NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Sugarydrinks : @BakerResearchAu Study reveals the damaging effects for inactive, young, obese people who consume soft drink regularly : What’s going on inside your veins ?

“ With lifestyle-related diseases such as obesity rising rapidly and sugar sweetened beverages the largest source of added sugars in Western diets, understanding the ‘real world’ health impact is critical in determining ‘real world’ prevention and intervention strategies,”

Professor Bronwyn Kingwell, the study’s senior author : See Baker Institute Press Release Part 1

If you did this day in, day out, your pancreas would be under considerable stress – and this is how diabetes can develop.

Having a little can of soft drink in the morning is going to have lasting effects throughout the day.”

If your diet has too much sugar in it, forcing your body to keep your insulin high all the time, eventually your cells will grow insulin-resistant. That forces the pancreas to make even more insulin, adding to its workload. Eventually, it will burn out

Professor Bronwyn Kingwell. See SMH Article Part 2 What’s going on inside your veins after you drink a soft drink

See NACCHO Nutrition ,Obesity , Sugar Tax,, Health Promotion 200 + articles published over 6 years and see our policy below

 ” The 2012-13 Health Survey identified that Indigenous adults were 1.6 times as likely to be obese as non-Indigenous Australians, with the prevalence increasing more rapidly in Aboriginal school-aged children.

Overweight and obesity in childhood are important predictors of adult adiposity, increasing the risk of developing a range of medical conditions, each of which is a major cause of morbidity, mortality and health expenditure.

While it is surprisingly clear what needs to be done to improve the health of Indigenous children, recent cuts to Indigenous preventative workforce and nutrition programs throughout Australia have severely reduced the capacity to respond.

Comprehensive primary health care is a key strategy for improving the health of Indigenous Australians and is an important platform from which to address complex health and social issues associated with obesity.

Closing the Gap, including the gap attributable to obesity, requires ensuring the ACCHS sector is resourced to deliver the full range of core services required under a comprehensive and culturally safe model of primary health care.

The effectiveness of ACCHSs has long been recognised, with many able to document better health outcomes than mainstream services for the communities they serve. “

Extract from NACCHO Network Submission to the Select Committee’s Obesity Epidemic in Australia Inquiry. 

Download the full 15 Page submission HERE

Obesity Epidemic in Australia – Network Submission – 6.7.18

Press Release : Study reveals the damaging metabolic effects for inactive, young, obese people who consume soft drink regularly

We know drinking soft drink is bad for the waistline, now a study by Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute researchers provides evidence of the damaging metabolic effects on overweight and obese people who regularly consume soft drink and sit for long periods.

Researchers have quantified the detrimental effects on glucose and lipid metabolism by studying young, obese adults in a ‘real-world’ setting where up to 750ml of soft drink is consumed between meals daily and where prolonged sitting with no activity is the norm.

The results, outlined by PhD candidate Pia Varsamis in the Clinical Nutrition journal, show how habitual soft drink consumption and large periods of sedentary behaviour may set these young adults on the path to serious cardiometabolic diseases such as fatty liver disease, type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Whilst most studies to date have focused on the relationship between soft drink consumption and obesity, the large amount of added sugars contained in these drinks has additional implications beyond weight control.

Watch TV Interview

Senior author, Professor Bronwyn Kingwell, who heads up the Institute’s Metabolic and Vascular Physiology laboratory, says the acute metabolic effects of soft drink consumption and prolonged sitting identified in this latest study are cause for concern.

“With lifestyle-related diseases such as obesity rising rapidly and sugar sweetened beverages the largest source of added sugars in Western diets, understanding the ‘real world’ health impact is critical in determining ‘real world’ prevention and intervention strategies,” Professor Kingwell says.

She says this study quantified the effects of soft drink consumption compared to water on glucose and lipid metabolism in a context that was reflective of typical daily consumption levels, meal patterns and activity behaviours such as sitting for long periods.

The study, involved 28 overweight or obese adults aged 19–30 years who were habitual soft drink consumers. They participated in two separate experiments on different days drinking soft drink on one and water on the other both mid-morning and mid-afternoon during a 7-hour day of uninterrupted sitting.

Professor Kingwell says the combination of soft drink and prolonged sitting significantly elevated plasma glucose and plasma insulin, while reducing circulating triglycerides and fatty acids which indicates significant suppression of lipid metabolism, particularly in males.

She says the metabolic effects of a regular diet of soft drink combined with extended periods of sitting may contribute to the development of metabolic disease in young people who are overweight or obese, including predisposing men to an elevated risk of fatty liver disease.

“The acute metabolic effects outlined in this study are very worrying and suggest that young, overweight people who engage in this type of lifestyle are setting themselves on a path toward chronic cardiometabolic disease,” Professor Kingwell says. “This highlights significant health implications both for individuals and our healthcare system.”

Part 2 : Here’s what’s going on inside your veins after you drink a soft drink

Orginally published Here

Half an hour after finishing a can of soft drink, your blood sugar has spiked.

So you’re probably feeling pretty good. Your cells have plenty of energy, more than they need.

Maybe that soft drink had some caffeine as well, giving your central nervous system a kick, making you feel excitable, suppressing any tiredness you might have.

But a clever new study, published this week, nicely illustrates that while you’re feeling good, strange things are going on inside your blood vessels – and in the long run they are not good for you.

For this study, 28 obese or overweight young adults agreed to sit in a lab for a whole day while having their blood continuously sampled.

The volunteers ate a normal breakfast, lunch and dinner. At morning tea and afternoon tea, researchers from Melbourne’s Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute gave them a can of soft drink.

Their blood samples revealed exactly what happened next.

Sugar from, say, a chocolate bar is released slowly, as your digestive system breaks it down.

With a can of soft drink, almost no break-down time is needed. The drink’s sugar starts to hit your bloodstream within about 30 minutes. That’s why you get such a big spike.

Your body responds to high levels of blood sugar by producing a hormone called insulin.

Insulin pumps through the bloodstream and tells your cells to suck in as much sugar as they can. The cells then start burning it, and storing what they can’t burn.

That quickly reduces the amount of sugar in the blood, and gives you a burst of energy. So far so good.

But the sugar keeps coming. High levels of blood sugar will quickly damage your blood vessels, so the body keeps making insulin.

In fact, just having two cans of soft drink meant the volunteers’ insulin stayed significantly higher than usual – all day.

After lunch, and another soft drink for afternoon tea, their sugar and insulin levels spiked again.

And, once again, over the next few hours blood sugar dropped but insulin levels stayed stubbornly high – right through to late afternoon, when the study finished.

The study demonstrates that two cans of soft drink is all it takes to give your pancreas – the crucial organ that produces insulin – a serious workout, says Professor Bronwyn Kingwell, the study’s senior author.

Watch Video 

We get more sugar each year from beverages than all the sweet treats you can think of combined.

“If you did this day in, day out, your pancreas would be under considerable stress – and this is how diabetes can develop,” says Professor Kingwell. “Having a little can of soft drink in the morning is going to have lasting effects throughout the day.”

If your diet has too much sugar in it, forcing your body to keep your insulin high all the time, eventually your cells will grow insulin-resistant. That forces the pancreas to make even more insulin, adding to its workload. Eventually, it will burn out.

But something else interesting is happening inside your body as well.

Insulin tells your body to burn sugar. But it also tells it to stop burning fat.

Normally, the body burns a little bit of both at once. But after a soft drink, your insulin stays high all day – so you won’t burn much fat, whether you’re on a diet or not.

One of the study’s participants, Michelle Kneipp, is now trying as hard as she can to kick her soft-drink habit.

She’s switched soft drinks for flavoured sparkling water. “It still tastes like soft drink, and it’s still got the fizz,” she says.

“But it’s hard, because sugar’s a very addictive substance.”

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Governor-General visits @WinnungaACCHO Plus #NSW #StrokeWeek2018 Events @Galambila @ReadyMob @awabakalltd #Tamworth #VIC #BDAC #BADAC #QLD @Apunipima #NT @AMSANTaus @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

2.QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service was honoured and pleased by a visit on September 3 from his Excellency the Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove and Lady Cosgrove.

Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs briefed their Excellency’s on the range of services which are provided to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Canberra and the region.

Sir Peter was particularly interested in the range and breadth of services which are provided to the community and learn that of the almost 7000 clients which Winnunga sees each year that almost 20% are non- Indigenous.

Sir Peter was also very interested to explore with Julie Tongs the rationale for the decision that has been taken in the ACT by the ACT Governmnet and Winnunga Nimmityjah to establish an autonomous Aboriginal managed and staffed health clinic within the Alexander Maconochie Centre to minister to the health needs of Aboriginal prisoners.

Following the briefing Sir Peter and Lady Cosgrove joined all staff for afternoon tea.

It was Chris Saddler an Aboriginal Health Practitioner at Winnunga and Lieutenant Nam’s birthday so the visitors sang happy birthday to both . Sir Peter  gave Chris and Julie a medal with the inscription Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia with the Crown and a wattle tree.

2.1 QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

The current guidelines recommend that a stroke risk screening be provided for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people over 35 years of age. However there is an argument to introduce that screening at a younger age.

Education is required to assist all Australians to understand what a stroke is, how to reduce the risk of stroke and the importance be fast acting at the first sign of stroke.”

Dr Mark Wenitong, Public Health Medical Advisor at Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima), says that strokes can be prevented through a healthy lifestyle and Health screening, and just as importantly, a healthy pregnancy and early childhood can reduce risk for the child in later life.

Naomi Wenitong  pictured above with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media and celebrate Stroke Week in your community.

Listen to the new rap song HERE  or Hear

The song, written by Cairns speech pathologist Rukmani Rusch and performed by leading Indigenous artist Naomi Wenitong, was created to boost low levels of stroke awareness in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said the rap packed a punch, delivering an important message, in a fun and accessible way.

“The Stroke Rap has a powerful message we all need to hear,’’ Ms McGowan said.

“Too many Australians continue to lose their lives to stroke each year when most strokes can be prevented.

“Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song, remember and act on its stroke awareness and prevention message – it could save their life.”

Ms McGowan said the song’s message was particularly important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities who were over represented in stroke statistics.

Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islanders are twice as likely to be hospitalised for stroke and are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians. These alarming figures were revealed in a recent study conducted by the Australian National University.

There is one stroke every nine minutes in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are overrepresented in stroke statistics. Strokes are the third leading cause of death in Australia.

Apunipima delivers primary health care services, health screening, health promotion and education to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people across 11 Cape York communities. These health screens will help to make sure you aren’t at risk  .

We encourage you to speak to an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health Practitioner or visit one of Apunipima’s Health Centres to talk to them about getting a health screen.

What is a stroke?

A stroke occurs when the blood flow to the brain is interrupted, depriving an area of the brain of oxygen. This is usually caused by a clot (ischaemic stroke) or a bleed in the brain (haemorrhagic stroke).

Brief stroke-like episodes that resolve by themselves are called transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs). They are often a sign of an impending stroke, and need to be treated seriously.

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

What to do in case of stroke?

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

The Australian National Stroke Foundation promotes the FAST tool as a quick way for anyone to identify a possible stroke. FAST consists of the following simple steps:

Face – has their mouth has dropped on one side?

Arm – can they lift both arms?

Speech – Is their speech slurred? Do they understand you?

Time – is critical. Call an ambulance.

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

The @Galambila ACCHO and @ReadyMob staff  hosting #strokeweek2018 on Gumbaynggirr country ( Coffs Harbour ) : Special thanks to Carroll Towney, Leon Williams and Katrina Widders from the Health Promotion team #ourMob#ourHealth #ourGoal #fightstoke @strokefdn

Recently released Australian National University research, found around one-third to a half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their 40s, 50s and 60s were at high risk of future heart attack or stroke. It also found risk increased substantially with age and starts earlier than previously thought, with high levels of risk were occurring in people younger than 35.

The good news is more than 80 percent of strokes can be prevented,’’ said Colin Cowell NACCHO Social Media editor and himself a stroke survivor.

“This National Stroke Week, we are urging all Australians to take steps to reduce their stroke risk.

“As a first step, I encourage all the mob to visit to visit one of our 302 ACCHO clinics , their local GP or community health centre for a health check, or take advantage of a free digital health check at your local pharmacy to learn more about your stroke risk factors.

“Then make small changes and stay motivated to reduce your stroke risk. Every step counts towards a healthy life,” he said.

Top tips for National Stroke Week:

  • Stay active – Too much body fat can contribute to high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Get moving and aim exercise at least 2.5 to 5 hours a week.
    •Eat well – Fuel your body with a balanced diet. Drop the salt and check the sodium content on packaged foods. Steer clear of sugary drinks and drink plenty of water.
    • Drink alcohol in moderation – Drinking large amounts of alcohol increases your risk of stroke through increased blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, obesity and irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation). Stick to no more than two standard alcoholic drinks a day for men and one standard drink per day for women.
    • Quit smoking – Smokers have twice the risk of having a stroke than non-smokers. There are immediate health benefits from quitting.
    • Make time to see your doctor for a health check.  Ask for a blood pressure check because high blood pressure is the key risk factor for stroke. Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and atrial fibrillation are also stroke risks which can be managed with the help of a GP.National Stroke Week is the Stroke Foundation’s annual stroke awareness campaign.

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

WHEN Aboriginal elder Aunty Pam Smith first had a stroke she had no idea what was happening to her body.

On her way back to town from a traditional smoking ceremony, she became confused, her jaw slack and dribbling.

FROM HERE

Picture above : CARE: Coral and Bill Toomey at National Stroke Awareness Week.

“I started feeling headachey, when they opened up the car and the cool air hit me I didn’t know where I was – I was in LaLa Land,” she said.

A guest speaker at the Stroke Foundation National Stroke Awareness Week event in Tamworth, Ms Smith has created a cultural awareness book about strokes for other Aboriginal people.

Watch Aunty Pams Story

She hopes it will teach others what to expect and how to look out for signs of a stroke, Aboriginal people are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-Indigenous people.

But, most still don’t go to hospital for help.

“Every time we went to a hospital we were treated for one thing, alcoholism – a bad heart or kidneys because of alcohol,” Ms Smith said.

“We were past that years ago, we’re up to what we call white fella’s things now.”

Elders encouraged people to make small changes in their daily lives, to quit smoking, eat a balanced diet and drink less alcohol.

For Bill Toomey it was a chance to speak with people who understood what it was like to have a stroke. A trip to Sydney in 2010 ended in the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital when he was found unconscious.

Now in a wheelchair, Mr Toomey was once a football referee and an Aboriginal Health Education Officer.

“I wouldn’t wish a stroke on anyone,” Mr Toomey said.

“I didn’t have the signs, the face didn’t drop or speech.”

His wife Coral Toomey cares for him, she was in Narrabri when he was rushed to hospital.

“Sometimes you want to hide, sit down and cry because there’s nothing you can do to help them,” she said.

“You’re doing what you can but you feel inside that it’s not enough to help them.”

Stroke survivor Pam Smith had a message for her community.

“Please go and have a second opinion, it doesn’t matter where or who it is – go to the hospital,” she said.

“If you’re not satisfied with your doctor go to another one.”

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

Did you know that Aboriginal people are up to three times more likely to suffer a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians, and twice as likely to die from a stroke?

This week is National Stroke Week, so make sure you know the signs of a stroke and call 000 if you suspect someone is experiencing a stroke.

Common risk factors for stroke include:
– High blood pressure
– Increasing age
– High cholesterol
– Diabetes
– Smoking

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

Veronica and Meagan had the opportunity to work closely with a group of the women in town. The ladies got to work on their paintings whilst participating in the Family Wellbeing training which focused on dealing with conflict and recognising personal strengths.


The week ended with a delicious lunch out bush and lots of smiles!

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

Chair of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance [AMSANT], Donna Ah Chee, said it wasn’t just the arrival of spring in the deserts of Central Australia to be welcomed today as the Aboriginal community-controlled health sector celebrated the graduation of 10 future leaders in receiving Diplomas in Leadership and Management.

“This is of course a wonderful achievement for each of the graduates who have put in a lot of hard work while still holding on to their full-time jobs,” said Ms Ah Chee.

“But just as important is what it means for the entire Aboriginal community controlled health sector—these women and men are the future, they are our future leaders in what are difficult, complex roles, they are role models for younger people, they are role models for their families and communities.

“Already organisations are moving graduates into managerial and team leader roles, and we are looking towards future intakes of students across a range of training opportunities in the sector— in management, administration, cultural leadership, community engagement and research.”

John Paterson, CEO of AMSANT reflected at the graduation ceremony in Alice Springs that while the work in the sector was very challenging, it was extraordinarily fulfilling.

“It really is the best sector to work in, no two ways about it.

“These new graduates are at the heart of what Aboriginal community control in comprehensive primary health care is about, it’s about people with lived experience in their own communities and families and having the strength and tenacity to take on the challenges we face in Aboriginal primary health care here in the Northern Territory.”

The graduates were drawn from the Katherine West Health Board, Anyinginyi Health, Miwatj Health and the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress).

Anyinginyi graduate, Nova Pomare, said that it hadn’t always been easy to get through the course.

“It was pretty hard working full time, studying and having to leave home away from family to attend the face-to-face course work in Darwin,” she said.

“But we were supported by our work places who have shown faith in our abilities and committed to our futures.”

Graduates of Diploma in Leadership and Management:

Anita Maynard Congress Velda Winunguj Miwatj Health

Carlissa Broome Congress Stan Stokes Anyinginyi Health

Glenn Clarke Congress Mahalia Hippi Anyinginyi Health

Samarra Schwarz Congress Nova Pomare Anyinginyi Health

John Liddle Congress Lorraine Johns Katherine West Health Board

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

 

 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

National Child Protection week began for VACCHO and the Victorian Aboriginal Children and Young People’s Alliance (Alliance) at the 2018 Victorian Protecting Children Awards on Monday 3 September 2018.

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) annual awards recognise dedicated teams and individuals working within government and community services who make protecting children their business.

We are pleased to announce that two of the 13 award winners were Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations and Members of VACCHO and the Alliance.

Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

This award was established by DHHS in partnership with the Victorian Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People, in memory of Aunty Walda Blow – a proud Yorta

Yorta and Wemba Wemba Elder who lived her life in the pursuit of equality.

Aunty Walda was an early founder of the Dandenong and District Aboriginal Cooperative and worked for over 40 years improving the lives of the Aboriginal community. This award recognises contributions of an Aboriginal person in Victoria to the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people.

Karen ensures the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people are always front and centre.

Karen has personally committed her support to the Ballarat Community through establishing and continuously advocating for innovative prevention, intervention and reunification programs.

As the inaugural Chairperson of the Alliance, Karen contributions to establishing the identity and achieving multiple outcomes in the Alliance Strategic Plan is celebrated by her peers and recognised by the community service sector and DHHS.

Karen’s leadership in community but particularly for BADAC, has seen new ways of delivering cultural models of care to Aboriginal children, carers and their families, ensuring a holistic service is provided to best meet the needs of each individual and in turn benefit the community.

The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

This award is for a team within the child and family services sector who has made an exceptional contribution to directly improve the lives of children, young people and families,

BDAC have lead the way, showing the Alliance member organisations what it takes to run the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18) program. BDAC have adapted a child protection model to incorporate holistic assessment and an Aboriginal cultural lens to support the children and families.

They have evidence that empowered decision making improves outcomes, particularly family reunification. The BDAC CEO, Raylene Harradine and Section 18 Pilot team have shown dedication, empathy and long term commitment in getting the program right for their organisation and clients, so that they can share their learning and program model with other ACCOs.

Their leadership in community has created waves of innovation in delivering cultural models of care to vulnerable Aboriginal children, carers and their families, achieving shared outcomes for all.

VACCHO and the Alliance walk away feeling inspired by all to do the best we can for our Koori children and young people, congratul

 

NACCHO #Saveadate #NACCHOagm2018 : Aboriginal #WomensHealthWeek and It’s a busy week, with also, #strokeweek2018 & Global Week for Action on NCDs #enoughNCDs. Yet they are all linked. Time to invest in #prevention

Womens Health Week Monday 3 to Sunday 9 September 2018

Global week for action #NCD’s

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

National Stroke Week – Monday 3 to Sunday 9 September 2018.

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project. 

NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Womens Health Week Monday 3 to Sunday 9 September 2018

View Here previous Video

My family’s wellbeing is so important to me and, as an Indigenous woman, I am equally passionate about tackling the appalling health and life expectancy statistics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. As an ambassador for Jean Hailes and Women’s Health Week, I feel I can be part of the solution by encouraging Indigenous women to take the time to put their health first.

You can put your health first too by being part of this year’s Women’s Health Week from 3-7 September. It’s fun and free. Please sign up!

Shelley Ware Womens Health Week Ambassador 

Read over 350 Aboriginal Womens Health articles published by NACCHO over the past 6 years

Four years ago I was delighted to become one of the first ambassadors for Jean Hailes’ Women’s Health Week. I am still so proud to be involved, helping to promote the importance of good health.

Growing up, sport was a natural part of our family life.  I played netball, participated in little athletics, swimming – even touch footy.  My Dad was a professional runner and Mum played netball too so if we weren’t at sport, we were watching our parents play.

My childhood was pretty idyllic until the awful day when my beloved Dad suffered a heart attack and passed away at the age of 51.  A few years later, Mum was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 following a routine mammogram.  Thankfully she beat it and is still doing well today.

I have a lot to watch out for in my yearly health checks, so it’s important I stay fit and healthy.

I have suffered from endometriosis, which, as well as being extremely painful, made conceiving my beautiful son Taj that much harder for my husband Steven and I.

My family’s wellbeing is so important to me and, as an Indigenous woman, I am equally passionate about tackling the appalling health and life expectancy statistics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. As an ambassador for Jean Hailes and Women’s Health Week, I feel I can be part of the solution by encouraging Indigenous women to take the time to put their health first.

You can put your health first too by being part of this year’s Women’s Health Week from 3-7 September. It’s fun and free. Please sign up!

Follow @JeanHailes 

Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance

The Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance (ACDPA) brings together five leading non-government health organisations in the primary prevention of chronic disease in Australia.

Cancer Council Australia, Diabetes Australia, National Heart Foundation of Australia, Kidney Health Australia, and the Stroke Foundation work together, with emphasis on changes to the food and physical environments to:

  • improve nutrition

  • increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behaviour,

  • reduce unhealthy weight at a population level.

Chronic diseases are Australia’s greatest health challenge, and leading cause of illness, disability and death. However, much burden could be prevented through improving nutrition, increasing physical activity and decreasing overweight and obesity.

About us

The Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance (ACDPA) brings together Cancer Council Australia, Diabetes Australia, National Heart Foundation of Australia, Kidney Health Australia, and the Stroke Foundation to provide an independent voice addressing shared modifiable risk factors for chronic disease.

What is chronic disease?

Chronic diseases are generally long lasting conditions with persistent effects. These include cancer, heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and kidney disease. Chronic diseases are the leading cause of illness, disability, and death in Australia, and accounted for around 90% of all deaths in 2011 (1).

One in two Australians have a chronic disease and almost one quarter have at least two conditions (2).

However, much chronic disease is actually preventable. Poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and overweight and obesity are common modifiable risk factors.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare estimates that around one third of total disease burden could be prevented by reducing modifiable risk factors. Globally, the World Health Organization estimates that at least 80% of premature heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes, and over 40% of cancer could be prevented.

Find out How ACDPA works

Global week for action #NCD’s

With the digital world switched on to talk about NCDs, the first Global Week for Action on NCDs – from Monday 3 September to Sunday 9 September – will provide everyone, everywhere the opportunity to mobilise on the ground in the lead-up to the HLM on NCDs, under the theme ENOUGH. Our Health. Our Right. Right Now.

This will be a global opportunity to talk to each other, to leaders, to media, to crowds, to the world about what works well and what needs to change to ensure a transition from commitment to tangible actions that not only yield reportable improvements in NCD targets and outcomes, but result in the improvement of health and lives of all people in all places.

The opportunities are endless. Possible activities include organising a meeting, community conversation, picnic, fun run, dance party, or art competition. The week is your chance to do something achievable, appropriate, relevant and impactful where you live, but linked to a global movement.

  • It’s time to say ENOUGH.
  • It’s time to celebrate progress and leadership.
  • It’s time to move from commitment to action.
  • It’s Time to Deliver action on NCDs.

More information is cavailable on the NCD Alliance led initiative here.

Follow @IndigenousNCDs

Promoting inclusion of peoples & Indigenous-led solutions in global  discourse    

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

The recording of our second webinar that gives an overview of digital health in Australia and where My Health Record fits in the scheme of things is now up on our YouTube channel:

You can register here: http://www.webcasts.com.au/chf300818/. Next week, we have an in depth look at the risks.

 

If you have questions or thoughts about either, please use the links below to send them to us.

Upcoming Webinars

Risks of My Health Record
Thursday, 6 September
12:30pm-1:30pm AEST

Ask a question | Register to attend | Find out more

Digital inclusion, health literacy and My Health Record
Thursday, 13 September
3pm-4pm AEST

Ask a question | Register to attend | Find out more

Consumer Estimates: My Health Record
Thursday, 4 October
12:30pm-1:30pm AEST

Register to attend | Find out more

 

National Stroke Week – Monday 3 to Sunday 9 September 2018.

Risky reality of stroke in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

Read over 90 Aboriginal Health and Stroke articles published in past 6 years 

Stroke Foundation has backed a call for urgent action to prevent stroke in Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

This follows today’s release of a world-first study by the Australian National University (ANU), highlighting the harrowing reality of stroke and heart attack risk in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The research found around one-third to a half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their 40s, 50s and 60s were at high risk of future heart attack or stroke. It also found risk increased substantially with age and starts earlier than previously thought.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said the research results were frightening.

“We knew the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community had a greater risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease, but the rate was well above the non-indigenous population,” Ms McGowan said.

“Alarmingly, the study also found high levels of risk were occurring in people younger than 35.

“Steps must be taken immediately to increase stroke awareness and access to health checks through targeted action. Federal and state government must come together to address this issue.”

National guidelines currently recommend heart health and stroke risk screening be provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 35 and over. This study highlights the need for screening in much younger people.

Ms McGowan said there was one stroke every nine minutes in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were overrepresented in stroke statistics.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were twice as likely to be hospitalised with stroke and 1.4 times as likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians.

“Stroke can be prevented, it can be treated and it can be beaten. We must act now to stem the tide of this devastating disease,’’ she said.

“Federal and State Government must do more to empower our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to take control of their health and prevent stroke and heart disease – we must deliver targeted education on what stroke is, how to prevent it and the importance of accessing treatment at the first sign of stroke.”

Ms McGowan said stroke could be prevented by managing your blood pressure and cholesterol, eating healthily, exercising, not smoking and limiting alcohol consumption

 Stroke Week 

Every step counts towards a healthy life.

This year, Stroke Foundation is encouraging Australians to discover how easy it is to fit healthy habits into their day and do their part to prevent stroke.

It’s estimated that more than 80 percent of strokes can be prevented simply by managing risk factors and living a healthy lifestyle. There are some risk factors for stroke which can’t be prevented like age, family history and prior stroke. If you’re male, your risk is also higher.

There are two ways to approach this: first by talking to your doctor and secondly by taking ownership of your own health.

Take charge of your own health:

  • Eat well.
  • Stay active.
  • Be smoke free.
  • Moderate alcohol intake.
  • Visit your doctor for a health check to help manage blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation (irregular heart beat).

Read more about stroke prevention

 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Alice Springs September 2018
Tennant Creek September 2018
Yarrabah September 2018
Weipa September 2018
Torres Strait Islands October 2018
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

Download HERE

 

 NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location: 233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.
Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Save a date Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #NACCHOAgm2018 This week #MyHealthRecord webinar @strokefdn #strokeweek2018 #fightstroke @June_Oscar #WomensVoices

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

National Stroke Week – Monday 3 to Sunday 9 September 2018.

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project. 

NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

The recording of our second webinar that gives an overview of digital health in Australia and where My Health Record fits in the scheme of things is now up on our YouTube channel:

The next webinar is on Thursday 30 August at 12:30-1:30pm and is looking more closely at the Benefits of My Health Record – you can register here: http://www.webcasts.com.au/chf300818/. Next week, we have an in depth look at the risks.

If you have questions or thoughts about either, please use the links below to send them to us.

Upcoming Webinars

Benefits of My Health Record
Thursday, 30 August
12:30pm-1:30pm AEST

Ask a question | Register to attend | Find out more

Risks of My Health Record
Thursday, 6 September
12:30pm-1:30pm AEST

Ask a question | Register to attend | Find out more

Digital inclusion, health literacy and My Health Record
Thursday, 13 September
3pm-4pm AEST

Ask a question | Register to attend | Find out more

Consumer Estimates: My Health Record
Thursday, 4 October
12:30pm-1:30pm AEST

Register to attend | Find out more

 

National Stroke Week – Monday 3 to Sunday 9 September 2018.

Risky reality of stroke in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

Read over 90 Aboriginal Health and Stroke articles published in past 6 years 

Stroke Foundation has backed a call for urgent action to prevent stroke in Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

This follows today’s release of a world-first study by the Australian National University (ANU), highlighting the harrowing reality of stroke and heart attack risk in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The research found around one-third to a half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their 40s, 50s and 60s were at high risk of future heart attack or stroke. It also found risk increased substantially with age and starts earlier than previously thought.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said the research results were frightening.

“We knew the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community had a greater risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease, but the rate was well above the non-indigenous population,” Ms McGowan said.

“Alarmingly, the study also found high levels of risk were occurring in people younger than 35.

“Steps must be taken immediately to increase stroke awareness and access to health checks through targeted action. Federal and state government must come together to address this issue.”

National guidelines currently recommend heart health and stroke risk screening be provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 35 and over. This study highlights the need for screening in much younger people.

Ms McGowan said there was one stroke every nine minutes in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were overrepresented in stroke statistics.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were twice as likely to be hospitalised with stroke and 1.4 times as likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians.

“Stroke can be prevented, it can be treated and it can be beaten. We must act now to stem the tide of this devastating disease,’’ she said.

“Federal and State Government must do more to empower our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to take control of their health and prevent stroke and heart disease – we must deliver targeted education on what stroke is, how to prevent it and the importance of accessing treatment at the first sign of stroke.”

Ms McGowan said stroke could be prevented by managing your blood pressure and cholesterol, eating healthily, exercising, not smoking and limiting alcohol consumption

 Stroke Week 

Every step counts towards a healthy life.

This year, Stroke Foundation is encouraging Australians to discover how easy it is to fit healthy habits into their day and do their part to prevent stroke.

It’s estimated that more than 80 percent of strokes can be prevented simply by managing risk factors and living a healthy lifestyle. There are some risk factors for stroke which can’t be prevented like age, family history and prior stroke. If you’re male, your risk is also higher.

There are two ways to approach this: first by talking to your doctor and secondly by taking ownership of your own health.

Take charge of your own health:

  • Eat well.
  • Stay active.
  • Be smoke free.
  • Moderate alcohol intake.
  • Visit your doctor for a health check to help manage blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation (irregular heart beat).

Read more about stroke prevention

 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings

Canberra
Location Date Time Address Who? Registration
Gugan Gulwan Youth Aboriginal Corporation Tuesday 28 August 2018 9:00am – 1:00pm 1 Gratton Court Waniassa ACT 2903 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Tuesday 28 August 2018 2:00pm – 5:30pm Central Plaza 16 Bowes Place, Phillip ACT 2606 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in the Australian Public Service only Register
Women’s Legal Centre Wednesday 29 August 2018 12:30pm – 4:30pm Conference Room, Ground Floor, 21 Barry Dr, Turner ACT 2601 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
Wreck Bay
Jervis Bay High School Thursday 30 August 2018 12:00pm – 4:00pm Dykes Avenue Jervis Bay ACT 2540 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
Nowra
Nowra Showground Friday 31 August 2018 09:00am – 1:30pm Committee Room, Nowra Showground, 20 West Street, Nowra NSW 2541 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Alice Springs September 2018
Tennant Creek September 2018
Yarrabah September 2018
Weipa September 2018
Torres Strait Islands October 2018
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

Download HERE

 

 NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location: 233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.
Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Obesity NEWS : 1.Network Submission to the Select Committee’s #Obesity Epidemic in Australia Inquiry and our 13 recommendations: 2.Healthy Food Partnership Survey

 

” The 2012-13 Health Survey identified that Indigenous adults were 1.6 times as likely to be obese as non-Indigenous Australians, with the prevalence increasing more rapidly in Aboriginal school-aged children.

Overweight and obesity in childhood are important predictors of adult adiposity, increasing the risk of developing a range of medical conditions, each of which is a major cause of morbidity, mortality and health expenditure.

While it is surprisingly clear what needs to be done to improve the health of Indigenous children, recent cuts to Indigenous preventative workforce and nutrition programs throughout Australia have severely reduced the capacity to respond.

Comprehensive primary health care is a key strategy for improving the health of Indigenous Australians and is an important platform from which to address complex health and social issues associated with obesity.

Closing the Gap, including the gap attributable to obesity, requires ensuring the ACCHS sector is resourced to deliver the full range of core services required under a comprehensive and culturally safe model of primary health care.

The effectiveness of ACCHSs has long been recognised, with many able to document better health outcomes than mainstream services for the communities they serve. “

Extract from NACCHO Network Submission to the Select Committee’s Obesity Epidemic in Australia Inquiry. 

Download the full 15 Page submission HERE

Obesity Epidemic in Australia – Network Submission – 6.7.18

 ” The Healthy Food Partnership is a mechanism for government, the public health sector and the food industry to cooperatively tackle obesity, encourage healthy eating and empower food manufacturers to make positive changes.

The Healthy Food Partnership’s Reformulation Working Group has developed draft reformulation targets for sodium, sugars and/or saturated fats, in 36 sub-categories of food.  These food categories are amongst the highest contributors of sodium, sugars and saturated fat to Australian population level intakes.”

See Healthy Food Partnership Survey Part 2 Below

Read over 50 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Obesity articles published in past 6 years 

 

Introduction to NACCHO Network Sumission and selected extracts 

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) is the peak body representing 143 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) across Australia.

ACCHSs provide comprehensive primary health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through over 300 Aboriginal medical clinics throughout Australia.

ACCHSs deliver three million episodes of care to around 350,000 people each year, servicing over 47% of the Aboriginal population, with about one million episodes of care delivered in remote areas.

The Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) sector is the largest single employer of Indigenous people in the country, employing 6,000 staff, the majority of whom are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

The evidence that the ACCHS model of comprehensive primary health care delivers better outcomes than mainstream services for Aboriginal people is well established.

Without exception, where Aboriginal people and communities lead, define, design, control and deliver services and programs to their communities, they achieve improved outcomes.

The ACCHS model of care has its genesis in Aboriginal people’s right to self-determination, and is predicated on principles that incorporate a holistic, person-centred, whole-of-life, culturally secure approach.

The ACCHS principles of self-determination and community control remain central to wellbeing and sovereignty of Aboriginal people. Equipped with inequitable levels of funding and resources ,

ACCHSs continue to meet the ongoing challenges of addressing the burden of disease in Aboriginal communities.

Executive summary

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) welcomes the opportunity to provide input into the Inquiry into the Obesity epidemic in Australia.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people represent approximately 3% of the Australian population yet are disproportionately over-represented on almost every indicium of social, health and wellbeing determinant.

Social determinants and historical factors such as intergenerational trauma, racism, social exclusion, and loss of land and culture are commonly recognised as causative factors for these disparities.

In 2008 the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) committed to addressing the health disparity between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians by adopting the Closing the Gap initiative. Whilst gaining some success in achieving convergence for some health indicators, wide health and wellbeing disparity still remains for both children and adults.

The life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians remains 10.6 years for males and 9.5 years for females.

As a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among Indigenous Australians, obesity is estimated to account for 16% of the health gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the total Australian population.

Comprehensive primary health care is a key strategy for improving the health of Indigenous Australians and is an important platform from which to address complex health and social issues associated with obesity.

Closing the Gap, including the gap attributable to obesity, requires ensuring the ACCHS sector is resourced to deliver the full range of core services required under a comprehensive and culturally safe model of primary health care. The effectiveness of ACCHSs has long been recognised, with many able to document better health outcomes than mainstream services for the communities they serve.

Combating the burden of obesity and its health effects for Indigenous Australians demands a strategic and coordinated whole-of-society approach at a national level by the Federal Government.

Without coordinated, sustained national action, efforts to improve the health status of Aboriginal children are likely to fail. In recognising the need to seriously address this critical and increasing gap in Indigenous health, NACCHO welcomes this inquiry and proposes the following recommendations:

  1. Government to work in partnership with NACCHO and the ACCHS sector to develop policies and plans that are responsive to the needs of Aboriginal communities
  2. A commitment to increase the understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of the health significance of overweight and obesity, and facilitating access for these communities to resources which support healthy eating and physical activity
  3. Additional investment to build organisational capacity within the ACCHS sector and to increase the capacity of Aboriginal Health Promotion Officers to maintain a focus on public health initiatives
  4. Government to encourage professional support systems for, and assist Aboriginal Health Worker’s and other primary care workers to provide advice to adults and children about weight management as part of existing health checks and screening programs – this may be achieved by encouraging the MBS Aboriginal Health Check item to communicate more effectively the importance of physical activity, nutrition and weight management
  5. Fund the development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural awareness training for health care professionals covering care, education and information relating to food, physical activity, lifestyle choices and health service arrangements
  6. In understanding that health promotion is more difficult in regional and rural Australia, targeted funding should be dedicated to these areas to overcome the pervasive problems associated with distance
  7. A commitment to ongoing consultation with Aboriginal communities on what can be achieved at a local level to effectively promote healthy eating and physical activity for children
  8. Facilitate access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to resources which support lifestyle changes, including access to information, physical activity opportunities, and healthy food choices
  9. The prevalence of childhood obesity and the absence of culturally specific programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people warrants further work in the development of culturally appropriate programs and tailored communication strategies alongside mainstream campaigns and messages
  10. Given the paucity of studies on Indigenous children, there is a need for further research on effective obesity prevention interventions for Indigenous families. This requires commitment to more detailed monitoring of young Indigenous children’s diets and their physical activity
  11. Government to work with the food industry and community stores to implement retail intervention strategies to positively influence access to and consumption of healthy food choices for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
  12. Consider mechanisms to sustain programs on physical activity, nutrition and weight management that have proven effective
  13. Ensure significant participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in national surveys and evaluations by enhancing the sampling frame and applying culturally appropriate recruitment strategies

Evidence-based measures and interventions to prevent and reverse childhood obesity, including experiences from overseas jurisdictions

Evidence-based profiling of obesity and overweight in Indigenous Australian children has been poor, with very little known about the effectiveness of culturally adapted children’s interventions. Given the impact on health, finances and community, the need for better strategies and interventions to manage obesity are now being recognised by the entire health system.

Historically, initiatives have focused on nutrition or physical activity as separate entities and have shown modest effects. In recent years, global interventions considering the wider ‘obesogenic environment’ have been recommended, with policymakers and public health practitioners increasingly turning to evidence-based strategies to discover effective interventions to childhood obesity.

It is important to note, however, that the rapidly growing body of literature has meant many recommendations for childhood obesity have often relied on research that has not been systematically reviewed and focused more on assessing the internal validity of study results than on evaluating the external validity, feasibility or sustainability of intervention effects.

Experience in several countries has shown that successful obesity prevention during childhood can be achieved through a combination of population-based initiatives.li There is strong evidence for the effectiveness of school-based strategies, acting as an ideal setting for interventions to support healthy behaviours, and can also potentially reach most school age 9 children of diverse ethnic and socioeconomic groups. The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a curriculum that is culturally appropriate and a school environment that reflects the culture within the community by demonstrating cultural awareness in healthy eating and physical activity practices.l

Examples of school-based strategies include policies that limit student access to foods and beverages that are high in fats and sugar, contributing to decreased consumption during the school dayliii, and efforts to increase physical activity leading to a lowered body mass indexliv and improved cognitive abilities,lv especially in younger children. An evaluation of a school-based health education program for urban Indigenous youth found compromising results in physical activity, breakfast intake and fruit and vegetable consumption, all of which are core components of healthy weight management.lvi

Studies have examined the effectiveness of culturally specific versions of programs to tackle obesity, including a US study comparing a mainstream program with a culturally adapted version. Findings were that cultural adaptations improved recruitment and retention numbers, with the authors recommending that to improve program design, ethnic communities and organisations should be approached to collaborate with researchers in design, modifications, recruitment techniques, implementation, evaluation and interpretation of results.lvii

A 2013 Canadian pilot evaluation of a whole-school health promotion program, Healthy Buddies, involved researchers consulting Aboriginal community members about how the program could be more effective, sustainable and culturally appropriate, resulting in a new version called Healthy Buddies – First Nations. Prior to implementation, communities were able to review the program and tailor its cultural appropriateness. Lesson content and visual aids were amended to resemble Aboriginal children, as well as Aboriginal food and activities.lviii In promoting social responsibility through the buddy system, the program showed a significant lowering in BMI and waist circumference and was considered particularly important for remote communities.

Systematic and evidence-based reviews have suggested promise in tailoring programs to be more culturally appropriate for specific ethnic and culturally diverse groups. The 2014 Global Nutrition Report, which examined the limited access to supermarkets and a reliance on fast-food as contributing to the growing prevalence of obesity in American Indian communities, recommended that interventions need to be multi-faceted, culturally sensitive, grounded in cultural traditions, and developed with full participation of American Indian communities.lix

Similar recommendations were made in a review by Toronto Public Health, identifying that interventions targeting children from low socioeconomic or culturally diverse backgrounds can positively impact on physical activity levels and dietary intake. This highlights the need to consider focusing on specific cultural backgrounds, like Indigenous Australians, when planning obesity prevention interventions to achieve better outcomes.

The role of the food industry in contributing to poor diets and childhood obesity in Australia

Improving the access to and availability of nutritious food is a vital step to combating the prevalence of obesity. Indigenous people living in rural and remote areas in particular face significant barriers in accessing nutritious and affordable food.

The level and composition of food intake is influenced by socio-economic status, high prices, poor quality fruit and vegetables in community stores, and unavailability of many nutritious foods.lxi This is indeed exacerbated by the exposure to high levels of unhealthy food marketing across a range of media. 10

The ubiquitous marketing of unhealthy food creates a negative food culture, undermining nutrition recommendations.

Substantial research documents the extensiveness and persuasive nature of food marketing in Australia; importantly, the vast majority of all food and drink marketing, regardless of medium or setting, is for food and drinks high in fat, sugar and/or salt.lxii Australian children are exposed to high levels of unhealthy food marketing through a range of mediums, including sponsorship arrangements with children’s sport. With research identifying a logical sequence of effects linking food promotion to individual-level weight outcomes,lxiii it is clear that food marketing influences children’s attitudes and subsequent food consumption.

Australia’s National Preventative Health Taskforce has highlighted the importance of restricting inappropriate marketing of unhealthy food and beverages to children as a cost-effective obesity prevention strategy.lxiv Clear affirmative action in Australia to such marketing has been lacking to date, compounding the need for Government to explore options for regulating the production, marketing and sale of energy-dense and nutrient-poor products to reduce consumption.

Research has shown that the prevalence of obesity increases and consumption of fruit and vegetables decreases with increasing distance to grocery stores and supermarketslxv and a higher density of convenience stores and take-away food outlets.lxvi Cost is also a major issue, with the price of basic healthy foods increased by 50% or more in rural and remote areas where there is a higher proportion of Indigenous residents compared to non-Indigenous residents than in urban areas.lxvii The purchasing behaviour of children is particularly sensitive to price, and can have significant effects over time.

Foods of better nutritional choice, including fresh fruits and vegetables, are often expensive due to transportation and overhead costs, or only minimally available.lxviii Comparatively, takeaway and convenience food, often energy-dense and high in fat or sugar, are less affected by cost and availability.

A study of intake of six remote Aboriginal communities, based on store turnover, found that intake of energy, fat and sugar was excessive, with fatty meats making the largest contribution to fat intake.lxx Compared with national data, intake of sweet and carbonated beverages and sugar was much higher in these communities, with the proportion of energy derived from refined sugars approximately four times the recommended intake.

Recent evidence from Mexico indicates that implementing health-related taxes on sugary drinks and on ‘junk’ food can decrease purchase of these foods and drinks.lxxi A recent Australian study predicted that increasing the price of sugary drinks by 20% could reduce consumption by 12.6%.lxxii Revenue raised by such a measure could be directed to an evaluation of effectiveness and in the longer term be used to subsidise and market healthy food choices as well as promotion of physical activity.

It is imperative that all of these interventions to promote healthy eating should have community-ownership and not undermine the cultural importance of family social events, the role of Elders, or traditional preferences for some food. Food supply in Indigenous communities needs to ensure healthy, good quality foods are available at affordable prices.

In Summary

It is widely understood that many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, predominantly children, are at high-risk of ill-health due to overweight and obesity. This is likely to lead to a widening gap in health outcomes for Indigenous Australians if prevention efforts are not improved. Despite the identified health and economic gains which can be achieved by using a social determinants and culturally appropriate approach, Australia is yet to embed such thinking in health policy.

Policy in isolation will not solve the epidemic of childhood obesity for Indigenous children. What is required, is urgent action to address poverty, education, unemployment and housing, all of which are factors that shape a child’s ability to engage with healthy behaviours. There also needs to be close ongoing national monitoring through the collection of comparable data; more detailed monitoring of the composition of young Indigenous children’s diets and physical activity is necessary to determine whether patterns are changing in response to interventions.

Undeniably, strategic investment is needed to implement population-based childhood obesity prevention programs which are effective and also culturally appropriate, evidence-based, easily understood, action-oriented and motivating. Interventions must be positioned within broad strategies addressing the continuing social and economic disadvantages that many Indigenous people experience and need to have an emphasis on training community-based health workers, particularly in the ACCHS sector who are best placed to respond to the increasing rates of obesity and associated health concerns for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The ACCH sector has a central role in promoting and improving health outcomes for Indigenous people yet requires additional targeted funding and resources to implement new initiatives, including intervention, education, and research to encourage physical activity and healthy nutrition. Indeed, multifaceted strategies involving the public, private and ACCHS sector, along with community participation and government support, are required to gradually reverse this trend.

NACCHO and its Affiliates in each State and Territory appreciate the opportunity to make this submission on behalf of our member services. With circumstances unimproved after years of policy approaches, the need remains to overturn the prevalence of overweight and obesity of Indigenous people. There needs to be a commitment at all levels of government in terms of funding, policy development, and support for the implementation of culturally appropriate programs and services. There must be a recognition that self-determination of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people will be the foundation of true progress.

NACCHO strongly recommend that Government engage in meaningful dialogue with NACCHO, NACCHO’s Affiliates in each State and Territory and ACCHSs in relation to the proposals canvassed in this response; and work in partnership to address the significant prevalence of obesity in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, especially children

 

Part 2 Overview Healthy Food Partnership Survey 

The Healthy Food Partnership is a mechanism for government, the public health sector and the food industry to cooperatively tackle obesity, encourage healthy eating and empower food manufacturers to make positive changes.

The Healthy Food Partnership’s Reformulation Working Group has developed draft reformulation targets for sodium, sugars and/or saturated fats, in 36 sub-categories of food.  These food categories are amongst the highest contributors of sodium, sugars and saturated fat to Australian population level intakes.

Please note the different closing dates relating to feedback on the various nutrient targets.

Why We Are Consulting

The Healthy Food Partnership (Partnership) recognises that many companies are already reformulating their products to improve the nutritional quality and aims to build on (rather than replicate) these efforts.

It is not the intention of the Partnership to disadvantage companies that are already reformulating, but to recognise and support their efforts to date, and encourage those companies that are yet to engage in reformulation activities to move towards improving the nutritional profile of their products.  Targets will create certainty for industry of what they, and their competitors, should be aiming for.

Feedback is sought on the feasibility of the draft targets, the appropriateness of the draft category definitions (including products which are included or excluded), and the proposed implementation period (four years).  Consultation feedback will inform the final recommendations of the Reformulation Working Group, to the Partnership’s Executive Committee.

Deidentified information from submissions will be provided to the Reformulation Working Group and other committees involved with the Healthy Food Partnership.

Submissions will be published at the end of the consultation period, unless confidentiality has been requested.

Begin survey

NACCHO Aboriginal Heart Health : @ourANU @Mayi_Kuwayu Report high levels of risk of heart disease and #stroke for young and old #Indigenous Australians can be prevented : Plus @strokefdn Response

Recognising the risk will help save and improve lives and contribute to Closing the Gap in life expectancy.

Heart checks may need to start earlier in order to protect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people but the good news is most heart attacks and strokes can be prevented.

Critical to this is knowing who is at risk and encouraging lifestyle changes, including quitting smoking, and lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

The study also found that many people at high risk of heart attacks or strokes are not aware of it and most are not receiving currently recommended therapy to lower their cholesterol.”

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt releasing the study

Ken Wyatt Heart study press release

 ” Programs aimed at prevention should also be co-designed with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, taking into account social and cultural barriers that impact access and ongoing treatment.

The good news is, we know heart attacks and strokes can be prevented and we have effective treatments to achieve this. Within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities there is huge potential to prevent heart attacks and stroke.

Many people don’t receive a heart check and could be at high risk without knowing it. Prevention starts with getting a heart check and continuing to use any medications prescribed to you by your doctor to lower your risk ‘

Download the Report here Heart Stroke Report

OR Read online HERE

ANU researchers have met with Minister for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt, Aboriginal woman and heart health researcher Vicki Wade and to launch new study on First Nations people heart health.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were twice as likely to be hospitalised with stroke and 1.4 times as likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians. 

Stroke can be prevented, it can be treated and it can be beaten. We must act now to stem the tide of this devastating disease

Steps must be taken immediately to increase stroke awareness and access to health checks through targeted action. Federal and state government must come together to address this issue.”

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said the research results were frightening. See Full Press Release Part 2 below

” Australian’s national guidelines currently say heart health screening should begin at age 35 for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

However, new research has found there’s a high risk of Indigenous people under 35 developing cardiovascular disease.

The study also shows Indigenous people have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in older age.

Researchers say this information will be important to help identify risks earlier, and prevent disease from developing ”

Dr Norman Swan radio interview LISTEN HERE

Professor Emily Banks

Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra

Associate Professor Ray Lovett

Head of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra

Most heart attacks and strokes can be prevented with appropriate treatment. Yet heart disease, including heart attacks, causes 13% of deaths among Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and is a major contributor to the gap in life expectancy with non-Indigenous Australians.

New findings from a study published today in the Medical Journal of Australia show vast room for improvement in heart health among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Who is at risk?

This new research found 10% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 35-74 years old have heart disease (compared to 9% aged 45-74 in the general population). Another 16% are at high risk of getting heart disease (compared to 11% aged 45-74 in the general population), defined in Australia as a greater than 15% chance of getting heart disease in the next five years.

A heart check involves calculating how likely a person is to develop heart disease over a specific time period (five years in Australia). This involves gathering information from multiple factors including a person’s age, sex, smoking status, whether they have diabetes and their blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Australia’s national guidelines recommend all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples aged 35-74 have a heart check. But this new research found the “high risk” category starts much earlier than this.

Around 1.1% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 18-24 year olds and 4.7% of 25-34 year olds were at high risk of heart disease. This is around the same as the proportion of non-Indigenous Australians aged 45-54 who are at high risk.

Too few Indigenous peoples are having heart checks. from http://www.shutterstock.com

Potential to prevent events through medication

Heart disease risk can be lowered through lifestyle changes, including giving up smoking, losing weight and exercising more, as well as using medications that lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Generally, all people who have heart disease and those at high risk should be prescribed preventative medications.

Yet this latest evidence shows only 53% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with existing heart disease and 42% of those at high risk were using cholesterol-lowering medications. We don’t know the exact reasons for this. It could be due to a number of things including people not getting a heart check in the first place, and not continuing to use medications when they have been prescribed.

We don’t know the exact number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people receiving a heart check, but we do know overall numbers are low and it varies by region. Estimates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with diabetes found rates of heart checks ranged from about 3% of people in participating health centres in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia to around 56% in the Northern Territory.

This highlights the huge potential to prevent future heart attack and stroke in these communities by improving treatment in people at high risk.

What can we do?

These findings highlight multiple actions that can be taken to improve heart disease prevention. First, this new evidence suggests the age to start doing heart checks should be lowered in Australian guidelines. This decision would need to be jointly undertaken with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

GPs and nurses should be proactive in identifying Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, providing heart and overall health checks, and following up with patients.

The Northern Territory is a good example. There, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples receiving a heart check more than doubled after improvements in reporting, monitoring and follow-up. Improving the rate of health checks for adolescents and young adults is particularly important so discussions and treatment decisions can take place early.

Programs aimed at prevention should also be co-designed with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, taking into account social and cultural barriers that impact access and ongoing treatment.

The good news is, we know heart attacks and strokes can be prevented and we have effective treatments to achieve this. Within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities there is huge potential to prevent heart attacks and stroke.

Many people don’t receive a heart check and could be at high risk without knowing it. Prevention starts with getting a heart check and continuing to use any medications prescribed to you by your doctor to lower your risk.

Part 2 Stroke Foundation  Press Release

 

Stroke Foundation has backed a call for urgent action to prevent stroke in Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

This follows today’s release of a world-first study by the Australian National University (ANU), highlighting the harrowing reality of stroke and heart attack risk in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The research found around one-third to a half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their 40s, 50s and 60s were at high risk of future heart attack or stroke. It also found risk increased substantially with age and starts earlier than previously thought.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said the research results were frightening.

“We knew the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community had a greater risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease, but the rate was well above the non-indigenous population,” Ms McGowan said.

“Alarmingly, the study also found high levels of risk were occurring in people younger than 35.

“Steps must be taken immediately to increase stroke awareness and access to health checks through targeted action. Federal and state government must come together to address this issue.”

National guidelines currently recommend heart health and stroke risk screening be provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 35 and over. This study highlights the need for screening in much younger people.

Ms McGowan said there was one stroke every nine minutes in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were overrepresented in stroke statistics.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were twice as likely to be hospitalised with stroke and 1.4 times as likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians.

“Stroke can be prevented, it can be treated and it can be beaten. We must act now to stem the tide of this devastating disease,’’ she said.

“Federal and State Government must do more to empower our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to take control of their health and prevent stroke and heart disease – we must deliver targeted education on what stroke is, how to prevent it and the importance of accessing treatment at the first sign of stroke.”

Ms McGowan said stroke could be prevented by managing your blood pressure and cholesterol, eating healthily, exercising, not smoking and limiting alcohol consumption

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Chronic Disease : #NCDForum @Prevention1stAU Report : Government is ignoring our chronic disease time bomb

  ” One in every two Australians suffer from chronic disease but experts say Commonwealth and State Governments appear blind to the country’s greatest health challenge.

The latest assessment of the country’s chronic disease prevention policy has found that while our health measures in tobacco policy are world leading, Australia has fallen well short in its preventive health efforts in the key areas of alcohol consumption, nutrition, and physical activity.”

A scorecard released today by Prevention 1st found that while government anti-smoking policies are ‘good’, efforts to address alcohol consumption, physical activity and nutrition all rate poorly.

Download report HERE

Prevention-in-Australia-online

Prevention 1st invited experts in tobacco, alcohol, nutrition and physical activity to rate Commonwealth and state government action against the World Health Organization’s (WHO) ‘Best Buys’ and Other Recommended Interventions for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases.i

Chronic disease, which is responsible for 83 per cent of all premature deaths in Australia, accounts for 66 per cent of the burden of disease, and costs our economy an estimated $27 billion annually.

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, one-third of chronic disease cases are preventable and can be traced to four modifiable risk factors: tobacco use, alcohol consumption, poor diet, and physical inactivity.

FARE Chief Executive Michael Thorn says that while Australia has been a world leader in preventive health, past glories count for little, when the Prevention 1st Scorecard released today makes clear that our governments are not presently doing enough.

Mr Thorn says a framework already exists around evidence-based, short-term wins and that those World Health Organization recommendations, if implemented, would immediately improve Australians’ health.

“Effective policies are essential and we have those, but those solutions become worthless if government is not prepared to translate those policies into action,” Mr Thorn said

The Prevention 1st Scorecard recommends the implementation of four simple evidence-based measures to address tobacco use, alcohol consumption, nutrition and physical activity.

• The renewal of mass media anti-smoking campaigns that are population-wide and engage effectively with disadvantaged groups.

• The abolition of the Wine Equalisation Tax (WET) and introduction of a volumetric tax for wine and cider.

• Legislated time-based restrictions on exposure of children (under 16 years of age) to unhealthy food and drink marketing on free-to-air television until 9.30pm.

• The implementation of a whole-of-school program that includes mandatory daily physical activity.

Prevention 1st is a campaign led by the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE), the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA), Consumers Health Forum of Australia (CHF Australia), and Dementia Australia.

ENDS

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WorldHypertensionDay @strokefdn High #bloodpressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob with 47% having high #stroke risk

 

 ” But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

A staggering 82 percent of those, found to have high blood pressure, were not aware prior to taking the health check and were referred to their doctor for a further assessment.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are between two and three times as likely to have a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians which is why increasing stroke awareness is crucial.

Too many Australians couldn’t spot a stroke if it was happening right in front of them.

We know that in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities this awareness is even lower.

We want all Australians, regardless of where they live or what community they’re from, to learn the signs of stroke.”

Stroke Foundation and Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Project

 ” Naomi and Rukmani’s stroke rap runs through vital stroke awareness messages, such as lifestyle advice, learning the signs of stroke, and crucially the need to seek medical advice when stroke strikes.

Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song and remember the FAST message – it could save their life,”

Stroke Foundation Queensland Executive Officer Libby Dunstan 

Naomi Wenitong  pictured with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media

Listen to the new rap song HERE

                                       or Hear

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated

NACCHO has published over 90 articles Aboriginal health stroke prevention and recovery READ HERE

“It can happen to anyone — stroke doesn’t discriminate against colour, it doesn’t discriminate against age “

Photo above Seith Fourmile, Indigenous stroke survivor campaigns for culture to aid in stroke recovery

” Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who experience and die from cardiovascular disease at much higher rates than other Australians.

What you don’t know can hurt you. Heart disease and strokes are the biggest killers of Australians, and the biggest risk factor for both of them is high blood pressure.

But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

John Kelly CEO-National, Heart Foundation

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, when compared with other Australians, are:

  • 1.3 times as likely to have cardiovascular disease
  • three times more likely to have a major coronary event, such as a heart attack
  • more than twice as likely to die in hospital from coronary heart disease
  • 19 times as likely to die from acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart Disease
  • more likely to smoke, have high blood pressure, be obese, have diabetes and have end-stage renal disease.

It was World Hypertension Day yesterday  and the Stroke Foundation is determined to slash stroke numbers in Australia – with your help.

Today kicks off Australia’s Biggest Blood Pressure Check for 2018 and communities are being urged to take five minutes out of their day for a potentially life-saving blood pressure check.

More than 4.1 Million Australians are living with hypertension or high blood pressure, putting themselves at serious and unnecessary risk of stroke.

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.

The major concern with high blood pressure is many people don’t realise they have it. It has no immediate symptoms, but over time, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of stroke and heart disease.

How you can help?

  • Encourage your family and friends to take advantage of a free check.
  • Help spread the word via social media:  Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.
  • Get your free health check today! https://bit.ly/2ps1UOn #WorldHypertensionDay

  • I am urging you – no matter what age you are – to have a blood pressure check regularly with your ACCHO GP (General Practitioner), pharmacist or via a digital health check machine.
  • Stroke strikes in an instant, attacking the brain. It kills more women than breast cancer and more men than prostate cancer and leaves thousands with an ongoing disability, but stroke is largely preventable by managing blood pressure and living a healthy lifestyle.
  • Stroke Foundation and SiSU Wellness conducted more than 520,000 digital health checks throughout 2017, finding 16 percent of participants had high blood pressure putting them at risk of stroke

Given there will be 56,000 strokes in Australia this year alone, if we can reduce high blood pressure we will have a direct and lasting impact on the rate of stroke in this country.Yours sincerely,

Sharon McGowan
Chief Executive Officer
Stroke Foundation

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Sugartax : @4Corners #Tippingthescales: #4corners Sugar, politics and what’s making us fat #rethinksugarydrinks @janemartinopc @OPCAustralia

On Monday night Four Corners investigates the power of Big Sugar and its influence on public policy.

“How did the entire world get this fat, this fast? Did everyone just become a bunch of gluttons and sloths?”  Doctor

The figures are startling. Today, 60% of Australian adults are classified as overweight or obese. By 2025 that figure is expected to rise to 80%.

“It’s the stuff of despair. Personally, when I see some of these young people, it’s almost hard to imagine that we’ve got to this point.”  Surgeon

Many point the finger at sugar – which we’re consuming in enormous amounts – and the food and drink industry that makes and sells the products fuelled by it.

Tipping the scales, reported by Michael Brissenden and presented by Sarah Ferguson, goes to air on Monday 30th of April at 8.30pm. It is replayed on Tuesday 1st of May at 1.00pm and Wednesday 2nd at 11.20pm.

It can also be seen on ABC NEWS channel on Saturday at 8.10pm AEST, ABC iview and at abc.net.au/4corners.

See Preview Video here

 ” In 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2 years and over consumed an average of 75 grams of free sugars per day (equivalent to 18 teaspoons of white sugar)1. Added sugars made up the majority of free sugar intakes with an average of 68 grams (or 16 teaspoons) consumed and an additional 7 grams of free sugars came from honey and fruit juice. “

NACCHO post – ABS Report abs-indigenous-consumption-of-added-sugars 

Amata was an alcohol-free community, but some years earlier its population of just under 400 people had been consuming 40,000 litres of soft drink annually.

The thing that I say in community meetings all the time is that, the reason we’re doing this is so that the young children now do not end up going down the same track of diabetes, kidney failure, dialysis machines and early death, which is the track that many, many people out here are on now,”

NACCHO Post : Mai Wiru, meaning good health, and managed by long-time community consultant John Tregenza.

See Previous NACCHO Post Aboriginal Health and Sugar TV Doco: APY community and the Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation

4 Corners Press Release

“This isn’t about, as the food industry put it, people making their own choices and therefore determining what their weight will be. It is not as simple as that, and the science is very clear.” Surgeon

Despite doctors’ calls for urgent action, there’s been fierce resistance by the industry to measures aimed at changing what we eat and drink, like the proposed introduction of a sugar tax.

“We know about the health impact, but there’s something that’s restricting us, and it’s industry.”  Public health advocate

On Monday night Four Corners investigates the power of Big Sugar and its influence on public policy.

“The reality is that industry is, by and large, making most of the policy. Public health is brought in, so that we can have the least worse solution.”  Public health advocate

From its role in shutting down debate about a possible sugar tax to its involvement in the controversial health star rating system, the industry has been remarkably successful in getting its way.

“We are encouraged by the government here in Australia, and indeed the opposition here in Australia, who continue to look to the evidence base and continue to reject this type of tax as some sort of silver bullet or whatnot to solve what is a really complex problem, and that is our nation’s collective expanding waistline.” Industry spokesperson

We reveal the tactics employed by the industry and the access it enjoys at a time when health professionals say we are in a national obesity crisis.

“We cannot leave it up to the food industry to solve this. They have an imperative to make a profit for their shareholders. They don’t have an imperative to create a healthy, active Australia.”  Health advocate

NACCHO post – Sixty-three per cent of Australian adults and 27 per cent of our children are overweight or obese.

 “This is not surprising when you look at our environment – our kids are bombarded with advertising for junk food, high-sugar drinks are cheaper than water, and sugar and saturated fat are hiding in so-called ‘healthy’ foods. Making a healthy choice has never been more difficult.

The annual cost of overweight and obesity in Australia in 2011-12 was estimated to be $8.6 billion in direct and indirect costs such as GP services, hospital care, absenteeism and government subsidies.1 “

 OPC Executive Manager Jane Martin 

BACKGROUND

 ” This campaign is straightforward – sugary drinks are no good for our health. It’s calling on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks.’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Cape York experience a disproportionate burden of chronic disease compared to other Australians.’

‘Regular consumption of sugary drinks is associated with increased energy intake and in turn, weight gain and obesity. It is well established that obesity is a leading risk factor for diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease and some cancers. Consumption of sugary drinks is also associated with poor dental health.

Water is the best drink for everyone – it doesn’t have any sugar and keeps our bodies healthy.’

Apunipima Public Health Advisor Dr Mark Wenitong

Read over 48 NACCHO articles Health and Nutrition HERE

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/nutrition-healthy-foods/

Read over 24 NACCHO articles Sugar Tax HERE  

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/sugar-

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @VACCHO_org @Apunipima join major 2018 health groups campaign @Live Lighter #RethinkSugaryDrink launching ad showing heavy health cost of cheap $1 frozen drinks

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Junkfood #Sugarydrinks #Sugartax @AMAPresident says Advertising and marketing of #junkfood and #sugarydrinks to children should be banned

Minister @KenWyattMP launches NACCHO @RACGP National guide for healthcare professionals to improve health of #Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients

 

All of our 6000 staff in 145 member services in 305 health settings across Australia will have access to this new and update edition of the National Guide. It’s a comprehensive edition for our clinicians and support staff that updates them all with current medical practice.

“NACCHO is committed to quality healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, and will work with all levels of government to ensure accessibility for all.”

NACCHO Chair John Singer said the updated National Guide would help governments improve health policy and lead initiatives that support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can Download the Guide via this LINK

A/Prof Peter O’Mara, NACCHO Chair John Singer Minister Ken Wyatt & RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel launch the National guide at Parliament house this morning

“Prevention is always better than cure. Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

Minister Ken Wyatt highlights what is new to the 3rd Edition of the National Guide-including FASD, lung cancer, young people lifecycle, family abuse & violence and supporting families to optimise child safety & wellbeing : Pic Lisa Whop SEE Full Press Release Part 2 Below

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) have joined forces to produce a guide that aims to improve the level of healthcare currently being delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and close the gap.

Chair of RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Associate Professor Peter O’Mara said the third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (the National Guide) is an important resource for all health professionals to deliver best practice healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

“The National Guide will support all healthcare providers, not just GPs, across Australia to improve prevention and early detection of disease and illness,” A/Prof O’Mara said.

“The prevention and early detection of disease and illness can improve people’s lives and increase their lifespans.

“The National Guide will support healthcare providers to feel more confident that they are looking for health issues in the right way.”

RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel said the RACGP is committed to tackling the health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

“The National Guide plays a vital role in closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health disparity,” Dr Seidel said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should have equal access to quality healthcare across Australia and the National guide is an essential part of ensuring these services are provided.

“GPs and other healthcare providers who implement the recommendations within the National Guide will play an integral role in reducing health disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, and ensuring culturally responsive and appropriate healthcare is always available.”

The updated third edition of the National Guide can be found on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website.

 

Free to download on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website:

http://www.racgp.org.au/national-guide/

and NACCHO

Part 2 Prevention and Early Diagnosis Focus for a Healthier Future

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians.

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, today launched the updated third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Prevention is always better than cure,” said Minister Wyatt. “Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

“The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.

“It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

The guide, which was first published in 2005, is a joint project between the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners RACGP).

“To give you some idea of the high regard in which it is held, the last edition was downloaded 645,000 times since its release in 2012,” said Minister Wyatt.

“The latest edition highlights the importance of individual, patient-centred care and has been developed to reflect local and regional needs.

“Integrating resources like the national guide across the whole health system plays a pivotal role in helping us meet our Closing the Gap targets.

“The Turnbull Government is committed to accelerating positive change and is investing in targeted activities that have delivered significant reductions in the burden of disease.

“Rates of heart disease, smoking and binge drinking are down. We are on track to achieve the child mortality target for 2018 and deaths associated with kidney and respiratory diseases have also reduced.”

The National Guide is funded under the Indigenous Australian’s Health Programme as part of a record $3.6 billion investment across four financial years.

The RACGP received $429,000 to review, update, publish and distribute the third edition, in hard copy and electronic formats.

The National Guide is available on the RACGP website or by contacting RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health on 1800 000 251 or aboriginalhealth@racgp.org.au.