NACCHO Aboriginal Health #CarersGateway : Free online resources to support #Aboriginal #carers

It’s rewarding work, but without help Dolly finds herself emotionally and physically drained. Dolly reached out and found that she could get services to help her.

Like Dolly, millions of people in Australia care for others who need help with their everyday lives.

A carer may be someone who looks after their husband or wife, partner, grandparent, uncle, aunty, cousin, child, grandchild or any other family member, a neighbour, a friend or someone in their community who needs help.

Everyone’s situation is different. Some carers look after someone who is an older person or who is unwell or has difficulties getting around. Some carers may look after someone who has a disability, a mental illness or dementia, a chronic condition or a long-term illness or drug and alcohol problems.

Many people looking after someone else don’t think of themselves as carers. They just see caring as what they do to help their families or friends or people in their communities.

Carers need help too – someone they can talk to and find out about services that can help. Carer Gateway is a free, Australian Government funded service that provides information for carers and helps people get in touch with their local services. People can ring up and have a private chat or go online and find out about support in their area, free financial and legal help and what to do in emergencies.  They can also get tips on how to look after themselves so they don’t get burnt out while caring for someone else.

Carer Gateway has short videos about real-life carers in the community – showing how they cope and deal with problems – and how they make the most of the time they spend caring for someone in need.

The videos include Dolly’s story. Dolly is a mother and full-time carer for her two adult daughters, who both need support with their everyday needs.

“It’s pretty much 24/7 around the clock. Four years ago, I realised I was doing a care role and I was also a working mum so quite busy. I thought you know what, it’s time for me to step back and start looking after my own,” she said.

There are free online resources to support Aboriginal carers, including a guided relaxation audio recording and information brochures and posters for use by health and community groups  which can also be ordered from the Carer Gateway ordering form and a Carer Gateway Facebook page to keep up to date on services and supports for carers.

To find out more, Carer Gateway can be contacted on 1800 422 737, Monday to Friday between 8am and 6pm,

or by visiting carergateway.gov.au

You can join the Carer Gateway Facebook community by visiting https://www.facebook.com/carergateway/

 

 

 

Aboriginal Health : Second Atlas of Healthcare Variation highlights higher Aboriginal hospitalisation rates for all 18 clinical conditions

 

“The report, compiled by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, shows us that high hospitalisation rates often point to inadequate primary care in the community, leading to higher rates of potentially preventative hospitalization

The most disturbing example of this  has been the higher hospitalisation rates for all of the 18 clinical conditions surveyed experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, people living in areas of relative socioeconomic disadvantage and those living in remote areas.

 Chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson who is a member of the Atlas Advisory Group.

 “Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Please note

  • Features of the second Atlas include: Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status

DOWNLOAD Key-findings-and-recommendations

Mr Martin Bowles Secretary Dept of Health  launches the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation

A new report showing dramatic differences in treatment rates around Australia signals a pressing need for reforms to ensure equitable access to appropriate health care for all Australians, the Consumers Health Forum, says.

“A seven-fold difference in hospitalisation for heart failure and a 15-fold difference for a serious chronic respiratory disease depending on place of residence, are among many findings of substantial variations in treatment rates in Australia revealed in the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation,” the chairman of Consumers Health Forum, Tony Lawson, said.

“While there are a variety of factors contributing to these differences,  the variation in health and treatment outcomes is, as the report states, an ‘alarm bell’ that should make us stop and investigate whether appropriate care is being delivered.

“These findings show that recommended care for chronic diseases is not always provided.  Even with the significant funding provided through Medicare to better coordinate primary care for people with chronic and complex conditions, fragmented health services contribute to suboptimal management, as the report states.

“We support the report’s recommendation for a stronger primary health system that would provide a clinical ‘home base’ for coordination of patient care and in which patients and carers are activated to develop their knowledge and confidence to manage their health with the aid of a healthcare team.

“The Atlas provides further robust reasons for federal, state and territory governments to act on the demonstrated need for a more effective primary health system that will ensure better and more cost effective care for all Australians.

“The Atlas also examined  variations in women’s health care, and its findings included a seven-fold difference in rates of hysterectomy and  21-fold  difference in rates of endometrial ablation.  The report states that rates of hysterectomy and caesarean sections in Australia are higher than reported rates in other developed nations.  These results highlight the need for continuing support and information on women’s health issues,” Mr Lawson said.

The Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation (second Atlas) paints a picture of marked variation in the use of 18 clinical areas (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications) across Australia.

This Atlas, the second to be released by the Commission, illuminates variation by mapping use of health care according to where people live.  As well, this Atlas identifies specific achievable actions for exploration and quality improvement.

The second Atlas includes interventions not covered in the first Atlas, such as hospitalisations for chronic diseases and caesarean section in younger women. It also builds on the findings from the first Atlas – for example, examining hysterectomy and endometrial ablation separately, and examining rates of cataract surgery using a different dataset.

Priority areas for investigation and action arising from the second Atlas include use of:

  • Hysterectomy and endometrial ablation
  • Chronic conditions (COPD, diabetes complications)
  • Knee replacement.

Additional priorities for investigation and action are hospitalisation rates for specific populations with chronic conditions and cardiovascular conditions, particularly:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
  • People living in remote areas
  • People at most socioeconomic disadvantage.

Healthcare Variation – what does it tell us

Some variation is expected and associated with need-related factors such as underlying differences in the health of specific populations, or personal preferences. However, the weight of evidence in Australia and internationally suggests that much of the variation documented in the Atlas is likely to be unwarranted. Understanding this variation is critical to improving the quality, value and appropriateness of health care.

View the second Atlas

The second Atlas, released in June 2017, examined four clinical themes: chronic disease and infection – potentially preventable hospitalisations, cardiovascular, women’s health and maternity, and surgical interventions.

Key findings and recommendations for action are available here.

View the maps and download the data using the interactive platform.

What does the Atlas measure?

The second Atlas shows rates of use of healthcare interventions (hospitalisations, surgical procedures and complications,) in geographical areas across Australia.  The rate is then age and sex standardised to allow comparisons between populations with different age and sex structures. All rates are based on the patient’s place of residence, not the location of the hospital or health service.

The second Atlas uses data from national databases to explore variation across different healthcare settings. These included the National Hospital Morbidity Database and the AIHW National Perinatal Data Collection.

Who has developed the second Atlas?

The Commission worked with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) on the second Atlas.

The Commission consulted widely with the Australian government, state and territory governments, specialist medical colleges, clinicians and consumer representatives to develop the second Atlas.

Features of the second Atlas include:

  • Greater involvement of clinicians during all stages of development
  • Analysis of data by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status
  • Analysis of data by patient funding status (public or private).

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Chronic disease and infection: potentially preventable hospitalisations

1.1 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
1.2 Heart failure
1.3 Cellulitis
1.4 Kidney and urinary tract infections
1.5 Diabetes complications

Chapter 2 Cardiovascular conditions

2.1 Acute myocardial infarction admissions
2.2 Atrial fibrillation

Chapter 3 Women’s health and maternity

3.1 Hysterectomy
3.2 Endometrial ablation
3.3 Cervical loop excision or cervical laser ablation
3.4 Caesarean section, ages 20 to 34 years
3.5 Third- and fourth-degree perineal tear

Chapter 4 Surgical interventions

4.1 Knee replacement
4.2 Lumbar spinal decompression
4.3 Lumbar spinal fusion
4.4 Laparoscopic cholecystectomy
4.5 Appendicectomy
4.6 Cataract surgery
Technical Supplement
About the Atlas
Glossary

Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation data set specifications are available at http://meteor.aihw.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/674758

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Mental Health : Download report “Mental health in remote and rural communities “

 ” The poorer mental health of remote and rural Indigenous Australians is also impacted by the social determinants of Indigenous health, which are well recognised nationally and internationally.

These relate to the loss of language and connection to the land, environmental deprivation, spiritual, emotional and mental disconnectedness, a lack of cultural respect, lack of opportunities for self-determination, poor educational attainment, reduced opportunities for employment, poor housing, and negative interactions with government systems

The relationship of remoteness to health is particularly important for Indigenous Australians, who are overrepresented in remote and rural Australia (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2014a).

The National Mental Health Commission (2014a, p. 19) identified that “the mental health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are significantly higher than those of other Australians.”

Photo above

“ The women of Inkawenyerre, a small settlement in the Utopia community four hours by road north of Alice Springs, regularly take part in a different kind of mental health therapy, known as ‘narrative therapy.’

Narrative therapy taps into the centuries-old tradition among Aboriginal people of story-telling and expression through art. At the family Urapuntja Clinic, both women and children take part in narrative therapy.

They recreate what is commonly seen on any given evening in an Aboriginal community—people sitting around the fire, relating to one another and telling stories.

The activity is enjoyable for participants with group members often laughing and supporting one another as they tell stories and work on their painting—all while promoting good mental health living practice,”

Lynne Henderson, former RFDS Central Operations mental health clinician.

“People who live in the country get less access to care. And they become sicker,”

To increase the access to care, the RFDS said it needed a massive increase in funding. Country Australians see mental health professionals at only a fifth the rate of those who live in the city,

So there should be a five-fold increase in access to mental health care for country Australians.”

RFDS CEO Martin Laverty see story Part 2 below

Mental health in remote and rural communities

Mental health disorders are not more common in rural and regional Australia than they are in Australia’s cities, according to a new report from the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS), but they are a lot harder to treat.

The report, Mental Health in Remote and Rural Communities, found about one in five remote and rural Australians — 960,000 people — experience mental illness.

Download the report HERE

RN031_Mental_Health_D5

But a combination of lack of access to facilities, social stigma, and cultural barriers present challenges to getting people the help they need.

AHCRA believes that’s something that everyone should be concerned about, with access to care regardless of location.

 

Part 1  Indigenous mental health and suicide

Data from the 2011 Australian Census demonstrated that 669,881 Australians, or 3% of the population, identified as Indigenous (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013b), and that 142,900 Indigenous Australians, or 21% of the Indigenous population, lived in remote and very remote areas (Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, 2014).

Around 45% of people in very remote Australia (91,600 people), and 16% of people in remote Australia (51,300 people) were Indigenous (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013b; Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, 2014).

In 2011–2012 around one-third (30%) of Indigenous adults reported high or very high levels of psychological distress—almost three times the rate for non-Indigenous Australians (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2014).

In 2008–2012, in NSW, Queensland (Qld), WA, SA and the NT, there were 347 Indigenous deaths11 from mental health-related conditions (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare,

2015a). Specifically, age-standardised death data demonstrated that Indigenous Australians (49 per 100,000 population) were 1.2 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (40 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). Age-standardised deaths from mental and behavioural disorders increased with increasing age in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in 2008–2012.

Very few Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians under the age of 35 years died as result of mental and behavioural disorders in 2008–2012. However, Indigenous Australians aged 35 years or older were more likely to die from mental and behavioural disorders than non-Indigenous

Australians in 2008–2012. Specifically, Indigenous Australians (7.2 per 100,000 population) aged 35–44 years were 5.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (1.3 per 1200,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and

Welfare, 2015a). In 2008–2012, Indigenous Australians (14.7 per 100,000 population) aged 45–54 years were 4.9 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (3.0 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

In 2008–2012, Indigenous Australians (18.3 per 100,000 population) aged 55–64 years were 2.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (6.9 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). In 2008–2012,

Indigenous Australians (91.2 per 100,000 population) aged 65–74 years were 2.9 times as likely

as non-Indigenous Australians (31.3 per 100,000 population) to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

Further exploration of death data from mental and behavioural disorders illustrates the significant impact of psychoactive substance use (ICD-10-AM codes F10–F19) on Indigenous mortality (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). In 2008–2012, 29.1% of Indigenous deaths due to mental and behavioural disorders were the result of psychoactive substance use, such as alcohol, opioids, cannabinoids, sedative hypnotics, cocaine, other stimulants such as caffeine, hallucinogens, tobacco, volatile solvents, or multiple drug use. During this period, Indigenous Australians (7.3 per 100,000 populations) were 4.8 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to die as a result of psychoactive substance use (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

Similarly, in 2006–2010, there were 312 Indigenous deaths from mental health-related conditions (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013a). Indigenous Australians living in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT were 1.5 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to die from mental and behavioural disorders in 2006–2010 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013a).

11 Deaths from mental and behavioural disorders do not include deaths from intentional self-harm (suicide). Intentional self-harm is coded under ICD-10-AM Chapter 19—Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes.

Age-standardised death data demonstrated that Indigenous males (49 per 100,000 population) were 1.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous males to die from mental and behavioural disorders. Indigenous females were 1.3 times as likely as non-Indigenous females to die from mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013a).

The greater number of deaths from mental and behavioural disorders with age may also represent the impact of conditions associated with ageing, such as dementia. For example, in 2014, Indigenous Australians (50.7 per 100,000 population) in NSW, Qld, SA, WA and the NT were 1.1 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (45.3 per 100,000 population) to die from dementia (including Alzheimer disease) (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016a).

In 2014–2015, Indigenous Australians (28.3 per 1,000 population) were 1.7 times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (16.3 per 1,000 population) to be hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016a).

In 2011–2013, 4.2% of Indigenous hospitalisations were for mental and behavioural disorders (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a). Age-standardised data demonstrated that Indigenous Australians (27.7 per 1,000 population) were twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (14.2 per 1,000 population) to be hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders in 2011–2013 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a).

In 2008–2009, Indigenous young people aged 12–24 years (2,535 per 100,000 population) were three times as likely to be hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders than non-Indigenous young people (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2011).

 

The leading causes of hospitalisation for mental and behavioural disorders amongst Indigenous young people were schizophrenia (306 per 100,000 population), alcohol misuse (348 per 100,000 population) and reactions to severe stress (266 per 100,000 population) (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2011).

A preliminary clinical survey of 170 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in Cape York and the Torres Strait, aged 17–65 years, with a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, was undertaken to describe the prevalence and characteristics of psychotic disorders in this population (Hunter, Gynther, Anderson, Onnis, Groves, & Nelson, 2011).

Researchers found that: 62% of the sample had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 24% had substance-related psychoses, 8% had affective psychoses, 3% had organic psychoses and 3% had brief reactive psychoses; Indigenous Australians aged 30–39 years were overrepresented in the psychosis sample compared to their representation in the population (37% of sample versus 29% of population) with slightly lower proportions in the 15–29 years and 40 years and older age groups; almost three-quarters (73%) of the sample were male (versus 51% for the Indigenous population as a whole); Aboriginal males (63% in the sample compared to 46% for the region as a whole) were overrepresented; a higher proportion of males (42%) than females (5%), and Aboriginal (44%) than Torres Strait Islander patients (10%) had a lifetime history of incarceration; comorbid intellectual disability was identified for 27% of patients, with a higher proportion for males compared to females (29% versus 20%) and Aboriginal compared to Torres Strait Islander patients (38% versus 7%); and alcohol misuse (47%) and cannabis use (52%) were believed to have had a major role in the onset of psychosis (Hunter et al., 2011).

In 2015, Indigenous Australians (25.5 deaths per 100,000 population) in Qld, SA, NT, NSW and WA were twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians (12.5 deaths per 100,000 population) to die from suicide (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016b). In their spatial analysis of suicide, Cheung et al. (2012) concluded that higher rates of suicide in the NT and in some remote areas could be explained by the large numbers of Indigenous Australians living in these areas, who demonstrate higher levels of suicide compared with the general population.

The poorer mental health of remote and rural Indigenous Australians is also impacted by the social determinants of Indigenous health, which are well recognised nationally and internationally.

These relate to the loss of language and connection to the land, environmental deprivation, spiritual, emotional and mental disconnectedness, a lack of cultural respect, lack of opportunities for self-determination, poor educational attainment, reduced opportunities for employment, poor housing, and negative interactions with government systems

Part 2 Flying Doctors fight barriers to treat mental illness in rural Australia

Source ABC

Like so many in the bush, Brendan Cullen has a lot on his plate.

He manages a 40,000-hectare property south of Broken Hill. There are 8,000 sheep to keep track of. And that’s just a fraction of the number he looked after previously at another station.

A few years ago, the mustering, the maintenance, juggling bills and family — it all caught up to him.

“You just bottle stuff up. And sometimes you can’t find an out,” he said.

“In the bush you have a lot of time by yourself.”

He spent a lot of that time thinking about his problems. But Mr Cullen was lucky.

He heard about a mental health clinic being run by the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) in a nearby community and decided to go along.

“Catching up with one of the mental health nurses gave me the tools to be able to work out how I go about living a day-to-day life,” he said.

“My life’s a hell of a lot easier now than what it used to be.”

Mental health disorders are not more common in rural and regional Australia than they are in Australia’s cities, according to a new report from the RFDS, but they are a lot harder to treat.

The report, Mental Health in Remote and Rural Communities, found about one in five remote and rural Australians — 960,000 people — experience mental illness.

But a combination of lack of access to facilities, social stigma, and cultural barriers present challenges to getting people the help they need.

“People who live in the country get less access to care. And they become sicker,” RFDS CEO Martin Laverty said.

To increase the access to care, the RFDS said it needed a massive increase in funding.

“Country Australians see mental health professionals at only a fifth the rate of those who live in the city,” Mr Laverty said.

“So there should be a five-fold increase in access to mental health care for country Australians.”

The impact of distance and isolation when it comes to treating mental disorders can be seen in suicide rates. In remote Australia, the rate is nearly twice what it is in major metropolitan areas — 19.6 deaths per 100,000 people.

The suicide rate is even greater in very remote communities.

If you or anyone you know needs help:

The RFDS has responded by increasing its mental health outreach. In communities like Menindee, about an hour’s drive from Broken Hill in the far west of New South Wales, a mental health nurse is on call once a fortnight.

“I have needed them in the past. I got down to rock bottom at one stage. Even now I appreciate that support,” Menindee resident Margot Muscat said.

Ms Muscat plays an active role in the remote community. But she has also felt pressure in the past to manage that role, her work, and family commitments.

Mental health counselling has given her a valuable outlet.

“Just to know that I wasn’t alone. And that you don’t have to take the drastic step of suiciding, so to speak,” Ms Muscat said.

Some the RFDS’s mental health counselling is done over the airwaves. From its regional base in Broken Hill, mental health nurse Glynis Thorp counsels patients over the phone. Often calls are simply people checking in.

“It’s critically important…often there might only be two people on the property. So no one to talk to maybe,” she said.

“We might get out to a clinic every fortnight, but we might have follow up phone calls to check how people are going. For myself it’s probably a ratio of four to one.”

The RFDS report reveals every year hundreds of serious mental illness incidents require airplanes to be dispatched to remote areas to fly patients out for treatment.

Over three years from July 2013 the RFDS conducted 2,567 ‘aeromedical retrievals’.

The leading causes for evacuation flights due to mental disorder are

The RFDS also uses airplanes to carry its mental health nurses to very remote areas. On a typical day in Broken Hill, the medical team takes off just after dawn to head to three communities hundreds of kilometres away: Wilcania, White Cliffs and Tilpa.

In the opal mining town of White Cliffs, the mental health nurse sees patients at the local clinic. One is “Jane”, who doesn’t want her full name used.

“Without them, we would really be lost here,” she said.

Jane has been counselled by the RFDS and was recently directed to mental health treatment in Broken Hill. But she’s still reluctant to talk openly in town about the help she’s getting.

“In a small community it’s not wise to talk to other people in town,” she said. “And mental health, it does carry a stigma.”

Back on his station south of Broken Hill, Mr Cullen believes that stigma over mental health is slowly changing in the bush.

“People get wind that someone’s had a mental health problem, people talk now. As opposed to, let’s go back five years even, 10 years. It was a closed book,” he said.

“With these clinics, once upon a time you might have had a dental nurse, a doctor, and the like.

“But now you have a mental health nurse…And these clinics are close by. So you’re able to go to them. They come to you.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Youth Health : Youth programs deliver a social return of more than $4.50 to every dollar of investment

 

” The report found the programs resulted in improved health outcomes and self-esteem, greater engagement with education and training, and increased school attendance and literacy.

They also saw a decrease in anti-social and criminal behaviour, reduced drug and alcohol abuse, and fewer children sentenced to youth detention. Relationships between children and their families, the community and authorities also improved.

Well-funded and consistent youth programs deliver a social return of more than $4.50 to every dollar of investment, a report on Northern Territory services has found.”

Nous Group consulting firm, examined three youth programs in Utopia, Hermannsburg, and Yuendumu, which each had “different levels of program size, resourcing and sophistication of activities

Report by Helen Davidson The Guardian

Photo above : Children play in Utopia, where the youth programs were forecast to return $3.48 for every dollar spent. Photograph: Getty Images

Download the report HERE

The study, on the impact of youth programs in remote central Australia, found that, with enough support and effort, youth programs provided significant support to children, their families and communities, as well as the broader health, education and justice systems.

They also actively reduced rates of crime and drug and alcohol abuse among young people.

The report, presented in Canberra on Tuesday, comes amid ongoing issues with youth crime and substance abuse in the Northern Territory, and skyrocketing rates of incarceration – particularly among Indigenous youth – across the country.

The royal commission into the protection and detention of children in the NT has spent recent weeks hearing of the importance of early intervention in stopping the cycle of criminal behaviour and incarceration.

It found all three were forecast to create a positive return over the next three years, ranging from $3.48 in Utopia to $4.56 in Yuendumu.

The study said a successful youth program was “reliant on stable and skilled youth workers, regular and consistent activities and community involvement in the design and delivery of the program”.

“Creating conditions that can deliver these prerequisites in the remote environment takes resourcing, time and skilled support,” it said. “However, if time, resourcing and support is insufficient, there is a high risk that youth programs will be unable to produce the value identified in this study.”

The Warlpiri Youth Development Aboriginal Corporation (Wydac) – formerly known as the Mt Theo program – was found to have the biggest return.

Based on Nous’s social return on investment formula, it had a projected a social return worth $14.14m for a two-year investment of $3.01m in 2017/18 and 2019/20.

Wydac, in the community of Yuendumu, 300km north-west of Alice Springs, employs seven staff and has up to 120 young Indigenous trainees, a number of whom go on to become youth workers themselves, Wydac said.

The Hermannsburg youth program, which has run since the mid-1990s but saw increased funding from 2007/08, also saw positive outcomes and a projected return of $8.05m of social value on a funding investment of $1.95m.

In Utopia, a region home to fewer than 300 people about 250km north-east of Alice Springs, a youth program, which centred on a drop-in centre and with emphasis on sport and recreational activities, has operated consistently since

The anticipated investment of $1.02m in the Utopia program was forecast to generate about $3.56m of social value.

The findings were guided and verified by a stakeholder group that included the youth programs, regional shire councils and territory and federal government departments.

The report was commissioned by the Central Australian Youth Link Up Service (Caylus), which was set up by the federal government in 2002 to address an epidemic of petrol sniffing in remote central Australian communities. It now coordinates and supports youth programs and responds to sniffing and other substance abuse outbreaks across the region.

The organisation has consistently maintained that substance abuse issues must addressed on both the supply and demand sides, and youth programs effectively addressed demand.

“Stakeholders in remote communities across our region consistently state that youth programs are essential to give kids good things to do, keeping them busy and away from trouble,” it said in the report.

Blair McFarland, co-manager of operations at Caylus, said it had been difficult to get successive federal and governments on board with the idea that consistency in delivery is key. “No one seems to have understood the value of those youth programs – partly because [people in cities] don’t understand the context of where they’re happening,” he said.

“Communities of 300 people with no coffee shops, movie theatres, and local parks which are dusty things which you could fry eggs on in summer.”

In these places, where extreme poverty, high unemployment, and low engagement with Centrelink support are also factors, there is “literally nothing else” for young people to occupy themselves with without a youth program.

“In that context the youth programs were a little island of hope, it demonstrated to the little kids that somebody cared about them,” he said.

McFarland said there had been vast improvements over the past 15 years but there were still big gaps in resourcing – and the situation was far better in central Australia than in the Top End.

“We’re hoping governments think about that and focus on every kid having the opportunity to attend a youth program.”

The Nous Group principal, Robert Griew, said his company partnered with Caylus as part of its work supporting community organisations.

“The big takeout message [from the report] is the longer those programs are sustained and supported you get an increasing return,” he said. “This is just really fabulous news and an opportunity for the community and government to invest in working on the ground and largely employing Indigenous staff.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Summary #ruralhealthconf : Indigenous health focus at 14th National Rural Health Conference

As we contemplate a culturally safe future from our current vantage point, let us reflect upon how each and every one of us can contribute to making this future that I’ve shared with you today a reality.

  • Embed cultural safety in your organisation’s strategic plan, and Reconciliation Action Plan.
  • Make anti-racism practice part of your everyday – whether you are at home or at work – and whether anyone is looking or not. Enact zero tolerance for racism.
  • Ensure your governance structures reflect the communities who you are serving. Privilege the voices and the wisdom of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations.
  • Inform yourself about 18C and Constitutional Recognition.
  • Inform yourself about climate change and the actions you can take – and try to put aside non-Indigenous lenses when doing this. Learn from us about caring for country.
  • Practise trust, respect and reciprocity. Build and value your relationships with us

In 2037, let us look back on this conference – and this moment – as a time when we stood together, determined to make history and to create a better future.”

It’s no wonder the speech  ” Today is tomorrow’s history ”  from Janine Mohamed – CEO of the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) – sparked such a big response at the National Rural Health Conference in Cairns.

She imagined a strong, positive, future for Australia 20 years from now – and what it might take to get us there.

See full speech below thanks to Janine and Croakey Team

The improvement of Indigenous health outcomes in rural and remote areas was the focus of many of the sessions and keynote presentations at the 14th National Rural Health Conference in Cairns .

Dr Mark Wenitong, Senior Medical Advisor with the Apunipima Cape York Council, spoke on health and cultural competence.

Addressing matters such as clinicians bringing their own cultural biases into practices, DrWenitong stressed the need for individuals to learn more about their own cultures.

“Reflective practice is important so that people recognise their own bias,” he said, also pointing out that some of the simplest are the most effective.

“You need to treat people nicely and with respect to improve engagement.”

Download  Cultural competency in the delivery of health services for Indigenous people referenced by Dr Mark Wenitong ctgc-ip13

Another of the keynote presenters was Professor of Nursing and Midwifery at CQ University, Gracelyn Smallwood.

Professor Smallwood discussed the need to better understand history in order to aid reconciliation.

“Captain Cook didn’t discover Australia. People were here for thousands of years and one day discovered Captain Cook.”

Audience member Dr Lucas de Toca tweeted that Professor Smallwood was perceived as “Absolutely killing it delivering hard truths in her outstanding keynote on cultural competency at #ruralhealthconf.”

The Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie was present for the conclusion of proceedings and to receive the priority recommendations for rural and remote health to emerge from the Conference as put forward by the attending delegates through the Sharing Shed.

See all recommendations here DOWNLOAD

Recommendations14NRHC

 

Janine Mohamed: speech to the National Rural Health Conference

As published originally here thanks to Janine and Croakey Team

Good morning ladies and gentlemen, Elders, dignitaries and colleagues.

janineI would like to begin by paying my respects to the Traditional Custodians of this land, the Yirrganydji Gimyayg Yidinji people, and to Elders past and present, and future generations.

Thank you for your very warm welcome and for the invitation to talk to you today.

About two years ago I had the privilege of meeting Professor Moana Jackson, from Aeoteroa. He is truly an inspirational Maori leader, who challenged us at CATSINaM to ‘see beyond the mountain’, to vision our future at all costs, and to be brave because that is the way of our people.

He also reminded us that we are storytellers – Moana has inspired me to share our hopes for the future with you today.

So….hang on to your seats – we are going to be doing some time travel together!

Becoming advocates and agents of change

slide young JanineWhen I was a young girl I realised I wanted to become a nurse, after seeing my family members suffer traumatic experiences at the hands of the health system.

While I have worked in many different roles across the health system – clinically, in program development and delivery, academia and in policy –I am now very pleased to be leading the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives, or CATSINaM since 2013.

I am proud to be an advocate for the unique and powerful roles that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses have in the health system and their communities, as agents of change.

I like to begin my speeches by acknowledging May Yarrowick, who trained as an obstetric nurse in Sydney in 1903. She may well be our first Indigenous nurse qualified in Western nursing.

Let’s take a few moments to reflect upon the challenges that May must have overcome to train and work as a nurse in those times. Remember, this was just a few years after the new federation of Australia passed the Immigration Restriction Act of 1901.

This legislation enshrined the White Australia policy, embedding dominant culture worldviews and priorities into the very birth of the federation, and of course the exclusion of us from Australia’s birth certificate.

Some might say that to this day Australia has not yet grown up – or out of those views.

Too often, the limitations of these dominant culture worldviews stop non-Indigenous people from recognising the incredible strengths of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and cultures.

Imagine this is now 2037….

Now, I’d like to invite you to cast your minds forward.

Imagine that we have travelled forward in time from May Yarrowick and 1903, all the way to 2037 – 20 years in the future from the time of this conference here in beautiful Cairns.

How old are you in 2037?

I am 62. – I think I look like I belong on the set of the Golden Girls – the Black Betty White. But I am not yet retired. Now that we all are living longer, the retirement age is now 70.

I am happy to still be working. In fact, I am happy to still be alive and in relatively good health.

When I think back to 2017, I remember that I was not at all sure this would be the case. In my early 40s I developed a chronic disease and worried about what it might mean for my future health. But my worries proved unfounded. As I grew older, I remained strong and well.

When I think back over the last few decades, I realise that what helped to keep me feeling good was the strength of my identity, my connection to community and country, and my mentors.

The health literacy that I developed through my nursing career also helped – just one of many ways that developing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce helps to improve the health of our people.

At 62, I must admit that I am feeling pretty good about myself. My life has had – and continues to have – purpose and meaning, thanks to my passion for improving the health of my people.

So much of my work has been about re-writing national narratives that were once so detrimental to our well-being but are now a source of pride and strength in our identities as members of the world’s oldest living cultures.

One of the reasons I’m so happy is that I am now watching my grandchildren thrive.

I am seeing that their experiences at school and university are so different from my days , and even from those of my children – their parents.

My grandchildren are reading histories and textbooks that have been written by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

My grannies are learning from Indigenous teachers and lecturers and television presenters. And they are proud and strong in their identities because of how and what they are learning.

It is such a far cry from when I was at school and university. Then our romanticised and exotic histories were being told by non-Indigenous people, who too often saw us through the overlapping lenses of deficit, unconscious bias and racism.

goodes pmMy grandchildren are learning about the tremendous achievements of our first Indigenous Prime Minister, Mr Adam Goodes.

From their classrooms, they scan in to hear the discussions from the First Nations Parliament.

Self-determination is not an aspiration or even a dream for my great grandchildren. It is their daily reality.

They grow up conscious of whose country they are on

In school, they learn about our many Indigenous health heroes — about people like Professor Tom Calma and Aunty Pat Anderson, & Aunty Gracelyn Smallwood…….

It is not only my grandchildren who are learning about the strengths and proud history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples  – so are their non-Indigenous classmates.

Together, they are learning a shared, true history of this place we call Australia.

My grandchildren and their non-Indigenous friends share in learning local language and they learn together about the importance of respecting and caring for country. They grow up knowing about whose country they were born on – because this is written on their birth certificates and is part of their identities from the day they are born.

slide signpostsThey grow up knowing to always be conscious of whose country they are on – the signs, GPS reminders and names on our maps and roads also remind them of this.

Thanks to the many outcomes of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, when they go on fun school excursions, they visit fun exhibitions that are informed by our Indigenous knowledges and cultures.

They visit memorials that honour our First Nations people, including our brave Warriors and protectors of country such as Pemulway.

When they go on school excursions, the signage on the streets and highways is not only in English, but also honours the language and naming of the local First Nations peoples.

They grow up with intergenerational hope, not trauma

My grandchildren are growing up in a society that values them and their heritage. They are growing up with intergenerational hope, rather than intergenerational trauma.

They are relative strangers to the experiences of racism that were part of the daily experience of their ancestors over so many generations — including for me, my parents and my children.

The health professionals of the future are learning, from their earliest days, when they first set step into early childhood learning and development centres, about cultural safety. Not that they call it that any more.

Cultural safety has become so embedded into all systems that it has become the norm – rather than something exceptional that people have to learn when they start training to be a nurse or a doctor.

In 2037, cultural safety doesn’t begin in the health system; it begins in our homes and schools. It is evident in our private conversations, and our public debate and discourse.

In 2037, there is no longer a disconnect between public and political discourse – and the language used in the education and training of health professionals.

Politicians of ALL persuasions now understand – just as well as do ALL health professionals – that racism is an attack on people’s health and well-being, and our capacity to live productive, self-determining lives.

slide health careIn 2037, cultural safety has become a societal norm. The cultures, knowledges and practices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are central to the national narrative; they are valued and respected.

We have fixed the “racism problem”. Embedding cultural safety into all aspects of society has helped us to transform Eurocentric systems and worldviews.

In 2037, I no longer feel the need to put on my heavy “armour” when I venture outside of my home. It’s a far cry from 20 years ago, when this armour was part of my defence system against the everyday insults of unconscious bias born of racism. Experiences such as deflecting or swallowing hard when I hear:

  • ‘You’ve done well for yourself’
  • ‘Aboriginal people get so much given to them’
  • ‘You’re too pretty to be Aboriginal’
  • ‘Yes, but you’re not like the rest of them, you’re different’
  • or ‘You’re not a real Aboriginal, you’re a half caste’
  • being asked to see my receipt at Woolworths self-serve because ‘they’ve had problems with my sort of people’.

In 2037, I know that when non-Indigenous people see me in the street or at work, their first reaction will not be of prejudice or fear, but of gratitude and pride.

This reflects their understanding of the profound value that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and cultures bring to Australian society.

We have closed the gap in health outcomes

In 2037, when my grandchildren get sick or need to go to the hospital, I no longer even think to worry about whether their care and treatment will be respectful.

No longer do my people leave seeing a doctor or visiting a hospital to the last possible moment because of the fear of being humiliated or traumatised.

The real-time reporting of national safety and quality healthcare data shows that cultural safety is now so embedded across all health systems that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients are as likely as any other Australians to have proper access to respectful and appropriate care.

The Health Barometer – which was established some years ago to measure our health outcomes, race relations and the cultural safety of health services, programs and policies – has become redundant.

The dual governance boards which Local Area Health Networks established to eradicate racism at the organisational and direct service delivery level are also no longer needed.

There is no longer a gap between the safety and quality of healthcare provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strat Islander people and that provided to other Australians. Our health status is now comparable with other Australians.

The health sector has long ago acknowledged its role in colonisation and such traumatic practices as removal of children and the medical incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Nursing and midwifery now learn this history at the same time as learning about our founders, for example Florence Nightingale.

Health professions and systems have apologised and provided reparation and justice for harmful practices.

Over the past 20 years the sector learnt how to be part of healing, rather than causing harm.

The persistence, hard work and brilliance of our Indigenous health leaders paved the way for a sea change that became evident around the time this century celebrated its 21st birthday.

Climate change prompted a global sea change

I must admit that things were looking pretty grim in the years leading up to 2021. We were still dealing with the aftermath of President Trump, fake news, climate deniers, and the rise of nationalistic, xenophobic movements.

 But as the impacts of climate change started to hit – earlier and harder than expected – there was a profound sea change around the world.

People realised the limitations of the usual Western ways of doing business. Globally, Indigenous knowledges were not only legitimised, but valued and centred in responses to such complex problems as climate change; social and economic inequality; and the protection and management of land and water resources.

As new social and economic structures emerged in response to these challenges and in response to what was then called the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the voices of Indigenous peoples were heard – not only in Australia but also globally.

Our ways of doing business – informed by practices of respect, reciprocity, caring for country, and relationship-based ways of working – are now centred.

Power no longer rested in self-interested hierarchies but became de-centralised. People and organisations were valued for what they could do for the well-being of the community and the planet.

Just imagine what a wonderful difference this has made for rural and remote people and communities!

At the same time as these wider shifts were occurring in society, some fundamental shifts were occurring in health systems.

The health system changed its way of doing business

slide health planIt wasn’t just that the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health plan was fully resourced and implemented – and that this became remembered as one of the landmark achievements of Minister Ken Wyatt, along with establishment of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Authority.

It wasn’t just that the Rural Health Commissioner’s role was reformed – after some sustained, behind-the-scenes lobbying – to ensure that the Commissioner had a more wide-ranging and meaningful remit.

It wasn’t just that in the wake of the abolition of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, the Goodes Government set up a Productivity Commission for Indigenous Health. This quarantined, money so that we were able to self-determine the way we invested in our health. And what a difference that made!

It wasn’t just that insurance laws were changed and health systems were reformed to enable women, both Aboriginal and Non- Indigenous women, to birth on country.

It wasn’t any one of these changes alone that led to us closing the gap in life expectancy and health outcomes – years earlier than we had hoped for in our wildest dreams.

It was these things, but it was more than this.

When I look back now, it seems incredible that most of our health dollars and efforts were once spent on centralised, institutional systems of care that contributed relatively little to health outcomes for the large investment they incurred.

It now seems unbelievable that we once invested so little effort and money into providing the conditions that empowered people and their families and communities to have to healthy, contributing lives.

Such a fundamental shift occurred. As Indigenous knowledges and practices were centred in wider systems, so too did the health system change its way of doing business.

.The mainstream health system learnt from the successes of the Aboriginal community controlled health sector. The mainstream re-oriented itself around our ways of doing business – to focus on primary health care, communities, prevention, social justice, and the social and cultural determinants of health.

Health services moved towards providing long-term contracts and seamless services addressing peoples’ needs for inclusion, housing, transport and integrated care.

For our members at CATSINaM, the changes have brought profound transformations to the way they work and how they are valued.

 Our members now work at their full scope of practice. They are involved in diagnosing and managing dental caries, for example, while dentists are incorporating population health strategies into their daily work. Their work has been funded for many years now by ….the sugar tax (dare I say this in Queensland?).

It is so thrilling too to see that the mainstream politic has learnt from the ingenuity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Creativity and innovation are not only valued — but properly funded and rewarded.

After its unpromising early years, visionary leadership transformed the NBN to provide equitable access to connectivity right across the country.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people capitalised on this opportunity, supporting our creativity, entrepreneurialism and innovation. We used the NBN to drive innovation in healthcare and health promotion, as well as to contribute to a better future for all.

We are all making history right now

twitter historyAs I stand before you in 2037, I am not only happy, but I am proud.

One of the highlights of my career has been working to use the virtual world  – cyberspace – to embed cultural safety, not only into the training and education of all who work in the health system – but also into wider societal systems. Along with my newly released cookbook, written in conjunction with the CWA of course.

As we contemplate this potential future together now from our present reality, in 2017, let us remember that history is not something that happens in the past.

It is happening right now. We are all making history right now.

Over the next few years, as we move to embedding cultural safety into our systems and services, supported by the forthcoming Version 2 of the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards and CATSINaM’s current campaign to have Cultural Safety embedded into our Health Practitioners legislation, let us ensure that this brings meaningful improvement to rural and remote health services.

Let us remember that cultural safety is a philosophy of practice that is about how a health professional does something, not simply what they do. Its focus is on systemic and structural issues and on the social determinants of health.

Cultural safety is as important to quality care as clinical safety. It includes regard for the physical, mental, social, spiritual and cultural components of the patient and the community.

Cultural safety represents a key philosophical shift from providing care regardless of difference, to care that takes account of peoples’ unique needs – and to be regardful of difference.

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, cultural safety provides a decolonising model of practice based on dialogue, communication, power sharing and negotiation, and the acknowledgment of white privilege.

These actions are a means to challenge racism at personal and institutional levels, and to establish trust in health care encounters.

Culturally safe and respectful practice therefore is not about learning about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples – in fact you can never know this.

Cultural safety requires having knowledge of how one’s own culture, values, attitudes, assumptions and beliefs – influence interactions with patients or clients, their families and the community. Being aware of our racial orator.

As we contemplate a culturally safe future from our current vantage point, let us reflect upon how each and every one of us can contribute to making this future that I’ve shared with you today a reality.

I’d like to conclude this presentation by inviting you to journey with me into the future. I ask each and every one of you to think deeply about how you might contribute to creating this future.

How can YOU help to make history?

Here are some suggestions:

  • Embed cultural safety in your organisation’s strategic plan, and Reconciliation Action Plan.
  • Make anti-racism practice part of your everyday – whether you are at home or at work – and whether anyone is looking or not. Enact zero tolerance for racism.
  • Ensure your governance structures reflect the communities who you are serving. Privilege the voices and the wisdom of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations.
  • Inform yourself about 18C and Constitutional Recognition.
  • Inform yourself about climate change and the actions you can take – and try to put aside non-Indigenous lenses when doing this. Learn from us about caring for country.
  • Practise trust, respect and reciprocity. Build and value your relationships with us.

In 2037, let us look back on this conference – and this moment – as a time when we stood together, determined to make history and to create a better future.

Because today is tomorrow’s history – be brave.

Thank you.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Delivery to @DaveGillespie of #RuralHealthConf priority delegate recommendations

 

 ” Rural and regional Australians have higher rates of major diseases including heart disease and stroke, chronic lung conditions, diabetes, asthma, and arthritis.

We also have a persistent and disturbingly large gap in health outcomes and life expectancy, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians “

Minister Gillespie said Australia’s long life expectancy and good average health outcomes disguised unacceptable differences between population groups and communities, particularly in rural Australia : See Full Response press release from Minister below

After four action-packed days, the 14th National Rural Health Conference with its theme of ‘A World of Rural Health’, has concluded with the delivery of the priority recommendations to emerge from the event to Assistant Minister for Health, David Gillespie.

According to CEO of the NRHA, David Butt, “the Conference provided an excellent opportunity for learning and sharing the evidence of what works in rural and remote health.

“People who live and work in rural and remote Australia have the knowledge about what works and what needs to change to improve health and wellbeing.

“Very importantly, through the conference they have identified key recommendations for health systems reform, to improve the health and wellbeing of the seven million people who live in rural and remote Australia,” Mr Butt said.

Download a PDF Copy of all recommendations

Recommendations14NRHC

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

Digital Health

Workforce

AUSTRALIA LEADS IN INNOVATION FOR RURAL HEALTH

Press Release

The Coalition Government’s innovative reforms to improve the health of rural, regional and remote communities were today showcased to the 14th World Rural Health Conference.

In his opening address to the conference in Cairns, Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie, outlined a series of major changes to improve rural health which will start or bed down over the coming year.

These included:

  •  legislation to establish the first independent National Rural Health Commissioner;
  •  pathways to recognise rural GPs as “Rural Generalists”;
  •  Primary Health Networks across Australia commission health services to ensure that local health needs are met;
  •  federally funded mental health services including suicide prevention and drug and alcohol rehabilitation now managed at the regional level by PHNs;
  •  200 general practices and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services will soon start providing Health Care Home services, to coordinate care for people with chronic conditions.

Minister Gillespie said Australia’s long life expectancy and good average health outcomes disguised unacceptable differences between population groups and communities, particularly in rural Australia.

Rural and regional Australians have higher rates of major diseases including heart disease and stroke, chronic lung conditions, diabetes, asthma, and arthritis.

“We also have a persistent and disturbingly large gap in health outcomes and life expectancy, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians,” he said.

Minister Gillespie also represented the Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, at the National Rural Health Alliance Conference held as part of the World of Rural Health event.

“I know that it takes determination, resilience and flexibility to provide the care that your patients need, without the resources available to your counterparts in the cities,” Minister Gillespie said.

“The Prime Minister shares my passion – your passion – for rural Australia.

“Like you, and me, he believes that Australians have a right to high quality, affordable and accessible health care, wherever they live and whatever their circumstances.

“Meeting the needs of rural families and communities is one of the top priorities in the long term national health plan.”

Smile: $11m reduces gap in rural and remote dental services

Press Release 2

People living and working in rural and remote Australia will now have access to dental services that were previously unavailable.

Assistant Minister for Health, Dr David Gillespie, said today that the Coalition Government is providing $11 million to the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) to provide dental services.

“The Royal Flying Doctor Service is well-placed to provide these essential mobile outreach dental services in rural and remote Australia,” Minister Gillespie said.

“Where there is an identified market failure and there are gaps in services, it is important that the Government steps in to provide assistance. Today we deliver on our election commitment to ensure people outside our major cities have better access to high quality dental services.”

The Government provides funding to the RFDS under the RFDS Program, which aims to ensure access to essential emergency aeromedical and other primary health care services in rural and remote areas of Australia.

“The Flying Doctor welcomes this new funding for dental services in rural and remote Australia,” RFDS of Australia CEO, Martin Laverty, said.

“There are only one third the dentists in remote areas, with 72 dentists per 100,000 people in major cities, and less than 23 per 100,000 people in remote areas.”

“The research statistics are compelling, with more than one-third of remote area residents living with untreated decay. Essentially, when people from remote areas visit the dentist, they are more likely to require acute intervention – 1 in 3 had a tooth extraction in a year, compared with less than 1 in 10 in metropolitan areas.”

“This funding from the Federal Government will enable the Flying Doctor to expand its dental outreach program to start tackling the disparity that exists between city and the bush – and for that we are very, very thankful”.

On 28 June 2016, the Government announced it would continue to support the RFDS by extending its contract for continued delivery of aeromedical services until 30 June 2020.

The announcement included a commitment of an additional $11 million over two years for the RFDS to expand its existing non-Commonwealth funded dental services for the period 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2019.

Labor Party Response

Labor supports the development of a national rural health strategy and associated implementation plan, as part of ensuring there is clear and targeted action towards closing the gap in health outcomes between Australians living in rural areas and their metropolitan peers. 

Shadow Minister for Health Catherine King announced Labor’s support for a strategy at the National Rural Health Conference in Cairns, calling on the Government to join in bipartisan support.

“The impact of inequity on health and recognising the challenges that some groups face which require more targeted support – including rural and remote Australians – was a clear theme to emerge from Labor’s National Health Summit in March,” Ms King said

“We think that a national rural health strategy is an important step to ensuring we have a defined roadmap to improving health outcomes for Australians living outside our big cities and I hope the Government follows our lead.”

Shadow Assistant Minister for Medicare, Tony Zappia, said while Labor welcomes the implementation of the National Rural Health Commissioner, this single role will not be a cure-all.

“The National Rural Health Commissioner would aid in the implementation of a national rural health strategy, but we still need to have an understanding of where we are going, and what we are trying to achieve in rural heath,” Mr Zappia said.

“A national rural health strategy would help achieve this goal of all levels of Government working more closely together, to reduce fragmentation and duplication.”

Aboriginal Health #ruralhealthconf : Investing in rural health brings $ returns

Investing in rural health brings $ returns to local economies (and improves health)

” When we talk about rural health, it’s easy to focus on health inequalities between the roughly 10% of Australians who live in rural and remote areas and those who live in our cities.

Statistics show the further Australians live from the major cities, the less their life expectancy and the poorer their health.

But rural health is not just an issue about equitable access to health care services; it’s an economic issue that impacts on national, community and family budgets and life’s opportunities.”

Lesley Russell is talking about the economics of delivering primary health care in rural and under-served areas at the 14th National Rural Health Conference in Cairns on Thursday April 27, 2017.

The government isn’t investing enough in rural and remote health because of its failure to recognise the comprehensive impact of health care funding as a driver for local economic development.

The federal government’s development plan for Northern Australiadoesn’t appear to mention health and health care services at all.

This is despite international research showing investing a dollar in rural health care can generate more than a ten-fold economic return.

How can investing in rural health boost economies?

The best example of health care centres as anchors for economic growth and investment comes from the US. Here, community health centres run primary health care clinics (patients’ initial point of contact with the health system) in rural and medically under-served areas.

Data collected over their nearly 50-year history show these centres not only provide quality and culturally safe health care and related social services to vulnerable populations, they stimulate the economies of their local communities.

There’s a multiplier effect that extends beyond the employment of health care professionals and ancillary staff and beyond the walls of the clinics; the centres buy goods and services from local businesses and the improved health of the local population means increased employment and household spending.

For every US$1 invested in these health centres, an estimated US$11 is generated in total economic activity.

Could this happen in Australia?

Australia has shown little interest in these sorts of analyses and economic justifications for changes in health policy to better service rural areas.

For example, we have no idea what economic impact, if any, GP Super Clinics have had in their communities. These are meant to bring together GPs, practice nurses, allied health professionals, visiting medical specialists and other health care providers to address the health care needs and priorities of their local communities.

We still don’t have an economic evaluation of how GP Super Clinics, like this one in the Northern Territory, have fared years after they opened. Larine Statham/AAP

And data is limited for the economic impact of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, which are similar to the community health centres in the US. Although we know such organisations are the largest private employer for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, I have seen no economic data beyond this.

What we do know is on the basis of health care costs alone, spending more money more wisely on rural and remote health could result in some significant savings.

For instance, an Australian study showed investing A$1 in medium-level primary care (2-11 visits per year) for people with diabetes in remote Indigenous communities could save A$12.90 in hospitalisation costs.

How best to care for the health of rural Australians?

If we accept there are economic benefits to investing in rural health care, what should our rural health care system or systems look like?

Work from the now-defunded Centre for Excellence for Accessible and Equitable Primary Health Care Service Provision in Rural and Remote Australia gives us some clues.

Researchers said we should agree on a core set of primary health care services to be available to Australians living in rural and remote areas and the necessary support functions to ensure these are sustainable.

Knowing what services are needed allows communities, health professionals and policy makers to ensure they can be delivered in a way that is “fit for (local) purpose” and there are no gaps. It is clear we need something beyond general practice.

They highlighted necessary services including: emergency care, obstetrics (pregancy and birth-related services), mental health and counselling, dental health, rehabilitation, and services for substance abuse, disability and aged care. And of course, there is a range of necessary support functions. These include on-demand specialist back-up, telehealth and video conferencing, and the ability to promptly evacuate seriously ill patients.

Researchers have also looked at the features of effective and sustainable models of primary health care in rural and remote Australia. Key issues were supportive healthy policy, productive relations between federal and state/territory governments and a receptive community; essential services like good governance, management and leadership; as well as adequate funding, infrastructure and workforce supply.

Who will staff primary health care in the bush?

So, how do we recruit, structure and retain the primary health care team needed to deliver these services? Again, we know quite a lot about health care professionals who are more likely to be attracted to the challenges of rural and remote medicine.

Those who love their work in country areas talk about high levels of professional satisfaction, the challenging variety of the work, close relationships with other health professionals, and the sense of satisfaction from their patients.

But the isolation, the struggle with work-life balance, career advancement, schooling for children, jobs for spouses and difficulty finding locums (for instance to back-fill when they are sick, want to take a holiday or need extra training) are causes of dissatisfaction. Future policies need to address these issues.

Looking to the future

Providing sustainable health care services in the bush is possible. But finding the evaluations and anecdotes about what works is not easy.

For instance, it’s now impossible to know from publicly available documents how much federal money is spend on rural health initiatives, let alone their outcomes.

However, websites like Community Commons, which allow people to share their experiences, data and resources about providing health care to local communities, can help.

Expenditure on rural and remote health is a wise use of government resources because it focuses on what private markets are unable to do. It also delivers on outcomes that can be measured in dollar benefits, as well as the social justice currency of a fair go for all Australians.

Yet, there are also concerns that federal government attention to rural health is waning. So, many hopes are pinned on the proposed Rural Health Commissioner to champion the strategic, consistent, long-term and varied health needs of rural and remote communities.


The headline has been updated to reflect the potential economic benefit from investing in Australian rural health.


Lesley Russell is talking about the economics of delivering primary health care in rural and under-served areas at the 14th National Rural Health Conference in Cairns on Thursday April 27, 2017.

NACCHO TOP10+ #JobAlerts : This week in Aboriginal Health : #RuralHealthConf Doctors, Aboriginal Health Workers etc. etc

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application check with the ACCHO that job is still available

1-2 .Danila Dilba Health Service Darwin (2 positions )

3-4-5 Awabakal (3 positions )

6. AH&MRC NSW Public Health and Member Services Support units.

7.Urapuntja Community  NT : Psychologist 

8. Ballarat : Director of Health and Home Support Services

9. Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service – GP

10-13 Employment opportunities Lowitja Institute (3 positions)

14.Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

15.Nunkuwarrin Yunti SA Chronic Condition Management Team

16.Congress Alice Springs : SENIOR ABORIGINAL YOUTH ENGAGEMENT OFFICER

17. Wheatbelt Health Network WA Care Coordinator (Integrated Team Care)

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 1-2 .Danila Dilba Health Service Darwin (2 positions )

Danila Dilba Health Service is going through a dynamic period of expansion, growth and review and currently has the following vacancies

We offer:

  • Attractive salary with salary packaging benefits
  • Six weeks annual leave
  • Flexible hours
  • Training and development

1.OUTREACH WORKER

(SEWB)

*Total Salary: $66,322 – $71,376

Fixed Term – 1 Position – Full Time

The Outreach Worker will provide extensive support to identified clients affected by domestic violence to address social and family needs and to ensure their access to needed services in the Darwin and Palmerston regions. The Outreach Worker will also work with groups of people in the community to develop community resilience and capacity that is protective against violence

Applications Close:

MONDAY 1 MAY 2017

(Close of business 5.00 p.m.)

2.ABORIGINAL HEALTH  PRACTITIONER

(Palmerston)

*Total Salary: $69,137 – $75,584

1 Position – Full Time

The Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) will participate in the provision of comprehensive primary health care to the Indigenous people of the Greater Darwin Area. In addition the AHP will provide a support role to other health practitioners both within the organisation and the community. The AHP is crucial to maintaining cultural integrity and advocates strongly for our patients.

*Total salary includes leave loading and superannuation

Applications Close:

MONDAY 8 MAY 2017

(Close of business 5.00 p.m.)

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people encouraged to apply.
Danila Dilba Health Service is an Aboriginal community controlled organisation that provides comprehensive, high-quality primary health care and community services to Biluru (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) people in Yilli Rreung (greater Darwin) region.
Details: www.daniladilba.org.au

3-4-5 Awabakal (3 positions )

3. Awabakal Business Manager

4.Awabakal Community Liaison

5. Awabakal Project Officer

 6. AH&MRC NSW Public Health and Member Services Support units.

Full-Time positions available Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council NSW

AH&MRC are looking for highly skilled employees with Aboriginal Health related experience.

We currently have full-time vacancies available in our Public Health and Member Services Support units.

Experience required

  • Knowledge, understanding and experience of Aboriginal health issues, including the social determinants of health – essential
  • Bachelor qualifications preferred but not essential
  • Experience working as an effective team member
  • Verbal communication skills that demonstrate an ability to communicate effectively through consultative processes with Aboriginal communities
  • Written communication skills that demonstrate your ability to prepare and present reports, briefs and general correspondence
  • Demonstrated computer and keyboard skills to operate Microsoft programs and other business applications with knowledge of word processing and spread sheet applications
  • A current driver’s license or the ability to acquire a license and capacity to undertake travel including to rural, remote and regional NSW communities and interstate
  • Attractive salary and salary packaging available
  • Based in Surry Hills, close to Central station and Hyde Park

About AH&MRC

The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC) is the peak representative body and voice of Aboriginal communities on health in NSW. We represent our members, the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) that deliver culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care to their communities.

The AH&MRC is governed by a Board of Directors who are Aboriginal people elected by our members on a regional basis. We represent and support our members and their communities on Aboriginal health at state and national levels.

For further information and to view position descriptions for the roles available please contact Gordana Agic (HR Coordinator) on (02) 9212 4777 or email mailto:gagic@ahmrc.org.auor simply send through your CV via the Apply button below.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply

The AH&MRC is, and promotes, a smoke-free environment

(The AH&MRC considers that being Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander is a genuine occupational qualification under s 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW))

APPLY HERE

7.Urapuntja Community  NT : Psychologist 

URAPUNTJA HEALTH SERVICE ABORIGINAL CORPORATION

POSITION DESCRIPTION – PYSCHOLOGIST

Title                                     Psychologist

Responsible To                 Clinic Manager

Location                             Amengernternenh Community, Utopia and Ampilatwatja        Community

SUMMARY OF POSITION

The Urapuntja Community is situated on the Sandover Highway some 280 km north east of Alice Springs. Urapuntja Community comprises 16 Outstation communities spread out over some 3230 square km of desert. There are some 900 people who are mainly Anmatyerre and Alyawarra speaking people. Distances to the outstations vary from 5 to 100 kms from the clinic.

Urapuntja Health Service developed from many years of negotiations by Aboriginal people to have their own health service. Urapuntja is a community controlled health service with a Board of Directors which is elected from and by the community at the Annual General Meeting held each year. The Directors meets regularly to discuss issues and make decisions relevant to the Organisation.

The Psychologist position has been funded by the NTPHN to provide services to the residents of both the Urapuntja and Ampilatwatja Health Service areas.

The Psychologist will work as a member of the Social and Emotional Wellbeing Team as well as the clinical team, to provide psychological services addressing the needs of all clients using the bio-psychosocial to community members who self- refer or are referred by a provider. At times the Psychologist will work under the supervision of the Clinic Manager. At other times the Psychologist will be required to work with limited assistance. The Psychologist will be required to travel by 4WD vehicle to provide clinical services to remote outstations in both the Urapuntja and Ampilatwatja Health Service Areas.

 

DUTIES OF THE POSITION

  1. Create, develop and nurture culturally appropriate interactions within Primary Health Care (PHC) teams and with the community.
  2. Develop a positive culture within integrated PHC teams through development of “core” behavioural health skills including cooperative interpersonal relationship building strategies.
  3. Make appropriate referrals to other providers and seek resources to aid team members and community residents.
  4. Perform assessment and provide brief treatment for a wide range of psychological and behavioural health needs using brief therapy.
  5. Maintain currency of job knowledge and skills and assist PHC team members to self-care.
  6. Utilises professional communication and conflict resolution skills with team members, various brief therapeutic modalities including group learning circles, individual, child, family, couples counselling, and family support services.
  7. Direct Caseload that involves documentation and procedural adherence; includes Medicare billing as appropriate and provide identified social and emotional wellbeing services to clients.
  8. Provide evidence-based culturally appropriate interventions (including assessment, therapy and case management) on individual, group and family levels.
  9. Ensure the development of Mental Health Care Plans in collaboration with GP’s, for all eligible clients in the service, and facilitate the provision of co-ordinated clinical care and treatment for referred clients.
  10. Follow defined service quality standards and relevant Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) policies and procedures to ensure high quality, safe services are being provided within a safe workplace.

Further

  1. Contribute to opportunities to Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) processes, quality and service delivery outcomes
  2. Participate in opportunistic and community screening activities
  3. Work with other community health program staff and seek advice and assistance from a General Practitioner
  4. Enter data accurately into the Communicare system
  5. Collect specified data on all client contacts in accordance with Clinic and funding body requirements
  6. Liaise with other staff within Urapuntja Health Service in regards to patient care, referrals and follow up as required
  7. Assist other health staff requiring community, cultural and/or linguistic assistance with clients where culturally appropriate
  8. To provide quality and professional service of care and work ethics at all times
  9. Work within strict confidentiality guidelines, ensuring all client and organisational information is kept secure
  10. Undertake any other duties at the request of the Clinic Manager which are considered relevant to the position and the level of classification

 

SELECTION CRITERIA

Essential

  • Recognised qualifications in Psychology with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) registration to practice as a Psychologist.
  • Proven ability to be self-directed and self-motivated as well as working effectively as a member of a team.
  • Demonstrated knowledge of current issues, standards and trends in the delivery of mental health and social and emotional well-being services to Aboriginal people.
  • Demonstrated recent experience in the mental health and social and emotional wellbeing assessment, treatment and rehabilitation methods appropriate to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) people.
  • Proven ability to be able to develop the behavioural health and working skills required by each employee working within a PHC team.
  • Proficiency in and commitment to the use of electronic information systems for the maintenance of clinical and service delivery records.
  • Hold a current Northern Territory (NT) manual driver’s licence or ability to obtain, ability and willingness to undertake travel by 4WD or light aircraft to remote communities, and capacity to reside in a remote community.
  • A good level of health and fitness that matches the requirements of the role. Note: If so required by UHSAC at any time, you must undergo a satisfactory medical examination (including a pre-employment medical examination) for the purpose of determining whether you are able to perform the inherent requirements of your position. Any such medical examination will be at the employer’s cost, and copies of any medical report will be provided to you. You must advise UHSAC of any illness, injury, disease, or any other matter relating to your health or physical fitness which may prevent you from performing your duties, or which may affect your ability to work safely.
  • Excellent communication skills, in particular the ability to communicate sensitively in a cross-cultural environment
  • Current Drivers Licence
  • Ochre Card (Working with Children Clearance)

 

Desirable

    • Masters in Clinical Psychology qualification.
    • Awareness of/sensitivity to Aboriginal culture and history
    • Experience in using a Patient Information and Recall System and in data collection and analysis including the ability to use word processing, spreadsheet, and database software to produce effective reports.
    • Previous experience working with primary health care teams.
  • Experience working in the area of Indigenous Primary Health

 

  • Highly developed cross cultural communication skills and willingness to take cultural advice from Aboriginal staff
  • Previous experience working with remote Aboriginal communities and Aboriginal organisations and groups

 

 

8. Ballarat ACCHO : Director of Health and Home Support Services
 

The role of the Director of Health and Home Support Services is to provide overarching management across the organisation in the areas of Health and Home Support Services. The position will require the incumbent to effectivly managet and provide service development across the BADAC Health program, Medical Clinic, Social and Emotional Wellbeing program and the Home Support Services.

The Director of Health and Home Support Services will be required to review the current service delivery provided by the organisation and implement concepts and ideas that will work toward the further development of the program and generate possible business concepts that will assist in the directorates operational oncosts and contribute to the organisations overarching goal of achieving self-sustainability.

Applicaitions for this position close on the 3rd of May 2017-5pm.

For information on the position, please contact David Carter (Director of Human Resources and Early Childhood Services) on dcarter@badac.net.au

For position description and application submission, please contact Emily Carter (Human Resource Administrator) on ecarter@badac.net.au

APPLY HERE

9.Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service – GP

Medical practice in rural and remote Australia

10-13 Employment opportunities Lowitja Institute (3 positions)

Become part of a leading national Aborginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation

Competititve salary with generous salary sacrifice options

For all enquiries please contact the Lowitja Institute reception on t: 03 8341 5555 or e: admin@lowitja.org.au 

Communications Officer

  • Full time
  • Melbourne-based

The Communications Officer will be a member of the Innovation and Business Development Team, working with the Communications Manager to establish and deliver the Institute’s communications agenda in service of enhancing the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm AEST, Wednesday 1 May 2017.

Position description

Apply online

Research Project Officer

  • Full time
  • Melbourne-based

The Research Project Officer will be a member of the Research and Knowledge Translation team, which is responsible for the creation and management of the research-related activities and products required to meet the strategic and operational objectives of the Institute. The Research Project Officer will work within one of the Lowitja Institute’s broader activities, Insight, which converts key elements of research findings into approaches for evidence-based decision making by policymakers, communities and service practitioners.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm AEST, Wednesday 1 May 2017.

Position description

Apply online

Product Innovation Specialist

  • Full time
  • Melbourne-based

The Product Innovation Specialist will be a member of the Innovation and Business Development Team, working with the Team Director to establish and deliver the Institute’s innovation pipeline agenda including consultancies to enhance the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm AEST, Wednesday 1 May 2017.

Position description

Apply online

14. Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

 

Galangoor Duwalami Primary Healthcare Service is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled primary health care service, operating in both Hervey Bay and Maryborough, servicing the entire Fraser Coast area.

Galangoor Duwalami collaborates with health and well-being partner agencies to enable integrated continuity of care for the community, and continue to work to contribute to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy and program reform in Queensland to address the Burden of disease and Close the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

General Practitioner (GP) two positions available

This is an exciting opportunity to join an innovative and flexible employer, enthusiastic and committed team and make a direct impact on improved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Fraser Coast area.

The Practice:

Galangoor Duwalami (meaning a ‘happy meeting place’) is located on the Fraser Coast in sunny Queensland, with two clinics (Hervey Bay and Maryborough). Originally established in 2007 we offer a comprehensive suite of Health Services within the Fraser Coast region.

The Hervey Bay clinic is situated at the beachside, while a newly built practice in the heart of Historical Maryborough, offers exceptional facilities with 10 consulting rooms including a mums and bubs room, new equipment and large reception. The practice is Community Controlled and has a well-established clientele and reports indicate continued growth.

This is a rewarding prospect for a compassionate, engaging, visionary and thorough General Practitioner with an ability to work within a diverse interdisciplinary team exhibiting admirable communication skills.

  • Two positions available – 2 Part Time – hours negotiable OR 1 Full Time and 1 Part Time
  • Well balanced working environment – Monday to Friday from 0830 to 1700.
  • No on-call requirements
  • Competitive Salary Package
  • Salary packaging
  • Annual Leave plus Study Leave
  • 9.5% Superannuation Entitlement

Key Requirements:

Must Have:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding current registration with the Medical Board of Australia
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number

Download this Information GP Advertisement

Application Process:

A Position Description is available by email. All applications, including a covering letter, are to be e-mailed to: ann.woolcock@gdphcs.com.au

For further details regarding this position please contact Ann Woolcock on 07 41945554.

15.Nunkuwarrin Yunti SA Chronic Condition Management Team

Nunkuwarrin Yunti has multiple positions on our Chronic Conditions Management team.

Location: Adelaide, SA

Reference: 87409

Link to job ad/to apply: http://applynow.net.au/jobs/87409

Job Title: Chronic Conditions Clinical Workers

Short description/teaser: Multiple opportunities to join a well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation renowned throughout South Australia!

About the Organisation

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia, providing a range of health care and community support services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

First incorporated in 1971, Nunkuwarrin Yunti has grown from a welfare agency with three employees to a multi-faceted organisation with over 100 staff who deliver a diverse range of health care and community support services.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and wellbeing of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide, and advance their social, cultural and economic status. The organisation places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative multidisciplinary working culture to achieve the best possible outcome for clients.

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is seeking a number of Chronic Conditions Clinical Workers to join their team on a full-time basis.

Reporting to the Chronic Conditions Coordinator, you will provide services for clients with chronic health conditions engaged with the Chronic Conditions Management team. Working alongside a range of service providers, you will ensure coordinated, flexible and accessible care for individual clients.

Working under general or limited direction (depending on level) of the Chronic Conditions Coordinator the primary role of the Chronic Conditions Clinical Worker is to deliver a range of services which includes, but is not limited to:

  • Development, management and implementation of multidisciplinary care plans based on best practice, to optimise health and wellbeing outcomes for individual clients;
  • Management of care coordination processes including recall and referral, case conferencing and coordination of visiting specialist clinics;
  • Liaison with external agencies as necessary for individual client care and development of accessible and appropriate systems and services for the client group; and
  • Information and education to increase awareness and understanding of healthy lifestyles.Working in conjunction with a team of highly skilled health professionals, you’ll have the opportunity to provide a much needed service for your clients. You’ll be given the chance to work closely with a wide variety of people and make a real impact on their health and welfare outcomes, as well as working towards Closing the Gap in Aboriginal Health!Nunkuwarrin Yunti is committed to nurturing ongoing professional development and growth, with training, mentoring and guidance provided. You’ll be granted a number of opportunities for career advancement, alongside the chance to build your experience within Aboriginal health.
  • This is a fantastic opportunity to join an influential Aboriginal health organisation in metropolitan Adelaide. Apply now! Please Note: Applications close 12pm ACST on the 26th of April, 2017.
  • Your dedication and hard work will be rewarded with a competitive remuneration circa $59,045 – $66,566, commensurate with skills and experience, plus super. You’ll also enjoy extensive salary packaging options that greatly increase your take home pay!
  • About the Benefits

Here is the link to the advertisement.

https://www.seek.com.au/job/33171419?type=standard&tier=no_tier&pos=1&whereid=3000&userqueryid=633e3c0a1b7c540e57937f39f915feb3-1213354&ref=beta

16.Congress Alice Springs : SENIOR ABORIGINAL YOUTH ENGAGEMENT OFFICER

  • Base Salary: $62,263- $67,567(p.a.)
  • Total Effective Package: $79,126 – $85,041(p.a.)*
  • Full-time, fixed term contract up to 30/09/2017

This is an Aboriginal Identified Position

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 40 years’ experience providing comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal people living in Central Australia. Congress is seeking a Senior Aboriginal Youth Engagement Officer who is interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

The position leads the Aboriginal Youth Engagement Officer’s (YEO) with responsibility for team and relationship management of the Congress After Hours Services. The Senior Aboriginal Youth Engagement Officer engages with young people in the Alice Springs CBD at night, assists transport of young people off the streets to a safe place and provides brief crisis intervention and referrals.

Night and weekend work is an inherent requirement of the position.

Alice Springs offers a unique lifestyle in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere in the heart of Australia. It is within easy reach of Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Watarrka (Kings Canyon) and a host of other world heritage sites.

As well as a wonderful lifestyle and rewarding work, Congress offers the following:

  • Competitive salaries
  • Six (6) weeks annual leave
  • 9.5% superannuation
  • Generous salary packaging
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Family friendly conditions
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)

For more information on the position please contact the Social and Emotional Wellbeing Manager, Dr Jon-Paul Cacioli on (08) 8959 4799 or jon-paul.cacioli@caac.org.au.

Applications close: FRIDAY 28 APRIL 2017.

*Total effective package includes: base salary, district allowance, superannuation, leave loading, and estimated tax saving from salary packaging options.

Contact Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 for more information.

For more information about jobs at Congress visit www.caac.org.au/hr.

To apply for this job go to: http://www.caac.org.au/hr & enter ref code: 3460868.

For more information about jobs at Congress visit
http://www.caac.org.au/hr

17. Wheatbelt Health Network WA Care Coordinator (Integrated Team Care)

 
We are seeking a Care Coordinator (Integrated Team Care) to join our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health team at the Wheatbelt Health Centre in Northam, WA.
The Care Coordinator will coordinate care and support to ATSI clients, to facilitate client self-management of chronic conditions and assist them to achieve optimal health outcomes.
The Coordinator works collaboratively as part of a multidisciplinary team to provide comprehensive support to clients and will take a lead role in liaising with the local ATSI community.
The applicant must have a Aboriginal Health Worker or Aboriginal Health Practitioner background.
This is an Indigenous-identified position

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce : @KenWyattMP meets medical colleges to boost Aboriginal health care

” Providing health care that was culturally appropriate for Indigenous people was crucial.

Ultimately, what I want to see is that Aboriginal people, if they come into a hospital, they take the full patient journey,

The procedures and treatment regimes are the same as any other Australian receives so that we push out life and we move to closing the gap.

Increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people working in health care will also be discussed.

If we don’t get our initial training and ongoing education right, we will never deliver a culturally safe health system,

The colleges are critical partners in getting this right with ideas on training and recruitment and retention initiatives.”

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt

Photo above : Danielle Dries  pictured above with the minister in an inspiring final-year Aboriginal medical student from the Australian National University was the recipient of the MDA National and Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) Rural Health Bursary for 2016. Read full Story here

NACCHO Background Info

Read NACCHO Articles Cultural Safety

Aboriginal Health ” managing two worlds ” : How Katherine Hospital, once Australia’s worst for Indigenous health, became one of the best

Senior representatives from Australia’s medical colleges are converging on Canberra today for a roundtable aimed at improving treatment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

As reported by ABC NEWS this morning

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt will host the 12 colleges at Parliament House in a bid to boost outcomes and access to health care over the next decade.

The powerful groups include the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

“[They’re] important for me to partner with if I’m going to close the gap,” Mr Wyatt told the ABC.

“I believe that they can make an incredible difference, it’s just we’ve never asked them to in this sense.”

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s Closing the Gap report to Parliament last month showed six of the seven targets were off track, including life expectancy and child mortality.

Mr Wyatt earlier this year became Australia’s first-ever Indigenous federal government minister.

 

Aboriginal #Earlychildhood #Obesity Study : We need to reduce the prevalence of overweight/obesity in the first 3 years of life

“People who are obese in childhood are at increased risk of being obese in adulthood, which can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, some types of cancer, diabetes, and arthritis,”

Research found reducing consumption of sugary drinks and junk food from an early age could benefit the health of Indigenous children, but that this is just one part of the solution to improving weight status.

“We know that Indigenous families across Australia – in remote, regional, and urban settings – face barriers to accessing healthy foods. Therefore, efforts to reduce junk food consumption need to occur alongside efforts to increase the affordability, availability, and acceptability of healthy foods,”

 Ms Thurber, PhD Scholar, from the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health at ANU.

A major study into the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children has found programs and policies to promote healthy weight should target children as young as three.

Lead researcher Katie Thurber from The Australian National University (ANU) said the majority of Indigenous children in the national study had a health body Mass Index (BMI), but around 40 per cent were classified as overweight or obese by the time they reached nine years of age.

Download the Report Here Thurber BMI Trajectories LSIC

Latest national figures show obesity rates are 60 per cent higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples compared to non-Indigenous Australians.

In 2013, around 30 per cent of Indigenous children were classified as overweight or obese, and two thirds of Indigenous people over 15 years old were classified as overweight or obese.

Key messages

•  The majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children nationally have a healthy Body Mass Index
•  However, more than one in ten Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in Footprints in Time were already overweight or obese at 3 years of age, and there was a rapid onset of overweight/obesity between age 3 and 9 years
•  We need programs and policies to reduce the prevalence of overweight/obesity in the first 3 years of life, and to slow the onset of overweight/obesity from age 3-9 years
•  Reducing children’s consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and high-fat foods is one part of the solution to improving weight status at the population level
•  To enable healthy diets, we need to (1) create healthier environments and (2) improve the social determinants of health (such as financial security, housing, and community wellbeing). Creating healthy environments is complex, and will require both increasing the affordability, availability, and acceptability of healthy foods and decreasing the affordability, availability, and acceptability of unhealthy foods
•  Programs and policy to promote healthy weight need to be developed in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
•  Despite higher levels of disadvantage, most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children maintain a healthy weight; we need programs and policies that cultivate environments and circumstances that will enable all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to have a healthy start to life
 

Ms Thurber said improving weight status would have a major benefit in closing the gap in health between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

“Obesity is a leading contributor to the gap in health,” Ms Thurber said.

“We want to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities, as well as policy makers and service providers, to think about what will work best to promote healthy weight in those early childhood years.

“We want to start early, and identify the best ways for families and communities to support healthy diets, so that all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children can have a healthy start to life.”

The research used data from Footprints in Time, a national longitudinal study that has followed more than 1,000 Indigenous children since 2008. It is funded and managed by the Department of Social Services.

Professor Mick Dodson, Chair of the Steering Committee for the Footprints in Time Study and Director of the ANU National Centre for Indigenous Studies, said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children deserve the best possible start in life.

“This study shows just how important it is to support them, their families and their communities to provide a healthy diet and opportunities for physical activity,” Professor Dodson said.

Ms Thurber said using the Footprints in Time study, researchers for the first time were able to look at how weight status changes over time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, enabling them to identify pathways that help children maintain a healthy weight.

The research has been published in Obesity.