NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: CPR during COVID-19 – Guidelines

feature tile CPR training

CPR during COVID-19 Guidelines

CPR training hands on dummy & National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce logo

The National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce has recently issued guidance on CPR during the pandemic. Healthcare workers and trained first aid responders are being urged not to delay commencing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Taskforce, in partnership with the Infection Control Expert Group (ICEG), have published new clinical flowcharts to guide clinicians and first aid responders in delivering potentially lifesaving CPR as safely as possible.

View the new flowcharts and the Australian guidelines for the clinical care of people with COVID-19 here.

NACCHO CEO 2021 Australian of the Year nominee

Pat Turner had been nominated for Australian of the Year in the ACT!

An Arrernte and Gurdanji woman, Patricia Turner AM has successfully negotiated with all levels of government to ensure that the concerns of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are given respectful consideration. As CEO of the NACCHO, and the Lead Convener of the Coalition of Peaks, Pat has an invaluable record of improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes. Pat’s leadership at NACCHO is creating real, meaningful and lasting change that will strengthen and support community-based Aboriginal health services.

She is the driving force behind a partnership between the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) and the Coalition of Peaks to facilitate shared decision making. One of the key outcomes from this partnership is a new national network funding agreement on Closing the Gap, which will help keep Aboriginal health in the hands of our communities. For her outstanding contribution to public service, Pat has been awarded the Order of Australia.

To read the full article in the Canberra Times click here.

NACCHO CEO Pat Turne sitting in a chair smiling with woven dog sculptures on a small table behind her & an a colourful Aboriginal painting of a bird

Portrait of Patricia Turner AM in her office in Canberra. Picture by Sean Davey.

SWAMS Mental Health Awards finalist

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service are celebrating being named a finalist for the Even Keel Bipolar Support Association Diversity Award at the 2020 WA Mental Health Awards. The award aims to recognise organisations that make an outstanding contribution to mental health. The medical service’s mental health team, called Kaat Darabiny (What you thinking?) senior prevention worker Lisa Collard said they were excited about the announcement. “We are excited and honored to be finalists for this award and very grateful that we are able to connect with and care for our wonderful local Aboriginal Community,” she said.

The team has also launched a new Tools in Schools Program for at risk children and teens. “The Tools in Schools Program is especially designed to support and engage directly with students who are struggling emotionally or behaviorally,” Ms Collard said. “It is an early intervention program to give these kids tools and skills they need to deal with their emotions. We want to give them a safe place to have a yarn about their issues, feelings and let them know they have somewhere to go and someone to talk to.” “So far, the response from schools and students has been very positive. The way the program is structured and delivered in small groups allows us to really connect with and empower the students,” Ms Collard said.

To see the full article click here.

the Kaat Darabiny team at South West Aboriginal Medical Service

Image source: Bunbury Mail.

Architecture awards for Puntukurnu AMS

Kaunitz Yeung Architecture won four awards at the 2020 International Architecture MasterPrize (AMP) including three awards across Healthcare, Green Building and Best of the Best, for Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Services (PAMS) Newman clinic. The Architecture MasterPrize is an international competition that honours designs in the disciplines of architecture, interior design and landscape architecture across the world.

The Newman clinic was commissioned by the Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Services (PAMS) and called for a state-of-the-art, regional primary health care facility to be the physical embodiment of the ethos of PAMS – community focused, connected to country, incorporating culture and providing the highest standard of primary health care.

To view the full article click here.

external view of Puntukurnu AMA WA

Image source: Architecture & Design website.

Melioidosis warning for Top End

Residents and visitors to the Top End need to be aware about the increased risk of getting the potentially deadly disease, Melioidosis, following recent wet weather. Dr Vicki Krause Director of the NT Centre for Disease Control said increased rainfall expected this year due to an active La Niña event meant there would be a greater risk of Melioidosis, a disease caused by the bacteria called Burkholderia pseudomallei that lives below the soil’s surface during the dry season. Territorians are urged to take precautions to avoid Melioidosis this wet season, with about 50 cases reported in the Top End between October and May each year. “Melioidosis can lead to severe pneumonia and blood poisoning with 10-15 per cent of infections in past years leading to death, even with the best medical care,” Dr Krause said. “Cuts and sores are the perfect entry point for the bacteria to invade the body, but it can also be inhaled if it gets stirred up by wind.”

To view the Northern Territory Government’s media release in full click here.

muddy legs with rubber sandals walking across muddy grassy wet ground

Image source: Katherine Times.

Intentional self-harm a leading cause of death

New data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics has revealed that intentional self-harm is the fifth leading cause of death for Indigenous Australians. The data also highlighted the alarming reality that suicide is the second leading cause of death for Indigenous males, with individuals aged between 15–24 years-old over four times more likely to commit suicide than non-Indigenous people in the same age bracket. The data also revealed suicide was the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5–17-years-old between 2015–2019.

Leilani Darwin, Head of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Lived Experience at the Black Dog Institute, says Australia needs to put suicide prevention on the agenda as a priority, as well as being a self-identified priority in communities, “Indigenous people are overrepresented in the worst ways.” 

To veiw the full article click here.

Aboriginal arms around child - torsos only set against wooden framed windows

Image source: NITV News website.

Latest COVID-19 update for Mob

The latest COVID-19 and other health updates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities newsletter produced by the Australian Government Department of Health has been released and can be accessed here.

35 year-old Larrakia man Jonathan sitting cross-legged on carpeted floor surrounded by study/work papers

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

PHC worker engagement with screening programs

The University of Melbourne in the Department of General Practice is seeking primary healthcare workers to take part in a qualitative study they are undertaking to evaluate ways to engage with primary healthcare workers about national screening programs (bowel, breast and cervical). The evaluation has been commissioned by the Commonwealth Department of Health. Findings thus far from this study have led to the development of communication materials to assist in boosting participation, education and engagement.  

They researchers recognise the importance of the whole clinic in improving cancer screening and would like to invite GPs, practice managers and practice nurses to participate in a focus group discussion (via Zoom) to review and provide feedback on the developed communication materials. The focus group discussions will occur in early December, with all participants receiving a $50 gift card for their time. 

To view the advertisement for the focus group click here.

Aboriginal Health Worker at ATSICHS Brisbane sitting at her desk

Tereina Kimo, Aboriginal Health Worker at ATSICHS Brisbane. Image source: NATSIHWA.

Remote community COVID-19 vulnerability

COVID-19 doesn’t discriminate. It can infect and affect anyone, regardless of age, location, socioeconomic status or other health circumstances. Unfortunately though, it can be more devastating for some sections of the community than others. The situation in Victorian aged-care facilities has been a tragic reminder of the way in which this virus affects our most vulnerable in the community. That’s why, when COVID-19 first hit Australia, it was so important — and remains just as important — that strong measures are taken to protect remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and people living in remote communities are at greater risk of COVID-19 due to higher rates of other health issues in these communities, difficulties accessing health care, people often being very mobile and travelling often, and in many cases relying more on outreach services. When COVID-19 hit, the message from many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations was clear: protecting these remote communities was of the utmost importance. On 20 March, Pat Turner — CEO of NACCHO told the ABC that it would be “catastrophic” if COVID-19 got into remote Indigenous communities, not only because of the potential loss of life, but also the loss of cultural heritage.

To view the full Hospital and Healthcare article click here.

WA remote community buildings against bald rock hills

Image source: ABC News website.

RACGP and ACRRM GP training collaboration

A joint statement from The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) has outlined the cooperative approach they will take ahead of the transition to college-led training. The statement reaffirms that the Federal Government is also committed to reforming the Australian General Practice Training (AGPT) model, which will see the colleges become directly responsible for training registrars.
 
RACGP Acting President Associate Professor Ayman Shenouda said the colleges are committed to making general practice and rural generalist training the ‘career pathway of choice’ for prospective students. ‘The return of general practice training to the RACGP provides a unique opportunity to drive further excellence in general practice training, and align it to workforce-distribution strategies that satisfy the healthcare needs of the diverse communities we serve,’ he said as well as pointing out that ‘This is a complex and multifaceted set of reforms that will require extensive consultation and collaboration with all of our stakeholders.’

To view the GPNews article in full click here and to access the RACGP media release click here.Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine world leaders in rural practice logo, vector of orange snake wound around windmill

New England health unit awarded for CtG Framework

To view the full article in the Newcastle Herald click here.

stethoscope on centre of Aboriginal flag

Image source: PHN Hunter New England and Central Coast website.

2021 GP Fellowship Training

The Remote Vocational Training Scheme Ltd (RVTS) is an established training provider with 20 years’ experience delivering GP Fellowship Training across Australia. Its AMS training stream, now in its 7th year, has positions available for doctors to train towards Fellowship qualifications of the RACGP and/or ACRRM. Training with RVTS allows registrars to stay in the one AMS location for the duration of training and offers structured distance education and remote supervision. Registrars receive comprehensive support from a dedicated Cultural Mentor, Medical Educator Mentor, and Training Coordinator throughout the duration of training and have access to Cultural Orientation Resources developed by the RVTS Cultural Educator and Cultural Mentor Team. The RVTS has a high fellowship achievement rate.

To check your eligibility for the AMS stream and to apply click here.

GP Fellowship Training applications are open now until 11 November 2020.

Dr Dharminder Singh who trained with RVTS at Mallee District Aboriginal Services

Dr Dharminder Singh who trained with RVTS at Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) and still works at MDAS.

Indigenous voice critical in government program evaluation

The Productivity Commission today released a proposed Indigenous Evaluation Strategy. The Strategy, which has been delivered to the Government, sets out a new approach to evaluating Australian Government policies and programs. Policies and programs affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are not working as well as they need to. Evaluation can play an important role filling this gap, but regrettably it is often an afterthought and of poor quality, Commissioner Romlie Mokak said. Importantly, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are rarely asked about what, or how to evaluate, or what evaluation results mean, Mr Mokak said. The Strategy puts Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at its centre.

To view the Australian Government Productivity Commission’s media release in full click here.

8 Aboriginal hands around quit smoking badges

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

NSW – Wyong – Yerin Aboriginal Health Services Limited

Executive Assistant to the CEO

Suicide Prevention Worker

To access the Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Services website and the job descriptions for these positions click here.

Applications for the EA to the CEO position close at 5.00 pm on Wednesday 11 November 2020 and applications for the Suicide Prevention Worker position close at 5.00 pm on Tuesday 11 November 2020.


Yerin Eleanor Duncan AHS logo

ACT – Canberra – National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association (NATSIHWA)

NATSIHWA is an association founded on the cultural and spiritual teachings of our past and present leaders, which best serves our members in their important role in achieving physical, social, cultural and emotional wellbeing for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. They are currently seeking applications for the following senior level positions within the organisation:

Manager Executive Services

Teacher – Manager Professional Development

Manager – Policy, Projects and Research

For job descriptions click on the title of the job above. Applications for each position must be received by midnight Monday 2 November 2020.NATSIHWA logo

NSW – Sydney- Kirketon Road Centre

Senior Aboriginal Health Project Officer

The Kirketon Road Centre (KRC) is a primary health care facility located in Kings Cross, which is involved in the prevention, treatment and care of HIV/AIDS and other transmissible infections among ‘at-risk’ young people, sex workers and people who inject drugs. Working across KRC’s three clinical sites and extensive outreach program, this position is responsible for addressing the needs of Aboriginal people among KRC’s target populations, including ‘at risk young people, sex workers and people who inject drugs. The position also provides cultural expertise within KRC. 

For more information about the position and to apply click here.

Applications close Sunday 8 November 2020.Kirkton Road Centre logo, white letters KRC against green background

Across Australia – Remote Vocational Training Scheme Targeted Recruitment

General Practitioners – multiple positions

The Remote Vocational Training Scheme (RVTS) is assisting the recruitment of doctors to targeted remote communities with high medical workforce need by including the RVTS GP Vocational Training program as a component of the doctor recruitment package. In 2018-20 the RVTS Targeted Recruitment Strategy successfully secured the services of 11 full-time doctors to 13 rural and remote communities across Australia. RVTS Training is a four-year GP training program delivered by Distance Education and Remote Supervision leading to Fellowship of the ACRRM and/or RACGP. RVTS Training is fully funded by the Australian Government.

Tor further information about the Targeted Recruitment positions click here.RVTS logo, vector of white sun rising or setting yellow sky, red earth

Across Australia (except Vic & Tas) – Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

2021 Census Engagement Manager x 35 (25 in remote areas, 10 in urban/regional locations)

The ABS is recruiting Census Engagement Managers for the 2021 Census. Due to the close working relationship with the community, 35 Census Engagement Manager positions will be only open to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander applicants. Census Engagement Managers are specialised roles requiring a high degree of community interaction. They will be working within communities telling people about the Census and ensuring everyone can take part and get the help they need. Where possible, Census Engagement Managers will be recruited locally. To view a recruitment poster click here.

For further information on the roles and to apply click here.

Applications for Census Engagement Manager roles are open now and close Thursday 5 November 2020.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News Alert : 2018-19 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey : Download detailed state and territory tables and facts sheets

The ABS is pleased to advise that detailed state and territory tables and facts sheets using data from the 2018-19 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey are now available on the ABS website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from all states and territories living in both non-remote and remote areas participated in the survey, providing information on their health and well-being.

Download Summary results for states and territories (fact sheets)

summary results for states and territories_fact sheets

Summary results for states and territories (pictorial)

summary results for states and territories_pictorial

There are eight data cubes accompanying this release (for each state and territory), containing information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ self-assessed health, use of health services, health conditions, lifestyle risk factors, physical measurements and dietary indicators.

Complimenting the data and available for download are summary results for all states and territories, packaged separately as a detailed and pictorial fact sheet.

Also released today are regional modelled estimates, providing information by Indigenous Region and Primary Health Network.

An Appendix also accompanies the modelled regional data.

Health

  • More than four in 10 (46%) people had at least one chronic condition that posed a significant health problem in 2018–19, up from 40% in 2012–13.
  • The proportion of people with asthma in remote areas (9%) was around half the proportion for people living in non-remote areas (17%).
  • More than one in 10 people aged two years and over reported having anxiety (17%) or depression (13%).
  • More than four in 10 (45%) people aged 15 years and over rated their own health as excellent or very good in 2018–19, up from 39% in 2012–13.

Risk factors

  • The proportion of people aged 15 years and over who smoked every day decreased from 41% in 2012–13 to 37% in 2018–19.
  • The proportion of children aged 2–14 years who were overweight or obese increased from 30% in 2012–13 to 37% in 2018–19.
  • The proportion of people aged 15 years and over who had consumed the recommended number of serves of fruit per day declined for those living in remote areas from 49% in 2012–13 to 42% in 2018–19.
  • Sugar sweetened drinks were usually consumed every day by around one-quarter (24%) of people aged 15 years and over.

Use of health services

  • More than half (57%) of children aged 2–17 years had seen a dentist or dental professional in the last 12 months.
  • The proportion of people who did not see a GP when needed in the last 12 months was higher for those living in non-remote areas (14%) than remote areas (8%).

More data from the Survey will be published over the course of the year.

NACCHO Alert : Future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health @ABSStats Surveys – #HaveYourSay 2020 Plus @aihw Stakeholders survey

 ” The ABS is committed to providing a range of opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to provide feedback and we are asking you to tell us your thoughts and suggestions on all elements of the proposed health survey including how and what information should be collected.”

There are many ways you can provide your feedback to ABS : See Part 1 below 

For AIHW See Part 2 Below 

Part 1: There are many ways you can provide your feedback to the ABS 

1.Workshop update 2.00 pm 19 March

Due to the rapidly evolving situation around novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Australia and internationally, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has postponed all face-to-face health survey workshops and community sessions which were due to be held across Australia from March until June 2020.

The health and safety of our stakeholders is our highest priority, and this decision was taken with due consideration of the medical advice available and after listening to our stakeholders and members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

We acknowledge there has been a lot of interest in these workshops and community sessions, and we hope to be able to run them in the future. In the interim we are exploring options for virtual consultation, such as video conferences or Webinars.

You can have your say now through the ABS paper Future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Surveys – Have Your Say, 2020, or by completing an online survey.

We will be in touch as more information becomes available.

If you would like more information, please contact us via email (coeatsis@abs.gov.au).

 

See above

3.Connect with an Engagement Manager

The ABS has Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Engagement Managers in each state and territory who are keen to have discussions with you, either at a community session or directly if you prefer.

4.Complete our eSurvey

The electronic survey covers a range of key topics and discussion points as well as the ability to provide general comments. For those interested, the survey can be accessed here ABS Consultation Hub

5.Write to us

In addition the ABS invites people to submit written feedback in response to this discussion paper.

Submissions are welcome until 15 June 2020 and can be forwarded electronically or in hard copy using the contact details below.

Email: coeatsis@abs.gov.au

Or by post to:

Director of CoEATSIS

Locked Bag 10

Belconnen ACT 2616

A report on the engagement undertaken will be made available at the end of the consultation.

Part 2

As one of our valued stakeholders, your opinion is important to us and we would appreciate it if you could complete a short survey.

The aim of this survey is to better understand your preferences for engaging with us and what topics (that we currently report on) you find most useful or would like us to start reporting on.

Your participation will help to guide our stakeholder engagement plans in the future.

If you have any questions regarding this survey, please contact the team via communications@aihw.gov.au or phone +61 2 6249 5089.

This survey will close on Monday 23 March 2020. 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News Alert : New Report @ABSStats Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey shows mixed outcomes : But fewer of our mob are #Smoking

 “A new report shows mixed health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a reduction in smoking and improvements in how people feel about their health but an increased proportion of people with chronic conditions causing significant health problems.

The 2018-19 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) examines long-term health conditions, risk factors, and social and emotional well-being indicators.

The survey included Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from all states and territories and included people in both non-remote and remote areas.” 

Please note formal NACCHO response press release out Friday 

Indigenous and Social Information Program Manager, Stephen Collett, said positive outcomes included a decrease in people aged 15 years and over who smoked every day, falling from 41 per cent in 2012-13 to 37 per cent in 2018-19.

“In addition, the proportion of young people who had never smoked increased between 2012-13 and 2018-19 from 77 per cent to 85 per cent for 15 to 17 year-olds and from 43 per cent to 50 per cent for those aged 18 to 24,” he said.

“The results also show a decline in the proportion of people aged 18 years and over who consumed more than four standard drinks on one occasion in the last 12 months, down from 57 per cent in 2012-13 to 54 per cent in 2018-19.”

However, 46 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people had one or more chronic conditions that posed a significant health problem, up from 40 per cent in 2012-13.

“People living in non-remote areas were more likely to report having one or more chronic conditions (48 per cent) than people living in remote areas (33 per cent).

“The proportion of people with diabetes was higher in remote areas (12 per cent) than non-remote areas (7 per cent) and similarly, rates of kidney disease were higher in remote areas (3.4 per cent) than non-remote areas (1.4 per cent).”

Between 2012-13 and 2018-19 the proportion of people who were overweight or obese increased both for children aged 2-14 years (up from 30 per cent to 37 per cent) and those aged 15 years and over (up from 66 per cent to 71 per cent).

More than four in 10 people (45 per cent) rated their health as excellent or very good, up from 39 per cent in 2012-13 and more than half (57 per cent) of children aged 2-17 years had seen a dentist or dental professional in the last 12 months.

Key statistics Health

  • More than four in 10 (46%) people had at least one chronic condition that posed a significant health problem in 2018–19, up from 40% in 2012–13.
  • The proportion of people with asthma in remote areas (9%) was around half the proportion for people living in non-remote areas (17%).
  • More than one in 10 people aged two years and over reported having anxiety (17%) or depression (13%).
  • More than four in 10 (45%) people aged 15 years and over rated their own health as excellent or very good in 2018–19, up from 39% in 2012–13.

Risk factors

  • The proportion of people aged 15 years and over who smoked every day decreased from 41% in 2012–13 to 37% in 2018–19.
  • The proportion of children aged 2–14 years who were overweight or obese increased from 30% in 2012–13 to 37% in 2018–19.
  • The proportion of people aged 15 years and over who had consumed the recommended number of serves of fruit per day declined for those living in remote areas from 49% in 2012–13 to 42% in 2018–19.
  • Sugar sweetened drinks were usually consumed every day by around one-quarter (24%) of people aged 15 years and over.

Use of health services

  • More than half (57%) of children aged 2–17 years had seen a dentist or dental professional in the last 12 months.
  • The proportion of people who did not see a GP when needed in the last 12 months was higher for those living in non-remote areas (14%) than remote areas (8%).

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey collected data on a broad range of health-related topics, language, cultural identification, education, labour force status, income and discrimination — for full details see Survey topics (appendix).

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #ClosingTheGap : With our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population of Australia projected to reach 1 million by 2028 @ABSStats: Will our ACCHO’s be funded and resourced to manage this growth ?

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population of Australia is projected to reach 1 million by 2028, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

These projections are based on a series of assumptions of future levels of fertility, paternity, mortality and internal migration, which are guided by recent population trends.

ABS Demography Director, Beidar Cho, said: “Based on medium series, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population of Australia is projected to grow by 2.0 per cent per year to reach around 1,072,000 people by 2031.

“This compares with a projected annual growth rate of 1.5 per cent for the total Australian population over the same period.

“Although younger than the general population, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population of Australia is ageing.

The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons aged 65 years and over is projected to double from 4 per cent in 2016 to 8 per cent in 2031.”

Ms Cho added: “The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations in all states and territories are projected to continue to grow, although at varying rates.”

Based on medium series, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population living in Major Cities is projected to grow by 2.5 per cent, compared with 2.0 per cent in Inner and Outer Regional Areas and 0.7 per cent in Remote and Very Remote Areas.

Further details are available in Estimates and Projections, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, 2006 to 2031 (cat. no. 3238.0).

Size and growth

In 2016, there were 798,400 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, representing 3.3% of the total Australian population.

Between 2006 and 2016, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population increased by 2.2% (from 640,000 people) per year on average, compared with 1.6% for the total Australian population. 

By 2031, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is projected to increase to between 1,054,600 people (low series) and 1,100,400 people (high series) at an average annual growth rate of between 1.9% and 2.2% per year. In comparison, the average annual growth rate of the total Australian population is projected to be between 1.3% and 1.7% per year over the same period (Population Projections, Australia, 2017 (base) to 2066 (cat. no. 3222.0)).

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population of Australia is projected to reach one million people by 2027 (high series) and by 2028 (medium and low series).

Graph Image for Graph 1 - Estimated and projected Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, 2016 to 2031

Natural increase

At the national level any growth in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is entirely due to natural increase as net overseas migration is assumed to be zero.

Although decreasing fertility rates are assumed, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander births is projected to increase over the projection period. This is due to the increase in the number of women of child-bearing ages over the projection period as well as the assumption of increasing paternity rates.

As a result:

  • births are projected to increase from 18,970 in 2017 (Series B), to between 22,150 and 28,050 in 2031
  • deaths are projected to increase from 3,080 in 2017 (Series B), to between 3,900 and 4,540 in 2031
  • natural increase remains consistently high, increasing from 15,890 in 2017 (Series B) to between 17,620 and 24,150 in 2031.

POPULATION STRUCTURE

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population has a relatively young age structure with a median age of 22.9 years in 2016 (37.8 years for the Non-Indigenous population).

  • in 2006 the median age was 21.2 years
  • by 2031 the median age is projected to be between 25.7 and 26.7 years.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is projected to increase across all age groups between 2016 and 2031.

People aged 0–14 years

The number of children (0–14 years) is 274,300 in 2016. This is projected to:

  • increase to between 309,800 and 350,900 in 2031
  • decrease as a proportion of the population, from 34.4% in 2016 to between 29.4% and 31.9% in 2031.

People aged 15–64 years

The number of people aged 15–64 years is 490,000 in 2016. This is projected to:

  • increase to between 658,200 and 660,000 in 2031
  • remain stable as a proportion of the population, from 61.4% in 2016 to between 60.0% and 62.4% in 2031.

People aged 65 years and over

The number of people aged 65 years and over is 34,000 in 2016. This is projected to:

  • increase to between 86,500 and 89,600 in 2031
  • increase as a proportion of the population, from 4.3% in 2016 to between 8.1% and 8.2% in 2031.

REMOTENESS AREAS AND INDIGENOUS REGIONS

In 2016, there were 298,400 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people residing in Major Cities, followed by 351,200 in Inner and Outer Regional areas and 148,700 in Remote and Very Remote areas.

By 2031, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is projected to increase to between:

  • 424,700 people (low series) and 443,700 people (high series) in Major Cities, at an average annual growth rate of between 2.4% and 2.7% per year
  • 467,500 people (low series) and 488,300 people (high series) in Inner and Outer Regional areas, at an average annual growth rate of between 1.9% and 2.2% per year
  • 162,400 people (low series) and 168,400 people (high series) in Remote and Very Remote areas, at an average annual growth rate of between 0.6% and 0.8% per year.
Table 1: ESTIMATED AND PROJECTED ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER POPULATION(a), Remoteness Areas, 2006 – 2031

2006
2016
2031 (SERIES A)
2031 (SERIES B)
2031 (SERIES C)
no.
no.
no.
Growth rate (%)(b)
no.
Growth rate (%)(b)
no.
Growth rate (%)(b)

Major Cities
242,987
298 430
443,739
2.7
431,982
2.5
424,711
2.4
Inner and Outer Regional
280,477
351 206
488,254
2.2
475,383
2.0
467,459
1.9
Remote and Very Remote
116,572
148 729
168,434
0.8
164,506
0.7
162,399
0.6
Australia(c)
640,036
798 365
1 100 427
2.2
1 071 871
2.0
1 054 569
1.9

(a) Estimates and projections based on the 2016 Census.
(b) Average annual growth rate for the period 2016 to 2031.
(c) Includes Other Territories.

Population share

Based on all three series:

  • Inner and Outer Regional areas are projected to continue to have the largest Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population with their share remaining stable at 44% in both 2016 and 2031
  • Major Cities share is projected to increase from 37% in 2016 to 40% in 2031
  • Remote and Very Remote areas share is projected to decrease from 19% in 2016 to 15% in 2031.

INDIGENOUS REGIONS

All three series project continuing population growth in the majority of Indigenous Regions between 2016 and 2031:

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in the Australian Capital Territory is projected to be the fastest growing of all Indigenous regions, with an average annual growth rate of between 2.7% and 3.0% per year. This is followed by:

  • Brisbane (between 2.6% and 2.9%)
  • Victoria, excluding Melbourne (between 2.4% and 2.8%).

Katherine is the only Indigenous region where the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is projected to decrease between 2016 and 2031. This can be attributed to assumed net migration loss (see Assumptions chapter, Table 15).

Table 2: ESTIMATED AND PROJECTED ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER POPULATION(a), Indigenous Regions, 2016 – 2031

2016
2031 (SERIES A)
2031 (SERIES B)
2031 (SERIES C)
no.
no.
Growth rate (%)(b)
no.
Growth rate (%)(b)
no.
Growth rate (%)(b)

Dubbo
15 962
20 567
1.7
19 979
1.5
19 619
1.4
North-Eastern NSW
25 475
33 737
1.9
32 808
1.7
32 223
1.6
North-Western NSW
9 848
10 854
0.7
10 542
0.5
10 346
0.3
NSW Central and North Coast
85 169
123 722
2.5
120 367
2.3
118 120
2.2
Riverina – Orange
30 830
43 415
2.3
42 237
2.1
41 443
2.0
South-Eastern NSW
16 716
23 454
2.3
22 832
2.1
22 407
2.0
Sydney – Wollongong
81 685
108 893
1.9
106 006
1.8
104 115
1.6
Melbourne
28 584
41 896
2.6
40 845
2.4
40 114
2.3
Victoria exc. Melbourne
29 183
44 090
2.8
42 761
2.6
41 879
2.4
Brisbane
84 454
129 835
2.9
126 482
2.7
124 313
2.6
Cairns – Atherton
30 050
40 148
2.0
39 064
1.8
38 416
1.7
Cape York
10 579
13 848
1.8
13 469
1.6
13 228
1.5
Mount Isa
9 003
9 518
0.4
9 253
0.2
9 085
0.1
Rockhampton
26 941
36 468
2.0
35 528
1.9
34 941
1.7
Toowoomba – Roma
21 350
28 398
1.9
27 648
1.7
27 210
1.6
Torres Strait
7 403
8 378
0.8
8 156
0.6
8 027
0.5
Townsville – Mackay
31 496
46 046
2.6
44 795
2.4
44 072
2.3
Adelaide
30 124
44 711
2.7
43 578
2.5
42 867
2.4
Port Augusta
9 403
11 171
1.2
10 906
1.0
10 751
0.9
Port Lincoln – Ceduna
2 738
2 881
0.3
2 822
0.2
2 772
0.1
Broome
6 057
7 909
1.8
7 706
1.6
7 597
1.5
Geraldton
8 502
10 267
1.3
10 020
1.1
9 857
1.0
Kalgoorlie
7 510
10 179
2.0
9 937
1.9
9 809
1.8
Kununurra
6 040
6 932
0.9
6 760
0.8
6 643
0.6
Perth
38 919
57 899
2.7
56 463
2.5
55 635
2.4
South Hedland
11 800
16 260
2.2
15 870
2.0
15 669
1.9
South-Western WA
15 631
21 009
2.0
20 539
1.8
20 264
1.7
West Kimberly
6 053
7 789
1.7
7 600
1.5
7 506
1.4
Tasmania
28 537
38 113
1.9
37 089
1.8
36 584
1.7
Alice Springs
6 807
7 548
0.7
7 368
0.5
7 315
0.5
Apatula
10 191
12 513
1.4
12 242
1.2
12 158
1.2
Darwin
18 309
22 044
1.2
21 574
1.1
21 385
1.0
Jabiru – Tiwi
12 425
16 720
2.0
16 411
1.9
16 324
1.8
Katherine
11 063
10 105
-0.6
9 865
-0.8
9 804
-0.8
Nhulunbuy
11 377
16 370
2.5
16 020
2.3
15 957
2.3
Tennant Creek
4 374
4 778
0.6
4 690
0.5
4 645
0.4
Australian Capital Territory
7 513
11 638
3.0
11 324
2.8
11 155
2.7
Australia(c)
798 365
1 100 427
2.2
1 071 871
2.0
1 054 569
1.9

(a) Estimate and projections based on the 2016 Census.
(b) Average annual growth rate for the period 2016 to 2031.

(c) Includes Other Territories.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #RefreshtheCTGRefresh #ClosingTheGap : @ABSStats Release : #Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander life expectancy lowest in remote and very remote areas

“Today’s figures show that life expectancy estimates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians remain lower than for the non- Indigenous population.

The life expectancy at birth of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in 2015-2017 was 8.6 years lower than for non-Indigenous men, while that of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women was 7.8 years lower than that of non-Indigenous women”

The life expectancy at birth for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in 2015-2017 was 71.6 years for men and 75.6 years for women, according to figures released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

See ABS Website 

“However, life expectancy within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population varied considerably, with the lowest life expectancy experienced by those living in the more remote parts of the country” said Anthony Grubb, Director of Demography at the ABS.

“Life expectancy at birth for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote and very remote areas was 65.9 years for men and 69.6 years for women, while those living in major cities had the highest life expectancy (72.1 years and 76.5 years for men and women respectively).”

“Today’s figures show that life expectancy estimates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians remain lower than for the non- Indigenous population. The life expectancy at birth of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in 2015-2017 was 8.6 years lower than for non-Indigenous men, while that of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women was 7.8 years lower than that of non-Indigenous women”.

These differences were more marked in remote and very remote areas, where the difference in life expectancy at birth for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population compared with the non-Indigenous population was 13.8 years for men and 14.0 years for women.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in the Northern Territory and Western Australia had the lowest life expectancy estimates.

Today’s release suggests the differences in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians narrowed slightly over the five-year period since 2010-2012.

LIFE EXPECTANCY AT BIRTH, Remoteness Areas – 2015-2017(a)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Non-Indigenous
Difference between non-Indigenous and Aboriginal and 
Torres Strait Islander life expectancy at birth(b)

MALES


Major Cities
72.1
80.7
8.6
Inner and Outer Regional
70.0
79.1
9.1
Remote and Very Remote
65.9
79.7
13.8

FEMALES


Major Cities
76.5
83.7
7.2
Inner and Outer Regional
74.8
82.8
8.0
Remote and Very Remote
69.6
83.6
14.0

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MALES AND FEMALES


Major Cities
-4.4
-3.0
. .
Inner and Outer Regional
-4.8
-3.7
. .
Remote and Very Remote
-3.8
-3.9
. .

.. not applicable.
(a) Based on the average number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths registered in 2015-2017 adjusted for under/over identification of Indigenous Status in registrations, and final Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population estimates for 30 June 2016 based on the 2016 Census.
(b) Differences are based on unrounded estimates. 

LIFE EXPECTANCY AT BIRTH, States and Territory – 2015-2017(a)

LIFE EXPECTANCY AT BIRTH
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Non-Indigenous
Difference between non-Indigenous and Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander life expectancy at birth(b)
years
years
years

MALES


NSW
70.9
80.2
9.4
Qld
72.0
79.8
7.8
WA
66.9
80.3
13.4
NT
66.6
78.1
11.5
Aust.(c)
71.6
80.2
8.6

FEMALES


NSW
75.9
83.5
7.6
Qld
76.4
83.2
6.7
WA
71.8
83.8
12.0
NT
69.9
82.7
12.8
Aust.(c)
75.6
83.4
7.8

(a) Based on the average number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths registered in 2015-2017 adjusted for under/over identification of Indigenous Status in registrations, and final Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population estimates for 30 June 2016 based on the 2016 Census.
(b) Differences are based on unrounded estimates.
(c) These life expectancy estimates are calculated taking age-specific identification rates into account. 

Further details are available in Life Tables for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, 2015-2017 (cat. no. 3302.0.55.003).

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #NATSIHS : @ABSStats responds to questions raised in @IndigenousX article about the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey

 

” The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) runs the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS) every six years to collect vital information about the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people all over Australia.

These insights inform Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policies, programs and services and help identify gaps and areas for improvement.

The information is also used extensively as part of the Closing the Gap initiative.”

ABS responds to 13 November Indigenous X article answering 6 key questions

See Part 1 below 

SEE ABS Promo Video

There are videos from ambassadors, FAQs on the ABS website, and other promotional resources available encouraging Indigenous people to participate if their household is randomly selected. What is missing in all of this is the information that says failure to comply in the research can result in fines of $210 per day.

There are no shortage of stories available about the risks for those Aboriginal people who already face financial hardships that can arise from unpaid fines.”

Extract from the Indigenous X article 10 November read in full HERE 

Is the National Indigenous Health Survey ethical?

Part 1 In response to questions raised in the Indigenous X article 10 November the ABS advises  

1.Do they advise in writing in advance (in accordance with their ‘avoiding scammers’ process) that they will be door knocking to inquire about occupants’ Indigeneity?

Before the survey begins, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) works with its Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Roundtable members and consults with community groups across the country about the aims of the survey and how it will be conducted.

The survey is also advertised throughout local media, through various Aboriginal and Torres Strait organisations and is communicated to various communities through the ABS Indigenous Engagement Managers.

The ABS has also posted online videos, presenting the material at conferences and events and uses various Indigenous Champions to promote the survey.

Households are randomly selected and, as the ABS is unaware of whether someone within a household identifies as Indigenous or non-Indigenous and is therefore within the scope of the survey, the ABS does not write in advance.

To ensure respondents fit the scope of the survey, ABS interviewers knock on the door and ask if any resident identifies as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

All ABS interviewers are required to identify themselves and show their identification when they first speak to a potential respondent. They also receive special training to work on this important survey.

2. Is it at the point of confirming one’s Indigeneity that a household is then legally compelled to participate in the NATSIHS?

Yes.

3.Is the financial penalty consistent with other compulsory surveys?

In order to ensure the ABS provides high quality national statistics that reflect the Australian population, the Census and Statistics Act provides the ABS with the capacity to legally direct respondents to provide survey information.

Interviewers are trained to explain the importance of the information the survey collects to potential respondents to encourage them to participate.

If, after a written direction, the requested information is still not provided, the ABS can refer for potential prosecution where a court can consider a fine. This has been the case since the introduction of the Act in 1905 and applies consistently across all ABS surveys undertaken under this legislation.

It is the ABS’ experience that once the importance, benefits and value of participating is understood, respondents voluntarily complete ABS surveys. Therefore, very few referrals for court prosecutions, and fines, occur.

4. Have they issued fines as a result of households refusing to participate in the NATSIHS? If so, how many?

No. The ABS has not referred anyone who has refused to participate in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey for potential prosecution.

5. In households where there is more than one adult in the premises, who is issued with the fine? What is the consequence for a household if they refuse to pay the fine?

Should respondents refuse to participate in the survey, the matter is referred to the Department of Public Prosecutions (DPP) to consider who, if anyone, would be prosecuted if the matter cannot be resolved, with the court determining any fine.  A failure to pay any fine would also be a matter for the DPP and then a court.

6. Are there any legitimate grounds for which a household can legally not participate in the NATSIHS?

Upon request and on a case by case basis, the ABS can exempt people in genuine difficulty from completing a survey.

If someone is selected but unable to complete the NATSIHS, or has any further questions about the survey or ABS interviewers, the ABS welcomes their contact on 1300 135 070.

Part 2 NACCHO Article 18 September

I’ve been chosen to be in something called the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS). Why? 

This survey is run to provide the community with vital information for measuring the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

If your household has been selected to be in this survey, it means that the people in your household will represent households that are similar to yours. This is so that statistics about larger groups in the community can be produced. The ABS has developed the NATSIHS in close consultation with a range of stakeholders, including commonwealth and state/territory governments, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations, academics and researchers.

The results from the survey are used extensively by government agencies, researchers, clinicians and other health professionals in your community to help plan for the future and support research into ways to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples live healthier and longer lives.

Watch full Video 

Why was my household selected?

From July 2018 to March 2019, about 6,500 households will be randomly selected to be included in the NATSIHS. Every household in Australia has the same chance of being selected in the survey.

If your household has been selected to be in this survey, it means that the people in your household will represent households that are similar to yours. This is so that statistics about larger groups in the community can be produced.

How will you complete the survey?

An interviewer will come to your home. They will check your address, identify themselves as an ABS interviewer, and show you their official ABS photo identification. They will conduct the interview using a laptop computer. It would be appreciated if you could provide a table and chair to the interviewer if possible.

What information are you going to ask about? 

The NATSIHS collects a range of information to give a ‘snapshot’ of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health, including the type of health problems people have and their lifestyle patterns.

The NATSIHS includes questions about:

  • General health and wellbeing (including disability status)
  • Health risk status (physical activity, smoking, dietary behaviour, alcohol consumption)
  • Diagnosed conditions (focusing on the National Health Priority Areas of asthma, cancer, cardiovascular and circulatory conditions, arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes and high sugar levels, kidney disease, as well as mental health conditions)
  • Cultural identification
  • Experience of Discrimination
  • Social and emotional wellbeing
  • Physical measures (blood pressure, weight, height and waist size). This part of the survey is voluntary.
  • Voluntary hearing test.

In addition, detailed demographic and socio-demographic data (age, education, employment, income and housing) are collected to enable an assessment to be made of the health and related needs of groups such as the elderly, migrants and low income families.

Adults aged 18 years and over who are selected, may also be asked to volunteer follow-up contact details for the purpose of assisting the ABS with future health related information collections.

Which people in the Household will be required to participate?

Up to two adult members of each selected household (aged 18 years and over) will be chosen at random to participate. Interviewers will conduct a personal interview with this person which will cover a range of topics about the individual’s health and wellbeing.

Up to two child members of each selected household (aged 0 to 17 years) will also be chosen at random, where applicable. If the selected child is 0-14 years, the interview is conducted by proxy with a nominated adult. If the selected child is 15-17 years, a personal interview can be conducted if the parent or guardian consents, otherwise a proxy interview will be conducted.

What happens if there are people in the household who don’t speak English?

An ABS interviewer who speaks the language of the householder will conduct the interview if possible. Alternatively, arrangements can be made to organise an interpreter to conduct the interview. Please call 1800 271 346 (free call, excluding mobile phones) so that these arrangements can be made.

Will I be paid for my time?

No. As with other household surveys, the ABS relies on the willing co-operation of households.

I don’t want to participate. Can you choose another household?

It is very important to make sure that every household in Australia has an equal chance of being selected for this survey. This means that when all the selected houses are combined, the survey will resemble the whole community which they represent. Once your household has been selected, another household cannot be substituted in its place, as other households have already had their chance of being selected, and this could mean that some parts of the community are under or over represented.

Is the survey compulsory?

The questions in the survey are asked under the authority of the Census and Statistics Act 1905. Under the Act, you are obliged to provide the information that is requested. The ABS is required by the Act to maintain the secrecy of all information provided. No information will be released in a way that would enable an individual or household to be identified.

How will you keep my information safe, secure, and confidential? 

The ABS takes the security of the information you provide to us very seriously.

The survey information is collected using a notebook computer and then securely transferred to the ABS office environment. The computer makes the survey quicker and easier to do, and means you only need to answer the questions that relate to you and your household.

All ABS employees have signed a legally enforceable Undertaking of Fidelity and Secrecy in which they agree to keep any information, including personal information which they may deal with in the course of their work, private and confidential. This agreement applies to ABS employees for the rest of their lives, even if they leave the ABS. The penalty for breaching this is two years jail, a $21,600 fine, or both.

The ABS complies with the Australian Privacy Principles. If you believe the ABS has breached these principles, you can find information on how to lodge a complaint here. This link also provides more detail on the ABS’s own Privacy Policy.

How can I find the results from the NATSIHS?

The results from NATSIHS 2018/19 will be available in late 2019.

Results from the previous NATSIHS can be found on the ABS website:
4727.0.55.006 – Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Updated Results, 2012–13

The ABS has also produced some videos related to the upcoming NATSIHS:
NATSIHS video 
Brisbane Lions Charlie Cameron video
Carlton FC Sam Petrevski-Seton video
Fremantle FC Gemma Houghton video
Fremantle FC Michael Walters video
Shellie Morris video

Where can I get more information?

For more information about participating in ABS surveys, see the Household Survey Participant Information FAQ’s

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @ABSStats : Understanding the 18.4 % Increase in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population 2011 to 2016

 ” Between the 2011 and 2016 Censuses, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia increased by 18.4% (100,803 people).

Large increases in the counts of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people have been observed over various periods since 1971. Particularly-large increases occurred between the 1991 and 1996 Censuses (33.0%) and the 2006 and 2011 Censuses (20.5%).”

Remoteness

Remoteness is associated with poorer outcomes on a range of Closing the Gap targets (see Closing the Gap targets: 2017 analysis of progress and key drivers of change released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare). Consequentially, changes in the population distribution across Remoteness areas may impact on the progress towards meeting these targets (see Impact of Intercensal Change on Selected Characteristics).

Since the 2006 Census, the distribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Remote and Non-Remote Australia has shifted. Proportionally, more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are living in Major Cities and Inner Regional Areas and fewer people are living in Outer Regional Australia, Remote Australia and Very Remote Australia. These shifts are larger between the 2011 Census and the 2016 Census than they were between the 2006 Census and the 2011 Census.

Factors contributing to these intercensal increases were explored in Occasional Paper: Population Issues, Indigenous Australians, 1996 (cat. no. 4708.0) and in the previous release of this publication after the 2011 Census.

Graph Image for Growth in counts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, 1971-2016(a)

Footnote(s): (a) Usual residence Census Counts. Includes Other Territories from 1996 onwards. Excludes overseas visitors. (b) In 1986, Indigenous status was reported as ‘Aboriginal origin’.  Between 1971 and 1981, Indigenous status was reported as ‘Racial origin’. (c) The Standard Indigenous Question was introduced in 1996. (d) In 2016, Other Territories includes Norfolk Island. Note: Totals and components may not be consistent within and between tables due to introduced random error to protect confidentiality of Census respondents – see Census Dictionary, 2016 (cat. no. 2901.0).

Source(s): Australian Census of Population and Housing, 1971-2016

 

The purpose of this publication is to discuss factors contributing to the increase in counts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people observed between the 2011 and 2016 Censuses and their implications for interpreting and understanding Census data. This analysis is important because increases such as these have an impact on other statistics, such as population measures and/or performance indicators used for government reporting.

This analysis explores the components of the increase by breaking it down into its demographically-explainable and unexplainable components. Components including births and deaths, migration, a person’s propensity to identify as an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person, and Census enumeration and response are all taken into account to help define and understand the intercensal increase.

Graphic: Components of the Increase in Census Counts 2006 to 2016

 

The chapter Overview of the Increase examines how the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population changed during the intercensal period. It shows that births between the 2011 and 2016 Censuses (0-4 year olds) are driving the majority of the intercensal increase (72.7%). The intercensal growth in counts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons between 2011 and 2016 is not consistent across the country, with growth primarily occurring in Major cities and on the eastern coast of Australia. Population growth is significantly higher in Non-Remote areas (22.8%) than in Remote areas (2.0%).

The chapter Change Explained by Demographic Factors quantifies how much of the 100,803 increase in the Census count of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people between 2011 and 2016 can be explained by demographic factors. It finds that most (78.6%) of the increase can be accounted for by explainable demographic factors of population change – births, deaths and migration.

The remaining 21.4% of the increase cannot be explained by typical factors of population change and equates to 3.3% of the total 2016 Census count of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Change Not Explained by Demographic Factors). This increase did not occur consistently across the country and was primarily focused in Major Cities and Inner Regional areas, particularly in New South Wales.

Factors of unexplainable change in Census counts include: coverage, response rates and a changing propensity to identify. Analysis in this chapter shows that while the overall increase in Census counts is predominately composed of intercensal births (72.7%), other young children (5-14 year olds) were also a significant contributor (14.7%).

The chapter Changing Propensity to Identify examines peoples’ changing propensity to identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander. It finds that there is a relationship between changes in parental identification and changes in the identification of children. Children of couples where both parents are of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin – or children in lone parent families with an identifying parent – are more likely to be identified than children of couples where one person is of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin and the other is non-Indigenous.

The final chapter of this publication Impact of Intercensal Change on Selected Characteristics explores differences in the measures of socio-economic characteristics of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people counted in the 2011 and 2016 Censuses, particularly for characteristics used to monitor progress against Closing the Gap targets (Education, Labour Force and Income). The chapter finds that attempting to measure the impact of changing propensity to identify is complex. Across all characteristics analysed, intercensal improvements appear to be a result of a combination of the changing population distribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Remoteness areas, persons who are socio-economically better off choosing to identify, and actual progress.

There are three technical notes attached to this publication to provide background and context to the analysis. Technical Note 1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Status and the Census looks at the characteristics of people whose Indigenous Status is unknown. Technical Note 2 The undercount in the Census and the PES outlines Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander undercount and overcount from the 2016 Post Enumeration Survey. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander undercount increased slightly to 17.5% in 2016 (from 17.2%).

Finally, the Technical Note 3 provides information on the Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset.

NACCHO Aboriginal #GoodHealth #OurFuture and why you should support the @ABSStats National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS)

I’ve been chosen to be in something called the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS). Why? 

This survey is run to provide the community with vital information for measuring the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

If your household has been selected to be in this survey, it means that the people in your household will represent households that are similar to yours. This is so that statistics about larger groups in the community can be produced. The ABS has developed the NATSIHS in close consultation with a range of stakeholders, including commonwealth and state/territory governments, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations, academics and researchers.

The results from the survey are used extensively by government agencies, researchers, clinicians and other health professionals in your community to help plan for the future and support research into ways to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples live healthier and longer lives.

Watch full Video 


Why was my household selected?

From July 2018 to March 2019, about 6,500 households will be randomly selected to be included in the NATSIHS. Every household in Australia has the same chance of being selected in the survey.

If your household has been selected to be in this survey, it means that the people in your household will represent households that are similar to yours. This is so that statistics about larger groups in the community can be produced.

How will you complete the survey?

An interviewer will come to your home. They will check your address, identify themselves as an ABS interviewer, and show you their official ABS photo identification. They will conduct the interview using a laptop computer. It would be appreciated if you could provide a table and chair to the interviewer if possible.

What information are you going to ask about? 

The NATSIHS collects a range of information to give a ‘snapshot’ of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health, including the type of health problems people have and their lifestyle patterns.

The NATSIHS includes questions about:

  • General health and wellbeing (including disability status)
  • Health risk status (physical activity, smoking, dietary behaviour, alcohol consumption)
  • Diagnosed conditions (focusing on the National Health Priority Areas of asthma, cancer, cardiovascular and circulatory conditions, arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes and high sugar levels, kidney disease, as well as mental health conditions)
  • Cultural identification
  • Experience of Discrimination
  • Social and emotional wellbeing
  • Physical measures (blood pressure, weight, height and waist size). This part of the survey is voluntary.
  • Voluntary hearing test.

In addition, detailed demographic and socio-demographic data (age, education, employment, income and housing) are collected to enable an assessment to be made of the health and related needs of groups such as the elderly, migrants and low income families.

Adults aged 18 years and over who are selected, may also be asked to volunteer follow-up contact details for the purpose of assisting the ABS with future health related information collections.

Which people in the Household will be required to participate?

Up to two adult members of each selected household (aged 18 years and over) will be chosen at random to participate. Interviewers will conduct a personal interview with this person which will cover a range of topics about the individual’s health and wellbeing.

Up to two child members of each selected household (aged 0 to 17 years) will also be chosen at random, where applicable. If the selected child is 0-14 years, the interview is conducted by proxy with a nominated adult. If the selected child is 15-17 years, a personal interview can be conducted if the parent or guardian consents, otherwise a proxy interview will be conducted.

What happens if there are people in the household who don’t speak English?

An ABS interviewer who speaks the language of the householder will conduct the interview if possible. Alternatively, arrangements can be made to organise an interpreter to conduct the interview. Please call 1800 271 346 (free call, excluding mobile phones) so that these arrangements can be made.

Will I be paid for my time?

No. As with other household surveys, the ABS relies on the willing co-operation of households.

I don’t want to participate. Can you choose another household?

It is very important to make sure that every household in Australia has an equal chance of being selected for this survey. This means that when all the selected houses are combined, the survey will resemble the whole community which they represent. Once your household has been selected, another household cannot be substituted in its place, as other households have already had their chance of being selected, and this could mean that some parts of the community are under or over represented.

Is the survey compulsory?

The questions in the survey are asked under the authority of the Census and Statistics Act 1905. Under the Act, you are obliged to provide the information that is requested. The ABS is required by the Act to maintain the secrecy of all information provided. No information will be released in a way that would enable an individual or household to be identified.

How will you keep my information safe, secure, and confidential? 

The ABS takes the security of the information you provide to us very seriously.

The survey information is collected using a notebook computer and then securely transferred to the ABS office environment. The computer makes the survey quicker and easier to do, and means you only need to answer the questions that relate to you and your household.

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How can I find the results from the NATSIHS?

The results from NATSIHS 2018/19 will be available in late 2019.

Results from the previous NATSIHS can be found on the ABS website:
4727.0.55.006 – Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Updated Results, 2012–13

The ABS has also produced some videos related to the upcoming NATSIHS:
NATSIHS video 
Brisbane Lions Charlie Cameron video
Carlton FC Sam Petrevski-Seton video
Fremantle FC Gemma Houghton video
Fremantle FC Michael Walters video
Shellie Morris video

Where can I get more information?

For more information about participating in ABS surveys, see the Household Survey Participant Information FAQ’s

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Socialdeterminants #ClosingTheGap @ANU_CAEPR Three charts on: the changing status of #Indigenous Australians

 ” The data do not tell us anything about the content or meaning of Indigenous identity, or who is or isn’t Indigenous. These data do not suggest changing identification in the census in any way leads to an improvement in outcomes, nor is that the motivation for people’s identification to change.

Rather, there are a range of social and familial reasons why some people may change their identification in the census. And the person who filled out a census form on behalf of someone in 2011 might be different to the person who filled out the form in 2016.

There should not be any intervention to reduce identification change; in fact it should be seen as a positive development. But identification change must always be always kept in mind when assessing the progress toward targets related to Indigenous Australians like Closing the Gap ”

The complexity of identification change

Dr. Nicholas Biddle is a quantitative social scientist, Senior Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)

Francis Markham Research Fellow, College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University 

See Additional NACCHO ABS Aboriginal Health : 2016 CENSUS of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders launched

Above chart added by NACCHO

Three charts on: the changing status of Indigenous Australians

Originally published in The Conversation

A new dataset has shed fresh light on the changing socioeconomic status of Indigenous Australians.

It shows that what appears to be slow progress or steady outcomes for the whole population may be masking worsening results.

This stems from how the Indigenous population is counted in the census and in surveys, and how that identification might change over time.

In each survey or census, people are asked to indicate if they are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin. If they move in or out of the group classified as Indigenous, then this can appear in the aggregate as if people’s life-chances are changing. Rather, this may be an artefact of the group’s changing composition.

Flows into and out of the Indigenous population

Between 2011 and 2016, the best estimate of the Indigenous population grew by 128,500, or around 19%. This was due to a greater number of births than deaths, but also partly due to changes in how people were identified (either by themselves or others) as being of Indigenous origin.

There are many good reasons why Indigenous people may choose not to disclose their ancestry. These are often of a highly personal nature, especially given Australia’s history of discrimination against Indigenous people.

A decision to identify as Indigenous (or not) in the census should not be interpreted as a reflection on someone’s Indigenous identity, which is a separate matter from what box gets ticked on a census form.

But the box-ticking does inform the government’s understanding of the Indigenous population – including monitoring progress against Closing the Gap targets.


Read more: Three reasons why the gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians aren’t closing


Using the data, we can identify three groups of Indigenous people in the 2011 and 2016 censuses:

  • the “always identified” – those who identified as Indigenous in both censuses;
  • the “formerly identified” – those who identified as Indigenous in the 2011 census but not the 2016 census; and
  • the “newly identified” – those who did not identify as Indigenous in the 2011 census, but who did identify as such in the 2016 census.

The figure below gives our best estimate of the flows that constitute these populations, and estimated births and deaths over the period.

Indigenous population flows, 2011-2016. Authors/Australian Bureau of Statistics

The largest of these three groups is the 572,400 people who identified as being of Indigenous origin in both the 2011 and 2016 censuses. This is the population we usually think about when analysing and interpreting Indigenous socioeconomic and demographic change.

However, two other groups were also quite large. There were 45,000 people in Australia who identified as Indigenous in the 2011 Census, but who didn’t identify as such in the 2016 Census. While this is a large number relative to the 2011 population estimate, the newly identified number is larger still (129,600).

The net increase from identification change was therefore estimated to be 84,600. This is equivalent to 13.7% of the Indigenous population in 2011.

The geography of identification change

The vast majority of those who changed how they identified their Indigenous origins in the census lived in urban parts of Australia in 2011.

There are significant differences in the level of change in each of Australia’s eight states and territories.

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/SL1j3/1/

Added by NACCHO

Added by NACCHO 2/2

Changing answers to the census question on Indigenous origin had a particularly pronounced impact on Indigenous population estimates in three jurisdictions – Victoria (21.5%), the Australian Capital Territory (20.9%), and New South Wales (20.8%).

However, because NSW had a relatively large Indigenous population in 2011 relative to Victoria and the ACT, net identification change in that state made up 48% of the total identification change. This is almost double the next greatest contribution – Queensland, which contributed 24.3%.

This may have implications for the distribution of GST revenue between the states and territories.

The relationship between socioeconomic and demographic change

Changes to the way people answer the census question on Indigenous origin has the potential to impact on the understanding of change in Indigenous socioeconomic outcomes.

If those who newly identified in the census had higher relative socioeconomic status before their identification changed, then this will tend to bias upward any measured change in socioeconomic outcomes.

Looking at all Indigenous adults aged 15 years and above at the time of each census, the employment rate in 2011 was 49.7%, while for the same measure in 2016 it was 50.4%.

If we only used repeated cross-sections, we would think that Indigenous employment is improving, albeit relatively slowly.

But when we look at the employment rates using the linked population, a very different picture emerges.

 

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/Jg8vz/1/

The employment rate for “always identifiers” was 49.6% in 2011 and 48.7% in 2016. So, there was actually worsening employment outcomes between 2011 and 2016 for this group, rather than the small increase that might be concluded from looking at the two censuses separately.

The complexity of identification change

Changes to the way people answer the census question on Indigenous origin not only changes official estimates of the size of the Indigenous population – it also changes the composition.

Compared to those previously identified in the census, those who are newly identified are more likely to:

  • be young;
  • live in NSW, Victoria or ACT;
  • likely to live in a major city;
  • be employed;
  • live in higher-income households; and
  • have higher rates of education.

The data do not tell us anything about the content or meaning of Indigenous identity, or who is or isn’t Indigenous. These data do not suggest changing identification in the census in any way leads to an improvement in outcomes, nor is that the motivation for people’s identification to change.

Rather, there are a range of social and familial reasons why some people may change their identification in the census. And the person who filled out a census form on behalf of someone in 2011 might be different to the person who filled out the form in 2016.

There should not be any intervention to reduce identification change; in fact it should be seen as a positive development. But identification change must always be always kept in mind when assessing the progress toward targets related to Indigenous Australians like Closing the Gap

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