NACCHO Aboriginal Health #RUOKDay : Download @RACGP Report underlines crucial role of GPs in #mentalhealthcare

“With a shortage of psychologists and other mental health professionals in rural and remote areas, the role of rural doctors in providing mental healthcare is already absolutely critical, and is becoming more so.

“Feedback from many rural and remote doctors backs up the findings in today’s RACGP report — namely, that there is a significant mental healthcare load in general practice.

“And this area of general practice care is growing.

“Many rural doctors already undertake additional upskilling in advanced mental healthcare.”

President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), Dr Ewen McPhee

Download a PDF Copy of report

Health-of-the-Nation-2017-report

Read over 150 Aboriginal Mental Health Articles published over the past 5 years by NACCHO

A major report released today on general practice care in Australia shows that the most frequent visits to GPs are for psychological care, demonstrating that the sector plays a critical role in helping patients with their mental health as well as physical health.

The report, General Practice: Health of the Nation, is the first of what will be an annual insight into the state of general practice in Australia, published by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP).

Dr Ewen McPhee continued

“And under the National Rural Generalist Pathway that the Federal Government is progressing, medical graduates training as Rural Generalist doctors will be able to undertake advanced mental healthcare as a key element of their training, alongside other advanced skills.

“Earlier this year, we also welcomed an announcement by the Federal Government that, from November, it will increase access for rural and remote Australians to Medicare-rebated psychological care delivered by video consultations.

“Under the change, psychologists will be able to deliver up to 7 of the currently available 10 face-to-face sessions accessed through a General Practitioner. The rebates for these sessions have previously only been available if provided by a GP.

“This change will help to significantly improve access to tele-psychology services for many rural and remote Australians and the Government deserves full credit for implementing it.”

RDAA has supported concerns raised by the RACGP, however, that despite the fact that over 85% of the Australian population visits their GP each year, the general practice sector receives only 5% of the total annual health budget.

“This should be sending significant warning bells to governments” Dr McPhee said.

“Given the reliance that Australians have on general practice for their primary care — and the ability of investment in general practice to generate significant budget savings by reducing hospital admissions — it is clear that additional investment in general practice needs to be made, sooner rather than later.”

Consumers Health Forum MEDIA RELEASE :

The finding that psychological issues are a leading reason patients see GPs highlights the importance of the GPs’ role as the first base for health concerns in the community.

The Health of the Nation report released by the Royal Australian College of GPs today reveals mental health issues like depression and anxiety are among the most common ailments reported by 61 per cent of GPs.

“That is a disturbingly high figure.  It is also the issue causing GPs most concern for the future,” the CEO of the Consumers Health Forum, Leanne Wells, said.

The next most commonly mentioned as emerging issues by GPs are obesity and diabetes.  The prevalence of these conditions, all of which raise complex challenges for the most skilled GP, underlines the need for a well-coordinated and integrated health system in the community.

“The Consumers Health Forum recognises the GP as the pivotal figure in primary health care who needs more support through such measures as the Government’s Health Care Homes, initiating more integrated care of those with chronic and complex conditions.

“At a recent Consumers Roundtable meeting with Health Minister, Greg Hunt, we set out priorities for a National Health Plan to strengthen Australia’s primary health system, making it more consumer-centred, prevention-oriented and integrated with hospital and social care.

“We also called for more investment in health systems research, shaped by consumer and community priorities, to stimulate services that reflect advances in health sciences and knowledge.

Too often Australians, particularly those with chronic illness, are confounded by our fragmented health system.

We have world class health practitioners and hospitals. But these are disconnected so that patients don’t get the comprehensive top-quality care that should be routine.

“Investing in primary health care led by GPs is the way to a better performing and more consumer-responsive health system,” Ms Wells said.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : 2016 CENSUS of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders launched

In 2016, there were 649,171 people identified as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin in the Census.

Of these people, 91% (590,056 people) were of Aboriginal origin only, 5% (32,345 people) were of Torres Strait Islander origin only and 4% (26,767 people) identified as being of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin.

See Full ABS Data here

 ” The number of Aboriginal Australians living in NSW and Victoria has doubled since 2001, figures released by the Bureau of Statistics show, far outpacing the growth in the non-Indigenous population of both states.

In NSW, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders has increased from 120,000 in 2001 to 216,000 in 2016 while in Victoria the numbers have almost doubled from 25,000 to 47,000. ”

See Part 2 below for Article in full Census 2016: Indigenous population in NSW and Victoria doubles

These proportions have changed very little in the last ten year period (see Data Cube 3, Table 3b).

In the Northern Territory, just under 25% of the population identified as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin in the 2016 Census. In all other jurisdictions, 5% or less of the population were of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin. Victoria had the lowest proportion at 0.8% of the state total.

When a response to the Indigenous status question in the Census was not provided, a response of ‘not stated’ is recorded. When these people are excluded from the total population, the proportion of those identifying as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander increases slightly (between 0.1 and 0.3 percentage points) in all states and territories, with the exception of the Northern Territory which increases by 2.8 percentage points (see Data Cube 3, Table 3a).

 

Census Counts(a) by Indigenous status — State/Territory, 2016


Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander
Non-Indigenous
Not stated
Total
Aboriginal
and TSI

State/Territory
Count of Persons
Proportion of Persons (%)
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Proportion of Persons (%)

New South Wales
216 176
33.3
6 826 286
437 762
7 480 228
2.9
Victoria
47 788
7.4
5 532 275
346 563
5 926 624
0.8
Queensland
186 482
28.7
4 211 020
305 685
4 703 193
4.0
South Australia
34 184
5.3
1 557 001
85 464
1 676 653
2.0
Western Australia
75 978
11.7
2 237 541
160 891
2 474 410
3.1
Tasmania
23 572
3.6
455 137
31 255
509 965
4.6
Northern Territory
58 248
9.0
147 327
23 257
228 833
25.5
Australian Capital Territory
6 508
1.0
370 748
20 143
397 397
1.6

Total Australia(b)
649 171
100.0
21 341 231
1 411 491
23 401 892
2.8

(a) Usual residence, excludes overseas visitors.
(b) Includes Other Territories, comprising Jervis Bay Territory, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Christmas Island and Norfolk Island, Migratory-Offshore-Shipping, and No Usual Address.
Note: Please note that there are small random adjustments made to all cell values to protect the confidentiality of data. These adjustments may cause the sum of rows or columns to differ by small amounts from table totals. For further information see Census of Population and Housing: Census Dictionary, 2016 (cat. no. 2901.0).

CAPITAL CITIES AND REST OF STATE

In the 2016 Census, just over one-third (35%) of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population lived in Capital City areas. States with relatively high proportions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Capital Cities include South Australia (54%) and Victoria (50%). In contrast, 78% of the population who identified as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin in the Northern Territory lived outside the Capital City area. Likewise, in Queensland, 71% of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population lived outside of the Capital City area.

Census Counts(a) by Indigenous Status — Capital City and Rest of State, 2016


Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander
Non-Indigenous
Not stated
Total
Proportion of
Persons

Capital City/Rest of State
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Count of Persons
Proportion of Persons (%)

New South Wales (NSW)
Greater Sydney
70 135
4 493 490
260 364
4 823 991
32.4
Rest of State
145 189
2 322 911
175 436
2 643 536
67.2
No Usual Address
839
9 528
1 916
12 288
0.4
Total NSW
216 176
6 826 286
437 762
7 480 228
100
Victoria (Vic)
Greater Melbourne
24 062
4 215 761
245 390
4 485 211
50.4
Rest of State
23 444
1 310 270
100 103
1 433 818
49.1
No Usual Address
279
6 219
1 069
7 565
0.6
Total Vic
47 788
5 532 275
346 563
5 926 624
100
Queensland (Qld)
Greater Brisbane
54 158
2 093 128
123 517
2 270 800
29.0
Rest of State
131 520
2 107 878
180 324
2 419 724
70.5
No Usual Address
799
9 886
1 827
12 510
0.4
Total Qld
186 482
4 211 020
305 685
4 703 193
100
South Australia (SA)
Greater Adelaide
18 403
1 216 624
60 689
1 295 714
53.8
Rest of State
15 530
338 096
24 445
378 074
45.4
No Usual Address
249
2 279
328
2 863
0.7
Total SA
34 184
1 557 001
85 464
1 676 653
100
Western Australia (WA)
Greater Perth
31 214
1 801 031
111 612
1 943 858
41.1
Rest of State
44 169
431 657
48 341
524 167
58.1
No Usual Address
587
4 497
867
5 950
0.8
Total WA
75 978
2 237 541
160 891
2 474 410
100
Tasmania (Tas)
Greater Hobart
8 534
201 462
12 351
222 356
36.2
Rest of State
14 983
252 850
18 791
286 627
63.6
No Usual Address
55
755
104
912
0.2
Total Tas
23 572
455 137
31 255
509 965
100
Northern Territory (NT)
Greater Darwin
11 960
110 004
14 862
136 828
20.5
Rest of Territory
45 590
35 862
7 998
89 443
78.3
No Usual Address
696
1 402
387
2 489
1.2
Total NT
58 248
147 327
23 257
228 833
100
Australian Capital Territory (ACT)
Australian Capital Territory
6 476
370 297
20 084
396 857
99.5
No Usual Address
33
454
62
538
0.5
Total ACT
6 508
370 748
20 143
397 397
100

Total Australia(b)
649 171
21 341 231
1 411 491
23 401 892

(a) Usual residence, excludes overseas visitors.
(b) Includes Other Territories, comprising Jervis Bay Territory, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Christmas Island and Norfolk Island, and Migratory-Offshore-Shipping, and No Usual Address.
Note: Please note that there are small random adjustments made to all cell values to protect the confidentiality of data. These adjustments may cause the sum of rows or columns to differ by small amounts from table totals. For further information see Census of Population and Housing: Census Dictionary, 2016 (cat. no. 2901.0).

AGE PROFILE

In the 2016 Census, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population had a younger age distribution than the non-Indigenous population, reflecting higher fertility and lower life expectancy – a trend consistent with 2011 Census results. In 2016, the median age (the age at which half the population is older and half the population is younger) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was 23 years (up from 21 years in 2011), compared with 38 years for non-Indigenous people (up from 37 years in 2011). The Northern Territory had the highest median age for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in both 2011 and 2016 (23 years and 25 years respectively). In 2016, New South Wales and Queensland had the lowest median age (22 years). For 2011 age profiles, see Census of Population and Housing – Counts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, 2011 (cat. no. 2075.0).

Nationally, just over one-third of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people counted in the 2016 Census were under 15 years of age (34%), while 5% were aged 65 years and over. The age profile of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait population varied only slightly between the states and territories. Queensland had the highest proportion of children aged under 15 years (35%). Tasmania had the highest proportion of older persons aged 65 years and over (6%).

Census Counts(a) — Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by State/Territory and Age, 2016


Total Persons
Persons aged 0-14 years
Persons aged 15-64 years
Persons aged 65 years and over
Median age

State/Territory
Count of Persons
Proportion of Persons (%)
Proportion of Persons (%)
Proportion of Persons (%)
Years

New South Wales
216 176
34.4
60.3
5.4
22
Victoria
47 788
33.3
61.5
5.3
23
Queensland
186 482
35.4
60.2
4.4
22
South Australia
34 184
33.4
62.0
4.6
23
Western Australia
75 978
33.4
62.4
4.2
23
Tasmania
23 572
33.0
60.8
6.2
24
Northern Territory
58 248
30.0
66.2
3.8
25
Australian Capital Territory
6 508
31.2
65.5
3.1
23

Total Australia(b)
649 171
34.0
61.3
4.8
23

(a) Usual residence, excludes overseas visitors.
(b) Includes Other Territories, comprising Jervis Bay Territory, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Christmas Island and Norfolk Island, and Migratory-Offshore-Shipping, and No Usual Address.
Note: Please note that there are small random adjustments made to all cell values to protect the confidentiality of data. These adjustments may cause the sum of rows or columns to differ by small amounts from table totals. For further information see Census of Population and Housing: Census Dictionary, 2016 (cat. no. 2901.0).

Part2 : Census 2016: Indigenous population in NSW and Victoria doubles

The number of Aboriginal Australians living in NSW and Victoria has doubled since 2001, figures released by the Bureau of Statistics show, far outpacing the growth in the non-Indigenous population of both states.

Originally published HERE

In NSW, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders has increased from 120,000 in 2001 to 216,000 in 2016 while in Victoria the numbers have almost doubled from 25,000 to 47,000.

The Indigenous population is growing – rapidly,” Australian National University associate professor Nicholas Biddle and research fellow Francis Markham told the ANU’s Centre for Economic Policy Research on Friday.

Over the same period the non-indigenous population has grown by between 15 and 20 per cent in NSW and Victoria.

“Apart from the higher fertility rate of Indigenous Australians there is pretty strong evidence for there being a larger number of people who previously weren’t being counted,” said Dr Biddle.

“Part of it is the census getting better at counting the population, and part of it is people being more comfortable identifying themselves to a census collector.”

Nationally, there are now 650,000 Indigenous Australians, according to the updated 2016 Census figures released by the bureau on Thursday, which also show the suburbs with the highest and lowest proportion of Aboriginal residents.

In NSW, the lower North-Shore has just 0.2 per cent of residents identifying as Aboriginal compared to the state average of 1.4 per cent. In Sydney’s east, at 6.6 per cent, La Perouse has the highest rate among Indigenous areas identified in the Sydney city region.

In Victoria, the Melbourne areas of Bayside and Glen Eira have the lowest proportion of Aboriginal residents at 0.2 per cent. The Mornington Peninsula has the Melbourne area’s highest at 1.3 per cent.

While more Aboriginal Australians are moving to urban areas, the majority are staying on city fringes. There are now more than 9000 Indigenous Australians in Blacktown in Sydney’s west and more than 2800 located across Northcote, Preston and Whittlesea in Melbourne.

Dr Biddle said these areas also have high rates of mixed parentage, where Indigenous males and females have a non-indigenous partner causing the rate of the population that identifies as Aboriginal to increase.

“That is kind of what you expect if you have a population that makes up 1 or 2 per cent. The chances of your partner having the same ethnicity as you is relatively low.”

The number of people identifying as Indigenous has significant implications for government policy. The Commonwealth Grants Commission allocates a small share of more than $50 billion in GST revenue to states for Indigenous funding on the basis of the census figures.

Nikita Rotumah and Ben Clark work at one of the few remaining Aboriginal youth outreach centre in the Melbourne city area.

“All the services are under resourced,” said their manager Troy Austin, who has run the Aboriginal Youth Sport and Recreation Co-Operative in Fitzroy for the past three years.

“A lot of the organisations have moved out of the inner city as the community goes out to where housing is more affordable.”

He said while more and more people are identifying as Indigenous that has not translated to greater resources.

“People are becoming more aware of the number of services that you have to have your Aboriginality confirmation for,” he said. “Maybe someone who wasn’t getting services before can now get them.”

“There was a period where it was safer for someone to not poke your head up and say you were Aboriginal, now there is a lot more pride and also a lot more awareness,” he said. “That’s a good thing.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : New #census release : Number of @IndigenousX has jumped by 18 per cent since 2011 to 649,171

The first results of the 2016 Census of Population and Housing, released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) today, show that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples represented 2.8 per cent of the population counted in the 2016 Census – up from 2.5 per cent in 2011, and 2.3 per cent in 2006.

Download this press release 2016 Census Press Release

Graphics below SBS TV and NITV

Of the 649,200 people who reported being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin in 2016, 91 per cent were of Aboriginal origin, 5 per cent were of Torres Strait Islander origin, and 4.1 per cent reported being of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin.

While the Northern Territory has Australia’s highest proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (25.5 per cent of the NT population), New South Wales is home to the highest number, with more than 216,000 people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin.

The Census also revealed the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is younger than Australia’s overall population, with a median age 23 years in 2016. This is substantially younger than the median age for non-Indigenous Australians, who had a median age of 38 years in 2016.

There have been increases in income levels within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population since the 2011 Census, with median weekly household income increasing from $991 to $1,203.

One in ten Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported speaking an Australian Indigenous language at home in the 2016 Census. A total of 150 Australian Indigenous languages were spoken in homes in 2016, reflecting the linguistic diversity of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

Australian Statistician David W. Kalisch said Census data is high quality, thanks to the participation of Australians.

“The Independent Assurance Panel I established to provide extra assurance and transparency of Census data quality concluded that the 2016 Census data can be used with confidence,” Mr Kalisch said.

“The 2016 Census had a response rate of 95.1 per cent and a net undercount of 1.0 per cent. This is a quality result, comparable to both previous Australian Censuses and Censuses in other countries, such as New Zealand, Canada, and the United Kingdom. 2

“Furthermore, 63 per cent of people completed the Census online, embracing the digital-first approach and contributing to faster data processing and data quality improvements.

“2016 Census data provides a detailed, accurate and fascinating picture of Australia, which will be used to inform critical policy, planning and service delivery decisions for our communities over the coming years,” he said.

Census data is available free online. Use one of our easy tools such as QuickStats and Community Profiles to access the latest data for your area or topic of interest.

For more information on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, please see a data summary here.

You can also attend one of our free Seminars. To find out more about Census Data Seminar series, or to register, go to the ABS website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

2016

 

2011

Total Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population 649,200 548,400
% of total Australian Population 2.8% 2.5%
Median age 23 21
Sex
Male 322,171 (49.6%) 270,333 (49.3%)
Female 326,996 (50.4%) 278,039 (50.7%)
State of residence
NSW 216,176 172,625
QLD 186,482 155,826
WA 75,978 69,664
NT 58,248 56,779
VIC 47,788 37,992
SA 34,184 30,432
TAS 23,572 19,625
ACT 6,508 5,184
Languages spoken at home (other than English) %
1. Arnhem Land and Daly River Region Languages 16.1% 18.2%
2. Torres Strait Island Languages 11.7% 11.0%
3. Western Desert Languages 11.1% 14.0%
4. Yolngu Matha 10.6% 11.2%
Median household income (weekly) $1,203 $991

Aboriginal Health : Second Atlas of Healthcare Variation highlights higher Aboriginal hospitalisation rates for all 18 clinical conditions

 

“The report, compiled by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, shows us that high hospitalisation rates often point to inadequate primary care in the community, leading to higher rates of potentially preventative hospitalization

The most disturbing example of this  has been the higher hospitalisation rates for all of the 18 clinical conditions surveyed experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, people living in areas of relative socioeconomic disadvantage and those living in remote areas.

 Chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson who is a member of the Atlas Advisory Group.

 “Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Please note

  • Features of the second Atlas include: Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status

DOWNLOAD Key-findings-and-recommendations

Mr Martin Bowles Secretary Dept of Health  launches the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation

A new report showing dramatic differences in treatment rates around Australia signals a pressing need for reforms to ensure equitable access to appropriate health care for all Australians, the Consumers Health Forum, says.

“A seven-fold difference in hospitalisation for heart failure and a 15-fold difference for a serious chronic respiratory disease depending on place of residence, are among many findings of substantial variations in treatment rates in Australia revealed in the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation,” the chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson, said.

“While there are a variety of factors contributing to these differences,  the variation in health and treatment outcomes is, as the report states, an ‘alarm bell’ that should make us stop and investigate whether appropriate care is being delivered.

“These findings show that recommended care for chronic diseases is not always provided.  Even with the significant funding provided through Medicare to better coordinate primary care for people with chronic and complex conditions, fragmented health services contribute to suboptimal management, as the report states.

“We support the report’s recommendation for a stronger primary health system that would provide a clinical ‘home base’ for coordination of patient care and in which patients and carers are activated to develop their knowledge and confidence to manage their health with the aid of a healthcare team.

“The Atlas provides further robust reasons for federal, state and territory governments to act on the demonstrated need for a more effective primary health system that will ensure better and more cost effective care for all Australians.

“The Atlas also examined  variations in women’s health care, and its findings included a seven-fold difference in rates of hysterectomy and  21-fold  difference in rates of endometrial ablation.  The report states that rates of hysterectomy and caesarean sections in Australia are higher than reported rates in other developed nations.  These results highlight the need for continuing support and information on women’s health issues,” Mr Lawson said.

The Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation (second Atlas) paints a picture of marked variation in the use of 18 clinical areas (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications) across Australia.

This Atlas, the second to be released by the Commission, illuminates variation by mapping use of health care according to where people live.  As well, this Atlas identifies specific achievable actions for exploration and quality improvement.

The second Atlas includes interventions not covered in the first Atlas, such as hospitalisations for chronic diseases and caesarean section in younger women. It also builds on the findings from the first Atlas – for example, examining hysterectomy and endometrial ablation separately, and examining rates of cataract surgery using a different dataset.

Priority areas for investigation and action arising from the second Atlas include use of:

  • Hysterectomy and endometrial ablation
  • Chronic conditions (COPD, diabetes complications)
  • Knee replacement.

Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Healthcare Variation – what does it tell us

Some variation is expected and associated with need-related factors such as underlying differences in the health of specific populations, or personal preferences. However, the weight of evidence in Australia and internationally suggests that much of the variation documented in the Atlas is likely to be unwarranted. Understanding this variation is critical to improving the quality, value and appropriateness of health care.

View the second Atlas

The second Atlas, released in June 2017, examined four clinical themes: chronic disease and infection – potentially preventable hospitalisations, cardiovascular, women’s health and maternity, and surgical interventions.

Key findings and recommendations for action are available here.

View the maps and download the data using the interactive platform.

What does the Atlas measure?

The second Atlas shows rates of use of healthcare interventions (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications,) in geographical areas across Australia.  The rate is then age and sex standardised to allow comparisons between populations with different age and sex structures. All rates are based on the patient’s place of residence, not the location of the hospital or health service.

The second Atlas uses data from national databases to explore variation across different healthcare settings. These included the National Hospital Morbidity Database and the AIHW National Perinatal Data Collection.

Who has developed the second Atlas?

The Commission worked with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) on the second Atlas.

The Commission consulted widely with the Australian government, state and territory governments, specialist medical colleges, clinicians and consumer representatives to develop the second Atlas.

Features of the second Atlas include:

  • Greater involvement of clinicians during all stages of development
  • Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status
  • Analysis of data by patient funding status (public or private).

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Chronic disease and infection: potentially preventable hospitalisations

1.1 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
1.2 Heart failure
1.3 Cellulitis
1.4 Kidney and urinary tract infections
1.5 Diabetes complications

Chapter 2 Cardiovascular conditions

2.1 Acute myocardial infarction admissions
2.2 Atrial fibrillation

Chapter 3 Women’s health and maternity

3.1 Hysterectomy
3.2 Endometrial ablation
3.3 Cervical loop excision or cervical laser ablation
3.4 Caesarean section, ages 20 to 34 years
3.5 Third- and fourth-degree perineal tear

Chapter 4 Surgical interventions

4.1 Knee replacement
4.2 Lumbar spinal decompression
4.3 Lumbar spinal fusion
4.4 Laparoscopic cholecystectomy
4.5 Appendicectomy
4.6 Cataract surgery
Technical Supplement
About the Atlas
Glossary

Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation data set specifications are available at http://meteor.aihw.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/674758

 

NACCHO #ABS Aboriginal Health Report : Indigenous Australians consuming too much added sugar

 sugary-drink
 

In 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2 years and over consumed an average of 75 grams of free sugars per day (equivalent to 18 teaspoons of white sugar)1. Added sugars made up the majority of free sugar intakes with an average of 68 grams (or 16 teaspoons) consumed and an additional 7 grams of free sugars came from honey and fruit juice.

ABS Report abs-indigenous-consumption-of-added-sugars

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consume around 14 per cent of their total energy intake as free sugars, according to data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that free sugars contribute less than 10 per cent of total energy intake.

Director of Health, Louise Gates, said the new ABS report showed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are consuming an average of 18 teaspoons (or 75 grams) of free sugars per day (almost two cans of soft drink), four teaspoons more than non-Indigenous people (14 teaspoons or 60 grams).

OTHER KEY FINDINGS

    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people derived an average of 14% of their daily energy from free sugars, exceeding the WHO recommendation that children and adults should limit their intake of free sugars to less than 10% of dietary energy.
    • Free sugars made the greatest contribution to energy intakes among older children and young adults. For example, teenage boys aged 14-18 years derived 18 per cent of their dietary energy from free sugars as they consumed the equivalent of 25 teaspoons (106 grams) of free sugars per day. This amount is equivalent to more than two and a half cans of soft drink. Women aged 19-30 years consumed 21 teaspoons (87 grams) of free sugars, which contributed 17 per cent to their total energy intake.
    • The majority (87%) of free sugars were consumed from energy dense, nutrient-poor ‘discretionary’ foods and beverages. Two thirds (67%) of all free sugars consumed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people came from beverages, led by soft drinks, sports and energy drinks (28%), followed by fruit and vegetable juices and drinks (12%), cordials (9.5%), and sugars added to beverages such as tea and coffee (9.4%), alcoholic beverages (4.9%) and milk beverages (3.4%).
    • Intakes were higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in non-remote areas where the average consumption was 78 grams (18.5 teaspoons), around 3 teaspoons (12 grams) higher than people living in remote areas (65 grams or 15.5 teaspoons).
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed 15 grams (almost 4 teaspoons) more free sugars on average than non-Indigenous people. Beverages were the most common source of free sugars for both populations, however Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people derived a higher proportion of free sugars from beverages than non-Indigenous people (67% compared with 51%).

ENDNOTES

1 A level teaspoon of white sugar contains 4.2 grams of sugar.

sugary-drink-infographic

“Free sugars include the sugars added by consumers in preparing foods and beverages plus the added sugars in manufactured foods, as well as honey and the sugar naturally present in fruit juice,” said Ms Gates.

“The data shows that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in urban areas derived more energy from free sugars than those living in remote areas (14 per cent compared with 13 per cent).”

Free sugars contributed 18 per cent to dietary energy intake for teenage boys aged 14-18 years, who consumed 25 teaspoons (106 grams) of free sugars per day. This amount is equivalent to more than two and a half cans of soft drink.

Women aged 19-30 years consumed 21 teaspoons (87 grams) of free sugars, which contributed 17 per cent to their total energy intake.

“Beverages were the source of two thirds of free sugars, with soft drinks, sports and energy drinks providing 28 per cent, followed by fruit and vegetable juices with 12 per cent, cordials (9.5 per cent), sugars added to beverages such as tea and coffee (9.4 per cent), alcoholic beverages (4.9 per cent) and milk drinks (3.4 per cent),” said Ms Gates.

More details are available in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Consumption of Added Sugars (cat. no. 4727.0.55.009), available for free download from the ABS website, http://www.abs.gov.au.

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This year’s theme: Strengthening Our Future through Self Determination

As you are aware, the  2016 NACCHO Members’ Meeting and Annual General Meeting will be in Melbourne this year 6-8 December

1. Call to action to Present
at the 2016 Members Conference closing 8 November
See below or Download here

2.NACCHO Partnership Opportunities

3. NACCHO Interim 3 day Program has been released

4. The dates are fast approaching – so register today

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alert : #AIHW and Minister Sussan Ley launch #AustraliasHealth2016 report

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 ” A new snapshot of Australia’s health has found we are living longer than ever before, but the rise of chronic disease still presents challenges in achieving equal health outcomes for Indigenous Australians and people living outside metropolitan areas.

Minister for Health Sussan Ley pictured above with Dr Mukesh Haikerwal

Download the Report Here

australias-health-2016

As well as looking at factors influencing individuals’ health, today’s report also examines the health of particular population groups, and shows considerable disparities.

‘For example, while there have been some improvements overall in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians—including falls in smoking rates and infant mortality—Indigenous Australians continue to have a lower life expectancy than non-Indigenous.

Indigenous Australians, at 69.1 years for males and 73.7 for females, more than 10 years shorter than for non-Indigenous Australians,’

Indigenous Australians also continue to have higher rates of many diseases, such as diabetes, end-stage kidney disease and coronary heart disease.”

AIHW Director and CEO Barry Sandison

                     AIHW website Australia’s Health 2016

aus-2016

The Minister today launched the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s (AIHW) publication Australia’s health 2016, which provides an update on the health of Australians and the performance of Australia’s health system.

“Australia’s health 2016 shows us that about 85 per cent of Australians rate their health as good, very good or excellent, which is a testament to the significant investment of the Turnbull Government into the health of our nation, with about one-quarter of total government revenue attributed to health spending,” Minister Ley said.

“Our Government’s priority is to ensure the high performance and sustainability of our health system over the long term. This is why the Turnbull Government is working closely with stakeholders to progress a range of health system reforms.”

Total Commonwealth investment in health will grow to more than $71 billion in 2015-16 and this will increase to $79 billion within four years. The Turnbull Government’s investment in Medicare is at $23 billion per year and this will increase by $4 billion over the next four years.

“The report indicates that health outcomes for Australians have improved over time with life expectancy at an all-time high of 80.3 years for males, while a baby girl could expect to live for 84.4 years. Survival rates for cancer are also improving,” Minister Ley said

Minister Ley said that despite plenty of good news on health in the report, managing chronic conditions and their impact on Australia’s health system remained one of our greatest health challenges.

“The report shows that half of Australians have a chronic disease – such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, diabetes or a mental health disorder – and one-in four have two or more of these conditions,” Minister Ley said.

“This is why our initial investment of almost $120 million in the Health Care Homes initiative is so important. It will help to keep those with chronic conditions healthier and out of hospital. It will give GPs the flexibility and tools they need to design individual care plans for patients with chronic conditions and coordinate care services to support them.

“We recently announced the 10 geographic regions that will deliver Stage One of this important initiative from 1 July next year, and we hope the results will lead more broadly to a better, consumer-focused approach to health care.”

Australia’s health 2016 is available on the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s website.

85 out of 100 Australians say they’re healthy—but are we really? AIHW Press Release

Most Australians consider themselves to be in good health, according to the latest two-yearly report card from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, Australia’s health 2016 is a key information resource, and was launched today byfederal Health Minister, the Hon. Sussan Ley.

AIHW Director and CEO Barry Sandison said the report provided new insights and new ways of understanding the health of Australians.

‘The report shows that Australia has much to be proud of in terms of health,’ he said.

‘We are living longer than ever before, death rates continue to fall, and most of us consider ourselves to be in good health.’

If Australia had a population of just 100 people, 56 would rate their health as ‘excellent’, or ‘very good’ and 29 as ‘good’.

‘However, 19 of us would have a disability, 20 a mental health disorder in the last 12 months, and 50 at least one chronic disease.’

Mr Sandison said the influence of lifestyle factors on a person’s health was a recurring theme of the report. ‘13 out of 100 of us smoke daily, 18 drink alcohol at risky levels, and 95 do not eat the recommended servings of fruit and vegetables.

‘And while 55 do enough physical activity, 63 of us are overweight or obese.’

Mr Sandison said that while lifestyle choices were a major contributor to the development of many chronic diseases, other factors such as our income, education and whether we had a job—known as ‘social determinants’—all affected our health, for better or worse.

‘As a general rule, every step up the socioeconomic ladder is accompanied by an increase in health.

‘Compared with people living in the highest socioeconomic areas, people living in the lowest socioeconomic areas generally live about 3 years less, are 1.6 times as likely to have more than one chronic health condition, and are 3 times as likely to smoke daily.’

As well as looking at factors influencing individuals’ health, today’s report also examines the health of particular population groups, and shows considerable disparities.

‘For example, while there have been some improvements overall in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians—including falls in smoking rates and infant mortality—Indigenous Australians continue to have a lower life expectancy than non-

Indigenous Australians, at 69.1 years for males and 73.7 for females, more than 10 years shorter than for non-Indigenous Australians,’ Mr Sandison said.

Indigenous Australians also continue to have higher rates of many diseases, such as diabetes, end-stage kidney disease and coronary heart disease.

For people living in rural and remote areas, where accessing services can be more difficult, lower life expectancy and higher rates of disease and injury—particularly road accidents— are of concern.

In Australia, health services are delivered by a mix of public and private providers that includes more than 1,300 hospitals and about 385,000 nurses, midwives and medical practitioners.

Of the $155 billion spent on health in 2013–14, $145 billion was recurrent expenditure. Hospitals accounted for 40% of recurrent expenditure ($59 billion), primary health care 38% ($55 billion), with the remaining 22% spent on other health goods and services.

For the first time, the report examines how spending by age for people admitted to hospital has changed over time.

Mr Sandison said the analysis showed that the largest increase in spending between 2004–05 and 2012–13 was for Australians aged 50 and over.

‘This was due to more being spent per person in the population as well as the increased number of people in these age groups.’

Mr Sandison also said that while Australia’s health 2016 provides an excellent overview of Australia’s health at a point in time, there is still scope to expand on the analysis.

New to this edition is information on the changing nature of services provided by publicand private hospitals over the last 10 years; information about how geography affects

Indigenous women’s access to maternal health services; and about the increasing role ofinstitutions such as hospitals and residential aged care in end-of-life care.

‘Good data is essential to inform debate and policy and service delivery decision-making— and improving its quality and availability is at the core of the AIHW’s work.

‘We’re committed to providing meaningful, comprehensive information about Australia’s health and wellbeing—to help create a healthier Australia.’

  • Preliminary material
    • Title and verso pages
    • Contents
    • Preface
    • Acknowledgments
    • Terminology
  • Body section
    • Chapter 1 An overview of Australia’s health
      • Introduction
      • What is health?
      • Australians: who we are
      • How healthy are Australians?
    • Chapter 2 Australia’s health system
      • Introduction
      • How does Australia’s health system work?
      • How much does Australia spend on health care?
      • Who is in the health workforce?
    • Chapter 3 Leading causes of ill health
      • Introduction
      • Burden of disease and injury in Australia
      • Premature mortality
      • Chronic disease and comorbidities
      • Cancer
      • Coronary heart disease
      • Stroke
      • Diabetes
      • Kidney disease
      • Arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions
      • Chronic respiratory conditions
      • Mental health
      • Dementia
      • Injury
      • Oral health
      • Vision and hearing disorders
      • Incontinence
      • Vaccine preventable disease
    • Chapter 4 Determinants of health
      • Introduction
      • Social determinants of health
      • Social determinants of Indigenous health
      • Biomedical risk factors
      • Overweight and obesity
      • Illicit drug use
      • Alcohol risk and harm
      • Tobacco smoking
      • Health behaviours and biomedical risks of Indigenous Australians
    • Chapter 5 Health of population groups
      • Introduction
      • Health across socioeconomic groups
      • Trends and patterns in maternal and perinatal
      • health
      • How healthy are Australia’s children?
      • Health of young Australians
      • Mental health of Australia’s young people and adolescents
      • Health of the very old
      • How healthy are Indigenous Australians?
      • Main contributors to the Indigenous life expectancy gap
      • Health of Australians with disability
      • Health of prisoners in Australia
      • Rural and remote health
    • Chapter 6 Preventing and treating ill health
      • Introduction
      • Prevention and health promotion
      • Cancer screening
      • Primary health care
      • Medicines in the health system
      • Using data to improve the quality of Indigenous health care
      • Indigenous Australians’ access to health services
      • Spatial variation in Indigenous women’s access to maternal health services
      • Overview of hospitals
      • Changes in the provision of hospital care
      • Elective surgery
      • Emergency department care
      • Radiotherapy
      • Organ and tissue donation
      • Safety and quality in Australian hospitals
      • Specialised alcohol and other drug treatment services
      • Mental health services
      • Health care use by older Australians
      • End-of-life care
    • Chapter 7 Indicators of Australia’s health
      • Introduction
      • Indicators of Australia’s health
  • End matter
    • Methods and conventions
    • Symbols
    • Acronyms and abbreviations
    • Glossary
    • Index

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Data : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Health Atlas released

atlas

The Public Health Information Development Unit (PHIDU) has published an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Health Atlas.

This presents a range of demographic, socioeconomic, health outcomes and service use data for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples at the Indigenous Area level.

The  2016 release of the atlas includes updated data for the following:

  • Estimate Resident Population (ERP) data for 2015
  • Projected ERP data for 2016
  • Immunisation data for 2015
  • Deaths data now includes data for 2013

And new hospitalisations data for:

  • Hospitalisations by principal diagnosis and age
  • Ambulatory-sensitive hospitalisations

Maps for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander  Atlas can be found at the link below:

http://phidu.torrens.edu.au/current/maps/atsi-sha/atlas.html

For those who prefer the data in a spreadsheet format, the data can be found below:

http://phidu.torrens.edu.au/current/data/atsi-sha/phidu_atsi_data_ia_aust.xls

If you have any questions regarding the Social Health Atlas, our contact details can be found at the link below:

http://phidu.torrens.edu.au/contact-us

 

 

NACCHO Census2016 : Census mission to collect data on Indigenous populations in urban areas

Page 12 AD

 

” There could me a myriad of reasons why there is population growth – it could be naturally occurring or it could be people coming in from country areas, rural and remote, and/or other places within Australia.

We offer stuff to do with smoke cessation, alcohol and other drug use emotional and social well being, and general health checks.

It is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation so it is being given direction by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are from the region.

The DANILA DILBA organisation’s chair, Braiden Abala, isn’t sure what’s behind the population shift. 

The clinic was commissioned by Danila Dilba, after Census data in 2011 revealed Aboriginal people had moved from Darwin’s city centre to the northern suburbs.

Above ad Page 12 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Newspaper

Full ABC TV Interview

MARK COLVIN: The Australian Bureau of Statistics is about to embark on a huge Census data collection mission in Indigenous communities across Northern Australia.

A key aim of the research is to capture more accurate statistics on the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in urban areas.

Sally Brooks compiled this report.

MALE SPEAKER: I’d just like to introduce James Parfit to do a welcome to country for Larrakia.

JAMES PARFIT: I’d first like to say welcome everyone and thank you all for coming and a big congratulations of the opening of this great new facility that will make our people healthy and strong again.

SALLY BROOKS: A new Aboriginal health clinic opened in a suburb outside Darwin today.

DANILA DILBA: We offer stuff to do with smoke cessation, alcohol and other drug use emotional and social well being, and general health checks. It is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation so it is being given direction by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are from the region.

SALLY BROOKS: The clinic was commissioned by Danila Dilba, after Census data in 2011 revealed Aboriginal people had moved from Darwin’s city centre to the northern suburbs.

The organisation’s chair, Braiden Abala, isn’t sure what’s behind the population shift.

BRAIDEN ABALA: There could me a myriad of reasons why there is population growth – it could be naturally occurring or it could be people coming in from country areas, rural and remote, and/or other places within Australia.

SALLY BROOKS: The trend is something Northern Australia Census director Tony Grubb thinks is being replicated in other jurisdictions.

TONY GRUBB: I think we are seeing that in a lot of our capital cities and even in our regional areas and we need to remember that 60 per cent of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are actually in urban environments.

SALLY BROOKS: Tony Grubb is about to oversee a huge five to six week mission to collect data from Indigenous communities across Northern Australia.

TONY GRUBB: From Darwin we actually manage all the remote teams for the NT, the Kimberlys, Cape York, Torres Strait, and in that we actually use about 65 teams of about 200 staff and whilst we are actually out in communities we employ up to 1,500 more people to actually help with that undertaking.

Actually, we like to say, you know, it’s the largest peace time logistical operation that the country does.

SALLY BROOKS: Many of the remote employees will help to collect data by interviewing people in their own language.

TONY GRUBB: In our remote areas, quite distinct to how we do mainstream Australia in terms of asking people to actually jump online or fill in a form, we will actually employ local facilitators and local interviewers and actually interview the population and that allows us to get across to meet some of those challenges of cultural differences and language.

SALLY BROOKS: Like with the health clinic opened in Darwin today, Tony Grubb thinks this Census data will be critical to informing how Governments allocate resources for Indigenous people in future.

TONY GRUBB: So in addition to being one of the drivers for the allocation of funding across states and territories it’s also used by all levels of Government for organising and planning for services such as housing, education, and transport, and infrastructure.

So, yeah very important Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

MARK COLVIN: Northern Australia Census director Tony Grubb ending that report by Sally Brooks.