NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Events and Conferences : @SenatorDodson Constitutional Recognition hearings #ACT #NSW #SA #WA Plus NACCHO launches its National #OchreDay2018 Men’s Health Summit program and registrations

June 25 – July 6 Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition

The Parliamentary Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples has just concluded hearings at the Barunga Festival and in the Kimberley.

The Committee conducted hearings at Barunga, Halls Creek, Fitzroy Crossing, Kununurra and Broome. The Committee heard from organisations and individuals about how constitutional recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples might be implemented.

The Committee will be conducting hearings in Canberra on 25 June 2018.

It will be conducting further hearings in:

• Dubbo – 2 July 2018;

• Sydney/ Western Sydney – 3/4 July 2018;

• Adelaide – 5 July 2018; and

• Perth – 6 July 2018.

For location details etc

In particular the Committee is interested in hearing from witnesses about the design of the Voice proposal including proposals for constitutional change which emerged from the Uluru Statement from the Heart. This includes:

• Should the Voice be national, regional or local?

• How should its members be chosen?

• What functions should it have?

To make a submission on these issues please contact the secretariat on jsccr@aph.gov.au.

The Committee is due to present its interim report to Parliament on 30 July and the final report on 29 November 2018.

19 June 21 St Century Aboriginal Health Research

21st Century Aboriginal Health Research

The Aboriginal Health College is thrilled to be hosting a showcase of Aboriginal Health Research projects. This event is the first in a series of educational seminars promoting best practice in Aboriginal Health Research by exploring community engagement, Aboriginal Governance, evidence-based practice and how researchers achieved success working with community.

Please join us to hear from the SEARCH team at the Sax Institute, the POCHE Centre’s Adjunct Associate Professor Kylie Gwynne and University of Wollongong’s Professor Kathleen Clapham.

Bookings

2 – 4 July 2018 First Nations Governance Forum; :  Canberra

Museum of Australian Democracy
Old Parliament House, Canberra

As Australia’s national university, ANU has an obligation to constructively contribute to the discussion of policy reform and processes of significant issues concerning Indigenous Australia.

The University seeks to reignite national debate about Australia’s First Nations governance models and their contribution to policy. We are in a unique position to facilitate an International Indigenous-led discussion, with academic rigour, on some of the most challenging issues affecting the country.

We recognise that the academic expertise on these issues is distributed among universities around Australia and the world and welcomes contributions from interested parties.

Forum details

In 2018 ANU will host the First Nations Governance Forum with a goal to provide a series of policy options relevant to Australia through learning from models in other colonial settler states that demonstrate Indigenous peoples leadership in the governance of their affairs. The Forum will include a welcome dinner, keynote presentations, a series of high-level panel discussions and workshop sessions.

The Forum will be hosted with the support of Australia’s Federal Indigenous parliamentarians, Indigenous leaders, academics, government, leading international policy makers and other interested stakeholders. The Forum will consider First Nations governance reform in Australia and, share the experiences of Indigenous people in comparable jurisdictions including Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada, USA and Scandinavian countries. The Forum will build on the extensive work undertaken on this issue including the Report of the Expert Panel on Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution (2012), the Report of the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (2015) and the Uluru Statement from the Heart (2017).

Attendance options

Broad participation in the Forum from across the community is encouraged and supported. The Forum is a public event. Attendance is free (though attendees will be responsible for their own expenses including travel, accommodation and meals). The Forum will also be live-streamed and recorded to ensure remote access.

The following attendance options are available:

  1. Onsite
    An Expression of Interest process will be conducted for a limited number of seats available at the Museum of Australian Democracy. Complete the Expression of Interest form by 13 June. Applicants will be selected across representative groups and notified in the first week of June.
  2. Live-stream at ANU
    A facilitated, live-streamed broadcast will be hosted at Llewellyn Hall on the ANU campus. Those who are unsuccessful in registering a place at the Museum of Australian Democracy are encouraged to register to attend this event at Llewellyn Hall.
  3. Remote live-streaming
    The Forum will also be live-streamed across the internet, ensuring access for everyone. Register your interest to participate in the national live-stream.

* Note: the Forum is a public event and will be live-streamed and recorded, and research may be conducted using data obtained from the event. Live-stream analytics data from the event may be collected and used in research.

EVENT WEBSITE

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

8 July : Because of Her, We Can! – NAIDOC Week 2018 will be held nationally from Sunday 8 July and continue through to Sunday 15 July.

As pillars of our society, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have played – and continue to play – active and significant roles at the community, local, state and national levels.

As leaders, trailblazers, politicians, activists and social change advocates, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women fought and continue to fight, for justice, equal rights, our rights to country, for law and justice, access to education, employment and to maintain and celebrate our culture, language, music and art.

They continue to influence as doctors, lawyers, teachers, electricians, chefs, nurses, architects, rangers, emergency and defence personnel, writers, volunteers, chief executive officers, actors, singer songwriters, journalists, entrepreneurs, media personalities, board members, accountants, academics, sporting icons and Olympians, the list goes on.

They are our mothers, our elders, our grandmothers, our aunties, our sisters and our daughters.

Sadly, Indigenous women’s role in our cultural, social and political survival has often been invisible, unsung or diminished.

For at least 65,000 years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have carried our dreaming stories, songlines, languages and knowledge that have kept our culture strong and enriched us as the oldest continuing culture on the planet.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were there at first contact.

They were there at the Torres Strait Pearlers strike in 1936, the Day of Mourning in 1938, the 1939 Cummeragunja Walk-Off, at the 1946 Pilbara pastoral workers’ strike, the 1965 Freedom Rides, the Wave Hill walk off in 1966, on the front line of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in 1972 and at the drafting of the Uluru Statement.

They have marched, protested and spoken at demonstrations and national gatherings for the proper recognition of our rights and calling for national reform and justice.

Our women were heavily involved in the campaign for the 1967 Referendum and also put up their hands to represent their people at the establishment of national advocacy and representative bodies from the National Aboriginal Congress (NAC) to ATSIC to Land Councils and onto the National Congress for Australia’s First Peoples.

They often did so while caring for our families, maintaining our homes and breaking down cultural and institutionalised barriers and gender stereotypes.

Our women did so because they demanded a better life, greater opportunities and – in many cases equal rights – for our children, our families and our people.

They were pioneering women like Barangaroo, Truganini, Gladys Elphick, Fannie Cochrane-Smith, Evelyn Scott, Pearl Gibbs, Oodgeroo Noonuccal, Celuia Mapo Salee, Thancoupie, Justine Saunders, Gladys Nicholls, Flo Kennedy, Essie Coffey, Isabel Coe, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Eleanor Harding, Mum Shirl, Ellie Gaffney and Gladys Tybingoompa.

Today, they are trailblazers like Joyce Clague, Yalmay Yunupingu, Evonne Goolagong Cawley, Nova Peris, Carol Martin, Elizabeth Morgan, Barbara Shaw, Rose Richards, Vonda Malone, Margaret Valadian, Lowitja O’Donoghue, June Oscar, Pat O’Shane, Pat Anderson Jill Milroy, Banduk Marika, Linda Burney and Rosalie Kunoth-Monks – to name but a few.

Their achievements, their voice, their unwavering passion give us strength and have empowered past generations and paved the way for generations to come.

WEBSITE

Because of her, we can!

Download the National NAIDOC Logo and other social media resources.

July 11-12 National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference in Sydney.

When the National NAIDOC Committee announced the 2018 Theme: Because of Her, We Can in November 2017 there was a huge round of applause around Australia particularly from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women.

Amongst those women were Christine Ross, Sharon Kinchela and Chris Figg who all agreed we needed to celebrate this fabulous theme.

So, with great excitement Ngiyani Pty Ltd announced they would host a National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference to be held on 11 – 12 July 2018 at UNSW Kensington Campus Sydney. They are utlising the services of Christine Ross Consultancy as the Project Manager.

For all event enquires please call 1300 807 374 or email christine.ross@live.com.au

Only 200 spots left. Go to the Registration Site

4 August National Children’s Day

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day (Children’s Day) is a time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families to celebrate the strengths and culture of their children. The day is an opportunity for all Australians to show their support for Aboriginal children, as well as learn about the crucial impact that community, culture and family play in the life of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child.

Children’s Day is held on 4 August each year and is coordinated by SNAICC – National Voice for our Children. Children’s Day was first observed in 1988, with 2017 being the 29th celebration. Each year SNAICC produces and distributes resources to help organisations, services, schools, and communities celebrate.

The theme for Children’s Day 2018 is SNAICC – Celebrating Our Children for 30 Years.

Our children are the youngest people from the longest living culture in the world, with rich traditions, lore and customs that have been passed down from generation to generation. Our children are growing up strong with connection to family, community and country. Our children are the centre of our families and the heart of our communities. They are our future and the carriers of our story.

This year, we invite communities to take a walk down memory lane, as we revisit some of the highlights of the last 30 years. We look back on the empowering protest movements instigated by community that had led to the establishment of the first Children’s Day on 4 August 1988. We look back at all of the amazing moments we’ve shared with our children over the years, and how we’re watching them grow into leaders.

We look back to see what we’ve achieved, and decide where we want to go from here to create a better future for our children. If you have celebrated Children’s Day at any time during the past 30 years, we would love to hear from you.

Website

Download HERE

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

October 30 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day 27-28 August

More info

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #MensHealthWeek 3 of 3 #OchreDay2018 News 1. @GregHuntMP announces a National Male Health Strategy to support the health of men and boys 2. @MyHealthRec Men encouraged to connect with their health with a #Myhealthrecord

During 2018 Men’s Health Week it is important to remember that in Australia, like most countries, males have poorer health outcomes on average than females.

More males die at every stage of life. Males have more accidents, are more likely to take their own lives and are more prone to lifestyle-related chronic health conditions than women and girls at the same age.

This is why I am announcing today, the beginning of a process to establish a National Male Health Strategy for the period 2020 to 2030. “

The Hon. Greg Hunt Minister for Health full press release Part 1

The AMA welcomes today’s announcement of the establishment of a 10-year National Male Health Strategy that will target the mental and physical health of men and boys.

The AMA called for a major overhaul of men’s health policy in April this year, including a new national strategy to address the different expectations, experiences, and situations facing Australian men.

Australian men are less likely to seek treatment from a general practitioner or other health professional, and are less likely to have the supports and social connections needed when they experience physical and mental health problems

We look forward to engaging with the Turnbull Government to develop initiatives to address the reasons why men are reluctant to engage with GPs, and the consequence of that reluctance, and to invest in innovative models of care than overcome these barriers “

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said the AMA was pleased that the Federal Government recognised that Australian males have poorer health outcomes, on average, than Australian females. In full Part 2 below

Encouraging men to discuss their health with their doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare specialist can be difficult.

My Health Record supports and assists men to have these conversations, enabling better connected care and, ultimately, better health outcomes,”

My Health Record gives men and the broader community the capacity to upload important health information including allergies, medical conditions and treatments, medicine details, test results and immunisations; supporting them in remembering the dates of tests, medicine names, or dosages “

Australian Digital Health Agency Chief Medical Adviser Clinical Professor Meredith Makeham said My Health Record provided many valuable benefits for men. in full Part 3 Below

NACCHO Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek and #OchreDay2018 Launch :

Download 30 years 1988 – 2018 of Aboriginal Male Health Strategies and Summit recommendations

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launched its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

The two day conference is free: To register

Part 1 Greg Hunt press release

The Australian Government will establish a decade-long National Male Health Strategy that will focus on the mental and physical health of men and boys.

During 2018 Men’s Health Week it is important to remember that in Australia, like most countries, males have poorer health outcomes on average than females.

More males die at every stage of life. Males have more accidents, are more likely to take their own lives and are more prone to lifestyle-related chronic health conditions than women and girls at the same age.

This is why I am announcing today, the beginning of a process to establish a National Male Health Strategy for the period 2020 to 2030.

Building on the 2010 National Male Health Policy, the strategy will aim to identify what is required to improve male health outcomes and provide a framework for taking action.

The strategy will be developed in consultation with key experts and stakeholders in male health, and importantly, the public will be invited to have a say through online consultation later this year.

Australian men and boys are vital to the health and happiness of their families and communities, but need to pay more attention to their own mental and physical wellbeing.

During Men’s Health Week, men are encouraged to talk about their health with someone they trust.

I encourage all men to take time this week to think about their own health and wellbeing and participate in events happening across the country.

The Turnbull Government provides funding to a number of organisations that focus on the health of men and boys including Men’s Health Information Resource Centre at Western Sydney University, Andrology Australia and the Australian Men’s Health Forum.

The National Male Health Strategy builds on and complements the National Women’s Health Strategy 2020 to 2030 I announced at the National Women’s Health Summit in February.

Part 2 AMA WELCOMES NATIONAL MALE HEALTH STRATEGY

The AMA welcomes today’s announcement of the establishment of a 10-year National Male Health Strategy that will target the mental and physical health of men and boys.

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said the AMA was pleased that the Federal Government recognised that Australian males have poorer health outcomes, on average, than Australian females.

“In Australia, men have a life expectancy of approximately four years less than women, and have a higher mortality rate from most leading causes of death,” Dr Bartone said.

“Australian men are less likely to seek treatment from a general practitioner or other health professional, and are less likely to have the supports and social connections needed when they experience physical and mental health problems.

“An appropriately-funded and implemented National Male Health Strategy is needed to deliver a cohesive platform for the improvement of male health service access and men’s health outcomes.

“This does not mean taking funding away from women’s health strategies. Initiatives that address the health needs of one gender should not occur at the expense of the other.

“Men and women should be given equal opportunity to realise their potential for a healthy life.

“The AMA congratulates Health Minister, Greg Hunt, for his decision to begin the process to establish a National Male Health Strategy for the period 2020 to 2030.

“We look forward to engaging with the Turnbull Government to develop initiatives to address the reasons why men are reluctant to engage with GPs, and the consequence of that reluctance, and to invest in innovative models of care than overcome these barriers.

“Compared to women, Australian men not only see their GP less often but, when they do see a doctor, it is for shorter consultations, and typically when a condition or illness is advanced.

“Men’s Health Week is an opportune time for Australian men to do something positive for their physical or mental health – book in for a preventive health check with a trusted GP, get some exercise, have an extra alcohol-free day, or reach out to check on the wellbeing of a mate.”

The AMA Position Statement on Men’s Health 2018 is at https://ama.com.au/position-statement/mens-health-2018

Background

  • Australian men are more than twice as likely to die in a motor vehicle accident than Australian women.
  • Men have a lower five-year survival rate for all cancers than women.
  • Australian men experience approximately 75 per cent of the burden of drug-related harm.
  • More than three in four suicide deaths in Australia are men, and intentional self-harm is the leading cause of death in men under 54 years of age.
  • Men are more likely to be in full-time work and may have less time for medical appointments.
  • Men are traditionally employed in high-risk jobs, especially in the trades, transport, construction, and mining industries.
  • Australian men are twice as likely as Australian women to exceed the lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol consumption, with one in four men drinking at a rate that puts them at risk of alcohol-related disease.

 

Part 3

Creating a My Health Record is one way men can be proactive about their health and make it a priority this Men’s Health Week, running between June 11 – 17.

My Health Record is a secure online summary of a person’s health information that can be accessed at any time by the individual and their healthcare providers.

Australian Men’s Shed Association Executive Officer David Helmers said My Health Record will make it easier for men who may find visiting healthcare professionals difficult or uncomfortable.

“We know that men often avoid having conversations about their health – particularly when those conversations involve visiting a healthcare provider.

“My Health Record takes some of the pain out of keeping a consistent record of our health and is a great platform for ongoing health management.

“Right from the get-go males are more likely to be involved in accidents or become ill, so as we age, it becomes even more important to stay on top of health information,” Mr Helmers said.

33 year-old Nick Morton was forced to take a serious look at his overall health after suffering a heart attack while working in North Queensland.

“I had a rupture in my artery wall – it was a big wake-up call going into cardiac rehab and I was the youngest by 20 years. I ended up really thinking about my health and becoming more aware of my medical history so I registered with My Health Record,” Mr Morton said.

After Nick returned to the family doctor back in his home state, his Melbourne based doctor was able to securely log onto My Health Record and view Nick’s Queensland medical history.

“It helped me having a digital copy of everything instead of having to go to my GP or cardiologist with a binder full of all my records,” Mr Morton said.

All Australians will have the benefit of receiving a My Health Record before the end of 2018, unless they choose not to have one.

Getting familiar with what is included in an individual’s personal record can assist in being prepared in an emergency like the one Nick Morton experienced. Nick now advocates a more proactive approach.

“I thought I was in control of my health and took it for granted like most blokes my age. There’s no excuse not to keep track of your health. Go to your GP and ask about my Health Record.”

Australian Digital Health Agency Chief Medical Adviser Clinical Professor Meredith Makeham said My Health Record provided many valuable benefits for men.

“Encouraging men to discuss their health with their doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare specialist can be difficult.”

“My Health Record supports and assists men to have these conversations, enabling better connected care and, ultimately, better health outcomes,” Dr Makeham said.

My Health Record gives men and the broader community the capacity to upload important health information including allergies, medical conditions and treatments, medicine details, test results and immunisations; supporting them in remembering the dates of tests, medicine names, or dosages.

A major advantage of having a My Health Record is individuals having 24-hour, 7 day per week access to their own health information.

For further information visit www.myhealthrecord.gov.au or call 1800 723 471

NACCHO Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek and #OchreDay2018 Launch : Download 30 years 1988 – 2018 of Aboriginal Male Health Strategies and Summit recommendations

1989 National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS)

1994 National Aboriginal Health Strategy: An Evaluation 1989

1999 The 1st National Indigenous Male Health Convention, held at Ross River Homestead

2000 NSW Aboriginal Male Health Plan

2002 Dr Mark Wenitong Indigenous Male Health Report for OATSIH

2002 National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002) Dr Mick Adams

2003 National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

2008 National Aboriginal Male Health Summit -Ross River NT 22 Key Recommendations

2009 Federal Governments response (12 Months later ) to 2008 Summit recommendations

2010 Review of Indigenous Male Health by HealthInfoNet

2010 National Male Health Policy Supporting Document -Social determinants

2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 

2013 – 2030 NACCHO BluePrint for Aboriginal Male Healthy Futures for generational change

 2013 -2018 National NACCHO Ochre Day Summits  : Registrations and program open for this years 2018 event in Hobart  

The two day conference is free: To register

 

Please note these entries below are only a snap shot of the thousands of Aboriginal Health reports and strategies published over the past 30 years

If you feel we have missed any important documents etc. that you feel we should add

Please Contact : Colin Cowell Editor Email nacchonews@naccho.org.au

1989 National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS)

“Health to Aboriginal peoples is a matter of determining all aspects of their life, including control over their physical environment, of dignity, of community self-esteem, and of justice. It is not merely a matter of the provision of doctors, hospitals, medicines or the absence of disease and incapacity.”

The National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS) was developed by the National Aboriginal Health Strategy Working Group in 1989 following extensive national consultations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, organizations and communities and with governments.

It was a landmark document providing agreed direction for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy in Australia.

In July 2003, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council stated that the NAHS was ‘never fully implemented [but] remains the key document in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

It is extensively used by health services and service providers and continues to guide policy makers and planners.’

Detailed Information:
Key priorities identified in the 1989 National Health Strategy included building community control of Aboriginal health services, increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation in the health workforce, reforming health system and increasing funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services.

The strategy also supported increased community education, health promotion and prevention, improvement of the effectiveness and adequacy of essential services such as sewerage, water supply and communication, and building effective intersectoral collaboration.

It noted that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities must participate in research to ensure it is ethical and research findings must be monitored and reviewed to ensure implementation.

1994 National Aboriginal Health Strategy: An Evaluation 1989

Download 1994 health_eval_execsum

1999 The 1st National Indigenous Male Health Convention, held at Ross River Homestead

Provided an opportunity for Indigenous males from around Australia to express their views and share their experiences of health. Delegates to the Convention explored strategies to improve the health and well-being of Indigenous males, their families and their communities.

Download the Report 1999 growing_up_as_an_indigenous_male

2000 NSW Aboriginal Male Health Plan :

WHAT WE KNOW WORKS IN ABORIGINAL MEN’S HEALTH

Download 2000 NSW ATSI Male Health

1.Addressing men’s health through separate gender strategies to women’s health

Developing separate strategies for men’s health and women’s health can be highly effective in the short term. If a men’s health clinic is not at a main health centre but is housed a few blocks away, Aboriginal men are more at ease, are more likely to consult a male doctor for a specific problem, and are more likely to return for follow up. The concept of separate gender strategies also applies to health promotion.

2.Employing more men within the NSW health sector

There are fewer Aboriginal male health workers compared to Aboriginal female health workers. Aboriginal male health workers may draw Aboriginal men to primary health care facilities, because men feel more comfortable accessing services where they know they can talk to another man about men’s business. Increasing the number of Aboriginal male health workers within primary health care settings is therefore desirable

3. Making health services relevant for Aboriginal men, their lives and interests

The achievement of Aboriginal men in sport has been a source of great pride and many Aboriginal men are able to demonstrate community leadership through this success. Sports and fitness programs are an important part of Aboriginal community development in general. This is especially true for the health of young people, as sports and fitness programs are likely to contribute to their physical and emotional wellbeing. Physical fitness programs can form a focus for active life skills, as opposed to negative coping mechanisms such as alcohol and substance abuse and other destructive behaviours.

4. Providing incentives for Aboriginal men to be involved

Successful programs often provide some kind of incentive to Aboriginal men to encourage them to become involved. This might be access to the local golf course, or to the local gym; or it could be providing a meal to encourage a more informal atmosphere and sense of fellowship.

5. Developing services within the terms set down by local men

A program or service will have greater success if it aims to be relevant to the needs of local Aboriginal men. For example: in one area, Aboriginal men were embarrassed about seeing a female health worker in a sexual health clinic; so they worked together to establish a separate clinic in a location where they felt more comfortable. As a result attendance increased by 600 per cent.

6.Recognising men’s role in Aboriginal society and how that role influences their health

The role of men in Aboriginal society has changed tremendously in only a few generations. Aboriginal men have experienced a loss of their traditional role in both society and family. This results in despair, shame, and a sense of inadequacy. Some men feel that they cannot contribute to their communities any more. This can be influenced by programs and services that highlight a positive role for Aboriginal men in their communities and families.

7.Addressing the high costs of medication

Compared to non-Aboriginal men, Aboriginal men suffer a higher burden of ill health, and have a significantly lower income, so the cost of medication is an important issue. Aboriginal men need to be informed about any benefits they are eligible for, which can reduce the cost of medication.

8. Increasing the numbers of medical practitioners with an understanding of, and time to deal with, Aboriginal men’s needs

Local medical practitioners should be encouraged to work closely with local Aboriginal health workers, and to develop partnerships with them. In local areas is it essential to increasing the number of health practitioners who understand the needs of local men, and whom local men feel comfortable consulting.

9. Working in partnership

Partnerships are about working collaboratively in an environment based on respect, trust, and equality.

Aboriginal health workers across NSW need to be encouraged to provide the kinds of programs and services that most benefit Aboriginal men in their communities, through partnership between health service delivery and projects of community interest.

10. Developing an evidence base to improve services

Research is needed to develop an evidence base on which to improve service delivery for Aboriginal men.

Issues in need of further research include: how to integrate men’s health programs into existing Aboriginal primary health care services; how to increase the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in the research process; how to better target research that aims to improve Aboriginal men’s health; how to improve access to health services for Aboriginal males in urban, rural and remote areas; and what strategies and programs provide the best health outcomes for Aboriginal men. There also needs to be greater encouragement to publish existing research.

2002 Dr Mark Wenitong Indigenous Male Health Report report for OATSIH

This report by Dr Mark Wenitong was commissioned by the Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health in response to the continuing need for accessible information around the needs and issues facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males

Download 2002 Wenitong malehealthprelim

Approximately half of Australia’s Indigenous population is male. Knowledge of the status of their health, although not complete due to limitations on Indigenous identification, is an area of acute need.

A ‘gendered approach’ to health is not a new idea and it is becoming more apparent that gender is a key determinant of health in Australia.

The interaction between gender and health has been well recognised and has proved very useful with respect to women’s health. It may be possible to achieve better health access and outcomes for Indigenous males by considering this approach.

This report is an overview of Indigenous male health. It takes account of the:

  • historical, social and cultural background of Indigenous males and its relationship to health and behaviour;
  • fact that Indigenous males do not necessarily want a complete isolationist approach, and regard Indigenous women and family as a significant support and integral part of their health;
  • documented lack of Indigenous males in the health workforce at all levels.

2002 National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002) Dr Mick Adams

Download 2002 Indigenous Male Health – Adams Mick

2003 National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

This National Strategic Framework is not a replacement of the 1989 NAHS.

It is a complementary document, which addresses contemporary approaches to primary health care and population health within the current policy environment and planning structures. It aims to guide government action over the next ten years through a coordinated, collaborative and multi-sectorial approach supported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health stakeholder organisations.

Download 2003 nsfatsihcont

Development

This National Strategic Framework was developed following consultation on the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Strategy: Draft for Discussion, February 2001, produced by the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council (NATSIHC).

The Draft for Discussion was based on the 1989 NAHS and the report of its 1994 evaluation.

It took into account the recommendations of the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, the Bringing Them Home Report, submissions made to the House of Representatives Inquiry into Indigenous Health and its final report entitled Health is Life. It also considered existing state and territory, regional and local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policies, strategies and plans. All these have been fundamental to shaping this National Strategic Framework.

NATSIHC comprises members from the Commonwealth Government, the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council representing State and Territory governments, NACCHO, ATSIC, the TSRA, the Australian Indigenous Doctors Association, the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and individuals with specific expertise appointed by the Commonwealth Minister responsible for health. The chairperson of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) also sits on NATSIHC as an ex officio member.

2008 National Aboriginal Male Health SummitRoss River NT 22 Key Recommendations

Inteyerrkwe Statement

We the Aboriginal males from Central Australia and our visitor brothers from around Australia gathered at Inteyerrkwe in July 2008 to develop strategies to ensure our future roles as grandfathers, fathers, uncles, nephews, brothers, grandsons, and sons in caring for our children in a safe family environment that will lead to a happier, longer life that reflects opportunities experienced by the wider community.

We acknowledge and say sorry for the hurt, pain and suffering caused by Aboriginal males to our wives, to our children, to our mothers, to our grandmothers, to our granddaughters, to our aunties, to our nieces and to our sisters.

We also acknowledge that we need the love and support of our Aboriginal women to help us move forward.”

In 2008 with the national focus on the NT intervention over 400 Aboriginal males from around to participate in a men’s Health Summit at the Ross River Camp

There was a need for Aboriginal men to get back control and understanding of their roles as fathers, uncles, brothers and sons in caring for children in a safe family environment that leads families and the community having a happier, healthier, longer life that reflects opportunities experienced by the wider community

Download 90 Page Report

2008 National Male Health Summit of Reports 1 and 2

Download the media report from summit

Final report Media Coverage 2

There has been over a decade of work by Aboriginal men to establish male health in the policy debates, but as I will outline later I feel we now need to move beyond the policy struggle to implementing the vision.

Patrick Dodson has been quoted that: “There has been a process of undermining the role and status of Aboriginal men within our society since the early days of Australia’s colonisation and continuing in recent commentary around the Northern Territory Intervention”.

When you add to this the rapid changes in the role of males within that colonising society and the consequent dislocation of non-Aboriginal males and their struggle to define new self-images, it is no wonder that Aboriginal males may struggle to make sense of the contemporary world.

And if those critical views of us as Aboriginal males are expressed with no effort to understand our cultural values, or the pressures caused by the colonial relationships and contemporary social transformations, then we become alienated from this society.

This alienation is at the core of the struggle for male health and wellbeing, as it acts to debase men, stripping away their dignity and the meaning in their lives.

We therefore need to confront these social relationships that shape our health.

Out of the hundreds of ideas that have been discussed and developed over the last three days at Ross River, some of the key recommendations that have come out of this forum are as follows:

  1. Establishment of community-based violence prevention programs, including programs specific to Aboriginal men.
  2. Establishment of places of healing for Aboriginal men, including men’s shelters/’sheds’, short term ‘drying out’ places for men, and more resources for long-term rehabilitation of Aboriginal men with alcohol and other drug problems, preferably within their own community. Also ‘half-way’ houses to either give ‘time out’ or time to move slowly back into work/family/training, preferably to be run by Aboriginal men.
  3. Tax-free status for three years for identified communities for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal professionals to attract much-needed doctors, health workers, teachers and police. Also incentives to employ Aboriginal people in similar positions.
  4. Building the capacity of Aboriginal men in literacy and numeracy to access locally-based jobs, and better support for establishing local Aboriginal-controlled businesses to tap into the minerals boom, agriculture, aquaculture or whatever business activity is relevant to their traditional country. Also the linking of education and training to locally-based employment.
  5. ‘Unfinished business’ – This Summit calls on the Federal Government and the Northern Territory Government to respond to its final report within three months (by the end of September, 2008).

See all 22 recommendations in this next section

 

2009 Federal Governments response (12 Months later ) to 2008 Summit recommendations

Download Government Response

2009 Federal Government Response malehealthsummitjun09

2010 Review of Indigenous Male Health by HealthInfoNet

Download

2010 Indigenous Male Health Healthindonet

2010 National Male Health Policy Supporting Document -Social determinants

SOCIAL DETERMINANTS AND KEY ACTIONS SUPPORTING MALE HEALTH

2010 Social determinants revised 170510

2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 was developed to provide an overarching framework which builds links with other major Commonwealth health activities and identifies areas of focus to guide future investment and effort in relation to improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

On 30 May 2014 Senator the Hon Fiona Nash, Assistant Minister for Health, announced that an Implementation plan would be developed outlining the Commonwealth’s coordinated efforts to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes.

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 (online)
PDF version: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 – PDF 6280 KB

2013 – 2030 NACCHO BluePrint for Aboriginal Male Healthy Futures for generational change

NACCHO has long recognised the importance of an Aboriginal male health policy and program to close the gap by 2030 on the alarming Aboriginal male mortality rates across Australia.

Aboriginal males have arguably the worst health outcomes of any population group in Australia.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to Aboriginal male health and wellbeing

NACCHO, its affiliates and members are committed to building upon past innovations and we require targeted actions and investments to implement a wide range of Aboriginal male health and wellbeing programs and strategies.

We call on State, Territory and Federal governments to commit to a specific, substantial and sustainable funding allocation for the NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint 2013-2030

 

This blueprint sets out how the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services sector will continue to improve our rates of access to health and wellbeing services by Aboriginal males through working closely within our communities, strengthening cultural safety and further building upon our current Aboriginal male health workforce and leadership.

We celebrate Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children

The NACCHO 10-Point Blue print Plan is based on a robust body of work that includes the Close the Gap Statement of Intent and the Close the Gap targets, the National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002), NACCHO’s position paper on Aboriginal male health (2010) the 2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP), and the NACCHO Healthy futures 10 point plan 2013-2030

These solutions have been developed in response to the deep-rooted social, political and economic conditions that effect Aboriginal males and the need to be addressed alongside the delivery of essential health care.

Our plan is based on evidence, targeted to need and capable of addressing the existing inequalities in Aboriginal male health services, with the aim of achieving equality of health status and life expectancy between Aboriginal males and non-Aboriginal males by 2030.

This blueprint celebrates our success so far and proposes the strategies that governments, NACCHO affiliates and member services must in partnership commit to and invest in to ensure major health gains are maintained into the future

NACCHO, our affiliates and members remain focused on creating a healthy future for generational change and the NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint 2013-2030 will enable comprehensive and long-term action to achieve real outcomes.

To close the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal males and non-Aboriginal within a generation we need achieve these 10 key goals

1. To call on government at all levels to invest a specific, substantial and sustainable funding allocation for the, NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint plan 2013-2030 a comprehensive, long-term Aboriginal male Health plan of action that is based on evidence, targeted to need, and capable of addressing the existing inequities in Aboriginal male health

2. To assist delivering community-controlled ,comprehensive primary male health care, services that are culturally appropriate accessible, affordable, good quality, innovative to bridge the gap in health standards and to respect and promote the rights of Aboriginal males, in urban, rural and remote areas in order to achieve lasting improvements in Aboriginal male health and well-being

3. To ensure Aboriginal males have equal access to health services that are equal in standard to those enjoyed by other Australians, and ensure primary health care services and health infrastructure for Aboriginal males are capable of bridging the gap in health standards by 2030.

4. To prioritise specific funding to address mental health, social and emotional well-being and suicide prevention for Aboriginal males.

5. To ensure that we address Social determinants relating to identity culture, language and land, as well as violence, alcohol, employment and education.

6.To improve access to and the responsiveness of mainstream health services and programs to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s health  services are provided commensurate Accessibility within the Primary Health Care Centre may mean restructuring clinics to accommodate male specific areas, or off-site areas, and may include specific access (back door entrance) to improve attendance and cultural gender issues

 7.To provide an adequate workforce to meet Aboriginal male health needs by increasing the recruitment, retention, effectiveness and training of male health practitioners working within Aboriginal settings and by building the capacity of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

8 To identified and prioritised (as appropriate) in all health strategies developed for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) including that all relevant programs being progressed in these services will be expected to ensure Aboriginal male health is considered in the planning phase or as the program progresses. Specialised Aboriginal male health programs and targeted interventions should be developed to address male health intervention points across the life cycle continuum.

9. To build on the evidence base of what works in Aboriginal health, supporting it with research and data on relevant local and international experience and to ensure that the quality of data quality in all jurisdictions meets AIHW standards.

10. To measure, monitor, and report on our joint efforts in accordance with benchmarks and targets – to ensure that we are progressively reaching our shared aims.

NOTE : Throughout this document the word Male is used instead of Men. At the inaugural Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health Gathering-Alice Springs 1999, all delegates present agreed that the word Male would be used instead of the word Men. With the intention being to encompass the Male existence from it’s beginnings in the womb until death.

Throughout this document the word Aboriginal is used instead of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. This is in line with the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) being representative of Aboriginal People. This does not intend to exclude nor be disrespectful to our Brothers from the Torres Strait Islands.

 2013 -2018 NACCHO Ochre Days : Registrations open for this years event in Hobart  

 First Ochre Day Canberra 2013 with present and past 2 NACCHO chairs

The week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offers a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

Canberra 2013

Brisbane 2014

Adelaide 2015

Perth 2016

Darwin 2017

Hobart 2018

Reports from all

 

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Events and Conferences :To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO launches its National #OchreDay2018 Men’s Health Summit program and registrations

The week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offers a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

19 June 21 St Century Aboriginal Health Research

21st Century Aboriginal Health Research

The Aboriginal Health College is thrilled to be hosting a showcase of Aboriginal Health Research projects. This event is the first in a series of educational seminars promoting best practice in Aboriginal Health Research by exploring community engagement, Aboriginal Governance, evidence-based practice and how researchers achieved success working with community.

Please join us to hear from the SEARCH team at the Sax Institute, the POCHE Centre’s Adjunct Associate Professor Kylie Gwynne and University of Wollongong’s Professor Kathleen Clapham.

Bookings

2 – 4 July 2018 First Nations Governance Forum; :  Canberra

Museum of Australian Democracy
Old Parliament House, Canberra

As Australia’s national university, ANU has an obligation to constructively contribute to the discussion of policy reform and processes of significant issues concerning Indigenous Australia.

The University seeks to reignite national debate about Australia’s First Nations governance models and their contribution to policy. We are in a unique position to facilitate an International Indigenous-led discussion, with academic rigour, on some of the most challenging issues affecting the country.

We recognise that the academic expertise on these issues is distributed among universities around Australia and the world and welcomes contributions from interested parties.

Forum details

In 2018 ANU will host the First Nations Governance Forum with a goal to provide a series of policy options relevant to Australia through learning from models in other colonial settler states that demonstrate Indigenous peoples leadership in the governance of their affairs. The Forum will include a welcome dinner, keynote presentations, a series of high-level panel discussions and workshop sessions.

The Forum will be hosted with the support of Australia’s Federal Indigenous parliamentarians, Indigenous leaders, academics, government, leading international policy makers and other interested stakeholders. The Forum will consider First Nations governance reform in Australia and, share the experiences of Indigenous people in comparable jurisdictions including Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada, USA and Scandinavian countries. The Forum will build on the extensive work undertaken on this issue including the Report of the Expert Panel on Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution (2012), the Report of the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (2015) and the Uluru Statement from the Heart (2017).

Attendance options

Broad participation in the Forum from across the community is encouraged and supported. The Forum is a public event. Attendance is free (though attendees will be responsible for their own expenses including travel, accommodation and meals). The Forum will also be live-streamed and recorded to ensure remote access.

The following attendance options are available:

  1. Onsite
    An Expression of Interest process will be conducted for a limited number of seats available at the Museum of Australian Democracy. Complete the Expression of Interest form by 13 June. Applicants will be selected across representative groups and notified in the first week of June.
  2. Live-stream at ANU
    A facilitated, live-streamed broadcast will be hosted at Llewellyn Hall on the ANU campus. Those who are unsuccessful in registering a place at the Museum of Australian Democracy are encouraged to register to attend this event at Llewellyn Hall.
  3. Remote live-streaming
    The Forum will also be live-streamed across the internet, ensuring access for everyone. Register your interest to participate in the national live-stream.

* Note: the Forum is a public event and will be live-streamed and recorded, and research may be conducted using data obtained from the event. Live-stream analytics data from the event may be collected and used in research.

EVENT WEBSITE

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

July 11-12 National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference in Sydney.

When the National NAIDOC Committee announced the 2018 Theme: Because of Her, We Can in November 2017 there was a huge round of applause around Australia particularly from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women.

Amongst those women were Christine Ross, Sharon Kinchela and Chris Figg who all agreed we needed to celebrate this fabulous theme.

So, with great excitement Ngiyani Pty Ltd announced they would host a National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference to be held on 11 – 12 July 2018 at UNSW Kensington Campus Sydney. They are utlising the services of Christine Ross Consultancy as the Project Manager.

For all event enquires please call 1300 807 374 or email christine.ross@live.com.au

Only 200 spots left. Go to the Registration Site

Download HERE

October 30 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day 27-28 August

More info

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities Inc CEO @ahmrc @TISprogramme #NT #Sunrise @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

Job of the Week

Ngaanyatjarra Health Service is currently seeking a Deputy General Manager to join the team. This position is a fixed contract for 2 years.

Location:  Alice Springs

Base salary $115,000 – $130,000 per annum commensurate with skills and experience, plus Remote Allowance, 9.5% Superannuation and annual airfare.  Access to Salary Packaging available.

The Role:

The Deputy General Manager is a newly established role to provide strategic leadership and management of the existing functions of People & Capability, ICT and Assets & Logistics teams.  This role provides critical and ongoing support to the General Manager in managing and administering the Ngaanyatjarra Health Service (NHS).

More Info apply

Director of Medical Services Durri ACCHO Kempsey

‘Durri’ means ‘To grow in good health’ so that’s the name the Community gave us. Our people are dedicated to achieving better health outcomes, and they see their impact on the faces of the people they meet every day. Join us and make this opportunity your own.

Work for our community, with meaningful reward…

Durri ACMS now has a unique opportunity for a full-time Director of Medical Services to join their clinic in Kempsey, NSW. Hours will be Monday to Friday, 8:30am – 5:00pm, with no after hours or weekend work required.

This pivotal role will be primarily responsible for overseeing and consolidating a team of full-time and part-time General Practitioners that work across the Kempsey and Numbucca heads clinics.

Some of your key duties will include:

  • Supporting the team of GP’s and other Clinicians with medical supervision;
  • Coordinating team activity, including rostering to ensure adequate coverage in both clinics;
  • Acting as the go to person for all general practice queries;
  • Ensuring the clinics are achieving KPIs, in line with funding agreements;
  • Liaising with the GP team and acting as their representative when communicating with the CEO; and
  • Negotiating and engaging with various specialists and specialist services.

About the Benefits

This is a fantastic opportunity to take the next step in your career, embrace unique, complex challenges and benefit from broad exposure to a number of health conditions and a varied client base that you won’t find elsewhere. As Durri ACMS is undergoing an exciting period of fine tuning their model of care, you’ll play a key part in the future direction and success of the organisation.

You’ll join a dedicated, multidisciplinary team of health professionals delivering highly regarded and beneficial services to the local community.If you’re looking to contribute to vital health improvements for today and tomorrow, and want to contribute to closing the gap in Aboriginal healthcare, this is your chance.

In return for your dedication, you’ll be rewarded with a highly attractive remuneration circa $320,000 plus super and extensive salary packaging options. Additionally, you will receive 6 weeks’ annual leave, and negotiable relocation assistance is available.

Seize the opportunity to grow, develop your skills and move flexibly across Durri’s diverse services – you will be supported and encouraged every step of the way!

About Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service

We’ve been on a heck of a journey.

Over the past few years, we’ve transformed our approach to delivering vital primary health care, and have become an organisation to be proud of.

Our community is at the heart of everything we do, and they set the direction for our people, who have achieved so much. Join us and you’ll find a supportive and caring environment, built by professional, down to earth people who are dedicated to our mission.

Durri employs people who have a passion and genuine interest in working with Aboriginal Health Services. We understand the culture, the history and how Durri got to where we are today. We want people who are committed to contributing to vital health improvements for today and tomorrow.

If you’re an experienced GP looking to take your career in a new direction – Apply Now!

Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Health Service

Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is a community controlled Aboriginal health service providing holistic health care to Aboriginal clients in Port Hedland, South Hedland and surrounding communities. We are seeking a Senior Medical Officer (SMO) to join our organisation based in South Hedland.

As Senior Medical Officer, you will provide leadership to the medical services team and work closely with the Senior Management team on the coordination of service delivery and clinical needs in order to optimise service delivery and outcomes. The medical services team is made up of General Practitioners, Registered Nurses, Enrolled Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers and a number of allied health professionals.

To be considered in this role you must have: 

  • Experience in developing and implementing primary health care services;
  • Experience in strategic planning and management;
  • Experience in setting and reporting against key deliverables;
  • Experience working in AMS is highly desirable;
  • VR GP is highly desirable.

For your commitment and dedication, you’ll be offered a highly attractive remuneration package commensurate with skills and experience, alongside a range of benefits.

Candidates joining Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Health Service will receive:

  • Salary packaging options;
  • Fully furnished housing;
  • Maintained car provided;
  • No on-call requirements;
  • 10 Days paid study leave; and
  • 5 weeks’ annual leave.

Applicants must obtain a copy of the position description and address all selection criteria. A copy of the position description and selection criteria may be obtained by calling the Human Resources Officer on 08 9172 0446 or emailing hr@wmhsac.com. Applicants who do not address the selection criteria may not be considered.

WMHSAC may commence appointment proceedings immediately, appoint by invitation or make no appointment at all. This opportunity is only open to candidates with the right to work in Australia.  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply. 

For further enquiries, please contact Human Resources Officer by phone on 08 9172 0446 or via email to hr@wmhsac.com.

Apply Here

 

Purpose of the position:

The CEO establishes the core values and strategy of the workplace and is accountable for developing, communicating and executing strategic plans to facilitate the sustainable business success of the AH&MRC. The CEO will lead the development of annual goals and will work with Senior Management Team to guide the successful implementation of strategies that promotes the organisation’s values.

The AH&MRC CEO is ultimately responsible to the Chairperson and the Board of Directors (the Board) for implementing strategic and operational policy and for the continued growth and viability of the organisation.  The CEO will be building the confidence, reputation and profile of the AH&MRC amongst the Members and across the Aboriginal health sector of NSW.  The CEO will develop and grow the organisation’s services to members and provide strategies and advice to the Board.

Depending on the notice period of the successful applicant this position is expected to commence around August/September for a period of a three (3) year contract, based in our Surry Hills office (66 Wentworth Ave, NSW).

Criteria:

  1. Knowledge of the Aboriginal Health sector
  2. Demonstrated experience working at a high level
  3. Current CEO experience and management
  4. This vacancy is an identified Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander recruitment under Part 22, section 22.9 of the AH&MRC Constitution. Applicants for this role must satisfy the Aboriginality criteria you will need to provide information on how you satisfy the Aboriginality

A detailed position description is attached which includes the duties of the position and the salary.

EOI should be forwarded to the HR department via email to gagic@ahmrc.org.au included with the application should be a current CV and a Cover Letter outlining the above criteria.

Please contact the HR Department via email gagic@ahmrc.org.au should you wish to discuss the position further.

Applications close Friday, 22 June 2018

 Download AHMRC_CEO_PD_May_2018

Rural Doctor job of the week

Gidgee Healing is currently seeking a General Practitioner to deliver integrated, comprehensive primary health care services at their Burke St Clinic in Mount Isa.

You will be supported by a team of dedicated clinic staff including Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Medical Receptionists, Practice Managers and visiting Specialists and Allied Health providers; in addition to community and secondary service providers.

ESSENTIAL CRITERIA:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding unconditional current registration with AHPRA
  • Vocationally Registered, FRACGP or FACRRM
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number
  • Knowledge, understanding and sensitivity towards the social, economic and cultural factors affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health.

ABOUT US:

Gidgee Healing is a dynamic Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service that provides a comprehensive and growing range of primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people residing in the Mount Isa, North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria regions. Our services include General Practice, maternal and child health, social and preventative health, health promotion and education, allied health and specialist services. Gidgee Healing is also the lead agency for headspace Mount Isa and the Normanton Recovery and Community Wellbeing Service. The organisation strives to provide high quality health and wellbeing services in a culturally welcoming environment, to enhance the accessibility and uptake of health services by our clients and support the early identification and management of illness and chronic diseases.

THE LIFESTYLE:

The North West offers a relaxed and casual lifestyle, with a wealth of camping and exploring, scenic national parks, gorges, as well as pristine river, lake and open water fishing and recreation.

Applications close COB Friday 15th June, 2018

To apply online, please click on the appropriate link below. Alternatively, for a confidential discussion, please contact Lauren Taylor on (07) 4743 6681, quoting Ref No. 798746.

APPLY HERE

General Practitioners Awabakal

We are currently seeking two dedicated and talented General Practitioners to join our growing team. A strong interest in, and commitment to Aboriginal Health is a must. You will form an essential part of our multidisciplinary team, serving the local community in strong consultation with a network of excellent nursing, allied health and administration specialists.

Our GP’s will rotate across our Medical Facilitates based at Hamilton, Raymond Terrace and Cardiff, and through Outreach programs.

Why work for Awabakal?

Awabakal is a dynamic and innovative community organisation with the support and wellbeing of the Aboriginal community in Newcastle, Hunter Valley, Lake Macquarie and Port Stephens at the heart of everything we do.

Our highly skilled teams across medical, aged care, housing and preschool services are passionate and driven to provide the most progressive and flexible services to our local Aboriginal communities and we actively empower our staff to be creative and forward thinking.

The positions:

You will work as an integral part of Awabakal’s Medical team, and report to the Senior Medical Officer.

The role will require you to provide quality, integrated, best practice primary health care to the patients of the Aboriginal Medical Service, both within the confines of the medical practice and through Outreach programs.

You will improve the health of the Awabakal community by improving patient access to appropriate treatment and health care plans.

What you need to be successful:

Professional medical registration with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Authority (AHPRA)

Fellowship of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners FRACGP

Fellowship of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or equivalent

Accredited GP registrar supervisor (desirable)

Demonstrated relevant experience as a General Practitioner as a vocationally registered/fellow in a community setting

Demonstrated experience of working effectively with Aboriginal clients and community

Demonstrated understanding of cultural issues impacting access to care for Aboriginal people

Extensive experience with patient consultation

Experience with Medicare Billing

Current Class C Drivers Licence

Salary:

Our teams are professional, hardworking and passionate, best describing our culture as innovative, flexible and supportive and we are committed to ensuring our leadership team members reflect our important organisational values.

A competitive salary will be negotiated with the right candidate, to match skills, experience and qualifications.

Please note as part of Awabakal’s recruitment process, prior to an offer of employment being made, recommended candidates will be required to undertake and provide a current Working with Children and National Police Check, and demonstrate evidence of current registration, and original qualifications.

All General Practitioners employed by Awabakal are required to maintain individual medical indemnity insurance, always, and as appropriate to their position at Awabakal. Medical indemnity insurance is an essential requirement of registration with the Medical Board of Australia.

How to Apply:

To apply please forward your resume and supporting covering letter, or alternatively contact Dr Dean Wright on 0419 638 796 or Jessica Gossage, Human Resource Consultant on (02) 4940 8743 for a confidential discussion.

We site www.yerin.org.au

Check out the Website

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

There are 5 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website

 

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 28 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

Director, Primary Health Care

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (SHSAC) is an independent, community controlled health service, directed by a Board of representatives from the remote Aboriginal communities. SHSAC has a philosophy of community participation and a strong focus on Care Coordination and Chronic Disease prevention and management including population health, health promotion and awareness.

The Director, Primary Health Care (DPHC) plays an Executive leadership role ensuring the organisation is operationally sustainable and responsive to the needs of people within the remote areas. This includes effective planning and management of human, financial and physical resources and the evaluation of services, ensuring effective systems are in place to support daily practice and the maintenance of all health related accreditation and standards underpinned by high quality service delivery.

Your new role

As the DPHC, you’ll provide professional direction to staff, influence the achievement of the strategic and operational goals, and provide progressive planning and operational service delivery advice to the Executive Management Team. As an advocate for change, you’ll shape an environment of strategic thinking, develop policies and cost savings measures, MOU’s and provide regular analysis of community health data.

Taking the lead in the review of activities and operations Clinic by Clinic including staffing levels, resource and accommodation requirements, you’ll collaborate with other managers and health service providers to ensure their participation in the activity and service delivery planning processes. You’ll manage and regularly review structures, budgets and operational costs across 9 Clinics in excess of $9m; audit all fiscal expenditure under your control and ensure full compliance and oversight of all clinical governance matters.

Via sound forward planning, you’ll support the Health Centre Managers with innovative and effective plans and solutions to workforce, recruitment and retention issues arising from working in rural and remote areas, to ensure an improved, merit based qualified and adequate remote health workforce across all of the Health Centres.

With the ability to inspire confidence and trust, and resolve workplace conflict, you’ll drive an effective, positive and united culture; fostering cohesive, respectful communication and a ‘one team’ outlook throughout remote clinics and head office. Continuously working to maximise access to accredited health services by community members, you’ll forge strong relationships at both community and professional level, working proactively to strengthen regional consensus and solidarity on health service delivery policy.

What you’ll need to succeed

You’ll have proven Executive / Senior level expertise in the management of complex operational and contentious issues in a health context, providing strategic leadership and advice with the management of clinical operations and strict budgets, complex projects, policy development, and improved resource mobilisation and efficiency. With contemporary problem solving, people and risk management skills, you’ll have the capability to lead significant change and negotiate through differences to achieve positive outcomes.

With a relevant tertiary qualification (i.e. Masters, MBA or PhD) and current health practitioner registration or eligibility, you’ll have a thorough understanding of the provision of advanced clinical care and health programs, and clinical leadership.

What you’ll get in return

On offer is an attractive package for a 1 year maternity cover contract. Benefits include salary packaging, 6 weeks Leave, 10 days study leave and relocation.

What you need to do now If you’re interested, please click apply now or forward a copy of your CV to mailto:hayley.schwab@hays.com.au

PLEASE NOTE – Please direct all applications to Hays who are exclusively managing the recruitment for this vacancy on behalf of Sunrise H

There are 5 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

Durri servicing the Macleay and Nambucca Valleys – making a difference

 

Durri’s vision is to achieve and maintain better health and wellbeing outcomes for our Aboriginal people and communities.

Durri aims to be an employer of choice in Aboriginal health, supporting a skilled and flexible workforce.

Durri is a great place to work – a family friendly and culturally sensitive work environment that values people.

If you have a passion for indigenous health and are committed to closing the gap, then why not join us?

Please view our current vacancies .

We are currently hiring for 2 Senior Policy & Research Officers
The link to the role on Ethical Jobs is here:

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Bendigo

Closing Date : 24 June

More Info apply: http://www.murrayphn.org.au/aboriginal-internship

Job Ref : N2018 – 37

Academic Leader: Indigenous Health (Identified*) – 180357

School of Medicine

Closing Date: 02/07/2018

NACCHO Aboriginal health and #Barunga30years #TreatyNow : Can we achieve an #UluruStatement #Voice and #Treaties in a reconciled republic of Australia : Plus Indigenous deride Scullion for his offer: ‘Take my job’

Australian states have taken steps towards the nation’s first treaties with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Australia is the only Commonwealth country that does not have a treaty with its indigenous populations.

Many indigenous Australians have cited a treaty or treaties as the best chance of bringing them substantive as well as symbolic recognition – the subject of a long-running national debate.

In an Australian first, a bill committing to a treaty was approved in Victoria’s lower house of parliament on Thursday.

The Northern Territory and Western Australia have pledged their own, separate actions in recent days.

All of this has intensified discussion about whether others, including the Australian government, will follow suit

From BBC Treaty report

Treaty Score board Image above from Kyam Maher MLC

Polling commissioned by the Australia Institute, of 1417 people, found there was 51 per cent support for a treaty and 55 per cent backed a truth telling commission.

There was 46 per cent support for enshrining an indigenous voice in the constitution and 29 per cent of those surveyed opposed the move, the rest were unsure

The Northern Territory’s four Land Councils and the Northern Territory Government have today signed an historic Memorandum of Understanding (the “Barunga Agreement”), paving the way for consultations to begin with Aboriginal people about a Treaty.

A joint meeting of the four Land Councils at Barunga this week voted to empower their Chairmen to sign the MOU “

Combined Land Councils and the Northern Territory Government Prees Release see Part 1 Below

And we also need to make clear that if we can establish a Voice for our first Australians – the decisions made about them are made with them and by them.

This is not a radical concept. It is nothing less than we should expect in any other circumstances.

We should not be afraid either, of the using our voice and the voice of first Australians to talk about treaties and agreement-making between our first Australians and levels of government within Australia.

I believe that Australians have the goodwill to reconcile this country. What they don’t have is the leadership in this country to drive proper and meaningful reconciliation.”

Leader of the Opposition Bill Shorten see full speech Part 2 below

Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said it was “irresponsible” for supporters of the indigenous voice concept to leave it open and undefined.

He said it was his personal opinion that it would be more effective to have indigenous people having direct influence and power through the office of minister for indigenous affairs.

“Whether or not you can run my job by a committee, well it hasn’t been done before,” Senator Scullion said.

“Don’t just get on the voice like it’s a life ring, it’s the only thing we’ve got, stick our head in it, start paddling, hope there’s no sharks.”

From the Australian June 11 Indigenous deride Scullion for his offer: ‘Take my job’

The proposal to replace a minister of the crown with a group of unelected indigenous leaders is far more radical than what the Uluru reform calls for, a voice to the parliament .It suggests a lack of understanding of how cabinet government works.”

Aboriginal activist and constitutional law professor Megan Davis was highly critical of Senator Scullion’s idea see part 3 below

 

 “What does the Victorian bill say?

If passed in the upper house, it will legislate a process for establishing a state Aboriginal representative body and a treaty, or treaties.

The bill will also require the Victorian government to provide annual updates on progress.

“It is about the recognition of us as the first people of this country,” said Victorian Treaty Advancement Commissioner Jill Gallagher.

Aboriginal history Prof Richard Broome, from La Trobe University, told the BBC: “It is very significant because it is the first move from any government in the country.”

See Full Guardian Coverage

The South Australian Government has scrapped a process to negotiate treaties with the state’s Aboriginal nations.

It comes on the same day the Northern Territory pledged to work towards a treaty with its Indigenous peoples.

Premier Steven Marshall said his government was instead in the process of developing a “state-wide plan with a series defined outcomes for Aboriginal people across areas including education, child protection, health and jobs”.

“Treaty commissioner Roger Thomas pictured above has provided advice to the incoming government regarding the positives and negatives of the treaty consultation,” Mr Marshall, who is also Aboriginal Affairs Minister, said.

See SA Coverage HERE

 

Part 1

The Northern Territory’s four Land Councils and the Northern Territory Government have today signed an historic Memorandum of Understanding (the “Barunga Agreement”), paving the way for consultations to begin with Aboriginal people about a Treaty.

A joint meeting of the four Land Councils at Barunga this week voted to empower their Chairmen to sign the MOU.

“This is a momentous day in the history of the Territory, a chance to reset the relationship between the Territory’s First Nations and the Government,” Northern Land Council Chairman Samuel Bush-Blanansi said. “We’ve got big journey ahead of us. The MOU gives us high hopes about the future and I hope the Government stays true to spirit of the MOU.”

 

Central Land Council Chairman Francis Jupurrurla Kelly said: “I hope a treaty will settle us down together and bring us self-determination. Today we bounced the ball but we don’t want to stay the only players in this game. The next steps must be led by Aboriginal people across the Territory so that everyone can run with the ball and have their say.”

Anindilyakwa Land Council Chairman Tony Wurramarrba said: “We celebrate the highly significant step that has been achieved today and will work with the Northern Territory Government and other Land Councils to continue the important work required to achieve the goal of a Northern Territory Treaty.”

Tiwi Land Council Gibson Farmer Illortaminni said: “We’ve got to be careful and understand each other about what we want, because we don’t want to have the same problems we’ve had in the past. The MoU is a good start, but we’ve got a long way to go. The Government needs to be honest and transparent.”

Chief Minister Michael Gunner, who signed on behalf of the Government, said: “This is the first day of a new course for the Northern Territory. The MoU we have signed today commits us to a new path of lasting reconciliation that will heal the past and allow for a cooperative, unified future for all.

“A Territory where everyone understands our history, our role in a modern society and our united and joint future will be an important achievement for all Territorians.”

The Territory Labor Government promised soon after the election in 2016 to advance a Treaty, and the MoU is the result of intensive discussions and negotiations between the Land Councils and the Government.

Significantly, the MoU was signed on the first day of the Barunga Sport and Cultural Festival – the 30th anniversary of the presentation of the Barunga Statement to Prime Minister Bob Hawke, who went on to promise a Treaty between the Commonwealth and Australia’s Indigenous peoples, but has remained undelivered.

AMSANT CEO John Paterson was at the signing of the agreement with Senator Dodson

Under the terms of the MOU NT Government will appoint an independent Treaty Commissioner who will lead the consultations with Aboriginal people and organisations across the Territory, and develop a framework for Treaty negotiations. The Commissioner will be an Aboriginal person with strong connections to the Territory, and expressions of interest will be called for the position.

The Land Councils and the Northern Territory Government will make their extensive regional staffing networks available to the Treaty Commission to organise consultations in communities.

The MoU prescribes that all Territorians should ultimately benefit from any Treaty, which must provide for substantive outcomes. It’s founded on the agreement that there has been “deep injustice done to Aboriginal people, including violent dispossession, the regression of their languages and cultures and the forcible removal of children from their families, which have left a legacy of trauma and loss that needs to be addressed and healed”.

“The process will begin with an open slate. We will start with nothing on or off the table,” Mr Gunner said.

The MoU acknowledges that there is a range of Aboriginal interests in the Territory, and that all Aboriginal people must have the opportunity to be fully engaged. It further acknowledges that non-Aboriginal people “need to be brought along in this process.”

The document leaves open the possibility of multiple treaties, and lays out a timetable for the work of the Treaty Commissioner.

Part 2 Bill Shorten Speech at Barunga

I acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land, I pay my respects to elders past, present and emerging.

It’s true everywhere on this mighty continent but no more so than here and now: this is, was and always will be Aboriginal land.

I also want to acknowledge, amongst all of the distinguished guests, including Nigel Scullion, I want to acknowledge all the leaders and the Land Council members.

Not just now but those who were here 30 years ago making such significant decisions. And we should remember those who have passed between then and now.

I thank the Bagala mob for having us on their land.

I also want to acknowledge members of the Stolen Generations who are here with us.

And to you, I wish to reiterate the commitment of my party that if we are elected we will provide overdue compensation to the remaining survivors of the Stolen Generations here in the Northern Territory and everywhere else in Australia.

Thirty years ago, the Barunga Statement was made. It was only 327 words but they were powerful.

But let me acknowledge that in the intervening 30 years not enough of the words, or the spirit,  have been kept.

I’m embarrassed the Barunga Statement hangs on a wall in Parliament House and too many members of parliament wouldn’t even know it was there. And too many walk past it, their eyes looking the other way.

But I’m not here today to talk about failure, I want to add words of hope.

When I see and meet the elders and the leaders of the Land Councils, I see hope.

When I see Senator Pat Dodson, Senator Malarndirri McCarthy, Linda Burney – first Australians in the Parliament – I see hope.

When I see so many of you here, here for the music and the sport, here to listen and to learn, I see hope.

Yesterday at Katherine High School, remarkable young teenage girls from the Stars Foundation, I saw hope. Remarkable young Aboriginal boys, teenagers at the Clontarf Foundation, I see hope.

I see hope but I also acknowledge there is unfinished business.

Not unfinished business here but unfinished business across our nation. We have not come far enough.

We need to reset the relationship between our first Australians and all other Australians, we need to change the way we do business.

Not until we are a reconciled nation can any of us help fulfil the destiny this nation has.

We need to change the way we talk to each other and act to each other.

I see that we need to use honour, equality, respect and recognition.

For me coming here is a privilege but it is also a reminder. We need to take the Barunga Statement and use it as a map on our journey to deliver a voice for our first Australians in the parliament and in the constitution.

We need to work towards a Makarrata Commission, a truth-telling commission.

Because until our communities can reconcile a joint narrative about the history of this country, we cannot truly be reconciled.

And we also need to make clear that if we can establish a Voice for our first Australians – the decisions made about them are made with them and by them.

This is not a radical concept. It is nothing less than we should expect in any other circumstances.

We should not be afraid either, of the using our voice and the voice of first Australians to talk about treaties and agreement-making between our first Australians and levels of government within Australia.

I believe that Australians have the goodwill to reconcile this country. What they don’t have is the leadership in this country to drive proper and meaningful reconciliation.

I say to the people who fear the concepts of agreement-making, of a Voice, of treaties.

I say to these people who fear this: you have nothing to lose.

You still will be able to play football on the MCG, your backyard hills-hoists will not be part of any claim, the chickens will still lay eggs.

We are not giving a special deal to our first Australians – because they don’t get a special deal in our country.

A famous man once said, it’s all very well that to say that you lift yourself up by your bootstraps but if you don’t own a pair of boots, you’re not starting from the same position.

So I regard the spirit of Barunga as a reminder to trust the better angels of the nature of the Australian people, to recognise that we can’t honour our country unless we honour our first Australians.

Unless we recognise and respect and have equality this nation will not be the country it should be when – because of the colour of your skin – your life expectancy, your access to healthcare, your educational opportunity, your access to housing and to justice are discriminated against.

So I understand very keenly not just the obligation here but the obligation elsewhere for leadership and I thank you very much for inviting me to be part of this great festival today.

Part 3 Indigenous deride Scullion for his offer: ‘Take my job’

Aboriginal leaders and constitutional lawyers have slammed a proposal from Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion to replace his job with an indigenous committee, arguing it is “far more radical” than their proposal for a constitutionally enshrined indigenous voice to parliament.

Senator Scullion made the call during an interview at the Barunga Festival near Katherine in the Northern Territory yesterday, declaring the voice to parliament was “nothing” next to the decision-making and policymaking powers that come with his office.

The voice to parliament has been championed by the Referendum Council and would involve an indigenous representative voice being enshrined in the constitution, as called for by indigenous leaders from across Australia in last year’s Uluru Statement.

Aboriginal activist and constitutional law professor Megan Davis was highly critical of Senator Scullion’s idea.

“The proposal to replace a minister of the crown with a group of unelected indigenous leaders is far more radical than what the Uluru reform calls for, a voice to the parliament,” Professor Davis said. “It suggests a lack of understanding of how cabinet government works.”

Indigenous academic Marcia Langton said she believed Aboriginal people were “perfectly well aware” of the power held by the Indigenous Affairs Minister.

“The Uluru Statement from the Heart calls for a voice to ­parliament, and I’m pretty sure this was not what was meant by the Uluru indigenous Convention delegates,” Professor Langton said.

Former Kimberley Land Council CEO Nolan Hunter said the idea was unworkable.

“If you applied the same thinking to all the other portfolio areas, how would that work?” he said.

Mr Hunter said Senator Scullion’s idea was a distraction from constructive work the indigenous community had been doing towards the voice to parliament.

Constitutional law professor Cheryl Saunders, who is not indigenous, was also sceptical, tweeting: “So much for the Parliament. And, for that matter, the cabinet.”

Senator Scullion accused the Referendum Council of being “irresponsible” in proposing the voice to parliament without also proposing a question to put to a referendum.

A parliamentary committee co-chaired by Labor senator Pat Dodson and Liberal MP Julian Leeser is examining recognition for indigenous Australians in the constitution, with submissions due today.

Senator Scullion said a voice to ­parliament was “all fluff” compared with the power his job holds.

“It’s my job, mate. It’s my job,” he told Sky News. “I have the money and I have the capacity, not me, but the job has the capacity to allocate funds, to create policy, to create change and to do stuff … Now if you don’t have that you’re just fluffing around the edges. You don’t want a voice to parliament, you don’t want a third chamber … it is nothing next to the decision-making, the policymaking, that comes with my office”.

Asked whether he was proposing putting the powers of his job in the hands of indigenous Australians, Senator Scullion said: “Absolutely. Because they would run their own thing.”

He knew from his interactions with Aboriginal people “that part of what they want is more control. So this should be a part of the conversation, a wider conversation.”

He had not “specifically” discussed his idea with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. “My utterances are not necessarily the views of government,” he said.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health , #ACCHO’s and #Medicare : Download Your guide to Medicare for Indigenous health services’ : Includes tips from people who work with Indigenous communities every day.

The Department of Human Services has a new guide to support health professionals with all aspects of Indigenous health services available under Medicare

Your guide to Medicare for Indigenous health services includes tips from people who work with Indigenous communities every day.

The department’s Medicare Liaison Officers – Adam from the Northern Territory and Hazel from north Queensland – contribute insights based on their own experiences.

The guide can help you find out more about:

  • family and domestic violence
  • the Practice Incentives Program including the PIP Indigenous Health Incentive
  • the Practice Nurse Incentive Program
  • Closing the Gap PBS prescriptions, and
  • Indigenous Medicare servicing

Your guide to Medicare for Indigenous health services  is available online for downloading and features artwork by Indigenous Australians.

Next steps 

Read more News for health professionals

INFO HERE

Education guides

These guides support health professionals who provide services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The guides also include case studies.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features @DeadlyChoices #NSW Armajun #QLD @GidgeeHealing and Carbal ACCHO #VIC @VAHS1972 #SA @AHCSA #WA #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre #ACT #NT @DanilaDilba Plus @FaCtS_Study #IGAwards2018

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

1.3 NACCHO offers discounted subscriptions and trials of the Clinical Decision Support System UpToDate for all practices

2.1 SA : Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service, Quitline and Puyu Blasters jion forces in Murray Bridge health promotion

2.2 SA : Pika Wiya Aboriginal Health Service hosted a Social and Emotional Wellbeing Day on Tuesday, June 5 to address chronic diseases in a culturally sensitive way.

3.NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Services tours New England to understand the challenges facing our Indigenous communities

4.QLD : Carbal Medical Services expands health services for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community

5.VIC : VAHS and Deadly Choices health promotion at the AFL Long Walk

6.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO staff came out in force for the Larrakia Nation Family Fun day 

7.WA :Tracy Westerman visited Karratha for Indigenous mental health in the Pilbara

8. TAS: The latest Virgin aircraft Tinamirakuna named after the Macquarie River in lutruwita (Tasmania)

9.ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service $11 million delayed

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations that place culture at the heart of their governance are invited to apply for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards (IGAs), which were launched today.

Reconciliation Australia and BHP Billiton are proud to run the awards for the first time in partnership with the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute, a national centre of governance excellence.

Established in 2005, the IGAs publicly recognise and celebrate outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations and projects that make extraordinary contributions to communities and the nation.

Organisations that are displaying effective Indigenous governance are encouraged to apply, with prizes including corporate mentoring, feedback from the judging panel, media and networking opportunities, and a share in $60,000.

Reconciliation Australia CEO Karen Mundine said it was important to showcase the high achievers in Indigenous governance, so that they get the accolades they deserve – and so that broader Australia understands their important contributions.

“For more than a decade, the IGA winners have shown that so much is possible when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander develop innovative and robust systems of governance by putting culture at the heart of what they do,” Ms Mundine said.

Australian Indigenous Governance Institute CEO Michelle Deshong said governance was the foundation stone that enabled Indigenous peoples and communities to build a prosperous future.

“The ability to come together, set goals, and put things in place to achieve their goals, allows people to build a self-determined future,” Ms Deshong said.

“For Indigenous peoples, this means navigating a complex and interconnected web of cultural, environmental, economic and political influences. Celebrating those who have done this well fills us with ideas, confidence and inspiration.”

The two award categories are Category A: Indigenous-led incorporated organisations and Category B: Indigenous-led non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Winners in each of the two categories will receive $20,000, and highly commended organisations in each category will each be awarded $10,000. Ms Mundine said the IGAs have a history of attracting high caliber nominations from organisations around the country, from the bustling capital cities to our most remote communities.

“In 2018, we want to see applications from organisations and projects that are making a difference in their communities, through community engagement, varying governance models and cultural practices.

Applications or recommendations for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards can be made online at http://www.reconciliation.org.au/iga or by calling 02 6273 9200. Applications close Saturday 30 June 2018.

There are two award categories:

  • Category A: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in Indigenous incorporated organisations.
  • Category B: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Each category is looking for governance that demonstrates:

  • Innovation
  • Effectiveness
  • Self-determination and leadership
  • Cultural relevance and legitimacy
  • Future planning, sustainability and governance resilience.

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

The Australian National University is seeking partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families. We want to partner and work with local organisations and communities to make sure the research benefits the community.

Who are we?

We work at the Australian National University (ANU). The study is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers. Professor Victoria Hovane (Ngarluma, Malgnin/Kitja, Gooniyandi), along with Associate Professor Raymond Lovett (Wongaibon, Ngiyampaa) and Dr Jill Guthrie (Wiradjuri) from NCEPH, and Professor Matthew Gray of the Centre for Social Research and Methods (CSRM) at ANU will be leading the study.

Study Question: What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

How are we going to gather information to answer the study question?

A Community Researcher (who we would give funds to employ) would capture the data by interviewing 100 community members, running 3 focus groups for Men / Women / Youth (over 16).  We would interview approx. 5 community members to hear about the story in your community.

We know Family Violence happens in all communities. We don’t want to find out the prevalence, we want to know what your communities needs to feel safe. We will also be mapping the services in your community, facilities and resources available in a community.  All this information will be given back to your community.

What support would we provide your service?

We are able to support your organisation up to $40,000 (including funds for $30 vouchers), this would also help to employ a Community Researcher.

Community participants would be provided with a $30 voucher to complete a survey, another $30 for the focus group, and another $30 for the interview for their time.

What will we give your organisation?

We can give you back all the data that we have captured from your community, (DE identified and confidentialised of course).We can give you the data in any form you like, plus create a Community Report for your community. There might be some questions you would like to ask your community, and we can include them in the survey.

How long would we be involved with your community / organisation?

Approximately 2 months

How safe is the data we collect?

The data is safe. It will be DE identified and Confidentialised. Our final report will reflect what Communities (up to 20) took part in the study, but your data and community will be kept secret.  Meaning, no one will know what data came from your community.

If you think this study would be of benefit to your community, or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Victoria Hovane and the FaCtS team on 1800 531 600 or email facts.study@anu.edu.au.

1.3 NACCHO offers discounted subscriptions and trials of the Clinical Decision Support System UpToDate for all practices. 

 Download the brochure

UpToDate Brochure – Staying UpToDate

UpToDate is an evidence-based clinical decision support system and extensive medical database. Used to answer clinical questions, improve medical knowledge and helps provide consistent, best practice care on the full spectrum of medical conditions.

It is proven to change the way medical professionals practice medicine, and is currently used across a range of our practices.

Key features of UpToDate® include:

  • Evidence-based medical content that is researched, created, and continually updated by over 6,500 leading physicians
  • Practice Changing Updates – highlights specific new recommendations and/or updates that UTD anticipate may change usual clinical practice
  • 25 Specialties – UTD contains all of the internal medicine subspecialties (at a level that meets the needs of the subspecialist), all of primary care, internal medicine, ob/gyn, pediatrics, general surgery, and more – all in one resource.
  • Graphics Search – This powerful search engine feature allows you to search tens of thousands of pictures, charts, movies, illustrations and more – all without ever leaving UpToDate®
  • Medical Calculators – More than 165 medical calculators are available with the subscription
  • Drug Information – A select drug database of more than 5,600 unique drug entries (in partnership with Lexicomp®) including adult, pediatric, and international drugs and a drug interactions tool that provides graded adverse reaction information between drug-to-drug and drug-to-herb interactions.
  • Patient Information – UTD includes more than 1,500 Patient Information articles about the most common medical conditions and therapies.
  • Accredited Education Resource – accredited from a range of colleges including the RACGP & ACRRM allowing staff to earn CME/CPD Points

Contact details

James Dixon from UpToDate

In the meantime, don’t hesitate to contact me at james.dixon@wolterskluwer.com or Mobile: 0401 855 882, if you have any questions.

2.1 SA : Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service, Quitline and Puyu Blasters jion forces in Murray Bridge health promotion

Smoking is more than just an expensive habit – it steals lifetimes and tears families apart, those present at a World No Tobacco Day event have been told.

In Edwards Square, Murray Bridge last Thursday, several Aboriginal health organisations joined forces to warn about the long-term consequences of smoking.

Originally published here

T-shirts designed by local artist Harley Hall were given out as people pledged to live smoke-free, or help friends and family do so; sausages were cooked and songs sung.

Mr Hall said smoking had always been a big part of his family.

He had lost both of his nannas to emphysema, he said; his father had had lung cancer and his mother now had a reduced lung capacity as well.

“So much of our community is smoking,” he said.

“Family means everything to us blackfellas, so it’s time to start now, time to take the pledge.”

Harold Bundamarra Stewart, now aged in his 60s, said he finally managed to quit 25 years ago.

“I struggled all my life,” he said.

“I had my first cigarette when I was 15 years old.

“Now I’ve dedicated my life to helping get that message out there about the dangers of smoking.”

It was a significant factor in diabetes, he said, and three or four other diseases came along with it.

He urged all smokers to seek help from health services.

“It’s very important to have support,” he said.

“I struggled – I quit seven times in my life and always went back.

“But you can give up successfully.”

The event was organised by the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service, Quitline and Puyu Blasters.

Get help: Quitline 13 78 48, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service 8531 0289.

 

2.2 SA : Pika Wiya Aboriginal Health Service hosted a Social and Emotional Wellbeing Day on Tuesday, June 5 to address chronic diseases in a culturally sensitive way.

HEALTH: Pika Wiya CEO Alan Morris and Country and Outback Health Indigenous Health Project Officer Jacinta McKenzie at Pika Wiya’s Social and Emotional Wellbeing Day

Originally published HERE

The theme of the event, which was held in conjunction with Country and Outback Health, was ‘Wellness our way’, bringing a host of traditional healers on site for consultation.

The event showcased programs that focus on mental and physical personal care, such as Stepping Stones, headspace and Family Violence Legal Service Aboriginal Corporation.

Pika Wiya CEO Alan Morris highlighted the importance of integrating traditional healers into medicine.

“We (Pika Wiya) are the largest users of traditional healers, or Ngangkari’s, outside of the APY,” Mr Morris said.

“Using bush medicine to heal mind, spirit and body are integral to the ongoing success of the Aboriginal community.

“Their medicine and ways of healing compliment the more traditional western medicine.”

Tom Powell from Red Dust Healing was a guest speaker at the event, focusing on how to deal with grief, loss and trauma.

Country and Outback Health’s Indigenous Health Project Officer Jacinta McKenzie said the day was all about caring for the mind and making better choices.

“Every person and family has different things going on within their life to overcome to be able to get to that next stage,” she said.

“Grief and loss; we have a lot in the community that impacts on people as well. We try to encourage people to look after themselves a bit better to try to deal with it separately.”

The event also gave the organisations the chance to bring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into Pika Wiya to complete their Medicare Health Assessment.

3.NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Services tours New England to understand the challenges facing our Indigenous communities

Service providers with Aboriginal clients are invited to attend a local workshop this month to understand the challenges facing our Indigenous communities.

SEE EVENTS Calendar

The workshops have been developed by Spirit Dreaming for the Armajun Aboriginal Health Service in response to feedback they received from communities in the areas where they provide primary health care services: Tenterfield, Armidale, Glen Innes, Inverell, Tingha and Walcha.

Originally published HERE

“The workshops came about through consultation with our communities in our service region,” said Armajun program manager James Sheather.

“They’ve told us there is a need for more mental health wellbeing services in community, so we are hoping these workshops will start the ball rolling by providing community and service suppliers with information sessions to help them understand the issues being faced by their clients.”

Mr Sheather said the workshop would challenge and test past perceptions of Aboriginal Peoples and their culture.

“It is designed to address cultural realities in order to improve service delivery to Aboriginal clients and co-workers,” he said.

“We will explore the three major issues which impact on Aboriginal peoples of today; transgenerational trauma; lateral violence and cultural loads.”

Facilitator Mel Brown, an Aboriginal Ngunnawal woman, will identify and ask participants to consider the actual and potential impacts of these issues upon their community.

“She will also show them available resources and help them develop the skills for managing clients and families who are affected by these issues,” Mr Sheather said.

The Tenterfield workshop will be held at the Visitor Information office on June 15 between 9.30am and 3.30pm.

4.QLD : Carbal Medical Services expands health services for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community

Carbal Medical Services has opened a new centre in Guy St as it prepares to ramp up its clinical practice and community services.

CEO Brian Hewitt said the clinic in Warwick was “bulging at the seams”.

“We now deliver 29 different programs across the darling downs on top of the two full clinics that we operate in Warwick and Toowoomba.”

Originally published HERE

The increased services in Warwick will address an growing demand for culturally appropriate medical care in the region.

Carbal Medical Services now has 7000 clients across the Darling Downs.

Toni Park with Carbal Medical Centre patient, Githabul elder Amos Close. Photo Jayden Brown / Warwick Daily News
Toni Park with Carbal Medical Centre patient, Githabul elder Amos Close. Photo Jayden Brown / Warwick Daily News Jayden Brown

“If we identify a gap, we don’t sit around and wait for funding. We will set up a program and make it happen,” Mr Hewitt said.

The new community services centre in Guy St would focus on delivering health programs to tackle smoking, drug and alcohol abuse and low-intensity mental health.

The Warwick clinic also plans to increase the number of doctors to cater to rising demands for GP and allied health care.

Practice manager Kerry Stewart said the waiting list for doctor appointments signified the community’s investment in health.

“We certainly get a strong engagement from the community,” Ms Stewart said.

She put the success down to staff cultural awareness training and empowering patients.

“There is a focus on assisting people to take initiative on their own health which makes them want to attend their appointments,” Ms Stewart said.

 

EVERYONE COUNTS: Carbal helps Indigenous and non-Indigenous people of all ages.
EVERYONE COUNTS: Carbal helps Indigenous and non-Indigenous people of all ages. Contributed

Patients travel from as far as Stanthorpe and Inglewood to access specialised care in Warwick.

Ms Stewart said the expansion of services for the community’s Indigenous population was a positive step in reconciliation week.

“Being able to offer more services for Indigenous people in the community contributes to the broader reconciliation movement and making Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people feel valued.”

“It is a long road but if everyone works together we will eventually get there in closing the gaps.”

4.2 :  Queensland State Minister for Health checks out Gidgee Healing Deadly Choices Program

Steven Miles, Queensland State Minister for Health and Paul Woodhouse, North West Hospital and Health Service Chair who came down to Mount Isa Special School today to check out the Deadly Choices program!

5.VIC : VAHS and Deadly Choices health promotion at the AFL Long Walk

Check it out the Essendon legend himself Anthony McDonald-Tipungwuti wearing the VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt out during the warm up for Dream Time at the G. The other players also wore the shirts as well… What a moment !

If you want your very own VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt just like Tippa the only way you can get one is to complete a health check at VAHS. So call us and book your health check on 03 9419 3000

6.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO staff came out in force for the Larrakia Nation Family Fun day 

Danila Dilba staff came out in force for the Larrakia Nation Family Fun day to celebrate their 20th Anniversary at the Jingili Water Gardens on 26 May.

It was a great day with lots of cultural activities and community coming down. Congratulations to Larrakia Nation for this important milestone and thanks to all our staff who helped out on the day. #LivingStronger #LivingLonger

7.WA :Tracy Westerman visited Karratha for Indigenous mental health in the Pilbara

Pioneering Aboriginal psychologist and WA Australian of the Year winner Tracy Westerman visited Karratha last week to deliver specialised training in indigenous mental health to psychologists and social workers from across the region.

Originally published HERE

Over a two-day workshop at the Karratha Leisureplex, the internationally recognised psychologist spoke to local staff about how to identify signs of mental health issues such as depression in Aboriginal clients and intervene early in a culturally appropriate way.

The event marks the first time Dr Westerman, who grew up in Tom Price, has returned to the Pilbara since winning WA Australian of the Year in November.

She said the training would fill in gaps in professionals’ knowledge on indigenous mental health, which was too often “invisible” in mainstream psychology training.

“We get people skilled up in identifying the different signs of depression and knowing how to treat depression in a more culturally specific way, because the more we can get conditions at an early stage, the more we can prevent the escalation of those issues in the community more generally,” she said.

“I want people to be more tuned into those early signs and also how to work on and prevent mental health issues in Aboriginal communities, which are often very different to working with non-indigenous communities.”

The workshop, which was supported by the WA Primary Health Alliance and facilitated by Mission Australia, was attended by about 40 mental health and drug and alcohol counselling staff from Mission Australia, headspace, Hedland’s Youth Involvement Council and Bloodwood Tree.

Mission Australia Hedland clinical lead Amanda MacBride said Dr Westerman’s training was invaluable for her and her colleagues for its focus on indigenous mental health.

“We can get cultural training but it’s general, and we can get more mental health training in our field, but to find that combination is rare, so that’s what makes this so enriching because we need that combination up here in the Pilbara,” she said.

“You are going to have Aboriginal clients here … so you need those tools.”

8. TAS: The latest Virgin aircraft Tinamirakuna named after the Macquarie River in lutruwita (Tasmania)

 

9.ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service $11 million delayed

About $11 million has been set aside over three years for a new facility for Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service, a 2016 election promise.

The majority of the money will be delivered to Winnunga later than proposed, with about $8 million of the funding being delivered in 2020-21

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alcohol and other Drugs : Critical Aboriginal health Drug and Alcohol services cut during #NRW Reconciliation Week

First Nations people in crisis will be left without a place to go after Minister Scullion announced the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council in South Australia, the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health in Brisbane and the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council will all have their alcohol and other drug support funding cut.

This is yet another example of the Government doing things ‘to’ and not ‘with’ First Nations people and clearly demonstrates why First Nations people need a Voice to Parliament.”

Senator Patrick Dodson and The Hon Warren Snowdon Press release See Part 3 Below

NACCHO has published close the 200 Aboriginal Health Alcohol and other Drugs articles over the past 6 years

We believe at the current time this must be some kind of oversight.  It will take Aboriginal health in this country backwards in a massive way if there is no Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council.

We urge the Prime Minister and Minister Scullion to reconsider urgently and to announce that our funding will continue ”

The CEO of the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (ADAC) urges the Prime Minister to reconsider following shocking news from the Federal Government that the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council is to be closed down. See Part 2 below

Scott Wilson says the news is devastating and will have a massive negative impact on Indigenous Australian highlighting that ADAC helps close to 30,000 Indigenous people a year and costs the Federal Government just $700,000.

Part 1 Press Coverage SBS

An Indigenous rehabilitation centre in South Australia could be forced to stop taking clients from September because of funding cuts, its chief executive says.

The head of an Indigenous drug and alcohol rehabilitation centre believes it will have to stop taking clients from September because of federal government funding cuts.

Originally published here

Services provided by the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council in South Australia can’t continue without ongoing funding for its main body, its chief executive Scott Wilson says.

The council receives $4.5 million a year from the federal government to operate a residential rehabilitation centre in Port Augusta and two day centres in Ceduna and Port Augusta.

But Mr Wilson says he received a call last week, during reconciliation week, to say while funding for the facilities would continue they’d stop receiving $700,000 a year for administrative facilities and wages, including his own, from January 1.

“When you don’t actually have the legal entity being funded you can’t actually operate the other services at all,” he told Sky News.

“It’s almost like having an airline but no airport to land.”

A spokesman for Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said the government has provided $1.38 million a year to continue the alcohol and drug treatment service until June 2020.

“The Minister is absolutely focused on delivering the best outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and does not apologise for holding service providers like Mr Wilson to account for the outcomes they deliver,” the Minister’s spokesman said.

He said the government was also assessing the effectiveness of the service.

Mr Wilson said the cut would mean staff could only be offered six-month contracts and the residential treatment centre would probably stop taking clients from September this year.

“Without us there is simply no voice,” Mr Wilson said in a statement.

“We need the funding back. We have so many clients in crisis who need our help.”

Part 2 Press Release

The CEO of the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (ADAC) – which was set up as a direct result of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Black Deaths in Custody – is urging the Federal Government not to close the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council.

On May 31st 2018, the Prime Minister’s Office called Scott Wilson indicating that from January 1st of next year there will be no funding for ADAC.

Scott Wilson says the news is devastating and will have a massive negative impact on thousands and thousands of Indigenous Australians.

The Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council helps over 20,000 Indigenous people through its day centres’ diversionary programs. A further 10,000 people use other services. ADAC costs the Federal Government just $700,000 a year.

Scott Wilson says minor savings in money will lead to massive drug and alcohol problems for the Aboriginal community. He says the cutback is a false economy.

ADAC has been operating for 25 years. It represents the only collective voice for over 30 Indigenous community controlled member organisations across South Australia.

ADAC provides alcohol and other drugs resources to close to 2,000 community organisations across the nation. 30 Aboriginal community organisations across South Australia are members of ADAC.

ADAC is the largest provider of alcohol and other drugs services for Indigenous people in the State and employs 57 staff across South Australia.

CEO Scott Wilson has had numerous Ministerial appointments including twoPrime Ministerial appointments onto the Australian National Council of Drugs (now called ANACAD) for a decade and he is the founding director of the Alcohol Education Rehabilitation Foundation (now called FARE).

Scott Wilson said, “We cannot believe that the Federal Government is intending to close the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council. The impact would be massive.

ADAC runs a wide range of services across the State including doing all the payroll and purchasing. I have absolutely no idea how staff would get paid without us.”

“To be clear, we advocate on behalf of Aboriginal people facing drug and alcohol issues. Without us there is simply no voice. We don’t believe day centres and rehabilitation centres will be able to continue without ADAC so we are talking about 57 jobs going.”

“We ask the Federal Government to urgently review and reconsider its decision.

We need the funding back. We have so many clients in crisis who need our help. If the Federal Government pursues this track, staff will leave all parts of ADAC in droves because there will be no job security.

We won’t be able to offer contracts to people and everything will be very different indeed.” ADAC was formed in 1993 as a South Australian community response to the Royal Commission into Black Deaths in Custody. It was recommended that there should be a community controlled response through a statewide peak substance misuse organisation.

ADAC has received consecutive funding from the Australian Federal Government for 25 years. Scott Wilson says it is well known that the most effective and sustainable approaches to alcohol and drug misuse are those that are actually delivered by Indigenous community controlled organisations.

Staff at ADAC include five Aboriginal people with either a Master in Indigenous Health or a Graduate Diploma.

They also have registered nurses, enrolled nurses, counsellors and a range of other experts.

ADAC expertise has been recognised by the Federal Government over numerous years with ADAC staff being members of nearly every national drug strategy committee since 1998.

ADAC has held over 15 community forums on alcohol and other drugs and ice in the past 12 months.

ADAC is also involved with four National Health and Medical Research Council grants.

Since taking over, day centre client contacts have climbed massively from 900 a year to 20,000 per year.

Scott Wilson added, “We believe at the current time this must be some kind of oversight. It will take Aboriginal health in this country backwards in a massive way if there is no Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council.

We urge the Prime Minister and Minister Scullion to reconsider urgently and to announce that our funding will continue.

WEBSITE

ADAC FACT SHEET

Formed in 1993 (25 years ago) as a South Australian Community response to the Royal Commission into Black Deaths in Custody (RCIADIC) recommendations to provide a community-controlled response through a statewide peak substance misuse organization.

With recurrent funding from the Australian Government, ADAC has successfully provided Peak Body AOD services in South Australia for over 25 years.

It is well known that the most effective and sustainable approaches to alcohol and drug misuse are those delivered by Indigenous community-controlled organisations.

Saggers & Gray (2010) therefore, ADAC is unique as it is the only Indigenous peak body of its kind in Australia and represents the only collective voice for over 20 Indigenous community-controlled member organisations across South Australia.

30 Aboriginal community organisations across SA are members of ADAC

ADAC employ 57 staff across SA and is the largest provider of AOD for indigenous people in the state. Our staff include 5 Aboriginal people with either a Master in Indigenous health or Graduate Diploma, Registered Nurses, enrolled nurses, Counselors and a range of other qualifications including aboriginal Primary Health.

ADAC expertise has been recognized by the Commonwealth government over numerous years with ADAC staff being members of nearly every National drug Strategy Committee since 1998.

The CEO Scott Wilson has had numerous Ministerial appointments including 2 Prime Ministerial appointments onto the Australian National Council on Drugs (ANCD) for 10 years and the founding Director of the Alcohol Education Rehabilitation Foundation for 11 years.

Part 3 Labor Press Release

First Nations people in crisis will be left without a place to go after Minister Scullion announced the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council in South Australia, the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health in Brisbane and the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council will all have their alcohol and other drug support funding cut.

This is yet another example of the Government doing things ‘to’ and not ‘with’ First Nations people and clearly demonstrates why First Nations people need a Voice to Parliament.

CEO of the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council in South Australia Mr Wilson received a call during reconciliations week, to inform him of the cut, which includes his own wages from January 1.

The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health received a call yesterday confirming their Inner City Referral Service will face cuts. The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health council will lose the equivalent of two full-time alcohol and other drug workers.

This is just the beginning, with other state and territory bodies anticipating similar cuts.

You can’t make this stuff up, the Turnbull Government has cut critical rehab services during reconciliation week.

Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol services support members of the First Nations community at their most vulnerable. Alcoholic and drug dependant patients have a high incidence of entering the criminal justice system, it is only through rehabilitative services that people get the second chance they deserve. First Nations people need access to crisis alcohol and other drug support, not a hall pass to correctional centres.

Alarmingly, the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA),Institute for Urban Indigenous Health in Brisbane (IUIH), Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) were not consulted prior to the decision to cease funding.

Labor calls upon the Government to rethink their ill-advised decision to cut funding to critical Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol services across Australia.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities Inc CEO @ahmrc @TISprogramme #NT #Sunrise @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

Job of the Week CEO AHMRC Expression of interest

 

Purpose of the position:

The CEO establishes the core values and strategy of the workplace and is accountable for developing, communicating and executing strategic plans to facilitate the sustainable business success of the AH&MRC. The CEO will lead the development of annual goals and will work with Senior Management Team to guide the successful implementation of strategies that promotes the organisation’s values.

The AH&MRC CEO is ultimately responsible to the Chairperson and the Board of Directors (the Board) for implementing strategic and operational policy and for the continued growth and viability of the organisation.  The CEO will be building the confidence, reputation and profile of the AH&MRC amongst the Members and across the Aboriginal health sector of NSW.  The CEO will develop and grow the organisation’s services to members and provide strategies and advice to the Board.

Depending on the notice period of the successful applicant this position is expected to commence around August/September for a period of a three (3) year contract, based in our Surry Hills office (66 Wentworth Ave, NSW).

Criteria:

  1. Knowledge of the Aboriginal Health sector
  2. Demonstrated experience working at a high level
  3. Current CEO experience and management
  4. This vacancy is an identified Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander recruitment under Part 22, section 22.9 of the AH&MRC Constitution. Applicants for this role must satisfy the Aboriginality criteria you will need to provide information on how you satisfy the Aboriginality

A detailed position description is attached which includes the duties of the position and the salary.

EOI should be forwarded to the HR department via email to gagic@ahmrc.org.au included with the application should be a current CV and a Cover Letter outlining the above criteria.

Please contact the HR Department via email gagic@ahmrc.org.au should you wish to discuss the position further.

Applications close Friday, 22 June 2018

 Download AHMRC_CEO_PD_May_2018

Rural Doctor job of the week

Gidgee Healing is currently seeking a General Practitioner to deliver integrated, comprehensive primary health care services at their Burke St Clinic in Mount Isa.

You will be supported by a team of dedicated clinic staff including Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Medical Receptionists, Practice Managers and visiting Specialists and Allied Health providers; in addition to community and secondary service providers.

ESSENTIAL CRITERIA:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding unconditional current registration with AHPRA
  • Vocationally Registered, FRACGP or FACRRM
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number
  • Knowledge, understanding and sensitivity towards the social, economic and cultural factors affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health.

ABOUT US:

Gidgee Healing is a dynamic Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service that provides a comprehensive and growing range of primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people residing in the Mount Isa, North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria regions. Our services include General Practice, maternal and child health, social and preventative health, health promotion and education, allied health and specialist services. Gidgee Healing is also the lead agency for headspace Mount Isa and the Normanton Recovery and Community Wellbeing Service. The organisation strives to provide high quality health and wellbeing services in a culturally welcoming environment, to enhance the accessibility and uptake of health services by our clients and support the early identification and management of illness and chronic diseases.

THE LIFESTYLE:

The North West offers a relaxed and casual lifestyle, with a wealth of camping and exploring, scenic national parks, gorges, as well as pristine river, lake and open water fishing and recreation.

Applications close COB Friday 15th June, 2018

To apply online, please click on the appropriate link below. Alternatively, for a confidential discussion, please contact Lauren Taylor on (07) 4743 6681, quoting Ref No. 798746.

APPLY HERE

General Practitioners Awabakal

We are currently seeking two dedicated and talented General Practitioners to join our growing team. A strong interest in, and commitment to Aboriginal Health is a must. You will form an essential part of our multidisciplinary team, serving the local community in strong consultation with a network of excellent nursing, allied health and administration specialists.

Our GP’s will rotate across our Medical Facilitates based at Hamilton, Raymond Terrace and Cardiff, and through Outreach programs.

Why work for Awabakal?

Awabakal is a dynamic and innovative community organisation with the support and wellbeing of the Aboriginal community in Newcastle, Hunter Valley, Lake Macquarie and Port Stephens at the heart of everything we do.

Our highly skilled teams across medical, aged care, housing and preschool services are passionate and driven to provide the most progressive and flexible services to our local Aboriginal communities and we actively empower our staff to be creative and forward thinking.

The positions:

You will work as an integral part of Awabakal’s Medical team, and report to the Senior Medical Officer.

The role will require you to provide quality, integrated, best practice primary health care to the patients of the Aboriginal Medical Service, both within the confines of the medical practice and through Outreach programs.

You will improve the health of the Awabakal community by improving patient access to appropriate treatment and health care plans.

What you need to be successful:

Professional medical registration with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Authority (AHPRA)

Fellowship of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners FRACGP

Fellowship of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or equivalent

Accredited GP registrar supervisor (desirable)

Demonstrated relevant experience as a General Practitioner as a vocationally registered/fellow in a community setting

Demonstrated experience of working effectively with Aboriginal clients and community

Demonstrated understanding of cultural issues impacting access to care for Aboriginal people

Extensive experience with patient consultation

Experience with Medicare Billing

Current Class C Drivers Licence

Salary:

Our teams are professional, hardworking and passionate, best describing our culture as innovative, flexible and supportive and we are committed to ensuring our leadership team members reflect our important organisational values.

A competitive salary will be negotiated with the right candidate, to match skills, experience and qualifications.

Please note as part of Awabakal’s recruitment process, prior to an offer of employment being made, recommended candidates will be required to undertake and provide a current Working with Children and National Police Check, and demonstrate evidence of current registration, and original qualifications.

All General Practitioners employed by Awabakal are required to maintain individual medical indemnity insurance, always, and as appropriate to their position at Awabakal. Medical indemnity insurance is an essential requirement of registration with the Medical Board of Australia.

How to Apply:

To apply please forward your resume and supporting covering letter, or alternatively contact Dr Dean Wright on 0419 638 796 or Jessica Gossage, Human Resource Consultant on (02) 4940 8743 for a confidential discussion.

We site www.yerin.org.au

Check out the Website

Jobs of the week 

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Research and Evidence Manager

We seek a high calibre professional, to undertake a range of research projects in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $100,000 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* South Brisbane location

* This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Research and Evidence Manager.

Role Overview

The Research and Evidence Manager will be responsible for managing the Research Division, consisting of the Health Information Team and Research Team (including funded programmes).  This includes undertaking a diverse range of research projects including the development of a research plan that will strengthen the capacity of QAIHC to develop innovative, culturally responsive and evidence informed programs and policy responses in high profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Understanding of Indigenous Health.

* Demonstrated capability in conducting evaluation projects, including design, analysis and interpretation of data.

* Knowledge of ethics committees.

* High level quantitative and qualitative data analysis skills.

* Ability to conduct literature reviews to a high standard including search, collation and summarising skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled health organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Health Policy Manager

An exciting opportunity for a high calibre professional, to provide high quality policy advice in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

  • Indigenous Health Organisation
  • Salary: $100,000 + superannuation
  • Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging
  • South Brisbane Location
  • This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Health Policy Manager.

Role Overview

The Health Policy Manager, will provide leadership to a small team responsible for providing high quality policy advice on complex and high-profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

  • Specific policy development knowledge.
  • Experience in developing state or national health policy.
  • Understanding of relevant state and federal government decision making process.
  • Understanding of the AICCHOs and the issues facing them.
  • Demonstrated experience of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.
  • Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Workforce Coordinator – Medicare Specialist

We are seeking a Medicare Specialist to support and train clinics in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* South Brisbane location

* Salary: $82,500 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The Medicare Specialist will be responsible for supporting QAIHCs Member Services across Queensland in the management and use of electronic patient information and recall systems and in maximising access to health incentives, Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and Medicare Benefits Schedule opportunities.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Medical claims and incentives programs is essential in this role, in particular:

o Medicare

o Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

o Practice Incentives Program

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders, including relevant government departments, networks and specialist providers

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills

* Project management experience

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business

* A certificate IV in Training and Assessment and knowledge of the VET sector is desirable

* A current drivers licence is required

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – mailto:applications@qaihc.com.au

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 10th June 201

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

There are 5 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website

MAMU HEALTH SERVICE LIMITED

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal community controlled health service providing comprehensive primary health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Ravenshoe and surrounding districts.  We are recruiting the following positions for our Ravenshoe Clinic:-

Aboriginal & or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Practice Certificate III/IV Fixed Term. Applicant must have previous experience in similar role.

Traineeship – Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) HLT30113 Certificate III – If you have a passion to work in the health industry we are offering a Traineeship in Certificate III ATSI Primary Health Care (Practice) fixed term (12- 14 months) (It is a genuine occupational requirement that the position be filled by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person as permitted by Section 25, 105 & 106 Queensland Anti-Discrimination (1991) Act.)

Registered Nurse – A Full time position is available. Applicants must have previous experience in working with the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people. This is a Rural & Remote position which offers an attractive employment package including accommodation & fuel allowance.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check, and a Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian.

To apply for this vacancy, a full application package can be obtained from our website on http://www.mamuhsl.org.au, or please don’t hesitate to contact Julie Browne on 07 4061 9988 or jbrowne@mamuhsl.org.au to register your interest.

Please submit your resume and written responses addressing the Knowledge, Skills and Personal Attributes/Selection Criteria outlined in the Position Description to: The Chief Executive Officer Mamu Health Service Limited PO Box 1537 INNISFAIL Q 4860 Applications close at 5.00 pm on Friday 8th June 2018

Mamu Website

Ravenshoe Positions:

RAV-067 Trainee Health Worker_Position Description

RAV-066 ATSI Health Worker_3

RAV-060 Registered Nurse_Position Description3

Innisfail Positions:

IFL-267 Trainee Health Worker

IFL-264 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL-263 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL 269 Community Liason Officer_Female (002)

IFL-261 Sport Rec Officer_Position Description_110518 (003)

FOR ALL POSITIONS

APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY 8th JUNE 2018 5.00PM

 

There are 3 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

+ Clinical Optometrist (Full Time or Part Time position based at Windsor) + Indigenous Outreach Worker (Ongoing Full Time position based at Strathpine) + Medical Quality Coordinator (Regional Fixed Term Position)

 There are 14 JOBS at ATSICHS Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 28 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

Director, Primary Health Care

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (SHSAC) is an independent, community controlled health service, directed by a Board of representatives from the remote Aboriginal communities. SHSAC has a philosophy of community participation and a strong focus on Care Coordination and Chronic Disease prevention and management including population health, health promotion and awareness.

The Director, Primary Health Care (DPHC) plays an Executive leadership role ensuring the organisation is operationally sustainable and responsive to the needs of people within the remote areas. This includes effective planning and management of human, financial and physical resources and the evaluation of services, ensuring effective systems are in place to support daily practice and the maintenance of all health related accreditation and standards underpinned by high quality service delivery.

Your new role

As the DPHC, you’ll provide professional direction to staff, influence the achievement of the strategic and operational goals, and provide progressive planning and operational service delivery advice to the Executive Management Team. As an advocate for change, you’ll shape an environment of strategic thinking, develop policies and cost savings measures, MOU’s and provide regular analysis of community health data.

Taking the lead in the review of activities and operations Clinic by Clinic including staffing levels, resource and accommodation requirements, you’ll collaborate with other managers and health service providers to ensure their participation in the activity and service delivery planning processes. You’ll manage and regularly review structures, budgets and operational costs across 9 Clinics in excess of $9m; audit all fiscal expenditure under your control and ensure full compliance and oversight of all clinical governance matters.

Via sound forward planning, you’ll support the Health Centre Managers with innovative and effective plans and solutions to workforce, recruitment and retention issues arising from working in rural and remote areas, to ensure an improved, merit based qualified and adequate remote health workforce across all of the Health Centres.

With the ability to inspire confidence and trust, and resolve workplace conflict, you’ll drive an effective, positive and united culture; fostering cohesive, respectful communication and a ‘one team’ outlook throughout remote clinics and head office. Continuously working to maximise access to accredited health services by community members, you’ll forge strong relationships at both community and professional level, working proactively to strengthen regional consensus and solidarity on health service delivery policy.

What you’ll need to succeed

You’ll have proven Executive / Senior level expertise in the management of complex operational and contentious issues in a health context, providing strategic leadership and advice with the management of clinical operations and strict budgets, complex projects, policy development, and improved resource mobilisation and efficiency. With contemporary problem solving, people and risk management skills, you’ll have the capability to lead significant change and negotiate through differences to achieve positive outcomes.

With a relevant tertiary qualification (i.e. Masters, MBA or PhD) and current health practitioner registration or eligibility, you’ll have a thorough understanding of the provision of advanced clinical care and health programs, and clinical leadership.

What you’ll get in return

On offer is an attractive package for a 1 year maternity cover contract. Benefits include salary packaging, 6 weeks Leave, 10 days study leave and relocation.

What you need to do now If you’re interested, please click apply now or forward a copy of your CV to mailto:hayley.schwab@hays.com.au

PLEASE NOTE – Please direct all applications to Hays who are exclusively managing the recruitment for this vacancy on behalf of Sunrise H

There are 5 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

 

Deputy Chief Executive Officer

About the Organisation

The name Derbarl Yerrigan is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River. Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC) is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation which was established in 1974 as the Perth Aboriginal Medical Service and later changed its name to DYHSAC in 1998

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

To view and download the application pack, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

Durri servicing the Macleay and Nambucca Valleys – making a difference

 

Durri’s vision is to achieve and maintain better health and wellbeing outcomes for our Aboriginal people and communities.

Durri aims to be an employer of choice in Aboriginal health, supporting a skilled and flexible workforce.

Durri is a great place to work – a family friendly and culturally sensitive work environment that values people.

If you have a passion for indigenous health and are committed to closing the gap, then why not join us?

Please view our current vacancies .

We are currently hiring for 2 Senior Policy & Research Officers
The link to the role on Ethical Jobs is here:

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Bendigo

Closing Date : 24 June

More Info apply: http://www.murrayphn.org.au/aboriginal-internship

Job Ref : N2018 – 37

 

Academic Leader: Indigenous Health (Identified*) – 180357

School of Medicine

Closing Date: 02/07/2018