NACCHO Aboriginal Health #HaveYourSayCTG #ClosingTheGap New @OxfamAustralia report shows #self-determined First Peoples like our ACCHO’s are In Good Hands : Download HERE

“ Not only will this give First Peoples a sense of empowerment, control and indeed sovereignty, as the case studies in this report show, this approach will also help to address the systemic disadvantage that is a consequence of Australian history.

Sadly, Australia’s current approach lags well behind similar countries in closing the health and well-being gaps endured by First Peoples around the world.

Oxfam Australia is calling on State and Federal governments to empower and fund local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations to allow them to build on traditional knowledge and culture when delivering services,” 

National Manager for Oxfam’s First Peoples’ Program, Ngarra Murray, said preferencing Aboriginal organisations was essential in working towards a future underpinned by the principles of self-determination, community-control and effective service delivery to the First Peoples of Australia.

Download the Report HERE 

2019-AP-001-IN_GOOD_HANDS_FINAL_FA_WEB

“We walk and work in two worlds . We have a far better grasp of the issues faced by these communities. We shouldn’t be overlooked because we are an Aboriginal medical service.”

Acting Chief Executive Jo Grant says in the report that Katungul ACCHO staff had a much deeper understanding of the issues facing the Aboriginal people of the region

Government policies that empower local Aboriginal communities and build on traditional knowledge and culture to deliver services generally produce better results and should become the policy norm in Australia, according to a landmark report released today by Oxfam Australia.

The report, In Good Hands, shows how programs that embrace the principle of self-determination have been rolled out extensively in the United States and other countries with similar historical settings, with better outcomes for Indigenous people than those achieved in Australia.

However, the report also demonstrates that successive Australian governments have instead taken a top- down approach and ignored advice from their own experts on how to effectively tackle the systemic disadvantage and poverty that afflicts too many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

The Oxfam report captures numerous case studies that demonstrate why community-based services are best placed to respond to the complex needs of First Peoples.

The unique network of more than 145 Aboriginal medical services is a prime example of how trusted organisations that are grounded in community and culture deliver results that improve health outcomes – and at the same time can reduce the demand on the hospital system.

The report cites new data showing an impressive 30 per cent reduction in preventable hospitalisations in the region where Katungul Aboriginal Medical Service operates on New South Wales’ south coast in the six years to 2016-17, compared with a rise of 20 per cent for the entire NSW population.

In Western Australia, the Ngalla Maya employment service has placed more than 300 ex-prisoners into jobs by taking an approach that is grounded in traditional culture.

Former prisoner and now Chief Executive Mervyn Eades explained: “The cultural stuff, mentoring, that is the heart of our project.

We talk a lot about culture. A lot of the young ones don’t have identity in heritage and the self-worth in being part of the oldest culture in the world; they haven’t been taught and told, the stories haven’t been handed down to empower them.”

The report highlights that despite these results, many Aboriginal organisations are forced to navigate a never- ending treadmill of grant applications and changing funding streams to keep their lights on and staff paid.

“Oxfam Australia is calling on State and Federal governments to empower and fund local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations to allow them to build on traditional knowledge and culture when delivering services,” Ms Murray said.

Have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mob #HaveYourSay about #closingthegapCTG

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people know what works best for us.

We need to make sure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth voices are reflected and expertise is recognised in every way at every step on efforts to close the gap in life outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.’

‘The Coalition of Peaks is leading the face to face discussions, not governments.

The Peaks are asking Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth to tell us what should be included in a new Closing the Gap agreement and we will take this to the negotiating table.’

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

NACCHO #HaveYourSayCTG about #closingthegap on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth health : #NACCHOYouth19 Registrations Close Oct 20 @RACGP Doctor :Routine health assessments co-created with young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may soon be adopted by general practice.

Part 1 : Research project ‘Developing, implementing, and testing a co-created health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in primary care’

Part 2 : Registrations close 20 October for the NACCHO Youth Conference Darwin 4 November 

Part 3 : If you cannot get to Darwin  you can still have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth

‘General practice needs to think more carefully about the issues facing young people as a distinct group. Better understanding has to start with asking Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about important health priorities, and then listening carefully to the responses.

Once we have listened to community voices on health priorities and co-created the young person’s health assessment, we intend to conduct a pilot randomised trial of the new health assessment looking at outcomes including social and emotional wellbeing, detection of psychological distress and appropriate management and referrals.” 

Dr Geoffrey Spurling first had the idea for his research project ‘Developing, implementing, and testing a co-created health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in primary care’ during a moving experience not so long ago, when he attended the funeral of a young Aboriginal woman who had committed suicide. See Part 1

The project was originally published in the RACGP News GP

Read all NACCHO Youth Articles HERE 

Part 1 ‘Developing, implementing, and testing a co-created health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in primary care’. Continued from intro above

‘It was a profoundly sad experience,’ Dr Spurling told newsGP.

‘At the same time, community members were telling me that social and emotional wellbeing, especially for young people, was a health priority.

‘I wanted to do what I could with my medical and research skills to understand and help address the social and emotional wellbeing issues facing the community.’

It was here that his research project began to take shape.

Dr Spurling, a GP at Inala Indigenous Health Service and senior lecturer at the University of Queensland, was recently granted funds from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) to develop his project, ‘Developing, implementing, and testing a co-created health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in primary care’.

Through collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members, this research aims to develop and implement a health check especially tailored for young people in these communities.

Current Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Medicare health assessments involving adolescents are constructed for 5–14-year-olds and 15–54-year-olds. Dr Spurling believes more focus is needed on the health of young people within the second age group, and a specific health assessment should be implemented.

Following development of the tailored health assessments, Dr Spurling and his team intend to conduct a trial comparing the new health check with the current one available in clinical software, aiming to show better detection and management of social and emotional wellbeing concerns.

‘By creating a youth health assessment together with both young people and clinicians, I hope we can have more relevant conversations about health in general practice within both the specific context of the newly developed young person’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health assessment, and more broadly in general practice.’

The National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people recommends the Social Emotional Wellbeing (SEW) and HEEADSSS screening tools as part of health assessments for young people.

Investigator Grants is the NHMRC’s largest funding scheme, with a 40% allocation from the Medical Research Endowment Account. The scheme’s objective is to support the research of outstanding investigators at all career stages, providing five-year funding security for high-performing researchers through its salary and research support packages. The 2019 Investigator Grants funding totals $365.8 million.

Part 2 NACCHO Youth Conference Darwin 4 November 

 ” Culturally-appropriate care and safety has a vast role to play in improving the health and wellbeing of our people.

In this respect, I want to make special mention of the proven record of the Aboriginal Community Health Organisations in increasing the health and wellbeing of First Peoples by delivering culturally competent care.

I’m pleased to be here at this conference, which aims to make a difference with a simple but sentinel theme of investing in what works, surely a guiding principle for all that we do

Providing strong pointers for this is a new youth report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Equipped with this information, we can connect the dots – what is working well and where we need to focus our energies, invest our expertise, so our young people can reap the benefits of better health and wellbeing “

Minister Ken Wyatt launching AIHW Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Adolescent and Youth Health and Wellbeing 2018 report at NACCHO Conference 31 October attended by over 500 ACCHO delegates including 75 ACCHO Youth delegates Pictured above 

Read Download Report HERE

The central focus of the NACCHO Youth Conference Healthy youth, healthy future is on building resilience. For thousands of years our Ancestors have shown great resolve thriving on this vast continent.

Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who make up 54% of our population, now look to the example set by generations past and present to navigate ever-changing and complex social and health issues.

Healthy youth, healthy future provides us with opportunities to explore and discuss issues of importance to us, our families and communities, and to take further steps toward becoming tomorrow’s leaders.

We hope to see you there!

Registrations CLOSE 20 October 

Registrations are now open for the 2019 NACCHO Youth Conference, which will be held November 4th in Darwin at the Darwin Convention Centre

REGISTER HERE

Part 3 Have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth #HaveYourSay about #closingthegapCTG

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people know what works best for us.

We need to make sure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth voices are reflected and expertise is recognised in every way at every step on efforts to close the gap in life outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.’

‘The Coalition of Peaks is leading the face to face discussions, not governments.

The Peaks are asking Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth to tell us what should be included in a new Closing the Gap agreement and we will take this to the negotiating table.’

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

NACCHO Members Deadly Good News : Community health was the big winner in the #NSW #KooriKnockout and #QLD #MurriCarnival thanks to our ACCHO’s and our affiliates @ahmrc @QAIHC_QLD Plus #Vic @VACCHO_org #WorldSightDay2019 #WA #NT

1. National : NACCHO Chair congratulates Kuku Yalanji and Tagalaka woman Haylene Grogan appointed as Queensland’s first-ever Chief Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Officer

1.2 National : Have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people #HaveYourSay about #closingthegap

2. NSW : The South Coast Black Cockatoos have won the 2019 NSW Aboriginal Rugby League Koori Knockout

3. QLD : Queensland Murri Carnival wrapped up on the weekend with huge community support

4.1 VIC : VACCHO Partners with VISION 2020 for the Looking Deadly Aboriginal Health Worker training

4.2 VIC : Leadership opportunities for Victorian  Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander students at the Regional Protect Country Summit 19 and 20 October

5.WA : Chair of the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA), Vicki O’Donnell expresses great concern over inadequate access to mental health support 

6.1 NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs partners with Headspace to open new drop in centre 

6.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin awarded the NTGPE Training Post of the Year Award

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : NACCHO Chair congratulates Kuku Yalanji and Tagalaka woman Haylene Grogan appointed as Queensland’s first-ever Chief Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Officer

“ NACCHO congratulates Ms Grogan on her historic appointment and welcomes her experience and knowledge of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs).

This is a significant role as for the first time, this type of leadership position has been created within a government health department.

“We look forward to working constructively with Ms Grogan to improve health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people throughout Queensland.

We are confident that with Ms Grogan leading the new Aboriginal and Torres Stait Islander Health Division will result in positive progress towards closing the health gap in Queensland for our communities,”

Donnella Mills Acting NACCHO Chair

Read full or download full NACCHO Press Release

Pictured above from QAIHC  (L – R) Dr John Wakefield (Director General, Queensland Health), Hon. Jackie Trad MP (Deputy Premier of Queensland), Haylene Grogan (Chief Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Officer), Hon. Steven Miles MP (Queensland Minister for Health and Ambulance Services) and QAIHC CEO Neil Willmett

Proud Kuku Yalanji and Tagalaka woman, Haylene Grogan, has been appointed as Queensland’s first-ever Chief Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Officer (and Deputy Director General) of Queensland Health.

Haylene Grogan began her health career with the community controlled Wuchopperen Health Service in Cairns in 1982.

She has since held senior positions in the federal and state governments, including in Queensland Health, in roles encompassing service delivery, policy development, program implementation and project management.

1.2 National : Have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people #HaveYourSay about #closingthegap

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

2. NSW : The South Coast Black Cockatoos have won the 2019 NSW Aboriginal Rugby League Koori Knockout

The South Coast Black Cockatoos have won the 2019 NSW Aboriginal Rugby League Knockout, or the Koori Knockout, against Griffith Three Ways in an impressive 28-point lead

Report from NITV

Photos AHMRC

Griffith, known for their strong defence, didn’t fall into their usual groove during the first half with the South Coast scoring 26 points in the first 21 minutes.

South Coast’s Jason Gillard scored an impressive hat-trick, giving his team an early lead and Bud Sullivan, South Coasts kicker, scoring three out of six of the conversion kicks, as well as getting over the line with a  try.

The second half saw Griffith make their way up to 12 points, but it wasn’t enough to take out the men’s title, with South Coasts winning 40-12.

Mr Wellington and James won their first Koori Knockout 21 years ago, playing for Numbacca Valley Rams and then another two with the Redfern All Blacks.

The South Coasts aforementioned jersey featured an image of James on the left sleeve, so he too could be there to win another Koori Knockout.

This victory will see the 50th Koori Knockout travel to NSW’s Shoalhaven in 2020.

The women’s Bellbrook Dunghutti Connections and the Wellington Wedgetails battled it out with Wellington taking out the title during the second half.

The first half was neck and neck sitting on nil-all until Dunghutti scored a try right on half-time

The young talent shone through the boys’ and girl’s La Perouse Panthers teams, who proved phenomenal with star player Lachlan Moses scoring the first three tries for the U-12 boys during the first half and making the conversion kick in the second half.

The team went up against the Butucarbin Warriors in a dominate 38-4 win taking out the champion title for the U-12s boys at the 2019 Koori Knockout.

Mr Moses said that it felt “good” to win the 2019 title.

“We versed them last year in the grand final, so it feels good to get one back,” he said.

As he continues to work on and improve his skills, Mr Moses said he “would love to play NRL” as he looks into the future.

Finals 

Men’s  

Griffith Three Ways United 12 – 40 South Coast Black Cockatoos

Women’s  

Bellbrook Dunghutti Connections 4 – 6 Wellington Wedgetails

U-17 boys  

Kempsey Sharks 12 – 10 Western Koori Eels

U-16 girls 

La Perouse Panthers 34 – 0 Narwan Eels

U-15 boys  

Toomelah Tigers 10 – 20 South Taree

U-12 boys  

La Perouse Panthers 38 – 4 Butucarbin Warriors

3. QLD : Queensland Murri Carnival wrapped up on the weekend with huge community support

In the men’s division, the Purga Wagtails claimed the honours, while Brisbane Natives were the winners of the Open Women’s division.

SEE QRL Photo’s HERE

Plus 242 Photos HERE

The Queensland Under 16 Murri side which is selected from performances in this carnival will be unveiled on the QRL website soon.

All results from the carnival can be found at the Murri Rugby League website.

Photos below thanks to Deadly Choices


4.1 VIC : VACCHO Partners with VISION 2020 for the Looking Deadly Aboriginal Health Worker training

It’s #WorldSightDay2019 and we’ve got a full house!!!

Today we launched the Looking Deadly online learning module created by #Kadadjinyi and our new quarterly eye-health State-wide Communique with Nicole McCartney – Chief Aboriginal Health Adviser DHHS

We also celebrated with Margaret Murray from Mungabareena Aboriginal Corporation the tireless work the amazing Dr Genevieve Napper has done in the eye health sector for over 20 years.

If you want to know more about the deadly work that’s being done in the eye health area (or you think you might need an eye check…just sayin) contact us here at VACCHO or go to http://www.vaccho.org.au/wd/eh/

Background 

Across Australia, too many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people still experience avoidable vision loss and blindness, and those who have lost vision often find it difficult to access the support and services they need.

For example, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are three times as likely as non-Indigenous people to be blind or have low vision and on average, currently wait 63% longer for cataract surgery.

Strong eyes, strong communities: a five year plan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye health and vision charts a course to close the gap for vision and achieve a world class system of eye health and vision care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Based on available evidence and shaped by the collective input of many individuals and organisations, Strong eyes, strong communities describes an integrated suite of activities that need to be progressed over the coming five years. In combination, these will

  • expand service delivery,
  • strengthen partnerships and local supports,
  • embed eye care into community controlled and mainstream services,
  • eliminate trachoma, and
  • sustain the focus on monitoring progress.

This blueprint for change recognises that improving eye health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is everybody’s business, and that the collective efforts of governments, communities,service providers and others are essential.

Together, a world class system that delivers culturally safe eye care to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is within our reach.

4.2 VIC : Leadership opportunities for Victorian  Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander students at the Regional Protect Country Summit 19 and 20 October

My name is Zac Romagnoli-Townsend, I am a community organiser for Seed Indigenous Youth Climate Network; Seed is a branch of the Australian Youth Climate Coalition and we are standing up to protect country, community and climate. I am getting in touch in regards to a leadership opportunity for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander students in Victoria.

Seed is a continent-wide network of young Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander peoples standing up to protect country and making climate justice a reality for our communities. You can find more information about us here: https://www.seedmob.org.au/.

We are calling on Indigenous youth between the ages of 14 and 35 years old to come to our Regional Protect Country Summit, being held at the Anglesea Valley Lodge.

The purpose of the summit is to learn about climate change, it’s causes, impacts and risks to country. Young people will have the opportunity to connect with their peers across Victoria to learn, share and make plans to stand strong for our culture, country and future.

When: From Saturday morning 19th October – Afternoon of Sunday 20th of October

Where: Anglesea Valley Lodge, 635 Wensleydale Station Rd, Wensleydale VIC 3241

Who: Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander youth aged between 14-35 (family supporters are welcome)

What: Connecting with each other, learning about climate justice, and making positive, lasting and meaningful change.

Getting there: We will be helping to organise transport and covering the cost of that transport

Accomodation: From Friday to Saturday we will be staying together at Anglesea Valley Lodge.

Food: We will cater all meals from Friday night to Sunday afternoon. Please let us know dietary requirements in advance.

REGISTER HERE: https://forms.gle/g8uC6nY76H8Mwy6S6

Please encourage any and all Indigenous youth that you know who would be interested in this opportunity to register! If they need assistance with registering or have any questions, please feel free to contact me on: 0497 371 650 or Zac.Romagnoli-Townsend@aycc.org.au

5.WA : Chair of the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA), Vicki O’Donnell expresses great concern over inadequate access to mental health support services across WA, and the unacceptable suicide and self-harm rates within Aboriginal communities.

Chair of the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA), Vicki O’Donnell expresses great concern over inadequate access to mental health support services across WA, and the unacceptable suicide and self-harm rates within Aboriginal communities.

AHCWA is the peak body for its 23 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services across WA.

“AHCWA has major concerns with the lack of culturally secure mental health support services for Aboriginal people and communities, experiencing crisis and trauma on a daily basis” says Vicki O’Donnell.

This crisis has tragically been highlighted again, with the recent suicides in the Midwest and Gascoyne regions, and the fatal shooting of an Aboriginal Mother in Geraldton who had a history of mental health, alcohol and other drug issues.

Aboriginal people continue to experience systemic racism within the Mental Health and Justice systems, resulting in poor health and wellbeing outcomes for Aboriginal people, their families and communities across WA.

AHCWA provides full support to the Aboriginal Elders and Leaders who gathered in Geraldton to discuss the suicide crisis in the community and are calling for urgent reform of the Mental Health system.

AHCWA calls upon the Government to undertake the following as a matter of urgency: • Significant reform of the Mental Health Sector through direct engagement with Aboriginal communities and organisations.

• Commitment of significant funding for Suicide Prevention for Aboriginal people across WA. • Significant investment for the delivery of culturally secure Social and Emotional Well Being services for Aboriginal people and their communities across WA.

• Greatly improve the awareness and understanding of suicidal behaviour, mental health, alcohol and drug issues through appropriate training of Police and others who work within the justice system.

• Review of existing sentencing laws to prevent the further breakdown of families and communities.

• Review of the policies and procedures around the use of lethal force by Police Officers.

6.1 NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs partners with Headspace to open new drop in centre 

Headspace, a one-stop-shop for young people who need help with mental and physical health had opened a new centre in Alice Springs.

Cultural Advisor Roxanne Highfold, tells CAAMA that young aboriginal people in Alice Springs want to be shown respect and have their voices heard by the community.

7.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin awarded the NTGPE Training Post of the Year Award

At the NTGPE Training Awards earlierthis month , Danila Dilba was awarded the Training Post of the Year Award, highlighting our strong training culture and commitment to developing a high quality clinical workforce.

In the last few years, several of our GPs have become GP supervisors, providing invaluable mentoring and support to up and coming GPs

NACCHO #WorldMentalHealthDay Part 2 of 2 : @TheAHCWA Leaders in Aboriginal health and legal services express great concern over inadequate access to mental health support services and the unacceptable #suicide and self-harm rates within Aboriginal communities.

 

AHCWA has major concerns with the lack of culturally secure mental health support services for Aboriginal people and communities, experiencing crisis and trauma on a daily basis”

Chair of the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA), Vicki O’Donnell expresses great concern over inadequate access to mental health support services across WA, and the unacceptable suicide and self-harm rates within Aboriginal communities. See Press release Part 1 below

“It’s the highest rate of suicide in the State this calendar year,”

Speaking at a press conference in Geraldton last week , Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service board chair and former NACCHO Deputy Chair Sandy Davies said the two suicides were among seven deaths this year, which included children as young as 12. Watch Press Conference Part 2 Below

Picture Above : National Suicide Prevention and Trauma Recovery Project co-ordinator Gerry Georgatos, director Megan Krakouer, National Justice Project principal solicitor George Newhouse, Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service board chair Sandy Davies and Aboriginal Legal Service of WA chief executive Dennis Eggington at ;last weeks press conference in Geraldton. Credit: Tamra Carr, The Geraldton Guardian

Read over 230 Aboriginal Mental Health articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years 

Read over 150 Aboriginal Health and Suicide articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years

Part 1

AHCWA is the peak body for its 23 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services across WA.

This crisis has tragically been highlighted again, with the recent suicides in the Midwest and Gascoyne regions, and the fatal shooting of an Aboriginal Mother in Geraldton who had a history of mental health, alcohol and other drug issues.

Aboriginal people continue to experience systemic racism within the Mental Health and Justice systems, resulting in poor health and wellbeing outcomes for Aboriginal people, their families and communities across WA.

AHCWA provides full support to the Aboriginal Elders and Leaders who gathered in Geraldton to discuss the suicide crisis in the community and are calling for urgent reform of the Mental Health system.

AHCWA calls upon the Government to undertake the following as a matter of urgency:

  • Significant reform of the Mental Health Sector through direct engagement with Aboriginal communities and organisations.
  • Commitment of significant funding for Suicide Prevention for Aboriginal people across WA.
  • Significant investment for the delivery of culturally secure Social and Emotional Well Being services for Aboriginal people and their communities across WA.
  • Greatly improve the awareness and understanding of suicidal behaviour, mental health, alcohol and drug issues through appropriate training of Police and others who work within the justice system.
  • Review of existing sentencing laws to prevent the further breakdown of families and communities.
  • Review of the policies and procedures around the use of lethal force by Police Officers.

Part 2 Leaders in Aboriginal health and legal services have warned of a suicide crisis which they say has included two Indigenous deaths in the Mid West and Gascoyne in the past six days.

Speaking at a press conference in Geraldton  Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service board chair Sandy Davies said the two suicides were among seven deaths this year, which included children as young as 12.

“It’s the highest rate of suicide in the State this calendar year,” he said.

Calls for the State Government to make mental health reforms were top of the agenda at the conference, which comes after the death last month of Aboriginal woman Joyce Clarke.

Ms Clarke was shot in the stomach by a police officer just days after she left hospital due to a mental health incident.

Her death is under investigation, with Police Commissioner Chris Dawson promising independent oversight from the Corruption and Crime Commission and the State Coroner.

According to Ms Clarke’s family, she had a history of drug use and spent a large part of her life in prison.

National Suicide Prevention and Trauma Recovery Project director Megan Krakouer said the number of Aboriginals going without access to support services was “beyond a joke”.

“People who don’t know what they’re doing in mental health programs just need to get out of the way,” she said.

“I don’t know what good all these representative bodies are doing if it’s not translating to the ground.”

The conference also called on the Government to ensure police no longer respond to mental health incidents, leaving qualified professionals to do so instead.

Speakers insisted on the repeal of mandatory sentencing laws so an offender’s individual circumstances could be taken into account.

It was also said police should never use a gun on someone who did not have a gun, and that a lifelong approach to State-delivered care needed to be adopted, from birth to old age.

Other speakers included GRAMS chief executive Deb Woods, National Suicide Prevention and Trauma Recovery Project co-ordinator Gerry Georgatos, Aboriginal Legal Service of WA chief executive Dennis Eggington and National Justice Project principal solicitor George Newhouse.

At the time of Ms Clarke’s death, WA Police offered their condolences to her family and have promised a thorough investigation.

Police Commissioner Chris Dawson, who has described the incident as tragic, said eight police officers were present in Petchell Street at the time and witnesses had seen Ms Clarke with a knife before the shooting.

Ms Clarke’s death has fast-tracked the roll-out of body cameras for Mid West and Gascoyne police, who were not scheduled to receive them until 2021.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health #WorldMentalHealthDay 2019: NACCHO recognises the foundations are in place to Closing the #MentalHealth Gap, but the work lies ahead. @cbpatsisp @MenziesResearch #ClosingtheGap #HaveyourSayCTG

“Our people experience very high levels of psychological stress at almost three times the rate of other Australians and are twice as likely to commit suicide.

At the heart of suicide is a sense of helplessness and powerlessness, which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience across multiple domains in direct response to their intractable circumstances.

Almost all of our people who die of suicide are living below the poverty line.

Our children are four times more likely to kill themselves in comparison with other Australian children.

In 2018, suicide was the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, accounting for more than a quarter of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child deaths.”

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner AM highlighting the most vulnerable victims of this mental health crisis

Read over 230 Aboriginal Mental Health articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years 

Read over 150 Aboriginal Health and Suicide articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years

” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities will have greater support for their wellbeing with the release of a video in nine Aboriginal languages and in Aboriginal English during Mental Health Week.

Led by Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) and in collaboration with Indigenous communities, “Yarning About Mental Health:

Becoming Better, Becoming Stronger” aims to support the wellbeing of Indigenous communities by drawing on the strength and resilience of communities to promote mental health and wellbeing

See Menzies Press Release and English video version Part 2 below

Download this NACCHO Press Release in PDF HERE

NACCHO is marking World Mental Health Day by emphasising the importance of the 2019 theme and focus, suicide prevention.

In Australia, the rate of suicide in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities continues to grow.

NACCHO believes that suicide prevention initiatives must incorporate culturally safe, holistic approaches that are co-designed with communities, and which consider the physical, emotional, spiritual and cultural wellbeing of individuals and families.

Professor Pat Dudgeon, Director of the Centre of Best Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Director, said, “The evidence shows that Indigenous cultural strengths already provide an overarching foundation for the national effort ahead. These strengths contribute to what we call our ‘social and emotional wellbeing’. Strong families, strong communities and strong cultures and cultural identity support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental (and indeed physical) health.”

There is a range of evidence which demonstrates that community-led initiatives, exemplified by the values, beliefs and services of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs), are critical for designing programs that strengthen Social and Emotional Wellbeing and promote healing.

Ms Turner stated, “Our ACCHOs deliver culturally safe, trauma-informed services in communities dealing with the extreme social and economic disadvantage that are affected by intergenerational trauma, but they need more support. Our services know what’s happening on the ground, and the help that our communities need and that is why government funding is so vital.”

NACCHO understands harnessing the global momentum on World Mental Health Day is critical to ensure productive and culturally meaningful solutions are resourced and delivered to drive suicide rates down within Aboriginal and Torres Strait communities.

“NACCHO urges the Commonwealth Government to continue providing support for the national suicide prevention trials in 12 communities by looking at the learnings and how they can transition the successful elements into ongoing funding and programs,” Ms Turner stated.

Part 2 : Media Release Menzies School of Health Research : New resource to promote mental health and wellbeing in Indigenous communities featured during Mental Health Week

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities will have greater support for their wellbeing with the release of a video in nine Aboriginal languages and in Aboriginal English during Mental Health Week.

Led by Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) and in collaboration with Indigenous communities, “Yarning About Mental Health: Becoming Better, Becoming Stronger” aims to support the wellbeing of Indigenous communities by drawing on the strength and resilience of communities to promote mental health and wellbeing.

The short video provides information about common mental illnesses and delivers strength- based messages about staying strong and seeking help.

According to project lead, Associate Professor Tricia Nagel, releasing the video during Mental Health Week where the focus is on ‘Do you see what I see’, is very appropriate.

“People tell us that story telling in a way that shares strengths and cultural values, and includes local people and language, is the best way to share wellbeing messages – and that is what this video is all about,” A/Prof Nagel said.

“The video describes key mental health concepts and uses imagery designed to resonate with Indigenous people, drawing on connections to country and kin.”

Menzies Indigenous researcher, Jahdai Vigona says the video has been designed for use by wellbeing service providers and within communities to talk about wellbeing and ways to stay strong.

“It makes talking about mental health more accessible and the discussion more relevant to community members,” Mr Vigona said.
The video is now available on YouTube in nine Aboriginal languages and in Aboriginal English here.

The project was supported by funding from the Australian Government through the Primary Health Network Program.

Menzies’ full suite of mental health resources dedicated to Indigenous wellbeing can be found at www.menzies.edu.au/mentalhealthresources

Part 3 : Have your say about mental health / suicide prevention and what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people #HaveYourSay about #closingthegap

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workers News @NATSIHWA  #2019Footprints : In remote communities, where more health workers are needed, #chronicdisease is rising

 In Barunga NT where high-risk pregnancies are on the rise, Aboriginal health practitioners (AHPs) like Desleigh Shields are in high demand.

Acting as a translator between doctor and patient and using her hard-earned medical training and insights from growing up on country, Ms Shields is at the forefront of an immense health battle gripping Aboriginal communities.

That battle is chronic disease, and in communities like Barunga, AHPs of Ms Shields’s calibre are critical to the cause.

Ms Shields has taken up the fight with her mother, Joanne Berry, (pictured below ) who has been an AHP in Barunga for over 30 years.

But as Ms Berry has witnessed pregnancies become increasingly complicated due to chronic disease in the town, she says she is still seeing women miss vital scans during pregnancy. “

Read over 170 Aboriginal Workforce Articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years 

This article originally published ABC Website 

Key points:

  • There has been a 52 per cent increase in young Aboriginal people with gestational and pre-existing diabetes in the NT over the last four years
  • Aboriginal women are three times less likely to go to a clinic for their first antenatal visit to detect diseases
  • Medical professionals say Indigenous healthcare workers are key to helping pregnant women attend clinics for their scans

Concerningly for AHPs like Ms Shields and Ms Berry, cultural stigmas attached to health clinics can often lead to women missing such scans.

“For teenagers, sometimes it’s a shame job, ashamed of coming to the clinic,” Ms Berry said.

According to a Menzies School of Health Research study in 2018, Aboriginal women in the Territory are three times less likely to go to a clinic for their first antenatal visit before the required 14-week mark to detect diseases like diabetes.

But without more AHPs providing comfort, communication and expertise in Aboriginal communities, professionals like Ms Berry and Ms Shields remain undermanned in their fight.

Aboriginal Health Workers and the link to healthy communities

On the ground in Barunga, front-line health professionals are lamenting a lack of funding and support for AHPs, who face critical barriers such as a lack of housing and professional development opportunities.

Some professionals are even linking the lack of housing options for AHPs directly to health outcomes for pregnant women in communities.

Bill Palmer, the acting chief executive of Sunrise Health, which runs Barunga’s health clinic, said many AHPs want to upskill, but “the pathways to having that happen are not clear”.

Mr Palmer said AHPs were not afforded the same provisions as police officers or doctors, and therefore struggle with accommodation when working in remote locations.

But the work of AHPs like Ms Shields and Ms Berry has not gone unrewarded.

According to Menzies Health, there was a significant improvement in antenatal visits during the first 14 weeks of pregnancy among Aboriginal women — from 36 per cent to 50 per cent — between 2001 and 2012.

Communities losing their loved ones

The rise of intergenerational type 2 diabates in Aboriginal communities presents a daunting challenge for AHPs.

In the town of Ampilatwatja, about 320 kilometres north of Alice Springs, 50 per cent of the community’s population of 500 are estimated to have diabetes.

PHOTO: In Ampilatwatja, patients like Rhonda Holmes are depending on an increase of medical services. (ABC News: Chris Kimball)

The malignant form of type 2 diabetes prevalent in the town can lead to amputated limbs, poor life expectancy and end-stage kidney disease requiring dialysis.

The community’s battle is an example of what Menzies Health diabetes researcher Louise Maple-Brown says is a growing problem in the Northern Territory.

Professor Maple-Brown, who is also the head of Royal Darwin Hospital’s endocrinology department, said one in five Aboriginal women in the Territory have gestational or pre-existing type 2 diabetes during pregnancy.

“Those [type 2] rates were 10 times higher in Aboriginal women than non-Aboriginal women in the Territory in 2016,” Professor Maple-Brown said.

She said intergenerational diabetes was on the rise because a mother’s in-utero environment contributed to a higher risk of obesity or diabetes in their baby, which led to early onset of the disease as the child grew up.

If that child is a female, she’ll then carry that diabetes during her own pregnancy and pass on the same risks, Professor Maple-Brown said.

What is type 2 diabetes?

  • It occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or is ineffective
  • 90 per cent of diabetics have type 2
  • It is caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors
  • There is no cure but it can be managed through medication and treatment
  • It usually affects adults but there’s been a rise in cases in children
  • The condition can lead to cardiovascular disease, blindness, kidney failure and foot neuropathy
  • Type 2 diabetes can double the risk of death

For more information visit the Diabetes Australia website

“In the last four years in the Northern Territory we’ve seen a 52 per cent increase in young Aboriginal people with diabetes in the age group of 15 to 25 years,” she said.

“So we’re particularly focusing on working with that group to improve care,” she said.

Professor Maple-Brown said AHPs were critical to improving care through ensuring pregnant women attend clinics for their scans.

“Strengthening the Aboriginal community-based workforce is a key priority for many health services in the Northern Territory,” she said.

Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #Saveadate : This week #WorldMentalHealthWeek #WorldSightDayAU @NATSIHWA #2019Footprints REGISTRATIONS open for our #NACCHOAgm19 #NACCHOYouth19 November 4 to 7 Plus #ClosingTheGap #HaveYourSayCTG #FacetoFace October dates

This week 

7-14 October World Mental Health Week

10 October World Mental Health Day  

10 October World Sight Day 

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

This Month

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

25 October Coalition of Peaks Have Your Say Survey Closes

Next month

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand

7 -11 October World Mental Health Week

October 10 — is a day for global mental health education, awareness and advocacy. An initiative of the World Federation for Mental Health to raise public awareness of mental health issues worldwide.

Mental Health Australia is delighted to be leading the World Mental Health Day campaign in Australia.

As the peak not-for-profit organisation representing the mental health sector in Australia, Mental Health Australia has a focus on ensuring the whole community recognises the part we all play in creating a mentally healthy society.

Do You See What I See? challenges perceptions about mental illness in Australia and encourages everyone to look at mental health in a more positive light, in an effort to reduce stigma and make way for more people to seek the help and support they deserve. Help reduce stigma and make a #MentalHealthPromise today.

See 1010 Website 

NACCHO Press release will be released Thursday 10 October

10 October World Sight Day

The annual day of awareness to focus global attention on blindness and vision impairment, held on the second Thursday in October each year.

This year the theme for World Sight Day is Vision First! Vision 2020 Australia will be using social media and the #WorldSightDayAU hashtag to share information about eye health and vision care and highlight the important work of the sector and our members.

To help your organisation support World Sight Day, we have created a range of images for Facebook, Twitter and Instagram posts, as well as key messages, which are available online at http://worldsightday.org.au/downloads/

We will also be monitoring our members’ social media pages to help promote any campaigns or events you’re running on the day.

We appreciate your support in celebrating World Sight Day 2019!

The Team at Vision2020

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

2019 Marks 10 years since the formation of NATSIHWA and registrations are now open!!!

From 9 – 10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference will be celebrated at the Convention Centre in Alice Springs

Celebrate NATSIHWA’s 10 year Anniversary National Conference ‘A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition’ which is being held in Alice Springs.

We aim to offer an insight into the Past, Present and Future of NATSIHWA and the overall importance of strengthening the primary health care sector’s unique workforce of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners throughout Australia.

During the 9-10 October 2019 delegates will be exposed to networking opportunities whilst immersing themselves with a combination of traditional and practical conference style delivery.

Our intention is to engage Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in the history and knowledge exchange of the past, todays evidence based best practice programs/services available and envisioning what the future has to offer for all Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Download full Conference Program 

15-17 October IUIH System of Care Conference

15 October IUIH 10 year anniversary

Building on the success of last year’s inaugural conference, the 2019 System of Care Conference will be focusing on further exploring and sharing the systems and processes that deliver this life changing way of looking at life-long health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

This year IUIH delivers 10 years of experience in improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with proven methods for closing the gap and impacting on the social determinants of health.

The IUIH System of Care is evidence-based and nationally recognised for delivering outcomes, and the conference will share the research behind the development and implementation of this system, with presentations by speakers across a range of specialisations including clinic set up, clinical governance, systems integration, wrap around services such as allied and social health, workforce development and research evidence.

If you are working in:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled health services
  • Primary Health Networks
  • Health and Hospital Boards and Management
  • Government Departments
  • The University Sector
  • The NGO Sector

Watch this video for an insight into the IUIH System of Care Conference.

Download brochure HERE IUIH System of Care Conference 2019 WEB

This year, the IUIH System of Care Conference will be offering a number of half-day workshops on Thursday 17 October 2019, available to conference attendees only. The cost for these workshops is $150 per person, per workshop and your attendance to these can be selected during your single or group registration.

IUIH are also hosting a 10 years of service celebration dinner on Tuesday 15 October – from 6.30-10pm. Tickets for this are $150 per person and are not included in the cost of registration.

All conference information is available here https://www.ivvy.com.au/event/IUIH19/

15 October IUIH 10 year anniversary

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

25 October Survey Closes  : Have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people #HaveYourSay about #closingthegap

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

The Coalition of Peaks are leading face to face meetings with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, communities and organisations on Closing the Gap during the month of October.

The meetings provide an opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in each state and territory to tell the Coalition of Peaks and governments what changes are needed to improve their lives

October Engagement Meetings:

 

South Australia2 October – Adelaide

15 October – Ceduna

18 October – Port Augusta

23 October – Mount Gambier

 

Tasmania

11 October – Launceston

 

Western Australia

14 October – Broome

17 October – Geraldton

21 October – Kalgoorlie

23 October – Port Headland

28 October – Perth

30 October – Narrogin

 

Australian Capital Territory

17 October – Canberra

28 October – Canberra

 

Victoria15 October – Melbourne

16 October – Bendigo

17 October – Morwell

 

New South Wales

21 October – Sydney

 

Northern Territory

4 October – Katherine

11 October – Yirrkala

30 October – Darwin

 

National

23 and 24 October – Canberra

 

VIC Update

There will be three meetings held across Victoria, details are below.

Website RSVP 

City Date Venue Time
Bendigo Monday 14 October Comfort Inn Julie Anna, 268/276 Napier Street 12PM – 4PM
Melbourne Tuesday 15 October Mantra Bell City, 215 Bell Street, Preston 12PM – 4PM
Morwell Thursday 17 October Gathering Place, 99 Buckley Street 12PM – 4PM

NSW Update 

The NSW Coalition of Aboriginal Peak Organisations (CAPO) of which NSW Aboriginal Land Council is a member, are leading the Closing the Gap engagements across the state.

28 consultations will be taking place during the month of October and early November. The consultations are an opportunity for communities to have their say on Closing the Gap.

The 2019 Closing the Gap consultation will see a new way of doing business, with a focus on community consultations. NSW is embarking on the largest number of membership consultations, more than any other state or territory, with an emphasis on hearing your views about what is needed to make the lives of Aboriginal people better.

Your voices will formulate the NSW submission to the new National Agreement. By talking to Aboriginal people, communities and organisations, CAPO can form a consensus on priority areas from NSW when finalising the new National Agreement on Closing the Gap with governments.

The discussion booklet: ‘A new way of doing business’ provides background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be discussed at the consultations.

The consultations are being supported by the NSW Government.

Come along and join in the conversation. The dates and locations are:

Route 1
Albury Monday 14th Oct
Deniliquin Tuesday 15th Oct
Balranald Wednesday 16th Oct
Griffith Thursday 17th Oct

Route 2
Wagga Wagga Tuesday 15th Oct
Young Wednesday 16th Oct
Queanbeyan Thursday 17th Oct
Batemans Bay Friday 18th Oct

Route 3
Dubbo Tuesday 22nd Oct
Condobolin Wednesday 23rd Oct
Cobar Thursday 24th Oct
Bourke Friday 25th Oct

Route 4
Newcastle Tuesday 22nd Oct
Central Coast Wednesday 23rd Oct
Muswellbrook Thursday 24th Oct
Tamworth Friday 25th Oct

Route 5
Broken Hill Tuesday 29th Oct
Wilcannia Wednesday 30th Oct
Menindee Thursday 31st Oct
Dareton Friday 1st Nov

Route 6
Lismore Monday 28th Oct
Coffs Harbour Tuesday 29th Oct
Kempsey Wednesday 30th Oct

Route 7
Redfern Monday 4th Nov
Mount Druitt Tuesday 5th Nov
Bathurst Thursday 7th Nov

Route 8
Moree Tuesday 5th Nov
Walgett Wednesday 6th Nov

To register your attendance at Routes 1 and 2, please do so via Eventbrite:

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/o/nsw-coalition-of-aboriginal-peak-organisations-16575398239.

Routes 3 to 8 will follow shortly.

Consultations will run from 11am – 3pm with lunch provided.

If you are unable to make the consultations, you can still have your say through an online survey. The survey closes on 25 October, 5pm.

For more information on the Closing the Gap consultations: https://www.aecg.nsw.edu.au/close-the-gap/

 

Each jurisdiction has structured the events differently, some opting for fewer large events and some opting for a larger number of smaller events.

For more information on The Coalition of Peaks, The Joint Council, The Partnership Agreement and to sign up for our mailing list, go to: https://www.naccho.org.au/ programmes/coalition-of-peaks/

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Monday 4th November 2019 NACCHO Youth Conference *Youth Registration is Free of Charge

The central focus of the NACCHO Youth Conference Healthy youth, healthy future is on building resilience.

For thousands of years our Ancestors have shown great resolve thriving on this vast continent. Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who make up 54% of our population, now look to the example set by generations past and present to navigate ever-changing and complex social and health issues.

Healthy youth, healthy future provides us with opportunities to explore and discuss issues of importance to us, our families and communities, and to take further steps toward becoming tomorrow’s leaders. We hope to see you there!

Registrations are now open for the 2019 NACCHO Youth Conference, which will be held November 4th in Darwin at the Darwin Convention Centre.

Register More Info HERE 

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

 

Tuesday 5th & Wednesday 6th November 2019

7th November 2019 NACCHO AGM

This year, NACCHO’s Members’ Conference focuses on the theme –

Because of them we must: improving health outcomes for our people aged 0-29 years.

We have chosen this focus because we know that investing in the health and wellbeing of our babies, children and young people can help prevent ill health, disease and disability. Strong investment in this age group will help them to thrive, help them build strong and healthy families and communities, and help to positively influence their future health outcomes and life expectancy measures.

Because of them we must provides an opportunity to place our future generations at the forefront of our discussions, to hear about the innovative work that is happening in our community controlled and other sectors, to exchange ideas and share our knowledge.

Registrations to this year’s Youth Conference and the NACCHO National Conference will close on Sunday 20th October 2019.  Late registrations will not be accepted.

We hope you can join us!

Register HERE

If you have any questions or would like further information contact Ros Daley and Jen Toohey on 02 6246 9309 or via email conference@naccho.org.au

Conference Co-Coordinators Ros Daley and Jen Toohey 02 6246 9309

7 November

On Thursday 7 November, following the NACCHO National Members Conference, we will hold the 2019 AGM. In addition to the general business, there will be an election for the NACCHO Chair and a vote on a special resolution to adopt a new constitution for NACCHO.

Once again, I thank all those members who sent delegates to the recent national members’ workshop on a new constitution at Sydney in July. It was a great success thanks to your involvement and feedback.

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @AIDAAustralia News : The @AMAPresident Dr Tony Bartone speech opening #AIDAConf2019 : We must use collective wisdom and advocacy to ensure that #ClosingtheGap is not just words, but a meaningful and deliverable target. #HaveYourSayCTG

 

 “ The basic principles of successful Indigenous healthcare models should be better promoted as exemplars and replicated across the country.

This will support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to translate their knowledge into innovative practices that will help solve intractable health problems in their communities.

Governments at all levels must ensure that policy frameworks move towards harmonisation with norms recognising the autonomy of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Governments must ensure that these frameworks are bolstered with adequate funding and workforce strategies to enable Indigenous communities to succeed in their pursuit of the right to health and wellbeing.

With the right support, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people stand to address health inequities by transforming services under their purview, as well as health services provided to Indigenous people by the mainstream.

As President of the AMA, I will continue to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is a key priority.”

President of the AMA Dr Tony Bartone opening speech

Photo above : Opening of #AIDAConf2019 a Welcome to Country from Larrakia Dr Jessica King. MC Jeff McMullen, keynotes  AIDA President Dr Kris Rallah-Baker, NLC CEO Marion Scrymgour, Danila Dilba ACCHO Olga Havnen, Dr Tony Bartone

I would like to begin by acknowledging the traditional owners and custodians of the land on which we meet today, and I pay my respects to their elders, past and present.

Thank you to the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) for inviting me to speak at your annual conference. This is my third year attending, and I feel very privileged to be here.

The theme for this year’s Conference is ‘Disruptive Innovations in Health Care’.

As a General Practitioner who has been practising medicine for over 30 years, I well and truly understand that innovative health care is needed to achieve improved outcomes for patients.

Indeed, innovation will be crucial as we deal with a health system that is so under strain.

This is especially true for Indigenous health, given the much higher burden of disease and mortality rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and the need for care to be delivered in a manner that is culturally safe.

We all know that Indigenous health statistics paint a bleak picture.

And we all know that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have poorer health than other Australians.

Medical science is constantly evolving and we have, only in recent times, recognised the innovations and practices of Indigenous people here and overseas.

There are some parallels and similarities in the way Australia and Canada – both former British colonies – are trying to improve health care for First Nations peoples.

In both countries, we are trying to address a legacy of harm from the imposition of policies that resulted in poor health today.

Sadly, investments in Indigenous health are often inadequate, and they are implemented without proper engagement with, and direction by, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

We all know that this approach does not work.

However, I know that there are many innovative health services that are delivering high quality health care for their communities, driven by local leadership.

There are models of health care that are delivering proved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and these should be supported in terms of funding and workforce.

I was fortunate to visit one such model last year and see first-hand just one example of quality health services and witness the important work that they do.

There are others all underpinned by community oversight and direction. This sense of community leadership is a key feature.

I am sure you will hear of many more positive and innovative healthcare models throughout this Conference.

The problem with such models is that they are not being sufficiently resourced and funded to continue and further their development.

The basic principles of successful Indigenous healthcare models should be better promoted as exemplars and replicated across the country.

This will support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to translate their knowledge into innovative practices that will help solve intractable health problems in their communities.

Governments at all levels must ensure that policy frameworks move towards harmonisation with norms recognising the autonomy of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Governments must ensure that these frameworks are bolstered with adequate funding and workforce strategies to enable Indigenous communities to succeed in their pursuit of the right to health and wellbeing.

With the right support, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people stand to address health inequities by transforming services under their purview, as well as health services provided to Indigenous people by the mainstream.

As President of the AMA, I will continue to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is a key priority.

I am very proud to lead an organisation that champions Aboriginal and Torres Strait health care.

This is demonstrated through:

  • the AMA’s Taskforce on Indigenous Health, which I am honoured to Chair;
  • having AIDA represented on the AMA’s Federal Council;
  • producing an annual Report Card on Indigenous Health;
  • supporting more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to become doctors through our Indigenous Medical Scholarship initiative;
  • participation in the Close the Gap Steering Committee; and
  • participation in the END Rheumatic Heart Disease Coalition, among many other things.

 See all NACCHO and AMA Articles HERE 

The AMA also supports the Uluru Statement from the Heart, and is encouraging the Australian Parliament to make this a national priority.

I firmly believe that giving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people a say in the decisions that affect their lives will allow for healing through recognition of past and current injustices.

The AMA believes respecting the decisions and directions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should underpin all Government endeavours to close the health and life expectancy gap.

The AMA is pleased to see the agreement between the Council of Australian Governments and a Coalition of Peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations – an historic partnership to oversee the refresh of the Closing the Gap strategy.

See Coalition of Peaks Press Release this week

But this is not enough.

We must use this collective wisdom and advocacy to ensure that Closing the Gap is not just words, but a meaningful and deliverable target.

This is certainly an innovative approach to improving health and life outcomes for Indigenous Australians.

Since the beginning of the Closing the Gap strategy, progress has been mixed, limited, and, overall, disappointing.

This must change. It has to change.

It is simply unacceptable that year in, year out, we see the same gaps and the same shortfalls in funding and resources.

I hope that the partnership between COAG and the Coalition of Peaks will result in some real, meaningful change. It must.

Governments cannot keep promising to improve health and other services and not deliver on their commitments.

The AMA welcomed the stated intent of the Minister for Indigenous Australians, Ken Wyatt, to hold a referendum on Constitutional recognition for Indigenous peoples.

And I was disappointed by his recent announcement that an Indigenous voice to Parliament enshrined in the Constitution would not be included as part of this process.

Ken Wyatt has achieved a tremendous amount in his time as Minister, and I hope that Constitutional recognition is part of his legacy.

Let me conclude by saying that it is our responsibility as doctors to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can enjoy the same level of good health as their non-Indigenous peers – that they are able to live their lives to the fullest.

The AMA recognises that Indigenous doctors are critical to making real change in Indigenous health, as they have the unique ability to align their clinical and cultural expertise to improve access to services and provide culturally safe care.

The Indigenous medical workforce is steadily growing, but we need more Indigenous doctors. And dentists, nurses, social workers, and all other allied health specialists.

The AMA remains committed to working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to advocate for better Government investment and cohesive, coordinated strategies to improve health outcomes.

Thank you, and I wish you the very best for your Conference.

 Part 2  Have your say about what is needed to make real change in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people #HaveYourSay about #closingthegap

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health  : October is #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth Our Feature Story @VACCHO_org BreastScreen Victoria’s hot pink breast screening vans Plus Download Resources from @CancerAustralia

 ” October, Australia’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, provides an opportunity for us all to focus on breast cancer and its impact on those affected by the disease in our community.

Breast cancer remains the most common cancer among Australian women (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer). Survival rates continue to improve in Australia with 89 out of every 100 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer now surviving five or more years beyond diagnosis.

Take the time this month to find out what you need to know about breast awareness and share this important information with your family, friends and colleagues.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and is the second leading cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Research shows that survival is lower in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women diagnosed with breast cancer than in the general population.

Cancer Australia is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to provide women with important information about breast cancer awareness, early detection as well as breast cancer treatment and care.

Looking after your breasts – Find breast cancer early and survive see Part 2 Below

See BCNA story Part 4 Below

BreastScreen Victoria and the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) are saying goodbye to the days of sterile, cold mammograms under fluorescent flickering lights and saying hello to mammograms in hot pink vans, with beautifully created cultural shawls and lots of love and giggles.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and the organisations have introduced a program which enables Aboriginal women living in regional and remote areas of Victoria to access safe, free and comforting breast screening facilities.

 “ The idea for the program was born from conversations between BreastScreen Victoria CEO, Vicki Pridmore and VACCHO Manager of Public Health and Research, Susan Forrester.

Ms Forrester said that most women shy away from breast screening due to the safety aspect.

“Why we use the word safe is because there are lots of layers around health and some of the themes that were emerging were that women may have felt a bit uncomfortable being screened for multiple reasons and at times, the staff they had contact with across the health system, although [they] may have been very well meaning, lacked cultural awareness.”

See full story Part 3 below

Picture opening graphic  : Almost all the DWECH BreastScreen Team. Rose Hollis DWECH Community Worker, Allira Maes DWECH Aboriginal Health Worker, Joanne Ronald BSV Radiographer, Lisa Joyce BSV Health Promotion Officer

Part 1 Cancer Australia is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to reduce the impact of cancer on Indigenous Australians

About 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are diagnosed with cancer every day. Indigenous Australians have a slightly lower rate of cancer diagnosis but are almost 30 per cent more likely to die from cancer than non-Indigenous Australians1.

Cancer Australia is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to reduce the impact of cancer on Indigenous Australians.

Our work includes:

  • raising awareness of risk factors and promoting awareness and early detection for the community
  • developing evidence-based information and resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by cancer and health professionals
  • providing evidence-based cancer information and training resources to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers
  • increasing understanding of best-practice health care and support, and
  • supporting research.

We have a range of resources which provide information to support you and the work you do:

Breast Cancer: a handbook for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers

This handbook has been written to help health professionals support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with breast cancer. Increasing the understanding of breast cancer may help to encourage earlier investigation of symptoms, and contribute to the quality of life of people living with breast cancer.

This handbook has been written for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers, Health Practitioners and Aboriginal Liaison Officers involved in the care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with breast cancer in community and clinical settings.

Download HERE

Part 2 BE BREAST AWARE

Finding breast cancer early provides the best chance of surviving the disease. Remember you don’t need to be an expert or use a special technique to check your breasts.

Changes to look for include:

  • new lump or lumpiness, especially if it’s only in one breast
  • change in the size or shape of your breast
  • change to the nipple, such as crustingulcerredness or inversion
  • nipple discharge that occurs without squeezing
  • change in the skin of your breast such as redness or dimpling
  • an unusual pain that doesn’t go away.

Most changes aren’t due to breast cancer but it’s important to see your doctor without delay if you notice any of these changes.

My breast cancer journey: a guide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their families

Cancer Australia has developed a new resource My breast cancer journey: a guide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their families which outlines the clinical management of the early breast cancer journey to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women with breast cancer and their families.

DOWNLOAD HERE

Part 3 BreastScreen Victoria and the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) are saying goodbye to the days of sterile, cold mammograms under fluorescent flickering lights

Read full story from NIT 

The program was trialled, a screen-friendly shawl was designed using artwork by Lyn Briggs, and the shawls were gifted to each woman who was screened.

The trial was a result of a team of around 15 women who screened 14 First Nations women. The feedback received was exactly what BreastScreen Victoria’s Senior Health Promotion’s Officer, Lisa Joyce had hoped for.

“The feedback included things like, I feel safe, protected by culture, cultural safety blanket, made me proud of who I am and visible, the shawl was a screen from feeling shame and it was beautiful, easy to wear and makes you feel comfortable and safe,” Ms Joyce said.

BreastScreen Victoria and VACCHO have partnered with eight Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) who will receive visits from Nina and Marjorie – BreastScreen Victoria’s hot pink breast screening vans.

The vans will work with ACCHOs to provide Aboriginal women with free mammograms, which assist in the identification of breast cancer in its early stages. The program is aimed particularly at women between 50 and 74, who are at higher risk of breast cancer.

Picture above :Rose Hollis who is a DWECH Community Worker had her breast screen and then spent the rest of her day driving Community members to their screenings.

The program will also gift a shawl to 50 women from each centre – which will be printed with a design of their country.

Amber Neilley, VACCHO’s State-wide Health Services Program Officer said artworks have been created by artists both established and emerging.

“Each shawl has been designed by a local artist, we are taking the shawls with the designs back to country,” Ms Neilley said.

Ms Joyce said that bringing the vans onto ACCHO sites offers leadership to those centres.

“We are playing into self-determination in that way as the organisation is in control of who screens and what happens in their community in that time,” Ms Joyce said.

“Many of the sites we are going to … have permanent breast screening facilities in the town but we know that Aboriginal women aren’t attending those clinics so we are trying to increase that by bringing it to a familiar place.”

“Taking the van and using the shawls is the first step in improving Aboriginal women’s experiences when they come to breast screens. I think unfamiliarity, lack of trust and potential fear is why we don’t have that contact with many women.”

Research shows that once a woman has screened for breast cancer, she is more likely to regularly screen – a hope the team have for the women in these communities.

“We hope that when the project leaves town the shawl will be in the permanent screening space and people will become involved,” Ms Forrester said.

“We want to be able to say here is a strength-based, culturally-led model that can go national, and international. The CEO of BreastScreen has just been at the World Indigenous Cancer Conference in Canada and presented this on our behalf and she has had a world of interest.”

Dates and locations for BreastScreen Victoria’s screening vans include:

  • 30/9 – 4/10 at Dhauwurd-Wurrung Elderly and Community Health Service (DWECH)
  • 7/10 – 10/10 at Winda-Mara Aboriginal Corporation
  • 14/10 – 18/10 at Gunditjmara Aboriginal Cooperative
  • 21/10 – 24/10 at Kirrae Health Service
  • 28/10 – 1/11 at Wathaurong Aboriginal Cooperative
  • 11/11 – 15/11 at Rumbalara Aboriginal Cooperative
  • 18/11 to 22/11 at Ramahyuck District Aboriginal Corporation.

For more information, visit: https://www.breastscreen.org.au/.

Part 4 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women share their breast cancer experience in new BCNA video

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have come together to share their stories and experiences as breast cancer survivors as part of a  video produced by BCNA.

See Website 

The video shares the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander women affected by breast cancer and aims to encourage other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to connect, seek support and information on breast cancer.

A number of women in the video, including Aunty Josie Hansen, highlight the importance of early detection.

‘Early detection is really important; not just for women, but for men too,’ Aunty Josie said.

‘Being diagnosed with breast cancer isn’t a death sentence, there’s always hope … as long as you have breath there’s hope,’ she said.

Aunty Thelma reflected that breast cancer is ‘just a terrible disease’.

‘I think it’s so important that women go and have their breast screens done,’ she said.

The video was filmed at the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Think Tank at BCNA’s National Summit in March. The Think Tank was facilitated by BCNA board member Professor Jacinta Elston.  Jacinta said that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women’s outcomes are poorer both in survival and at diagnosis.

The Think Tank brought together 48 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women from around Australia to share issues around treatment and survivorship of breast cancer in their communities. The key outcome of the Think Tank was the development of a three-year Action Plan that outlines BCNA’s key future work, in partnership with national peak Aboriginal health organisations.

The group worked to develop and prioritise future action to improve support and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women diagnosed with breast cancer.

This included identifying locally based cultural healing projects, to allow breast cancer survivors to connect and support each other in culturally safe spaces. A weaving project in Queensland and a possum skin cloak project in Victoria is being undertaken and used to support the training of health professionals in local culture and knowledge. The Culture is Healing projects are supported by Cancer Australia.

This video was produced as part of BCNA’s ongoing commitment to better support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women diagnosed with breast cancer.

You can watch the video below:

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Job alerts at many of our 302 ACCHO : Features #AIDAconf2019 #disruptinnovate @AIDAAustralia Plus #QLD @Apunipima @IUIH_ #NT @CAACongress @MiwatjHealth Sunrise @AMSANTaus @DanilaDilba

Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 This weeks feature article : 

AIDA Conference 2019 is a forum to share and build on knowledges that increasingly disrupt existing practice and policy to raise the standards of health care.

1.2 TOP 10 Jobs

2.Queensland

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

  5.3 Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) WA

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

7.3 Katungul ACCHO 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

This weeks feature

Disruptive Innovations in Healthcare

Indigenous communities hold profound knowledges of health and wellbeing that are informed over generations.

These holistic understandings are increasingly sought after to improve equitable healthcare for all Australians.

Disruptive transformations to achieve better health for all require innovations that build on the capabilities of individuals, institutions, healthcare settings and the communities in which they serve.

The AIDA Conference 2019 is a forum to share and build on knowledges that increasingly disrupt existing practice and policy to raise the standards of health care.

People with a passion for health care equity are invited to share their knowledges and expertise about how they have participated in or enabled a ‘disruptive innovation’ to achieve culturally safe and responsive practice or policy for Indigenous communities.

SEE FULL PROGRAM HERE 

Job Ref : 2019 – 181

ACCHO Member :  Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation

Position: General Practitioners (Multiple full/part-time opportunities)

Location: Grafton NSW

Salary Package : $300,000

Closing Date: On Application

More Info apply

Job Ref : 2019 – 182

ACCHO Member : Spinifex Health Service

Position: Health Services Manager 

Location: Kalgoorlie Region

Salary Package : Approx $140,000

Closing Date: On Application

More Info apply

Job Ref : 2019 – 183

ACCHO Member : ATSICHS Brisbane

Position: Child Protection/Family Services Worker

Location: Brisbane

Salary Package : $75,000

Closing Date: On Application

More Info apply

Job Ref : 2019 – 184

ACCHO Member  : Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation. 

Position: RN Practice Nurse

Location: Grafton

Salary Package : On Application

Closing Date: On application

More Info apply Email :  hr@bnmac.com.au

Job Ref : 2019 – 185

ACCHO Affiliate : AMSANT

Position: Research/Project Officer Cultural Safety and Community Control/Engagement

Location: Alice Springs (Preferred )

Salary Package : On Application

Closing Date: 18th October 2019

More Info apply :  hr@amsant.org.au 

Job Ref : 2019 – 186

ACCHO Member  : Rumbalara Aboriginal Cooperative

Position: NDIS Coordinator

Location: Shepparton VIC

Salary Package : On Application

Closing Date : 22 October

More Info apply

Job Ref : 2019 – 187

ACCHO Member   : Sunrise Health Service 

Position : Remote Area Nurses 

Location: Katherine NT

Salary Package : $110,000

Closing Date: On application

More Info apply

Job Ref : 2019 – 188

ACCHO Member : Sunrise Health Service

Position: Clinical Educator

Location: Katherine NT

Salary Package : $110,000

Closing Date: On application

More Info apply

2.1 JOBS AT Apunipima ACCHO Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

2.2 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane and throughout Queensland

JOBS AT IUIH check the closing dates as some may have closed

2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited has been providing primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for over 35 years. Our workforce has a range of professional, clinical, allied health, social emotional wellbeing and administration positions.

  • We have two sites in Cairns and a growing number of supplementary services and partnerships.
  • We have a diverse workforce of over 200 employees
  • 70 percent of our team identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people

Our team is dedicated to the Wuchopperen vision: Improving the Quality of Life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. If you would like to make a difference, and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, please apply today.

Expressions of Interest

We invite Expressions of Interest from:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Clinical Psychologists
  • Dietitians
  • Diabetes Educators
  • Exercise Physiologists
  • Medical Officers (FAACGP / FACCRM)
  • Registered Nurses
  • Midwives
  • Optometrists
  • Podiatrists
  • Speech Pathologists

In accordance with Wuchopperen’s privacy processes, we will keep your EOI on file for three months.

 Current Vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

Want to work for Congress?

There are a range of job opportunities available right now, including:

• Governance Support Officer
• Aboriginal Liaison Officer
• Health Information Officer
• Transport Officer- Casual
• Care Coordinator- Chronic Disease
• Lead Aboriginal Cultural Advisor
• Remote SEWB Caseworker
• Child Psychologist/ Clinical Psychologist
• Alukura Midwife
• Early Childhood Educators
• Cleaners
• GPs – Town and Remote

Apply now at www.caac.org.au/hr

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 20 + JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

  We’re one of Australia’s largest providers of Aboriginal healthcare

We’re engaging with health issues at a grass roots community level:  We’re looking for passionate individuals who are ready to help change the future for Aboriginal healthcare

Updated 23 Sept Website HERE

3.3  JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

 

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

 5.3 Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) WA 

Are you a dynamic team member who thrives on a challenge, loves working with people and has a genuine passion for client service delivery? A team player who appreciates the value of an energetic team environment and respects cultural diversity?

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) is currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants.

If you have any questions please contact Human Resources on (08) 9022 5591 or email recruitment@bega.org.au

  • Senior Medical Officer
  • Counsellor, Social Worker
  • Speech Therapist (EOI)
  • Occupational Therapist (EOI)
  • Physiotherapist (EOI)
  • Youth Worker (Female)
  • Manager Social Support
  • Child Health Nurse
  • Midwife
  • Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Enrolled/Registered Nurse

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

 

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 2 POSITIONS VACANT

.

http://www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies

 

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

Check website for current Opportunities

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service (GWAHS) is an entity of Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service. GWAHS provides a culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care service for the local Aboriginal communities of western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains. GWAHS provides multidisciplinary services from sites located in Mt Druitt and Penrith.

The clinical service model includes general practitioners (GPs), Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, nursing staff, reception and transport staff. The service also offers a number of wraparound services and programs focused on child and maternal health, social and emotional wellbeing, Drug and Alcohol Support, chronic disease, as well as population health activities.

GWAHS is committed to ensuring that patients have access to and receive high quality, culturally appropriate care and services that meet the needs of local Aboriginal communities.

WEBSITE

7.3 Katungul ACCHO

Download position descriptions HERE 

8. Tasmania

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites