NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #SuicidePrevention Recommendation 4 of 10 : Why does an Aboriginal ACCHO Health Service in one of Australia’s worst suicide regions have to self-fund #MentalHealth roles

“I think it’s appalling that we have to raise Medicare funds to subsidise services when the need is clearly demonstrated in umpteen coroner’s reports.

There are many gaps in the services that are currently available across Australia.

We welcome Labor policies to move SEWB funding into the federal health department, as well as its proposed multi-disciplinary teams of paediatricians, social workers, psychologists and Aboriginal counsellors.

But I criticize the “piecemeal approach” of the major parties. What governments don’t get is that the overall needs based funding required for Aboriginal community controlled health organisations (ACCHOs) to deliver fully on comprehensive primary healthcare hasn’t been built in to our model of care funding.”

As a result, the sector has had to seek additional funding for services like SEWB, instead of receiving a sufficient level as the base

We call for money to go to ACCHOs instead of mainstream services for Aboriginal healthcare.

We have a much better understanding of the issues [Aboriginal communities] deal with day in and day out. I also believe there should be workers engaged in the communities who are available out of hours, because most people don’t suicide between 9 and 5.”

Pat Turner AM  CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, told BuzzFeed News it was unacceptable, given the situation in the Kimberley

“We need those two positions given everything that’s happening in the community. People know them, they trust them, they will work with them. And it takes a long time to build up that trust with Aboriginal people.

Derby Aboriginal Health Service ( DAHS CEO )  Lynette Henderson-Yates said she is unsure how much longer DAHS will be able to find the $330,000 funding

Recommendation 4.Address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide rates

  • Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities
  • Fund new Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management
  • Fund regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance; and
  • Provide accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

More info https://www.naccho.org.au/media/voteaccho/

 Part 1 This is what it’s actually like to work on the frontline of Australia’s youth suicide Crisis

 “Alongside its beauty and isolation, the Kimberley is also known for its suicide rate. Last year, Indigenous health minister Ken Wyatt told the World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference: “If [the Kimberley] was a nation, it would have the highest suicide rate in the world.”

About eight years ago, Derby was at the epicentre of this ongoing catastrophe. In 2011 three young people died by suicide in as many weeks. The following year, the Aboriginal community of Mowanjum, 10km out of town, was rocked by the suicides of six people within six months.

Trent Ozies, 27, is a Djugun man from the Broome area who grew up in Derby. Ozies also has Filipino, Chinese and European heritage, as well as a gentle manner and a thoroughly infectious laugh. But he is grave as he recalls this terrible period.

“It was almost as if we went full circle,” he says. “Someone passed. Had their funeral, had the wake, someone passed. Had the funeral, had the wake, someone passed.

Read article in full HERE

Part 2

An Aboriginal health service in one of Australia’s worst suicide affected regions faces losing its psychologist and Aboriginal mental health worker, after money for the positions was cut in a state funding restructure last year.

The community controlled Derby Aboriginal Health Service (DAHS), located 220km east of Broome in Western Australia’s Kimberley region, delivers social and emotional wellbeing (SEWB) services in Derby.

The region has long struggled with the issue of Indigenous youth suicide. Coroner Ros Fogliani’s recent report into the deaths of 13 Aboriginal children and young people who died in the Kimberley found that 12 had died by suicide, the tragedies prompted by widespread poverty and intergenerational trauma.

The five person SEWB team in Derby is considered a model for how community mental health outreach should work in remote towns, according to Rob McPhee, the deputy CEO of Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services.

But in a state funding restructure last year, DAHS lost funding for psychologist Maureen Robertson and mental health worker Ash Bin Omar and is now covering the $330,000 per year with money raised through Medicare consultations. SEWB services are generally funded by the Commonwealth.

Omar, who works with young Aboriginal men and boys, is also running a new project aimed at families with a low to medium risk of having their children removed to try and improve the situation and keep families together.

“For us not to have a psychologist and an Aboriginal mental health worker is really crazy,” Henderson-Yates said. “To my mind, there’s no debate about whether you have them or not have them.”

Senator Pat Dodson, who will become Indigenous affairs minister if Labor wins the election on May 18, told BuzzFeed News a Labor government would look to provide Commonwealth funding for two positions in Derby.

Labor has pledged $30 million over three years to support Aboriginal mental health and SEWB services in three high-need regions, including the Kimberley.

“If you don’t have these people being employed through the community health services, it just makes the effort to try and assist young people from taking these extreme measures totally impossible,” Dodson said.

Indigenous health minister Ken Wyatt told BuzzFeed News in a statement that the $19.6 million for suicide prevention pledged by the Coalition “builds on existing funding” provided through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) in the department of prime minister and cabinet.

The sum includes $15 million for the rollout of mental health first aid training in 12 Indigenous communities and for youth, as well as continuing training for frontline workers. Another $4.6 million will go towards community-led programs — designed to complement existing services — in areas such as leadership, sports and culture.

The IAS currently funds about $55 million per year for SEWB, Wyatt said.

If you or someone you know needs help, you can visit your nearest ACCHO or call Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue Australia on 1300 22 4636.

 

NACCHO #VoteACCHO Aboriginal Health and #SuicidePrevention debate @TracyWesterman Suicide risk factors are being incorrectly stated as suicide causes : and Comments from Harley Thompson @TheAHCWA Youth Co-ordinator

” First, we need to recognise the significant societal contributors to escalating rates of child suicides.

And we need to start with changing the narrative on indigenous suicides.

The core driver is that indigenous suicide is badly understood and myths about so-called causes of suicide are portrayed as if they exist as a direct linear relationship.

Suicide risk factors are being incorrectly stated as suicide causes and this is critical to this whole issue. Alcohol, poverty, abuse, colonialisation — these are not causes. They are risk factors, not causes. It is vital we understand this distinction to ensure adequate prevention efforts.

So, what separates Person A, who has been abused and becomes suicidal, from Person B, who has been abused and does not?

While this is an essential question, we do not have clear evidence of these critical causal pathways ” 

Adjunct professor Tracy Westerman is a clinical psychologist and proud Njamal woman from the Pilbara region of Western Australia. She was named Western Australia’s Australian of the Year last year for working to reduce the burden of mental ill health and suicide in Aboriginal communities. See full article from The Australian below Part 1

 ” Labor’s response to rising rates of indigenous youth suicide is a vote of confidence in Aboriginal health organisations such as the one Ms Thompson works for. A Shorten Labor government would make an “urgent investment” of $29.6 million in those Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations that already treat 350,000 indigenous people a year.

The money would be used to create regionally based multi­disciplinary teams of paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and ­Aboriginal health practitioners tasked with suicide prevention in vulnerable communities. “

What Ms Harley Thompson has learned in her role as a youth ­program co-ordinator at the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia has been seized upon by politicians scrambling to respond to Australia’s indigenous youth suicide crisis. See Full Story part 2 below 

Read all NACCHO 130+ Aboriginal Health and Suicide Articles Here 

#VoteACCHO Recommendation 4 of 10.

Address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide rates

  • Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities
  • Fund new Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management
  • Fund regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance; and
  • Provide accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

See all 10 #VoteACCHO recommendations HERE

Part 1

Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion has allocated $134 million for indigenous suicide prevention. This crudely translates to $248,000 per death based on the suicide mortality rate — without adding state funding into the mix.

From the Australian April 20

Despite this, and as a country facing a growing tragedy of generational indigenous child suicides, we still have no nationally accepted evidence-based programs across the spectrum of early intervention and prevention activities.

Staggeringly, funded programs are not required to demonstrate evidence of impact, nor are they required to demonstrate a measurable reduction in suicide and mental health risk factors.

So, given this, can governments truly claim they are funding suicide prevention? You cannot claim prevention if you aren’t measuring risk. It’s that simple.

In an area as complex as indigenous suicide, it is crucial that funding decisions unsupported by clinical and cultural expertise are challenged and redirected in the best way possible: towards the evidence. Report after report has pointed to the need for “evidence-based approaches”, but has anyone questioned why this continues to remain elusive?

Perhaps we need to start with what constitutes evidence.

It doesn’t mean attendance. This is not evidence of impact. It means measurable, outcome-based evidence — a reduction in suicide risk factors attributable to the intervention provided.

Without measurability there is no accountability. Without measurability we are failing to gather crucial evidence of what works to better inform current and future practitioners struggling to halt the intergenerational transmission of suicide risk.

Clinicians terrified

Up to 30 per cent of clinicians will experience the suicide death of a client in our clinical lifetime. It is complex, it is scary, and very few of us understand what it is like to feel as though you are holding someone’s life in your hands.

I can tell you that, despite extensive training, suicide prevention challenges you at every level.

It challenges your core values about the right of people to choose death over life; it stretches you therapeutically despite your training in best practice; and it terrifies you that you have missed something long after you have left your at-risk client.

The nature of suicide risk is that it changes. Being able to predict and monitor it takes years of clinical expertise and well-honed clinical insight and judgment.

Throw culture into the mix and this becomes a rare set of skills held by few in this country. Indeed, back-to-back coronial inquiries, a 2016 parliamentary inquiry and 2018 Senate inquiry all concluded that not only are ser­vices lacking in remote and rural areas of Australia but culturally appropriate services were often non-existent.

Prevention focus

First, we need to recognise the significant societal contributors to escalating rates of child suicides.

And we need to start with changing the narrative on indigenous suicides.

The core driver is that indigenous suicide is badly understood and myths about so-called causes of suicide are portrayed as if they exist as a direct linear relationship.

Suicide risk factors are being incorrectly stated as suicide causes and this is critical to this whole issue. Alcohol, poverty, abuse, colonialisation — these are not causes. They are risk factors, not causes. It is vital we understand this distinction to ensure adequate prevention efforts.

So, what separates Person A, who has been abused and becomes suicidal, from Person B, who has been abused and does not? While this is an essential question, we do not have clear evidence of these critical causal pathways.

Once we establish a causal pathway, we can then focus on determining treatments of best practice to ensure that clinicians are focused in the best possible way to eliminate the established cause.

This can be done only through rigorous assessment of individual risk factors. Some of these risk factors will be static and historical, meaning they cannot be changed: you cannot change someone’s date or place of birth, for example.

Other risk factors will be dynamic and changeable: we can work on changing anxiety and responses to trauma.

Once we have a comprehensive picture of an individual’s risk factors, treatment is then determined as being effective based on a reduction in the symptoms attributable to the clinical intervention. Presenting poverty and colonialisation as causes offers little to clinicians, who need to focus therapeutic interventions on what is alterative and treatable.

It distracts us from the true causes of indigenous suicide that enable a genuine opportunity for prevention. Our people are not killing themselves because they are poor. They are killing themselves because of racism, trauma, most likely co-morbid with depression and alcohol and drug use, isolation and a lack of access to culturally competent clinicians and evidence-based programs.

A further danger in confusing causes with risk factors is that it also informs government approaches to this issue.

So, taking this example of alcohol, the government decided to solve suicides through establishing dry communities and restricting alcohol. There has not been a decrease in suicide in alcohol-restricted communities; in fact, the opposite is true. Suicide is so multidimensional and multifaceted that, unless you can undertake rigorous assessment, there is going to be an endless cycle of risk that is “predicted” only once a child dies by suicide.

The most distressing outcome of failing to understand suicide causes is it further stigmatises bereaved Aboriginal parents, inferring that most, if not all, are perpetrators or alcoholics.

Perpetuating such stereotypes contributes to a general lack of empathy for Aboriginal people bereaved by suicide. It is a “they did it to themselves” mentality that is not only inaccurate but also unhelpful and unkind.

When non-indigenous children die by suicide, we rightly look for deficits in society or systems and how we need to “do better” as a society.

When indigenous children die by suicide, we look for deficits in their families, in their culture. Why don’t we have a more empathetic view of indigenous child suicides and for indigenous families bereaved by suicide?

Finding answers

Unfortunately the gaps are obvious and have been for decades.

First, universities need to set minimum standards of cultural competence as prerequisites in the degrees undertaken by those in the “helping professions”.

Most would be lucky to have an hour of cultural training in their degrees and then are sent out to remote indigenous communities where cultural barriers are so significant they render the most gifted clinicians into paralysis.

I have developed a normed Aboriginal Mental Health Cultural Competency Profile, which has demonstrated the capacity to measure, support and improve cultural competency development. This is objective and measurable, and provides a useful method for educational institutions to set minimum standards.

Second, we need to assess and screen for early risk. My PhD resulted in the development of the Westerman Aboriginal Symptom Checklist, a culturally validated psychometric test to screen youth at risk.

Despite this, we do not have a widely accepted methodology to assess for suicide risk in indigenous people.

While the youth version (WASCY) and adult version (WASCA) have existed for two decades, and more than 25,000 clinicians have chosen to be accredited in it, access into high-risk areas is limited by the lack of wide-scale government rollout of the tool.

Third, we need to understand the causes of indigenous suicide. The priority needs to be to analyse the suicide death data to firmly establish causal pathways to suicide. If the suicide data were analysed in a way that determined “causal” pathways it would quite simply change the paradigm of this area.

The big-picture thinking is to use continuous suicide data (suicide risk factors that move and change) gathered by the WASCY and WASCA to determine causal pathways and co-variates (that is, impulsivity, depression and suicide risk) and determine whether a reduction in these factors reduces the overall suicide death rate.

This is complex but these two data sets will enable us to determine what risk factors are reducing the suicide death rate in more of an immediate, measurable and responsive way.

Access to this data is likely to take many more months to pass through several ethics committees, but we will self-fund this analysis to fast-track this vital information and to speed up crucial gaps in our knowledge in this area.

Fourth, we need to determine whether indigenous suicide is different. The WASCY has determined a different set of risk factors for indigenous suicide, finding among other things that up to 60 per cent of suicide risk is accounted for by impulsivity.

Those with impulse-control issues are likelier to have limited coping mechanisms that enable self-soothing specific to interpersonal conflict. This pattern often occurs with those who have trauma and attachment-related issues — the origins of which for Aboriginal families often lie in the forcible removal from primary attachment figures.

With the increasing evidence of the impacts of race-based trauma there is a need to address societal contributors to indigenous suicides. Thema Bryant-Davis and Carlota Ocampo, among others, have noted similar courses of mental illness between victims of violent crime and victims of racism.

In Australia, Yin Paradies has found that racism explains 30 per cent of depression and reduces Aboriginal life expectancy more than smoking.

Just as trauma frequently becomes a central organising principle in the psychological structure of the individual, trauma has become a central organising principle in the psychological structure of whole communities. This is known as “repetition compulsion”, meaning individuals who have had a previous traumatic event are at increased risk for future trauma experiences.

Suicide “clusters” are an obvious and common consequence of trauma repetition compulsion.

From a suicide prevention perspective, racism manifests as a sense of hopelessness and helplessness, which has consistently been implicated in suicide risk. When the origin of this lies in rac­ial identity it seems inherently “untreatable” as a core risk factor and unchallengeable as a core driver when a suicidal individual develops thought processes based on a belief they don’t matter.

When those within the “system” and broader community show no visible sign of caring, this cognition then becomes increasingly ingrained through daily reinforcement.

The best I can do as a clinician is to assist my clients to develop healthy and robust cultural identity and develop the skills and resilience to manage racist events.

The WASCY provides a cultural resilience assessment that enables clinicians to “treat” factors that have been demonstrated to moderate or buffer suicide risk. This is crucial to prevention.

We are also about to publish on the impacts of a whole-of-community suicide intervention response to indigenous deaths.

This is the first evidence-based program to demonstrate a measurable reduction in suicide risk factors. It is crucial that these programs are widely available in high-risk communities.

Epigenetics tells us that racism impacts on Aboriginal people in the same way as a traumatic event. The fact most of our suicides are so impulsive makes absolute sense from a trauma perspective.

Finally, we turn to our political leadership. We look for guidance in what resonates in the conscience of our nation.

I wrote recently about the silence of our political leaders during the Fogliani coronial inquiry into the 13 deaths of indigenous children in the Kimberley.

Not a single question in the lower house of the West Australian parliament has been asked about the coroner’s report, nor what was going to be done about it.

The ABC reported only nine of the 95 members of parliament have brought up the inquest in any way, in either chamber, this year.

Studies support that a “hierarchy of newsworthiness” exists in which “cultural proximity” to the audience plays a crucial role in the extent of empathy generated for victims. The more the audience relates to victims, the greater the newsworthiness.

If the broader community can’t connect in a “this could happen to me or my family” manner, then there is less community outcry, and significantly less pressure on politicians to respond because, ­ultimately, they are very aware there will be little to no backlash about it.

When those who are mandated to care fail to respond your trauma becomes magnified.

The silence of our political leaders has served to magnify the trauma of these families and in effect has become systemically perpetuated by them.

Part 2

Hayley Thompson has been listening as Indigenous teenagers tell her what makes them happy as well as what troubles them, and she says the answers might surprise adults who believe social media makes young people miserable and even suicidal.

From The Australian April 20

“The young people don’t talk about social media as a problem,” Ms Thompson said. “The good thing about listening to the young people is you hear what they think is important, and that can be quite different to what older generations think is important.”

What Ms Thompson has learned in her role as a youth ­program co-ordinator at the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia has been seized upon by politicians scrambling to respond to Australia’s indigenous youth suicide crisis.

Indigenous Australians die by suicide at twice the rate of other Australians and this rate is even higher for youth. So far this year, 12 indigenous boys aged 12 to 18 have taken their own lives.

The tragedies have prompted questions about what works and what should happen next. In Inquirer today, clinical psychologist Tracy Westerman writes: “Suicide risk factors are being incorrectly stated as suicide causes and this is critical to this whole issue.”

Labor’s response to rising rates of indigenous youth suicide is a vote of confidence in Aboriginal health organisations such as the one Ms Thompson works for. A Shorten Labor government would make an “urgent investment” of $29.6 million in those Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations that already treat 350,000 indigenous people a year.

The money would be used to create regionally based multi­disciplinary teams of paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and ­Aboriginal health practitioners tasked with suicide prevention in vulnerable communities.

The Coalition’s mental health and suicide prevention plan includes $34.1m to “support indigenous leadership that delivers culturally appropriate, trauma-informed care” as well as “services that recognise the value of community, cultural artistic traditions and protective social factors”.

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt earlier gave just over $1m to the youth strategy Ms Thompson is part of. She says young indigenous people in cities and remote areas all tell her they want to feel closer to their culture.

NACCHO #VoteACCHO Aboriginal Health #Election2019 @billshortenmp and @SenatorDodson set to unveil a $115 million #Labor plan to tackle the Indigenous health crisis today in Darwin : Including $ for @DeadlyChoices #SuicidePrevention  #MentalHealth #RHD #SexualHealth #EyeHealth

“Labor believes innovative and culturally appropriate health care models are central to improving the health outcomes of First Australians and closing the gap, noting that improving Indigenous health was “critical to our journey towards reconciliation. Labor would be funding programs “co-designed with and led by First Nations peoples – driven by the Aboriginal health workforce “

The Opposition Leader, who is also Labor’s spokesman for Indigenous affairs, will unveil the commitment while on the campaign trail with his assistant spokesman Senator Pat Dodson in the Northern Territory today;

Summary of the Labor Party $115 million commitments against NACCHO #VoteACCHO Recommendations

See all 10 NACCHO #VoteACCHO Recommendations Here

Refer NACCHO Recommendation 4

$29.6 million to improve mental health and prevent youth suicide : to administer the mental health funds through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services

See our NACCHO Chair Press Release yesterday

Refer NACCHO Recommendation 6

Sexual health promotion would get a $20 million boost

$13 million would be invested to tackle preventable eye diseases and blindness.

$3 million in seed funding provided to Aboriginal Medical Services to develop health and justice programs addressing the link between incarceration and poor health

Deadly Choices campaign would get $16.5 million for advertising to raise awareness of health and lifestyle choices

Refer NACCHO Recommendation 3

$33 million to address rheumatic heart disease

Media report from

‘Critical to reconciliation’: Labor’s plan to close the gap on Indigenous health

Bill Shorten is set to unveil a $115 million plan to tackle the Indigenous health crisis, as he seeks to position Labor as the only party capable of closing the ten-year gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and their non-Indigenous peers.

The package includes $29.6 million to improve mental health and prevent youth suicide, which has rocked communities in remote areas including the Kimberley where a spate of deaths has been linked to intergenerational trauma, violence and poverty.

The Opposition Leader, who is also Labor’s spokesman for Indigenous affairs, will unveil the commitment while on the campaign trail with his assistant spokesman Senator Pat Dodson in the Northern Territory on Thursday.

“Labor believes innovative and culturally appropriate health care models are central to improving the health outcomes of First Australians and closing the gap,” Mr Shorten said, noting that improving Indigenous health was “critical to our journey towards reconciliation”.

Labor’s package is $10 million more than the $19.6 million Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced for Indigenous suicide prevention on Saturday, after the suicide of an 18-year-old girl from the Kimberley last week.

Indigenous health advocates have previously raised concerns that the Coalition’s wider mental health package could be consumed by “mainstream” services like Headspace.

Mr Shorten highlighted Labor would be funding programs “co-designed with and led by First Nations peoples – driven by the Aboriginal health workforce”.

The Labor plan is to administer the mental health funds through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, which employ teams of paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners in vulnerable communities.

Official statistics show a ten-year gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, with the rate of preventable hospital admissions and deaths three times higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Labor’s Indigenous health plan, which would be delivered over four years, also includes $33 million to address rheumatic heart disease, a preventable cause of heart failure, death and disability which is common in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Sexual health promotion would get a $20 million boost, while $13 million would be invested to tackle preventable eye diseases and blindness.

The Deadly Choices campaign would get $16.5 million for advertising to raise awareness of health and lifestyle choices and $3 million in seed funding provided to Aboriginal Medical Services to develop health and justice programs addressing the link between incarceration and poor health.

Mr Shorten said Labor would reinstate the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Equality Council, abolished by the Abbott Government in 2014.

Crisis support can be found at Lifeline: (13 11 14 and lifeline.org.au), the Suicide Call Back Service (1300 659 467 and suicidecallbackservice.org.au) and beyondblue (1300 224 636 and beyondblue.org.au) Or 1 of 302 ACCHO Clinics 

NACCHO #VoteACCHO Aboriginal Health #Election2019 #AusVotesHealth and #SuicidePrevention : @NACCHOChair Donnella Mills and other #health #justice leaders express concern that recent Indigenous #MentalHealth funding will go to mainstream services like @headspace_aus

What we know from the federal budget is a significant amount has been allocated towards Headspace and again, if it’s working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people the call is for it to go back to our community health organisations.

Evidence shows that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people access services where they feel culturally safe… Aboriginal people engage with community controlled health organisations because of that trust.

We want to see the money go towards community-driven health organisations so they can each determine what mental health programs would look like in their own communities

Acting Chairperson for NACCHO Donnella Mills told NITV News it was “absolutely a worry” the funding would be put into the hands of services like Headspace. See Full Article below from NITV

Read over 130 Aboriginal health and Suicide Prevention articles written by NACCHO over past 7 years

The above photo from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Evaluation Project

“I would like to visit and sit down with the Indigenous Elders in the community and first of all share the sorrow.

Our first Australians need us, so their kids can see hope and not choose the darkest of all possible options.”

The PM Scott Morrison told reporters combating youth suicide was his big priority

See PM and Minister Ken Wyatt Press Release HERE

Visit our NACCHO #VoteACCHO Election Campaign page HERE 

Especially #VoteACCHO Recommendation 4.

The incoming Federal Government must invest in ACCHOs, so we can address youth suicide

Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities.

  • Fund new Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management.
  • Fund regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance.
  • Provide accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

#VoteACCHO Recommendation 6.

The incoming Federal Government must allocate Indigenous specific health funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.

● Transfer the funding for Indigenous specific programs from Primary Health Networks to ACCHOs.

● Primary Health Networks assign ACCHOs as preferred providers for other Australian Government funded services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples unless it can be shown that alternative arrangements can produce better outcomes in quality of care and access to services.

With the federal election coming up next month, Prime Minister Scott Morrison has pledged additional funding towards combating youth and Aboriginal suicide, but Indigenous health advocates are concerned the money isn’t making it into the right places.

Edited from Brook Fryer NITV

Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a boost towards mental health services on Saturday for young and Indigenous people, leaving Aboriginal health representatives concerned the funding will be put into the hands of conventional services.

If the Coalition is re-elected next month in the federal election, Mr Morrison has pledged to roll out an additional $42.1 million on top of the already committed $461 million that was announced as part of the federal budget earlier this month.

The promise includes $12.5 million towards making mental health services more effective for Indigenous people as well as $22.5 million to boost the governments Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention strategy.

The remainder will be put towards digital tools for mental health issues that are impacting young people including depression, anxiety and substance abuse.

Announced as part of the federal budget, the youth mental health organisation received $263.3 million to be rolled out over seven years.

In January, Headspace also received a $47 million boost from the Coalition, which was the third announcement of funding given to the youth mental health organisation since October last year.

Hannah McGlade, Senior Indigenous Research Fellow at Curtin University and a justice advocate, reiterated the need to have funding given to Indigenous initiatives.

“Cultural safety and cultural competency is critical for mental health care for Indigenous people and Indigenous youth and it’s simply too much of a challenge for non-Indigenous people,” she said.

Ms McGlade said there is a real concern the amount of funding won’t be enough to combat the First Nations suicide crisis.

The latest reported suicide was an 18-year-old female from the remote Western Australia community of Balgo, in the Kimberley region, on Thursday.

This year alone there have been 47 Aboriginal suicides with more than half under the age of 26 and around 12 under the age of 18, said Gerry Georgatos, the CEO of the National Critical Response Trauma Project.

“20 have been females,” he said.

“There have been four [First Nations] suicides across the country in the last week.”

Ms McGlade said she is expecting very little to come out of Mr Morrison’s visits to affected communities.

“Tony Abbott did the same thing and it lead to nothing, this is not a government that is at all committed to human rights… there is no indication that this government is at all interested in Aboriginal human rights,” she said.

The government is also pledging a further $19.6 million through the Indigenous Advancement strategy to prevent Indigenous youth suicide, with Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion saying the funding would be largely used in the Kimberley.

Readers seeking support and information about suicide prevention can contact: Lifeline on 13 11 14 or a local ACCHO Aboriginal Health Service 302 locations

 Indigenous Australian psychologist services can be found here.

NACCHO #VoteACCHO Aboriginal #Mental Health and #SuicidePrevention : For #Election2019 #AusVotesHealth Prime Minister @ScottMorrisonMP and Indigenous Health Minister @KenWyattMP  Announce a  further $42m on mental health initiatives for young and some for Indigenous Australians

Young Indigenous people face many barriers to accessing healthcare including finding services that are safe and tailored to meet their needs.

This work will help change the way we deliver general mental health services so they draw on the value of culture, community and country to enrich the care provided to our First Nations people ”  

 Indigenous Health minister, Ken Wyatt. See extensive FACT SHEETS Part 2 below

“Our government will do  whatever it takes and whatever we can to break the curse of youth suicide in our country and ensure young people get the support they need”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison

Read over 130 Aboriginal Health and Suicide Prevention articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years  

Read over 200 Aboriginal Mental Health articles published by NACCHO over the past 7 years 

Visit our NACCHO #VoteACCHO Election Campaign page HERE 

#VoteACCHO Recommendation 4.

The incoming Federal Government must invest in ACCHOs, so we can address youth suicide

Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities.

  • Fund new Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management.
  • Fund regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance.
  • Provide accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

#VoteACCHO Recommendation 6.

The incoming Federal Government must allocate Indigenous specific health funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.

● Transfer the funding for Indigenous specific programs from Primary Health Networks to ACCHOs.

● Primary Health Networks assign ACCHOs as preferred providers for other Australian Government funded services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples unless it can be shown that alternative arrangements can produce better outcomes in quality of care and access to services.

Part 1 : Coalition vows to ‘break the curse of youth suicide’ with mental health package

The Coalition has pledged a further $42m on mental health initiatives for young and Indigenous Australians, on top of $461m in the budget for mental health and suicide prevention.

Extracts from The Guardian

Of the new funding, $22.5m will be spent on research grants to help find better treatments for mental health problems and $19.6m on the Indigenous advancement strategy to prevent suicide, particularly in the Kimberley.

In the first three months of this year, there were at least 35 suicides among Indigenous people, three of whom were only 12 years old.

The findings of an inquest into 13 suicides among young Aboriginal people in the Kimberley, handed down in February, found that crushing intergenerational trauma and poverty, including from the harmful effect of colonisation and loss of culture, were to blame.

The Morrison government has made “securing essential services” central to its re-election pitch, using its projection of a surplus in 2019-20 and perceived strength of economic management to pre-empt Labor attacks that it is not spending enough on health and other social causes.

Labor is promising to not only build bigger budget surpluses but also outspend the Coalition in health, beginning with its $2.3bn cancer package that it announced in the budget reply.

The research component of the Coalition’s mental health package has been allocated to a series of grants, including about emergency department management of acute mental health crises and culturally appropriate mental healthcare for Indigenous Australians.

Past 2 #VoteACCHO

1. Indigenous Mental Health and Suicide Prevention

  • The rate of suicide among Australians, particularly young First Australians is one of the most heartbreaking challenges we face as a country.
  • We have provided $88.8 million for Indigenous-specific mental health services, as well as local, culturally-safe mental health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders through our $1.45 billion investment in PHNs.
  • The Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt MP, has championed new measures to address Indigenous suicide prevention measures. Under the Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan the Morrison McCormack Government is providing $14.5 million to support Indigenous leadership to help our health care system provide culturally safe and appropriate care, as well as new funding to enable young Indigenous people to participate in place-based cultural programs; build a centre of excellence in childhood wellness; and adapt psychological treatments to meet the needs of Indigenous Australians.
  • The Morrison McCormack Government is also making a new $19.6 million investment through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy to prevent Indigenous youth suicide, particularly in the Kimberley. This new $19.6 million investment will help build resilience and leadership skills in at-risk communities and provide new pathways for engagement, including some which the Kimberley Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Forum told us are needed to support fellow young people.

2. Mental Health

  • The mental health of Australians is a priority for the Morrison McCormack Government.
  • One in five people in Australia experience a common mental disorder each year. Nearly half of the Australian population will experience mental illness at some point in their lives, but less than half will access treatment.
  • We are doing more than any other previous government to safeguard the mental wellbeing of Australians, providing record funding of $4.8 billion in 2018-19.
  • We are delivering more frontline services that meet the specific needs of local communities through a record $1.45 billion investment in our Primary Health Networks. We are providing long-term support for local psychologists, mental health nurses, and social workers, ensuring that the right services are available in the right place and at the right time.
  • We have expanded the headspace network, boosted headspace services, and established the Mental Health in Education Initiative with Beyond Blue to provide young Australians with additional help and support.
  • We have pioneered Medicare telehealth services allowing Australians in rural areas to access care from their homes. We have also expanded free or low-cost digital services, accessible through our new head to health portal to cater for those who prefer to access support online.
  • We have been the first to fully recognise the need for intensive support for Australians with eating disorders – the deadliest of all psychiatric illnesses – by creating specific Medicare funded services, a National Helpline, and providing $70.2 million for new residential treatment centres.
  • We have introduced key reforms such as a Productivity Commission Inquiry into Mental Health, changes to private health insurance, and innovative models of care such as the $114.5 million trial of 8 mental health centres.
  • Investing in mental health and suicide prevention is not a choice, it is a must.
  • The Liberal and Nationals Government’s track record in delivering a strong economy ensures we can invest in essential services such as youth mental health and suicide prevention services.

3.Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention

  • The tragedy of suicide touches far too many Australian families. Suicide is the leading cause of death of our young people – accounting for one-third of deaths of Australians aged 15-24.
  • The Government will provide $503.1 million for a Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan to prevent suicide and promote the mental wellbeing of young Australians. This represents the single largest investment in youth suicide prevention in the country’s history.
  • We are prioritising three key areas as our nation’s best protection against suicide – strengthening the headspace network, Indigenous suicide prevention and early childhood and parenting support.
  • We will ensure young people get help where and when needed by investing an additional $375 million to expand and improve the headspace network. headspace provides youth-friendly services for the challenges facing young Australians: across physical health, alcohol and other drug use, vocational support and mental health.
  • To strengthen Indigenous youth suicide prevention, we will invest $34.1 million including support for Indigenous leadership that will help our health care system deliver culturally appropriate, trauma-informed care as well as services that recognise the value of community, cultural artistic traditions and protective social factors. Out support includes $19.6 million for measures to prevent Indigenous youth suicide, particularly in the Kimberley.
  • To support parents and their children we will invest $11.8 million in a range of initiatives to help parents recognise when their children are struggling, improve mental health skills training in schools, enhance peer support networks and boost counselling support services for young people.
  • We are also providing an additional $22.5 million in specific youth and Indigenous health research projects as part of our $125 million ‘Million Minds Mission’.
  • The Liberal and Nationals Government established this ten-year $125 million Mission through the Medical Research Future Fund. It will unlock key research into the cause of mental health as well as better treatments and therapies.
  • For Australians living in rural and regional we are ensuring that services are available where they are most needed by establishing more than 20 new headspace sites in rural and regional Australia, and by providing new mental health telehealth services funded through Medicare.
  • .

Natural Disasters

  • We are also addressing the mental health needs of those affected by natural disasters through:
    • $5.5 million for additional mental health services in Victoria, Queensland and Tasmania. This includes Medicare items for GPs to provide telehealth services to flood affected communities in Queensland.
    • $21.9 million for the Empowering our Communitiesinitiative to support community-led mental health programmes in nine drought-affected Primary Health Network regions.

Background

Mental Health Facts

  • One in five Australians aged 16 to 85 experiences a common mental illness (e.g. anxiety disorder, depression) in any year; nearly half (45 per cent) of all Australians will experience a mental health problem over the course of their lives. In 2016, one in seven children aged 4 to 17 years was assessed as having a mental health disorder in the previous 12 months.
  • Approximately 730,000 Australians experience severe mental health disorders. Another 4-6 per cent of the population (about 1.5 million people) are estimated to have a moderate disorder and a further 9-12 per cent (about 2.9 million people) a mild disorder.
  • Mental illness costs the Australian economy over $60 billion per year (around four per cent of Gross Domestic Product).

Suicide and Self-harm Facts

  • In 2017, 3,128 people died from intentional self-harm (12.6 deaths per 100,000 people), rising 9.1% from 2,866 in 2016. The 2017 rate is on par with 2015 as the highest recorded rate of suicide in the past 10 years. Most states saw an increase in their suicide rates, with Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory experiencing the largest rises. However, there were declines in Tasmania, South Australia and Victoria.
  • Suicide remained the leading cause of death among people aged between 15-44 years, and the second leading cause of death among those 45-54 years of age.
  • While intentional self-harm accounts for a relatively small proportion (1.9 per cent) of all deaths in Australia, it accounts for a higher proportion of deaths among younger people (36 per cent of deaths among people aged 15 to 24).

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Mental Health and #SuicidePrevention : @ruokday ? launches #RUOKSTRONGERTOGETHER resources a targeted suicide prevention campaign to encourage conversation within our communities. Contributions inc Dr Vanessa Lee @joewilliams_tew @ShannanJDodson

“Nationally, Indigenous people die from suicide at twice the rate of non-Indigenous people. This campaign comes at a critical time.

As a community we are Stronger Together. Knowledge is culture, and emotional wellbeing can be learned from family members such as mothers and grandmothers.

These new resources from R U OK? will empower family members, and the wider community, with the tools to look out for each other as well as providing guidance on what to do if someone answers “No, I’m not OK”.”

Dr Vanessa Lee BTD, MPH, PhD Chair R U OK’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Group whose counsel has been integral in the development of the campaign

Read over 130 + NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Suicide Prevention articles

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Evaluation Project (ATSISPEP)

https://www.atsispep.sis.uwa.edu.au/

I have struggled with depression and anxiety for as long as I can remember. I’m 32 years old and only this year did I have the first psychologist ever ask me about my family history and acknowledge the intergenerational trauma that runs through Indigenous families.

Like many others, I have thought about taking my own life. There were a myriad of factors that led to that point, and a myriad of factors that led to me not following through. But one of the factors was the immense weight of intergenerational trauma that I believe is embedded into my heart, mind and soul and at times feels too heavy a burden to carry.

We can break this cycle of trauma. We need culturally safe Indigenous-designed suicide prevention programs and to destigmatise conversations around mental health. My hope is that, by sharing my own experiences of dealing with this complex subject, other people will be able to see that intergenerational trauma affects all of our mob.

The more we identify and acknowledge it, we’ll be stronger together “

Shannan Dodson is a Yawuru woman and on the RUOK? Indigenous Advisory committee that has launched the Stronger Together campaign targeted at help-givers – those in our communities who can offer help to those who are struggling ;

See full story Part 2 Below or HERE

R U OK? has launched STRONGER TOGETHER, a targeted suicide prevention campaign to encourage conversation within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Developed with the guidance and oversight of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Group and 33 Creative, an Aboriginal owned and managed agency, the campaign encourages individuals to engage and offer support to their family and friends who are struggling with life. Positive and culturally appropriate resources have been developed to help individuals feel more confident in starting conversations by asking R U OK?

The STRONGER TOGETHER campaign message comes at a time when reducing rates of  suicide looms as one of the biggest and most important challenges of our generation.

Suicide is one of the most common causes of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander people. A 2016 report noted that on average, over 100 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people end their lives through suicide each year, with the rate of suicide twice as high as that recorded for other Australians [1]. These are not just numbers. They represent lives and loved ones; relatives, friends, elders and extended community members affected by such tragic deaths.

STRONGER TOGETHER includes the release of four community announcement video

The video series showcases real conversations in action between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander advocates and role models.

The focus is on individuals talking about their experiences and the positive impact that sharing them had while they were going through a tough time.

“That weekend, I had the most deep and meaningful and beautiful conversations with my Dad that I never had.

My Dad was always a staunch dude and I was always trying to put up a front to, I guess, make my Dad proud. But we sat there, and we cried to each other.

I started to find myself and that’s when I came to the point of realising that, you know, I’m lucky to be alive and I had a second chance to help other people.”

When we talk, we are sharing, and our people have always shared, for thousands of years we’ve shared experiences, shared love. The only way we get out of those tough times is by sharing and talking and I hope this series helps to spread that message.”

Former NRL player and welterweight boxer Joe Williams has lent his voice to the series.

Born in Cowra, Joe is a proud Wiradjuri man. Although forging a successful professional sporting career, Joe has battled with suicidal ideation and bipolar disorder. After a suicide attempt in 2012, a phone call to a friend and then his family’s support encouraged him to seek professional psychiatric help.

Australian sports pioneer Marcia Ella-Duncan OAM has also lent her voice to the series. Marcia Ella-Duncan is an Aboriginal woman from La Perouse, Sydney, with traditional connection to the Walbunga people on the NSW Far South Coast, and kinship connection to the Bidigal, the traditional owners of the Botany Bay area.

“Sometimes, all we can do is listen, all we can do is be there with you. And sometimes that might be all you need. Or sometimes it’s just the first step towards a much longer journey,” said Marcia.

Click here to access the STRONGER TOGETHER resources on the RUOK? website.

If you or someone you know needs support, go to:  ruok.org.au/findhelp

Part 2

Shannan Dodson is a Yawuru woman and on the RUOK? Indigenous Advisory committee that has launched the Stronger Together campaign targeted at help-givers – those in our communities who can offer help to those who are struggling ;

Originally Published the Guardian and IndigenousX

It is unacceptable and a national disgrace that there have been at least 35 suicides of Indigenous people this year – in just 12 weeks – and three were children only 12 years old.

The Kimberley region – where my mob are from – has the highest rate of suicide in the country. If the Kimberley was a country it would have the worst suicide rate in the world.

A recent inquest investigated 13 deaths which occurred in the Kimberley region in less than four years, including five children aged between 10 and 13.

Western Australia’s coroner said the deaths had been shaped by “the crushing effects of intergenerational trauma”.

When we’re talking about Indigenous suicide, we have to talk about intergenerational trauma; the transfer of the impacts of historical trauma and grief to successive generations.

These multiple layers of trauma can have a “cumulative effect and increase the risk of destructive behaviours including suicide”. Many of our communities are, in essence, “not just going about the day, but operating in crisis mode on a daily basis.”

I have struggled with depression and anxiety for as long as I can remember. I’m 32 years old and only this year did I have the first psychologist ever ask me about my family history and acknowledge the intergenerational trauma that runs through Indigenous families.

Like many others, I have thought about taking my own life. There were a myriad of factors that led to that point, and a myriad of factors that led to me not following through. But one of the factors was the immense weight of intergenerational trauma that I believe is embedded into my heart, mind and soul and at times feels too heavy a burden to carry.

Indigenous suicide is different. Suicide is a complex issue, there is not one cause, reason, trigger or risk – it can be a web of many indicators. But with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people intergenerational trauma and the flow-on effects of colonisation, dispossession, genocide, cultural destruction and the stolen generations are paramount to understanding high Indigenous suicide rates.

When you think about the fact that most Indigenous families have been affected, in one or more generations, by the forcible removal of one or more children, that speaks volumes. The institutionalisation of our mob has had dire consequences on our sense of being, mental health, connection to family and culture.

Just think about that for a moment. If every Indigenous family has been affected by this, of course trauma is transmitted down through generations and manifests into impacts on children resulting from weakened attachment relationships with caregivers, challenged parenting skills and family functioning, parental physical and mental illness, and disconnection and alienation from the extended family, culture and society.

The high rates of poor physical health, mental health problems, addiction, incarceration, domestic violence, self-harm and suicide in Indigenous communities are directly linked to experiences of trauma. These issues are both results of historical trauma and causes of new instances of trauma which together can lead to a vicious cycle in Indigenous communities.

Our families have been stripped of the coping mechanisms that all people need to thrive and survive. And while Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are resilient, we are also human.

Our history does shape us. Let’s start from colonisation. My mob the Yawuru people from Rubibi (Broome) were often brutally dislocated from our lands, and stripped of our livelihood. Our culture was desecrated and we were used for slave labour.

My great-grandmother was taken from her father when she was very young and placed in a mission in Western Australia. My grandmother and aunties then all finished up in the same mission. And two of those aunties spent a considerable time in an orphanage in Broome, although they were not orphans.

In 1907, a telegram from Broome station was sent to Henry Prinsep, the “Chief Protector of Aborigines for Western Australia” in Perth. It reads: “Send cask arsenic exterminate aborigines letter will follow.” This gives a glimpse of the thinking of the time and that of course played out in traumatic and dehumanising ways.

In the late 1940s a magistrate in the court of Broome refused my great-grandmother’s application for a certificate of citizenship under the Native Citizen Rights Act of Western Australia. Part of his reasons for refusing her application was that she had not adopted the manner and habits of civilised life.

My anglo grandfather was imprisoned for breaching the Native Administration Act of Western Australia, in that he was cohabiting with my grandmother. He was jailed for loving my jamuny (grandmother/father’s mother).

My dad lost his parents when he was 10 years old. My grandfather died in tragic circumstances – and then my grandmother, again in tragic circumstances, soon after.

My dad was collected by family in Katherine and taken to Darwin. There was a fear that he would be taken away – Indigenous families knew well the ways of the Native Welfare authorities, and I suspect they were protecting my dad from that fate. Unlike many Indigenous families, he was permitted to stay with them and became a state child in the care of our family.

My family has suffered from ongoing systematic racism and research has shown that racism impacts Aboriginal people in the same way as a traumatic event.

My family and community have suffered premature deaths from suicide, preventable health issues, grief and inextricable trauma.

We can break this cycle of trauma. We need culturally safe Indigenous-designed suicide prevention programs and to destigmatise conversations around mental health. My hope is that, by sharing my own experiences of dealing with this complex subject, other people will be able to see that intergenerational trauma affects all of our mob. The more we identify and acknowledge it, we’ll be stronger together.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #SuicidePrevention News Alerts : #Closethegap : #NACCHO and @TheRACP Peak Health bodies call for Prime Minister and state and territory leaders to declare Aboriginal youth #suicide crisis an urgent national health priority

The recent Aboriginal youth suicides represent a national emergency that demands immediate attention.

Aboriginal community controlled health services need to be properly resourced to ensure our children are having regular health checks and to develop community led solutions.’

NACCHO CEO, Ms Patricia Turner : See NACCHO RACP press release : see Part 1 below

See all 130 + NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Suicide Prevention articles published over last 7 years 

“Funded programs are not required to demonstrate a measurable reduction in suicide and mental health risk factors, which is staggering,

We just aren’t demanding that basic level of accountability

The first priority must be analyses of suicide mortality data to identify the causal pathways,  

Suicide risk is the most complex thing to assess and monitor … communities are crying out for specialist assistance and just not getting it. “Children as young as 10 are dying by suicide … this is no longer an Aboriginal issue, it’s a national one,

Indigenous psychologist Adjunct Professor Tracy Westerman said Australia had failed to collect crucial evidence to determine what intervention strategies work. See Part 2 below 

 ” Community driven action plans to prevent suicide are extending across the Kimberley, with four more communities implementing plans to save lives and improve health and well-being.

As part of the Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial, Kununurra, Balgo, Wyndham and Halls Creek now have local plans, joining Broome, Derby and Bidyadanga.

Each community receives up to $130,000 to help roll out its action plan which reflects and responds to local issues

See Minister Ken Wyatt Press Release and Communique Part 3 and 4 Below

Part 1 RACP and NACCHO Press Release

JOINT STATEMENT

HEALTH BODIES DECLARE ABORIGINAL YOUTH SUICIDE AN URGENT NATIONAL PRIORITY

  • Health bodies call for Prime Minister and state and territory leaders to declare urgent national health priority
  • Immediate investment in Aboriginal-led mental health and wellbeing services needed to stop child deaths
  • Long-term solution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-determination requires commitment to Uluru Statement from the Heart

The Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP), the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) are calling on the Prime Minister to make tackling Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicides a national health priority.

Suicide was once unknown to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples but now every community has been affected by suicide.

In response to the recent Aboriginal youth suicides and the release of the WA Coroner’s report on the inquest into the deaths of thirteen children and young persons in the Kimberley Region, we are calling on the Prime Minister and state and territory leaders to put the issue at the top of the COAG agenda and to implement a coordinated crisis response to urgently scale up Aboriginal led mental health services before more young lives are tragically lost.

An urgent boost to Aboriginal community controlled health services is required to build on the existing range of initiatives that are being rolled out. We also call on the Government to expand upon evidence-based resilience and cultural connection programs to be adapted and attuned to local needs.

We are calling on the Federal Government to:

  • Provide secure and long-term funding to Aboriginal community controlled health services to expand their mental health, social and emotional wellbeing, suicide prevention, and alcohol and other drugs services, using best-practice traumainformed approaches
  • Increase funding for ACCHSs to employ staff to deliver mental health and social and emotional wellbeing services, including psychologists, psychiatrists, speech pathologists, mental health workers and other professionals and workers;
  • Increase the delivery of training to Aboriginal health practitioners to establish and/or consolidate skills development in mental health care and support, including suicide prevention
  • Commit to developing a comprehensive strategy to build resilience and facilitate healing from intergenerational trauma, designed and delivered in collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

RACP spokesperson Dr Mick Creati, said: “The unspeakable child suicide tragedy that has been unfolding requires a national response and the attention of the Prime Minister. Unless we see urgent boost to investment in Aboriginal-led mental health services then the deaths will continue.”

RANZCP President Dr Kym Jenkins, said: ‘We must address the factors underlying suicidality in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, including intergenerational trauma, disadvantage and distress. For this, we urgently need an increased capacity of mental health and wellbeing services to help people and communities recover from trauma and build resilience for the future.’

Part 2 Leaders urged to declare Aboriginal child suicides a ‘national crisis’

 Kate Aubusson From the Brisbane Times 20 March 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison must declare Indigenous child suicides a national emergency and overhaul current strategies, peak medical and health bodies have demanded.

The call comes in the wake of harrowing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child suicide rates, and the WA coroner’s inquest into the deaths of 13 young people, five aged between 10 and 13 years in the Kimberley region.

A joint statement from the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP), the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) has urged Mr Morrison and all state and territory leaders to make Indigenous youth suicides an “urgent national health priority”.

The organisations called on the leaders to launch a “coordinated crisis response” and invest in Aboriginal-led strategies “before more young lives are tragically lost”.

In January, five Aboriginal girls aged between 12 and 15 years took their own lives.

The latest ABS data shows Indigenous children aged 10 to 14 die of suicide at 8.4 times the rate of non-Indigenous children. One in four aged under 18 who suicided were Aboriginal.

None of the 13 children who died by suicide had a mental health assessment, according to the coroner’s report.

The international journal The Lancet Child and Adolescent Health recently called Australia’s Indigenous youth suicide rate an “unmitigated crisis”.

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner said the recent Aboriginal youth suicides was “a national emergency that demands immediate attention”.

The joint statement called for Indigenous community-led solutions, long-term funding boosts to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) for best-practice and trauma-informed mental health, suicide prevention, and drug and alcohol programs.

The organisations also pushed for more ACCHS funding to employ more psychologists, psychiatrists, speech pathologists and mental health workers, increase training for Aboriginal health practitioners to develop a comprehensive strategy focused on resilience and intergenerational trauma healing.

In September the Morrison government announced $36 million in national suicide prevention projects.

Paediatrician with Victorian Aboriginal Health Service Dr Mick Creati said Indigenous suicides could not be prevented by a “white bread psychiatry model”.

Aboriginal suicides were often radically different from those among the general population, research shows. They were more likely to be impulsive, potentially triggered by some kind of interpersonal conflict.

The crisis demanded a “different, culturally appropriate model”, Dr Creati said.

“We don’t know exactly what the right model is yet … but Aboriginal people need to be included [in their development] to make sure they are appropriate for Aboriginal populations.”

But Indigenous psychologist Adjunct Professor Tracy Westerman said Australia had failed to collect crucial evidence to determine what intervention strategies work.

“Funded programs are not required to demonstrate a measurable reduction in suicide and mental health risk factors, which is staggering,” Professor Westerman said.

“We just aren’t demanding that basic level of accountability”.

The first priority must be analyses of suicide mortality data to identify the causal pathways,  Professor Westerman said.

“Suicide risk is the most complex thing to assess and monitor … communities are crying out for specialist assistance and just not getting it. “Children as young as 10 are dying by suicide … this is no longer an Aboriginal issue, it’s a national one,” she said.

Part 3 The eighth meeting of the Kimberley Suicide Prevention Trial Working Group was held on 14 March in Broome communique

The Working Group discussed the findings of WA Coroner’s Report into suicide deaths in the Kimberley and continued its consideration of resources and strategies to support activity as part of the suicide Prevention trial.

The meeting today was chaired by the Hon Ken Wyatt, Minister for Indigenous Health (Commonwealth) and attended by the Hon Roger Cook, Deputy Premier and Minister for Health (WA State Government), Senator the Hon Patrick Dodson (Commonwealth) and Member for the Kimberley, the Hon Josie Farrer MLC (WA State Government). Apologies were received from the Hon Ben Wyatt, Minister for Indigenous Affairs (WA State Government).

The meeting was also attended by over 40 representatives from communities, organisations and government agencies.

Key messages from today’s discussion included:

  • A shared commitment to work together at all levels of government to develop place-based, and Aboriginal-led and designed responses.
  • A commitment to ongoing collaboration.
  • Acknowledgement of the good work achieved thus far – but noting more needs to be done.
  • The role of the community liaison officers on the ground across Kimberley communities was highlighted as an example of good progress – connecting services and projects with what people want.
  • The need to continue mapping services was agreed.
  • The need for holistic approaches was highlighted.
  • Community organisations are keen to work with the State and Commonwealth Governments on solutions that address the recommendations in relation to the report of the WA Coronial Inquest and all other referenced reports.

Part 4 Minister Wyatt Press release

Community driven action plans to prevent suicide are extending across the Kimberley, with four more communities implementing plans to save lives and improve health and well-being.

As part of the Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial, Kununurra, Balgo, Wyndham and Halls Creek now have local plans, joining Broome, Derby and Bidyadanga.

Each community receives up to $130,000 to help roll out its action plan which reflects and responds to local issues.

However, the four new plans have a common thread – they are centred on people working and walking together on country, with a series of camps involving high-risk groups.

The camps are planned to provide a range of supports around suicide including healing and sharing and respecting cultural knowledge and traditions. They will also support close engagement with Elders.

A strong cultural framework underpins all the Trial’s activities and all the projects identified by the communities fit within the systems-based approach, guided by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Evaluation Project (ATSISPEP).

Nine communities are involved in the Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial, with Community Liaison Officers playing a critical role.

The outcomes will contribute to a national evaluation which aims to find the most effective approaches to suicide prevention for at-risk populations and share this knowledge across Australia.

The Morrison Government is supporting the Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial with $4 million over four years, from 2016-2020.

It is one of 12 Suicide Prevention Trials being conducted across the nation, with total funding of $48 million.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #SuicidePrevention : Minister @KenWyattMP @SenatorDodson and KAMS ACCHO respond to 42 recommendations of WA Coroner inquiry into the deaths of 13 Aboriginal children and young persons in the Kimberley region between 2012 and 2016


” Today, Western Australian State Coroner, Ros Fogliani, released her report of the investigation into the suicide deaths of 13 Indigenous young people that occurred between November 2012 and March 2016 in the Kimberley Region.

I cannot adequately express my sense of grief at the deaths of these young people. 

Nor can I ever comprehend the loss and devastation their families and their communities are feeling.

The families and communities who have experienced these tragedies have been deeply affected and the pain will never leave them.

The high rate of suicide among young First Australians is one of the nation’s most confronting challenges.

Minister Ken Wyatt Press Release see Part 1 Below

Download the 42 Recommendations 

13-Children-and-Young-Persons-in-the-Kimberley-Region-Finding

Key recommendations from the inquest:

  • Screen for foetal alcohol spectrum disorder during infant health assessments and when a child enters the child protection or justice systems for the first time
  • Restrict take away alcohol across the entire region, introduce a banned drinker register, resource police to enforce “sly grogging” regulations and provide more funding for patrols to take intoxicated people to a “safe place”
  • Extend an offer of a voluntary cashless debit card to the entire region
  • Build culturally-appropriate residential colleges for students who volunteer to be admitted with the consent of their parents and/or caregivers
  • Build a mental health facility in the East Kimberley that incorporates treatment for alcohol and drug abuse problems, and permanently base a mental health clinician in Halls Creek
  • Train child protection workers and teachers who have regular contact with Aboriginal children in suicide intervention and prevention
  • Expand the “Adopt-a-Cop” classroom program to improve the relationship between children and police, and expand a program where Aboriginal elders help conduct night patrols and speak with children on the streets
  • Introduce or continue to expand Aboriginal language classes in schools, and introduce re-engagement classrooms in primary schools to improve attendance rates
  • Consult more with Aboriginal people to “co-design” services and programs
  • Expand cultural programs including on-country trips, and develop or refurbish facilities for young people to meet and engage in activities.

“ The report handed down today must not join the 42 reports into Aboriginal well-being delivered over the last 15 years that simply sit and gather dust. This report must lead a paradigm shift that leads to community-led solutions that address the clear sense of suffering, hopelessness and disillusionment that is being felt.

We must continue to work towards building mabu ngarrungu, strong community, and mabu buru, strong country. Essential to this is mabu liyan – being well inside ourselves through strong connections to family, community and country. Government must understand us and our thinking around culture and well-being and not continue to simply impose its own views.

There is hope for a better way of doing things and to stop this sadness. It requires a resolve to work with First Nations peoples to establish new ways.”

Senator Patrick Dodson See full Press Release Part 2 Below

The issues are complex. It is not something that we can simply resolve by one program or one set of funding. It is something we need to tackle across the community with the help of the government,

A shift in the way major support services approach remote communities is needed to address the specific needs.

I think we’ve got a lot of mainstream services trying to impose a particular model on the needs of the community. What we really need is to work with the community to understand what are the needs; and design the services to respond to the needs.

“We can’t continue to impose things because an organisation simply says they’re the best organisation to deliver it.”

Rob McPhee, Deputy CEO of the Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services, said it was going to take years to tackle the complex issues that arose in the report, but action was needed.

“I think it’s a real difference to the language I have heard previously. I thought there was recognition of all the issues that contribute to Indigenous suicide,

I think it’s not only good for the Kimberley, the outcomes, but it’s good for the whole country.”

To hear the recommendations about the social determinants, that holistic approaches are required,” 

Indigenous Health Professor Pat Dudgeon at the University of Western Australia said she felt the report showed recognition to the issues that have contributed to Indigenous suicide.

View further Interview HERE

The RACGP and National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO)’s National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people includes sections relevant to suicide intervention and prevention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth:

  • Child health – FASD, prevention of child maltreatment, and supporting families to optimise child safety and wellbeing
  • The health of young people – social and emotional wellbeing and drug use
  • Mental health – prevention of depression and suicide
  • Lifestyle – including alcohol
  • Family abuse and violence

Read over 130+ Aboriginal Health and Suicide Prevention Articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years 

Part 1

Our national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suicide death rate is more than double the rate of the rest of Australian society. And among 15 to 34 year olds, it’s three times as high.

The inquest has found common elements and factors contributing to the suicide deaths of the 13 young people.

These include alcohol abuse, domestic violence, poor living conditions and poor school attendance. Tragically, these young people were never able to reach out for help from support services.

There are 42 recommendations in Ms Fogliani’s report. These recommendations have been made to help target the causes of the issues.

A number of recommendations highlighted the need for suicide programs to be culturally sensitive, and that genuine and empowered relationships with First Nations communities are critical for the success of any program.

The report also highlights the need for better coordination between government agencies responsible for suicide prevention, and has recommended a Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People be established.

The Australian Government has taken prompt action to address youth suicide in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

On 25 January 2019, I hosted an urgent meeting in Perth with experts and members from the communities to discuss how best to respond to these recent tragedies.

As a result, an additional almost $5 million has been provided for a range of initiatives, including:

  • fast tracking the rollout of the Be You school-based support in the Kimberley and Pilbara
  • delivering of a targeted social media campaign
  • expanding of the Young Ambassadors for Mental Health project to include a special focus in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth
  • supporting to families dealing with grief with a focus on suicide prevention.
  • commitment to working with my WA state colleagues.

The Australian Government also provides $4 million to each of the 12 National Suicide Prevention Trial sites, including two sites for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the Kimberley and Darwin.

The report provides a unique opportunity to rethink how we do things with local communities.

I will be reviewing the coroner’s report as a matter of urgency.

The Australian Government will carefully consider the WA Coroner’s report and recommendations. These will inform the Government’s approach towards the issue of Indigenous suicide in the Kimberley region going forward.

Part  2

Today is a difficult day for the Kimberley and the families of those who passed away.

Today, after nearly three years, State Coroner Ros Fogliani has delivered her findings in a significant inquiry into the deaths of 13 Aboriginal children and young persons in the Kimberley region between 2012 and 2016.

The Coroner’s findings were handed down in Perth, and live-streamed to the Regional Courts of Broome, Kununurra, Fitzroy Crossing and Halls Creek. I sat in the Broome Court and it was crowded with a good cross-section of the community.

This inquiry confirms what we already know – we have a crisis in the Kimberley. The rate of suicide in the Kimberley by Indigenous people, in particular young Indigenous people, is amongst the highest in the world. The Coroner reinforced the well-known social determinants of well-being which First Nations peoples live in.

Ten years have passed since the last major inquiry into the deaths of young Indigenous people – the Hope Inquest. Today confirms yet again, we have made little or no progress.

Clearly, the policies and service delivery that address suicide in our communities are failing and our people are losing hope. Too much seems to be reliant on being delivered from the outside and not from within our community or the Kimberley.

Today, on this day of sorrow and reflection, we must re-think the way we address Indigenous youth suicide.

There needs to be a new form of engagement with Indigenous communities and young people need to have a voice and role in future initiatives if we are to fix the issues and deliver the opportunities for change in the future.

The Coroner, in her final key recommendation, emphasised the principles of self-determination and empowerment in initiatives, policies and programs relating to First Nations peoples. She has relied on the expressed aspirations of the Western Australian Government. The Western Australian Government must now honour this with First Nations people.

Any new approach must be informed by a rigorous analysis of the values driving the delivery of services. It must be holistic and therapeutic – addressing the complex needs of entrenched socio-economic disadvantage, unresolved trauma, cultural disruption, and systemic social exclusion and disempowerment. We need to prioritise programs that value cultural imperatives and programs controlled by Indigenous people.

There is no magical solution to be handed down by government. But government must work in collaboration with communities to achieve a new social order

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #JunkFood : Increasing how much exercise we get and switching to a healthy diet can also play an important role in treating – and even preventing – depression

” The review found that across 41 studies, people who stuck to a healthy diet had a 24-35% lower risk of depressive symptoms than those who ate more unhealthy foods.

These findings suggest improving your diet could be a cost-effective complementary treatment for depression and could reduce your risk of developing a mental illness.

From the Conversation / Megan Lee

 ” NACCHO Campaign 2013 : Our ‘Aboriginal communities should take health advice from the fast food industry’ a campaign that eventually went global, reaching more than  20 million Twitter followers.”

See over 60 NACCHO Healthy Foods Articles HERE

See over 200 NACCHO Mental Health articles HERE 

Worldwide, more than 300 million people live with depression. Without effective treatment, the condition can make it difficult to work and maintain relationships with family and friends.

Depression can cause sleep problems, difficulty concentrating, and a lack of interest in activities that are usually pleasurable. At its most extreme, it can lead to suicide.

Depression has long been treated with medication and talking therapies – and they’re not going anywhere just yet. But we’re beginning to understand that increasing how much exercise we get and switching to a healthy diet can also play an important role in treating – and even preventing – depression.

So what should you eat more of, and avoid, for the sake of your mood?

Ditch junk food

Research suggests that while healthy diets can reduce the risk or severity of depression, unhealthy diets may increase the risk.

Of course, we all indulge from time to time but unhealthy diets are those that contain lots of foods that are high in energy (kilojoules) and low on nutrition. This means too much of the foods we should limit:

  • processed and takeaway foods
  • processed meats
  • fried food
  • butter
  • salt
  • potatoes
  • refined grains, such as those in white bread, pasta, cakes and pastries
  • sugary drinks and snacks.

The average Australian consumes 19 serves of junk food a week, and far fewer serves of fibre-rich fresh food and wholegrains than recommended. This leaves us overfed, undernourished and mentally worse off.

Here’s what to eat instead

Mix it up. Anna Pelzer

Having a healthy diet means consuming a wide variety of nutritious foods every day, including:

  • fruit (two serves per day)
  • vegetables (five serves)
  • wholegrains
  • nuts
  • legumes
  • oily fish
  • dairy products
  • small quantities of meat
  • small quantities of olive oil
  • water.

This way of eating is common in Mediterranean countries, where people have been identified as having lower rates of cognitive decline, depression and dementia.

In Japan, a diet low in processed foods and high in fresh fruit, vegetables, green tea and soy products is recognised for its protective role in mental health.

How does healthy food help?

A healthy diet is naturally high in five food types that boost our mental health in different ways:

Complex carbohydrates found in fruits, vegetables and wholegrains help fuel our brain cells. Complex carbohydrates release glucose slowly into our system, unlike simple carbohydrates (found in sugary snacks and drinks), which create energy highs and lows throughout the day. These peaks and troughs decrease feelings of happiness and negatively affect our psychological well-being.

Antioxidants in brightly coloured fruit and vegetables scavenge free radicals, eliminate oxidative stress and decrease inflammation in the brain. This in turn increases the feelgood chemicals in the brain that elevate our mood.

Omega 3 found in oily fish and B vitamins found in some vegetables increase the production of the brain’s happiness chemicals and have been known to protect against both dementia and depression.

Salmon is an excellent source of omega 3. Caroline Attwood

Pro and prebiotics found in yoghurt, cheese and fermented products boost the millions of bacteria living in our gut. These bacteria produce chemical messengers from the gut to the brain that influence our emotions and reactions to stressful situations.

Research suggests pro- and prebiotics could work on the same neurological pathways that antidepressants do, thereby decreasing depressed and anxious states and elevating happy emotions.

What happens when you switch to a healthy diet?

An Australian research team recently undertook the first randomised control trial studying 56 individuals with depression.

Over a 12-week period, 31 participants were given nutritional consulting sessions and asked to change from their unhealthy diets to a healthy diet. The other 25 attended social support sessions and continued their usual eating patterns.

The participants continued their existing antidepressant and talking therapies during the trial.

At the end of the trial, the depressive symptoms of the group that maintained a healthier diet significantly improved. Some 32% of participants had scores so low they no longer met the criteria for depression, compared with 8% of the control group.

The trial was replicated by another research team, which found similar results, and supported by a recent review of all studies on dietary patterns and depression. The review found that across 41 studies, people who stuck to a healthy diet had a 24-35% lower risk of depressive symptoms than those who ate more unhealthy foods.

These findings suggest improving your diet could be a cost-effective complementary treatment for depression and could reduce your risk of developing a mental illness.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #SuicidePrevention : @ozprodcom issues paper on #MentalHealth in Australia is now available. It asks a range of questions which they seek information and feedback on. Submissions or comments are due by Friday 5 April.

 ” Many Australians experience difficulties with their mental health. Mental illness is the single largest contributor to years lived in ill-health and is the third largest contributor (after cancer and cardiovascular conditions) to a reduction in the total years of healthy life for Australians (AIHW 2016).

Almost half of all Australian adults have met the diagnostic criteria for an anxiety, mood or substance use disorder at some point in their lives, and around 20% will meet the criteria in a given year (ABS 2008). This is similar to the average experience of developed countries (OECD 2012, 2014).”

Download the PC issues paper HERE mental-health-issues

See Productivity Commission Website for More info 

“Clearly Australia’s mental health system is failing Aboriginal people, with Aboriginal communities devastated by high rates of suicide and poorer mental health outcomes. Poor mental health in Aboriginal communities often stems from historic dispossession, racism and a poor sense of connection to self and community. 

It is compounded by people’s lack of access to meaningful and ongoing education and employment. Drug and alcohol related conditions are also commonly identified in persons with poor mental health.

NACCHO Chairperson, Matthew Cooke 2015 Read in full Here 

Read over 200 Aboriginal Mental Health Suicide Prevention articles published by NACCHO over the past 7 years 

Despite a plethora of past reviews and inquiries into mental health in Australia, and positive reforms in services and their delivery, many people are still not getting the support they need to maintain good mental health or recover from episodes of mental ill‑health. Mental health in Australia is characterised by:

  • more than 3 100 deaths from suicide in 2017, an average of almost 9 deaths per day, and a suicide rate for Indigenous Australians that is much higher than for other Australians (ABS 2018)
  • for those living with a mental illness, lower average life expectancy than the general population with significant comorbidity issues — most early deaths of psychiatric patients are due to physical health conditions
  • gaps in services and supports for particular demographic groups, such as youth, elderly people in aged care facilities, Indigenous Australians, individuals from culturally diverse backgrounds, and carers of people with a mental illness
  • a lack of continuity in care across services and for those with episodic conditions who may need services and supports on an irregular or non-continuous basis
  • a variety of programs and supports that have been successfully trialled or undertaken for small populations but have been discontinued or proved difficult to scale up for broader benefits
  • significant stigma and discrimination around mental ill-health, particularly compared with physical illness.

The Productivity Commission has been asked to undertake an inquiry into the role of mental health in supporting social and economic participation, and enhancing productivity and economic growth (these terms are defined, for the purpose of this inquiry, in box 1).

By examining mental health from a participation and contribution perspective, this inquiry will essentially be asking how people can be enabled to reach their potential in life, have purpose and meaning, and contribute to the lives of others. That is good for individuals and for the whole community.

Background

In 2014-15, four million Australians reported having experienced a common mental disorder.

Mental health is a key driver of economic participation and productivity in Australia, and hence has the potential to impact incomes and living standards and social engagement and connectedness. Improved population mental health could also help to reduce costs to the economy over the long term.

Australian governments devote significant resources to promoting the best possible mental health and wellbeing outcomes. This includes the delivery of acute, recovery and rehabilitation health services, trauma informed care, preventative and early intervention programs, funding non-government organisations and privately delivered services, and providing income support, education, employment, housing and justice. It is important that policy settings are sustainable, efficient and effective in achieving their goals.

Employers, not-for-profit organisations and carers also play key roles in the mental health of Australians. Many businesses are developing initiatives to support and maintain positive mental health outcomes for their employees as well as helping employees with mental illhealth continue to participate in, or return to, work.

Scope of the inquiry

The Commission should consider the role of mental health in supporting economic participation, enhancing productivity and economic growth. It should make recommendations, as necessary, to improve population mental health, so as to realise economic and social participation and productivity benefits over the long term.

Without limiting related matters on which the Commission may report, the Commission should:

  • examine the effect of supporting mental health on economic and social participation, productivity and the Australian economy;
  • examine how sectors beyond health, including education, employment, social services, housing and justice, can contribute to improving mental health and economic participation and productivity;
  • examine the effectiveness of current programs and Initiatives across all jurisdictions to improve mental health, suicide prevention and participation, including by governments, employers and professional groups;
  • assess whether the current investment in mental health is delivering value for money and the best outcomes for individuals, their families, society and the economy;
  • draw on domestic and international policies and experience, where appropriate; and
  • develop a framework to measure and report the outcomes of mental health policies and investment on participation, productivity and economic growth over the long term.

The Commission should have regard to recent and current reviews, including the 2014 Review of National Mental Health Programmes and Services undertaken by the National Mental Health Commission and the Commission’s reviews into disability services and the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

The Issues Paper
The Commission has released this issues paper to assist individuals and organisations to participate in the inquiry. It contains and outlines:

  • the scope of the inquiry
  • matters about which we are seeking comment and information
  • how to share your views on the terms of reference and the matters raised.

Participants should not feel that they are restricted to comment only on matters raised in the issues paper. We want to receive information and comment on any issues that participants consider relevant to the inquiry’s terms of reference.

Key inquiry dates

Receipt of terms of reference 23 November 2018
Initial consultations November 2018 to April 2019
Initial submissions due 5 April 2019
Release of draft report Timing to be advised
Post draft report public hearings Timing to be advised
Submissions on the draft report due Timing to be advised
Consultations on the draft report November 2019 to February 2020
Final report to Government 23 May 2020

Submissions and brief comments can be lodged

Online (preferred): https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/current/mental-health/submissions
By post: Mental Health Inquiry
Productivity Commission
GPO Box 1428, Canberra City, ACT 2601

Contacts

Inquiry matters: Tracey Horsfall Ph: 02 6240 3261
Freecall number: Ph: 1800 020 083
Website: http://www.pc.gov.au/mental-health

Subscribe for inquiry updates

To receive emails updating you on the inquiry consultations and releases, subscribe to the inquiry at: http://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/current/mentalhealth/subscribe

 

 Definition of key terms
Mental health is a state of wellbeing in which every individual realises his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community.

Mental illness or mental disorder is a health problem that significantly affects how a person feels, thinks, behaves and interacts with other people. It is diagnosed according to standardised criteria.

Mental health problem refers to some combination of diminished cognitive, emotional, behavioural and social abilities, but not to the extent of meeting the criteria for a mental illness/disorder.

Mental ill-health refers to diminished mental health from either a mental illness/disorder or a mental health problem.

Social and economic participation refers to a range of ways in which people contribute to and have the resources, opportunities and capability to learn, work, engage with and have a voice in the community. Social participation can include social engagement, participation in decision making, volunteering, and working with community organisations. Economic participation can include paid employment (including self-employment), training and education.

Productivity measures how much people produce from a given amount of effort and resources. The greater their productivity, the higher their incomes and living standards will tend to be.

Economic growth is an increase in the total value of goods and services produced in an economy. This can be achieved, for example, by raising workforce participation and/or productivity.

Sources: AIHW (2018b); DOHA (2013); Gordon et al. (2015); PC (2013, 2016, 2017c); SCRGSP (2018); WHO (2001).

An improvement in an individual’s mental health can provide flow-on benefits in terms of increased social and economic participation, engagement and connectedness, and productivity in employment (figure 1).

This can in turn enhance the wellbeing of the wider community, including through more rewarding relationships for family and friends; a lower burden on informal carers; a greater contribution to society through volunteering and working in community groups; increased output for the community from a more productive workforce; and an associated expansion in national income and living standards. These raise the capacity of the community to invest in interventions to improve mental health, thereby completing a positive reinforcing loop.

The inquiry’s terms of reference (provided at the front of this paper) were developed by the Australian Government in consultation with State and Territory Governments. The terms of reference ask the Commission to make recommendations to improve population mental health so as to realise higher social and economic participation and contribution benefits over the long term.

Assessing the consequences of mental ill-health

The costs of mental ill-health for both individuals and the wider community will be assessed, as well as how these costs could be reduced through changes to the way governments and others deliver programs and supports to facilitate good mental health.

The Commission will consider the types of costs summarised in figure 4. These will be assessed through a combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis, drawing on available data and cost estimates, and consultations with inquiry participants and topic experts. We welcome the views of inquiry participants on other costs that we should take into account.