Feature tile - First Nations-lead pandemic reponse a triumph - two Aboriginal boys holding a sign 'too dangerous to stop in Wilcannia'

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: First Nations-led pandemic response a triumph

Feature Story

Telethon Kids representatives, including Dr Fiona Stanley, have written to The Lancet, describing Australia’s First Nations-led response to COVID-19 as ‘nothing short of a triumph’. Since the beginning of the pandemic in Australia, there have been only 60 First Nations cases nationwide. This represents only 0.7% of all cases, a considerable under-representation, as First Nations people make up 3% of the total population. Only 13% of First Nations cases have needed hospital treatment, none have been in intensive care, and there have been no deaths.

These results have shown how effective (and extremely cost-effective) giving power and capacity to Indigenous leaders is. The response has avoided major illness and deaths and avoided costly care and anguish.

To read the letter published in The Lancet click here.

Wiradjuri man appointed as a Professor

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) has welcomed the appointment of Peter O’Mara as a Professor of Newcastle University. The Chair of the RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Faculty, Professor O’Mara is Director of the University’s Thurru Indigenous Health Unit and a practicing GP in an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation, Tobwabba Aboriginal Medical Service. Professor O’Mara said becoming a GP was not something he grew up believing was possible, “I always had a strong interest in science, but in my early years I believed in the stereotypical view that studying and practicing medicine was for other people – doctors’ children and wealthy families.”

To view the full article about Professor O’Mara click click here.

Professor Peter O'Mara speaking into a microphone at a lecturn

Image source: GP News.

Face masks for our mob

The Australian Government Department of Health has developed an information sheet called How to keep our mob safe using face masks.

To access the editorial click here.

Aaron Simon standing against wall painted with Aboriginal art, wearing an Aboriginal art design face mask

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

Racial Violence in the Australian health system

The statistical story of Indigenous health and death, despite how stark, fails to do justice to the violence of racialised health inequities that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples continue to experience. The Australian health system’s Black Lives Matter moment is best characterised as indifferent; a “business as usual” approach that we know from experience betokens failure. In an article published in The Medical Journal of Australia a range of strategies have been offered, ‘not as a solution, but as some small steps towards a radical reimagining of the Black body within the Australian health system; one which demonstrates a more genuine commitment to the cries of “Black Lives Matter” from Blackfullas in this place right now.’

To read the full article click here.

back of BLM protester holding sign of face of Kevin Yow Yeh who dies in custody at 34 years

Image sourced Twitter @KevinYowYeh.

Water fluoridation required

Poor oral health profoundly affects a person’s ability to eat, speak, socialise, work and learn. It has an impact on social and emotional wellbeing, productivity in the workplace, and quality of life. A higher proportion of Australians who are socially disadvantaged have dental caries. Community water fluoridation is one of the most effective public health interventions of the 20th century. Its success has been attributed to wide population coverage with no concurrent behaviour change required. The authors of a recent article in The Medical Journal of Australia have said the denial of access to fluoridated drinking water for Indigenous Australians is of great concern and have urged the Commonwealth government to mandate that all states and territories maintain a minimum standard of 90% population access to fluoridated water.

To view the full article click here.

close up photo of three Aboriginal children smiling

Image source: University of Melbourne website.

Torres Strait communities taking back control of own healing

Torres Strait Island communities are leading their own healing by addressing the trauma, distress and long-term impacts caused by colonisation. The island communities of Kerriri, Dauan and Saibai will host a series of healing forums coordinated by The Healing Foundation, in conjunction with Mura Kosker Sorority Incorporated; the leading family and community wellbeing service provider in the Torres Strait. Identifying the need for healing in the Torres Strait, Mura Kosker Sorority Incorporated Board President Mrs Regina Turner said: “We believe that the forums will provide Torres Strait communities a voice for creating their own healing solutions.”

To view the Healing Foundation’s media release click ere.

Wabunau Geth dance group from Kaurareg Nation

Wabunau Geth dance group from Kaurareg Nation. Image source: The Healing Foundation.

New tool to manage healthcare trial

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples can trial a new tool to help them manage their healthcare with the launch of a pilot program in Perth of the GoShare digital platform which has supported over 1,000 patients so far. Launched by the Minister for Indigenous Australians, the Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, the pilot program enables doctors, nurses and other clinicians at St John of God Midland Public Hospital in Perth to prescribe a tailored information pack for patients. The electronic packs may include video-based patient stories, fact sheets, apps and tools on a range of health and wellness topics. They are prepared and adapted according to the patient’s health literacy levels and are being sent by email or text to improve their integrated care and chronic disease self-management.

To view the Australian Digital Health Agency’s media release click here.

GoShare Healthcare digital platform logo - clip art hand or hand

Image source: Healthily website.

NACCHO Aboriginal News: A free COVID-19 vaccine will be available throughout 2021, if promising trials prove successful

Prime Minister’s announcement on COVID-19 vaccines

Last week the Prime Minister announced Australia has secured onshore manufacturing agreements for two COVID-19 vaccines. This could mean a free vaccine for all Australians as early as January 2021 if proven safe and effective for use.

Advising the Australian Government on potential vaccines is the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation and the COVID-19 Vaccine and Treatments for Australia – Science and Industry Technical Advisory Group.

Remember to keep up to date with changing state, territory and border restrictions.

There are now 147 GP led respiratory clinics in operation across Australia, providing assessment of people with fever and respiratory symptoms and COVID-19 testing. You can find testing locations on the Health Direct website.

Cancer patients to be ‘wrapped in culture’ as they undergo treatment

Yorta Yorta woman Leah Lindrea-Morrison knows all too well the experience of undergoing cancer treatment, both as a patient and as someone watching a loved one go through it.

As a survivor of breast cancer, Ms Lindrea-Morrison counts herself lucky, and she has started a project to revive a local Aboriginal tradition to bring comfort to other patients.

  • The project will create a possum skin cloak to be used by Indigenous cancer patients
  • It will be made during a workshop bringing together local people touched by cancer
  • A film will also be made to show the value of adding a cultural healing element to the medical process.

Read the full story here.

Image source: ABC

Victoria continues to move towards a Treaty with First Nations people

The Victorian Government is helping Traditional Owners build stronger nations and to ensure every voice is heard on the path to Treaty. Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Gabrielle Williams today announced more than $4.3 million will be made available as part of the Traditional Owner Nation-Building Support Package to make communities stronger.

Funding will be used to support specific outcomes, such as improving governance arrangements, boosting youth engagement or building projects that will deliver economic and cultural benefits. Under the principles of the Nation-Building fund, it’s important Traditional Owners are engaged with their communities and are self-determining with strong identities, governance and knowledge, as well as economically sustainable and independent.

For further information click here.

Image source: Shutterstock

Government announces $13 million in funding for community nursing

Nurses are set to be recognised for their immense contributions in keeping Australians safe as a part of Nursing in the Community Week.

Starting on Monday, the week is about recognising the important role nurses have played during the pandemic and ensuring the most vulnerable are kept safe and healthy.

The federal government is planning to highlight the important role nurses have played for remote and regional communities, particularly in Indigenous and Defence Force health services.

Read the full story here.

Recent updates to Australian Immunisation Register

Improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is a national priority. The National Immunisation Program (NIP) for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people provides additional vaccines to help improve the health of Indigenous people, and close the gap between Indigenous and non- Indigenous people in health and life expectancy.

Until recently, the AIR used information from Medicare to record whether a person identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

Read the full article here.

Aboriginal child receiving an injection.vaccination

Image source: Deadly Vibe website.

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service August Newsletter

Winnunga AHCS August Newsletter is out! To read the newsletter click here.

New COVID-19 mental health clinics in Victoria

Minster for Health, Greg Hunt, says from Monday 14 September 2020, Victorians will have access to additional mental health support with 15 new dedicated mental health clinics opening to the public.

“The clinics, announced on 17 August as part of a $31.9 million federal government mental health package to support Victorians during the COVID-19 pandemic, have been rapidly rolled out across the state at a cost of $26.9 million.

Image Source: Department of Health

“There will be nine HeadtoHelp clinics located in Greater Melbourne and six in regional Victoria. The locations are: Greater Melbourne: Berwick, Frankston, Officer, Hawthorn, Yarra Junction, West Heidelberg, Broadmeadows, Wyndham Vale, Brunswick East and Regional Victoria: Warragul, Sale, Bendigo, Wodonga, Sebastopol and Norlane.”

To read the full press release click here.

Image source: Department of Health

Adverse Childhood Experience Coordinator – Yerin, NSW Central Coast

Yerin is seeking an experienced Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Case Coordinator to work with children, young people and their families on the NSW Central Coast, Darkinjung country wo are experiencing multiple vulnerabilities and whose children are at risk or have experienced an adverse childhood trauma. Through screening children and families, you will provide appropriate intervention care by arranging the required services to address the Adverse Childhood Trauma.

Read the full position description here.

To apply and know about other job vacancies at Yerin click here.

2021 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Eye Health Conference

Indigenous Eye Health has announced the dates for the 2021 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Eye Health Conference (previously the ‘Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 National Conference’). The conference will take place virtually from 20 April – 22 April 2021.

The full conference announcement can be read on the IEH website, here.

NACCHO Aboriginal News: Input Required to Renew Indigenous Suicide Prevention Strategy

 

Input required to renew Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy

Marking World Suicide Prevention Day, Gayaa Dhuwi (Proud Spirit) Australia (GDPSA) announced the renewal of the 2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy (NATSISPS) and called for stakeholders to make sure their voices are heard during the process.

GDPSA CEO Mr Tom Brideson explained, “The NATSISPS was released in May 2013. It was developed by Indigenous experts and leaders in mental health and suicide prevention and remains a sound evidence-based strategic response to Indigenous suicide. However, it also responded to a set of circumstances that have changed since 2013 and that require it to be renewed.

“GDPSA would like to hear from you to inform the NATSISPS renewal process. To that end, between now and the end of 2020, we will be hosting a number of targeted subject matter roundtables and Zoom consultations with particular groups, but there is also the opportunity to participate through our website and to make submissions against a Discussion Paper we have developed.”

Professor Pat Dudgeon, GDPSA director and National Director of the Centre of Best Practice in Indigenous Suicide Prevention (CBPATSISP) continued, Australian governments announced the renewal of the NATSISPS, alongside the development of a new mainstream national suicide prevention plan, in the 2017 Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan. GDPDSA has been asked by the Australian Government to renew the NATSISPS and will work closely with CBPATSISP and the Prime Minister’s National Suicide Prevention Taskforce to that end. We also want to hear from a range of stakeholders and – on behalf of both GDPSA and CBPATSISP – I strongly encourage you to participate – including Indigenous and non-Indigenous stakeholders.”

GDPSA Chair Professor Helen Milroy said, “Preliminary advice we have provided to the Taskforce are that there are two priority areas for consideration in NATSISPS renewal. The first is establishing Indigenous governance of Indigenous suicide prevention including at the national, regional and community levels. The second is establishing what is important to include in integrated approaches to Indigenous suicide prevention in our communities. In particular, with reference to ATSISPEP’s Solutions That Work report, and the to-be-released learnings from the Indigenous-specific suicide prevention trial sites. This includes consideration of clinical and cultural support elements of mental health and suicide prevention service provision.

To find out more or to make a submission please visit: https://www.gayaadhuwi.org.au/sp-strategy-renewal/

NACCHO highlights ACCHO work on World Suicide Prevention Day

National Indigenous Times (NIT) feature:

Currently, suicide is the fifth leading cause of death for Indigenous people in Australia, with rates twice as high as that for non-Indigenous Australians. ACCHOs are delivering place-based, community-led strategies and solutions to decrease suicide rates.

“For NACCHO and our communities, reducing suicide rates and improving the mental health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has always been a priority,” said NACCHO Chair, Donnella Mills.

“We know our Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations are best placed to deliver these essential services because they understand the issues our people go through.”

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) in WA are working tirelessly to ensure suicide prevention is a top priority in their region.

“Every loss of life due to suicide is tragic because it is preventable. What we are trying to do in the Kimberley is trying to better understand the reasons why the rates are so much higher, they are twice that of other Aboriginal people in Australia and three times the rate of non-Aboriginal Australians,” said Rob McPhee, KAMS Chief Operating Officer.

“It is really about getting to the root cause of that over representation and being able to work with communities to be able to address the issues associated with them.”

KAMS has been heavily involved with the Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial which is currently in its fifth and final year.

To read the full article click here.

Empowered Young Leaders Forum 2019’ in Broome WA

Health and safety for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Three recent reports and a new book share some critical messages for addressing systemic failures that are harming Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, reports Associate Professor Megan Williams, a Wiradjuri scholar from the University of Sydney.

Her article is published on what would have been the 58th birthday of Tanya Day, whose death in custody in December 2017 is the subject of one of these reports. Across social media today, supporters shared photographs of themselves wearing pink to pay their respects, using the hashtag #PinkforTanya, in response to a request by her family.

Commission recommendations, Inquest findings and Ombudsman reports about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s health and wellbeing are frequently quoted in attempts to improve systems and prevent further harms and deaths occurring. Their pages often include recommendations for mainstream, non-Indigenous workforce development, ranging from disciplinary actions to supervision and training.

To read the full story published in Croakey click here.

 

Stronger Together, There’s More to Say After #RUOK? 

Steven Satour, Stronger Together Campaign Manager, R U OK? says looking out for your mob is more important than ever in 2020, as it has been a challenging year for everyone and circumstances have made it even more important for us to stay connected.

“We know as a community we are Stronger Together. We know knowledge is culture and emotional wellness can be learned from our family members, so sharing resources, educating each other and providing guidance on what to say if someone answers they are not okay amongst our families is vital,” says Mr Satour.

Learn what to say next at www.ruok.org.au

Johnathan Thurston opens doors for Logan youth with ‘deadly’ new program

A new Deadly Choices jersey will be launched at Marsden State High School on September 11 by JT Academy Managing Director Johnathan Thurston – a key part of the JTConnect program that encourages the youth of Logan to believe in yourself and have the courage and confidence and pursue employment.

The JTConnect program is an initiative of the Johnathan Thurston Academy, sponsored by the Deadly Choices’ Indigenous health campaign, and is designed to empower young people to believe in themselves and be the difference. Students who complete the JTConnect program and are up to date with their 715 Health Check through their participating community controlled health service will receive a JTConnect Deadly Choices jersey.

“I’m excited about the new Deadly Choices jersey collaboration with the JT Academy and JTConnect – the program has already visited a number of high schools around Cairns and Logan,” Thurston said.  “We truly believe that by instilling a strong sense of self belief, confidence and courage will empower young people to pursue a career or a job for a better life.

“In everything we do, we aim to inspire our youth to feel proud and strong with their identity and who they are as individuals and this program will go a long way towards this goal.”

IAHA call for the long-term retention of temporary MBS telehealth items

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), the peak organisation for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce, calls on the government to extend access to Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) telehealth items for allied health professionals.

Introduced in March 2020 in response to the impacts of COVID-19 on the ability of people to access in person care, 36 new telehealth allied health items were included on the MBS, replicating existing MBS allied health items traditionally provided face-to-face. Scheduled to expire at the end of September 2020, IAHA joins calls from other stakeholders for the longerterm retention of these telehealth items on the MBS.

Read the full IAHA press release here.

Feature Image - Aboriginal boy head in hands

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Survey to review mental health youth services

Mental health youth services survey

If you work or volunteer with an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation or other Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander organisations you are invited to participate in a short headspace online survey and share your views on issues of access, engagement and cultural safety of mental health supports for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. All participants go into the draw to win a $100 voucher!

To view a survey flyer click here and to access the survey click here.

Young Aboriginal girl crying

Image source: newsinmind.com

NT outreach services improve hearing impairment

Ear and hearing health is vital for overall health and quality of life. Ear disease and associated hearing loss can have long-lasting impacts on education, wellbeing and employment. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are more likely than non-Indigenous children to experience ear and hearing problems.

An Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report has shown positive results are being achieved by hearing health outreach services provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in the NT. The report shows that in 2019, 2,156 audiology; 770 ear, nose and throat teleotology; and 1,119 Clinical Nurse Specialist services were provided. Among children and young people who received treatment, 61% had improved hearing loss and 71% had improved hearing impairment.

To access a more detailed summary of the report click here.

Health professional checking ear of Aboriginal boy

Image source: Menzies School of Health Research website.

National cancer screening health worker engagement project

The University of Melbourne is undertaking a project to understand how the primary healthcare workforce engages with the national cancer screening program (bowel, breast and cervical). Findings from the study will lead to the development of materials and initiatives to assist in boosting cancer screening participation.

During the first phase of the project the researchers are interested in interviewing nurses, GPs and Practice Managers to understand more about their role, their go-to-resources when they need more information about the screening programs and resources they would like to have access to.

Everyone that will be interviewed will be reimbursed with a $50 Gift Card. We intend to carry out interviews during the month of September. The interviews will be recorded with your permission.

For information about how to become involved in the project please contact Ebony Verbunt, Research Assistant, University of Melbourne email ebony.verbunt@unimelb.edu.au or phone 0429 928 039.

Aboriginal male & female cartoon figures with ages for breast, bowel, cervical cancer screening tests

Image source: Cancer Council Victoria website.

COVID-19 information to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities survey

Since the coronavirus outbreak began, it has been extremely important to make sure health information about the virus reaches people in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The Australian Government Department of Health has worked with Indigenous communications agencies to produce a range of communications materials to help share information about the virus and inform communities about how they can stay safe.

You can provide feedback on how effective these campaign materials have been in reaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities by taking this survey.

7 Keep Our Mob Safe resource images e.g. posters

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

Residential aged care risk assessment urgently required

The AMA has warned urgent improvements in aged care and a coordinated response from all levels of government are needed to prevent the pandemic outbreak in Victorian aged care homes spreading into residential aged care nationwide. The AMA has called for every residential aged care home in Australia to be urgently and comprehensively assessed for its ability to safely care for residents during the COVID-19 pandemic.

To view the AMA’s media release click here.

Elders hands in carer's hand

Image source: Aged Care Guide.

ACT paves way for raising incarceration age

The Australian Capital Territory’s Legislative Assembly has voted to raise the age of criminal responsibility from 10 to 14, paving the way for other jurisdictions to reform an outmoded law which disproportionately affects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

To read the related Amnesty International Australia media release click here.

Aboriginal child's hands on jail barred overlaid with Aboriginal flag.

Image source: Amnesty International Australia.

COVID-19 vaccine will not be compulsory

Health Minister, Greg Hunt has confirmed that although any potential coronavirus vaccine will be strongly encouraged, it will not be made compulsory.

To read a transcript of Minister Hunt’s interview with David Koch on the Sunrise program click here.

QLD – Cairns or ACT – Canberra

PT Cultural Lead x 1 (Identified Position)

CRANAplus, the peak professional body for health professionals working in remote and isolated areas across Australia, has a vacancy for a Cultural Lead. This identified position, available to Aboriginal, First Nations, and Torres Strait Island people, will collaborate closely with internal and external stakeholders to develop and drive priorities supporting CRANAplus’ Organisational Strategic Plan.

You can view the CRANAplus website here and find details of the Cultural Lead position here.

CRANAplus logo & image of 4-wheel drive in outback

ACT – Canberra

FT Flexible Education Classroom Teacher  x 1 (Identified Position) – 6 months with the possibility of permanency

The ACT Education Directorate is seeking a reflective practitioner who: is able to create dynamic learning environments and authentically personalised education programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students; has a demonstrated understanding of trauma and neuroscience informed education practices; and is passionate about inclusion, social justice, innovation and equity. Flexible Education is a community of schools/settings for students with complex and challenging needs including Murrumbidgee Education and Training Centre, Muliyan, Boomanulla, the Hospital School, the education program at The Cottage and Distance Education.

For more details about the position click here.

Aboriginal youth and teacher against graffitied wall

Image source: School News Australia.

Feature Image tile - Aboriginal Health News Coalition of Peaks Close the Gap Interview Save the Date NITV The Point

NACCHO Aboriginal News: Coalition of Peaks Housing Interview on NITV

Tune in this Sunday 16 August at 7pm for the FINAL exclusive installment of interviews with Coalition of Peaks members working to Close the Gap. This week Jamie Lowe, National Native Title Council and Josie Douglas, Central Land Council, join John Paul Janke from NITV’s The Point to discuss housing, a really important issue that impacts all areas of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s lives.

Australian Medical Students’ Association declare climate health emergency

The Australian Medical Students’ Association has joined Australia’s peak medical groups, representing around 90,000 or 75% of the nation’s doctors, in calling on Prime Minister Scott Morrison to commit to a climate-focused health recovery from COVID-19. A joint letter has been coordinated by Doctors for the Environment Australia (DEA), an independent organisation of medical doctors protecting health through care of the environment.

For further information about DEA and to view the joint letter to PM Scott Morrison click here.

Australian peak medical bodies, 10 in total

CHF calls for mandatory supply of health worker face masks

The Consumers Health Forum of Australia (CHF) has warned an inadequate supply of face masks in some hospitals and widespread confusion about when and what masks are needed represents a serious public health hazard that endangers many Australians.

CHF CEO, Leanne Wells said “The ongoing problems with the supply of masks generally, and particularly of hospital-grade masks, highlight the need for mandatory measures to ensure all health settings are adequately supplied.”

To view CHF’s 11 August 2020 Media Release click here.

Two health workers with PPE

Image source: AAP: David Mariuz – ABC News.

Boots for All charity sports store

Located in Melbourne, Boots for All is the only charity sports store in Australia. BFA was created in 2006 to provide high-quality recycled and new sports equipment at low prices to enable as many Australians as possible — no matter where they live or their economic circumstances — to participate in sport and physical activity.

Relying on donations from individuals, sporting clubs and sports apparel companies, Boots for All provides a valuable service for families in the local community, as well as distributing sports equipment across Australia, including many Indigenous communities and organisations.

Funds generated by Boots for All are used to provide training and employment opportunities for young people in the Melbourne area.

Boots for All has a broad range of new and high-quality used sports equipment: the main items are football boots (and footballs), running shoes, basketball gear, tennis and cricket gear, and team uniforms. All at bargain prices!

The Boots for All sports store has been closed for the past several months due to COVID-19, but purchases can be made online or by calling the CEO (and founder) Joanne Rockwell on (0408) 102 918.

Boots for All is currently running an online promotion on the sale of football boots — good quality footy boots are available for as little as $10.

For more information or to purchase apparel please visit here.

Aboriginal kids legs with boots, Boots for All logo

Image source: Boots for All website.

Lack of Australia-wide preventative program investment

A successful remote cattle station youth-at-risk program, that has been operating for the past 30 years without any public funding, has received $4.5 million from the NT government to run intensive youth camps for the next five years.

Meagan Krakouer, Director at the National Suicide Prevention and Trauma Recovery Project, said the funding is a “step in the right direction” however “small steps, even if in the right direction, are not enough”- there is a lack of Australia-wide investment in preventative programs and funding to date has been insufficient to make a real difference in people’s lives.

To read the full National Indigenous Times article click here.

Photo of Seven Emu Stattion owner Frank Shadforth standing in front of bush vehicle in outback

Seven Emu Station owner Frank Shadforth works with at risk kids to develop life skills and cultural connection. Photo supplied by Office of the NT Chief Minister.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Queensland contributes $10 million to Closing the Gap

 

Queensland to contribute nearly $10 million towards Closing the Gap agreement

The Palaszczuk Government will support the implementation of the new national Closing the Gap agreement, with $9.3 million as part of a national joint funding effort with the federal government and other states and territories.

The Federal Government today announced that it would provide $46.5 million over four years to building the capacity of the Indigenous community-controlled sector, to be matched by the state and territory jurisdictions, based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

Minister for Fire and Emergency Services and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Craig Crawford said that investment in building an effective community-controlled sector will be critical to improving life outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Read the full media release here.

Draft Prescribing Competencies Framework input request

NPS MedicineWise, as the stewards of Quality Use of Medicine in Australia, has undertaken a review of the Prescribing Competencies Framework, to ensure the Framework remains relevant and continues to support safe and quality prescribing for all prescribers.

Feedback is being sought from practitioners and stakeholders on the new draft framework by COB Friday 4 September 2020. The feedback will be used to finalise the revised framework document for publication.

The revised Prescribing Competencies Framework can be viewed here.

To access the questionnaire relating to this revised Framework click here.

Photo of Aboriginal hands holding pills

Image source: The Medical Journal of Australia.

NT diabetes in pregnancy rates rise

The burden of diabetes in pregnancy has grown substantially in the NT over the last three decades and is contributing to more babies being born at higher than expected birth-weights according to a new study undertaken by the Menzies School of Health Research.

The study, Diabetes during pregnancy and birth-weight treads among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory of Australia over 30 years, was recently published in the inaugural edition of The Lancet Regional Health – Western Pacific.

The full study can be found here.

Aboriginal woman's hands on her pregnant belly painted with red, white, black and yellow dotted concentric circles

Image source: Bobby-Lee Hille, the Milyali Art project.

Community collaboration delivers better oral health

Aboriginal children in rural Australia have up to three times the rate of tooth decay compared to other Australian children. Recently published research demonstrates the benefits of working alongside communities to establish the most effective ways to implement evidence-based strategies, and sustain them.

Co-design is about sharing knowledge to enable long-term, positive change to complex problems and enables much needed health-care services to be delivered in ways that strengthen communities, respect culture and build capacity.

Aboriginal girl with toothbrush in her mouth

Image Source: The Conversation.

To read more about the research Outcomes of a co-designed, community-led oral health promotion program for Aboriginal children in rural and remote communities in New South Wales, Australia click here.

Job Alerts

FT Suicide Prevention Officers x 2

PT Aboriginal Dental / Allied Health Administration Officer x 1 – 3 days/week

Yerin Aboriginal Health Services Limited are looking for highly motivated Aboriginal people to undertake the above roles at their modern new clinic in Wyong, NSW.

For further information about these positions click here.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Health Professional Expertise Sought for RPHCM Review

Health professional expertise sought for RPHCM review

SA Flinders University’s Centre for Remote Health would like to disseminate an invitation to our health professionals to participate in the review of the Remote Primary Health Care Manuals (RPHCM). The manuals are used by healthcare workers, including remote area nurses, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners, doctors, midwives, nurse practitioners, and allied health professionals.

The RPHCM suite was created in 2014 by practising remote health clinicians to support and promote good clinical practice in primary health care in central, northern and remote Australia. The suite of four manuals are: specifically designed for remote practice; current and evidence-based; in plain English and easy to access; and culturally appropriate.

The manuals provide the legislated clinical guidelines for remote primary healthcare staff in the NT, and are also widely used in clinical care, health service systems, education and orientation throughout the NT, remote SA, the Ngaanyatjarra and Kimberley regions in WA, and beyond.

For further information on the RPHCM click here.

In particular, the Centre for Remote Health are keen to engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health staff who may join the editorial committee or an expert advisory group.

Click here to download the invitation to participate letter, including an expression of interest form, which introduces the review process and encourages health professionals to collaborate in the project as a reviewer or expert adviser.

Keeping our mob safe – help for mental health and financial support

Lady looking at laptop

Written and supplied by the Australian Government Department of Health, Canberra.

Coronavirus has changed the way we live and connect with people for now. Change can be hard. Many people are having problems, both financially and mentally. During times like this, it is important to know where you can get help.

Social and emotional wellbeing support services

With big changes in our lives, it is normal to feel worried, stressed, sad, tired or angry. Talking with family, friends, or someone you trust can help. You can also talk with an Aboriginal health worker or your GP. There are a range of services to help people who are feeling upset or worried. Don’t hesitate to ask for support when needed and look out for others that you think might need help.

For more information click here.

Share your views to improve the Australian COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines

What do you think about the Australian National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce website, and the guidelines and flowcharts for care of people with COVID-19?

You can see them at covid19evidence.net.au

The National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce want to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement in the work of the Taskforce and their guidelines and flowcharts.

They are inviting Australian healthcare practitioners to participate in a brief (15 minute) survey. Participation is voluntary, anonymous, and very much appreciated.

To tell the Taskforce team what you think, please click here before Monday 17 August 2020.

A summary of the results of the survey, including no identifying information, will be used by the Taskforce team to improve their work.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Dr Tari Turner, Senior Research Fellow, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University on tari.turner@monash.edu 

The National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce is funded by, the Australian Government Department of Health, the Victorian Government Department of Health and Human Services, the Ian Potter Foundation and the Walter Cottman Endowment Fund, managed by Equity Trustees.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Research Alerts : Download @AIHW Report Indigenous primary health care results : Our ACCHO’s play a critical role in helping to improve the health of our mob

 ” Comprehensive and culturally appropriate primary health care services play a key role in improving the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians through prevention, early intervention, health education, and the timely identification and management of physical and psychological issues. “

Download the 77 Page AIHW Report HERE

Indigenous-primary-health-care-results-from-the-OSR-and-nKPI-collections

Primary health care organisations play a critical role in helping to improve the health of Indigenous Australians.

In 2018–19:

To this end, the Australian Government provides funding through the IAHP to organisations delivering Indigenous-specific primary health care services (referred to hereafter as organisations).

These organisations, designed to be accessible to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients, are administered and run by:

  • Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations (ACCHOs)
  • state/territory/local health services
  • non-government organisations (NGOs), such as women’s health services (a small proportion of services).

They vary in size, location, governance structure, length of time in operation, workforce composition, sources of funding, the services they offer, the ways in which they operate (for example, stand-alone or part of a consortium), and the needs of their clients.

What they all share in common is a holistic approach to meeting the needs of their Indigenous clients, which often involves addressing a complex mix of health conditions.

Each organisation provides contextual information about their organisation to the OSR once each financial year (covering the period July–June). The OSR includes all activities of the funded organisations, regardless of the percentage of those activities funded by IAHP.

This chapter presents a profile of organisations delivering Indigenous-specific primary health care services, including staffing levels, client numbers, client contacts, episodes of care and services provided. It excludes data from organisations that received funding only for maternal and child health services.

Trends over time are presented where possible, noting that the organisations providing data can vary over time which may limit comparability for some purposes (see Technical notes and Glossary for more information). Also, in 2018–19, the OSR collection underwent significant change and was scaled back to include only ‘core’ items. Plans are underway to reintroduce key items in a staged approach over the next few years.

The following boxes show key results for organisations providing Indigenous-specific primary health care in 2018–19.

Clicking HERE will go to more information on the selected topic.

Aboriginal Health #CoronaVirus #Nutrition News Alert No 69 : May 22 #KeepOurMobSafe #OurJobProtectOurMob : The #COVID19 pandemic has a silver lining with possible solutions to food affordability and availability in remote communities

Part 2 AIG Press Release

Originally published HERE

We know prices are too expensive in Aboriginal community stores around the NT. To prove the point however, we went shopping. The results from our Market Basket survey will shock you.

In April and May, 2020 our shoppers went into 9 stores in the Top End with the same shopping list made up of essential and popular products.

Shopping list:

  • Mi Goreng Fried Noodles 5pk
  • Weetbix 375g
  • Weetbix 575g
  • Deb Instant Potato Plain 115g
  • Bush Oven Bread 700g
  • Bushells tea bags rounds 200 pack
  • San Remo Spirals small No 15 500g
  • Palmolive soap gold 4pack
  • Colgate Toothpaste Maximum Floride Cool Mint 110g
  • Hazedenes Chicken Cuts 2kg Bag
  • Eggs Large Dozen 600g

And the results…..

Our key finding was the store managed by AIG has the cheapest prices for all products on the list – blue ribbon for us! For all the market basket results click here.

More importantly though, how is it possible that one store can charge almost $25 more for the same basket of products? Obviously, it’s because the prices are higher. The trickier and more important question to answer is why?

Lets just break it down a little, and look at chicken prices as an example of how prices influence food security.

Barunga store charges $9.40 for 2kg of Hazledene chicken cuts and Beswick store (which is run by the Commonwealth entity Outback Stores) charges $16.80. Its only 25km down the road! Another community store charges $24.60 for the same product.

Why the price difference?

There are three reasons why the prices are different between stores: rebates, ethics and freight.

Rebates

A rebate is money paid by the supplier to store management stock their products. Our research shows rebates can range between 1.5 and 25%. Rebates are calculated on each product and the higher the rebate, the more expensive the product becomes. Coke and tobacco reap the highest rebates in community stores. Rebates are given to the store management groups, and not the stores themselves.

Rebate revenue is worth millions of dollars in the Northern Territory alone. Look for example at the Commonwealth owned Outback Stores which last year made more than $2.6 million in rebates https://outbackstores.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/OS-Annual-Report-19-web-spread.pdf through raising the cost of products in store. That is a lot of tobacco and Coke!

AIG does not accept rebates because we believe it is unethical and drives up prices in the store which further disadvantages the vulnerable and threatens food security.

Freight

Usually listed as the primary reason for high prices in community stores, but in reality, has a far lesser impact on the actual prices of products in the store.

Freight is the cost of getting the products from the supplier to the store. If a store is very remote, then the freight is obviously going to be more expensive. Freight should be cheaper for the larger management groups because they order in bulk which reduces the actual freight costs further.

AIG is a small store management group and if we can have low prices while paying freight, it is proof that freight is not as expensive as people are led to believe.

Keep comparing food prices

We want to disrupt how community stores are managed in the NT through creating transparency about prices in stores. Its hard for people in remote communities to understand the situation they are in if they can’t compare prices in their stores to other communities.

AIG has created online shopping for the Barunga and Timber Creek communities which is a great service, but equally important is being able to provide transparency the prices we charge so others can compare to the prices in their stores. We don’t accept rebates from suppliers, and we don’t make a profit on fruit and vegetables. This is how our prices are low. If we can do it, other stores can do the same.

Check out the store and the prices https://barunga-store.myshopify.com or https://wirib-store.myshopify.com/

Aboriginal Health #CoronaVirus @NITV News Alert No 56 : May 6 #OurJobProtectOurMob : Travel bans to remote communities will stay put amidst easing COVID-19 restrictions elsewhere around Australia, but virus risks for Indigenous people living in cities and urban areas also remain high

 ” While COVID-19 restrictions are easing in some states and territories, remote Aboriginal communities in lockdown will remain off-limits to outsiders.

The Northern Territory, where almost 30% of the population is Indigenous, has begun a “roadmap to the new normal”, re-opening pools and parks and giving the green light to fishing with a mate.

As other states consider their own watered-down measures, there has been confusion around what this means for vulnerable Indigenous populations.

Shahni Wellington writing for NITV News

Pat Turner has been interviewed for NITV-The Point and the story will go on-air tonight, Wednesday 5 May at 8.30pm

In March, the federal government announced internal border controls that could restrict access to areas that include Indigenous communities under the Commonwealth Biosecurity Act.

The measures were an effort to protect vulnerable populations, with many Aboriginal communities opting to close their own borders, and were put in place until at least June 18.

While the enforcement of those restrictions are the responsibility of each jurisdiction, the lifting of the restrictions will be subject to a decision through the national cabinet.

Minister for Indigenous Australians, Ken Wyatt, confirmed to ABC radio on Tuesday that the lockdowns remain in place, including all 76 remote communities in the Northern Territory.

“You’re better off being patient than to end up with COVID-19 and possible death,” Minister Wyatt said.

“We only have to look at the aged care facility in New South Wales where the virus was brought into the facility and they’ve lost 15 people now, senior Australians, and we would run a similar risk in a community if somebody brought the virus in inadvertently and we end up losing, and when I say us, I mean our people, will lose Elders and senior people.”

The most at-risk areas to be placed in lockdown was identified by state and territory governments, with anyone entering those biosecurity boundaries needing to self-isolate for 14 days.

In Western Australia, there are fines up to $50,000 for entering a remote Aboriginal community without an appropriate reason.

Urban concerns

While remote Aboriginal communities can remain isolated to minimise the risks of catching COVID-19, the same options don’t exist for urban areas.

The federal government has partnered with the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) to combat potential outbreaks and ease socio-economic impacts.

Gudanji-Arrernte woman and head of NACCHO, Pat Turner, said people living in cities need to remain vigilant.

“The lifting of the restrictions remains a very grave concern in terms of what conditions need to be in place for us to lift the bio-security restrictions, particularly in the remote areas,” Ms Turner said.

“But I feel that the greatest risk for our people remains in the cities, where everyone is champing at the bit to have the restrictions lifted.”

According to the ABS, almost 80% of the Aboriginal population are living in urban areas, with a proportion of 35% living in capital cities.

Ms Turner said there are barriers for Indigenous people living in urban areas in accessing proper treatment or being able to properly self-isolate.

“State and territory governments have to assist with those processes, because of over-crowded housing, we just do not have the capacity within our communities to self isolate as many other Australians can do in their own homes,” she said.

“If we still have community transmission then our people – and there are many, many, many, First Nations people who live in Australian cities – I am extremely concerned.”