NACCHO Aboriginal Health Weekly Save a date : Conferenceand Events : Donna Ah Chee CEO @CAACongress to be keynote speaker @RuralDoctorsAu @ACRRMRural #Rural Medicine Australia conference Darwin #RMA18

Featured conference in NACCHO Save a dates this week

25-27 October 2018, Darwin Rural Medicine Australia conference

Donna Ah Chee, a highly respected advocate in the Aboriginal health sector, will be a keynote speaker at this year’s Rural Medicine Australia 2018 (RMA18) conference.

RMA18 is the premier annual event for rural and remote doctors, and is hosted by the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) and Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM).

Donna is a Bundgalung woman from the far north coast of New South Wales, and has lived in Alice Springs for 30 years, where she is a leader in the delivery of Aboriginal health services.

RDAA President, Dr Adam Coltzau, said: “We are very excited to have Donna — who is such an influential member of the Aboriginal health community — speaking at RMA18.

“Donna is CEO of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, an Aboriginal community-controlled primary health care service employing over 400 staff to deliver integrated services to Alice Springs and six remote communities.

“She is also a strong advocate at the state and national levels in the field of Aboriginal health, holding Chair, Board and Expert Member positions on numerous organisations, groups and committees concerned with Aboriginal healthcare, health research, literacy, and alcohol and other drug issues.

“We are really privileged to be able to hear her perspectives on Aboriginal health at RMA18.”

ACRRM President, Associate Professor Ruth Stewart, said: “We have so much to learn from the Community Controlled Health Organisations in the Northern Territory. In the light of the Close the Gap campaign, we all need to think about how we can best provide healthcare services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Donna’s keynote address will be of great interest to the people attending our conference.

“Additionally, Dr Kali Hayward, who is an inspirational speaker and President of the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association, will take part in the RMA18 Presidents’ Breakfast.

“Donna and Kali are both wonderful leaders in healthcare for and by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. We are privileged to have them at RMA18.

“It will be great to hear their messages as we develop the National Rural Generalist Pathway, which will enable more of the next generation of rural doctors to be trained in a wide range of advanced skills including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health.”

Assoc Prof Stewart said RMA18 is shaping up to be one of the best RMA conferences yet.

“We are very excited to be heading to Darwin, where we can focus the conference on important themes including Tropical Health, Indigenous Health and Women in Health” she said.

“The program for RMA18 has now been released and early bird registrations are still open for RMA18, so there has never been a better time to book your spot at Australia’s peak rural doctor event.”

See Website for further details 

See full details below

25 July AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, will address the National Press Club in Canberra

Dr Bartone, a Melbourne GP, will outline the AMA’s priorities for health reform, and suggest the types of health policies that the major parties should take to the next election, which is expected within the next 12 months.

Dr Bartone said today that AMA concerns include the eroding access, equity, and affordability of health care, especially rurally and regionally; the relentless squeezing of medical practice viability; extremely low value, yet increasingly unaffordable private health insurance policies, and the resultant patient exodus from private health insurance; a medical training pipeline bottleneck with a frustrating lack of postgraduate training places; and the continual long-term disinvestment in general practice.

“We also need to see appropriate funding across the health system, especially for public hospitals, and long-term strategies and investment in mental health and the aged care policy framework

You can book a place for Dr Bartone’s National Press Club address at

https://www.npc.org.au/speakers/dr-tony-bartone/

The Turnbull Government is proud to be partnering with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, Ms June Oscar AO, who in February this year commenced a landmark national consultation process with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls.

The Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) project commissioned by Minister Scullion is a national conversation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls’ to understand their priorities, challenges and aspirations.

Findings will inform key policies and programs such as the Closing the Gap refresh, future investment under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy and development of the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and Their Children. Consultations are continuing through to November 2018.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, June Oscar AO, warmly invites Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls to come together as part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) project.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls have many strengths and play a central role in bringing about positive social change for our families and communities.

Dr Jackie Huggins will be hosting these engagements on behalf of the Commissioner. Dr Huggins and the team will be speaking with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women (18+) and girls (aged 12-17) through a series of community gatherings across the country, to hear directly about their needs, aspirations and ideas for change.

Please see details and registration options below.

EVENT DETAILS: Northern Territory – Borroloola, Katherine, Tiwi Islands and Darwin

Please join us for one of the following sessions and register by clicking on the relevant link. You can also email us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone us on (02) 9284 9600.


Borroloola – Monday 23rd July 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: Mabunji Aboriginal Resource Centre, 2087 Robinson Road, Borroloola, NT 0854

Please click here to register for this event.


Borroloola – Tuesday 24th July 2018
  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: Mabunji Aboriginal Resource Centre, 2087 Robinson Road, Borroloola, NT 0854

Please click here to register for this event.


Katherine – Thursday 26th July 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9.30am – 1:30pm​
  • Location: Flinders University, O’Keefe House, Katherine Hospital, Giles Street, Katherine, NT 0850

Please click here to register for this event.


Wurrumiyanga (Bathurst Island) – Monday 30th July 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 10.30am – 2.30pm
  • Location: Tiwi Enterprises – Mantiyupwi Motel – Meeting Room, Lot 969 Wurrumiyanga, NT 0822

Please click here to register for this event.


Pirlangimpi (Melville Island) – Wednesday 1st August 2018
  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: TBC

Please click here to register for this event.


Darwin – Thursday 2nd August 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am- 1.30pm
  • Location: Michael Long Learning & Leadership Centre – Conference Room, 70 Abala Rd Marrara, Darwin, NT 0812

Please click here to register for this event.


Palmerston – Friday 3rd August 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: Palmerston Recreation Centre – Community Room, 11 The Boulevard, Palmerston, NT 0831

Please click here to register for this event.


Refreshments: Refreshments will be provided. Please register to ensure there is sufficient catering and please call or email to let us know any dietary requirements you may have.

Accessibility: The venue is accessible for people using wheelchairs. If you have any access or support requirements, such as an interpreter, please call or email us.

More information: Please see the website for further information about Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices), including a list of our planned gatherings.

If you are unable to attend this gathering, we would still like to hear from you through our submission process. For more details visit the submission page.

We hope you can take part in this important national conversation dedicated to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls.

Please share this invitation with others who may be interested in attending.

Should you have any questions please email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

 

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations and Expressions of Interest now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:          

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Expressions of Interest to present

NACCHO is now calling for EOI’s from Affiliates , Member Services and stakeholders for Case Studies and Presentations for the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

Download the Application

NACCHO Members Expressions of Interest to present to the Brisbane Conference 2018 on Day 1

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members Conference; ‘Investing in What Works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Health’. We are seeking EOIs for the following Conference Sessions.

Day 1 Wednesday 31 October 2018

Concurrent Session 1 (1.15 – 2.00pm) – topics can include Case Studies but are not limited to:

  • Workforce Innovation
  • Best Practice Primary Health Care for Clients with Chronic Disease
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Sustainable Growth
  • Harnessing Resources (Medicare, government and other)
  • Engagement/Health Promotion
  • Models of Primary Health Care and
  • Clinical and Service Delivery.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Regional, Rural or Remote.  Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes in either the Plenary or Breakout rooms.

OR

Table Top Presentations (2.00-3.00pm)

Presenters will speak from the lectern and provide a brief presentation on a key project or program currently being delivered by their service.

Presentation will be 10 minutes in duration-with 5 minutes to present and
5 minutes for discussion and questions from delegates.

Conference Website Link

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

4 August National Children’s Day

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day (Children’s Day) is a time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families to celebrate the strengths and culture of their children. The day is an opportunity for all Australians to show their support for Aboriginal children, as well as learn about the crucial impact that community, culture and family play in the life of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child.

Children’s Day is held on 4 August each year and is coordinated by SNAICC – National Voice for our Children. Children’s Day was first observed in 1988, with 2017 being the 29th celebration. Each year SNAICC produces and distributes resources to help organisations, services, schools, and communities celebrate.

The theme for Children’s Day 2018 is SNAICC – Celebrating Our Children for 30 Years.

Our children are the youngest people from the longest living culture in the world, with rich traditions, lore and customs that have been passed down from generation to generation. Our children are growing up strong with connection to family, community and country. Our children are the centre of our families and the heart of our communities. They are our future and the carriers of our story.

This year, we invite communities to take a walk down memory lane, as we revisit some of the highlights of the last 30 years. We look back on the empowering protest movements instigated by community that had led to the establishment of the first Children’s Day on 4 August 1988. We look back at all of the amazing moments we’ve shared with our children over the years, and how we’re watching them grow into leaders.

We look back to see what we’ve achieved, and decide where we want to go from here to create a better future for our children. If you have celebrated Children’s Day at any time during the past 30 years, we would love to hear from you.

Website

Download HERE

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

October 30 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day 27-28 August

More info

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @RuralDoctorsAus #Remote #NRW2018 #IHMayDay18 #ACCHO Job Opportunities Inc #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #NRW2018 #IHMayDay18 #Jobalerts

All jobs a listed Part 2 below

 

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

 

Rural doctors and other rural health professionals have always been concerned about the health and welfare of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

With two thirds of all Indigenous Australians living in rural or remote areas, we are often on the frontline of Indigenous healthcare provision.

Because of this, we are acutely aware of the inequities suffered by Indigenous Australians and their communities in terms of health outcomes, chronic disease and life expectancy.

We all have a role to play when it comes to Closing the Gap.”

The Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA )  has chosen National Reconciliation Week to launch its revised policy, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, which puts forward actions that need to be taken by Australia’s governments and other stakeholders like RDAA to Close the Gap in Indigenous health outcomes.

RDAA President, Dr Adam Colza, said the policy “puts right at the centre” the need to recognise the fundamental importance of socio-economic, environmental and cultural factors in improving health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Download NACCHO RDAA Revised Aboriginal Health Policy May 2018

RDAA Press Release : Reconciliation — “at the heart” of Closing the Gap

The Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) says the crucial role of Australia’s journey towards reconciliation — in empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and improving their health outcomes — should not be underestimated.

“We know that additional, special efforts are still required to raise the health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait\ Islander people to that of other Australians” he said.

“Crucially, these efforts will not just rely on improving health infrastructure or improving access to healthcare alone.

“They must also include recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia’s Constitution; recognition of Indigenous intergenerational trauma and the negative health effects that stem from it; and recognition of the importance of homeland, infrastructure, education, transport and employment on the health status of Indigenous Australians.

“These are not just throw-away lines — they are major determinants of health and well-being, and they must be factored into all strategies to better support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

“They are just as important to Closing the Gap as ensuring access to basic living conditions like clean and continuous water supply, good housing, functional sewerage systems, a reasonable diet and nutrition, and education.

“Other crucial factors that are key to improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians include:

  • involvement, partnership and leadership from local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in determining the type of health services best suited to local needs and resources
  • support for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services
  • a culturally respectful and consultative approach to policy and program development on all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health issues
  • an ongoing commitment in the healthcare sector to improving cultural sensitivity and understanding, to ensure the health and hospital system does not deter Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from seeking care.

“And we all have a responsibility to recognise the trauma that multiple generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have been through — and why reconciliation is so important for all of us in moving forward.”

The theme of National Reconciliation Week is Don’t Keep History A Mystery: Learn. Share. Grow. All Australians are being encouraged to learn more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories, to share that knowledge and help Australia grow as a nation.

Visit http://www.reconciliation.org.au for more information on National Reconciliation Week and visit www.rdaa.com.au to read the RDAA policy, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (see Resources and Policy Papers).

Rural Doctor job of the week

Gidgee Healing is currently seeking a General Practitioner to deliver integrated, comprehensive primary health care services at their Burke St Clinic in Mount Isa.

You will be supported by a team of dedicated clinic staff including Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Medical Receptionists, Practice Managers and visiting Specialists and Allied Health providers; in addition to community and secondary service providers.

ESSENTIAL CRITERIA:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding unconditional current registration with AHPRA
  • Vocationally Registered, FRACGP or FACRRM
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number
  • Knowledge, understanding and sensitivity towards the social, economic and cultural factors affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health.

ABOUT US:

Gidgee Healing is a dynamic Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service that provides a comprehensive and growing range of primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people residing in the Mount Isa, North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria regions. Our services include General Practice, maternal and child health, social and preventative health, health promotion and education, allied health and specialist services. Gidgee Healing is also the lead agency for headspace Mount Isa and the Normanton Recovery and Community Wellbeing Service. The organisation strives to provide high quality health and wellbeing services in a culturally welcoming environment, to enhance the accessibility and uptake of health services by our clients and support the early identification and management of illness and chronic diseases.

THE LIFESTYLE:

The North West offers a relaxed and casual lifestyle, with a wealth of camping and exploring, scenic national parks, gorges, as well as pristine river, lake and open water fishing and recreation.

Applications close COB Friday 15th June, 2018

To apply online, please click on the appropriate link below. Alternatively, for a confidential discussion, please contact Lauren Taylor on (07) 4743 6681, quoting Ref No. 798746.

APPLY HERE

Jobs of the week 

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Research and Evidence Manager

We seek a high calibre professional, to undertake a range of research projects in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $100,000 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* South Brisbane location

* This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Research and Evidence Manager.

Role Overview

The Research and Evidence Manager will be responsible for managing the Research Division, consisting of the Health Information Team and Research Team (including funded programmes).  This includes undertaking a diverse range of research projects including the development of a research plan that will strengthen the capacity of QAIHC to develop innovative, culturally responsive and evidence informed programs and policy responses in high profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Understanding of Indigenous Health.

* Demonstrated capability in conducting evaluation projects, including design, analysis and interpretation of data.

* Knowledge of ethics committees.

* High level quantitative and qualitative data analysis skills.

* Ability to conduct literature reviews to a high standard including search, collation and summarising skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled health organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Health Policy Manager

An exciting opportunity for a high calibre professional, to provide high quality policy advice in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

  • Indigenous Health Organisation
  • Salary: $100,000 + superannuation
  • Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging
  • South Brisbane Location
  • This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Health Policy Manager.

Role Overview

The Health Policy Manager, will provide leadership to a small team responsible for providing high quality policy advice on complex and high-profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

  • Specific policy development knowledge.
  • Experience in developing state or national health policy.
  • Understanding of relevant state and federal government decision making process.
  • Understanding of the AICCHOs and the issues facing them.
  • Demonstrated experience of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.
  • Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Workforce Coordinator – Medicare Specialist

We are seeking a Medicare Specialist to support and train clinics in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* South Brisbane location

* Salary: $82,500 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The Medicare Specialist will be responsible for supporting QAIHCs Member Services across Queensland in the management and use of electronic patient information and recall systems and in maximising access to health incentives, Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and Medicare Benefits Schedule opportunities.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Medical claims and incentives programs is essential in this role, in particular:

o Medicare

o Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

o Practice Incentives Program

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders, including relevant government departments, networks and specialist providers

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills

* Project management experience

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business

* A certificate IV in Training and Assessment and knowledge of the VET sector is desirable

* A current drivers licence is required

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – mailto:applications@qaihc.com.au

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 10th June 201

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

There are 5 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website

Men’s Health Worker Social Emotional Wellbeing

3 x full time fixed term (FIFO from Cairns) positions
Servicing Kowanyama, Wujal Wujal and Mapoon Communities

With over 230 team members, Apunipima Cape York Health Council is one of Australia’s leading Aboriginal Community Controlled health services, delivering a broad spectrum of comprehensive primary health care services to 11 communities of Cape York.

We are currently seeking applications for three full time fixed term Men’s Health Workers, who will provide and coordinate a range of quality and culturally appropriate primary health care services, to Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islander men over the age of 16 who are affected by alcohol and violence. The program aims to improve the safety and wellbeing of families and the broader communities to increase their sense of healing and personal wellbeing.

An attractive salary package is available for these positions dependent on qualifications and experience, including options for generous salary sacrifice, a great team environment, supportive networks and diverse duties, which make for an exciting opportunity.

Applications close 8 June

Under s25 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1991, there is a genuine occupational requirement for the incumbent to be Indigenous to the Aboriginal and/or Torres
Strait Islander Community

MAMU HEALTH SERVICE LIMITED

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal community controlled health service providing comprehensive primary health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Ravenshoe and surrounding districts.  We are recruiting the following positions for our Ravenshoe Clinic:-

Aboriginal & or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Practice Certificate III/IV Fixed Term. Applicant must have previous experience in similar role.

Traineeship – Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) HLT30113 Certificate III – If you have a passion to work in the health industry we are offering a Traineeship in Certificate III ATSI Primary Health Care (Practice) fixed term (12- 14 months) (It is a genuine occupational requirement that the position be filled by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person as permitted by Section 25, 105 & 106 Queensland Anti-Discrimination (1991) Act.)

Registered Nurse – A Full time position is available. Applicants must have previous experience in working with the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people. This is a Rural & Remote position which offers an attractive employment package including accommodation & fuel allowance.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check, and a Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian.

To apply for this vacancy, a full application package can be obtained from our website on http://www.mamuhsl.org.au, or please don’t hesitate to contact Julie Browne on 07 4061 9988 or jbrowne@mamuhsl.org.au to register your interest.

Please submit your resume and written responses addressing the Knowledge, Skills and Personal Attributes/Selection Criteria outlined in the Position Description to: The Chief Executive Officer Mamu Health Service Limited PO Box 1537 INNISFAIL Q 4860 Applications close at 5.00 pm on Friday 8th June 2018

Mamu Website

Ravenshoe Positions:

RAV-067 Trainee Health Worker_Position Description

RAV-066 ATSI Health Worker_3

RAV-060 Registered Nurse_Position Description3

Innisfail Positions:

IFL-267 Trainee Health Worker

IFL-264 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL-263 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL 269 Community Liason Officer_Female (002)

IFL-261 Sport Rec Officer_Position Description_110518 (003)

FOR ALL POSITIONS

APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY 8th JUNE 2018 5.00PM

 

There are 3 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

+ Traineeship Coordinator (Ongoing Full Time position based at Windsor) + Clinical Optometrist (Full Time or Part Time position based at Windsor) + Social Health Care Coordinator – MATSICHS (Ongoing Full Time position located at Morayfield)

 There are 14 JOBS at ATSICHS Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 28 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

There are 3 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

 

Deputy Chief Executive Officer

About the Organisation

The name Derbarl Yerrigan is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River. Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC) is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation which was established in 1974 as the Perth Aboriginal Medical Service and later changed its name to DYHSAC in 1998

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

To view and download the application pack, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

Durri servicing the Macleay and Nambucca Valleys – making a difference

 

Durri’s vision is to achieve and maintain better health and wellbeing outcomes for our Aboriginal people and communities.

Durri aims to be an employer of choice in Aboriginal health, supporting a skilled and flexible workforce.

Durri is a great place to work – a family friendly and culturally sensitive work environment that values people.

If you have a passion for indigenous health and are committed to closing the gap, then why not join us?

Please view our current vacancies .

We are currently hiring for 2 Senior Policy & Research Officers
The link to the role on Ethical Jobs is here:

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Bendigo

Closing Date : 24 June

More Info apply: http://www.murrayphn.org.au/aboriginal-internship

Job Ref : N2018 – 37

 

Academic Leader: Indigenous Health (Identified*) – 180357

School of Medicine

Closing Date: 02/07/2018

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AFL @AlcoholDrugFdn #NRW2018 #WorldNoTobaccoDay : Senator Bridget McKenzie Minister for Sport and Rural Health supports Redtails Pinktails #SayNoMore Drugs, #Smoking and #FamilyViolence #SayYesTo #Education #Employment #Family #Community

 

 ” Over the weekend Senator Bridget McKenzie had a chat pregame to local Central Australia Redtails before they took on Darwin’s TopEnd Storm curtain raiser to AFL Sir Doug Nicholls Indigenous round , a 6 hour broadcast on Channel 7 nationally : The Redtails and PinkTails Right Tracks Program is funded by the Local Drug Action Teams Program ”

See Part 1 Below

Part 2 Say No more to Family Violence all players link up

Part 3 #WorldNoTobaccoDay May 31 launched in the Alice

 ” Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,”

Watch video launch in the

The Minister for Rural Health, Senator Bridget McKenzie was also is in Alice Springs to launch the next phase of the National Tobacco Campaign and said that smoking related illness devastates individuals, families and the wider community : see Part 3 below

PART 1

Arrernte Males AFL Opening Ceremony

Arrernte women AFL Opening Ceremony

Part 1 The Australian Government and the ADF are excited to welcome an additional 92 Local Drug Action Teams, in to the LDAT program

The Senator with Alcohol and Drug Foundation CEO Dr Erin Lalor and  General Manager of Congress’ Alice Springs Health Services, Tracey Brand in Alice Springs talking about the inspirational Central Australian Local Drug Action Team at Congress and announcing 92 Local Drug Action Teams across Australia building partnerships to prevent and minimise harm of ice alcohol & illicit drugs use by our youth with local action plans

WATCH VIDEO of Launch

The Local Drug Action Team Program supports community organisations to work in partnership to develop and deliver programs that prevent or minimise harm from alcohol and other drugs (AOD).

Local Drug Action Teams work together, and with the community, to identify the issue they want to tackle, and to develop and implement a plan for action.

The Alcohol and Drug Foundation provides practical resources to assist Local Drug Action Teams to deliver evidence-informed projects and activities. The community grants component of the Local Drug Action Team Program may provide funding to support this work.

Each team will receive an initial $10,000 to develop and finalise a Community Action Plan and then to implement approved projects in your community. Grant funding of up to a maximum of $30k in the first year and up to a maximum of $40k in subsequent years is also available to help deliver approved projects in Community Action Plans. LDAT funding is intended to complement existing funding and in kind support from local partners.

LDATs typically apply for grants of between $10k and $15k to support their projects

 

See ADF website for Interactive locations of all sites

The power of community action

Community-based action is powerful in preventing and minimising harm from alcohol and other drugs.

Alcohol and other drugs harms are mediated by a number of factors – those that protect against risk, and those that increase risk. For example, factors that protect against alcohol and other drug harms include social connection, education, safe and secure housing, and a sense of belonging to a community. Factors that increase risks of alcohol and other drug harms include high availability of drugs, low levels of social cohesion, unstable housing, and socioeconomic disadvantage. Most of these factors are found at the community level, and must be targeted at this level for change.

Alcohol and other drugs are a community issue, not just an individual issue.

Community action to prevent alcohol and other drug harms is effective because:

  • the solutions and barriers (protective/risk factors) for addressing alcohol and other drugs harm are community-based
  • it creates change that is responsive to local needs
  • it increases community ownership and leads to more sustainable change

Part 2 Say No more to Family Violence all players link up

Such a powerful message told here in Alice Springs today as the Redtails Football Club, Top End Storm football club, link arms with the Melbourne Football Club, Adelaide Football Club for the NO MORE Campaign AU before the AFL Indigenous Round started.

WEBSITE Link up and say ‘No More’

 

 Watch Channel 7 Coverage of this special statement from all players

Part 3 #WorldNoTobaccoDay May 31 launched in the Alice

Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,”

Watch the ABC TV Interview HERE

Watch video of launch in the Alice

Successful Tobacco Campaign Continues

Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

The Minister for Rural Health, Senator Bridget McKenzie was in Alice Springs to launch the next phase of the National Tobacco Campaign and said that smoking related illness devastates individuals, families and the wider community.

“In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,” Minister McKenzie said.

“The latest phase of Don’t Make Smokes Your Story continues to focus on Indigenous Australians aged 18–40 years who smoke and those who have recently quit. The campaign also concentrates on pregnant women and their partners with Quit for You, Quit for Two.

“An evaluation of the first two phases of the campaign revealed they had successfully helped to reduce smoking rates.

“More than half of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants who saw the campaign took some action towards quitting smoking — and 8 per cent actually quit.

“These are very promising stats, however, we must continue to support and encourage those Australians who want to quit, but need help.”

The launch of the next phase of the campaign aligns with World No Tobacco Day and this year’s theme is Tobacco and heart disease.

“Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in Australia, killing one person every 12 minutes,” Minister McKenzie said.

“There is a clear link between tobacco and heart and other cardiovascular diseases, including stroke — a staggering 45,392 deaths in Australia can be attributed to cardiovascular disease in 20151.

“Latest estimates show that tobacco use and exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke not only costs the lives of loved ones, but it costs the Australian community $31.5 billion in social — including health — and economic costs.”

“The Coalition Government, along with all states and territories, has made significant efforts to reduce tobacco consumption across the board.

“For example, we know that tobacco is the leading cause of preventable disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accounting for more than 12 per cent of the overall burden of illness.

“The Coalition Government has recently invested $183.7 million continuing to boost the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program to cut smoking and save lives.

“This comprehensive program has helped to cut the rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people smoking and we want to build on this success.

“The Government’s investment in this program highlights our long-term commitment to Closing the Gap in health inequality.”

The ABS report Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Smoking Trends, Australia, 1994 to 2014-15, reported a decrease in current (daily and non-daily) smoking rate in those aged 18 years and older from 55 per cent in 1994 to 45 per cent in 2014-15, which shows Indigenous tobacco control is working.

For help to quit smoking, phone the Quitline on 13 7848, visit the Department of Health’s Quitnow website or download the free My Quitbuddy app.

Your doctor or healthcare provider can also help with information and support you may need to quit.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #Heart Health : @HeartAust #HeartWeek2018 Download @RoyalFlyingDoc Report : Cardivascular health in #remote and #rural communities

 

” The over-representation of males and Indigenous Australians in aeromedical transports for CVD, compared with females and non-Indigenous Australians, is unacceptable.

It suggests that prevention, early intervention and ongoing treatment for people with CVD should target all remote and rural males and Indigenous Australians of all ages.

The data shows that Indigenous patients were picked up from a wide spatial distribution but with a focus on Queensland and some specific centres including Rockhampton and Alice Springs.

That suggests early intervention, prevention and treatment services should be prioritised in these areas.”

This latest RFDS publication is a valuable addition to the data available for policy decisions : Download HERE

Royal Flying Doctors _Cardiovascular_Disease_Research_Report_D3

CVD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among Indigenous Australians : See Part 2 below

The Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) is one of the largest and most comprehensive aeromedical organisations in the world. It provides primary health care through general practice and nursing clinics to people in remote and rural Australia who are beyond reasonable access to medical infrastructure in more urbanised areas.

In 2016–17, the RFDS delivered 5,615 general practice clinics to 37,689 patients and 3,429 nursing clinics to 18,909 patients.

The RFDS has established a Research and Policy Unit whose role is to gather evidence about, and recommend strategies for improving health outcomes and health service access for patients and communities cared for by RFDS programs.

This latest publication is a valuable addition to the data available for policy decisions. https://bit.ly/2HImal9

The research indicates there is an opportunity for the RFDS to review its data collection procedures and to develop a national data collection policy. This would enable better reporting of programs, facilitate direct comparisons of data across Australia, and enable better assessment of outcomes, and evaluations of, RFDS delivered programs.

More specifically, the RFDS has an opportunity to review its own data collection processes to ensure all relevant data around aeromedical transports are collected.

Data linkage between the RFDS and state, territory and national clinical datasets has commenced and as linkages grow, longitudinal data on patients initially transported by the RFDS, and treated in hospital for CVD, will enable the RFDS to access comprehensive information on a patient’s prognosis, treatment, recovery, and rehabilitation.

Data linkage with local service providers that operate in areas where the RFDS delivers services, such as local GPs, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations or local hospitals would also assist in providing a more complete picture of the health outcomes of people from remote and rural Australia.

Part 2 :  3.4 CVD in Indigenous Australians

“CVD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among Indigenous Australians. It is more common in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, and occurs at much younger ages compared to the non-Indigenous population” (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b, p. 157) (Figure 3.8).

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2016b, p. 159).

Figure 3.8 demonstrates that in 2011 the burden from CVD among Indigenous Australians was low in childhood but increased rapidly from about age 30 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b).

Specifically, CHD and stroke contributed significantly to the burden of CVD from age 40 onwards (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b).

The burden from CHD peaked at around ages 45–54, and then declined (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b). The burden from stroke peaked at around ages 50–64, and then declined (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b).

In 2011, CVD burden was greater in Indigenous males than females (58% versus 42%), but this varied by type of CVD disease (Figure 3.9) (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b).

“Indigenous males experienced the majority of burden from aortic aneurysm (77%), hypertensive heart disease (72%) and CHD (67%), whereas Indigenous females experienced the majority of burden due to peripheral vascular disease (68%), rheumatic heart disease (61%), and stroke (58%)” (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016b, p. 160).

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and events : 2018 SAVE A DATE : #CongressUN18 #WeAreIndigenous #BecauseOfHerWeCan #NACCHOagm2018 , @NATSIHWA , @AIDAAustralia , @CATSINaM @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay

Download PDF copy 2018 Calendar

NACCHO Save a date Master 17 April

1.National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference 11-12 July

It is with great excitement that Ngiyani Pty Ltd as the host of the National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference with Project Management support from Christine Ross Consultancy proudly announce Registrations have officially OPENED. Please see the link below

https://www.ngiyani.com/because-of-her-we-can/

The dates for the conference are the 11 – 12 July 2018 at UNSW Kensington Campus in Sydney.

Please note the $350 Conference Registration for 2 days or $175 for one day is non- refundable or transferrable.

The Conference Dinner is optional on Wednesday 11 July 2018 at 7.00 – 11.00pm cost is an additional $80.00. food and entertainment will be provided (this is an alcohol free event). The Dinner is open to all Conference Delegates including Sponsors (so blokes are welcome) Details will be posted at a later date.

You will be able to choose your Workshops when you Register so please take the time to read Workshop outlines.

This Conference is incredibly popular and seats are limited, it will book out so to ensure you don’t miss out BOOK SOON.

Please note if you wish to purchase tickets to the National NAIDOC Awards Ceremony to be held Friday 13 July 2018 in Sydney. This is a seperate event to the Conference and first release tickets go on sale through Ticketek at 9.00 am AEST on Thursday 3 May 2018.Second release tickets go on sale at 9.00 am AEST 10 May 2018. Cost of tickets is $185.00 or $1,850.00 per table.

It will be a massive week in Sydney as we celebrate the theme:
‘Because of Her, We Can’

A huge thanks to our Sponsors: Reconciliation Australia, UNSW, Rio Tinto, JobLink Plus, Lendlease, Westpac, Veolia, NSWALC, Griffith Business School, Macquarie University, Accor Hotels, Warrikal, PwC Indigenous Consulting, Gilbert and Tobin and National Library of Australia.

2. Sir Michael Marmot in Alice Springs 4 May : Health equity : Taking Action

3.National Congress Co-Chair Jackie Huggins is set to participate in

Opens on 16 April 2018 with more than 1000 First Nations participants from across the globe.

 

4.New : Finding Common Ground and a Way Forward for Indigenous Recognition 

Written submissions should be received by Monday 11 June

Above NACCHO Library image

A new committee met yesterday, to further consider matters regarding recognition of Australia’s indigenous people, and will be co-chaired by Senator Patrick Dodson, Senator for Western Australia, and Mr Julian Leeser MP , Member for Berowra.

The Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition Relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples is expected to report by the end of November this year, with an interim report due in July.

The Committee is calling for submissions and is considering options for public meetings and hearings.

Co-Chairs Senator Dodson and Mr Leeser MP said: ‘As a committee, we are looking for common ground and ways forward on these critical matters for Australia’s future. We hope to hear from Australians about the next steps for recognition of First Nations peoples.

We plan to consult widely, starting with First Nations leadership. We understand that a great deal of work has already been done: the job of this committee is to build on that work and to now take the next steps.’

The Committee website has details of Committee membership, and will be the first point of information about the work of the Committee.

Written submissions should be received by Monday 11 June, to assist with planning meetings and hearings, but the Committee may accept submissions after this date.

For background:

Please contact the Committee secretariat on 02 6277 4129

or via email at jsccr@aph.gov.au

Interested members of the public may wish to track the committee via the website.

WEBSITE

Click on the blue ‘Track Committee’ button in the bottom right hand corner and register

5. 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day

Hobart  Aug 27 –28

More Info soon

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.
10.Study Question: What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

The Australian National University is seeking partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families.  We want to partner and work with local organisations and communities to make sure the research benefits the community.

Who are we?

We work at the Australian National University (ANU).  The study is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers.  Professor Victoria Hovane (Ngarluma, Malgnin/Kitja, Gooniyandi), along with Associate Professor Raymond Lovett (Wongaibon, Ngiyampaa) and Dr Jill Guthrie (Wiradjuri) from NCEPH, and Professor Matthew Gray of the Centre for Social Research and Methods (CSRM) at ANU will be leading the study.

 Study Question:  What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

 How are we going to gather information to answer the study question?

A Community Researcher (who we would give funds to employ) would capture the data by interviewing 100 community members, running 3 focus groups for Men /  Women / Youth (over 16).  We would interview approx. 5 community members to hear about the story in your community.

We know Family Violence happens in all communities.  We don’t want to find out the prevalence, we want to know what your communities needs to feel safe. We will also be mapping the services in your community, facilities and resources available in a community.  All this information will be given back to your community.

What support would we provide your service?

We are able to support your organisation up to $40,000 (including funds for $30 vouchers), this would also help to employ a Community Researcher.

Community participants would be provided with a $30 voucher to complete a survey, another $30 for the focus group, and another $30 for the interview for their time.

 What will we give your organisation?

We can give you back all the data that we have captured from your community, (DE identified and confidentialised of course). We can give you the data in any form you like, plus create a Community Report for your community.  There might be some questions you would like to ask your community, and we can include them in the survey.

 How long would we be involved with your community / organisation?

Approximately 2 months

How safe is the data we collect?

The data is safe. It will be DE identified and Confidentialised.  Our final report will reflect what Communities (up to 20) took part in the study, but your data and community will be kept secret.  Meaning, no one will know what data came from your community.

Application close April 27

If you think this study would be of benefit to your community, or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Victoria Hovane, or the teamon 1300 531 600 or email facts.study@anu.edu.au.

11.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
 
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
 
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
 
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwide began in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
 
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney
 

NACCHO Media Alerts : Top 10 Current Aboriginal Health News Stories to keep you up to date

1. Aboriginal sexual health: The Australian : Was the syphilis epidemic preventable ? NACCHO responds

2.Royal Flying Doctors Service extra 4-year funding $84 million Mental Health and Dental Services

3.Nurses PAQ continues political membership campaign spreading false and misleading information about our cultural safety

4.AMSANT has called for re-doubled efforts to implement the recommendations of the Royal Commission into the care and protection of children in partnership with NT Aboriginal leaders

5.Dialysis facilities worth $17 million are sitting padlocked, empty and unused in WA’s north

6.ALRC Report into Incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

7. Minister Ken Wyatt : Listening to Indigenous Needs: Healthy Ears Program Extended with $29.4 commitment

8.Tangentyere Alice Springs Women’s Family Safety Group visits Canberra

9.Minister Ken Wyatt launches our NACCHO RACGP National Guide to a preventative health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

10. Your guide to a healthy Easter : #Eggs-actly  

 

1.Aboriginal sexual health: The Australian : Was the syphilis epidemic preventable ? NACCHO responds

“These (STIs) are preventable diseases and we need increased testing, treatment plans and a ­culturally appropriate health ­education campaign that focuses resources on promoting safe-sex messages delivered to at-risk ­communities by our trained Aboriginal workforce,”

Pat Turner, chief executive of peak body the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, is adamant about this.

Read full article in Easter Monday The Australian or Part B below

2.Royal Flying Doctors Service extra 4-year funding $84 million Mental Health and Dental Services

Read full press release here

 

3.Nurses PAQ continues political membership campaign spreading false and misleading information about cultural safety

SEE NACCHO Response

SEE an Indigenous Patients Response

See Nurses PAQ Misleading and false campaign

4. AMSANT  has called for re-doubled efforts to implement the recommendations of the Royal Commission into the care and protection of children in partnership with NT Aboriginal leaders

Read full AMSANT press Release

Listen to interview with Donna Ah Chee

Press Release @NACCHOChair calls on the Federal Government to work with us to keep our children safe

#WeHaveTheSolutions Plus comments from CEO’s @Anyinginyi @DanilaDilba

4.Dialysis facilities worth $17 million are sitting padlocked, empty and unused in WA’s north

Read full Story HERE

6.ALRC Report into Incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People;

Read Download Full Transcript

Senator Patrick Dodson

Download the report from HERE

Community Groups Call For Action on Indigenous Incarceration Rates

7. Minister Ken Wyatt : Listening to Indigenous Needs: Healthy Ears Program Extended with $29.4 commitment

The Australian Government has committed $29.4 million to extend the Healthy Ears – Better Hearing, Better Listening Program, to help ensure tens of thousands more Indigenous children and young adults grow up with good hearing and the opportunities it brings.

Read Press Release HEAR

8.Tangentyere Alice Springs Women’s Family Safety Group visits Canberra

This week the Tangentyere Women’s Family Safety Group from Alice Springs were in Canberra. They shared with politicians, their own solutions for their own communities, and they are making an enormous difference.
Big thanks to all the Tangentyere women who made it to Canberra.

Read Download the Press Release

TANGENTYERE WOMEN’S FAMILY SAFETY GROUP (FED

9. Minister Ken Wyatt launches our NACCHO RACGP National Guide to a preventative health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Read press releases and link to Download the National Guide

10. Your guide to a  healthy Easter : #Eggs-actly  

And finally hope you had a Happy Easter all you mob ! After you have enjoyed your chocolate eggs and hot cross buns , this is how much exercise you will require to work of those Easter treats .

For medical and nutrition advice please check with your ACCHO Doctor , Health Promotion / Lifestyle teams or one of our ACCHO nutritionists

 

Part B Full Text The Australian Article Easter Monday

There is no reason it should have happened, especially not in a first-world country like Australia, but it has: indigenous communities in the country’s north are in the grip of wholly treatable sexually transmitted diseases.

In the case of syphilis, it is an epidemic — West Australian Labor senator Patrick Dodson ­described it as such, in a fury, when health department bureaucrats mumbled during Senate estimates about having held a few “meetings” on the matter.

There have been about 2000 syphilis notifications — with at least 13 congenital cases, six of them fatal — since the outbreak began in northern Queensland in 2011, before spreading to the Northern Territory, Western Australia and, finally, South Australia.

What’s worse, it could have been stopped. James Ward, of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, wrote in mid-2011 that there had been a “downward trend” over several years and it was likely at that point that the “elimination of syphilis is achievable within indigenous ­remote communities”.

But governments were slow to react, and Ward is now assisting in the design of an $8.8 million emergency “surge” treatment approach on the cusp of being rolled out in Cairns and Darwin, with sites in the two remaining affected states yet to be identified.

It will be an aggressive strategy — under previous guidelines, you had to have been identified during a health check as an active carrier of syphilis to be treated. Now, anyone who registers antibodies for the pathogen during a blood prick test, whether actively carrying syphilis or not, will receive an ­immediate penicillin injection in an attempt to halt the infection’s geographical spread.

This is key: the high mobility of indigenous people in northern and central Australia means pathogens cross jurisdictions with ­impunity. Australian Medical ­Association president Michael Gannon calls syphilis a “clever bacterium that will never go away”, warning that “bugs don’t respect state borders”.

Olga Havnen, one of the Northern Territory’s most respected public health experts, points out that many people “will have connections and relations from the Torres Strait through to the Kimberley and on to Broome — and it’s only a matter of seven or eight kilometres between PNG and the northernmost islands there in the Torres Strait”.

“This is probably something that’s not really understood by the broader Australian community,” Havnen says. “I suspect once you get a major outbreak of something like encephalitis or Dengue fever, any of those mosquito-borne diseases, and that starts to encroach onto the mainland, then people will start to get a bit worried.”

Olga Havnen, CEO of the Danila Dilba Health Service, says transmission is complex issue in Australia’s indigenous communities.
Olga Havnen, CEO of the Danila Dilba Health Service, says transmission is complex issue in Australia’s indigenous communities.

But it is not just syphilis — ­indeed, not even just STIs — that have infectious disease authorities concerned and the network of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations stretched.

Chlamydia, the nation’s most frequently diagnosed STI in 2016 based on figures from the Kirby Institute at the University of NSW, is three times more likely to be contracted by an indigenous Australian than a non-­indigenous one.

The rate was highest in the NT, at 1689.1 notifications per 100,000 indigenous people, compared with 607.9 per 100,000 non-indigenous Territorians. If you’re indigenous, you’re seven times more likely to contract gonorrhoea, spiking to 15 times more likely if only women are considered. Syphilis, five times more likely.

As the syphilis response gets under way, health services such as the one Havnen leads, the Darwin-based Danila Dilba, will be given extra resources to tackle it. “With proper resourcing, if you want to be doing outreach with those people who might be visitors to town living in the long grass, then we’re probably best placed to be able to do that,” she says.

But the extra focus comes with a warning. A spate of alleged sexual assaults on Aboriginal children, beginning with a two-year-old in Tennant Creek last month and followed by three more alleged ­attacks, has raised speculation of a link between high STI rates and evidence of child sexual assault.

After the first case, former NT children’s commissioner Howard Bath told this newspaper that STI rates were “a better indicator of background levels of abuse than reporting because so many of those cases don’t get reported to anyone, whereas kids with serious infections do tend to go to a ­doctor”. Others, including Alice Springs town councillor Jacinta Price and Aboriginal businessman Warren Mundine, raised the ­spectre of the need for removing more at-risk indigenous children from dangerous environments.

Children play AFL in Yeundumu. Picture: Jason Edwards
Children play AFL in Yeundumu. Picture: Jason Edwards

However, Sarah Giles, Danila Dilba’s clinical director and a medical practitioner of 20 years’ standing in northern Australia, warns this kind of response only exacerbates the problem. She is one of a range of public health authorities who, like Havnen, say connecting high STI figures to the very real scourge of child sex abuse simply makes no sense. They do not carry correlated data sets, the experts say.

“One of the things that’s really unhelpful about trying to manage STIs at a population level is to link it with child abuse and mandatory reporting, and for people to be fearful of STIs,” Giles says. “The problem is that when they’re conflated and when communities feel that they can’t get help ­because things might be misinterpreted or things might be reported, they’re less likely to present with symptoms. The majority of STIs are in adults and they’re sexually transmitted.”

Havnen says there is evidence of STIs being transmitted non-sexually, including to children, such as through poor hand ­hygiene, although Giles says that is “reasonably rare”. And while NT data shows five children under 12 contracted either chlamydia or gonorrhoea in 2016 (none had syphilis), and there were another five under 12 last year, Havnen points to the fact that over the past decade there has been no increasing trend in under 12s being affected. Where there has been a rise in the NT is in people aged between 13 and 19, with annual gonorrhoea notifications increasing from 64 cases in the 14-15-year-old ­female cohort in 2006 to 94 notifications in 2016.

In the 16-17-year-old female ­cohort the same figures were 96 and 141 and in the 12-13-year-old group it rose from 20 in 2006 to 33 in 2016. Overall, for both boys and girls under 16, annual gonorrhoea notifications rose from 109 in 2006 to 186 in 2016, according to figures provided to the royal ­commission into child detention by NT Health. Havnen describes the rise as “concerning but not, on its own, evidence of increasing ­levels of sexual abuse”.

Ward is more direct. Not all STIs are the result of sexual abuse, he warns, and not all sexual abuse results in an STI. If you’re a health professional trying to deal with an epidemiological wildfire, the distinction matters — the data and its correct interpretations can literally be a matter of life and death.

Indeed, in its own written cav­eats to the material it provided to the royal commission, the department warns that sexual health data is “very much subject to variations in testing” and warns against making “misleading assumptions about trends”. Ward says: “Most STIs notified in remote indigenous communities are ­assumed to be the result of sex ­between consenting adults — that is, 16 to 30-year-olds. Of the under 16s, the majority are 14 and 15-year-olds.” He says a historically high background prevalence of STIs in remote indigenous communities — along with a range of other ­infectious diseases long eradicated elsewhere — is to blame for their ongoing presence. Poor education, health services and hygiene contribute, and where drug and ­alcohol problems exist, sexually risky behaviour is more likely too. The lingering impact of colonisation and arrival of diseases then still common in broader ­society cannot be underestimated.

But Ward claims that an apparently high territory police figure of about 700 cases of “suspected child sexual offences” in the NT over the past five years may be misleading. He says a large number of these are likely to be the result of mandatory reporting, where someone under 16 is known to have a partner with an age gap of more than two years, or someone under 14 is known to be engaging in sexual activity. Ward points out that 15 is the nationwide ­median sexual debut age, an age he suggests is dropping. At any rate, he argues, child sex abuse is unlikely to be the main reason for that high rate of mandatory ­reporting in the NT.

Areyonga is a small Aboriginal community a few hours drive from Alice Springs.
Areyonga is a small Aboriginal community a few hours drive from Alice Springs.

Data matters, and so does how it is used. Chipping away at the perception of child sexual abuse in indigenous communities are the latest figures from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare showing the rate of removals for that crime is actually higher in non-indigenous Australia.

According to a report this month from the AIHW, removals based on substantiated sex abuse cases in 2016-17 were starkly different for each cohort: 8.3 per cent for indigenous children, from a total of 13,749 removals, and 13.4 per cent for non-indigenous children, from 34,915 removals.

Havnen concedes there is a need for better reporting of child abuse and has called for a confidential helpline that would be free of charge and staffed around the clock by health professionals.

It’s based on a model already in use in Europe that she says deals with millions of calls a year — but it would require a comprehensive education and publicity campaign if it were to gain traction in remote Australia. And that means starting with the adults.

“If you’re going to do sex ­education in schools and you start to move into the area about sexual abuse and violence and so on, it’s really important that adults are ­educated first about what to do with that information,” she says. “Because too often if you just ­educate kids, and they come home and make a disclosure, they end up being told they’re liars.”

These challenges exist against the backdrop of a community already beset by a range of infectious diseases barely present elsewhere in the country, including the STIs that should be so easily treatable. It is, as Havnen is the first to admit, a complex matter.

Cheryl Jones, president of the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, says the answer is better primary treatment solutions and education, rather than trying to solve the problem after it has ­occurred. “For any of these public health infectious disease problems in ­remote and rural areas, we need to support basic infrastructure at the point of care and work alongside communities to come up with ­solutions,” she says.

Sisters play in the mud after a rare rain at Hoppy's 'town camp' on the outskirts of Alice Springs.
Sisters play in the mud after a rare rain at Hoppy’s ‘town camp’ on the outskirts of Alice Springs.

Pat Turner, chief executive of peak body the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, is adamant about this. “These (STIs) are preventable diseases and we need increased testing, treatment plans and a ­culturally appropriate health ­education campaign that focuses resources on promoting safe-sex messages delivered to at-risk ­communities by our trained Aboriginal workforce,” Turner says.

The Australian Medical ­Association has called for the formation of a national Centre for Disease Control, focusing on global surveillance and most likely based in the north, as being “urgently needed to provide national leadership and to co-ordinate rapid and effective public health responses to manage communicable diseases and outbreaks”.

“The current approach to disease threats, and control of infectious diseases, relies on disjointed state and commonwealth formal structures, informal networks, collaborations, and the goodwill of public health and infectious disease physicians,” the association warned in a submission to the Turnbull government last year.

However, the federal health ­department has rebuffed the CDC argument, telling the association that “our current arrangements are effective” and warning the suggestion could introduce “considerable overlap and duplication with existing functions”.

“I think it (the CDC) might have some merit, if it helps to ­advocate with government about what needs to happen,” Havnen says, “but if these things are going to be targeted at Aboriginal bodies, it needs to be a genuine partnership. It’s got to be informed by the realities on the ground and what we know. That information has to be fed up into the planning process.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #CloseTheGap Research @GregHuntMP and @KenWyattMP announces $6 million 3 year funding for Aboriginal led , only Academic Health Science Centre in Australia with a primary focus on #Aboriginal and #remote health

As the only Academic Health Science Centre in Australia with a primary focus on Aboriginal and remote health, we are pleased that Minister Hunt is leading on the front foot with an announcement such as this.

It’s especially pleasing that this is happening just as we are about to engage with a wide consultation between our members over health research priorities in Central Australia in the coming years—this three year commitment allows us to do this with confidence.

The Centre is already working in key areas such as endemic HTLV-1 infection, exploring the complex interplay between communicable and chronic disease as well as exploring the capacity of the primary health care sector to reduce avoidable hospitalisations,”

The Chairperson of the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre [CA AHSC] John Paterson has welcomed the commitment over three years of significant research funding to the Centre by Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt.

“Research projects that will be supported will emphasise those based on community need and initiative especially as expressed by the Aboriginal partner organisations, though this will not necessarily preclude externally identified needs. 

In any case, we will focus on comprehensive approaches to consultation and participation in the ethical design of research projects, the carriage of the research, and the rapid implementation of positive research results.

A key activity will be that of building future leaders in the Aboriginal research workforce. We have already started this critical work with the first meeting of a network of more than 15 Aboriginal researchers in Central Australia.”

A health research partnership benefitting Warumungu, Arrernte (Eastern), Pintupi, Pitjantjatjarra, Arrernte (Central), Yankunytjarra, Luritja, Arrernte (Western), Warlpiri, Anmatyere, Ngaanyatjarra, Kaytetye and Alyawarre speakers across Central Australia

Project website

Press Release : Medical research to uncover better treatment for Indigenous Australians

The Turnbull Government will invest more than $6 million in a health science centre in Alice Springs which is focused on addressing health challenges faced by Indigenous Australians.

The Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre will receive $6.1 million over three years from the Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF).

This funding will support better treatment and diagnosis of health challenges experienced by Indigenous Australians.

The Centre brings together top researchers, medical experts and local communities to look at ways to improve healthcare options for the specific health challenges facing Indigenous Australians.

The Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre is the first Aboriginal-led collaboration of its kind and demonstrates the importance of Aboriginal community leadership in research and health improvement.

See NACCHO Coverage of launch July 2017

Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 : New Aboriginal-led collaboration has world-class focus on boosting remote Aboriginal health

These projects will directly benefit regional and remote Aboriginal communities and it is our hope that medical research will help in closing the gap on disadvantage.

The first priority project that will be supported through the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre will be a study into addressing HTLV-1.

Additional areas that will be considered by the Centre include addressing research into ear and eye health, renal health and dialysis, children and maternity health in Indigenous communities.

Indigenous health is one of the Turnbull Government’s fundamental priorities and while progress has been made on some key indicators, with male and female life expectancy increasing and child mortality and smoking rates decreasing, more needs to be done.

Today I am also pleased to announce more than $740,000 of MRFF funding for University of Queensland researchers to undertake a world-first project, in collaboration with Aboriginal communities, to find ways to improve Aboriginal food security and dietary intake in cities and remote areas.

Poor diet and food insecurity are major contributors to the excess mortality and morbidity suffered by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia.

The Turnbull Government is committed to improving the health services for Indigenous Australians and we will continue to invest in better treatment, care and medical research.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Features : @closethegapOZ #CTGV2020 #CloseTheGap Day 15 March and #IPAC EofI to trial a #pharmacist in your ACCHO health care team close 20 March @NRHAlliance #6rrhss #RuralHealth 11 April #AHCRA2018

Download the 2018 Aboriginal Health Save a dates 

NACCHO Save a date 2018 Calendar 13 march

Featured this week

1.Would your ACCHO health service like to trial a pharmacist in your health care team ?

Closing date for the Expressions of Interest is 20th March  2018

We are now seeking Expressions of Interest in the Integrating Pharmacists within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to improve Chronic Disease Management (IPAC) project.

This is a large project that will investigate if including a non-dispensing practice pharmacist as part of the primary health care team within Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHSs) leads to improvements in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Read all past NACCHO Pharmacy articles here

It will involve up to 22 ACCHSs invited to participate in the project from three jurisdictions- Queensland, Victoria, and the Northern Territory.  The project will provide funding and support for the pharmacist to be embedded within an ACCHS.

The project aims to benefit the ACCHS sector by providing the evidence-base to better support quality use of medicines through integrated care models.

The pharmacist will provide education and shared decision making for patients and staff on appropriate medicines for people with chronic conditions.

Having a culturally responsive pharmacist integrated into ACCHSs should enable the building of relationships and trust between pharmacists, patients, ACCHS staff and the community.

This should ultimately improve medicines use and health for ACCHS patients who agree to be part of this project.

The IPAC project is a partnership between the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA), James Cook University (College of Medicine and Dentistry) the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and its state Affiliates.

The Australian Government under the Pharmacy Trials Program of the 6th Community Pharmacy Agreement has funded the project.

Yours sincerely,

Pat Turner – NACCHO CEO

To express an interest please complete this quick scoping  survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/R5LD6JB

ACCHSs will be offered site agreements from April for gradual roll out of Pharmacists mid year

 Closing date for the Expressions of Interest is 20th March  2018

For further information please contact NACCHO IPAC Project Coordinators ipac@naccho.org.au

Alice Nugent 0439873723 and Fran Vaughan 0417826617

2. Close the Gap Day March 15, 2018

Everyone deserves the right to a healthy future and the opportunities this afford. We are very lucky to live in a rich country with a universal health system.

However, many of Australia’s First Peoples are denied the same access to healthcare that non-Indigenous Australians take for granted. Despite a decade of Government promises the gap in health and life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and other Australians is widening.

This National Close the Gap Day, we have an opportunity to send our governments a clear message that Australians value health equality as a fundamental right for all.

Read over 473 NACCHO Close the Gap Aboriginal Health articles published over last 6 years

On National Close the Gap Day we encourage you to host an activity in you workplace, home, community or school.

The aim? To bring people together, to share information — and most importantly — to take meaningful action in support of achieving Indigenous health equality by 2030.

How to get involved in National Close the Gap Day

If you register on or after March 9th it is unlikely you will receive your pack in time. But don’t worry, you can download all the resources online.

On National Close the Gap Day 2017, there were more than 1100 separate events held across the country from the tip of Cape York to Southern Tasmania, and from Rottnest Island in West Australia to towns along Australia’s east coast.

With events ranging from workplace morning teas, to sports days, school events and public events in hospitals and offices around the country — tens of thousands of people took part and made a difference.

Your actions can create lasting change. Be part of the generation who closes the gap.

What is Close the Gap?

Equal access to healthcare is a basic human right, and in Australia we expect it. So what if we told you that you can expect to die a decade earlier than your next-door neighbour? You wouldn’t accept it. No-one should.

But in reality, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People can expect to live 10 years less than non-Indigenous Australians. Learn more about why the health gap exists.

Working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is one of the critical success factors. With continued support from the public, we can ensure the Australian Government continues to work with Indigenous communities, recommit additional funding and invest in real partnerships.

Learn more about Close the Gap.

3.Close the Gap for Vision Conference Follow

 4. 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium to be held in Canberra, 11-12 April 2018.

The Symposium is shaping up to be a terrific event with exceptional speakers and topics and we hope to see many of you there.

 With only a month to go there is still time to register or book a table display.

Download 6RRHSSA4Flyer-6-3

 There are currently over 200 people registered and you can find full bios and abstracts on the Symposium website at www.ruralhealth.org.au/6rrhss

Download the program Rurand Remote Program March18

5.Australian Health Care Reform

Don’t miss meeting and discussing reform with these great experts and researchers. Register for the Summit today

More info HERE

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Pain Advice @AMAPresident @RuralDoctorsAus @ACRRM @CRANAplus @NRHAlliance Changes to the availability of #codeine containing medicines come into effect 1 February 2018

” From 1 February 2018, codeine will no longer be available over the counter. This means you will need to get a prescription from your ACCHO doctor to buy codeine. For people with ongoing chronic pain, there are other treatments in addition to or instead of medication that can be very helpful

There are many different ways that people can manage their pain without using codeine. Research shows low-dose codeine is not superior to over-the-counter alternatives such as a combination of paracetamol and ibuprofen for pain relief.”

From Real Relief

Opening graphic courtesy of Redfern AMA ACCHO

From 1 February 2018 medicines containing codeine will only be available by prescription. These medications are used to treat pain. Codeine is also sometimes used in cold and flu medicines.

If you live in a rural or remote area and you think that this change will affect you, it’s a good idea to know your options and plan ahead.


If you normally take medicines with codeine for ongoing (chronic) pain you should talk to a health practitioner about your pain management options. Codeine is only recommended for a maximum of three days and is not considered an effective treatment for chronic pain.

The best place to get advice and assistance will depend on the health services available in your area and your personal preference.

Visit your health practitioner

If you have access to a local GP, they can provide information and help with managing your pain and write you a prescription if you need one. If they feel you need extra help to manage chronic pain they might refer you to see a specialist – either in person or through a service called Telehealth that is used to deliver health services across Australia without the need for travel.

Go to a community health centre or remote health service

If you don’t have a local GP, you can get advice and help at a community health centre or a remote health service in your area. Remote area nurses and registered nurses can also provide advice and, in some areas, they can write prescriptions.

Visit your local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Medical services can provide holistic and culturally appropriate advice and care on all health and medical issues including pain management.

Get free advice over the phone

For free health advice 24 hours, 7 days a week, you can call Healthdirect Australia on 1800 022 222. Healthdirect can provide you with advice on all health topics, including pain management. They can also help you locate your nearest health services and chemists.

Download our NRHAM resources

Click here to download the NRHA Codeine Fact Sheet 

Click here to download the NRHA Posters

If pain is ongoing the best way to manage it is with a combination of strategies that suit your condition and personal situation. Medication alone is not effective.

Multidisciplinary pain management will address all of the factors associated with pain – including emotions, mental health, social relationships and work – to help you get the best results.

One of the best ways to manage pain is to take control of it. With access to the right education and strategies, most people with chronic pain can successfully regain quality of life without the need for opioids, surgery or other invasive treatments.

You can learn more about multidisciplinary pain management through your ACCHO GP who can refer you to your nearest pain service.

Rural Doctors RDAA are working with ACRRM, CRANAplus and the National Rural Health Alliance (NRHA) to ensure that all rural doctors, rural and remote nurses and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers can access relevant training and information so they can advise and/or prescribe the best and most appropriate form of treatment available to consumers following the change

AMA Interview

Well, first of all, the myth that something’s changing for people who have already required a prescription for opioids. We are more and more concerned about the use of opioids in our community. It’s not unique to Australia. So many of the people who die from heroin overdoses in the United States and Australia started off on prescription opioids. So, if anything good has come of the Guild’s advocacy on low dose codeine, it’s been shining a light on the opioid epidemic we have.

But the most important myth to bust is that – for those people who reach occasionally for one of these preparations for a headache, for backache, for period pain – an anti-inflammatory alone, paracetamol alone, is every bit as effective, and in fact it’s better, because for a lot of people codeine causes headaches, it doesn’t make them better.”

AMA President, Michael Gannon see interview in full Part 2

President of the Rural Doctors Association Australia (RDAA), Dr Adam Coltzau, said that while the up-scheduling of codeine has been well publicised, some patients will remain surprised when they can no longer buy their preferred pain medication over the counter.

“I have no doubt that starting today there will be disgruntled people who were either unaware of the coming change or who did not make plans to change their medication,” Dr Coltzau said.

“Everyone should be aware that they may consult with their pharmacist where available or where there is no pharmacist their health clinic team regarding alternative over-the-counter medications. It is imperative that consumers who have previously used over-the-counter codeine to manage pain see their health care provider regarding alternative medications or therapies that are available to them.

“And of course for those patients whose doctor or nurse practitioner recommends codeine-based products these remain available to them by prescription.

“The up-scheduling of codeine has provided a positive opportunity for both patients and prescribing practitioners to increase their knowledge of the safer and more effective pain relief medications and treatments, review their condition and re-assess their approach to management of these conditions,” Dr Coltzau said.

President of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM), Associate Professor Ruth Stewart, said that patients should start a conversation with their GP about their pain problems to find a treatment that works for them.

“There’s no clinical evidence to suggest that over-the-counter codeine products are more effective analgesics than similar medicines without codeine,” A/Prof Stewart said.

“Talking to your GP about your pain is the best way to address it, as they’re equipped to suggest a pain management strategy based on your symptoms.

“Medication alone is often not the most effective way of treating many conditions, and a multidisciplinary pain management plan will help get the best results.

“In rural and remote areas, where people may have to travel to access their health care provider to review the management of their condition, it is important for consumers to schedule a visit with their

GP or other health care provider. Where pharmaceutical services are available, consumers can take advantage of the Government’s new Pain MedCheck program that will be rolled out across community pharmacies for a one-on-one consultation with your pharmacist.

“Online resources such as http://www.realrelief.org.au can provide consumers with the facts and information on the proven alternative pain medications that are available and there may also be specialist and allied health services available via telehealth for people living in rural and remote communities,” A/Prof Stewart said.

RDAA is working with ACRRM, CRANAplus and the National Rural Health Alliance (NRHA) to ensure that all rural doctors, rural and remote nurses and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers can access relevant training and information so they can advise and/or prescribe the best and most appropriate form of treatment available to consumers following the change.

Visit www.rdaa.com.au for more information.

 Part 2

LAURA JAYES:   AMA President, Michael Gannon, joins us now live from Perth. Dr Gannon, thanks so much for your time. Is the AMA on board with this decision?

MICHAEL GANNON:   The AMA supports the decision made by Minister Greg Hunt, who in turn was taking the advice from the TGA, the Therapeutic Goods Administration. They’re the bureaucrats who have looked at the science and made a decision that brings Australia into line with 25 other countries.

LAURA JAYES:   There’s been a bit of reaction to this, you would’ve noticed, Dr Gannon, but most people do use these codeine products in a very responsible way. Are you concerned about what this might do in regional areas, where people don’t have access to this, they have to find a GP? That might delay them in seeking this medication.

MICHAEL GANNON:   Look, the Pharmacy Guild stands alone in their opposition to this change, and we’ve seen a lot of mythology out there. The important message – for people who have always required a prescription for higher doses of codeine, nothing’s changed.

Now, we’ll have more to say about that. This is a drug that is causing more harm than good in our community, and ideally over time we’ll see fewer and fewer prescriptions for opioids.

But for the lower doses of codeine that this change affects, it’s very important to deliver the message to people that there’s very clear scientific evidence that the low dose codeine-containing preparations are no more effective than the paracetamol or the anti-inflammatory alone.

That’s the message that should be delivered to a patient presenting to a community pharmacy today or in coming weeks: here’s some paracetamol, here’s some ibuprofen – it’s every bit as effective, and it’s a lot safer.

LAURA JAYES:   Well, you said myth-busting; what kind of myths did you want to bust? I’ll give you the platform to do it right here and now.

MICHAEL GANNON:   Well, first of all, the myth that something’s changing for people who have already required a prescription for opioids. We are more and more concerned about the use of opioids in our community. It’s not unique to Australia. So many of the people who die from heroin overdoses in the United States and Australia started off on prescription opioids. So, if anything good has come of the Guild’s advocacy on low dose codeine, it’s been shining a light on the opioid epidemic we have.

But the most important myth to bust is that – for those people who reach occasionally for one of these preparations for a headache, for backache, for period pain – an anti-inflammatory alone, paracetamol alone, is every bit as effective, and in fact it’s better, because for a lot of people codeine causes headaches, it doesn’t make them better.

LAURA JAYES:   You sound like the AMA is preparing to actually look more deeply into opioids other than codeine. It seems like codeine is the first frontier. Why is codeine any worse than some of the others?

MICHAEL GANNON:   Well, the reason that codeine is worse is that it’s unique amongst the opioids in that’s it’s being treated in such a permissive manner. You still need a prescription for fentanyl; you still need a prescription for oxycodone; you still need a prescription for morphine.

But if anything good has come out of this conversation in recent months, it’s been that we, as doctors – whether that’s surgeons dispensing opioids after surgery, whether it’s emergency departments dispensing them in people who have presented with trauma or some other form of pain – we need to do something, because oxycodone, fentanyl, higher doses of codeine, are also causing damage in our community.

We need to look carefully at better opioids. Codeine is very much yesterday’s drug, it would not be licensed if it was invented next week. But we need to look carefully at our prescription of other opioids and really look carefully at non-pharmacological approaches to chronic pain.

LAURA JAYES:   What ones are you concerned about? Are you concerned about pseudoephedrine? Because I believe if I’ve got a bit of the flu, I go to the chemist, I get some cold and flu tablets that contain pseudoephedrine. You can certainly get through a day of work with those drugs, but are they an addictive substance? If codeine is the first one you’re concerned about, what are the next?

MICHAEL GANNON:   Pseudoephedrine is not an opioid, so it’s not used for pain relief, and the main reason to be careful with its use is it’s used to cook up methamphetamine in criminal backyard laboratories.

But you raised an important issue there, the need to monitor. We support real-time prescription monitoring. We’ve been very supportive of what’s existed in Tasmania until now. State Minister Jill Hennessy in Victoria, Federal Minister Greg Hunt, have made noises about real-time prescription monitoring. We agree with the Pharmacy Guild that that’s the way forward, especially for other licit opioids that have become drugs of abuse, like fentanyl, like oxycodone.

LAURA JAYES:   Okay, so those are the main concerns that are being abused if the opportunity is given?

MICHAEL GANNON:   Well, we are concerned about these drugs as drugs of abuse. I mean, the evidence comes from coronial reports in Victoria and other States.

LAURA JAYES:   How do people get them, though? Do they doctor shop?

MICHAEL GANNON:   Well, there is no question that some people doctor shop, but that’s a pretty ambitious effort to doctor shop for 8mg codeine tablets. But there’s no question that some people, they cook up all sorts of stories, they’re very sophisticated in how they go around collecting prescriptions for codeine 30mg tablets.

We know that fentanyl patches, that people use them, and they get the drug out of the patch for intravenous or subcutaneous administration. Australia has long been a high user of opioids, we’re a big exporter of opioids, and the story of the harm they do in the community is not a new one. But this decision, it’s at least two or three years overdue, and it brings us into line with much of the rest of the developed world.

 LAURA JAYES:   Dr Michael Gannon, thanks so much for your time today. This is a fascinating area that I agree with you we need to look a lot more closely at. We’ll get you back another time and deep-dive into that issue. Thanks so much for your time.

 MICHAEL GANNON:   Thank you, Laura.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #Suicide : @RoyalFlyingDoc says mental health services in rural and remote Australia are in a state of “crisis”.

 “We see [more remote] people only accessing mental health services at … 20 per cent the rate of those who access services in the city.

If that’s not a crisis, I don’t know what a crisis is.

We provide 24-hour medical care to people in rural and remote Australia, but our doctors are finding themselves overwhelmed by the amount of psychological support they need to provide to their patients.

Last year the Flying Doctors saw 24,500 people to provide mental health counselling, but we could double or triple that service tomorrow and still not touch the surface,” .

The RFDS chief executive Martin Laverty said major disparities between country and city services still existed, despite numerous government reviews designed to address the problem

WATCH TV COVERAGE HERE

Read over 169 NACCHO Mental Health Articles published over past 6 years

Read over 119 NACCHO Suicide Prevention articles published over past 6 years

Fact 1   

“Roughly half the people the Flying Doctor cares for in our health or dental clinics or transports by air or ground are Indigenous.

“The Flying Doctor RAP, agreed with Reconciliation Australia, contains tailored actions for tangible improvements in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

RFDS Website

Fact 2

Each year, around one in five, or 960,000, remote and rural Australians experience a mental disorder. The prevalence of mental disorders in remote and rural Australia is the same as that in major cities, making mental disorders one of the few illnesses that does not have higher prevalence rates in country Australia compared to city areas.

The Royal Flying Doctor Service says mental health services in rural and remote Australia are in a state of “crisis”.

Originally published ABC TV NEWS

Key points:

  • There are no registered psychologists in 15 of Australia’s rural and remote areas
  • “There should be no excuse in a country of universal access to healthcare,” RFDS CEO says
  • Mental health advocates are calling for a bigger financial commitment from the Government in this year’s budget

Data from the Department of Health showed the number of registered psychologists across the country increased in 2015/16. But there were no registered psychologists in 15 rural and remote areas.

Mr Laverty said areas like west coast Tasmania, central Australia, western Queensland and the Kimberley in Western Australia missed out.

“Areas where perhaps you’re not surprised to see that there aren’t health professionals in abundance,” he said.

“That should be no excuse in a country of universal access to healthcare.”

Mental Health Australia chief executive Frank Quinlan said doctors were not always the best people to provide mental health support.

“It is not necessarily the best way for us to be spending our resources — to have GPs with 10 years or more of training — delivering basic brief interventions and counselling interventions that could be delivered by other professionals and trained peer workers,” he said.

Suicide rates in rural areas are 40 per cent higher than in major cities, and in remote areas, the rate is almost double.

Mental health advocates call for greater commitment

The Coalition allocated $80 million for psychosocial support services in last year’s federal budget.

The program would help people suffering from severe mental illness — who are not eligible for the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) — find housing, education and better care.

But the Government will not release the money unless states and territories stump up funds too, and Mr Quinlan said that was yet to happen.

“That’s in spite of the fact that we know that with the roll-out of the NDIS and the roll-back of previous Commonwealth programs, people are already starting to fall into the gaps,” he said.

Health Minister Greg Hunt has acknowledged more assistance is needed for people in the bush.

“I do believe there is a very significant challenge and this is because there are four million Australians every year who have some form of mental health challenge and in the rural areas this is a significant challenge which is precisely why we are looking at additional services,” he said.

The Federal Government recently announced more than $100 million for the youth mental health service Headspace.

It is also spending $9 million improving tele-health services in rural areas.

But mental health advocates are calling for a bigger commitment to such initiatives in this year’s federal budget.

“The Minister — Greg Hunt — was relatively new to the ministry when the 2017 budget was released,” Mr Quinlan said.

“So I think the sector quite broadly and quite rightly, now, 12 months on, will be looking to the 2018 budget to see whether the Government is actually able to prioritise a lot of the concerns and issues that have been addressed.”

Federal Labor response ( added comment )

The Turnbull Government must break its silence over growing concerns about the quality of mental health services being delivered across Australia.

The Royal Flying Doctors Service is the latest organisation to raise the alarm about mental health service issues in rural and remote Australia. These comments today should be a wake-up call for Malcolm Turnbull.

It is vitally important the Turnbull Government gets this right. The mental health gap between the city and country is already too wide.

Today’s comments follow the Australian Medical Association’s position statement on mental health last week on the ‘gross’ underfunding of mental health services.

The Turnbull Government must prioritise greater funding for mental health services in the lead-up to the Budget.

Labor knows there is more work to be done to improve the mental health of all Australians and find ways to further reduce the thousands of lives lost to suicide each year.

It is only by working together that we will be able to finally reduce the impact of mental health issues in our society .

Mental health services need more than lip-service from Malcolm Turnbull and his Government.

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