NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosingTheGap #NAIDOC2019 : @AIHW Key results report 2017-18 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations:

Findings from this report:

  • Just under half (45%) of organisations provide services in Remote or Very remote areas

  • In 2017–18, around 483,000 clients received 3.6 million episodes of care

  • Nearly 8,000 full-time equivalent staff are employed in these organisations and 4,695 (59%) are health staff

  • Organisations reported 445 vacant positions in June 2018 with health vacancies representing 366 (82%) of these
  • In 2017–18, nearly 200 organisations provided a range of primary health services to around 483,000 clients, 81% of whom were Indigenous.
  • Around 3.6 million episodes of care were provided, nearly 3.1 million of these (85%) by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

See AIHW detailed Interactive site locations map HERE

In 2017–18, Indigenous primary health services were delivered from 383 sites (Table 3). Most sites provided clinical services such as the diagnosis and treatment of chronic illnesses (88%), mental health and counselling services (88%), maternal and child health care (86%), and antenatal care (78%). Around two-thirds provided tobacco programs (69%) and substance-use and drug and alcohol programs (66%).

Most organisations provided access to a doctor (86%) and just over half (54%) delivered a wide range of services, including all of the following during usual opening hours: the diagnosis and treatment of illness and disease; antenatal care; maternal and child health care; social and emotional wellbeing/counselling services; substance use programs; and on‑site or off-site access to specialist, allied health and dental care services.

Most organisations (95%) also provided group activities as part of their health promotion and prevention work. For example, in 2017–18, these organisations provided around:

  • 8,400 physical activity/healthy weight sessions
  • 3,700 living skills sessions
  • 4,600 chronic disease client support sessions
  • 4,100 tobacco-use treatment and prevention sessions.

In addition to the services they provide, organisations were asked to report on service gaps and challenges they faced and could list up to 5 of each from predefined lists. In 2017–18, around two-thirds of organisations (68%) reported mental health/social and emotional health and wellbeing services as a gap faced by the community they served.

This was followed by youth services (54%). Over two-thirds of organisations (71%) reported the recruitment, training and support of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff as a challenge in delivering quality health services.

Read full report and all data HERE

This is the tenth national report on organisations funded by the Australian Government to provide health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Indigenous primary health services

Primary health services play a critical role in helping to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Indigenous Australians may access mainstream or Indigenous primary health services funded by the Australian and state and territory governments.

Information on organisations funded by the Australian Government under its Indigenous Australians’ health programme (IAHP) is available through two data collections: the Online Services Report (OSR) and the national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs). Most of the organisations funded under the IAHP contribute to both collections (Table 1).

The OSR collects information on the services organisations provide, client numbers, client contacts, episodes of care and staffing levels. Contextual information about each organisation is also collected. The nKPIs collect information on a set of process of care and health outcome indicators for Indigenous Australians.

There are 24 indicators that focus on maternal and child health, preventative health and chronic disease management. Information from the nKPI and OSR collections help monitor progress against the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Closing the Gap targets, and supports the national health goals set out in the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023.

Detailed information on the policy context and background to these collections are available in previous national reports, including the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: Online Services Report—key results 2016–17 and National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results for 2017.

At a glance

This tenth national OSR report presents information on organisations funded by the Australian Government to provide primary health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It includes a profile of these organisations and information on the services they provide, client numbers, client contacts, episodes of care and staffing levels. Interactive data visualisations using OSR data for 5 reporting periods, from 2013–14 to 2017–18, are presented for the first time.

Key messages

  1. A wide range of primary health services are provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In 2017–18:
  • 198 organisations provided primary health services to around 483,000 clients, most of whom were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (81%).
  • These organisations provided around 3.6 million episodes of care, with nearly 3.1 million (85%) delivered by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs).
  • More than two-thirds of organisations (71%) were ACCHSs. The rest included government-run organisations and other non-government-run organisations.
  • Nearly half of organisations (45%) provided services in Remoteand Very remote
  • Services were delivered from 383 sites across Australia. Most sites provided the diagnosis and treatment of chronic illnesses (88%), social and emotional wellbeing services (88%), maternal and child health care (86%), and antenatal care (78%). Around two-thirds provided tobacco programs (69%) and substance-use and drug and alcohol programs (66%).

See this AIHW detailed Interactive site locations map HERE

  1. Organisations made on average nearly 13 contacts per client

In 2017–18, organisations providing Indigenous primary health services made around 6.1 million client contacts, an average of nearly 13 contacts per client (Table 2). Over half of all client contacts (58%) were made by nurses and midwives (1.8 million contacts) and doctors (1.7 million contacts). Contacts by nurses and midwives represented half (49%) of all client contacts in Very remote areas compared with 29% overall.

  1. Organisations employed nearly 8,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) staff

At 30 June 2018, organisations providing Indigenous primary health services employed nearly 8,000 FTE staff and over half of these (54%) were Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. These organisations were assisted by around 270 visiting staff not paid for by the organisations themselves, making a total workforce of around 8,200 FTE staff.

Nurses and midwives were the most common type of health worker (14% of employed staff), followed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and practitioners (13%) and doctors (7%). Nurses and midwives represented a higher proportion of employed staff in Very remote areas (22%).

  1. Social and emotional health and wellbeing services are the most commonly reported service gap

Organisations can report up to 5 service gaps faced by the community they serve from a predefined list of gaps. Since this question was introduced in 2012–13, the most commonly reported gap has been for mental health and social and emotional health and wellbeing services. In 2017–18, this was reported as a gap by 68% of organisations.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Prevention2019 News Alert : Downloads @AIHW releases Burden of Disease study and an overview of health spending that provides an understanding of the impact of diseases in terms of spending through our health system.

 ” This report analyses the impact of more than 200 diseases and injuries in terms of living with illness (non-fatal burden) and premature death (fatal burden).

The study found that: chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and musculoskeletal conditions contributed the most burden in Australia in 2015 and 38% of the burden could have been prevented by removing exposure to risk factors such as tobacco use, overweight and obesity, and dietary risks.

The overall health of the Australian population improved substantially between 2003 and 2015 and further gains could be achieved by reducing lifestyle-related risk factors, according to a new report by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). ‘

Download aihw-bod-22

The Australian Burden of Disease Study: Impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2015, measures the number of years living with an illness or injury (the non-fatal burden) or lost through dying prematurely (the fatal burden).

In 2015, Australians collectively lost 4.8 million years of healthy life due to living with or dying prematurely from disease and injury,’ said AIHW spokesperson Mr Richard Juckes.

The disease groups causing the most burden in 2015 were cancer, cardiovascular diseases, musculoskeletal conditions, mental and substance use disorders and injuries.

After accounting for the increase in size and ageing of the population, there was an 11% decrease in the rate of burden between 2003 and 2015.’

Most of the improvement in the total burden resulted from reductions in premature deaths from illnesses and injuries such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and infant and congenital conditions.

‘Thirty eight per cent of the total burden of disease experienced by Australians in 2015 could have been prevented by reducing exposure to the risk factors included in this study,’ Mr Juckes said.

‘The 5 risk factors that caused the most total burden in 2015 were tobacco use (9.3%), overweight & obesity (8.4%), dietary risks (7.3%), high blood pressure (5.8%) and high blood plasma glucose—including diabetes (4.7%).’

For the first time, living with illness or injury caused more total disease burden than premature death. In 2015, the non-fatal share was 50.4% and the fatal share was 49.6% of the burden of disease.

Also released today is an overview of health spending that provides an understanding of the impact of diseases in terms of spending through the health system.

The data in Disease expenditure in Australia relates to the 2015–16 financial year only and suggests the highest expenditure groups were musculoskeletal conditions (10.7%), cardiovascular diseases (8.9%) injuries (7.6%) and mental and substance use disorders (7.6%).

‘Together the burden of disease and spending estimates can be used to understand the impact of diseases on the Australian community. However they can’t necessarily be compared with each other, as there are many reasons why they wouldn’t be expected to align,’ Mr Juckes said.

‘For example, spending on reproductive and maternal health is relatively high but it is not associated with substantial disease burden because the result is healthy mothers and babies more often than not.

‘Similarly, vaccine-preventable diseases cause very little burden in Australia due to national investment in immunisation programs.’

Reports

Table of contents

  • Summary
  • 1 Introduction
    • What is burden of disease?
    • How can burden of disease studies be used?
    • What can’t burden of disease studies tell us?
    • How is burden of disease measured?
    • What is the history of burden of disease analysis?
    • What’s new in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015 and this report?
  • 2 Total burden of disease
    • What is the total burden of disease in Australia?
    • How does total burden vary across the life course?
    • Which disease groups cause the most burden?
    • Which diseases cause the most burden?
    • How does disease burden change across the life course?
  • 3 Non-fatal burden of disease
    • What is the overall non-fatal burden in Australia?
    • How does living with illness vary across the life course?
    • Which disease groups cause the most non-fatal burden?
    • Which diseases cause the most non-fatal burden?
    • How does non-fatal disease burden change across the life course?
  • 4 Fatal burden of disease
    • What is the overall fatal burden in Australia?
    • How does years of life lost vary at different ages?
    • Which disease groups cause the most fatal burden?
    • Which diseases cause the most fatal burden?
    • How does fatal disease burden change across the life course?
  • 5 Health-adjusted life expectancy
    • HALE as a measure of population health
    • On average, almost 90% of years lived are in full health
    • Years of life gained are healthy years
    • HALE is unequal across states and territories
    • HALE varies by remoteness of area lived
    • HALE is unequal between socioeconomic groups
  • 6 Contribution of risk factors to burden
    • How are risk factors selected?
    • What is the contribution of all risk factors combined?
    • Which risk factors contribute the most burden?
    • How do risk factors change through the life course?
  • 7 Changes over time
    • How should changes between time points be interpreted?
    • How has total burden changed over time?
    • How have the non-fatal and fatal burden changed over time?
    • How have risk factors changed over time?

  • 8 Variation across geographic areas and population groups
    • Burden of disease by state and territory
    • Burden of disease by remoteness areas
    • Burden of disease by socioeconomic group
  • 9 International context and comparisons
    • What is the international context of burden of disease studies?
    • Can the ABDS 2015 be compared with international studies?
    • How does Australian burden compare internationally?
  • 10 Study developments and limitations
    • What are the underlying principles of the ABDS?
    • What stayed the same between Australian studies?
    • What changes were made in the ABDS 2015?
    • What are the data gaps?
    • What are the methodological limitations?
    • What opportunities are there for further analysis?
  • Appendix A: Methods summary
    • 1 Disease and injury (condition) list
    • 2 Fatal burden
    • 3 Non-fatal burden
    • 4 Total burden of disease
    • 5 Health-adjusted life expectancy
    • 6 Risk factors
    • 7 Overarching methods/choices
  • Appendix B: How reliable are the estimates?
    • ABDS 2015 quality index
  • Appendix C: Understanding and using burden of disease estimates
    • Different types of estimates presented in this report
    • Interpreting estimates
    • What can estimates from 2015 tell us about 2019?
  • Appendix D: Additional tables and figures
  • Appendix E: List of expert advisors
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • Symbols
  • Glossary
  • References
  • List of tables
  • List of figures
  • Related publications

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO : @RenBlackman CEO @GidgeeHealing #ACCHO Mt Isa : Highlights Inequality and climate change: the perfect storm threatening the health of our #Remote communities

 

“ Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services have a long history of working holistically and innovatively to address the wider determinants of health, and Gidgee Healing incorporates legal services, knowing that legal concerns “cause a lot of worry for families”

However, many of the levers for addressing the determinants of health lie outside of the health sector’s control.

 What would help Gidgee Healing clients includes increases to Newstart and other social security payments, with a loading for remoteness.

We would also like to see better access to education and training for remote communities, many of which do not have high schools.

As well, Blackman would like a “whole of government” approach to addressing the social determinants of health, as was recommended in 2008 by the World Health Organisation commission on social determinants of health.

My job is challenging enough at the best of times. But climate change and extreme weather events, such as recent flooding that cut road access to many remote communities for several weeks, are making it ever-more difficult “

Renee Blackman runs Gidgee Health ACCHO health service covering a vast chunk of north-west Queensland – about 640,000 sq km, an area larger than Spain – that provides services to about 7,000 Aboriginal people in communities from Mount Isa to the Gulf.

Reporting in this series is supported by VivCourt through the Guardian Civic Journalism Trust

Written by Melissa Sweet for The Guardian

While the cultures and circumstances of these communities are diverse, Blackman says they share a common health threat: that the harmful impacts of poverty are magnified in remote locations.

Blackman, a Gubbi Gubbi woman and CEO of an Aboriginal community-controlled health service Gidgee Healing, sees poverty contributing to poor health in remote communities in many ways.

People cannot afford healthy foods, to access or maintain housing, to buy vital medications, or to travel to regional centres such as Cairns or Townsville for surgery that would help them or their children, she says.

But mostly, she says, poverty means people have more pressing priorities than whether their diabetes is being well controlled.

“None of that matters if the priority is to put food on the table first, or a roof over the table,” she says. “Worrying about medication or a specialist appointment or an allied health wraparound service isn’t a priority.”

Blackman says she gets really frustrated when health groups put out simplistic messages for people to eat more fresh fruit and vegetables. It reminds her that so much health debate is far removed from the realities of people living in poverty.

Renee Blackman interviewed by NACCHO TV in 2016

Likewise, there is also a disconnect between much of the mainstream debate about health, which tends to focus on funding of medical services and hospitals, and the evidence about what matters most for people’s health.

The Western Australian government’s recent Sustainable Health Review cites US research suggesting that only 16% of a person’s overall health and wellbeing relates to clinical care and the biggest gains, especially for those at greatest risk of poor health, come from action on the social determinants of health. These are “the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age”, and are shaped by the distribution of money, power and resources.

In the case of Gidgee Healing’s clients, the determinants of health include the ongoing legacy of colonisation, such as poverty and racism, as well as protective factors such as connection to culture and country.

Tackling the social determinants of health is critical to address health inequities, which arise because people with the least social and economic power tend to have the worst health, live in unhealthier environments and have worse access to healthcare.

A study cited in the last two editions of Australia’s Health (in 2016 and 2018) estimates that if action were taken on the social determinants to close the health gap between the most and least disadvantaged Australians, half a million people could be spared chronic illness, $2.3bn in annual hospital costs saved and pharmaceutical benefits scheme prescriptions cut by 5.3 million.

In the absence of such action, she says Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services have to work hard and be creative in the face of government silos in their efforts to provide holistic services.

Blackman’s job is challenging enough at the best of times. But climate change and extreme weather events, such as recent flooding that cut road access to many remote communities for several weeks, are making it ever-more difficult.

“You have got these massive weather events sweeping through our communities, decimating structures, infrastructure – which means health services,” she says. “If your health service is down, you can’t provide any type of healthcare; it’s almost like you are operating under war conditions sometimes, because things get totally obliterated and you have got to build back from scratch, yet you’ve got people who need your assistance.”

Blackman and many other health professionals are seeing the impact of a perfect storm threatening the health of some of Australia’s most disadvantaged communities. Climate change is exacerbating the social and economic inequalities that already contribute to profound health inequities.

Blackman describes elderly Aboriginal people with multiple health problems stuck in inadequate housing without air-conditioning during increasingly frequent extreme heatwaves. Sometimes it is so hot, she says, the bitumen melts, making it difficult for her health teams to reach communities in times of high need.

As well, patients are presenting to Gidgee Healing clinics with conditions such as dehydration that might be preventable if they could afford their power bills and had appropriate housing.

The mental health impacts are also huge, Blackman says, mentioning the deaths of hundreds of thousands of livestock during the floods. “This is devastation, this is loss, this is grief, we are already facing a suicide crisis in the north-west across all of the community, including the Aboriginal community,” she says. “You’re talking about a region that already has depleted access to mental health professionals.”

Welcome to our special NACCHO #Election2019 #VoteACCHO resource page for Affiliates, ACCHO members, stakeholders and supporters. The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is not a partisan political issue and cannot be sidelined any longer.

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

More info HERE 

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills

A multiplier effect

Hurricane Katrina is often held up as a textbook example of how climate change hits poor people hardest, and not only because the poorest areas in New Orleans were worst affected by flooding. Much of the planning and emergency response catered to the better off – those with cars and the means to safely evacuate and arrange alternative accommodation.

As Sharon Friel, professor of health equity at the Australian National University, outlines in a new book, Climate Change and the People’s Health, most of those who died because of Hurricane Katrina came from disadvantaged populations. These were also the groups that suffered most in the aftermath, as a result of damage to infrastructure and loss of livelihoods.

“It was also lower-income groups, and in particular children and the elderly, who were at increased risk of developing severe mental health symptoms compared with their peers in higher income groups,” Friel writes.

It is not only the direct and indirect impacts of climate change that worsen health inequities; policies to address climate change can have unintended consequences. Friel cites international evidence that the distribution of green spaces in cities to promote urban cooling and health tends to benefit mainly white and affluent communities.

Friel’s book outlines myriad ways in which climate change interacts with other social determinants of health to create a multiplier effect that deepens and compounds health inequities. Yet policymakers have been slow to respond, although such concerns were clearly identified more than a decade ago, in the landmark WHO report on the social determinants of health, which said it was important to bring together “the two agendas of health equity and climate change”.

While Friel says the relationships between climate change and health inequity are “messy and complex”, she argues that understanding there are common determinants of both problems provides an opportunity to “kill two birds with one stone”.

Friel calls for intersectoral action, with a focus on equality, environmental sustainability and health equity, to tackle the underlying “consumptagenic system” that drives both problems. This system is “a network of policies, processes and modes of understanding and governance that fuels unhealthy, inequitable and environmentally destructive production and consumption”.

An unfair burden

In Victoria, a large community health service provider called Cohealth has had processes in place for at least five years to work with at-risk groups during extreme weather events, in recognition of the need to address climate change as a health threat, especially for disadvantaged populations. During heatwaves, the service checks on homeless people, public housing residents and people with mental illnesses to ensure they can take steps to stay safe.

“The growing frustration of people in the health sector is, this work is eating into our budgets, it’s occupying the time of our staff – and yet there is little or no policy recognition of the way health resources are being taken to address these problems,” says Cohealth chief executive, Lyn Morgain.

She adds that local governments and service providers have been left to carry an unfair burden due to inaction on climate and health by governments, especially the federal government.

Morgain, who is also chair of the Social Determinants of Health Alliance and a board member of the Australian Council of Social Service, notes that Acoss has been championing the need to apply an equity lens to climate policy, to assess whether new policy proposals across a range of portfolios advantage or disadvantage low-income households.

Kellie Caught, senior advisor on climate and energy at Acoss, is calling for the next federal government to invest in vulnerability mapping to identify communities most at risk from climate change, in order to support development of local climate adaptation and resilience plans.

Governments also need to invest in building the resilience of community organisations such as those providing disability, aged care, meals on wheels and services for homeless people, to ensure they have the capacity to undertake disaster management and resilience planning, and continue operating through extreme weather events, she says.

Acoss is advocating for mandatory energy-efficiency standards for all rental properties, for state and federal governments to invest in upgrading energy efficiency and production in all social and community housing, and for a fund to help low-income earners such as pensioners upgrade their homes’ energy efficiency, as well as programs for remote and Indigenous communities.

It is more than a decade since policymakers were presented with evidence showing that such measures bring concrete health benefits for low-income households.

A widely cited randomised trial, published in 2007 in the BMJ, found that insulating low-income households in New Zealand led to a significantly warmer, drier indoor environment, and resulted in significant improvements in health and comfort, a lower risk of children having time off school or adults having sick days off work, and a trend for fewer hospital admissions for respiratory conditions.

“Interventions of this kind, which focus on low-income communities and poorer quality housing, have the potential to reduce health inequalities,” found the researchers.

A big silent killer’

The health of people in Burnie in north-west Tasmania is shaped by rates of poverty, unemployment and poor educational outcomes that are worse than the state’s average.

At the public hospital, emergency physician Dr Melinda Venn is reminded every day how people who are poorer and sicker have difficulty accessing the services they need. She describes seeing patients who struggle to feed their families, or buy medications and who often can’t afford to put petrol in their cars to get to the doctor.

Her prescription for what would help her community’s health and wellbeing is similar to Renee Blackman’s in north-west Queensland. It includes wide-ranging action to address poverty, including through raising the Newstart allowance and more generally ensuring liveable incomes, as well as access to affordable fresh food, public transport and higher education.

Venn also stresses the importance of better funding for preventative health measures and primary healthcare. “Every day we see people come to the emergency department, either because they can’t afford to get into the GP or they can’t get into

Dr Nick Towle, a medical educator at the University of Tasmania who helped organise a recent Doctors for the Environment Australia conference in Hobart, where delegates declared a climate emergency, says that addressing the intertwined issues of health inequities and climate change will require massive transformation in how governments operate. They must move beyond the current siloed approaches whereby, for example, the housing portfolio can be reluctant to invest in improving housing if savings are to the health portfolio.

Towle says a systems approach would reimagine urban development so that communities are within cycling or walking distance of local food production, green spaces and infrastructure such as shops, primary healthcare and aged care centres, and with active and passive solar a requirement for all new developments.

Like Venn, Towle stresses the need to invest far more in primary healthcare and the prevention of chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, lung and cardiac disease, which are more common in poorer communities, and make people less resilient to the effects of heat, which he says “is emerging as a big silent killer”.

Back in Mount Isa, Renee Blackman stresses the importance of local action in responding to both health inequities and climate change. Local governments, especially Indigenous local governments, should be given more support for tackling these issues, she says.

“At least talk to the people it’s going to affect,” she says. “As an Aboriginal organisation, we would never tread on someone else’s Country, without first asking, what do you need?”

An assessment of the major parties’ track records and election promises shows Australia has a better chance of acting on poverty and climate change as critical health equity concerns if there is a change of government.

The Acoss’s election policy tracker suggests the Greens have the best policies for addressing poverty and climate change, while the Climate and Health Alliance scorecard gives the Greens top marks (8 out of 8), followed by Labor (4.5 out of 8) and the LNP (zero out of 8).

The Consumers Health Forum of Australia scorecard gives the Greens’ health policies the highest rating (21 out of a potential score of 37), followed by Labor (16/37) and the LNP (7/7). The Public Health Association of Australia has welcomed Labor’s and the Greens’ commitments on preventative health, while the Australian Health Care Reform Alliance has called on both major parties “to follow the lead of the Greens and commit to health policies that deliver both equity and efficiency”.

Like many, the Consumers Health Forum is disappointed in the lack of focus on primary healthcare, saying “the absence of a transformational agenda for primary care is a missed opportunity this election”. Meanwhile, the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association scorecard records the Liberal National party as having no explicit commitment to health equity and, days out from an election, the Rural Doctors Association of Australia says the Greens are the only party to have addressed rural health issues so far. Some health organisations have not yet released an election scorecard.

Reporting in this series is supported by VivCourt through the Guardian Civic Journalism Trust

NACCHO Aboriginal #Vote1RuralHealth #VoteACCHO #AusVotesHealth : Major health groups @NRHAlliance @amapresident @RuralDoctorsAus express concern over lack of #Election2019 focus on #RuralHealth #RemoteCommunities

“ We have a crisis in rural Australia – health outcomes have not improved and we continue to see measurable disparities in levels of access to health care and health outcomes.

I note that yesterday the Australian Medical Association and the Rural Doctors Association of Australia raised similar concerns. They’re concerned about the lack of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce and staffing levels in hospitals and health services.”

Mark Diamond  CEO National Rural Health Alliance See full press release PART 1

“It is inconceivable that millions of Australians who experience higher incidence of the drivers of chronic disease could be overlooked.

People in rural, regional, and remote Australia face many obstacles when they require access to the full range of quality medical and health services.

There are shortages of doctors and other health professionals.

It is harder to access specialist services such as maternity and mental health.

And country people often have to travel to capital cities and large regional centres for vital services such as major surgery or cancer care.”

We need to see tailored and targeted policies to address these inequities.

Rural Australians deserve nothing less.”

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said today that rural Australians are still waiting to hear major announcements from the major parties to address the serious and specific health needs of rural and remote communities. See Part 2 Below

“ With less than two weeks left to go until polling day, rural doctors are calling out the major parties on their absence of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce.

This is a cone of silence that Maxwell Smart would be proud of

There continues to be a massive maldistribution of doctors and other health professionals between urban Australia and the bush, yet this critical issue remains largely overlooked. “

President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), Dr Adam Coltzau

NACCHO has developed a set of policy  10 #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

The current health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are unacceptable. 65% of Indigenous people live in rural Australia.

We are calling on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

Our ACCHO TOP 10 key asks of a new Federal Government

Read all the 10 Recommendations HERE

Part 1

A chorus of concern over the major parties’ failure to focus on rural health issues in the election campaign is growing, the National Rural Health Alliance says.

The peak body for rural, regional and remote health says the 7 million people living in rural Australia have been unable to discern what the big health policy announcements mean for them.

“Nor has there been a specific focus by the Liberal-Nationals Coalition and Labor on how access to health and preventive health services will be improved for them,” CEO Mark Diamond said.

“We have a crisis in rural Australia – health outcomes have not improved and we continue to see measurable disparities in levels of access to health care and health outcomes.

“I note that yesterday the Australian Medical Association and the Rural Doctors Association of Australia raised similar concerns. They’re concerned about the lack of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce and staffing levels in hospitals and health services.

“The Greens have acknowledged that they recognize the significance of health care in rural areas and have issued a specific rural health statement which I commend them for.

“And yesterday, the Independent candidate for Indi, Helen Haines, joined the call for a boost to the allied health professions taskforce.

“Getting more allied health professionals into rural Australia is vital to address the chronic inequality of access to health services.

“This is a key part of the National Rural Health Alliance’s 2019 Election Charter.” (See www.ruralhealth.org.au/election19)

The NRHA is calling for

  • An additional 3000 Aboriginal Health Workers and practitioners
  • Increased funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (Labor has committed some funds for this)
  • An additional 3000 allied health positions
  • Trials created in 20 rural and remote sites to test for the best workforce models
  • A community grants program that communities can apply to for funds for better digital infrastructure so they can access healthcare online
  • Medicare rebates for online or telehealth consults to people in outer regional, remote and very remote areas
  • A special Mission for Rural Health created in the Medical Research Future Fund that is allocated a share of the fund proportionate to the population in rural Australia (28% = $360m)
  • A commitment to endorse the Uluru Statement and establish a Makarrata Commission for the sake of the nation’s wellbeing

Mr Diamond said parties must show they can govern for all of Australia, not just cities.

With 28% of the population and 7 million people, it’s important that all parties represent the interests of people in country areas. Rural health matters.

Part 2

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said today that rural Australians are still waiting to hear major announcements from the major parties to address the serious and specific health needs of rural and remote communities.

Dr Bartone said it is surprising and disappointing that rural health remains largely neglected this far into the election campaign.

“It is inconceivable that millions of Australians who experience higher incidence of the drivers of chronic disease could be overlooked,” Dr Bartone said.

“People in rural, regional, and remote Australia face many obstacles when they require access to the full range of quality medical and health services.

“There are shortages of doctors and other health professionals.

“It is harder to access specialist services such as maternity and mental health.

“And country people often have to travel to capital cities and large regional centres for vital services such as major surgery or cancer care.

“We need to see tailored and targeted policies to address these inequities. Rural Australians deserve nothing less.”

Dr Bartone said that there will be some flow-on to rural Australia from the policies already announced by the major parties, including public hospital funding, new PBS drugs, the Government’s Rural Generalist Pathway medical training initiatives, and Labor’s cancer and seniors’ dental plans, but there are still major gaps.

“It is staggering that there was very little mention of rural health during last week’s Health Debate at the National Press Club,” Dr Bartone said.

“The situation is critical.

“Rural communities need real investment in medical infrastructure and incentives to attract more permanent doctors.

“Country towns are seeing medical services closed on them with no other options provided.

“Rural maternity services are deteriorating. Earlier this year, expectant mothers in Queensland were sent DIY birthing kits because their nearest birthing unit was too far to get to.

“Many communities are struggling with few or no doctors, and many doctors will be looking to retire in the coming years with no one there to take over for them.

“In a recent AMA poll, the top priority for our rural doctors was extra funding and resources for hospitals to support improved staffing levels, including core visiting medical officers, to allow workable rosters.

“The pressure on public hospital staff and resources is felt even more acutely in rural, regional, and remote areas.

“Training the next generation of rural doctors is a major priority. We need strategic policies that support students from rural backgrounds to study medicine.

“We want to see investment in programs that create positive training experiences for prevocational doctors in rural areas.

“We need to support these students to complete their training rurally so that they can choose to stay to live and work in rural areas and deliver the care these communities need.

“Rural Australian families need the confidence and comfort of being able to see a doctor or other health professional when they need care or advice, and to be able to get to hospital when they are sick or injured.

“It is not too late for the major parties to provide rural Australians with that security.”

The AMA’s Key Health Issues for the 2019 Federal Election calls on the major parties to:

  • provide funding and resources to support improved staffing levels and workable rosters for rural doctors, including better access to locum relief and investment in hospital facilities, equipment, and practice infrastructure;
  • expand the successful Specialist Training Program to 1,400 places by 2021, with higher priority being given to training places in regional and rural areas, generalist training, and specialties that are undersupplied;
  • fund a further 425 rural GP infrastructure grants of up to $500,000 each;
  • provide additional funding/grants to individual GPs and practices to support nonvocationally registered doctors to attain fellowship through the More Doctors for Rural Australia Program; and
  • support further reforms to medical school selection criteria for Commonwealth supported students; and introduce changes to the structure of courses so that the targeted intake of medical students from a rural background is lifted from 25 per cent of all new enrolments to one-third of all new enrolments, and the proportion of medical students required to undertake at least one year of clinical training in a rural area is lifted from 25 per cent to one-third.

The AMA’s health policy wish list – Key Health Issues for the 2019 Federal Election – is available at https://ama.com.au/article/keyhealthissues2019federalelection

 

Part 3 Rural doctors urge parties to “Get Smart”  on rural health workforce plan

With less than two weeks left to go until polling day, rural doctors are calling out the major parties on their absence of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce.

“This is a cone of silence that Maxwell Smart would be proud of”

President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), Dr Adam Coltzau, said.

“There continues to be a massive maldistribution of doctors and other health professionals between urban Australia and the bush, yet this critical issue remains largely overlooked.

“Yes, there has been funding committed by both the Coalition and Labor to kick-start a National Rural Generalist Pathway, and this is very welcome – but if the major parties think that the Pathway will be the panacea for the shortage of doctors and other health professionals in the bush, they are sadly mistaken.

“The Pathway needs to be just one component of a much wider rural health workforce strategy – one that not only delivers more Rural Generalist doctors to the bush, but also more GPs, specialists, nurses, midwives and allied health professionals.

“The challenges of accessing health services in rural areas have not been resolved, and will require the incoming government to ‘get smart’ in improving this.

“It will require a practical, big picture strategy, not just tinkering at the edges.

“It will require the incoming government to invest in more training places in the bush, so newly-minted doctors are able to access the training they need in their intern and junior doctor years.

“There is real opportunity for rural hospitals, rural general practices and other rural health settings to meet the growing demand for junior doctor training, and to keep these doctors in the bush – but the right supports will be needed to make this happen.

“More also needs to be done to increase the capacity for regional training opportunities in non-GP Specialist training and Advanced Skills posts.

“These places are largely controlled by the specialist colleges, and it is virtually impossible for young doctors to access this training outside metropolitan areas or very large regional centres.

“This makes it very difficult for those doctors who want a career as a non-GP specialist in rural Australia to follow that path.

“The lack of commitment from the major parties to fix the rural health workforce crisis is a major black hole in the election campaign – and it needs urgent attention before polling day.”

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #Rural #Remote Health #VoteACCHO  #Vote1RuralHealth #AusVotesHealth : With 65% of Indigenous people living in rural Australia @NRHAlliance prioritises our mobs health

” The National Rural Health Alliance (NRHA) has named four key areas an incoming Federal Government must address to help rural Australians get healthier and live longer.

The nation’s peak body for rural, regional and remote health has also listed in detail what needs to be done in each area.

The four areas are:

1.Improving the health of Indigenous Australians

2.Boosting the supply and distribution of allied health care workers in rural, regional and remote areas

3.Creating a greater research focus on factors affecting rural health;

4.Developing a new National Rural Health Strategy.

NRHA CEO Mark Diamond says much needs to be done so everyone in Australia enjoys better health. Currently those living beyond major cities carry 1.3 times the cost, mortality and disability associated with illness and disease. See full Press Release Part 1 below

 ” The body representing 37 rural health organisations has urged the next government to endorse the Uluru Statement from the Heart and establish a “voice” to federal parliament as its No 1 priority to improve Indigenous health.

Launching its election charter at Parliament House, National Rural Health Alliance chair Tanya Lehmann said Australia needed to start tackling problems impacting on people’s health — problems that would not be fixed by more doctors or technology.

Connection to country, spiritual wellbeing, overcoming intergenerational trauma are central to the health of indigenous Australians,”

NRHA Chair Tanya Lehmann told The Australian. see full article Part 4 below

Download the NRHA 9 Page PDF #Election2019 Charter Document HERE

Rural Health Matters 2019 Election Charter FINAL_1

Part 1 Priority 1. Improve Indigenous health

The current health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are unacceptable. (65% of Indigenous people live in rural Australia.)

We seek a commitment from an incoming government to

  1. Endorse the Uluru Statement from the Heart and the Makarrata, ie establish a First Nations Voice in the Australian Constitution and establish a Makarrata Commission to supervise a process of agreement-making between governments and First Nations and truth-telling about our history.
  2. Fund an additional 3000 Aboriginal Health Workers and practitioners. ($180m over 4 years; $180m per year ongoing)
  3. Increase base funding of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.
  4. Eliminate Rheumatic Heart Disease. Get serious about meeting targets set under the END RHD program. ($170m over 4 years.)

See Rationale Part 3 Below  

Fund an additional 3000 Aboriginal Health Workers and practitioners. ($180m over 4 years; $180m per year ongoing)

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills

Visit NACCHO for more info

Part 2 :  NRHA CEO Mark Diamond says much needs to be done so everyone in Australia enjoys better health. Currently those living beyond major cities carry 1.3 times the cost, mortality and disability associated with illness and disease.

“We are looking for commitments from all sides of politics as we go into this election not only to fund immediate needs but to take a long-term strategic view for the sake of the future of the seven million people living outside major cities.

“We need a new National Rural Health Strategy. The previous strategy was based on a framework endorsed by the COAG Health Council in 2011.

“It’s use and effectiveness has not been evaluated since and we need to understand how widely that framework or guide for decision-making in planning and delivering effective and better health care and health promotion services is being used and what, if anything, needs to change.

“In short, we need to prepare a new National Rural Health Strategy for the approaching third decade of the 21st century to ensure all governments and health care service providers are pulling in the same direction when it comes to rural health.”

Mr Diamond says that if people living in rural, regional and remote areas had the same mortality rates as people living in major cities, there would have been almost 20,000 fewer deaths, according to Australian Institute of Health and Welfare data for 2009-2011.

“In these areas, coronary heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, transport accidents, diabetes, lung cancer and suicide – all preventable conditions – killed 11 more people a day compared with metropolitan areas.

“This situation is unfair and untenable. All that is required is the political will to fix it. In the lead up to this 2019 Federal election we are keen that voters, candidates and political parties understand what it will take for an incoming government to provide good healthcare and health promotion for all regardless of where they live.”

Over the next four weeks the NRHA will roll out more detail on what it is asking of Australia’s next Federal Government. To learn more, check www.ruralhealth.org.au/election19

The NRHA represents all professions and services dedicated to helping rural Australians get health care and health promotion services. Among them are nurses, physiotherapists, doctors, pharmacists, paramedics, surgeons and other allied health professionals. Its 37 members include national organisations representing those professions and other bodies such as NACCHO ,the Country Women’s Association of Australia, the Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association and the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia.

Part 3 Indigenous Health Rationale

  1. More than 1,100 delegates from around Australia voted at the 15thNational Rural Health Conference in March to seek government endorsement for the Uluru Statement from the Heart as a key priority. Poorer health outcomes in non-metropolitan Australia reflect the widening gap that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience in their health care compared with non-Indigenous people. It is only when we listen to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices that we will be able to deliver health solutions that will succeed.
  2. Aboriginal Health Workers and health practitioners are critical to achieving better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through culturally safe preventative health and treatment services. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have three-fold higher levels of preventable hospital admissions and deaths than other Australians and the burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is 2.3 times higher. A significant driver behind these numbers is that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can often feel unsafe in accessing the health care they need. 2016 data from the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association shows the number of Indigenous workers in health professions was 1347.A ratio of one for every 150 Indigenous people would require 4328 practitioners – this would mean putting 3000 more Aboriginal Health Workers and practitioners on the ground.
  3. Increasing the baseline funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations will remove funding insecurity that threatens their programs and services.
  4. Young Indigenous Australians are 55 times more likely to die of rheumatic heart disease than their non-Indigenous peers, yet it is preventable. Priorities have been established under the END RHD program – these need to be implemented immediately.

Updated Part 4 Indigenous voice key to wellbeing

The body representing 37 rural health organisations has urged the next government to endorse the Uluru Statement from the Heart and establish a “voice” to federal parliament as its No 1 priority to improve indigenous health.

Launching its election charter at Parliament House, National Rural Health Alliance chair Tanya Lehmann said Australia needed to start tackling problems impacting on people’s health — problems that would not be fixed by more doctors or technology.

“Connection to country, spiritual wellbeing, overcoming intergenerational trauma are central to the health of indigenous Australians,” she told The Australian.

“Recognising indigenous Australians appropriately in the ­Constitution is an important symbol but it’s more than a symbol, it’s ­actually essential to changing the trajectory of the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people. It’s ­essential to closing the gap.”

Bill Shorten plans to hold a ­referendum on indigenous recognition in the first term of his prime ministership if he wins the ­election.

Scott Morrison committed $7.3 million in the budget to investigate a model for an advisory body such as a “voice to parliament”.

In its charter, the NRHA said: “It is only when we listen to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices that we will be able to deliver health solutions that will succeed.”

The Uluru Statement from the Heart, released in 2017, called for a First Nations voice to be enshrined in the Constitution, with a Makarrata commission to supervise “a process of agreement-making between governments and First ­Nations people and truth-telling about our history”.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #refreshtheCTGRefresh @jackietrad Queensland Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships : How Queensland reform will #ClosetheGAP

 ” We asked the Queensland Productivity Commission to examine how res­ources devoted to service delivery in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities could be best used to meet their needs. It was clear from those findings, delivered in June, that we must reform and reframe the way we work with the state’s 19 remote communities.

They have given us a clear message: “Stop consulting us. Stop engaging us. Stop doing things to us and start doing things with us. Start to hear what we’re saying, and make us equal partners and key enablers in turning around the disadvantage our people face.”

Jackie Trad is Queensland Deputy Premier, Treasurer and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships. see extracts from Health Report here

Download all reports HERE

Or Download Health report here

Chapter-17-Health-and-wellbeing

This year marked 10 years since the release of the landmark report Closing the Gap, which for the first time held governments accountable for addressing the endemic inequality that exists between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians. There has been significant progress in areas such as Year 12 completion, employment and reducing infant mortality, but in some areas the gap has widened.

Does that mean we have been too ambitious? Of course not. It is incumbent on this generation to be ambitious in pursuing a better future for First Nations people and to right the wrongs of the past by tackling injustice, poverty and disadvantage. We cannot hope to achieve this unless we learn from mistakes, build on good work and acknowledge what doesn’t work.

In 2016, the Productivity Commission was scathing in its assessment of 1000 government programs to tackle indigenous disadvantage, finding that just 34 of them had been properly evaluated. It recommended more robust evaluation and publication of results.

These requests are central to achieving real change. We must stop punishing people and start empowering them. I am steadfast in my desire to make this happen. I want the Palaszczuk government’s response to be more than just a shopping list of things we are providing communities. We must throw away the bureaucratic playbook that has hampered change, and must work together to give real meaning to local authority, local decision-making and self-determin­ation.

I have tasked my director-general, Chris Sarra, to work with communities to test and work through the QPC recommendations and to put in place a framework that will enable commun­ities to thrive. It’s an agenda not devised and proselytised from Brisbane but shaped by the people who live in the unique communities across our state — communities such as Cherbourg, Yarrabah, Doomadgee and Thursday Island.

Thriving Communities will build on past successes and acknowledge failures. There is a clear place for the policy agenda advanced by Noel Pearson’s welfare reform trial and the Families Responsibilities Commission. For 10 years the FRC has been fac­ilitating behavioural change through conditional access to welfare payments in five communities in Cape York. Like Closing the Gap, the program has had mixed success.

Despite its protestations, the federal government knows this too. In June 2015, Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion wrote to the Queensland government seeking support for a new “lower cost approach” to the FRC, citing the current model as expensive and with limitations. Consequently, for two years, all parties have been engaged in a review of the model — a fact notice­ably absent from Scullion and special envoy Tony Abbott’s recent commentary. There also has been no mention of their failure to allocate funds to the program beyond this month.

While the federal government remains distracted by internal turbulence, we are committed to working with communities to give them the self-determination they need.

About the Inquiry

In September 2016, the Queensland Government announced the Queensland Productivity Commission (QPC) would inquire into service delivery in remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The Inquiry was announced in response to concerns expressed by Indigenous leaders that the level of investment in all services (federal, State and non-government) was not delivering higher outcomes for members of their communities.

The QPC was asked to consider investment in remote and discrete Indigenous communities and what works well, and why, with a view to improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The QPC has released its final report which is available on the QPC website.

The QPC Inquiry Recommendations

The QPC Inquiry final report and recommendations are based on extensive consultation with more than 500 stakeholders and remote and discrete Indigenous communities in Queensland.

The QPC Inquiry final report shows examples of good service delivery that can be built upon but most stakeholders agree that there are opportunities to improve how services are designed, funded and delivered that will work towards better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders.

The QPC Inquiry final report provides 22 recommendations and proposes a substantial reform agenda for policy and service delivery that includes structural reform, service delivery reform and economic reform, to be supported by capacity and capability building of all stakeholders, and timely and transparent transfer of data to measure performance and evaluation.

The Queensland Government Response to the QPC Inquiry

The Queensland Government makes a long-term commitment to work with the 19 remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, their leaders and Mayors and other stakeholders to implement the intent of the reform agenda proposed by the QPC.

The Queensland Government has provided its response to the final report (PDF, 521 KB).

Key points Health Delivery (text added by NACCHO ) 

􀁸 Indigenous people in remote Queensland experience a burden of disease and injury 2.4 times the non-Indigenous rate—mainly chronic disease, mental disorders, cancers and intentional injuries.

􀁸 Socioeconomic determinants (education, income, overcrowding), racism and discrimination play a significant role in the health gap, along with behavioural and environmental risk factors.

􀁸 The health system is a multifaceted network of services and settings, involving a variety of public and non-government providers, funding arrangements, participants and regulatory mechanisms.

System issues

􀁸 The ‘silo’ approach to service delivery is problematic for communities. It is difficult to ensure services are adequate, appropriate, coordinated and not unnecessarily duplicated, and meet community priorities and user needs.

􀁸 Mainstream mental health services do not meet the cultural needs of Indigenous people, who view social and emotional wellbeing as incorporating individuals, their families and communities.

􀁸 Service providers and institutions are not well-equipped to respond effectively to the distress Stolen

Generations can experience when using those services—distress that arises from the role of those institutions in past injustices.

􀁸 Anecdotally, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder is prevalent, and access to diagnosis limited.

􀁸 Access to healthcare can be problematic—issues include ineffective, nil or confusing referral pathways, lower screening rates and limited access to renal care and rehabilitation centres. There are significant gaps in the Indigenous health workforce.

What is working

􀁸 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled health services provide effective, culturally appropriate and multidisciplinary models of comprehensive primary healthcare.

􀁸 Family Wellbeing is an example of a cultural healing program that has been found to increase the capacity of participants to exert greater control over their health and wellbeing.

The reforms proposed by this inquiry can provide an enabling environment for stakeholders to develop collaborative and flexible solutions to these challenges.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #ElderCare funding up to $46 million : Applications close on 26 Nov 2018: Donna Ah Chee CEO @CAACongress welcomes @KenWyattMP announcement of increased funding to assist Aboriginal people growing old with their families in their own communities


Improvements in Aboriginal health have more of our people living into old age than there were even a decade ago and necessitates a need to meet the increasing demand for these types of services.

Being on country as you grow old is a very strong cultural obligation for Aboriginal people and for too long our people have had to move into population centres to access services.

We now have two major recent initiatives that will help our older people stay on country. Firstly, the announcement of the new Medicare item for nurse assisted dialysis on country and now this announcement from Minister Wyatt.

This continuing connection to country is vital for the spiritual foundation and quality of life of Aboriginal people.

It is a key part of keeping our older people healthy and happy.

Our people have a very strong desire to be on country when they die and announcements like this will help to make sure that people grow old and die on country and with family. We know that social isolation is very damaging to older people’s health and this will ensure people remain socially and culturally connected.

While keeping people at home with aged care packages is a key goal there are some very successful aged care facilities on country at places like Mutitjulu. This also is important for people who need this level of care

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) Chief Executive Officer, Donna Ah Chee, welcomes the announcement of increased funding to assist Aboriginal people growing old in a well-supported way, with their families in their own communities

Originally published Talking Aged Care 

Photos above Ken Wyatt meeting with the elders from the Yindjibarndi Aboriginal Corporation in Roebourne WA 2017

Read NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Elder Care Articles HERE

Ageing First Australians living remotely will now have increased access to residential and home aged care services close to family, home or country following an announcement by Federal Government to expand their Budget initiative – the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care (NATSIFAC) program

The $105.7 million Government commitment, which will benefit more than 900 additional First Australians, is set to be expanded progressively over the next four years.

Federal Minister for Senior Australians, Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt announced the first round of expansion funding under the program – up to $46 million – to increase the number of home care places delivered through NATSIFAC program in remote and very remote areas.

“Aged care providers are invited to apply for funding under the expanded NATSIFAC program’s first grants round, which is designed to improve access to culturally-safe aged services in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities,” the Minister explains.

“The program funds service providers to provide flexible, culturally-appropriate aged care to older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people close to home and community.

“Service providers can deliver a mix of residential and home care services in accordance with the needs of the community.”

Minister Wyatt reiterates the importance of home care in enabling senior Australians to receive aged care to live independently in their own homes and familiar surroundings for as long as possible, and says the initiative is all about “flexibility and stability”.

“It is improving access to aged care for older people living in remote and very remote locations, and enables more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to receive culturally-safe aged  care services close to family, home or country, rather than having to relocate hundreds of kilometres away,” he says.

“At the same time, it helps build the viability of remote aged care providers through funding certainty.”

Applicants can apply for new or additional home care places under the NATSIFAC program or approved providers can apply to convert their existing Home Care Packages, administered under the Aged Care Act 1997, to home care places under the NATSIFAC program.

Applications close on 26 November 2018 with more details about the expansion round available online.

GO ID: GO1606
Agency:Department of Health

Close Date & Time:

26-Nov-2018 2:00 pm (ACT Local Time)
Primary Category:
101001 – Aged Care

Publish Date:

4-Oct-2018

Location:

ACT, NSW, VIC, SA, WA, QLD, NT, TAS

Selection Process:

Targeted or Restricted Competitive

Description:

This Grant Opportunity is to increase the number of home care places under the NATSIFAC Program in remote and very remote Australia (geographical locations defined as Modified Monash Model (MMM) 6 and 7).

Eligibility:

To be eligible you must be one of the following:

Type A:

Existing NATSIFAC Program providers delivering services in geographical locations MMM 6-7

Type B:

Approved providers currently delivering Commonwealth funded home care services (administered under the Aged Care Act 1997) to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in geographical locations MMM 6-7, with up to 50 home care recipients per service, for conversion to the NATSIFAC Program

Type C:

Organisations not currently delivering aged care services in geographical locations MMM 6-7, however but existing infrastructure and the capability to deliver aged care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Total Amount Available (AUD):

$46,000,000.00

Instructions for Lodgement:

Applications must be submitted to the Department of Health by the closing date and time.

Other Instructions:

$46 million (GST exclusive) over 4 years, 2018-2022.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #CDP : Despite major objections from peak groups like #NACCHO The Morrison government to push ahead with changes to Indigenous remote work for the dole scheme

The National Association of Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Services, in its submission, warned that extending the four-week payment cutoff penalty to CDP and requiring recipients to reapply would be much more difficult for people in remote areas who may have language barriers, lack access to a phone or have underlying cognitive or health impairments and will likely mean that Aboriginal people in CDP regions will have less access to income support payments than other Australians”.

From The Australian October 12

See below copy of NACCHO Submission to the Senate Community Affairs Legislation Committee Inquiry into the Social Security Legislation Amendment (Community Development Program) Bill 2018

The Morrison Government will push ahead with controversial changes to the Indigenous remote work for the dole scheme despite extensive evidence given to a senate committee that they are punitive and unfairly target Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

The changes to the Community Development Plan, which was introduced in 2015, will entrench a compliance regime described by the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples in evidence as having never been designed for use in remote areas, where “persistent non-compliance is more likely to be the result of structural barriers such as geographical challenges”.

The regime, which began on July 1 in other unemployment benefit programs such as jobactive, will impose demerits and financial penalties on CDP participants if they fail to attend scheduled appointments.

The new system will cancel payments for a maximum of four weeks for defaults and require the affected participant to reapply to receive future payments.

However a dissenting report by Labor senators slammed the government’s recommendation that the Bill go ahead, saying it reflected an “inadequacy of consultation, and the lack of genuine engagement or co-design with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and representative organisations”.

It quoted Congress’s submission that the compliance system “was designed for use in urban and regional contexts, where the vast majority of employment program participants regularly comply with obligations, and those who refuse to often do so deliberately due to dissatisfaction with the system”.

“This is not the case in remote communities (where) many CDP participants breach obligations on a more regular (ie weekly or fortnightly) basis due to social, cultural and community obligations.”

It also cited evidence from peak group Jobs Australia that expanding the compliance regime “would consign many people to a penalties-and-compliance cycle which will increase the risk of disengagement”.

Jobs Australia said CDP was already causing “unecessary financial hardship, exacerbating poverty, creating disengagment and doing more harm than good in remote Australia”.

It said there were more financial penalties applied to CDP participants than to jobactive participants, a fact that could primarily be explained by “the onerous and inflexible participation requirements in CDP compared to non-remote areas”.

While the Labor response made no promise to repeal the change should it win government, it called on the Government “to urgently address the issues raised in the course of this inquiry”.

A separate Greens dissenting report called for the Government to release an evaluation of the current GDP “as a matter of urgency and allow time between its release and debate on this Bill … the fact that we are being asked to assess the Bill and the reforms more broadly when we have not yet seen the evaluation of the current CDP is unacceptable”.

The Government has proposed creating 6000 subsidised jobs which contain some exemptions from the compliance regime, a suggestion the Greens called “a nonsense argument” as other measures could be taken to separate CDP participation from the compliance regime.

Submission to the Senate Community Affairs Legislation Committee Inquiry into the Social Security Legislation Amendment (Community Development Program) Bill 2018

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia

Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia

Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council

Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Norther Territory

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

Winnunga Nimmityjah Health and Community Service

The following submission to the Senate Community Affairs Legislation Committee is made by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and its Affiliate from each State. NACCHO is the national peak body representing 145 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) across the country on Aboriginal health and wellbeing issues.

An ACCHO is a primary health care service initiated and operated by the local Aboriginal community to deliver holistic, comprehensive, and culturally appropriate health care to the community which controls it, through a locally elected Board of Governance. They range from large multi-functional services employing several medical practitioners and providing a wide range of services, to small services which rely on Aboriginal Health Workers and/or nurses to provide the bulk of primary care services, often with a preventive, health education focus. The services form a network, but each is autonomous and independent both of one another and of government.

NACCHO, the State Affiliates and its members are a living embodiment of the aspirations of Aboriginal communities and their struggle for self-determination. In 1997, the Federal Government funded NACCHO to establish a Secretariat in Canberra which greatly increased the capacity of Aboriginal Peoples involved in ACCHOs to participate in national health policy development.

The integrated, comprehensive primary health care model adopted by ACCHOs is in keeping with the philosophy of Aboriginal community control and the holistic view of health. Addressing the ill health of Aboriginal people can only be achieved by local Aboriginal people controlling health care delivery.

Overarching position

NACCHO is deeply concerned by the Community Development Program (CDP) and its impact on Aboriginal people living in remote areas or CDP regions. We believe that the CDP is discriminatory and is causing significant harm, hardship and distress to Aboriginal people across Australia. NACCHO does not support the CDP nor does it support the proposed Bill. We believe the proposed Bill will only worsen the impact of the current CDP.

The Senate must recognise the unanimous voice of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and reject this Bill.

Recommendations

NACCHO recommends the Senate:

  1. Reject the Social Security Legislation Amendment (Community Development Program) Bill 2018;
  2. Confirm whether the CDP is a program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and has been designed as a Special Measure under the Racial Discrimination Act 1975;
    1. If the CDP is a Special Measure, detail how CDP was designed as such and on what basis this has been determined;
    2. If the CDP is not a Special Measure, provide an explanation why the responsible Minister is the Minister for Indigenous Affairs; the program is administered by the Department of Prime Minister in its Indigenous Affairs Group; is funded from the Indigenous Advancement Strategy; and overwhelming applies to Aboriginal people.
  3. Advise the Government to immediately abandon the Community Development Program, recognising the program is deeply flawed; is discriminatory; and is causing disproportionate harm and distress to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples;
  4. Advise the Government to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and people in remote areas to develop a replacement program which reflects the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. We propose the Fair Work and Strong Communities scheme proposed by APO NT as the appropriate basis for this discussion.

Discussion

There are multiple issues with the proposed CDP reforms and with the underlying program and NACCHO has only referred to a few below. NACCHO notes the submissions of other Aboriginal organisations and peak bodies, including Aboriginal Peak Organisations in the Northern Territory and the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples, and their comments on other issues with the proposed Bill. We also note the submission of Ms Lisa Fowkes of the Australian National University and her comprehensive analysis of the issues.  

CDP is discriminatory in both its design and application

NACCHO believes that the CDP is discriminatory towards Aboriginal people living in remote areas, both in its design and in its application.

We understand that the Government claims the CDP is not a program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and is an employment program for all people living in remote areas, or CDP regions. NACCHO questions then why the responsible Minister is the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, rather than the Minister for Jobs as is the case for the Job Active program, and is administered by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet’s Indigenous Affairs Group, rather than the Department for Jobs. NACCHO is also concerned that the CDP is funded from the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, a program solely for Indigenous programs and services. Participants of CDP are also overwhelming Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Should the government claim that CDP is a program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, NACCHO is also not aware that the CDP has been designed as a Special Measure under the Racial Discrimination Act 1975.

NACCHO is also of the view that CDP has a disproportionate impact on Aboriginal people and affects their rights to social security, causing significant hardship. Reasons include: differing work requirements or mutual obligations to other Australians; use of phone assessments; lack of cultural competence of assessors; failure to use interpreters; differing cultural perceptions of disabilities; high levels of unassessed or unaddressed mental illness and/or disability in remote communities; reluctance of Indigenous people to disclose family or personal challenges; and poor on non-existent Centrelink services.

Clarity is required as to whether the CDP is a program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living in remote areas and if it is for CDP to be redesigned so it is consistent with a Special Measure.

Application of the TCF to CDP participants

The application of penalties under the current CDP compliance framework is having devastating impacts on Aboriginal people, with increasing hardship, people going hungry and increasing family stress.

NACCHO understands the TCF arrangements are designed to reduce penalties for those who might miss the occasional appointment within a six-month period, and increase penalties for those who miss appointments or activities more often. CDP participants have to attend activities more often than anyone else, so they have more ‘opportunities to fail’ and they incur many more penalties than other unemployed people.

NACCHO also believes that many CDP participants are incorrectly assessed during the initial job capacity assessments and too often have higher work obligations placed on them than they are able to meet. The multiple reasons for this are outlined above. Ultimately, it means that there are more ‘opportunities to fail’ for CDP participants.

One of the biggest consequences of the TCF comes from the removal of the current ability of participants who have had a longer penalty applied to return to their activities and have their income support reinstated. Under the TCF, individuals who have been penalised would have no way of having their payments re-instated early by returning to Work for the Dole. They could appeal the penalty, but in practice this is extremely difficult for Aboriginal people living in remote areas where Centrelink servicing is very poor and inconsistent, English is not the first language and there are multiple barriers to communication. This will increase the hardship for Aboriginal people in CDP regions.

In addition, those who receive 4 week penalties will have their payments cancelled altogether and they will need to re-apply for payments. This will be much more difficult for people in remote areas who may have language barriers, lack access to a phone or have underlying cognitive or health impairments and will likely mean that Aboriginal people in CDP regions will have less access to income support payments than other Australians.

It is our view that the TCF system will have a much harsher impact on CDP participants than other jobseekers across Australia and will continue CDP as a discriminatory measure. This change should be rejected by the Senate.

Provision for allied health professional to provide evidence for health assessments

NACCHO understand that the intention of the CDP reforms is to ensure job seekers are not required to participate beyond their capacity through an improved health assessment process: this includes allowing local allied health professionals to provide the evidence for assessments. The CDP reforms however do not address the deeply flawed initial job capacity assessment which has not achieved any significant exceptions to date based on the level of disability, illness and hardship in many remote Aboriginal communities; and sets Aboriginal people up with unrealistic work expectations.

The provisions for allied health workers to provide evidence on work capacity after the initial obligations have been set will then still sit within a deeply flawed system of assessment. The inadequacy of current assessment processes needs to be fixed by working with Aboriginal organisations with expertise in this area on a mechanism that supports locally-based assessments with more appropriate evidence requirements.

NACCHO also notes that the inclusion of evidence from allied health professionals has also been added with no consideration of health services’ current workloads and capacity, no additional resourcing and no consultation. If these provisions proceed, NACCHO recommends that the Government work with Aboriginal health organisations and their peaks to ensure the changes and requirements are properly understood and any financial impact is addressed.

An alternative to CDP

NACCHO believes that the current design of the CDP, including the proposed ‘reformed CDP’ does not address the real employment challenges facing remote communities including: lack of demand for labour; lack of required skills to take up available jobs and the health effects of poverty. These are long term challenges and require long term investments and strengthening of local capacity. These issues will only be addressed with the meaningful inclusion of Indigenous people in decision making.

NACCHO recommends that the government work in partnership with remote Aboriginal organisations and their peaks across Australia to design an appropriate and properly funded Aboriginal led community development agenda that includes economic and social outcomes.

The CDP should be abandoned whilst this work takes place.

” This attempt to force a harsh new penalty system on remote communities shows again that the Australian Government does not want to listen. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people want to take up the reins and drive job creation and community development.

Our proposal for a new model for fair conditions of work and strong remote communities is sitting on the Government’s desk but being ignored”

John Paterson CEO AMSANT, spokesperson for Aboriginal Peak Organisations NT, said that while subsidies for new jobs was a step in the right direction, the Government’s proposal falls far short of the alternative model – Fair Work and Strong Communities – that was handed to the Government by Aboriginal organisations in 2017.

Download Transcript APO NT at SENATE Community Affairs Legislation Committee_

Starts page 13

Picture above: Cenral Land Council policy manager Josie Douglas and AMSANT CEO John Patterson are fighting the Coalition government’s discriminatory and punitive work for the dole scheme in Canberra 

The two APO NT spokespeople just finished giving evidence before a Senate committee.

Dr Douglas said if the Coalition government’s CDP bill passes the Senate, remote communities will be hit with a tough new penalty regime in the New Year.

She said the so-called targeted compliance framework would create even greater financial hardship in the bush.

“ Aboriginal Peak Organisations of the Northern Territory (APONT ), and our members have received widespread concerns about the debilitating impacts that CDP is having on its participants, their families and communities.

Financial penalties were being imposed at an astonishing scale – causing families, including children, to go hungry.

Such consistent and strong concerns expressed by those at the coalface must be taken seriously and acted upon,

Onerous and discriminatory obligations applied to remote CDP work for the dole participants mean they have to do significantly more work than those in non-remote, mainly non-Indigenous majority areas, up to 670 hours more per year.”

The chief executive of Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory, John Paterson, said the program was causing significant harm to communities. He said financial penalties were being imposed at an astonishing scale – causing families, including children, to go hungry (see Guardian article in full below Part 2 )

See previous NACCHO COVERAGE HERE

Bawinanga Aboriginal Corporation’s Community Development Programme (CDP) and West Arnhem Regional Council works crew 

Press Release

Remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities struggling under the Australian Government’s racially discriminatory remote work for the dole program would be worse off under a proposed new penalty system, a Senate Committee inquiry has been told.

The Aboriginal Peak Organisations NT, the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency and the Human Rights Law Centre were among a number of organisations urging a Senate Committee to reject the Government’s attempt to expand the ‘Targeted Compliance Framework’ from urban areas into remote communities subject to the Government’s remote Community Development Program (CDP).

Jamie Ahfat, a community leader in the Northern Territory, told the Committee that CDP is making life a lot harder for people in remote communities.

“I’ve been doing CDP since 2016. I always wanted to get a proper job and not be on Centrelink but there are no jobs up here.”

“I’ve always tried to do the right thing in the CPD, but despite this there have been times when I’ve been penalised.

There was one time when I had to rush to Darwin to help my mum who had cancer. Because I didn’t tell them, I was penalised and dollars were taken from my pay.”

“The system is discriminatory, it’s unfair that we have to do twice as many hours of activities as people in the cities. The CDP is also confusing, things aren’t properly explained to us, it’s hard to see the point.

The activities don’t help us get jobs,” said Mr Ahfat.

One of the most alarming parts of the Targeted Compliance Framework would see vulnerablepeople cycling through 1, 2 and 4 week no-payment penalties, no matter how much debt, hunger or pain they cause – waivers would not be available.

The Government has included an offer to provide 6,000 job subsidies to the introduction of the harsh penalty system into remote areas. Those who get a subsidised job would be excludedfrom the penalty system.

CDP workers currently have to work up to 500 hours more per year than those covered by thenon-remote ‘Jobactive’ program. The scheme also imposes onerous daily requirements. As aresult people under CDP are struggling to keep up and are having payments docked at 25 timesthe rate of Jobactive participants.

David Woodroffe, Principal Legal Officer of the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency, said that for years Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations have been dealing with thedamage wrought by the Government’s program.

“Rather than adding more penalties there is a real need to address the factors that are drivinghigh penalty rates already, such as barriers to accessing supports for vulnerable people and more onerous work obligations,” said Mr Woodroffe.

Adrianne Walters, senior lawyer at the Human Rights Law Centre, said that it was unjust and unnecessary for the Government to effectively make its offer to subsidise jobs conditional on the introduction of a penalty system that will see many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffer.

“CDP already subjects remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to the indignity of having to work more for less. If the Government gets its way, parents will be left without money for food, fuel, rent and other basic necessities for four weeks no matter how dire their situation,” said Ms Walters.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alert : Download @RoyalFlyingDoc Report : Looking Ahead: Responding to the Health Needs 2028 #Remote population stable, but chronic illness and #rural workforce shortage to jump over decade

“Chronic illness growth and rural workforce shortage is but a forecast.

Investing in country health services and rural health professionals can halt these forecasts from ever being realised.

Investing now will save lives and dollars in the long run.”

RFDS CEO Dr Martin Laverty called the report a call to arms.

Download the Report HERE

RFDS NACCHO_Looking_Ahead_Report_D3

  ” Indigenous Australians comprise approximately 2.8% of the total Australian population, although they comprise almost half the population in remote areas.

The RFDS notes the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and its state-based organisations provide a pivotal service to rural and remote communities. NACCHO supports the Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS) which is a primary healthcare service operated by local Aboriginal communities.

The RFDS works in close partnership with many remote branches of the AMS, and respects and promotes the principle of community control “

 “The RFDS respects and acknowledges Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the first Australians and our vision for reconciliation is a culture that strives for unity, equity and respect between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians.

The RFDS is committed to improved health outcomes and access to health services for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, and our Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) outlines our intentions to use research and policy to drive this improvement.

RFDS research and policy reports, such as this one, include data on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as part of a broader effort to improve health outcomes and access to health services a contribution to the ‘Close the Gap’ campaign.”

RFDS Press Release

Australia’s remote population is forecast to grow only marginally in a decade. Yet chronic illness will rise dramatically, with the burden of mental illness forecast to increase by a fifth, if action is not taken to halt current trends.

Health service access in rural regions is also forecast to lag behind metropolitan areas, according to Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) research: From 90 to 100: Planning for the health needs of country Australia in 2028. The report provides health service forecasts form 2018, the RFDS 90th year of operation until 2028, the centenary year of the RFDS.

The forecast shows while the Australian population will grow from 25 million to 29 million in a decade, remote and very remote Australia’s population will grow by an average of only 0.2% each year, from 493,752 to only 504,724 in 2028.

11.8 million Australians currently live with at least one chronic illness, with 2028 forecasts equalling 13.8 million, a national increase of 15.6%. Yet chronic illness prevalence forecast to remain higher in remote Australia than metropolitan areas.

Disability-adjusted life years (DALY), or the number of years lost to ill-health, disability or early death, are forecast to increase in remote areas over the decade to 2028 with:

  • cancer up by 15.6%, from 37.6 to 44 DALYs;
  • mental illness up by 21.6%, from 21.8 to 27.1 DALYs;
  • neurological conditions such as Alzheimers, up by 47.8%, from 13.2 to 21.5 DALYs.

A welcome fall of 22.8% in the burden of cardiovascular disease in remote Australia is forecast, from 37.6 DALYs down to 29.9 in 2028, reflecting improvement in heart attack prevention and treatment in parts of country Australia.

The report forecasts by 2028 remote Australia will have only:

  • a fifth the number of General Practitioners compared to metropolitan areas (43 compared to 255 per 100,000 population);
  • a twelfth of the number of physiotherapists (23 compared to 276 per 100,000 population);
  • half the number of pharmacists (52 as compared to 113 per 100,000 population);
  • and a third the number of psychologists (34 as compared to 104 per 100,000 population).

Nurse and midwifery levels in metropolitan and remote areas by 2028 are forecast to be almost even, with 1,361 per 100,000 population in city areas and 1,259 in remote areas.

A survey of rural clinicians published in the report finds health literacy, mental health services, and improved access to primary care services are priorities for the next decade. The report also forecasts growth in demand for RFDS services by its centenary year in 2028.

Looking Ahead: Responding to the Health Needs of Country Australia in 2028 is available here

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities #HealthPromotion #AUSTPH2018 #NSW @AHMRC #WA @TheAHCWA #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @Deadlychoices @Wuchopperen @QAIHC @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima Plus FYI @NATSIHWA @IAHA_National Allied Health

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 ACCHO Job/s of the week 

Wuchopperen ACCHO Sexual Health Nurse Cairns FNQ Closing 2 October

Wuchopperen ACCHO Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Environmental Health Coordinator Carnarvon ACCHO WA

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council Project Officer

General Practitioner _ Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative

1.2 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland

2.Queensland 

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

1. 1 ACCHO Job/s of the week

1.Wuchopperen ACCHO Sexual Health Nurse Cairns FNQ Closing 2 October 

‘Keeping Our Generations Growing Strong’

Wuchopperen is a Community controlled Aboriginal Health Organisation providing holistic health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cairns.

Sexual Health Nurse

Full Time – Temporary 30 June 2020

Based in Cairns

The Sexual Health Nurse position co-ordinates the clinical sexual health programs targeting at risk clients, in both outreach and Wuchopperen Health Service clinic settings. The position will provide support and specialised sexual health education for all clinical services to improve the care of at risk clients.

The Sexual Health Nurse (RN) must have current registration as a Registered Nurse (Division 1) with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency, with a minimum of five years’ experience in direct clinical nursing care and/or community Health nursing.

Benefits of working with Wuchopperen:

* Generous salary sacrifice benefits

* 5 Weeks annual leave

* Commitment to professional development

* Private Health Care Corporate Rate

* 11.5% Superannuation Contribution

Applicants for the above position will:

* Demonstrate relevant experience and/or qualifications

* Possess a current driver’s licence

* Possess, or be eligible for, a Blue Card (for suitability to work with children and young people)

* Consent to a broader criminal history check, where relevant

Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Do Not Apply Through Seek

How to apply:

For information about this position, or for a recruitment package, please refer to www.wuchopperen.org.au/careers

Closing date for applications: 9am on Tuesday, 02 October 2018

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

2. Wuchopperen ACCHO Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Wuchopperen is a Community controlled Aboriginal Health Organisation providing holistic health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cairns.

Registered Nurse, Child Health (Immunisation Endorsed)

Full Time Permanent

Based in Cairns

The Registered Nurse, Child Health is responsible for working with clinic teams to improve the standard of health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families.

The successful applicant is required to have a minimum of 5 years’ experience in a similar role, hold a Registered Nursing degree, qualification of Child Health and be Immunisation Endorsed.

Benefits of working with Wuchopperen:

* Generous salary sacrifice benefits

* 5 Weeks annual leave

* Commitment to professional development

* Private Health Care Corporate Rate

* 11.5% Superannuation Contribution

Applicants for the above position will:

* Demonstrate relevant experience and/or qualifications

* Possess a current driver’s licence

* Possess, or be eligible for, a Blue Card (for suitability to work with children and young people)

* Consent to a broader criminal history check, where relevant

How to apply:

For information about this position, or for a recruitment package, please refer to www.wuchopperen.org.au.

Closing date for applications: 9am on, 2 October 2018

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

Environmental Health Coordinator Carnarvon ACCHO WA

Location: Carnarvon, WA
Location: Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC), Carnarvon WA
Employment Type: Full time / Permanent
Remuneration: $77,026 – $86,694 + superannuation + salary sacrifice

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

To find out more about CMSAC please click here

About the Opportunity

CMSAC has an opportunity for a motivated and professional Environmental Health Coordinator to join their team and take the lead in the development, monitoring and evaluation of environmental health initiatives.

As the Environmental Health Coordinator, you will be predominantly responsible for reducing the risk and incidents of environmental health issues for the Aboriginal communities in the North West Gascoyne region of WA. This includes (but is not limited to) drinking water, waste management, solid waste, housing supply and maintenance, power supply, animal management, food safety and supply, pest and mosquito control, dust control and emergency management.

To be successful in this position, your skills, experience and qualifications will include:

  • Qualifications and experience as a practicing Environmental Health / Health Promotion Officer or equivalent;
  • Sound knowledge and understanding of environmental health related legislation;
  • Competency in the use of environmental and public health monitoring tools and equipment;
  • Ability to evaluate, mediate, negotiate and achieve results in environmental and public health context;
  • Knowledge of Aboriginal culture and key relationship issues

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please click here.

About the Benefits

$77,026 – $86,694 + superannuation + salary sacrifice

In addition, you will have access to a number of fantastic benefits including:

  • 5 weeks annual leave
  • Vehicle provided for operational purposes
  • Support to further invest in your career through additional training
  • Study leave options
  • Annual leave loading
  • Employee assistance program

A relocation allowance can be negotiated with the right candidate, to find out more about Carnarvon and the community please click here

Applications close at 5pm, Friday 5 October 2018

For further information about this position please call Sarah Calder on 08 6145 1049.

As per section 51 of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA) CMSAC seeks to increase the diversity of our workforce to better meet the different needs of our clients and stakeholders and to improve equal opportunity outcomes for our employees.

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) WA 4 positions

Are you a dynamic team member who thrives on a challenge, loves working with people and has a genuine passion for client service delivery? A team player who appreciates the value of an energetic team environment and respects cultural diversity?

Bega Garnbirringu Health Services (Bega) is currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants. If you have any questions please contact (08) 9022 5591 or email recruitment@bega.org.au

All advertised positions may require one or more of the following:

Please Note: Applications received via indeed.com; other Recruitment Agencies and without a cover letter will not be accepted.


Health Practitioner – Mobile Clinic

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Health Practitioner (Mobile Clinic)

  • As the Health Practitioner you will provide health clinical assessment and treatment, care coordination, client support and community development activities to clients and families of the Goldfields.
  • You must be able to undertake scheduled travel within the Goldfields region on a regular basis, up to 4-5 days at a time and have an interest in developing and maintaining effective networks, alliances and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and other Health Organisations.
  • Due to the remote nature of this work, we require our Mobile Clinic team to have at least 2 years Primary Health Care experience.
  • You must hold a current AHPRA registration as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Enrolled Nurse or Registered Nurse; hold a current “MR” or higher WA drivers licence (or willing to obtain); police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check.

View position description

Apply for position


Health Practitioner – New Directions

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Health Practitioner (New Directions).

  • As a Health Practitioner – New Directions you will involved in Maternal and Child health clinical assessment and treatment, care coordination, client support and community development activities.
  • You must have a current registration with AHPRA as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Enrolled or Registered Nurse; police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check; current WA drivers licence.
  • This position may require you to travel on Outreach as required.

View position description

Apply for position


Registered Nurse – Mobile Clinic

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and committed applicants to fill the role of Registered Nurse (Mobile Clinic).

  • The Registered Nurse is responsible for the delivery of quality primary health care to clients and families of the Goldfields.
  • You must be able to undertake scheduled travel within the Goldfields region on a regular basis, up to 4-5 days at a time and have an interest in developing and maintaining effective networks, alliances and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and other Health Organisations.
  • Due to the remote nature of this work, we require our Mobile Clinic team to have at least 2 years Primary Health Care experience.
  • You must hold a current AHPRA registration as a Registered Nurse, hold a current “MR” or higher WA drivers licence (or willing to obtain); police certificate (not older than 6 months); current working with children’s check;

View position description

Apply for position


Manager Primary Health

Bega Garnbirringu Health Service (Bega) are currently seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified and experienced candidates with a proven track record in clinical management to fill the role of Manager Primary Health.

  • The Manager Primary Health is a key leadership role reporting to the Chief Operations Officer (COO) and is supported by the Assistant Manager Primary Health.
  • The core function is to provide clinical governance oversight and ensure clinical services are conducted in accordance with best practice, including all relevant clinical and regulatory legislation.
  • An integral component of this function is to ensure contractual reporting obligations of funding bodies are met in a timely manner while ensuring staff compliance with organisational and operational policies across all levels of clinical programs.
  • It is expected that you will be an exemplary leader who provides guidance, mentoring and coaching to all clinical staff in the pursuit of maintaining a workplace cultural that is free from unhealthy behaviours.
  • To be considered for this role, you will hold tertiary qualifications in health care and business management with at least five (5) years senior management experience in an Aboriginal Primary Health or similar setting.

Please continue with this link to read more

View position description

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Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council Project Officer – AOD Our Way Program

We are seeking two experienced AOD project officers to undertake program support in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $84,150 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* Cairns location

* Temporary position till 30th June 2020

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 29 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ATSICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The AOD Our Way program is designed to increase capacity in communities, families and individuals to better respond locally to problematic Ice and other drug use. The Project Officer position is based in Cairns but will have a state-wide focus to support this program. Reporting directly to the Manager, AOD, you will be responsible for ensuring that QAIHC meets its AOD Our Way program obligations and commitments under its Agreement with Queensland Health. The role includes ensuring services are engaged, supported and provided with the opportunity to participate in the AOD Our Way program.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Alcohol and Other Drugs program delivery.

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders.

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* A current drivers licence

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 7th October 2018

General Practitioner _ Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative

Organisational Profile

GEGAC is an Aboriginal Community organization based in Bairnsdale Victoria. Consisting of about 160 staff, GEGAC is a Not for Profit organization that delivers holistic services in the areas of Primary Health, Social Services, Elders & Disability and Early Childhood Education.

Position Purpose

The General Practitioner position will provide medical services to the population served by GEGAC Primary Health Care. This will include the management of acute and chronic conditions and assistance with the delivery and promotion of primary health care. The role will be part of a multidisciplinary team; including Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Koori Maternity Services, Dental and visiting allied health/Specialists.

Qualifications and Registrations Requirement (Essential or Desirable).

Relevant and Australian recognised medical degree Essential 

Registration with AHPRA; Fellowship of the College of General Practitioners or similar or be eligible of such Essential

Training in CPR, undertaken with the past three years Essential

A person of Aboriginal / Torres Strait Islander background Desirable

How to apply for this job

A copy of the position description and the application form can be obtained below, at GEGAC reception 0351 500 700 or by contacting HR@gegac.org.au.

Or by following the below links –

Position Description – https://goo.gl/iTiSGg

Application Form – https://goo.gl/xVbf3w

Applicants must complete the application form as it contains the selection criteria for shortlisting. Any applications not submitted on the Application form will not be considered.

Application forms should be emailed to HR@gegac.org.au, using the subject line:  General Practitioner

Or posted to:

Human Resources

Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative
PO Box 634
Bairnsdale Vic 3875

Applications close 29th September 5.00pm.

No late applications will be considered.

A valid Working with Children Check and Police check is mandatory to work in this organisation.

“this advertisement is pursuant to the ‘special measures’ provision at section 8 of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth)”.

 

Aboriginal Health Practitioner Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO 

  • Are you an Aboriginal Health Practitioner or Worker wanting to contribute to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal people?
  • Join a well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
  • Identified position for Aboriginal candidates

The Clinic

Primary Care Services (PCS) provides comprehensive primary health care to the Aboriginal community. The multi-disciplinary team consists of Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, a Clinical Services Officer, Enrolled and Registered Nurses, and General Practitioners and Registrars. Services are augmented by a range of visiting medical specialists and allied health professionals. The PCS team liaises and works closely with the Women, Children and Family Health program, the Social and Emotional Wellbeing program and the Community Health Promotion and Education program to ensure a high standard of integrated and coordinated client care.

The Opportunity

As an Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) or Aboriginal Health Worker (AHW) you will be required to work collaboratively with PCS staff and other members of Health Services teams to provide best practice client care. As a vital team member your role will contribute to the high quality and culturally appropriate client care that Nunkuwarrin Yunti is known to provide.

In order to deliver this, some of your key responsibilities will include:

  • Undertake client assessments and follow -up care, care plans and referrals from other members of the multi-disciplinary team
  • Provide health education and brief intervention counselling to improve health outcomes for individual clients
  • Promote the importance and benefits of general preventative health assessments and immunisations and ensure access to these services for clients

About you

  • Both AHP and AHW are required to have a Cert IV in Aboriginal Primary Health Care (Practice) or equivalent.
  • As an AHP you will be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Registration Authority (AHPRA); and bring a minimum of three (3) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a Primary Health Care setting.
  • As an AHW you will bring a minimum of two (2) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a relevant health field, preferably Primary Health Care.

As a suitably qualified AHP or AHW you will have well developed clinical skills and a sound knowledge of best practice approaches to comprehensive primary health care with broad knowledge of existing health and social issues within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. You will have the ability to resolve conflict, solve problems and negotiate outcomes. Organisational skills, self-confidence and the ability to work independently and autonomously, assess priorities, organise workloads and meet deadlines is critical to success.

Click here to download the AHP Job Description

Click here to download the AHW Job Description

Click here to download the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Application Form

Please note: It is a requirement of all roles that successful candidates have a current driver’s licence and are willing to undergo a National Police Check prior to commencing employment. 

Both roles are identified Aboriginal positions; exemption is claimed under Section 8 (1) of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975.

The Benefits

Classified under the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Enterprise Agreement of 2017 you will be entitled to the following dependent on qualifications and experience:

  • AHP – Health Services Level 4 with a starting salary of $69,255.98, plus super
  • AHW – Health Services Level 3 with a starting salary of $61,430.62, plus super

You will have access to salary sacrificing options which allow you to significantly increase your take home pay.

In addition, you will have access to generous leave allowances, including additional paid leave over the Christmas period, on top of your annual leave benefits!

Our organisation has a strong focus on professional development so you will have access to both internal and external training and development opportunities to enhance your career and self-care.

To apply

Please forward your CV, a Cover Letter and Application Form addressing the assessment questions to hr@nunku.org.au

Candidates who do not complete and submit the Application Form, Cover Letter and CV will not be considered further for this position.

We encourage and thank all applicants for their time, however only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Should you have any queries or for further information please contact HR via hr@nunku.org.au

Applications close Monday 1st October 2018 at 10am Adelaide time

Miwajt Health ACCHO : Coordinator Regional Renal Program

Are you passionate about improving health care to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in remote Northern Territory?

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is a regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Our Values

  • Compassion care and respect for our clients and staff and pride in the results of our work.
  • Cultural integrity and safety, while recognising cultural and individual differences.
  • Driven by evidence-based practice.
  • Accountability and transparency.
  • Continual capacity building of our organisation and community.

We have an exciting opportunity for a self-motivated hard working individual who will coordinate Miwatj Health’s Regional Renal Program across East Arnhem Land. Renal services are contracted to a partner organisation and the Regional Renal Program Coordinator will provide a central point of contact between services, foster and strengthen links between PHC programs and renal services, develop and implement an Aboriginal workforce model for the program, and coordinate and drive the aims of the community reference groups.

Key responsibilities:

  • Implement and coordinate renal program plan as per renal program statement and principles.
  • Manage program budgets and investigate funding opportunities.
  • Establish, support and engage regularly with the regional community reference groups and patient groups in Darwin.
  • Drive action on identified priorities of community reference groups.
  • Coordinate with WDNWPT regarding patient preceptor work plans.

To be successful in this role you should have current registration with AHPRA as Registered Nurse / Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner / other relevant qualified health professional.

More info APPLY

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland


Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

Dr Puggy Hunter was the NACCHO Chair 1991-2001

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 144 + Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996. He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council. He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

The scheme provides scholarships for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people studying an entry level health course.

Applications for PHMSS 2019 scholarship round are now open.

Click the button below to start your online application.

Applications must be completed and submitted before midnight AEDT (Sydney/Canberra time) Sunday 14 October 2018. After this time the system will shut down and any incomplete applications will be lost.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not available for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

A significant number of applications are received each year; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The scholarships are funded by the Australian Government, Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing. The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

2.1 There are 6 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 There are 7 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

 

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 24 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3 There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

 

Current Vacancies
  • Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Clinical)

  • Intake Officer / Support Worker

  • Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Senior)

  • Counsellor (Specialised) / Social Worker – Various Roles

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

 

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

General Practitioner (Swan Hill)Mental Health Nurse (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Mildura)Alcohol and Other Drugs Support WorkerCaseworker, Kinship ReunificationPractice Nurse – Chronic Care CoordinatorAboriginal Family-Led Decision-making Caseworker (Swan Hill)First Supports Caseworker (Swan Hill)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Mildura)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Health Worker (1)Team Leader, Early Years (Swan Hill)General Practitioner (Mildura)

MDAS Jobs website 

 

 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

Check website for current Opportunities

 

8. Tasmania

Are you interested in Chronic Disease Management?

Do you have a qualification as an Aboriginal Health Worker, Enrolled Nurse, or Registered Nurse?

We have a part time position at the

Aboriginal Health Service in Hobart,

for immediate start, to 30th June 2019.

 

Please provide a covering letter outlining your desire to work in this area and a current resume to payroll@tacinc.com.au

or email raylene.f@tacinc.com.au for further information.

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR (INDIGENOUS APPLICANTS ONLY)

The LIME Network – Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Only Indigenous Australians are eligible to apply as this position is exempt under the Special Measure Provision, Section 12 (1) of the Equal Opportunity Act 2011 (Vic).

Salary: $88,171 – $95,444 p.a. (pro rata) plus 9.5% superannuation

The Event and Project Coordinator will take a lead in the coordination, planning and implementation of key projects and events of the LIME Network.  These include the LIME Connection international conference, stakeholder meetings, seminars and other events.

Close date: 14 Oct 2018

Position Description and Selection Criteria

0046502.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to: https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/selection-criteria

Advertised: AUS Eastern Standard Time
Applications close: AUS Eastern Daylight Time

Website