NACCHO Aboriginal Health Evaluation Alert : Minister @KenWyattMP engages consultants to evaluates the #IAHP Indigenous Australians’ Health Program

Independent consultants have been engaged to conduct evaluations of the Australian Government’s Indigenous Australians’ Health Program (IAHP).

Our focus is on closing the gap and, while we are making gains, we need to accelerate progress and in some cases, just doing more of the same is not going to achieve that,

We need to know what is working well so we can best target our investment in, and support of, health programs.

The consultants will work closely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and key consumer, primary health care and government organisations, The subsequent implementation of the agreed evaluation design will be a separate, four-year project.”

The Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said the two projects were part of a wide ranging approach to monitor and examine the IAHP.See NACCHO background below Part 2 and 3

1.A longer term evaluation of comprehensive primary health care will be co-designed with stakeholders over 9 months, by consultants Allen and Clarke.

2.In addition, a health economics analysis will be undertaken by Deakin University.

This project will consider the IAHP’s return on investment and the relative costs of providing comprehensive primary health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through Indigenous specific and non-Indigenous health care services.

“Improved health results, social returns and broader economic benefits will be assessed,” said Minister Wyatt.

“This economic evaluation will inform future IAHP investments, to improve efficiency and drive better health outcomes.

“Both studies will be supported by an Evaluation Advisory Group comprised of key stakeholders and health experts, to ensure a wide range of perspectives are taken into account.

“This work aligns with the Turnbull Government’s commitment to a more strategic, long-term approach to Indigenous health and Indigenous affairs as a whole.”

Part 2 NACCHO Background : IAHP Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme

The Indigenous Health Division is responsible for the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme, which commenced on 1 July 2014.

This Programme consolidated four Indigenous health funding streams: primary health care base funding; child and maternal health activities; Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory (Health); and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Chronic Disease Fund.

The following themes comprise the Programme:

  • Primary Health Care Services;
  • Improving Access to Primary Health Care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People;
  • Targeted Health Activities;
  • Capital Works; and
  • Governance and System Effectiveness.

The Guidelines for the Programme provide an overview of the arrangements for the administration of, and activities that may be funded under, the Programme.

PDF version: Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme Guideline – PDF 501 KB

Part 3 NACCHO background history February 2016

NACCHO $ Aboriginal Health Funding alert :Federal Goverment’s Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme

1.Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme – Tackling Indigenous Smoking Innovation Grants

The Australian Government has made available $6.3 million over three financial years from June 2016 to June 2018 for innovation grants. These projects will offer innovative and intense activities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to reduce smoking prevalence in remote areas, for pregnant women and for young people vulnerable to entrenched cultural norms of smoking.

It is expected that successful grant recipients will work in collaborative partnerships of research organisations and service providers to seek solutions to reduce rates of smoking that have been resistant to reduction. This arrangement will improve the evidence on how to reduce smoking rates in areas or groups of high need and interventions will be evaluated in context to add to existing understanding of what works and what does not work in what circumstances.

This will be a competitive, open process for which various health service providers and research organisations may apply

2.Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme – Service Maintenance Programme

The Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme’s Service Maintenance Programme (SMP) is providing Commonwealth funded Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) a total of up to $2 million (GST exclusive) in grant funding in 2015-16. SMP grants will provide for the priority repair and upgrade of clinics and staff housing facilities run by organisations which aim to improve access to services and improve health outcomes for Indigenous Australians.

3.Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme – Primary Health Care Activity

The Department of Health has released two Invitations to Apply for the continuation of Primary Health Care and New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP) in selected communities and regions across Australia for two years from 2016-17. IAHP Primary Health Care Activity aims to improve access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to effective and high quality health care services essential to improving health and life expectancy, and reducing child mortality. New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services Activity aims to improve the health of Indigenous Australians by improving access to antenatal care and maternal and child health services by Indigenous children, their mothers and families.

4.Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme – New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services Activity

The Department of Health has released two Invitations to Apply for the continuation of Primary Health Care and New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP) in selected communities and regions across Australia for two years from 2016-17. IAHP Primary Health Care Activity aims to improve access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to effective and high quality health care services essential to improving health and life expectancy, and reducing child mortality. New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services Activity aims to improve the health of Indigenous Australians by improving access to antenatal care and maternal and child health services by Indigenous children, their mothers and families

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Disability : Can #NDIS Agency Actions Improve #Indigenous Participant Experience ?

 ” Participants by Indigenous and CALD status : The number of NDIS participants who identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander is broadly in line with estimates of disability prevalence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people represent 3 per cent of the population (ABS 2017a), and estimates of disability prevalence range from between 1.5 to 2 times the prevalence of the non-Indigenous population (ABS 2016a, 2016b; AIHW 2016).

The NDIS data indicate that about 5 per cent of NDIS participants identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.

However, some caution is warranted as it is not clear how the rollout schedule has influenced the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants in the scheme and there are some factors that may make it difficult for the NDIS to engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability are reluctant to identify as people with disability and have only had a limited interaction with the disability service system (FPDN 2016)).

Download the NDIS Summary Report  ndis-costs-overview

Download the full NDIS Report ndis-costs2

Read over 25 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Disability NDIS articles

 ” The NDIA said work was also underway to develop tailored pathways to ensure the NDIA had the right response for all participants, including people with psychosocial disability, children, people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and people with more complex needs.”

NDIS Agency Takes Action to Improve Participant Experience

Download 9 Page New-pathway-experience-combined

 ” It is [also] anticipated that the capacity for outreach will be significantly diminished due to the NDIS pricing structure. The most marginalised and vulnerable groups (eg homeless, CALD [culturally and linguistically diverse] communities, young people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders), and those who are particularly unwell, often need assertive and active outreach to engage.

With a framework based on individual choice and control, consumers who don’t have knowledge of the NDIS, the ability to advocate for themselves or connections with support services (eg people who are homeless or socially isolated) may miss out on the benefits of the NDIS. It is critical that existing services and supports continue to be funded to ensure supports are provided to the most vulnerable groups. (sub. 50, p. 13) “

NACCHO has #NDIS questions for our ACCHO member discussion

1) Are any of your members approved providers of disability services under the NDIS? What services do they provide?

2) What is your members’ experience of accessing the NDIS, both as providers and assisting potential participants? What works, and what needs improving?

3) What accessible and culturally appropriate resources and documents are available for ACCHS and participants seeking to access the NDIS? Have you developed any resources for your members that you would be willing to share with the network? 

4) If insufficient resources exist, would you be willing to lead a network collaboration to develop some?

5) What other assistance can NACCHO and affiliates provide in supporting ACCHS to access NDIS funding?

NACCHO  welcomes your feedback and comments

NACCHO Contact

Paul Gardner NACCHO Policy Officer Ph: (02) 6246 9314 Email

OR  leave comments below

 ” Thin markets need more attention .When creating a new market for disability supports, there is a risk that, in some areas, or for some types of supports, the market (the number of providers or participants) will be too small to support the competitive provision of services (‘thin market’).

Thin markets are not new — they have been, and will continue to be, a persistent feature of the disability support sector.

In the absence of government intervention, there will be greater shortages, less competition, and ultimately poorer outcomes for participants. Participants at most risk are those who:

  •  live in outer regional, remote or very remote areas
  •  have complex, specialised or high intensity needs, or very challenging behaviours
  •  are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  •  are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  •  have an acute and immediate need (crisis care and accommodation).

NDIS timetable won’t be met, Productivity Commission warns

The federal government will not meet its target of 475,000 national disability insurance scheme participants by 2019-20, and is failing to grow the disability workforce fast enough to meet the looming demand, the Productivity Commission has warned.

From The Guardian

The commission releases its report on the costs of the $22bn NDIS on Thursday, and offers a bleak assessment of its chances of meeting the tight deadlines set out in a series of bilateral agreements between the commonwealth and the states and territories.

About 100,000 people have already been signed up but the government must develop support plans for at least 475,000 by 2019-20.

To meet that deadline, the NDIS – the biggest social reform since Medicare – is being implemented at a dizzying speed. Advocates have long voiced concerns that the pace of the rollout is compromising decision making and leaving people with a disability with inadequate support packages.

Those fears were confirmed by the Productivity Commission’s report, which said the “[National Disability Insurance Agency’s] focus on participant intake has compromised the quality of plans and participant outcomes”.

“Quality plans are critical, not only for participant outcomes but also for sending the right signals to providers about demand for supports and containing long-term costs of the scheme,” the Productivity Commission said.

The report described the pace of change brought by the NDIS as “unprecedented”, and warned meeting the intake targets would require the approval of hundreds of plans a day, and the review of hundreds more.

In the final year of the transition, it would require the approval of 500 plans – each complex and tailored to the needs of the individual – every day.

“The reality is that the current timetable for participant intake will not be met,” the report said. “Governments and the NDIA need to start planning now for a changed timetable, including working through the financial implications.”

The timetable would be pushed out by at least a year, the report warned, or possibly longer, if the rollout continues to fall behind.

The commission also recommended that states and territories increase their funding to the scheme by 4% from 2019-20, rather than 3.5%.

The growth of the disability workforce was found to be “way too slow”. At full operation, the scheme will require 70,000 additional disability support care workers. That means one in every five jobs created now need to be in the disability sector.

The Productivity Commission recommended the looming shortages be addressed by a targeted approach to skilled migration, intervention in thin markets, and independent price monitoring and regulation.

The report also urged for state and territory funding to be restored to disability advocacy groups.

Advocacy groups fight for the rights and interests of people with a disability and their carers, families and providers, a service particularly important during the complex and confusing NDIS transition.

But in NSW alone, 50 groups are facing closure as the state pulls funding and puts the onus on the NDIS and Commonwealth to replace it.

“As advocacy remains important over the transition period, the commission recommends that funding be restored by jurisdictions that have ceased or reduced funding, and data collection and evaluation of disability advocacy be increased,” the report said.

But the overall message of the report was positive. The NDIS, if implemented well, would greatly improve the lives of people with a disability, it found. The support for the scheme was described as “overwhelming” and “extraordinary”.

The costs were broadly in line with what was expected, although that was largely because not all supports were being used by participants.

The report called for greater attention on the pre-planning and planning phases of the NDIS, which help determine what supports an individual is eligible for and for how long.

It comes just a day after the NDIA announced an overhaul of the way it interacts with people with a disability, promising more face-to-face planning conversations, and simpler and clearer communications.

The NDIA chief executive, Robert De Luca, conceded there had been flaws in the early implementation of the scheme, which were being learned from and addressed.

“What we’ve heard through the process is that the phone conversation hasn’t always been as engaging as it could have been in a face-to-face environment,” De Luca told Guardian Australia.

“The capability of the people on the phone wasn’t at the right level to understand the needs of the people that we’re helping.”

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health #F1000DA17 : International @First1000DaysOz Movement gets Aboriginal Make-Over

“We work to support parents in taking responsibility for our children, providing them with the best start in life and ensuring that the protective factors inherent in our culture and our strong family structures are evident in our work with families.

The work of First Thousand Days Australia is aimed at reducing chronic stressors for mums and dads, so that the focus is on healthy pregnancies and giving our parents the opportunity to provide their children the best start in life.

We welcome the support of Congress and note that both the recent Redfern and Uluru statements from the national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership highlighted early childhood development and health as a major priority for Indigenous communities “

Professor Kerry Arabena, Chair of Indigenous Health (Pictured above ) at the University of Melbourne, who heads up the Australian initiative says her group is unique in that it’s an Indigenous designed and managed intervention.

“Some of our people are kept apart from us –by politics and power— and forced to live away from the people who care most about them,” she told the audience of child care workers, educationalists, health workers and researchers. “They are in prisons and in out-of-home care.

“As long as they exist separated from us, from their families, from our communities and from our society, we remain a people who are unable to exercise the right of self-determination.

Dr Huggins, Co-Chair of the National Congress of First Peoples, said that the lack of success in improving the outcomes for Indigenous infants and children was a source of deep anxiety for all Indigenous families see Part 2 Below

Read over 270 NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health Articles published over the pat 5 Years

International First Thousand Days Movement got an  ” Aboriginal Make-Over ” when national summit began in Brisbane this week

Brisbane  hosted one of Australia’s most significant gatherings of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child and maternal health experts and community leaders when the First Thousand Days Australia national summit convened this week .

The first 1,000 days of life – the time spanning roughly between conception and one’s second birthday – is a unique period of opportunity when the foundations of optimum health, growth, and neurodevelopment across the lifespan are established.

In Australia this international movement has been broadened out, by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander health researchers and practitioners, from the original nutrition-focused international initiative to include child protection, early life literacy, the role and contribution of men and the range of other issues which impact on Indigenous parents and infants in Australia.

Professor Arabena said the Queensland Government had supported the initiative with a $1.5m grant to establish two trial sites in the state and other funds have been made available for ongoing research and evaluation.

“There is a sense of desperation in many of our communities and organisations that current efforts to give our kids the best possible opportunities in life are not having the impact we’d like; our children are being put into out-of-home-care at unprecedented rates and the COAG targets to close the gap on child mortality, school attendance and literacy and numeracy haven’t been met this year.

“It’s clear that we need new initiatives that give Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities more control over developing strategies and First Thousand days Australia is aiming to do just that,” said Professor Arabena.

The First Thousand Days Australia National Summit will run from tomorrow until Friday 20 October

View the Summit program including abstracts and presenters’ bios here.

 Part 2 Australian Government has historic opportunity to build safety and health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children  

Aboriginal leader, Dr Jackie Huggins, has told a child and maternal health summit In Brisbane that Australia’s elevation to the UN Human Rights Committee should cause the Australian Government to ensure its domestic actions matches its international rhetoric on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families.

Speaking at the First Thousand Days Summit in Brisbane today Dr Huggins, Co-Chair of the National Congress of First Peoples, said that the lack of success in improving the outcomes for Indigenous infants and children was a source of deep anxiety for all Indigenous families.

“Some of our people are kept apart from us –by politics and power— and forced to live away from the people who care most about them,” she told the audience of child care workers, educationalists, health workers and researchers. “They are in prisons and in out-of-home care.

“As long as they exist separated from us, from their families, from our communities and from our society, we remain a people who are unable to exercise the right of self-determination.

The first 1,000 days of life – the time spanning roughly between conception and one’s second birthday – is a unique period of opportunity when the foundations of optimum health, growth, and neurodevelopment across the lifespan are established.

In Australia this international movement has been broadened out, by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander health researchers and practitioners, from the original nutrition-focused international initiative to include child protection, early life literacy, the role and contribution of men and the range of other issues which impact on Indigenous parents and infants in Australia.

Dr Huggins said the Turnbull Government had an historical opportunity to engage with the Indigenous community on child health and safety through the Aboriginal-led First Thousand Days Australia initiative.

“Indigenous people are the experts when it comes to taking responsibility for, and looking after our children,” Dr Huggins said. “We have the right to develop and provide services which address inter-generational trauma. We have the right to teach our children in their languages and ensure they have a culturally appropriate education and have the right to deliver pre-natal services according to the needs of our communities.”

First Thousand Days Australia CEO, Professor Kerry Arabena, welcomed the support of Congress and said that both the recent Redfern and Uluru statements from the national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership highlighted early childhood development and health as a major priority for Indigenous communities.

“We all need to start focusing on the strengths and resilience of our families and work with them to build on these strengths rather than the continued emphasis on the perceived weaknesses,” said Professor Arabena.

 

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health #JobAlerts #Doctors #RMA17 #OTCC2017 This weeks @DanilaDilba @CAACongress @ahmrc @IUIH_

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1-8 Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin 8 Positions

9. Senior Rural Medical Practitioner – Port Augusta

10.Nhulundu Health Service : General Practitioner : Gladstone QLD

11. TRACHOMA ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS MANAGER

12. Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community NSW  : Medical Practitioner 

13. Miwatj Health NT Tackling Indigenous Smoking Community Worker

14-18 Congress ACCHO Alice Springs

19-20. AHMRC full-time Vacancies

 21 – 22 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

23. Poche Centre for Indigenous Health : Research Associate, Breathe Easy Walk Easy Lungs for Life

VIEW Hundreds of past Jobs on the NACCHO Jobalerts

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1-8 Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin 8 Positions

1 Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) / Registered Nurse
2 Transport Officer
3 Team Leader, Deadly Choices
4 Manager – Marketing and Communications
5 Team Leader, Mobile Unit
6 Community Support Worker (AOD)
7 Indigenous Outreach Worker (Palmerston)
8 Clinical Psychologist

WEBSITE

9. Senior Rural Medical Practitioner – Port Augusta

 

Established in the early 1970’s, Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation provides culturally appropriate, comprehensive primary health care services, social support and training to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The organisation operates from its premises in Port Augusta and also has clinics at Davenport, Copley and Nepabunna communities. Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation also provides services to the communities of Quorn, Hawker, Marree, Lyndhurst and Beltana.

About the Opportunity

Pika Wiya Aboriginal Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (Pika Wiya) now has a full-time opportunity for a Senior Rural Medical Practitioner to join their team in Port Augusta, SA.

Reporting to the Medical Director, you will be responsible for the provision of high-level primary health care, ensuring continuity care for individuals, and for prevention programs for the population.

This will be done primarily through the Port Augusta clinic (bulk-billing clinic) – servicing a combination of booked and walk in clients – and also by visiting a remote clinic once a month.

To be successful in this position, you will hold an AHPRA recognised medical degree including general or specialist registration and a Medicare Australia Provider Number.

You will also have demonstrated experience working in a medical practice and have the ability to provide high-quality clinical skills in a rural general practice. Additionally, you must have a good knowledge of the Australian health system and the Medicare billing system.

It is crucial to this role that you have a good understanding of Aboriginal community and health and be willing to involve yourself in the community.

About the Benefits

In return for your hard work and dedication, you will be rewarded with an attractive base salary of $225,000 plus super.

You will also be eligible generous salary packaging, up to$16,000 through Maxxia, to increase your take home pay!

Pika Wiya is also willing to negotiate relocation assistance and accommodation subsidies for the right candidate.

Make a real difference to the health and well-being of a vibrant community – Apply Now!

10.Nhulundu Health Service : General Practitioner : Gladstone QLD

 General Practitioner

(Full time positions based in Gladstone)

Nhulundu Wooribah Indigenous Health Organisation Inc. (“Nhulundu”) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service delivering an integrated, comprehensive primary health care service to the whole Gladstone community.

Services include; bulk billing GP services, chronic disease management program, diabetes education, health promotion programs, mums and bubs clinic, aged care and community support service functions.

The position is responsible for providing best practice comprehensive primary health care. Leadership in the safety and quality of clinical services delivered by the health team. Optimising uptake and income generation across the service through MBS billings

This is an exciting opportunity to join an enthusiastic and committed team and make a direct impact on improved health outcomes in the community.

  • Competitive Salary Package – including salary sacrifice
  • Well Balanced working environment – Hours = Monday – Friday 8.30 – 5.00pm

Key Requirements include

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding unconditional current registration with the Medical Board of Australia
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number
  • Vocational Registration preferred
  • Knowledge, understanding and sensitivity towards the social, economic and cultural factors affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s health; An ability to communicate and empathise with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

You will be supported by a team of dedicated clinic staff including Registered Nurses Aboriginal Health Workers, the Tackling Indigenous Smoking team, Dietician/Diabetes Educator, Medical Receptionist, Practice Manager and visiting Specialists and Allied Health providers

Enquiries and Applications (Resume) can be addressed to:

Karen Clifford – Business Service Manager:

By Email: jobs@nhulundu.com.au

By Phone: 0428 228 851

 

11. TRACHOMA ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS MANAGER

Job no: 0044056
Work type: Fixed Term
Location: Parkville

Indigenous Health Equity Unit
Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population & Global Health
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Salary: $99,199 – $107,370 p.a. plus 9.5% superannuation

The Trachoma Environmental Improvements Manager (TEIM) plays an important role to drive activities and provide focus on the “Environmental” element of the World Health Organisation SAFE strategy to eliminate trachoma. The position will: advocate for safe and functional washing facilities (bathrooms) and work to enhance coordination, collaboration and cooperation between key players at the State and Territory, regional and local levels in health including environmental health, housing, infrastructure and education in targeted regions and remote communities in the tri-state border region of NT, SA, and WA.

The Trachoma Environmental Improvements Manager will be based in Alice Springs and work closely with the Indigenous Eye Health (IEH) Trachoma Coordinator who is also based in Alice Springs.

The position requires travel by vehicle or plane to remote areas of NT, South Australia and Western Australia. Travel to Melbourne and other Australian destinations will also be required from time to time.

IEH strongly encourages applications from Indigenous Australians.

Close date: 22 Oct 2017

Position Description and Selection Criteria

Download File 0044056.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/search/info/selection-criteria

 12. Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community NSW  : Medical Practitioner 

 

 

Katungul ACCMS is an Aboriginal Community controlled corporation providing community and health services to Aboriginal Australians located in the South Coast of NSW. Katungul has recently been recognised for its excellence in business in the Eurobodalla and Far South Coast NSW Business Awards.
The role will involve working with a multi disciplinary team of health workers and other staff to provide culturally attuned, integrated health and community services on the Far South Coast of New South Wales.
Applicants will ideally be fully accredited as General Practitioners with experience working in an Aboriginal Medical service. However other General Practitioners  who do not meet this criteria will be considered.
Remuneration and terms of employment will be negotiated with the successful candidate(s).
Enquries should be directed to Chris Heazlewood, Human Resources Manager on 02 44762155 or by email chrish@katungul.org.au

 Download Position description  

MEDICAL PRACTITIONER October 2017

13. Miwatj Health NT Tackling Indigenous Smoking Community Worker

Job No: MHAC19
Location: Ramingining
Employment Status: Part Time
No. of Vacancies: 2
Closing Date: 30 Dec 2020

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is the regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Tackling Indigenous Smoking Community Worker .5

Are you reliable, self-motivated and hardworking? Do you want to make a difference to Indigenous health? You will work with individuals, clients, families and communities to help quit tobacco use. You will deliver and promote healthier life choices and encourage smoke free behaviour. You will report to the Coordinator TIS on progress and issues. You will need to maintain confidential client information, have the ability to speak and understand Yolngu Matha and have a good understanding of Yolngu kinship and traditional systems.

You must have a current NT Class C Drivers License and a current Ochre Card (or the ability to obtain one).

Click here for Job Description

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are encouraged to apply.

14-18 Congress ACCHO Alice Springs

Thank you for your interest in working with Congress!

CONGRESS HR Website

We have two types of applications for you to consider:

General Application

  • Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available.
  • This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up-to-date resume and three current employment referees.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

  • Applying for a specific advertised vacancy.
  • Before applying for any position general or current please read the section ‘Job App FAQ‘.

TRANSPORT OFFICER

Hourly Rate: $22.78 + 25% casual loading

Location: Alice Springs | Job ID: 3696530| Closing Date: 01 Dec 2017

GENERAL PRACTITIONER – ALICE SPRINGS

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 40 years’ experience providing comprehe …

Location: Alice Springs | Job ID: 3677297| Closing Date: 30 Dec 2017

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST – EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATORS

Multiple Positions Available

Location: Alice Springs | Job ID: 3683459

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST- CLIENT SERVICE ROLES

Client Service Officer     …

Location: Alice Springs | Job ID: 3672944| Closing Date: 31 Dec 2017

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST- CLINICAL ROLES

Location: Alice Springs | Job ID: 3672893 | Closing Date: 31 Dec 2017

19-20 . AHMRC full-time Vacancies

 

To receive a copy of the Recruitment Information Package for more information and the selection criteria, please contact HR via email or telephone. The selection criteria must be addressed for your application to be considered.

19.Research, Training and Workforce Development Manager

Located at Little Bay at the Aboriginal Health College.

For a position description please email hr@ahmrc.org.au

Applications close: Monday, 23 October 2017.

20.Government Policy and Partnership Manager

Located at our main office in Surry Hills

This is an Identified Position.

For a position description please email hr@ahmrc.org.au

Applications close: Monday, 23 October 2017.

For a confidential conversation please contact Human Resources on (02) 9212 4777 or email gagic@ahmrc.org.au

Pursuant to Section 14(d) of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW), Australian Aboriginality is a genuine occupational qualification for this position and is identified as an essential pre-requisite for appointment to the role of Chief Executive Officer, under AH&MRC Constitutional Rules.

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

21 – 22 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

 

IUIH and its members are constantly looking for healthcare workers, GP’s, allied health professionals, medical and health related students to fill short or long term vacancies within their growing operations.Current job opportunities are listed below:

 

Website HERE

23. Research Associate, Breathe Easy Walk Easy Lungs for Life

Faculty of Health Sciences

Physiotherapy and Poche Centre for Indigenous Health

The Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, is situated on the Camperdown campus of the University of Sydney

The primary aim of the Poche Centre is to contribute to the reduction of disparities in Indigenous Health and social justice outcomes through collaboration with health research organisations including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander controlled organisations, other community organisation and government.
A PhD scholarship is available for an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander identified person through a NHMRC funded project: Implementing evidence into practice to improve chronic lung disease management in Indigenous Australians: the Breathe Easy, Walk Easy – Lungs for Life (BE WELL) project.

 

While the project title suggests that the PhD topic could be in lung health, there are opportunities for the PhD student to choose a PhD topic within his/her interest, for example, health service delivery, education of Aboriginal Health Workers, models of best practice etc.
The PhD student will be able to work with a very supportive group and could be located either in the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health on the Camperdown Campus or in the Faculty of Health Sciences on the Cumberland Campus of the University of Sydney. In both these locations other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are enrolled in PhD programs and would provide a collaborative and engaging environment.

The PhD scholarship is for a part-time PhD at $27,000 per year (tax free) for 3.5 years or a part-time PhD combined with the part-time Project Manager role, which attracts a substantial full-time salary and a 5 year appointment.

All applications must be submitted via the University of Sydney careers website.  Visit sydney.edu.au/recruitment and search by the reference number 1695/0917 to apply.

Closing: 11:30pm 19 October 2017

The University of Sydney has established the Merit Appointment Scheme to increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed across the institution. Under this scheme an applicant’s Aboriginality is an essential selection criterion and is authorised under the provisions of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977.

 

Aboriginal Heart Health @AHPC_VU #HeartHealth: the first step in getting Australia’s health on track

 

” One Australian dies every 12 minutes from CVD including heart attack and stroke – 40 percent prematurely. People with type 2 diabetes are 3-4 times more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke. People with CVD are also at risk of kidney disease.”

Australia spends more on cardiovascular diseases than on any other disease group (3). The costs of CVD amount to over 12% of all health care expenditure. In 2011, CVD was the second most burdensome disease group in Australia, causing 15% of the total $4.5 million disability-adjusted life years lost (4).

Diseases of the circulatory system are also closely associated with other major chronic health conditions such as diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and arthritis.

This policy paper builds upon the work of the National Vascular Disease Prevention Alliance (NVDPA) and leading Australian health researchers to reinvigorate and reinforce the case for preventing CVD and its risk factors and in turn, to reduce disability, comorbidity and premature death.

These experts agree that the most important next step that the Australian Government should take to prevent and manage CVD is promoting an Absolute Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in primary practice.

The experts called for:

Targeted screening and treatment for absolute risk assessment of cardiovascular disease for adults aged 45–74 years and from 35 years for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in line with guidelines.”

Heart Health: the first step in getting Australia’s health on track

 ” The National Vascular Disease Prevention Alliance (NVDPA) has today supported calls for heart and stroke disease risk assessments to be embedded alongside type 2 diabetes and kidney disease risk assessment in routine GP visits for everyone over 45.

Australian Health Policy Collaboration (AHPC) released the policy paper Heart Health: the first step in getting Australia’s health on track in Canberra today.”

Download a copy : Heart Health: the first step in getting Australia’s health on track

 

AHPC-heart-health-policy-paper

Read over 30 Aboriginal Heart Health articles HERE

 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are up to three times more likely to suffer a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians and almost twice as likely to die, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics “

Read over 70 Aboriginal Stroke Health articles HERE

Read over 130 Aboriginal Diabetes Health Articles HERE

The paper recommends a national investment in Absolute Cardiovascular Risk Assessment (ACVR) screening and outlines a national primary care strategy to reduce the impact of cardiovascular disease (CVD) on the community.

This paper builds on the NVDPA proposal for an integrated health check for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

NVDPA member and Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said regular integrated health checks delivered by GPs will ensure people at high risk were identified and managed.

“Chronic diseases are Australia’s greatest health challenge and leading cause of illness, disability and death. However, much of this burden could be prevented through early detection and early treatment,’’ Ms McGowan said.

“Integrated health checks will help ensure Australians stay alive, stay well longer and stay out of hospital.”

AHPC Director Professor Rosemary Calder said embedding risk assessments into GP visits would be the single most effective strategy for chronic disease prevention.

The NVDPA and AHPC both recommend that integrated risk assessments be supported by the Medicare Benefits Schedule and promoted through the community and Primary Health Networks.

The AHPC Heart Health report was developed in collaboration with leading national clinical and policy experts and in consultation with the Royal Australian College of General Practice and the NVDPA.

The NVDPA includes the Stroke Foundation, the National Heart Foundation, Kidney Health Australia and Diabetes Australia.

The Heart Health report follows the AHPC’s policy roadmap, Getting Australia’s Health on Track, 2016 which aims to significantly reduce preventable illness and disability.

See NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alert #GetonTrack Report : The ten things we need to do to improve our health 

Aboriginal Health and #Disability #NDIS : $3 million plan to address the cultural barriers and disadvantage

7

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 1.8 times more likely to have a disability than other Australians

“We are announcing today up to $3 million in funding over three years for two targeted projects that will support the Plan; a research project to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners and ex-prisoners with disability as well as a trial on integrated health and education approaches to support students with disability in remote communities.”

Federal Government Press Release 17 October 2017

Read 23 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Disability Articles

Read 18 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and NDIS Articles

A $3 million plan has been unveiled to address the cultural barriers and disadvantage faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability.

Minister for Social Services, Christian Porter, Assistant Minister for Disability Services, Jane Prentice and Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said the Australian Government Plan to Improve Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People with Disability (the Plan) will drive better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their families and carers.

Download PDF Copy

dss0001_atsi_disability_plan_accessible_v1

Or for persons requiring Listen or Easy to Read

“We are announcing today up to $3 million in funding over three years for two targeted projects that will support the Plan; a research project to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners and ex-prisoners with disability as well as a trial on integrated health and education approaches to support students with disability in remote communities.”

Assistant Minister Prentice said consultations over the last three years show that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability face unique challenges.

“The Plan recognises the importance of supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, particularly in remote locations.

“We need to ensure services are delivered within a cultural framework that is appropriate for the community’s customs and practices.”

The plan identifies five key priority areas for action:

  • Housing – access to appropriately designed shelter and accessible, well-designed communities that are fully inclusive of all residents.
  • Justice System – the right to be free from racism and discrimination and a disability-inclusive justice system
  • Education – an inclusive high quality education system that is responsive to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability
  • Economic security – including employment and business ownership opportunities
  • Health Services – that meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability to ensure the highest possible health and wellbeing outcomes.

See Detail Below or in the Plan

“By addressing these issues head on, this Plan aims to achieve improved outcomes and overall social, emotional, cultural, and economic wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability and their families and carers,” Minister Porter said.

Extract- Executive Summary

The Australian Government is committed to building an environment that enables Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability to achieve improved life outcomes and overall social, emotional, cultural and economic wellbeing.

The development of a dedicated Australian Government plan to improve outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability seeks to build the capacity of service systems, including disability services and Indigenous programs, to better meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability in a culturally safe and appropriate way. The Plan also aims to support workers and carers in their continuing efforts in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The Plan acknowledges that disability is everyone’s responsibility:

• Australian Government

• state/territory government

• local government

• business and industry sectors

• not–for–profit and community organisations

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, communities and organisations.

The Plan is the first of its kind and will be built on over time. The Plan will build on significant work currently being undertaken by the Australian Government to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability. Consultations on the Plan have been undertaken over the last three years across government agencies together with community stakeholders, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their representative organisations, researchers and community organisations.

The Plan highlights five key areas that stakeholders view as priorities for future consideration by the Australian Government, highlighting work that is already underway in these areas, along with potential strategies to address each of the areas:

1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability have access to appropriately designed shelter and live in accessible, well designed communities that are fully inclusive of all their residents.

2. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability have the right to:

• be free from racism and discrimination

• have their rights promoted

• a disability inclusive justice system.

3. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability achieve their full potential through participation in an inclusive, high quality education system that is responsive to their needs. People with disability have opportunities for lifelong learning.

4. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their families and carers have opportunities to gain economic security through employment and business ownership, enabling them to plan for the future and exercise choice and control over their lives.

5. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability attain the highest possible health and wellbeing outcomes throughout their lives, enabled by all health services capabilities to meet the needs of people with disability.

6 .To ensure that the Plan leads to substantive and meaningful change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, any actions or strategies under the Plan must be:

Measurable The priorities and actions outlined in the Plan must be measurable to track progress and outcomes.

Replicable While Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities are diverse, there needs to be some consistency in approach and general principles for success that can be applied across different communities.

Sustainable The Plan represents a starting point in the development of a new approach for improving the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability. The Plan seeks to outline reform and action that will be sustainable over the long-term.

Flexible The Plan recognises that different people and different communities have different needs. While adhering to principles of sustainability and best practice in the delivery of services, implementation needs to be responsive to the unique requirements of individuals and communities.

Cultural The Plan recognises that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability will have similar physical and structural requirements as non–Indigenous people, but that service delivery needs to be undertaken in a cultural context to achieve success.

Area 5: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability attain the highest possible health and wellbeing outcomes throughout their lives, enabled by all health and disability services having the capability to meet their needs.

Why is it important?

Holistic health care and coordination between health and disability services are paramount for those with disabilities. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, those with a disability and those without, access Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled health services as they deliver holistic, comprehensive and culturally appropriate health care, and have an understanding of the cultural needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

While these services meet general health needs through comprehensive primary health care, there is still a need for health workers to receive appropriate training on disability issues. Workers aware of disability needs are able to facilitate appropriate referral pathways for clients to receive any required additional disability services and supports.

Access to disability services is limited by cultural considerations as well as by geographical location, environmental factors, capacity and level of need. Cultural safety can be at risk where the only service within geographic reach is designed for the general population without achieving cultural competency for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander care.

Summary of press release

The Australian Government is committed to working in a spirit of collaboration with states and territories, local government, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and communities and organisations to deliver real outcomes and foster greater opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their families and carers.

 

Aboriginal Health Events This Week #OTCC2017 #NNW2017 #F1000DA17 #SaveADate #NACCHOagm2017 #BlackLivesMatter

THIS WEEK follow on Twitter

15-21 October   National Nutrition Week 2017 Follow  #NNW2017

17-19 October  Oceania Tobacco Control Conference to be held in Hobart Tasmania  Follow #OTCC2017

18 -20 October  : 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome  Follow #CRANAplus2017

20 October : ‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference Follow #RMA17

18- 20 October First 1000 Days Summit Follow #F1000DA17

NEXT WEEK ONWARDS

26-27 October  :Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

31 October –2 Nov  : #NACCHOAGM2017  Members Meeting Canberra

2 November Black Lives Matter Founders and leaders visit Australia to accept 2017 Sydney Peace Prize

15 November  One Day NATSIHWA Workshop SA Forum

14- 15 November  : 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

15 -18 November  :National Conference on Incontinence Scholarship Opportunity close 1 September

27-30 November  :Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

December 7-8 Aboriginal Men and Family Violence Conference in Adelaide

14 December Shepparton  One Day NATSIHWA Workshop VIC Forum

11-12 April 2018  :6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium  Canberra call for extracts

If you have a Conference, Workshop Funding opportunity or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Social  Media

mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

15-21 October 2017 National Nutrition Week 2017 is 15-21 October 2017 #NNW2017

With beginnings more than 20 years ago, National Nutrition Week is Nutrition Australia’s annual healthy eating awareness campaign.

Read over 30 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Nutrition articles HERE

The theme for National Nutrition Week 2017 is Try For 5 – an annual campaign developed by Nutrition Australia that aims to encourage Australians to increase their vegetable consumption to the recommended five serves per day.

This year’s campaign is being launched during National Nutrition Week (15-21 October) which coincides with the United Nations’ World Food Day on 16 October.

Each year National Nutrition Week raises awareness around the role of food on our health, and supports the community to enjoy healthy eating. This year we are encouraging families to find more ways to enjoy vegetables, and to eat one extra serve of veg every day.

Thanks to our principle partner Bayer Australia and our other partners and supporters for working with us to encourage Australians to discover more ways to add veg to their day!

About National Nutrition Week

Each year National Nutrition Week raises awareness of the role of food on our health, and supports the community to enjoy healthy eating.

National Nutrition Week always coincides with the United Nations’ World Food Day, which takes place on 16 October.

The food and lifestyle choices we make impact on both our health, and the health of our planet. With childhood obesity rates now around 25% and with Australians identified as being among the highest producers of waste globally, we need to address these issues urgently.

17-19 October  Oceania Tobacco Control Conference to be held in Hobart Tasmania #OTCC2017

The theme of the conference is “From vision to reality: A tobacco-free Oceania”. With smoking rates still significantly high in a number of regions within Oceania, we must not lose sight and focus on the large number of negative health, social and economic impacts on individuals and communities related to tobacco smoking.

In Oceania we truly believe that our vision is not aspirational but must be an achievable reality.

Journalist Marie McInerney, who will cover #OTCC2017 for the Croakey Conference News Service, previews some of the hot conference topics in this Q and A with Sarah White, Director of Quit Victoria and Chair of the OTCC 2017 Program Committee

Read Here

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

We are pleased to announce the 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference will be held at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa in Broome, Western Australia, from 18 to 20 October 2017.

THE FUTURE OF REMOTE HEALTH AND THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY

Since the organisation’s inception in 1982 this event has served to create an opportunity for likeminded remote and isolated health individuals who can network, connect and share.

It serves as both a professional and social resource for the Remote and Isolated Health Workforce of Australia.

We aim to offer an environment that will foster new ideas, promote collegiate relationships, provide opportunities for professional development and celebrate remote health practice.

Conference Website

18- 20 October First 1000 Days Summit

The First 1000 Days Australia Summit is a three-day event that will bring together Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders, researchers, community members, front- line workers and policy makers involved in areas relevant to the work of First 1000 Days Australia. Lectures, panel discussions and workshops will address topics such as caring and parenting, infant and child development, family strengthening, implementation and translation, as well as a number of other areas.

The theme for the Summit is ‘Celebrating our leadership, strengthening our families’. We invite interested presenters to submit abstracts for oral presentations, workshops and posters that align with the aims, principles and research areas of First 1000 Days Australia, and of First 1,000 Days international.

20 October : ‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference 


‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference

RMA Presidents’ Breakfast
Friday 20 October 2017
Pullman Albert Park, Melbourne


www.ruralmedicineaustralia.com.au

Australia’s most influential health leaders will discuss critical health policy issues in a key Presidents’ Breakfast forum at the Rural Medicine Australia 2017 conference, to be held in Melbourne in October.Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), will host the forum and will be joined on the panel by Associate Professor Ruth Stewart, President of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM); Dr Bastian Seidel, President of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP); and Dr Tony Bartone, Vice President of the Australian Medical Association (AMA).

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

‘Translation at the Centre’ An educational symposium

Alice Springs Convention Centre, Alice Springs

This year the Symposium will look at research translation as well as the latest on diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.  The event will be run over a day and a half.
The Educational Symposium will feature a combination of relevant plenary presentations from renowned scientists and clinicians plus practical workshops.

Registration is free but essential.

Please contact the symposium coordinator on 1300 728 900 (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) or via email at events@baker.edu.au  

31 October2 Nov #NACCHOAGM2017  Members Meeting Canberra

Welcome to 2017 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2017

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Where :Hyatt Hotel Canberra

Dates :Members’ Conference: 31 October – 1 November 2017
Annual General Meeting: 2 November 2017

CLICK HERE

2 November Black Lives Matter Founders and leaders visit Australia to accept 2017 Sydney Peace Prize

Black Lives Matter Founders and leaders visit Australia to accept 2017 Sydney Peace Prize

Black Lives Matter Global Network Founders above (from left to right), Opal Tometi, Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza.

The Black Lives Matter Global Network will be awarded the 2017 Sydney Peace Prize (SPP). Its Founders – Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi, with Toronto Chapter Leader Rodney Diverlus – will travel to Australia to collect the Prize at the City of Sydney Lecture and Award Ceremony at Sydney Town Hall on November 2.

“To turn a radically inclusive message into a rallying cry for millions of people as the Black Lives Matter Global Network has done requires vision, leadership, heart and courage,” said Archie Law, Chair of the Sydney Peace Foundation.

“Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors and Opal Tometi and the many other Black Lives Matter leaders challenge us all to rethink, reimagine and reconstruct the societies we live in. This is an urgent and vital challenge, not least here in Australia.”

Since creating the social media hashtag #BlackLivesMatter in 2012, the Black Lives Matter Founders have strategically built the scaffolding of an on-the-ground political network that now has more than 40 chapters worldwide. The movement has become a catalyst for discussion, debate, dissent and personal expression for those who want to see an end to state and racially fuelled violence. Today, Black Lives Matter has developed into a social movement with global reach and relevance.

“We receive this award with tremendous gratitude and in solidarity with organisers throughout Australia who, in the face of egregious oppression, fightback against the state and proclaim that all Black Lives Matter,” said Patrisse Cullors.

Black Lives Matter’s focus on social and economic justice has strong relevance to Australia’s First Peoples who face highly disproportionate rates of imprisonment, death while in custody, and low life expectancy in comparison to non-Indigenous Australians.

“This movement resonates around the globe and here in Australia, where we have become inured to the high incarceration rates and deaths in custody of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It’s as if their lives do not matter,” said Aboriginal leader, former Commissioner into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, and 2008 Laureate Senator Pat Dodson.

President of Australian South Sea Islanders Port Jackson, Emelda Davis, whose ancestors were brought to Australia as forced labour (‘Blackbirding’), has applauded the Australian recognition of Black Lives Matter and believes its core messages have strong relevance to issues being faced by various black and Indigenous communities in Australia.

“Our untold Australian history of slavery is still unknown to the majority of Australians, but it haunts the minds, hearts and soul of our people. Addressing the hard realities our black and disadvantaged communities face takes guts and tenacity. Black Lives Matter is a bottom-up approach, a call for solidarity and truth telling for First Nation’s people and Australian South Sea Islanders as two of the most disadvantaged races in Australia,” said Ms Davis.

The Sydney Peace Prize is Australia’s international Prize for Peace, awarded by the Sydney Peace Foundation at the University of Sydney with support from the City of Sydney. The Sydney Peace Prize brings the Sydney community together to talk about peace, justice and nonviolence, and to honour some of the world’s most inspiring peacemakers.

Previous recipients of the Sydney Peace Prize include Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Mary Robinson, Arundhati Roy, Senator Pat Dodson, Professor Noam Chomsky, and Naomi Klein.

Tickets and media passes are available for the City of Sydney Lecture and Award ceremony, the Gala Dinner, and an In Conversation hosted by the Wheeler Centre in Melbourne.

The City of Sydney Peace Prize Lecture and Award Ceremony will feature the City of Sydney Peace Prize lecture presented by Black Lives Matter Founders Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi. Other speakers include Larissa Behrendt, Maxine Beneba Clarke, and Lord Mayor Clover Moore. Legendary Aboriginal singer/songwriter Archie Roach will perform.

November 2, 5:30pm- 8:00pm, Sydney Town Hall. Tickets: $25-$45

https://events.ticketbooth.com.au/event/SPPLecture2017

The 2017 Sydney Peace Prize Gala Dinner is the Sydney Peace Foundation’s annual fundraising event, providing an opportunity to celebrate the 2017 SPP recipient and hear from a range of inspiring speakers, including The Hon. Linda Burney MP and Tracey Spicer. Legendary Aboriginal singer/songwriter Archie Roach will perform live.

November 3, 7:00pm-11:00pm, Dockside, Cockle Bay Wharf, Darling Harbour. Tickets: $265 single – $3,000 table of 12

https://events.ticketbooth.com.au/event/SPPGalaDinner2017

Black Lives Matter Global Network Founders in conversation with Jack Latimore, hosted by the Wheeler Centre.

November 4, 8:00pm-9:00pm, the Melbourne Exhibition and Conference Centre. Tickets: $15-$25

https://www.wheelercentre.com/events/black-lives-matter-in-conversation

Media Opportunities

Black Lives Matter Global Network Chapter Leaders are available for phone interviews, as well as Chair of the Sydney Peace Foundation, Archie Law.

The Founders will also give an address on Wednesday November 1, at the National Press Club Address, Canberra, 11:35am – 1:30pm. Contact:

https://www.npc.org.au/speakers/alicia-garza-patrisse-cullors-rodney-diverlus/

 

 

15 November  One Day NATSIHWA Workshop SA Forum

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) 

Join the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) for a one day CPD networking workshop focussed on current workforce development opportunities.

Upskill and strengthen your skill level in a specialised area and find out what is happening through program development, education and funding opportunities.

Hear from organisations such as: PHN Primary Heath Network, CranaPlus, Autism QLD, Rheumatic Heart, PEPA Program of Experience in the Palliative Approach, Diabetes Australia, IBA Indigenous Business Australia, HESTA Superannuation, 1800 RESPECT, Hearing Australia and more to be annuonced in the coming months (tailored for your specific region).

Register HERE

14-15 November : 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the Lowitja Institute, Australia’s national institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, are proud to be co-hosting the 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

This partnership indicates an alignment of priorities and a strong commitment from our two institutions to deliver a measurable, positive impact on the health and wellbeing of Australia’s First Peoples.

Under the theme “The Butterfly Effect: Translating Knowledge into Action for Positive Change”, the Symposium will be an opportunity to bring relevant expertise to the business of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research translation and put forward Indigenous perspectives that inform the most effective policies and programs. It will also be a forum to share knowledge of what successful research looks like at community level and what the key elements of success are.

We look forward to the participation of delegates with community, research and policy expertise, including outstanding keynote speakers Dr Carrie Bourassa (Canada) and Sir Mason Durie (New Zealand). We are confident that through our joint commitment to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, the Symposium will make a significant contribution to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, families and individuals. This commitment also signals the importance of working together as equal partners, Indigenous and non-Indigenous.

More info HERE

15 -18 November :National Conference on Incontinence Scholarship Opportunity

The Continence Foundation of Australia is offering 10 scholarships to support health professionals to attend the 26th National Conference on Incontinence. The conference will be held in Sydney on 15-18 November 2017.  The conference program and registration brochure can be found here.
This scholarship program is open to registered nurses and physiotherapists with an interest in continence care working in rural and remote areas of Australia. The scholarship includes full conference registration, including clinical workshops and social events, flights and accommodation. The top applicant also has the opportunity to participate in a placement at a Sydney continence clinic. Previous unsuccessful applicants are encouraged to apply.
Applications closed Friday 1 September.
Applications are being taken online. Click here to find out more and to apply.  

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

iaha

Abstracts for the IAHA 2017 National Conference are now open!

We are calling for abstracts for concurrent oral presentations and workshops under the following streams:
– Care
– Cultures
– Connection

For abstract more information visit the IAHA Conference website at: https://iahaconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

December 7-8 Aboriginal Men and Family Violence Conference in Adelaide

Unlike so many other conferences on this subject, our gathering will consist of over 95% Aboriginal speakers and examine what’s really going on with Aboriginal men and their use of violence.

 
Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY) and No To Violence will be hosting the event which will support and promote good initiatives and ground-breaking approaches to working with Aboriginal men and families to address family violence. Our aim is to take the outcomes of the conference to government and other funding sources to draw attention to the initiatives being undertaken by Aboriginal communities.
 
Registrations are open for this conference now and we’d love it if you could promote the event with the below website.
KWY is an Aboriginal organisation based in Adelaide delivering services across South Australia to Aboriginal families to address family violence. No To Violence is the peak body for organisations and individuals working with men to end their violence and abuse towards family members. Both KWY and NTV are non-profit organisations.

14 December Shepparton  One Day NATSIHWA Workshop VIC Forum

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) 

Join the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) for a one day CPD networking workshop focussed on current workforce development opportunities.

Upskill and strengthen your skill level in a specialised area and find out what is happening through program development, education and funding opportunities.

Hear from organisations such as: PHN Primary Heath Network, CranaPlus, Autism QLD, Rheumatic Heart, PEPA Program of Experience in the Palliative Approach, Diabetes Australia, IBA Indigenous Business Australia, HESTA Superannuation, 1800 RESPECT, Hearing Australia and more to be annuonced in the coming months (tailored for your specific region).

Register HERE

11-12 April 2018 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium  Canberra call for extracts

About the Symposium

Drawing upon a tradition which commenced with the first rural and remote health scientific conference ‘Infront Outback’ held in Toowoomba in 1992, the 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium will be held in Canberra, 11-12 April 2018.

The Symposium will celebrate 20 years since the establishment of the first university department of rural health in 1997 and will highlight the research and knowledge that followed this innovation.

Outback Infront will celebrate the leadership that has emerged from the rural and remote health research community, while at the same time, support early career academics and the next generation of rural health researchers.

The Symposium will focus on rural and remote health research that informs strategic health policy and health service challenges in rural and remote Australia.

The Symposium will provide an opportunity to share and develop research that seeks to understand and deliver innovative change through building evidence that has the potential to transform health outcomes and service delivery.

Who should attend

The Symposium program will be designed to engage academics, policy makers, expert researchers in rural and remote health and clinician-researchers, as well as emerging and early career researchers.

It will also be relevant to policy makers, university departments of rural health, rural clinical schools, research collaborations and bodies, rural workforce organisations and health services delivery networks and providers.

Program

As well as key presentations from respected researchers in rural and remote health the Symposium will also feature Rogano presentations (scholarly debate on a current research project that answer “how to” questions and encourage scholarly thinking and debate) and a return of the popular Lightning Talk presentations to support early career academics and the next generation of rural health researchers.

Abstracts are now being sought for general presentations, Lightning talks and Rogano presentations

Aboriginal Health Research @NHMRC Road Map 3: A Strategic Framework for Improving Aboriginal Health through Research for public consultation.

The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) has released the draft Road Map 3: A Strategic Framework for Improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health through Research (Road Map 3) for public consultation.

The aims of the public consultation are to:

  1. Seek feedback on the draft Road Map 3, including comments on the objective and priority areas
  2. Identify any gaps in Road Map 3, and
  3. Seek feedback on the inclusion of an Action Plan.

NHMRC has committed to develop Road Map 3 to guide and communicate its objectives and investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research for the next decade. Road Map 3 builds on the previous documents, Road Map I (2002) and Road Map II (2010).

From March to July 2017, the NHMRC and its Principal Committee Indigenous Caucus (PCIC) worked with Nous Group (Nous) to conduct a national consultation process for the development of Road Map 3.

The consultation process for Road Map 3 began with a series of interviews with nine leaders from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and research peak bodies.  This was followed by seven workshops across Australia attended by researchers, health workers, government officials and community leaders. An online survey was also made available for those who could not attend the workshops.

Scope of this public consultation

NHMRC is seeking responses to a series of questions related to the development of Road Map 3.

Consultation Questions:

  1. Is the proposed objective of Road Map 3 relevant?  Why/why not?
  2. Are the three priority areas of Road Map 3 accurate?  Why/why not?
  3. Are there any further priority areas to add?
  4. Is there anything missing from Road Map 3?  Please provide further details.
  5. Are there any other comments you would like to make regarding Road Map 3?

Consultation dates:

Opening date – Friday, 13 October 2017 – 12:00pm, AEST

Closing date – Sunday, 10 December 2017 – 11:59pm, AEST

Extensions will not be provided.

Consultation document:

Supporting documents:

Please note: These documents are for information only and are not open for public consultation.

Please note: If you are having problems downloading a document, please right-click on the link and select “Save Target/Link as…” and choose a location to save the file to.

Personal information

Please provide your contact details: Name, Organisation (if relevant), Email, and Phone number.  This information will not be used or disclosed for any other purpose.

How NHMRC will consider submissions

Due consideration will be given to submissions that address the public consultation questions and provide additional evidence that meets the inclusion criteria.  NHMRC’s Principal Committee Indigenous Caucus (PCIC) will provide advice to NHMRC on responses received.

Privacy and confidentiality

After the final document Road Map 3 is released, submissions may be made publicly available via the NHMRC online public consultation portal, unless they have been requested NOT to be published.

How to make your submission

Provide a submission by response to the above questions using the submission form provided below, and email through to NHMRCroadmap3@nousgroup.com.au. (link sends e-mail)

Contact for further information:

Samantha Faulkner, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Adviser

Email: Samantha.faulkner@nhmrc.gov.au (link sends e-mail

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NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health : @DoctorBoffa Meningococcal epidemic targeting Indigenous youth in NT ‘must be taken seriously’

” We need all young people to take this very seriously, visit their local health services and be immunised immediately to stop the spread.

This is a really serious disease, it’s a major outbreak. It’s the biggest Australia has ever seen and its confined to Indigenous children under the age of 10…We need all young people to take this very seriously, visit their local health services and be immunised immediately to stop the spread,”

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, Alice Springs, NT Chief Medical Officer Public Health,  Dr John Boffa has urged everyone in the community to take this epidemic very seriously.

He says Aboriginal community controlled health services and NT government clinics were doing well to stop the spread of the virus but warns parents and Indigenous youth that the correct early prevention steps must be taken

 Dr Boffa says the results of this epidemic “highlights the extreme inequality between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in the NT.” He says the NT is desperate for more hands-on help to look after people impacted by the disease.

“We urgently need extra help! We need more nurses throughout the territory. If there are any nurses who want work as locums they should contact the central Australia Aboriginal congress in Alice Springs or send me an email, we want your help!”

Pictures Above Nick Hose : Meningococcal outbreak worries families in Central Australia:

Photo 1 : Vanessa Smith is making sure her three grandchildren are vaccinated against meningococcal

Photo 2 Geraldine Ashby is a remote nurse in Santa Teresa, and a parent

The meningococcal disease outbreak continues to hit Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people living in Central Australia, the Barkly, Katherine and Katherine West regions.

Originally Published here with the assistance of NACCHO

This year alone has seen 25 confirmed cases of the W strain, a rapid jump from only three cases last year. All cases have affected only Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. To make matters worse, 19 of those cases have been recorded as children younger than the age of 10.

WHAT IS MENINGOCOCCAL?

A rare, life-threatening illness caused by bacterial infection of the blood and/or the membranes that line the spinal cord and brain and occasionally infect other sites, such as large joints.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Fever, neck stiffness, headache, difficulty looking at bright lights, vomiting, diarrhoea, sore muscles or joints, drowsiness or a rash. Babies may refuse food and drink and have a high pitched cry.

HOW IS IT TREATED?

* With antibiotics, but the infection can progress very quickly, so seeking medical attention urgently is vital to survival.

This week, a mass vaccination program is being rolled out in the affected regions. Coordinated by the NT Centers for Disease Control (CDC), government and non-government health services, including Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations will be able to offer NT Health funded vaccines.

A free vaccine will be offered to all Indigenous people aged between 12 months and 19 years, living in remote communities. Aboriginal people aged between 12 months and 19 years living in Alice Springs, Tennant Creek and Katherine will also have access to the vaccine.

People are also able to pay for the vaccine at their local doctor. There are two vaccines available – one costs $49 while the other is $118 and authorities have advised that ‘the cheaper one is just as effective’.

Photo: Six-year-old Rexena awaits her vaccination against the disease. (ABC News: Nick Hose)

After working in the public health communal disease sector for nearly 30 years, Mr Boffa, speaking on behalf of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, has urged for action to be taken as soon as possible in the NT, such as changes to the national child immunisation schedule.

“This epidemic means plans need to be sped up so we’ll have populational protection through routine immunisation of children.”

Dr Boffa says Aboriginal community controlled health services and NT government clinics were doing well to stop the spread of the virus.

“The positive thing is the health system has diagnosed people early, gotten them to hospital and out of the 25 cases in the NT so far, We’ve been able to pick them up quickly and get them effectively treated.”

Dr Boffa warns parents and Indigenous youth that the correct early prevention steps must be taken.

“The disease presents differently and is hard to clearly identify – which is why any sick child with a fever needs to be assessed and get to their local clinic to be checked,” he said.

“If you have a late diagnosis, late being you only miss it by 24 hours, it can kill you.”

 

Meningococcal disease is an uncommon but very serious disease. It is treatable with antibiotics but the infection can progress very quickly. It’s important for people to be aware of the symptoms and to seek medical advice early for either themselves or their children if they have any concerns.

 

 

Aboriginal #MentalHealthWeek @GregHuntMP launches 5th National #MentalHealth and #SuicidePrevention Plan

 

” For the first time this plan commits all governments to work together to achieve integration in planning and service delivery at a regional level. Importantly it demands that consumers and carers are central to the way in which services are planned, delivered and evaluated.

Furthermore this plan recognises the tragic impact of suicide on the lives of so many Australians and sets a clear direction for coordinated actions by both levels of government to more effectively address this important public issue.

This plan is also the first to specifically outline an agreed set of actions to address social and emotional wellbeing, mental illness and suicide amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as a priority, as well as being the first to elevate the importance of addressing the physical health needs of people who live with mental illness and reducing the stigma and discrimination that accompanies mental illness.”

The Hon Jill HennessyChair, COAG Health Council

” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership in mental health services is fundamental to building culturally capable models of care. Governance, planning processes, systems and clinical pathways will be more effective if they include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workers at key points in the consumer journey, such as assessment, admission, case conferencing, discharge planning and development of mental health care plans.

Strong ACCHSs are an important component of a culturally responsive mental health service system.

These organisations can play a vital role in:

  1. prevention and early intervention to address risk of developing mental health problems
  2. enabling access to primary and specialist mental health services and allied health
  3. facilitating the transition of consumers across the primary and specialist/acute interface
  4. connecting consumers with the range of community-based social support services
  5. working with mainstream community mental health and hospital services to enhance cultural capability through provision of cultural mentorship, advice and training placements for non-Indigenous staff
  6. working as part of multi-agency and multidisciplinary teams aimed at delivering shared care arrangements.

Building a culturally competent service system also requires a well-supported Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health workforce.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health workers require opportunities and support to attain advanced qualifications and recruitment and retention processes that maximise opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and workforces should be complemented by mainstream services and clinicians that are responsive to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

From Page 30 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 

Download 84 page Plan PDF HERE

 Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan

Health Minister Greg Hunt Press Release 14 October

Around four million Australians who experience a mental health condition will benefit from a strengthened mental health system under the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan.

The Plan, which was endorsed in August by all health ministers at Council of Australian Governments Health Council, has been released as Mental Health Week comes to a close

The Turnbull Government is committed to ensuring people with mental health challenges get the support and treatment they need and this Plan will see a more coordinated national approach to mental health from all governments and stakeholders.

More than 2,800 Australians take their lives each year and the Plan will provide an additional focus of suicide prevention.

Evidence-based approaches and strategies to prevent suicide will be implemented through a community-wide approach, including more effective follow-up support for people who have attempted to take their own lives.

The Turnbull Government recently committed $47 million for more frontline services for suicide prevention.

Last week as part of our over $4 billion annual investment in mental health we launched the Head to Health website, which is a one-stop shop for services and resources delivered by some of Australia’s most trusted mental health service providers.

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealthDay : Australia’s new digital #mentalhealth gateway now live

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealthDay 2/2 @KenWyattMP Minister Scullion : Download Building a Better Understanding of Aboriginal Social and Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health

And yesterday the Turnbull Government announced a wide ranging package of reforms to make private health insurance simpler and more affordable for Australians, including better access for mental health services without a waiting period.

A particular focus of the Plan is addressing eating disorders. These can have a catastrophic impact on both individuals and their families. It will be a personal priority as we frame further policy in the future.

The Plan includes eight nationally agreed priority areas and 32 coordinated actions for the next five years with a view to achieving an integrated mental health system.

What will we do?

From Page 3o + Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 

Action 10 Governments will work with PHNs and LHNs to implement integrated planning and service delivery for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples at the regional level. This will include:

  1. engaging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the co-design of all aspects of regional planning and service delivery
  2. collaborating with service providers regionally to improve referral pathways between GPs, ACCHSs, social and emotional wellbeing services, alcohol and other drug services and mental health services, including improving opportunities for screening of mental and physical wellbeing at all points; connect culturally informed suicide prevention and postvention services locally and identify programs and services that support survivors of the Stolen Generation
  3. developing mechanisms and agreements that enable shared patient information, with informed consent, as a key enabler of care coordination and service integration
  4. clarifying roles and responsibilities across the health and community support service sectors
  5. ensuring that there is strong presence of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership on local mental health service and related area service governance structures.

Action 11 Governments will establish an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Subcommittee of MHDAPC, as identified in the Governance section of this Fifth Plan, that will set future directions for planning and investment and:

  1. provide advice to support the development of a nationally agreed approach to suicide prevention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for inclusion in the National Suicide Prevention Implementation Strategy
  2. provide advice on models for co-located or flexible service arrangements that promote social and emotional wellbeing incorporating factors, including a person’s connection to country, spirituality, ancestry, kinship and community
  3. identify innovative strategies, such as the use of care navigators and single care plans, to improve service integration, support continuity of care across health service settings and connect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with community-based social support (non-health) services
  4. provide advice on suitable governance for services and the most appropriate distribution of roles and responsibilities, recognising that the right of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to self-determination lies at the heart of community control in the provision of health services
  5. oversee the development, dissemination and promotion in community, hospital and custodial settings of a resource that articulates a model of culturally competent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health care across the health care continuum and brings together (a) the holistic concept of social and emotional wellbeing and (b) mainstream notions of stepped care, trauma-informed care and recovery-oriented practice
  6. provide advice on workforce development initiatives that can grow and support an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health workforce, incorporate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff into multidisciplinary teams and improve access to cultural healers
  7. provide advice on models of service delivery that embed cultural capability into all aspects of clinical care and implement the Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2016–2026 in mental health services
  8. provide advice on culturally appropriate digital service delivery and strategies to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to register for My Health Record and to understand the benefits of shared data.

Action 12 Governments will improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander access to, and experience with, mental health and wellbeing services in collaboration with ACCHSs and other service providers by:

12.1. developing and distributing a compendium of resources that includes (a) best-practice examples of effective Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health care, (b) culturally safe and appropriate education materials and resources to support self-management of mental illness and enhance mental health literacy and (c) culturally appropriate clinical tools and resources to facilitate effective assessment and to improve service experiences and outcomes

12.2. increasing knowledge of social and emotional wellbeing concepts, improving the cultural competence and capability of mainstream providers and promoting the use of culturally appropriate assessment and care planning tools and guidelines

12.3. recognising and promoting the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership and supporting implementation of the Gayaa Dhuwi (Proud Spirit) Declaration (Appendix B)

12.4. training all staff delivering mental health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, particularly those in forensic settings, in trauma-informed care that incorporates historical, cultural and contemporary experiences of trauma.

Action 13 Governments will strengthen the evidence base needed to improve mental health services and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples through:

13.1. establishing a clearinghouse of resources, tools and program evaluations for all settings to support the development of culturally safe models of service delivery, including the use of cultural healing and trauma-informed care

13.2. ensuring that all mental health services work to improve the quality of identification of Indigenous peoples in their information systems through the use of appropriate standards and business processes

13.3. ensuring that future investments are properly evaluated to inform what works

13.4. reviewing existing datasets across all settings for improved data collection on the mental health and wellbeing of, and the prevalence of mental illness in, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

13.5. utilising available health services data and enhancing those collections to improve services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

How will we know things are different?

What will be different for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consumers and carers?

  • Both your clinical and social and emotional wellbeing needs, and the needs of your community, will be addressed when care is planned and delivered.
  • Your care will be coordinated, and you will be supported to navigate the health system.
  • You will receive culturally appropriate care.
  • Services will actively follow up with you if you are at a higher risk of suicide, including after a suicide attempt.
  • If you are at risk of suicide, you will have timely access to support and be clear about which services in your area are responsible for providing you with care and support.

Press Release Continued

A key priority area is strengthening regional integration of mental health services to support more effective treatments for those in need.

In partnership with consumers and carers, Primary Health Networks and Local Hospital Networks will plan and design mental health services to meet specific local needs.

An implementation plan has been developed to guide and monitor implementation efforts of governments.

Improving the mental health system and outcomes for people with mental illness can only be done in partnership with the community, sector and all governments.

For people looking for mental health and suicide prevention support, I encourage them to visit the newly launched Head to Health website.