenous loading component of our schools funding package (to 2029).
  • $1 billion for Indigenous health through the Department of Health.
  • $37.5 million to support better housing for residents of remote Indigenous communities in South Australia.
  • $276.5 million for the Indigenous Youth Education Package to give more Indigenous students the support and mentoring they need through their secondary studies.
  • $35 million to support initiatives to address drivers of violence under the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.
  • $2.5 million for the eSafety Commissioner as part of the Fourth Action Plan of the National Action Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children.The eSafety Commissioner will work with and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in communities across Australia to identify, report and protect themselves and their children form technology-facilitated abuse.
  • $5 million towards regionally specific Indigenous Suicide Prevention Initiatives that are tailored to the needs of each community and led by local Indigenous Youth leaders.
  • $35 million contribution to support securing tourism and jobs in Kakadu in Jabiru.
  • $7.3 million to undertake a co-design process with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to detail options for Constitutional Recognition and a Voice to Parliament.
  • $62.4 million over four years under the Skills Package to support participation in the labour market with VET,language, literacy, numeracy, and digital literacy skills assistance in remote communities.
  • $36.4 million over five years for extending the Family Tax Benefit to families of ABSTUDY recipients aged 16 and over who study away from home.
  • A $45.4 million commitment by the Commonwealth over four years for the Barkly Regional Deal to deliver a suite of short, medium and long-term initiatives to support economic and social development in the Barkly region.
  • Regional deals in Hinkler, Albury/Wodonga and Adelaide will pursue opportunities for Indigenous Businesses and employment.
  • Legal Assistance Package – annual increases to baseline funding for Legal Aid Commissions, Community Legal Centres and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services with a single National Mechanism to be developed by the end of 2019.
  • $5 million for getting kids to school through working community by community and school by school to invest in remote and very remote areas for projects that support and promote school attendance.

The $5.2 billion Indigenous Advancement Strategy includes targeted programmes and activities to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians can take advantage of the opportunities the economy is creating. The Indigenous Advancement Strategy delivers on the ground funding in partnership with communities, ensuring children are attending school, adults are in employment and communities are safe.

The $200 million Indigenous Youth Education Package includes initiatives to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander secondary school students. The package will fund additional secondary school scholarships and residential support for students who move away from home to study, and more student support through academy and mentoring projects.

Additionally, the Government is supercharging growth in the Indigenous business sector by expanding the Indigenous Procurement Policy (IPP) by introducing a new 3 per cent value target for all Commonwealth contracts to be awarded to Indigenous business within the next decade. The IPP has resulted in more than $1.83 billion in contracts to more than 1,470 Indigenous companies since it was created in 2015. In contrast fewer than 30 Indigenous companies won a paltry $6.2 million worth of contracts across the Australian Government in the 2012-13 financial year.

Through the Indigenous Business Sector Strategy we are already delivering the $90 million Indigenous Entrepreneurs Fund, $27 million for the Indigenous Entrepreneurs Capital Scheme, $55 million for the Business Development Assistance Program, $21 million for additional microfinance as well as a $20 million Performance Bond Facility.

Through our commitments to housing, better services,reducing the incidents of family and domestic violence,empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, driving investment in the Indigenous businesses, all through deeper engagement and more local decision making, we are delivering a better future for First Australians.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #ClosingTheGap Prime Minister Scott Morrison announces new #ClosingtheGap Partnership Agreement 2019-2029 with 40 Indigenous peak bodies able to engage and negotiate as equal partners with governments to design and monitor Closing the Gap.

“The Closing the Gap Partnership Agreement will focus all of our efforts to deliver better health, education and employment outcomes for Indigenous Australians.

It recognises that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples must play an integral part in making the decisions that affect their lives. This agreement will put Indigenous peoples at the heart of the development and implementation of the next phase of Closing the Gap, embedding shared decision making and accountability at the centre of the way we do business.

In order to effect real change, governments must work collaboratively and in genuine, formal partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples because they are the essential agents of change. The change we all want to see will only come if we work together.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the new Closing the Gap Partnership Agreement between the Federal Government, states, territories and the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations (Coalition of Peaks) would ensure decision makers worked closer than ever to deliver real change for Indigenous Australians.

Download the CTG FACT Sheet and Partnership Agreement from Here

CTG Final fact sheet (1)

– Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap 2019-2029[73948]

“The historic Partnership Agreement means that for the first time Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, through their peak bodies, will share decision making with governments on Closing the Gap.

Closing the gap is not just about targets and programs. It is about making sure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples can share in the decision making about policies and programs that impact on them and have a real say over their own lives.

The Partnership Agreement is a significant step forward in this direction and the Coalition of Peaks is looking forward to working closely with the Council of Australian Governments to honour our shared commitment to closing the gap.”

Patricia Turner (CEO of NACCHO ) on behalf of the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations said almost 40 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies across Australia had come together as partners with governments on Closing the Gap. See Also NACCHO Press Release Part 2

PRIME MINISTER

THE HON. SCOTT MORRISON MP

MINISTER FOR INDIGENOUS AFFAIRS
SEN. THE HON. NIGEL SCULLION
 

PATRICIA TURNER
ON BEHALF OF THE COALITION OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEAK ORGANISATION

PARTNERING WITH INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS TO CLOSE THE GAP

Read all NACCHO COAG Articles Here 

An historic agreement is set to change the way governments and Indigenous Australians work together on Closing the Gap.

The Agreement was developed collaboratively with the Coalition of Peaks, the largest group of Indigenous community controlled organisations, and committed to by all levels of government. It builds on the December 2018 decision by the Council of Australian Governments to  establish a formal partnership on Closing the Gap between governments and Indigenous Australians.

The partnership will include a Joint Council on Closing the Gap, which for the first time will include ministers nominated by jurisdictions, together with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives chosen by the Coalition of Peaks.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion will co-chair the first meeting of the Joint Council alongside Pat Turner, CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and on behalf of the Coalition of Peaks.

“The Joint Council represents an historic step forward in the practical working relationship between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and governments,” Minister Scullion said.

“This is the first time Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives and ministerial leaders have met formally as part of a Joint Council to progress the Closing the Gap agenda and improve the lives of Indigenous Australians no matter where they live.

“To support this historic partnership, we will deliver $4.6 million to the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations to ensure the representatives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are able to engage and negotiate as equal partners with governments to design and monitor Closing the Gap.

“This is a new way of doing business that reflects that the top-down approach established in 2008 while well-intentioned, did not truly seek to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Australians. We enter this partnership recognising that Canberra cannot change it all and that we need more then lofty goals and bureaucratic targets.

“Finalising the refresh of the Closing the Gap framework and monitoring its implementation over the next ten years is critical to the future and prosperity of all Australians.

“We are committed to working closely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Australia to improve the lives of Indigenous Australians.”

Patricia Turner on behalf of the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations said almost 40 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies across Australia had come together as partners with governments on Closing the Gap.

The refreshed Closing the Gap framework and targets will be finalised through the Joint Council by mid-2019, ahead of endorsement by COAG. The Joint Council will meet for the first time on 27 March 2019 in Brisbane.

“Closing the gap is not just about targets and programs. It is about making sure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples can share in the decision making about policies and programs that impact on them and have a real say over their own lives.

“The Partnership Agreement is a significant step forward in this direction and the Coalition of Peaks is looking forward to working closely with the Council of Australian Governments to honour our shared commitment to closing the gap.”

Part 2

Download a copy of this NACCHO Press Release

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) has welcomed the signing of an historic Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap between the Commonwealth Government, State and Territory Governments and the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies.

The announcement will be made at the first Joint Council Meeting between the new partners in Brisbane

The Coalition of Peaks is made up of around forty Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisations that have come together to negotiate with governments and be signatories to the Partnership Agreement.

NACCHO Chief Executive, Pat Turner, said the Agreement means that for the first time Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, through their peak body representatives, will share decision making with governments on Closing the Gap.

“For some time now, NACCHO, along with other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations have been calling for a greater say with governments on efforts to close the unacceptable gaps in life outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the broader community,” said Ms Turner.

“The Coalition of Peaks believe that shared decision making between governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled representatives in the design, implementation and monitoring of Closing the Gap is essential to closing the gap”.

The Partnership Agreement sets out how governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peaks bodies will work together to agree a refreshed national agreement on Closing the Gap, including any new Closing the Gap targets and implementation and monitoring arrangements.

Ms Turner said the Partnership Agreement also marks the establishment of a new, Joint Council on Closing the Gap that will be co-chaired by a Minister and a representative of the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies.

“We look forward to a hardworking and constructive partnership with the Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments to secure better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples,” said Ms Turner.

The Partnership Agreement can be accessed at After 8.00am : https://www.naccho.org.au/ programmes/coalition-of-peaks/

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #WorldKidneyDay #Organdonation :  Minister @KenWyattMP announces $2.3mill for @TSANZ_txsoc proposal to address inequity and launches report Improving Kidney Transplant Outcomes for our mob

 

” I have the pleasure of launching a significant report in improving access to organ and tissue donation, but also the establishment of a national task force that will undertake work to look at, what the obstacles are, what are the challenges and considerations we need to make in the way in which people access the transplant list, but also the operations that follow”.

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt announced the national project on Tuesday, saying it aimed to combat the low rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians receiving donor kidneys and has announced it will provide $2.3 million towards increasing the number of Indigenous Australians receiving donor kidneys. see full speech part 2 Below

PHOTO: Darwin dialysis patient Jacqueline Amagula would like to be waitlisted for a kidney transplant. (ABC News: Bridget Brennan)

Download copy of report

Kidney Transplantation Report

World Kidney Day – Thursday 14 March 2019

World Kidney Day is an annual global campaign to raise awareness of the importance of kidney health.

Chronic kidney disease affects approximately 195 million women worldwide and it is currently the 8th leading cause of death in women, with close to 600,000 deaths each year.

On its 14th anniversary, World Kidney Day promotes affordable and equitable access to health education, healthcare and prevention for kidney diseases for all.

Find out more at www.worldkidneyday.org

” Australians should be “saddened, angry and flabbergasted” that Indigenous patients are up to 10 times less likely to be added to the kidney donation waitlist than non-Indigenous patients, a leading renal specialist has said.

Background Key points 2017

  • Indigenous dialysis patients 10 times less likely to be put on a waitlist for kidney transplant
  • Dr Paul Lawton says non-Indigenous doctors are biased towards non-Indigenous dialysis patients
  • Professor Steve Chadban says racism is not to blame

Dr Paul Lawton, a specialist at the Menzies School of Health Research, said Australian kidney specialists were “well meaning” but that structural racism had led to unacceptably low transplant rates for Aboriginal patients.

He said Australia’s system was tipped towards waitlisting non-Indigenous patients over Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Currently, our system is structured so that us non-Indigenous, often male, middle-aged white kidney specialists offer kidney transplants to people like ourselves,

Dr Lawton told 7.30.

The report was commissioned in June 2018, partly in response to figures that suggested Indigenous patients are 10 times less likely than non-Indigenous patients to be added to the waiting list for a kidney donation transplant :Picture Below 2017

FROM SBS / NITV 

Despite those figures, 13 per cent of patients receiving dialysis treatment in Australia are Indigenous.

The report was compiled by the Transplantation Society of Australia and New Zealand and prioritises three of its 35 recommendations, including the establishment of a National Indigenous Kidney Transplantation taskforce.

Professor Stephen McDonald, a nephrologist at the Royal Adelaide Hospital and one of the report’s authors, said the funding announcement is an important step.

“This is a very clear next step, and a change in focus from identifying with the problem, to actually doing something about the problem in a coordinated fashion. There have been a variety of bodies who have had input in this area in the past, but this is the first time there’s been a coordinated and focused approach.”

Indigenous people, especially those who live in remote communities, have a much greater risk of developing end-stage kidney disease, which initially requires dialysis treatment.

However, once Indigenous people make it on to the transplant waiting list, they receive transplants at around the same rate as non-Indigenous people.

Part 2 :Minister for Senior Australians and Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, MP speech at the 2019 Donation and Transplantation Conference – Indigenous Health Roundtable

Good morning everyone – in West Australian Noongar language, I say “kaya wangju” – hello and welcome.

I acknowledge the traditional owners of the land on which we meet, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation, and pay my respects to their Elders past, present and future.

I also acknowledge:

  • Lucinda Barry (CEO of Australia’s Organ and Tissue Authority)
  • Chairman of the OTA Board, Dr Mal Washer and Board members:
    • Professor Carol Pollock (deputy Chair)
    • Dr Marisa Herson
    • Margaret Kruger
    • Oren Klemich
    • Prof Stephen Lynch

I welcome our special international guests:

  • Howard Nathan (President and CEO of the Gift of Life Donor Program in Philadelphia, United States)
  • Chris Callaghan (Consultant kidney and pancreas transplant surgeon at Guy’s Hospital, Great Ormond Street Hospital and Evelina London Children’s Hospital, London, UK)
  • Dr Nick Cross (nephrologist at Christchurch Hospital, New Zealand)
  • And all the distinguished attendees here today.

On behalf of the Morrison Government and the Organ and Tissue Authority, I thank you for joining us for this important conference.

Organ and tissue donation and transplantation is an area I am very passionate about, and one that is critical to our nations’ health systems.

We are celebrating 10 years of the Australian Government’s national program to improve organ and tissue donation for transplantation in Australia.

At this significant anniversary, I think it is an important opportunity to reflect on how far we have come.

Since 2009, the national program has seen the number of deceased organ donors more than double – to 554 in 2018.

This has resulted in more than 11,000 people receiving a lifesaving transplant.

There has also been more than 16,000 Australians receiving the gift of sight since 2009.

And last year, we achieved our highest ever consent rate of 64 per cent due to more Australians saying ‘yes’ to donation.

The data gives us essential facts but what has made this real for me has been talking to those families who have said yes to donation and those that have had their lives transformed by a transplant.

I heard from a teenage boy who talked about his Dad becoming a donor, and the comfort it gave him knowing his father had given someone else the chance to live.

He spoke with pride about his Dad and pondered whether whoever had received his organs would also develop the same passions for life and sport that his father had.

And in January this year I was at St Vincent’s Hospital, here in Sydney.

There I met Jayden Cummins – a single Dad who in 2017 was living a normal life, caring for his teenage son, when he contracted the flu.

His life was turned upside down when he was told he needed a heart transplant.

He showed me his black little bag with his Ventricular Assist Device that he was permanently attached to – keeping him alive.

He had been waiting about 18 months, however he remained positive and totally focused on being there for his son.

Today, I was informed that Jayden has had his transplant and is on the road to recovery. I wish Jayden all the best and thank the generosity of his donor and their family for giving him the gift of life.

This is just one story that shows the importance of your work and the significant impact is has on people’s lives.

Like everyone attending this conference, our Government’s focus is on continuing to enhance clinical programs in hospitals, and the systems which support donation and transplantation services.

But what if we find a group of people within our communities who are not receiving their fair share of increasing organ donation and transplantation?

Last year, I saw figures showing that, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people registered for Renal Replacement Therapy, only 13 per cent received transplants, compared with 51 per cent of non-Indigenous Australians.

So, in June I announced funding for the Transplantation Society of Australia and New Zealand to lead an expert panel, to investigate and identify transplantation barriers facing our people.

The expert panel, convened by Prof Stephen McDonald, has produced an outstanding report: Improving Access to and Outcomes of Kidney Transplantation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in Australia.

I want to thank all members of the panel for their contribution to this comprehensive document, which I am releasing – and endorsing – today.

Furthermore, I am proud to announce that the Morrison Government will provide $2.3 million to drive a national project to lift the low rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians receiving donor organs, as recommended in the report.

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #IWD2019 : $35 million investment in #FourthActionPlan will respond to the needs, backgrounds and experiences of #Indigenous women and children affected by domestic, family and sexual violence.

Unfortunately however too many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women face far higher levels of violence than the general community and that is why we need to put in place genuine Indigenous designed and Indigenous led solutions.
 
“The $35 million in Indigenous specific measures announced today will help tackle the drivers of family and domestic violence and address the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by violence.”

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said the investments announced as part of the Fourth Action Plan will respond to the needs, backgrounds and experiences of Indigenous women and children affected by domestic, family and sexual violence.: see Part 1 Below

Our Government’s first priority is to keep Australians safe. To hear the accounts of survivors, and see the statistics, it’s just not good enough .That’s why we are investing $328 million for the Fourth Action Plan to fund prevention, response and recovery initiatives.

This is the largest ever Commonwealth contribution to the National Plan. To stop violence against women, we need to counter the culture of disrespect towards women. A culture of disrespect towards women is a precursor to violence, and anyone who doesn’t see that is kidding themselves.   That’s why we are investing so heavily in prevention with $68.3 million to stop violence before it begins.

This is about changing attitudes to violence, and helping those who think violence is an option, to stop.

We will also develop Australia’s first national prevention strategy to stop domestic and family violence and sexual assault, and continue our work to change the attitudes and beliefs that can lead to violence.”

The Prime Minister said his Government would deliver the largest ever Commonwealth investment of $328 million for prevention and frontline services through the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022. See in Full Part 2

 

‘ This measure also supports an update of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners’ Abuse and violence: Working with our patients in general practice  
 
After family and friends, it is GPs and other primary care providers who survivors of family and domestic violence turn to for support.

The quality of the response from the GP has been found to have a deep and profound impact on victims, influencing whether they seek help and support in the future.’

Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said the Government is committing $9.6 million to boost family violence care. Of that funding, Minister Hunt said $2.1 million over three years will be invested to train 5000 primary care workers across Australia, including GPs, ‘to better respond and support family violence victims’ See Part 3 Below 

Part 1 : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their children will receive support through the Federal Government’s $35 million investment as part of the Fourth Action Plan (4AP) of the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

The $35 million package includes:

  • Ongoing additional investment to continue and expand Indigenous specific projects funded under the Third Action Plan to keep women and their children safe from violence including funding to increase Family Violence Prevention Legal Services’ capacity to deliver holistic crisis support to Indigenous women and children
  • New funding to support Indigenous women and children through intensive family case management in remote areas and areas of high need so they are able to access services that work with the whole family to address the impacts of violence
  • Practical intervention programs to work with Indigenous young people and adults at risk of experiencing or using violence to address past trauma and equip them with the practical tools and skills to develop positive and violence-free relationships
  • $1.7 million to support the second stage of the Wiyi YaniU Thangani (Women’s Voices) national conversation with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, June Oscar AO.

“These measures, funded out of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, have been developed in partnership with Indigenous leaders, service providers and experts who have told us that investment is needed to provide wrap around support to women and their families impacted by domestic violence and to address the trauma and violence that is often a cause of future violence.

“These measures will also be rolled out in consultation with Indigenous Australians with the establishment of an expert consultative committee involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders, experts and service providers such as representatives of the Family Violence Prevention Legal Services to ensure these measures are delivered in a culturally appropriate way, in the areas of highest need and with Indigenous organisations and service providers that can best meet the needs of women and their families. Appropriate monitoring and evaluation strategies will also be built into this work.

“On top of this investment, the Coalition Government will provide $2.5 million for the Office of the eSafety Commissioner to work with and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in communities across Australia to identify, report and protect themselves and their children from technology-facilitated abuse.

“Funding will also be provided to 1800RESPECT to improve accessibility for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to ensure they have access to high quality and culturally appropriate counselling and support.

“Together these initiatives provide a comprehensive suite of measures to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, victims and survivors of family and domestic violence and builds on existing initiatives such as the Coalition’s record $121 million investment to 2020 for 14 Family Violence Prevention Legal Services,” Minister Scullion said.

If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au.

Part 2 RECORD FUNDING TO REDUCE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Combating violence against women and children remains one of the Federal Government’s top priorities, as part of its plan to keep Australians safe.

The Prime Minister said his Government would deliver the largest ever Commonwealth investment of $328 million for prevention and frontline services through the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

“Our Government’s first priority is to keep Australians safe. To hear the accounts of survivors, and see the statistics, it’s just not good enough,” the Prime Minister said.

“That’s why we are investing $328 million for the Fourth Action Plan to fund prevention, response and recovery initiatives.

“This is the largest ever Commonwealth contribution to the National Plan.

“To stop violence against women, we need to counter the culture of disrespect towards women.

“A culture of disrespect towards women is a precursor to violence, and anyone who doesn’t see that is kidding themselves.

“That’s why we are investing so heavily in prevention with $68.3 million to stop violence before it begins.

“This is about changing attitudes to violence, and helping those who think violence is an option, to stop. “We will also develop Australia’s first national prevention strategy to stop domestic and family violence and sexual assault, and continue our work to change the attitudes and beliefs that can lead to violence.”

The National Plan connects the important work being done by all Australian governments, community organisations and individuals so that Australian women and children can live in safe communities.

The National Plan and the Government’s investments are the product of extensive consultations with frontline workers and survivors ahead of the release of the Fourth Action Plan 2019-22 in mid-2019.

Minister for Families and Social Services Paul Fletcher said the Commonwealth would invest $35 million in support and prevention measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and $78 million to provide safe places for people impacted by domestic and family violence.

“We will act against the different forms abuse can take, including preventing financial abuse and technology-facilitated abuse, and we have included specific measures targeted to address the risks faced by women with intellectual disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women,” Minister Fletcher said.

The Commonwealth commitment will also fund targeted prevention initiatives to reach culturally and linguistically diverse communities and people with disability.

“Domestic violence is a risk that all women face – but we recognise that specific groups may have particular vulnerability, which is why there are specific targeted measures included in this package.”

“Today’s announcement brings Commonwealth investment in this space since 2013 to over $840 million,” said Mr Fletcher.

The Commonwealth’s commitment also provides $82 million for frontline services, including investments to improve and build on the systems responsible for keeping women and children safe, such as free training for health workers to identify and better support domestic violence victims, and the development of national standards for sexual assault responses.

The Coalition will investment $62 million in 1800RESPECT to support the service, which has rapidly grown in scope as more Australians find the courage to seek help and advice.

Minister for Women Kelly O’Dwyer said all women and children have the right to feel safe, and to feel supported to seek help when they need it.

“The statistics on this issue are shocking – one in six women have experienced physical or sexual violence by a current or former partner since the age of 15. This figure increases to nearly one in four women when violence by boyfriends, girlfriends and dates is included,” Minister O’Dwyer said.

“The safety of women and children is vitally important. Our Government has zero tolerance for violence against women and children.

“Whether it’s at home, in the workplace, in our communities or online, all women and children deserve to be safe.”

Summary of new measures:

  • $82 million for frontline services
  • $68 million for prevention strategies
  • $35 million in support and prevention measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities funded under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.
  • $78 million to provide safe places for people impacted by domestic and family violence.
  • 1800RESPECT will receive $64 million to support the service.

The Coalition has taken strong action already to protect women and children, including:

  • introducing a minimum standard for domestic violence leave for the very first time;
  • banning the direct cross-examination of women by their alleged perpetrator during family law proceedings;
  • extending early release of superannuation on compassionate grounds to victims of family and domestic violence;
  • expanding Good Shepherd Microfinance’s No Interest Loan Scheme to 45,000 women experiencing family and domestic violence;
  • providing over 7,046 visas for women and children needing safe refuge through the Women at Risk program;
  • extending funding for Specialist Domestic Violence Units and Health Justice Partnerships including funding for additional financial support services;
  • funding support for an additional 31,200 families to resolve family law disputes quickly through mediation;
  • continuing advertising of the award winning Stop it at the Start campaign;
  • further funding 1800RESPECT, the National Sexual Assault, Domestic and Family Violence Counselling Service;
  • investing an additional $6.7 million in DV alert;
  • prioritising women and children who are escaping family violence in the $7.8 billion housing and homelessness agreement; and
  • establishing the eSafety Commissioner in 2017, expanding the scope of the Office of the Children’s eSafety Commissioner.

About the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children (2010-2022) (the National Plan)

The National Plan aims to connect the important work being done by all Australian governments, community organisations and individuals to reduce violence so that we can work together to ensure each year, less women experience violence and more women and their children live safely.

The Commonwealth Government is leading the development of the Fourth Action Plan 2019-2022 of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022 (the National Plan) in partnership with state and territory governments.

The Fourth Action Plan is the final action plan of the National Plan and is due for implementation from mid-2019.

For further information on the National Plan, visit

Part 3 Major funding boost for family violence training

FROM RACGP Post

Family violence has been in the spotlight, with two large funding pledges from the Federal Government.

In one announcement, Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said the Government is committing $9.6 million to boost family violence care.

Of that funding, Minister Hunt said $2.1 million over three years will be invested to train 5000 primary care workers across Australia, including GPs, ‘to better respond and support family violence victims’.

That training will be delivered by accredited providers and will reflect evidence-based trauma-informed models of care and culturally appropriate care.

‘This measure also supports an update of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners’ Abuse and violence: Working with our patients in general practice,’ Minister Hunt said.

‘After family and friends, it is GPs and other primary care providers who survivors of family and domestic violence turn to for support.

‘The quality of the response from the GP has been found to have a deep and profound impact on victims, influencing whether they seek help and support in the future.’

A further $7.5m will be provided over three years towards expanding the Recognise, Respond and Refer Program, an initiative of the Brisbane South Primary Health Network (PHN) to a further four PHN regions.

The trial states that it will:

  • deliver whole-of-practice training to GP staff to recognise the signs of family violence
  • develop locally relevant care and referral pathways for people who are, or are at risk of, experiencing family violence
  • provide post-training support to practices to assist them to put in place training to identify and support victims of family violence
  • develop models to integrate primary healthcare into the domestic and family violence sector in the local region, including clear roles for GPs.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Press Release : @NACCHOChair is appalled and perplexed about Non -Aboriginal privately-owned company being granted $1.7 million funding

“ The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation ( NACCHO ) is appalled that funding of almost $1.7 million to Redimed was approved by the federal Aboriginal Health Minister Ken Wyatt two weeks ago

I am totally perplexed how a non-Aboriginal, privately-owned company, that has no experience whatsoever of working in the delivery of comprehensive primary health to Aboriginal people, can be given a federal government grant of almost $1.7 million.”

Ms Donnella Mills, Acting Chair of NACCHO

Download full NACCHO Press Release or read Part 1 Below 

NACCHO Press Release Questions about Aboriginal funding to Non Aboriginal Company

“ The decision to award such significant funding to a non-Indigenous organisation goes completely against the sentiments made in Prime Minister’s recent statement at the launch of the Closing the Gap Report,” 

Vicki O’Donnell, chair of the Aboriginal Health Council of WA, the peak body for the state’s 23 Aboriginal community-controlled health services said Aboriginal-controlled services were more accessible, performed better in key areas, and were the most cost-effective vehicles for delivering primary health care to Indigenous communities. See Full SMH Coverage Part 2

Our Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Organisations have the right to self-determination and self-management under the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Unless government begins to enable our Aboriginal Organisations to provide community-driven strength-based approaches to our people, it will not close the gap.”

Moorditj Koort Aboriginal Health and Wellness Centre, Indigenous-owned and run in Perth since being founded in 2010, CEO Jonathan Ford told the National Indigenous Times that it was unethical for non-Indigenous organisations to receive funds for Indigenous health services.

“NACCHO strongly believes that any such funding should only be given when there is an open and transparent process. In this case it was not.

We already have two well established Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services operating in Perth, Derbal Yerrigan and Moorditj Court,  and they would have welcomed the opportunity to apply for that funding.” she said.

“It is especially concerning that Redimed and its newly created entity, Aboriginal Medical Care 360 was not required to go through the proper normal application process that all our 145 Member Aboriginal Health Services must always do. Where is the clinical accreditation all our organisations must have prior to receiving government funding?” Ms Mills said.

“We trust the Federal Budget will include the much-needed funding of our sector that has repeatedly been sought and as outlined in our pre-budget submission lodged through Treasury in late January this year.” Ms Mills concluded.

See our NACCHO Pre Budget Submission HERE

Read AHCWA NACCHO Article HERE

Part 2 : Despite DIY rhetoric, federal Aboriginal health grant goes to non-Indigenous WA service

The federal Liberal government has shocked the Indigenous community by awarding almost $1.7 million from a funding program aimed at Aboriginal health services to a non-Indigenous organisation that employs a former WA Liberal minister.

From the SMH

Privately owned Redimed has former WA Liberal health minister Kim Hames on its staff as a GP.

Self-described in advertising materials as a “provider of specialised medical and injury management services”, it has not previously listed Indigenous health as a specialty.

But it says its pilot program will create Indigenous jobs and address unmet healthcare demand in one of Perth’s priority areas for Closing the Gap.

Senate estimates 22 February revealed there had been no tender process, closed or otherwise; the company had made an unsolicited bid for the two-year grant, approved by Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt.

A fortnight ago, when the 11th annual Closing the Gap report revealed that only two of seven targets were on track – neither concerning life expectancy – Prime Minister Scott Morrison had said the system was “set up to fail” through a lack of true partnership with Indigenous people, and promised an equal role for Indigenous leaders in redesigning the Closing the Gap process.

But the Indigenous community has “major concerns” about this federal funding decision, said a public statement from Vicki O’Donnell, chair of the Aboriginal Health Council of WA, the peak body for the state’s 23 Aboriginal community-controlled health services.

Ms O’Donnell queried how Redimed would add value to the two Aboriginal-controlled services already operating in Midland that had built connections with local Aboriginal people.

“How was the need for this additional service determined when there are already existing services in the area including Mooditj Koort, Derbarl Yerrigan and other not-for profit services?” she said.

She questioned how Redimed’s capacity to deliver the contract was determined, in terms of clinical accreditation and experience in delivering primary health care to Aboriginal people.

She also asked why, if additional funding was available, the government would not increase the support for the two Aboriginal-controlled services in Midland to expand.

Ms O’Donnell said Aboriginal-controlled services were more accessible, performed better in key areas, and were the most cost-effective vehicles for delivering primary health care to Indigenous communities.

“The decision to award such significant funding to a non-Indigenous organisation goes completely against the sentiments made in Prime Minister’s recent statement at the launch of the Closing the Gap Report,” she said.

The $800 million federal funding stream is “primarily aimed at and spent on Aboriginal-controlled organisations”, according to the Health Department.

About 85 per cent of its funding for front-line medical care goes to Aboriginal-controlled organisations, and another 10 per cent goes to state government services.

Only 5 per cent goes elsewhere, including now to Redimed for the pilot program of health assessments and follow-up home visits for Indigenous people in Rockingham, Joondalup and the eastern suburbs.

Moorditj Koort Aboriginal Health and Wellness Centre, Indigenous-owned and run in Perth since being founded in 2010, told the National Indigenous Times that it was unethical for non-Indigenous organisations to receive funds for Indigenous health services.

“Our Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Organisations have the right to self-determination and self-management under the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples,” he said.

“Unless government begins to enable our Aboriginal Organisations to provide community-driven strength-based approaches to our people, it will not close the gap.”

After questions from WA Senator Rachel Siewert in a Senate estimates hearing, the Health Department’s Caroline Edwards said while the “key focus” of the funding program was supporting Aboriginal-controlled organisations, the department was also “looking at alternative methods of primary care and alternative delivery methods to cater for different types of circumstances.”

“This particular grant is one of those instances of having a go at a different form of delivery to see how it works in a particular area,” she said.

Redimed won the grant on condition it consult and collaborate with Indigenous organisations. It says Koya Aboriginal Corporation in Midland will lead delivery of the project and will face independent evaluation at the end of the two years.

“We did state that the pilot was not to duplicate any already funded service and was to serve only clients who weren’t already visiting other funded services,” the Health Department’s Mark Roddam said at the estimates hearing.

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt emphasised the Redimed plan would be delivered in partnership with Koya Aboriginal Corporation in a “holistic and culturally focused” way.

He said it was normal for this funding program to receive unsolicited bids.

“It aims to fill a gap in services in two areas of Perth where there has been significant growth in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations,” he said.

“Under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program, unsolicited funding applications can be assessed against IAHP Guidelines. The key consideration is their capacity to help in Closing the Gap in health equality.”

A Redimed spokesman said Dr Hames was part of the initial funding application advisory team but was not involved with the team of 14 that developed the pilot program and submitted the final funding application.

Asked about Redimed’s Indigenous healthcare qualifications, he said the pilot would be delivered by a newly created entity, Aboriginal Medical Care 360, in close partnership with Koya and the Pindi Pindi Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Wellbeing.

Koya Aboriginal Corporation founding chairman and stolen generation survivor Allan Kickett, and Pindi Pindi patron Professor Fiona Stanley, both supported Redimed’s research and Mr Kickett would be in a leadership role on its delivery.

“Medical Practitioners care for people from all cultures and Redimed is already caring for Aboriginal patients,” he said.

“Statistics show that a high percentage of Aboriginal people are unable to attend Aboriginal Health centres for a variety of reasons, including not having access to or being able to afford transport to and from appointments.

“To address this, AMC360 will deliver health care in people’s homes or in local community settings where patients have family and friends close by.”

He said these home services, delivered by Aboriginal clinicians, were a key point of difference to existing  services.

He said the Greater City of Swan region was a federal priority area for Closing the Gap and up to 20 new Indigenous jobs would be created through the project.

State Coroner Ros Fogliani’s recent report into a string of Indigenous children’s suicides in the Kimberley resulted in 42 recommendations for this state.

Many of these, as well as the overall conclusion to the report, used the recommendations to push for better service design and delivery by Aboriginal people themselves.

She recommended the principles of self-determination and empowerment be given emphasis in programs relating to Aboriginal people in WA; that Aboriginal people and organisations be involved in setting and formulating policy and to share service delivery responsibilities.

“The considerable services already being provided to the region are not enough. They are still being provided from the perspective of mainstream services, that are adapted in an endeavour to fit into a culturally relevant paradigm,” she wrote.

“It may be time to consider whether the services themselves need to be co-designed in a completely different way, that recognises at a foundational level, the need for a more collective and inclusive approach.”

The Closing the Gap report revealed that while targets for increased participation in early childhood education and higher rates of year 12 attainment among Indigenous students were on track, the other five targets were not.

There had been little progress towards closing the gap in life expectancy, halving the gap in child mortality rates, halving the gap in employment and in reading and numeracy and closing the gap in school attendance.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosingTheGap : Our #ACCHO Aboriginal health sector could face a major shake-up, with the federal government flagging a preference for more mainstream funding and services 

” The government has been evaluating the IAHP, a $3.6 billion, four-year grants scheme running to 2021-22.

The Department of Health recently asked consultants to develop and test a sustainability strategy for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services .

It has told the consultants that “reducing the relative reliance of the ACCHS sector on IAHP grant funding” and making better use of Medicare and other funding is one solution.

Sean Parnell Health Editor The Australian Published HERE

Read our NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #RefreshtheCTGRefresh HERE

 

The Aboriginal health sector could face a major shake-up, with the federal government flagging a preference for more mainstream funding and services as it struggles to improve outcomes.

The commonwealth leads the delivery of primary healthcare, the Medicare Benefits Schedule, the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and funding for indigenous health through the Indigenous Australians Health Program.

Alongside mainstream services, there are more than 140 Aboriginal-controlled health services employing about 6000 staff, most of whom are indigenous, while the states

145 members operating 302 ACCHO Clinics

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The latest update on the Closing the Gap strategy, released last week, showed a smaller-than-expected increase in life expectancy for indigenous people, who continue to die about eight years earlier than other Australians.

“The target to close the gap in life expectancy by 2031 is not on track,” the report concluded.

While there had been a significant reduction in the indigenous mortality rate from chronic diseases, rates from cancer are rising and the gap in cancer mortality rates is widening.

The report foreshadowed more work being done on the social determinants of health; however, Scott Morrison declared “the main area of change needs to be in how governments approach implementation of policies and delivery of services”.

The government has been evaluating the IAHP, a $3.6 billion, four-year grants scheme running to 2021-22.

The Department of Health recently asked consultants to develop and test a sustainability strategy for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services .

It has told the consultants that “reducing the relative reliance of the ACCHS sector on IAHP grant funding” and making better use of Medicare and other funding is one solution.

IAHP funding is capped and distributions are based on historical allocations plus indexation, running at a rate of about 4 per cent. Medicare itself is not capped, although indexation of rebates can be frozen by the government.

“Therefore, improving access to and the appropriate use of Medicare benefits will also allow growth funding to be more specifically targeted towards gaps, deficiencies and barriers to access of (primary health) services by indigenous people,” the department told consultants.

The department expects the consultants to consider non-IAHP funding sources for the ACCHS, including their “ability to access philanthropic donations and their suitability for social impact bonds”.

The government has previously sought to stimulate more social impact investment, with Treasury arguing it has “the ­potential to complement (but not replace) the Australian government’s existing role and responsibilities across many portfolios”.

The engagement of consultants comes as the department awaits an evaluation of the effectiveness of the IAHP, having been advised that the ACCHS sector had a positive impact. In providing that advice, Deakin University noted that Medicare-funded mainstream services would otherwise expose vulnerable patients to out-of-pocket costs.

“If reliance were to be placed on mainstream services in lieu of ACCHS, reduced attendance and adherence to treatment is highly likely, due to services that may not meet their cultural needs and ­expectations,” the university reported.

“If this occurred, the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-indigenous Australians would increase rather than reduce.”

A recent study by the Australian National University and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association found the growth in indigenous health workers had not kept up with population growth. There has been an increase in NSW and Queensland but a decrease in the Northern Territory.

Association chief executive Karl Briscoe has emphasised they were a vital conduit between health services and the community. “It is the world’s first ethnic-based health profession that has national training curriculum as well as national regulation sitting behind it,” Briscoe says.

The Nursing and Midwifery Board has revised its code of conduct to refer to the need for indigenous patients to be afforded culturally safe and respectful care.

Some health and non-health groups opposed the move and, with the Medical Board of Australia now looking to adopt similar wording in its code, it remains a contentious issue.

While the department is still supportive of the ACCHS sector, it has foreshadowed a 2020 funding overhaul, subject to the outcome of the federal election and any change in policy.

Documents obtained under Freedom of Information laws show former commonwealth bureaucrat David Tune was asked to examine how unsolicited IAHP funding proposals were considered by the department and ­minister.

He found the process — which releases about $40 million a year — “works reasonably well” but still has “a number of serious problems”.

“Firstly, the nature of the process itself creates an inherent bias towards those ‘in the know’,” Tune concluded in November.

“This means that many (possibly worthy) organisations are missing out on opportunities to seek funding.”

Tune said there was also no mechanism for prioritising such funding andthere was a need for more weight to be given to innovative proposals.

The Australian National Audit Office last year criticised the lack of performance measurement and reporting for the IAHP, prompting the department to promise changes.