NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health #OCHREDay Press Release : Over 200 delegates inspired to take home new skills and knowledge to face the challenges in improving the health of men in their communities.

“We all know about the statistics in regards to Indigenous men’s health, we got some pretty numbers, better than some cricket scores.

We can close the gap about men’s health a lot better than a lot of the attempts that were made from Canberra.”

Ernie Dingo spoke at Ochre Day about their successful men’s health remote community program – Camping on Countrywhere culture is an integral part of health

NACCHO Ochre Day is an important event that reflects on the social and emotional issues our men face and are less likely to seek help for themselves. It is a great platform to hear stories of hope and empowerment and to learn what is working in our communities – of strategies that are successful for our men to take better care of their health and wellbeing.

This year’s conference saw great participation from all 200 delegates who embraced the three focus areas of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men being in control, innovative and influential.

 Problems were met with solutions, with many delegates taking home new skills and knowledge to face the challenges in improving the health of men in their communities.”

NACCHO’s commitment is to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males to live longer, healthier lives and reduce the rate of preventable hospitalisations, which is almost three times higher than for other Australian men.”

Mr John Paterson, CEO of Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) and spokesperson for NACCHO said in his opening address at the seventh annual Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference over August 29-30 at Pullman On the Park, Melbourne : Hosted by VACCHO

Read in full John Paterson’s opening speech

Read and or Download this NACCHO Press Release HERE

NACCHO Ochre Day Media Release 30 August 2019

Please note all photography James Henry : Contact Here

The NACCHO Ochre Day Conference celebrated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health and wellbeing.

It upholds traditional values of respect for the law, elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of families.

The enduring theme for the conference is – Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It!

The comprehensive program had an eminent line-up of speakers cover diverse topics, such as behavioural change and using data to tell stories about health.

“True empowering moments are the connections and friendships that lead the change for ourself’s, family and communities.

Strong men, Strong families and strong communities”.

Patrick Johnson at OCHRE day 

In photo above from left to right : Preston Campbell Dally M Award winner, Olympian Karl Vander-Kuyp ,Lomas Amini Bush TV, Ben Mitchell OChre Day MC Coolamon Adisors and Patrick Johnson Olympian and Deadly Choices Ambassador

Read or Download a full list of speakers HERE

Please note a full Ochre Day report on all speakers will be published next month 

Lomas Amini and Ernie Dingo spoke about their successful men’s health remote community program – Camping on Country, where culture is an integral part of health.

While Delroy Bergsma and Robert Binismar of Youth Focus shared their success stories in using art and music to help young people in rural areas deal with mental health.

Former NRL star and community leader Preston Campbell moved delegates, speaking about what it means to be a leader and an Elder.

He drove home the message that “Leaders aren’t the ones proclaiming to be leaders. Leaders put their hand up and take accountability”. Preston shared how his NRL career taught him the value of self-reflection and honesty in articulating a vision for his community.

Every year, during the Ochre Day conference, NACCHO hosts a memorial dinner in honour of Jaydon Adams, a young leader whose contribution to youth participation in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health lives on.

The winner of the 2019 Jaydon Adams Memorial Award was Nathan Taylor from Dandenong and District Aborigines Co-operative Ltd. Pictured here on right with Mark and Lizzie Adams

Nathan was recognised for his exemplary work as an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth worker

Nathan Taylor is employed as a Youth Worker at DDACL. In his role he comes into contact with many Aboriginal young people and is always caring about what they are doing and their health and their current situation. He shows exemplary care and concern for his fellow Koori (male or female) and advocates on their behalf with various providers, especially within our organisation.

Nathan Taylor is always concerned about better health for Aboriginal young people. He has been integrally involved in a good health program for young people early in the morning before school. He arranges to pick them up, gets them to a basketball facility and puts them through their paces, then they get ready and changed and have breakfast. He then drops them off at school.

It has changed these young peoples perceptions of themselves and improved their outlook on life and lifting their self-esteem and has encouraged them to do better at school and be more mindful of their health and that of their family and friends.

Nathan Taylor understands that young people need to be active and that will help them to stay fit through out their life, prevent take up of smoking and enable them to be better parents for the next generation and good roll models for our community at large. He knows that this will help reduce incidents of chronic disease like hypertension and diabetes, and reduce the risks of stroke and other lifestyle illnesses.

Nathan Taylor has a soft voice and a personal way of engaging with Aboriginal young people. He is able to build a quick rapport and to find out about a person (who they are and where they’re from) so that he can provide advice or a point of referral.

In 2018 Nathan Taylor earned a Diploma in Youth and received the Koori Student of the Year Award for 2018 and the CEO Award from Chisholm Institute TAFE Dandenong i

Our thanks to the sponsors Aboriginal Health Television

See AHTV website

Aboriginal Health Television (AHTV) has potential to reach over 1 million patients, family members and carers every month in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations & Aboriginal Medical Services across the country.

Our digital TV network delivers targeted, culturally relevant, health & wellbeing messages to Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander communities resulting in better health decisions & outcomes

Jake Thomson pictured below

NACCHO Aboriginal Men’s Health : John Paterson launches Men’s Health Our Way – Let’s Own it #Ochre Day program in Melbourne around three main themes, – In Control, Influence and Innovation : Read full speech HERE

Ochre Day is an important event for reflecting on these issues, and for hearing stories of hope and empowerment, and learning what is working in our communities – of strategies that are successful in engaging our men to take better care of their health and wellbeing.

It is good to see that other presentations will also be illustrating the connections between culture, sense of place and wellbeing, and the importance of supporting Aboriginal men to become leaders, role models and mentors within their communities. ”

Opening address by John Paterson, AMSANT CEO August 29

Download or view the full 2 Day Program

Good Morning everyone and welcome to the NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference.

My name is John Paterson, I am a Ngalakan man from the Roper River Region of the NT. I am the CEO of AMSANT, the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health peak body in the Northern Territory, and I have been invited to speak to you today on behalf of NACCHO.

I would like to acknowledge that the land we meet on today is the traditional lands for the Boon Wurrung and Woiwurrung (Wurnundjeri) peoples of the Kulin Nation. Their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Boon Wurrung and Woiwurrung (Wurnundjeri) people today.

This is also true for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples that are here this morning. We draw on the strength of our lands, our Elders past and on the lived experience of our community members.

I would also like to acknowledge and thank our hosts, the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

And finally, I would like to acknowledge and welcome our Mr Phillip Matsamato of Broome who has been our patron since 2013

Ochre Day was first held in 2013.

It is an important initiative that seeks to bring a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

Finally, NACCHO’s commitment is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves.

The goals of Ochre Day are to:

  • Provide an opportunity to ‘showcase’ examples of best practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health service delivery;
  • Raise awareness of issues that have an impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health and social, emotional wellbeing; and
  • Enable the exchange of information among delegates on initiatives that are focused on improving male health and wellbeing.

This year’s Ochre Day program has been developed around three main themes, – In Control, Influence and Innovation. They focus on strategies that:

  • Enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men to take control of their health;
  • Influence new health behaviours; and
  • Highlight new innovations in Aboriginal men’s health.

The three main themes sit comfortably with the Ochre Day logo – Men’s Health Our Way – Let’s Own it.

This year marks the seventh Ochre Day. The concept of Ochre Day was developed in 2013 by Mark Saunders and Colin Cowell to launch the NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10-Point Blueprint Plan 2013 -2030.

Deputy NACCHO chair Matthew Cooke, Chair Justin Mohamed and board member John Singer launching Blueprint 2013

The 2013 one day event was held in a marque in front of Parliament House Canberra to highlight the positive work of Aboriginal males in our sector and communities

We do not need another top down Federal Government strategy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander Men’s health when we already have the foundations with this Blue Print.

See 2013 BluePrint Plan HERE

Yes ,we need to review and edit our plan but

As we say its Men’s Health Our Way – Let’s Own it.

Speaking of the history of Ochre Day I  would also like to acknowledge the great work of Mark Saunders who managed on very tight budgets the first four Ochre Days held in Canberra , Brisbane , Perth and Adelaide.

See OCHRE DAY history HERE

So why is it important to hold an annual conference specifically focusing on men’s health?

When NACCHO first conceived the idea of an Ochre Day, it was in response to what we were hearing in the Aboriginal Community Controlled health sector, backed up by evidence-based research that suggested our men have the worst health outcomes of any group in Australia.[i]

Our men have an unacceptable higher rate of fatal and non-fatal burden for almost every health condition, and we also have a higher prevalence of risk factors and risk-taking behaviours. We are overrepresented in mental health statistics and are three times more likely to die prematurely than other Australian men.[ii]

Help seeking behaviour is important for addressing health issues. Sadly, our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men are much less likely than our women to seek help from health professionals.[iii] It is not surprising, then, to learn that our rate of preventable hospitalisations is almost three times higher than for other Australian men.

These statistics paint a disturbing picture of the state of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.

Ochre Day is an important event for reflecting on these issues, and for hearing stories of hope and empowerment, and learning what is working in our communities – of strategies that are successful in engaging our men to take better care of their health and wellbeing.

We are looking forward to hearing from Lomas Amini and Ernie Dingo on how Camping on Country, which has been designed around the principle that culture is an integral part of health, is achieving great outcomes in communities.

It is good to see that other presentations will also be illustrating the connections between culture, sense of place and wellbeing, and the importance of supporting Aboriginal men to become leaders, role models and mentors within their communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men make up one of the nine priority population groups of the National Men’s Health Strategy. We will have an opportunity to learn more about the goals of this important strategy later in the program, including how we can become involved in key activities.

We all know the devastating effects of social and emotional wellbeing issues in our communities, and the Ochre Day program includes several presentations on culturally appropriate interventions for engaging with young people and identifying persons with depression and possibly at risk of self-harm.

Sadly, nearly half of our men continue to smoke. This is in comparison with about 17% of non-Indigenous men. As you are aware, smoking is one of the biggest causes of death. It will be good to learn about how a Smoking in Prisons project is being rolled out in SA.

Culturally appropriate health promotion interventions are vital for engaging our men and changing health behaviours. I am looking forward to discovering more about what is working and what doesn’t work. It will also be good to learn more about Aboriginal Health Television, which plays important messages in the reception areas of our Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

Making sure that we have the information we need to help us improve our health outcomes is also important, and it will be good to hear about a national longitudinal study of culture, health and wellbeing that has been designed by Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people.

I am sure that you agree that an excellent program has been put together again. I am confident that the presentations will interest and inform; and I am looking forward to our discussions over the next two days.

I sincerely hope that the knowledge gained from Ochre Day will energise you to continue your ongoing and important contributions to men’s health in your communities.

I HEREBY DECLARE THE SEVENTH ANNUAL NACCHO NATIONAL OCHRE DAY CONFERENCE OPEN

[i] Commonwealth Department of Health. 2019. National Men’s Health Strategy 2020-2030. Canberra.

[ii] Ibid.

[iii] Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. 2017. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. Canberra.

NACCHO Aboriginal Men’s Health #OCHREDay Aug 29-30 : Registrations still open : Ernie Dingo @BushTV keynote #Closing  the gap in remote men’s health by empowering them to improve their physical, emotional, and social wellbeing.

“We’re going back on country with the men to strengthen their mentality towards their culture, their law, their language, but more so for medical benefits.

We have a team of medical officers who come out, male of course, who do checks on them so they can talk freely about their health, sitting around campfires.

We talk about needs in their community and just talk about things as a men’s group that we won’t be able to talk about in town or around family and stuff.”

Lomas Amini and Ernie Dingo will present Camping on Country at OCHRE Day Summit in Melbourne 29 -30 August

OCHRE DAY Web Page for all program info etc 

This year’s NACCHO Ochre Day men’s health conference is only a week away so be sure to register now

Register HERE

TV personality Ernie Dingo is hoping to close the gap in remote men’s health by empowering them to improve their physical, emotional, and social wellbeing.

Originally Published ABC NEWS 

Key points:

  • Ernie Dingo is working with BushTV to run camps for Indigenous men around Australia
  • The men have yarning circles, cultural activities and health checks
  • The program aims to empower men to improve their own health by strengthening culture, law and language

The Yamatji man from Western Australia is the chairman of Indigenous media organisation BushTV, which is running a program called Camping On Country.

“We’re going back on country with the men to strengthen their mentality towards their culture, their law, their language, but more so for medical benefits,” Dingo said.

“We have a team of medical officers who come out, male of course, who do checks on them so they can talk freely about their health, sitting around campfires.

“We talk about needs in their community and just talk about things as a men’s group that we won’t be able to talk about in town or around family and stuff.”

Men sitting around a camp fire in the outback.

The program has received $1 million from the Federal Government to run 20 camps over two years.

They have so far been held across northern Australia in places including Kununurra, Borroloola, Tennant Creek, and Kowanyama.

Strategies to close the gap had so far not worked well, Dingo said.

“The elders don’t want non-Indigenous people telling them what to,” he said.

“So this is Aboriginal men talking to Aboriginal men, rather than government coming out and they have to put up with the dry heat.

“We video interviews with [the men] about what they need and use that as a message stick to take to the minister for Aboriginal affairs.”

BushTV has also partnered with Sydney-based medical research organisation The George Institute, which will conduct longitudinal research using data collected from the camps.

‘Something special will happen’

Dingo said it was a privilege to take a young man with disabilities to a recent camp near Kowanyama.

“He’s a Kowanyama boy who was taken away at the age of two because of his disabilities; he needs care 24/7 and he’s in Cairns,” he said.

“He has never been to his country [since], and to be blessed on his tribal ground, that was very special to see.

“People moved heaven and earth to get him there.

“He was feeling the earth around him, a bit of a paddle in the creek and it was a real blessing to see.

“We have great moments like that at every camp — something special will happen.”

Ernie Dingo laughs while posing for a photo with another Indigenous man in front of BushTV truck

‘Don’t leave it too long’

Dingo, 63, has also struggled with depression and said it had been good for him to share his experiences with other men.

“You just suffer, and when you knock-off work and go home, that’s when it hurts the most,” he said.

If you or someone you know needs help contact your ACCHO , call:

“So I get to talk about a lot of stuff like that with a lot of people in similar situations and it’s making me stronger.

“It’s a good thing for me as well to be able to listen to people going through the same stuff that I’m going through and realise, not so much just zip it up and keep working, but actually spending time talking to people and making yourself feel better.”

He urged men struggling with problems to seek help.

“Don’t leave it too long, you can’t let things fester — it’s better to carry the scar than carry the the wound ”

 

NACCHO #OCHREDay 2019 Men’s Health Conference Speakers: Building stronger families and safer communities is the Dardi Munwurro vision.

“It’s important to understand the importance of healing in our work. While mainstream focus on behaviour, which is understandable, we’re trying to address both healing and behaviour.

It’s a different space. Aboriginal people carry a big weight, issues like racism, colonisation and the stolen generation. We’re trying to address all those issues as well as change the cycle of violence.

 It’s only once we address this trauma that we can move onto accountability and responsibility,”

said Alan Thorpe, Director of Dardi Munwurro 

Before men can stop being violent Alan Thorpe, Director of Dardi Munwurro and Lionel Dukakis Programs Manager of  Ngarra Jarranounith Place believe men must heal the trauma in their life.

Picture above (L-R) Lionel Dukakis, John Byrne and Alan Thorpe

They will be one of the many presenters at this year’s OCHRE DAY, Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne who will touch upon one of our key focus areas for this year – Innovative: identifying gaps in service delivery, considering new ideas and testing new approaches towards continuous quality improvement.

More Information Register HERE

Background Dardi Munwurro: Bringing out the best in Aboriginal men, for stronger communities article from No To Violence Website

Established in the year 2000, Dardi Munwurro provides group leadership training programs in Family Violence, specifically tailored to Aboriginal men and youth.Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women lead and support their families, communities and fellow Australians every week of every year.

It’s because of these women and their children, that organisations like Dardi Munwurro, who work directly with men to stop their use of violence, now exist. ‘Building stronger families and safer communities’ is indeed the Dardi Munwurro vision.

A vision best achieved by connecting with the heart and mind of an Aboriginal man who uses violence.

For Alan Thorpe, Director of Dardi Munwurro and Board Member of ‘No to Violence’, tackling a problem head on is an approach he’s used well both on and off the sporting field, having played in the AFL in the early 1980s for both Sydney and Footscray.

Not long after football, Alan sought after a deeper meaning, for both himself and the men in his community. With not much else but a mobile phone and a car, Alan began visiting Aboriginal men that had lost their way in life, men disconnected with their identity and angry with the world and those around them. The approach, which has naturally been refined over the years, was simple: Heal the man, stop the violence.

Over countless kilometres and conversations, Alan and John have little by little accumulated the support and trust of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people working to break the cycle of violence in communities.

Most of the team are men’s healing and behaviour change facilitators who work regularly with Indigenous and non-indigenous psychologists, family violence advisory councils and legal services.

Lionel Dukakis, a Gunditjmara man from southwestern Victoria, is Programs Manager of  Ngarra Jarranounith Place – a residential healing program for Aboriginal men using violence – a world first.

Supported by the Victorian Government and the Collingwood Football Club, the 12-16 week program uses therapeutic family violence and personal development programs to engage men, while supporting women and children to safely restore their own lives.

“Mainstream services aren’t yet equipped to address cultural losses in a safe environment” says Alan. “I know of a situation where a discussion in a men’s behaviour change program that ran during Australia Day week, caused conflict between Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants. Because of that conflict, four Aboriginal men left the group and never came back. That right there is the difference” says Alan.

‘No to Violence’ is working with Aboriginal experts in men’s family violence in the development of the new practice manual for Men’s Behaviour Change Program (MBCP) facilitators and will be developing new training courses in the coming months to support the culturally safe delivery of MBCPs.

Dardi Munwurro sees the rebuilding of cultural identity and the identification of emotional strength among its participants as central to its programs. Men in these Healing and Behaviour Change Programs attend camps where they participate in therapeutic healing circles, work with Elders and learn the skills to plan for a future with healthy, respectful relationships.

To read the full article open LINK HERE

For more information on Dardi Munwurro and its programs, please visit their website dardimunwurro.com.au or call 1800 435 799.

NACCHO #OCHREDay 2019: Lomas Amini and Ernie Dingo will present on their program ‘Camping on Country’ – The importance of remote men’s health and culture camp: Register HERE

 ” Camping on Country is a remote men’s movement designed to create powerful advocacy around closing the gap on remote men’s health.

 Our network of men is growing as we camp on country and link men’s groups around remote Australia.” 

Ernie Dingo

At the NACCHO OCHRE day Conference in Melbourne, Lomas Amini ( pictured below ) and Ernie Dingo will present Camping on Country – The importance of remote men’s health and culture camp 

 More info NACCHO OCHRE DAY and register HERE

 Here is what Lomas Amini and Ernie Dingo have to say about their program

What do they do: Each month we visit a remote community and run men’s health  and culture camps which include local Leadership and Lore men for that country.

The following is an extract from their Camping on Country Website

At the camps we provide a space for local leaders to discuss what health issues they face in their community, what programs are working or not working and we work with the men to articulate their ideas for health programs targeted at their own men.

We run a second bigger camp where the men from neighbouring language groups all come together to showcase their culture and well being programs. The men learn from each other and show pride in their culture and programs.

Local health stakeholders and community organisations are engaged and activated and finally we assist the men in identifying and applying for a specific health program grant developed by them for local men in their community.

We partner with health service providers to ensure our camps are safe, healthy and inspiring. Men get access to on-country culturally safe health checks, counselling and mental health first aid. Culture, Language and Lore play a significant role in our camps.

Culture and local leaders are also embedded in our longitudinal research and evaluation project which is conducted in partnership with the The George Institute. We collect and collate our camp data so we can track our impact and progress.

We employ local men to assist with our camps and our research. As an Aboriginal company we are committed to creating employment for our local men.

Why do they do it ? The Camping on Country Program enables Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men to be leaders in their own health and wellbeing and upholds values of respecting culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers and protectors of families and communities.

Evidence shows that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men have higher rates of alcohol misuse, mental health and social and emotional wellbeing issues and preventable chronic diseases than non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men[1].

While we know of the complex issues born of dispossession and colonisation we also know that by addressing social, emotional and cultural issues we can prevent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from developing further serious health complications[2].

The My Life My Lead report clearly shows that culture and Country play a significant role in the development of successful Aboriginal health programs[3]. We also know from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework that there is a clear gap in robust evidence on effective programs and interventions[4].

We need to be able to demonstrate this so Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men can show they are the experts of their health and to support their aspirations for strong, safe communities and happy vibrant families.

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan highlights the importance of putting culture at the centre of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s right to live a healthy, safe and empowered life with a strong connection to culture and country[5]. Culture and community as both protectors and enablers of health and wellbeing are central to the Camping on Country program.

Together we want build the evidence needed to demonstrate that working with Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander men as the experts in their own health and community is the best way to Close the Gap.

[1] National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023
[2] National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023
[3] My Life My Lead – Opportunities for strengthening approaches to the social determinants and cultural determinants of Indigenous health: Report on the national consultations, December 2017
[4] The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework, 2017
[5] National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Men’s Health News : History of NACCHO Ochre Days 2013-2019: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Men’s Health – Register now for Ochre Day 2019 in Melbourne 29-30 August!

For the past six years the annual NACCHO Ochre Day Health summits have provided a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities.”

This year Melbourne will host the 2019 Ochre Day-: Know more and REGISTER HERE

Down Memory Lane: Ochre Day events of the past – Canberra 2013, Brisbane 2014, Adelaide 2015, Perth 2018 ,Darwin 2016 and Hobart 2019

2013 Canberra

The first National NACCHO Ochre Day was held in a large marque erected on the lawns opposite Parliament House Canberra on 8 August 2013

The concept of Ochre Day was developed in 2013 by Mark Saunders and Colin Cowell as alternative to the White Ribbon Campaign :

View their conference presentation HERE 

The feature of the 2013 event was the launch of the NACCHO 10-Point Blueprint plan.

Deputy NACCHO chair Matthew Cooke, Chair Justin Mohamed and board member John Singer launching Blueprint

The Blueprint was based on a robust body of work that included the Close the Gap Statement of Intent and the Close the Gap targets, the National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002), NACCHO’s position paper on Aboriginal male health (2010) the 2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP), and the NACCHO Healthy futures 10 point plan 2013-2030.

Read full Blue Print HERE 

2014 Brisbane

The 2016 NACCHO Ochre Day was held on the lands Turrbal People

Details of 2016 speakers and events HERE

2015 Adelaide

The 2015 NACCHO Ochre Day lands of the Kaurna Peoples of the Adelaide Plains.

Details of 2015 speakers and events HERE

2016 Perth

The 2016 NACCHO Ochre Day was held on Noongar lands

Details of 2016 speakers and events HERE

2017 Darwin

2017 NACCHO Ochre Day was held on Larrakia Land

Details of 2017 speakers and events HERE

2018 Hobart

The 2018 NACCHO Ochre Day was held at Nipaluna (Hobart)

Details of 2018 speakers and events HERE

NACCHO Ochre Day videos are available on the NACCHO YouTube Channel.

The Nipaluna (Hobart) Ochre day statement: that our timeless culture still endures can be read here.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #SaveADate #NAIDOC2019 @KenWyattMP July 10 Watch @ABCTV #NPC Plus #OCHREDay registrations and nominations for Jaydon Adams Memorial Awards are open

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

9 July  Jaydon Adams Memorial Award 2019 nominations Open : Close 7 August

10 July Minister Ken Wyatt at the National Press Club 

2-5 August Garma Festival 

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

6 – 8 August 2019 Our Health, Our Way Leadership Conference Alice Springs 

13- 14 August Indigenous Health Justice Conference (IHJ) Darwin 

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured this week 

9 July Jaydon Adams Memorial Award 2019 nominations Open : Close 7 August

Jaydon Adams Memorial Award 2019 nominations open: Nominate now!

The Jaydon Adams Memorial award is presented each year at the Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference.

This year the conference is in Melbourne on the 29 – 30 August 2019.

See details and register HERE

The award is designed to recognise a dedicated young Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander man employed in the Aboriginal health area. Eligibility requirements

  • In order to be eligible for the Jaydon Adams Memorial Award 2019, applicants must meet all of the following criteria:be a young male, age 30 years or under and of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
  • currently work either in ACCHOs, AMSs, AODs (full forms) or in social and emotional wellbeing services from across urban, regional/rural and remote Australia
  • nominated by a supervisor and supported or endorsed by the current CEO of the organisation.

For more details on the selection process, selection panel and to nominate an eligible young Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander man employed in the Aboriginal health area click here.

10 July Minister Ken Wyatt at the National Press Club -SOLD OUT

During NAIDOC week and in his first major Address as Indigenous Affairs Minister, Ken Wyatt will lay out the pathway towards possible constitutional recognition for Australia’s first peoples and the importance of its view on the voice to parliament.

Ken Wyatt AM will outline how he and the Government want to do things differently – how partnerships, pride, respect and responsibility underpin his vision for a better future for Indigenous Australians and a stronger nation, even more confident in its cultural heritage and history.

Watch live on Free to Air TV 

Our first Aboriginal Minister for Indigenous Australians will detail the critical role of education, culture, community safety, suicide prevention, health, hope, employment and business development.

He will share the importance of co-designing and planning with Indigenous Australians at all levels, from the grassroots to peak representative bodies – and how inclusion and understanding is the only pathway towards Constitutional recognition.

As he has said, his dream is to ensure the greatness of our many Indigenous nations is reflected in the greatness of our Australian nation, now and forever.


Ken Wyatt was elected in 2010 as the Federal Member for Hasluck, located east of Perth, making history as the first Aboriginal Member of the House of Representatives.

The traditional garment worn by Ken on special occasions is a booka, a traditional kangaroo skin cloak presented to him by Perth’s Noongar elders and decorated with cockatoo feathers that signify his status in Noongar culture as a leader.

Since his election, Ken has worked tirelessly to be a strong advocate for his electorate to help build a stronger local community.

In 2015 Ken became the first Aboriginal member of the Federal Executive after being sworn in as Assistant Minister for Health, responsible for Aged Care, as well as for Dementia, the Organ and Tissue Authority and Australian Hearing.

In January 2017, Ken made history as the first Aboriginal Minister to serve in a Federal Government, after being appointed as Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

In August 2018, he was made Minister for Senior Australians & Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

In May 2019, he again made history when he became the first Aboriginal person to be made Minister for Indigenous Australians.

Before entering politics Ken worked in community and senior government roles in the fields of health and education including as Director of Aboriginal Health in both New South Wales and Western Australia.

In addition to Ken’s extensive public service career, he has made an enormous contribution to the wider community which was recognised in 1996 when he was awarded the Order of Australia for services to health, education and Indigenous affairs.

In 2000, Ken received a Centenary of Federation Medal for his contribution to improving the quality of life of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and mainstream Australian society.

BOOK HERE 

2-5 August Garma Festival 

Garma Website

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

We Play, We Learn, We Belong
We play on our land.
We learn from our ancestors.

We belong with our communities.

In 2019, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day is celebrating the early years, and promoting the importance of early years education and care for our little ones.

We recognise the critical role that family, community, country and culture play in their development.

And we will continue to fight for better access to culturally appropriate early childhood education for our children through Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations.

Our 2019 Ambassador is Nanna from the animated children’s series Little J & Big Cuz.

We are delighted to have Nanna representing Children’s Day this year.

Children’s Day has been celebrated on the 4th of August for more than 30 years. It’s a special time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to celebrate our children, and for all Aussies to learn about our cultures.

Around the 4th of August, schools, kinders and communities run Children’s Day events. On this website you can get ideas for how to run a Children’s Day event, and register your event so we can see Children’s Day growing each year across the nation.

We sell Children’s Day bags with fun toys and activities for kids to play with at your event. We can send you posters to promote Children’s Day and we will have a video of Nanna that you can show at your event.

Aboriginal Childrens Day Website

Are you holding a Children’s Day event this year? Call us on (03) 9419 1921 or email info@snaicc.org.au to order your FREE Children’s Day poster!

6-8 August AMSANT is holding a one and a half day conference to celebrate its 25thAnniversary of working with and supporting the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector and member services.

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) have a long and successful history as leaders in providing best practice primary health care to our communities, starting in the NT in 1973 with the establishment of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress). This was only two years after the first Aboriginal Medical Service was established at Redfern in Sydney.

At a meeting in Alice Springs in 1994, ACCHSs in the NT formed our own peak body, the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT (AMSANT). Our sector has not looked back. AMSANT now has 26 member services across the Territory and is continuing to expand and strengthen its membership.

The last 45 years has seen our sector grow significantly, supported for the past 25 years through AMSANT’s leadership and advocacy. The innovation and leadership of the ACCHSs sector has influenced system-wide improvements in primary health care.

This record of achievement has ensured that ACCHSs are the preferred model for primary health care services to Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory. Currently, our member ACCHSs provide over half of all primary health care services delivered to our people in the Northern Territory and there is an ongoing process for further transition to community control in coordination with our partners in the NT Aboriginal Health Forum.

A nationally-significant conference

The Our Health Our Way – 25 of Health Leadership Conference 2019 will be held at the Alice Springs Convention Centre and will bring together key local and national speakers to discuss the achievements and successes of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector in the Northern Territory and the future development of Aboriginal comprehensive primary health care here and beyond.

The themes of the conference will cover key aspects of our sector, from health leadership and governance through to research and data and continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes, and growing a sustainable Aboriginal health workforce.

The conference will showcase the successes of AMSANT’s member health services in effectively delivering primary health care services and developing local, community based and led programs across a range of areas including social and emotional well-being, health and housing, and expanding community controlled health services.

The conference format will include keynote speakers, plenary sessions and breakout workshop sessions on key topics. The conference program will be available soon on AMSANT’s website.

Conference Dinner

A Conference Dinner will be held on the evening of Wednesday 7th August at the Convention Centre featuring dinner and entertainment.

Individual seats or tables may be booked as part of the registration process.

Partner information stalls

The Our Health, Our Way – 25 Years of Health Leadership Conference 2019 will provide opportunities for government and NGO partners to hold information stalls within the conference venue to promote their work.

If you are interested in holding a stall during the conference please contact us using the details provided below.

Further information and registration

Further information including registration for the event will be available on AMSANT’s website: http://www.amsant.org.au

Inquiries can be made by phone or email or in person:

Mia Christophersen

Email: mia.christophersen@amsant.org.au

Phone: 08 8944 6666 (Darwin)

AMSANT Darwin Office: 43 Mitchell St, Darwin

13- 14 August Indigenous Health Justice Conference (IHJ)

This year AMSANT is pleased to partner with the group representing Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander lawyers and law students in the Northern Territory – Winkiku Rrumbangi NT Indigenous
Lawyers Aboriginal Corporation – to host the Indigenous Health Justice Conference (IHJ) in Darwin

This conference will run parallel to the 14th National Indigenous Legal Conference being held in Darwin for the first time. Collaborations between Health and Justice services are gaining momentum nationally and internationally because the broadly accepted evidence shows these can lead to improved outcomes.

AMSANT’s policy focus has raised the importance of dealing with the social determinants of healthand, for some individuals, unresolved legal issues can also be determinants of health.

To discuss this conference further, please contact John Rawnsley via email
directors.wrnt@gmail.com.

 

Website 

29th  – 30th  Aug 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

Ochre Day is on again! 

This year the event will be held at the Pullman on the Park in Melbourne between 29-30 August 2019.

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to share knowledge, design concepts and strengthen relationships that work to directly improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men.

Commencing in Canberra in 2013, Ochre Day is an important NACCHO Aboriginal male health initiative. Ochre Day has also been held in Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth, Darwin and Tasmania. NACCHO has long recognised the importance of addressing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health as part of Close the Gap initiatives.

NACCHO identified it needed to raise awareness, gain support and communicate to the wider Australian public on issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males. The purpose of the Ochre Day conference is to assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach.

Ochre Day Registrations

Registrations for this year’s Ochre Day Men’s Conference are now live!

To register for this year’s Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne, please click on the below link.

Register Here

Ochre Day Accommodation

To take advantage of the Ochre Day conference room rates which have been arranged with Pullman On The Park, Melbourne, please click on the below link.

Book Now

 

Full report on 2018 OCHRE DAY in Hobart with 15 NACCHOTV Interviews

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

Preliminary program and registration information available to download now!

Less than 3 weeks until our discounted early bird offer closes.

Visit  for more information.

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

Print

Location:             Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin NT
Theme:                 Disruptive Innovations in Healthcare
Register:              Register Here
Web:                     www.aida.org.au/conference
Enquiries:           conference@aida.org.au

The AIDA 2019 Conference is a forum to share and build on knowledge that increasingly disrupts existing practice and policy to raise the standards of health care.

People with a passion for health care equity are invited to share their knowledges and expertise about how they have participated in or enabled a ‘disruptive innovation to achieve culturally safe and responsive practice or policy for Indigenous communities.

The 23rd annual AIDA Conference provides a platform for networking, mentoring, member engagement and the opportunity to celebrate the achievements of AIDA’S Indigenous doctor and students.

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

 

2019 Marks 10 years since the formation of NATSIHWA and registrations are now open!!!

During the 9 – 10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference will be celebrated at the Convention Centre in Alice Springs

Bursaries available for our Full Members

Not a member?!

Register here today to become a Full Member to gain all NATSIHWA Full Member benefits

Come and celebrate NATSIHWA’s 10 year Anniversary National Conference ‘A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition’ which is being held in Alice Springs. We aim to offer an insight into the Past, Present and Future of NATSIHWA and the overall importance of strengthening the primary health care sector’s unique workforce of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners throughout Australia.

During the 9-10 October 2019 delegates will be exposed to networking opportunities whilst immersing themselves with a combination of traditional and practical conference style delivery.

Our intention is to engage Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in the history and knowledge exchange of the past, todays evidence based best practice programs/services available and envisioning what the future has to offer for all Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Watch this space for the guest speaker line up, draft agenda and award nominations

15-17 October IUIH System of Care Conference

15 October IUIH 10 year anniversary

Building on the success of last year’s inaugural conference, the 2019 System of Care Conference will be focusing on further exploring and sharing the systems and processes that deliver this life changing way of looking at life-long health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

This year IUIH delivers 10 years of experience in improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with proven methods for closing the gap and impacting on the social determinants of health.

The IUIH System of Care is evidence-based and nationally recognised for delivering outcomes, and the conference will share the research behind the development and implementation of this system, with presentations by speakers across a range of specialisations including clinic set up, clinical governance, systems integration, wrap around services such as allied and social health, workforce development and research evidence.

If you are working in:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled health services
  • Primary Health Networks
  • Health and Hospital Boards and Management
  • Government Departments
  • The University Sector
  • The NGO Sector

Watch this video for an insight into the IUIH System of Care Conference.

This year, the IUIH System of Care Conference will be offering a number of half-day workshops on Thursday 17 October 2019, available to conference attendees only. The cost for these workshops is $150 per person, per workshop and your attendance to these can be selected during your single or group registration.

IUIH are also hosting a 10 years of service celebration dinner on Tuesday 15 October – from 6.30-10pm. Tickets for this are $150 per person and are not included in the cost of registration.

All conference information is available here https://www.ivvy.com.au/event/IUIH19/

15 October IUIH 10 year anniversary

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

Want to be kept updated on the WIHC in November 2019 ?

Inbox us your email address and we will add you to the mailing list or email our Principal Project Manager- Brandon.etto@nationalcongress.com.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO #ClosingTheGap Aboriginal Men’s Health #OCHREDay 1 of 7 : @DrKootsy @theMJA:  Our ACCHO/ AMS’s health services must make the appropriate changes to improve access and, ultimately, men’s health outcomes

 

 Only 7 weeks to the NACCHO OCHRE Day in Melbourne and registrations are open

Between now and the 29-30 August National men’s Conference NACCHO will be publishing each Monday articles about Men’s Health and contributions from an amazing line up of speakers: Our first contribution from Trevor Pearce Acting CEO VACCHO 

” For so many of the men at Ochre Day, healing had come about through being better connected to their culture and understanding, and knowing who they are as Aboriginal men. Culture is what brought them back from the brink.

We’ve long known culture is a protective factor for our people, but hearing so many men in one place discuss how culture literally saved their lives really brought that fact home.

It made me even more conscious of how important it is that we focus on the wellbeing side of Aboriginal health. If we’re really serious about Closing the Gap, we need to fund male wellbeing workers in our Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations.

In Victoria, the life expectancy of an Aboriginal male is 10 years less than a non-Aboriginal male. Closing the Gap requires a holistic, strength- based response. As one of the fellas said, “you don’t need a university degree to Close the Gap, you just need to listen to our mob”.

I look forward to this year’s Ochre Day being hosted on Victorian country, and for VACCHO being even more involved.”

Trevor Pearce is Acting CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Health Organisation (VACCHO) Originally published here 

More OCHRE DAY Info , Register and Accommodation discounts

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #SaveADate : This weeks feature @AMSANTaus #AMSANT25Conf Prospectus 6- 8 August #OCHREDay 29-30 August Register your Interest Plus @IAHA_National @SNAICC @CATSINaM @IAHA_National #NACCHOAgm2019

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

6 – 8 August 2019 Our Health, Our Way Leadership Conference Alice Springs 

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

10 July Minister Ken Wyatt at the National Press Club 

2-5 August Garma Festival 

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

13- 14 August Indigenous Health Justice Conference (IHJ) Darwin 

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured Save a date this week

6 – 8 August 2019 Our Health, Our Way Leadership Conference Alice Springs 

AMSANT is holding a one and a half day conference to celebrate its 25th Anniversary of working with and supporting the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector and member services.

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) have a long and successful history as leaders in providing best practice primary health care to our communities, starting in the NT in 1973 with the establishment of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress). This was only two years after the first Aboriginal Medical Service was established at Redfern in Sydney.

At a meeting in Alice Springs in 1994, ACCHSs in the NT formed our own peak body, the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT (AMSANT). Our sector has not looked back. AMSANT now has 26 member services across the Territory and is continuing to expand and strengthen its membership.

The last 45 years has seen our sector grow significantly, supported for the past 25 years through AMSANT’s leadership and advocacy. The innovation and leadership of the ACCHSs sector has influenced system-wide improvements in primary health care.

This record of achievement has ensured that ACCHSs are the preferred model for primary health care services to Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory. Currently, our member ACCHSs provide over half of all primary health care services delivered to our people in the Northern Territory and there is an ongoing process for further transition to community control in coordination with our partners in the NT Aboriginal Health Forum.

A nationally-significant conference

The Our Health Our Way – 25 of Health Leadership Conference 2019 will be held at the Alice Springs Convention Centre and will bring together key local and national speakers to discuss the achievements and successes of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector in the Northern Territory and the future development of Aboriginal comprehensive primary health care here and beyond.

The themes of the conference will cover key aspects of our sector, from health leadership and governance through to research and data and continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes, and growing a sustainable Aboriginal health workforce.

The conference will showcase the successes of AMSANT’s member health services in effectively delivering primary health care services and developing local, community based and led programs across a range of areas including social and emotional well-being, health and housing, and expanding community controlled health services.

The conference format will include keynote speakers, plenary sessions and breakout workshop sessions on key topics. The conference program will be available soon on AMSANT’s website.

Conference Dinner

A Conference Dinner will be held on the evening of Wednesday 7th August at the Convention Centre featuring dinner and entertainment.

Individual seats or tables may be booked as part of the registration process.

Partner information stalls

The Our Health, Our Way – 25 Years of Health Leadership Conference 2019 will provide opportunities for government and NGO partners to hold information stalls within the conference venue to promote their work.

If you are interested in holding a stall during the conference please contact us using the details provided below.

Further information and registration

Further information including registration for the event will be available on AMSANT’s website: http://www.amsant.org.au

Inquiries can be made by phone or email or in person:

Mia Christophersen

Email: mia.christophersen@amsant.org.au

Phone: 08 8944 6666 (Darwin)

AMSANT Darwin Office: 43 Mitchell St, Darwin

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

7-14 July NAIDOC week

VOICE. TREATY. TRUTH.

We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people for a better future.

The Indigenous voice of this country is over 65,000 plus years old.

They are the first words spoken on this continent. Languages that passed down lore, culture and knowledge for over millennia. They are precious to our nation.

It’s that Indigenous voice that include know-how, practices, skills and innovations – found in a wide variety of contexts, such as agricultural, scientific, technical, ecological and medicinal fields, as well as biodiversity-related knowledge.  They are words connecting us to country, an understanding of country and of a people who are the oldest continuing culture on the planet.

And with 2019 being celebrated as the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages, it’s time for our knowledge to be heard through our voice.

For generations, we have sought recognition of our unique place in Australian history and society today. We need to be the architects of our lives and futures.

For generations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have looked for significant and lasting change.

Voice. Treaty. Truth. were three key elements to the reforms set out in the Uluru Statement from the Heart. These reforms represent the unified position of First Nations Australians.

However, the Uluru Statement built on generations of consultation and discussions among Indigenous people on a range of issues and grievances. Consultations about the further reforms necessary to secure and underpin our rights and to ensure they can be exercised and enjoyed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

It specifically sequenced a set of reforms: first, a First Nations Voice to Parliament enshrined in the Constitution and second, a Makarrata Commission to supervise treaty processes and truth-telling.

(Makarrata is a word from the language of the Yolngu people in Arnhem Land. The Yolngu concept of Makarrata captures the idea of two parties coming together after a struggle, healing the divisions of the past. It is about acknowledging that something has been done wrong, and it seeks to make things right.)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people want their voice to be heard. First Nations were excluded from the Constitutional convention debates of the 1800’s when the Australian Constitution came into force.  Indigenous people were excluded from the bargaining table.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have always wanted an enhanced role in decision-making in Australia’s democracy.

In the European settlement of Australia, there were no treaties, no formal settlements, no compacts. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people therefore did not cede sovereignty to our land. It was taken away from us. That will remain a continuing source of dispute.

Our sovereignty has never been ceded – not in 1788, not in 1967, not with the Native Title Act, not with the Uluru Statement from the Heart. It coexists with the sovereignty of the Crown and should never be extinguished.

Australia is one of the few liberal democracies around the world which still does not have a treaty or treaties or some other kind of formal acknowledgement or arrangement with its Indigenous minorities.

A substantive treaty has always been the primary aspiration of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movement.

Critically, treaties are inseparable from Truth.

Lasting and effective agreement cannot be achieved unless we have a shared, truthful understanding of the nature of the dispute, of the history, of how we got to where we stand.

The true story of colonisation must be told, must be heard, must be acknowledged.

But hearing this history is necessary before we can come to some true reconciliation, some genuine healing for both sides.

And of course, this is not just the history of our First Peoples – it is the history of all of us, of all of Australia, and we need to own it.

Then we can move forward together.

Let’s work together for a shared future.

Download the National NAIDOC Logo and other social media resources.

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

Symposium: Our Voice, Our Truth
Kick off NAIDOC week in Canberra with a Symposium event with keynote speakers and expert panel on the topic of good governance through strong leadership. A daylong event, fully catered with morning and afternoon tea, lunch and post-event drinks and canapes with entertainment to conclude.
This is an exclusive ticketed event in a stunning lakeside venue with limited seats available.
6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

10 July Minister Ken Wyatt at the National Press Club 

During NAIDOC week and in his first major Address as Indigenous Affairs Minister, Ken Wyatt will lay out the pathway towards possible constitutional recognition for Australia’s first peoples and the importance of its view on the voice to parliament.

Ken Wyatt AM will outline how he and the Government want to do things differently – how partnerships, pride, respect and responsibility underpin his vision for a better future for Indigenous Australians and a stronger nation, even more confident in its cultural heritage and history.

Our first Aboriginal Minister for Indigenous Australians will detail the critical role of education, culture, community safety, suicide prevention, health, hope, employment and business development.

He will share the importance of co-designing and planning with Indigenous Australians at all levels, from the grassroots to peak representative bodies – and how inclusion and understanding is the only pathway towards Constitutional recognition.

As he has said, his dream is to ensure the greatness of our many Indigenous nations is reflected in the greatness of our Australian nation, now and forever.


Ken Wyatt was elected in 2010 as the Federal Member for Hasluck, located east of Perth, making history as the first Aboriginal Member of the House of Representatives.

The traditional garment worn by Ken on special occasions is a booka, a traditional kangaroo skin cloak presented to him by Perth’s Noongar elders and decorated with cockatoo feathers that signify his status in Noongar culture as a leader.

Since his election, Ken has worked tirelessly to be a strong advocate for his electorate to help build a stronger local community.

In 2015 Ken became the first Aboriginal member of the Federal Executive after being sworn in as Assistant Minister for Health, responsible for Aged Care, as well as for Dementia, the Organ and Tissue Authority and Australian Hearing.

In January 2017, Ken made history as the first Aboriginal Minister to serve in a Federal Government, after being appointed as Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

In August 2018, he was made Minister for Senior Australians & Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

In May 2019, he again made history when he became the first Aboriginal person to be made Minister for Indigenous Australians.

Before entering politics Ken worked in community and senior government roles in the fields of health and education including as Director of Aboriginal Health in both New South Wales and Western Australia.

In addition to Ken’s extensive public service career, he has made an enormous contribution to the wider community which was recognised in 1996 when he was awarded the Order of Australia for services to health, education and Indigenous affairs.

In 2000, Ken received a Centenary of Federation Medal for his contribution to improving the quality of life of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and mainstream Australian society.

BOOK HERE 

 

2-5 August Garma Festival 

Garma Website

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

We Play, We Learn, We Belong
We play on our land.
We learn from our ancestors.

We belong with our communities.

In 2019, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day is celebrating the early years, and promoting the importance of early years education and care for our little ones.

We recognise the critical role that family, community, country and culture play in their development.

And we will continue to fight for better access to culturally appropriate early childhood education for our children through Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations.

Our 2019 Ambassador is Nanna from the animated children’s series Little J & Big Cuz.

We are delighted to have Nanna representing Children’s Day this year.

Children’s Day has been celebrated on the 4th of August for more than 30 years. It’s a special time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to celebrate our children, and for all Aussies to learn about our cultures.

Around the 4th of August, schools, kinders and communities run Children’s Day events. On this website you can get ideas for how to run a Children’s Day event, and register your event so we can see Children’s Day growing each year across the nation.

We sell Children’s Day bags with fun toys and activities for kids to play with at your event. We can send you posters to promote Children’s Day and we will have a video of Nanna that you can show at your event.

Aboriginal Childrens Day Website

Are you holding a Children’s Day event this year? Call us on (03) 9419 1921 or email info@snaicc.org.au to order your FREE Children’s Day poster!

13- 14 August Indigenous Health Justice Conference (IHJ)

This year AMSANT is pleased to partner with the group representing Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander lawyers and law students in the Northern Territory – Winkiku Rrumbangi NT Indigenous
Lawyers Aboriginal Corporation – to host the Indigenous Health Justice Conference (IHJ) in Darwin

This conference will run parallel to the 14th National Indigenous Legal Conference being held in Darwin for the first time. Collaborations between Health and Justice services are gaining momentum nationally and internationally because the broadly accepted evidence shows these can lead to improved outcomes.

AMSANT’s policy focus has raised the importance of dealing with the social determinants of healthand, for some individuals, unresolved legal issues can also be determinants of health.

To discuss this conference further, please contact John Rawnsley via email
directors.wrnt@gmail.com.

 

Website 

29th  – 30th  Aug 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

Ochre Day is on again! This is the space to let us know you are interested in attending ! Register to get on the Early Bird list now!

About this Event

This year the event will be held at the Pullman on the Park in Melbourne between 29-30 August 2019.

As we count down to the conference we are calling for you to express your interest in attending.

Your expression of interest will secure you a spot at the FREE OCHRE DAY MENS CONFERENCE .

TELLING US YOU WANT TO COME MEANS YOU WILL KNOW:

– when registration opens

– link to the registration

– the code to book your accommodation direct with the hotel BEFORE registration opens, securing your room with the fabulous PULLMAN ON THE PARK MELBOURNE

– receive a link to the conference APP

THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO BE IN THE KNOW.

REGISTER YOUR INTEREST HERE TODAY

 

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

Preliminary program and registration information available to download now!

Less than 3 weeks until our discounted early bird offer closes.

Visit  for more information.

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

Print

Location:             Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin NT
Theme:                 Disruptive Innovations in Healthcare
Register:              Register Here
Web:                     www.aida.org.au/conference
Enquiries:           conference@aida.org.au

The AIDA 2019 Conference is a forum to share and build on knowledge that increasingly disrupts existing practice and policy to raise the standards of health care.

People with a passion for health care equity are invited to share their knowledges and expertise about how they have participated in or enabled a ‘disruptive innovation to achieve culturally safe and responsive practice or policy for Indigenous communities.

The 23rd annual AIDA Conference provides a platform for networking, mentoring, member engagement and the opportunity to celebrate the achievements of AIDA’S Indigenous doctor and students.

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

2019 Marks 10 years since the formation of NATSIHWA and registrations are now open!!!

Come and celebrate NATSIHWA’s 10 year Anniversary National Conference ‘A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition’ which is being held in Alice Springs. We aim to offer an insight into the Past, Present and Future of NATSIHWA and the overall importance of strengthening the primary health care sector’s unique workforce of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners throughout Australia.

During the 9-10 October 2019 delegates will be exposed to networking opportunities whilst immersing themselves with a combination of traditional and practical conference style delivery. Our intention is to engage Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in the history and knowledge exchange of the past, todays evidence based best practice programs/services available and envisioning what the future has to offer for all Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Watch this space for the guest speaker line up, draft agenda and award nominations

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

Want to be kept updated on the WIHC in November 2019 ?

Inbox us your email address and we will add you to the mailing list or email our Principal Project Manager- Brandon.etto@nationalcongress.com.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #SaveADate : This weeks feature #MensHealthWeek #OCHREDay19 Plus @LowitjaInstitut #LowitjaConf2019 program @ausprogress #Progress2019 @IAHA_National @SNAICC @CATSINaM @IAHA_National @2019wihc #NACCHOAgm2019 #OCHREDay

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

10 -16 June Men’s Health Week 

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calenda

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

20 – 21 June First Nations led content and free tickets at Progress 2019

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

2-5 August Garma Festival 

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

June 10 Men’s health receives lower grades than women’s health says new report card

The state of men’s health in Australia is lagging behind women’s health, according to a new report published ahead of Men’s Health Week (10-16 June 2019).

The Men’s Health Report Card 2019 produced by the Australian Men’s Health Forum (AMHF) highlights a number of areas of concern including the fact that men in Australia are dying six years younger than women on average.

AMHF, the national peak body for men’s health, is calling on politicians at federal, state and territory level to invest more time, money and resources into improving the lives and health of men and boys.

AMHF President Jonathan Bedloe said:

 “This report card on the state of men and boys’ health in Australia tells us we must do better.

“Our sons are less educated than our daughters. Our brothers die younger than our sisters. Our fathers are more likely to die at work than our mothers. Our male friends are more likely to die by suicide than our female friends.

“The solution to these problems is not to stop working to improve the lives of women and girls, but to increase our efforts to tackle the issues facing men and boys. This means investing more time, money and resources into helping health services become more male-friendly and focused on the needs of men and boys.

“It also means looking at the wider social factors that shape men’s health, which include boys’ education, our experiences of fatherhood, our working lives, our financial wellbeing and our social connections.”

According to the report, which brings together the latest available data from a range of Government sources:

  • 4 times more men under 65 die from more heart disease than women the same age
  • 1 in 3 men die of cancer compared with 1 in 4 women
  • 3 in 4 suicides are men (with 6 men and 2 women dying each day on average)
  • 93% of workplace fatalities are men
  • 3 in 4 road fatalities are male, with 3 men and boys a day dying in road accidents

The report also highlights some of the broader social issues that are known to impact men and boys’ health such as education, employment, finances and family life. According to the most recent Government data:

  • boys are 50% more likely than girls to drop out of school before the end of year 12
  • 1 in 3 new fathers are not married
  • 1 in 5 children live in lone-parent families
  • around two million men are experiencing economic insecurity
  • the number of men not in the labour force has risen by 180% since 1978, five times the rate at which the number of women not in the labour force has risen.

AMHF says Australia is one of the few countries in the world that has developed a national men’s health strategy. AMHF CEO Glen Poole said:

“The National Men’s Health Strategy calls on governments at all levels to address the unique needs of men and boys through their policies, programs and services,” said Poole.

“To date, just two states have developed a men’s health strategy and most government initiatives to improve our physical and mental health aren’t specifically targeted at men and boys.

“The statistics uncovered in our report on the current state of male health in Australia demonstrate that there is much work still to do. The National Men’s Health Strategy, launched in April, was a vital step forward. We now need to see all levels of Government investing more, time, money and resources into initiatives that improve the lives and health of men and boys.”

DOWNLOAD THE NATIONAL MEN’S HEALTH REPORT CARD

This week is . For info about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and cultural perspectives on men, including fathers and , and prostate , visit our website:

29th  – 30th  Aug 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

Venue: Pullman Hotel – 192 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne Vic 3000

Website to be launched 17 June (TBC)

2018 NACCHO TV Ochre Day Interviewers

Read over 370 Aboriginal Male Health articles published by NACCHO in the last 7 years 

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Download HERE Lowitja Conference 2019 44 Page Program

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

20 – 21 June First Nations led content and free tickets at Progress 2019

Progress 2019 is a two day conference to bring together 1,500 change makers from

across First Nations, racial justice, environment, social services, refugees, health, aid and union movements in Australia. Over the two days we’ll work to breakdown silos, build partnerships and campaigns to create stronger movements and set the tone for the new term of government.

Progress will take place at Melbourne Town Hall on Thursday 20th and Friday 21st June and we’re offering free tickets to all First Nationsparticipants –registerhere and use the code: full scholarship-progress2019.

At Progress 2019 we’re working to make sure issues of First Nations justice and self-determination are central to the conference agenda. On Thursday there will be a First Nations stream, which is being coordinated by Larissa (details on sessions below). It’ll be a chance to connect with folks from across the country, hear from people working with communities and organising at scale and talk about what First Nations people need from the rest of the movement.

We have free tickets available for First Nations people to attend Progress 2019 and we’d love if you could pass this email through your contacts and to First Nations people you work with. And if you have any suggestions for people to invite please let us know!

Some sessions that are being led by Larissa Baldwin that might be of interest to you:

· Progress 2019 opening plenary – Rod Little (National Congress), Larissa Baldwin (Getup!), Bruce Pascoe (Author), Lara Watson (ACTU), Ruby Wharton (WAR) and other First Nations community advocates will open Progress 2019 with a discussion about truth telling, the role of First Nations people in organising First Nations communities, how we’re agitating against the status quo, and what comes next.

· A breakout conversation on land justice, co-developed with Karrina Nolan from Original Power. Karrina and Larissa will be joined by Gadrian Hoosan (Borroloola community leader) and Dwayne Coulthard (SA advocate organising his community against underground coal seam gasification) for an open discussion to celebrate our achievements, and examine the challenges and opportunities ahead.

· Two First Nations caucus spaces – the first will be a breakout session after the opening plenary, offering the chance for participants to meet and greet, and space to talk about our issues. The second will be an informal caucus over lunch.

First Nations speakers on other sessions in the agenda include:

· Nayuka Gorrie,

· Tarneen Tarneen Onus-Williams

· Roxy Moore

· Ari Gorring

· Veronica Turner

· Judy Kay

· Phil Winzer

· Zane Sikulu

· Jeff Amatto

· Emily Wurramara (performing)

· Larissa Behrendt (tentative)

You can check out our full program here.

 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

Symposium: Our Voice, Our Truth
Kick off NAIDOC week in Canberra with a Symposium event with keynote speakers and expert panel on the topic of good governance through strong leadership. A daylong event, fully catered with morning and afternoon tea, lunch and post-event drinks and canapes with entertainment to conclude.
This is an exclusive ticketed event in a stunning lakeside venue with limited seats available.
6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

VOICE. TREATY. TRUTH.

We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people for a better future.

The Indigenous voice of this country is over 65,000 plus years old.

They are the first words spoken on this continent. Languages that passed down lore, culture and knowledge for over millennia. They are precious to our nation.

It’s that Indigenous voice that include know-how, practices, skills and innovations – found in a wide variety of contexts, such as agricultural, scientific, technical, ecological and medicinal fields, as well as biodiversity-related knowledge.  They are words connecting us to country, an understanding of country and of a people who are the oldest continuing culture on the planet.

And with 2019 being celebrated as the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages, it’s time for our knowledge to be heard through our voice.

For generations, we have sought recognition of our unique place in Australian history and society today. We need to be the architects of our lives and futures.

For generations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have looked for significant and lasting change.

Voice. Treaty. Truth. were three key elements to the reforms set out in the Uluru Statement from the Heart. These reforms represent the unified position of First Nations Australians.

However, the Uluru Statement built on generations of consultation and discussions among Indigenous people on a range of issues and grievances. Consultations about the further reforms necessary to secure and underpin our rights and to ensure they can be exercised and enjoyed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

It specifically sequenced a set of reforms: first, a First Nations Voice to Parliament enshrined in the Constitution and second, a Makarrata Commission to supervise treaty processes and truth-telling.

(Makarrata is a word from the language of the Yolngu people in Arnhem Land. The Yolngu concept of Makarrata captures the idea of two parties coming together after a struggle, healing the divisions of the past. It is about acknowledging that something has been done wrong, and it seeks to make things right.)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people want their voice to be heard. First Nations were excluded from the Constitutional convention debates of the 1800’s when the Australian Constitution came into force.  Indigenous people were excluded from the bargaining table.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have always wanted an enhanced role in decision-making in Australia’s democracy.

In the European settlement of Australia, there were no treaties, no formal settlements, no compacts. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people therefore did not cede sovereignty to our land. It was taken away from us. That will remain a continuing source of dispute.

Our sovereignty has never been ceded – not in 1788, not in 1967, not with the Native Title Act, not with the Uluru Statement from the Heart. It coexists with the sovereignty of the Crown and should never be extinguished.

Australia is one of the few liberal democracies around the world which still does not have a treaty or treaties or some other kind of formal acknowledgement or arrangement with its Indigenous minorities.

A substantive treaty has always been the primary aspiration of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movement.

Critically, treaties are inseparable from Truth.

Lasting and effective agreement cannot be achieved unless we have a shared, truthful understanding of the nature of the dispute, of the history, of how we got to where we stand.

The true story of colonisation must be told, must be heard, must be acknowledged.

But hearing this history is necessary before we can come to some true reconciliation, some genuine healing for both sides.

And of course, this is not just the history of our First Peoples – it is the history of all of us, of all of Australia, and we need to own it.

Then we can move forward together.

Let’s work together for a shared future.

Download the National NAIDOC Logo and other social media resources.

2-5 August Garma Festival 

Garma Website

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

We Play, We Learn, We Belong
We play on our land.
We learn from our ancestors.

We belong with our communities.

In 2019, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day is celebrating the early years, and promoting the importance of early years education and care for our little ones.

We recognise the critical role that family, community, country and culture play in their development.

And we will continue to fight for better access to culturally appropriate early childhood education for our children through Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations.

Our 2019 Ambassador is Nanna from the animated children’s series Little J & Big Cuz.

We are delighted to have Nanna representing Children’s Day this year.

Children’s Day has been celebrated on the 4th of August for more than 30 years. It’s a special time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to celebrate our children, and for all Aussies to learn about our cultures.

Around the 4th of August, schools, kinders and communities run Children’s Day events. On this website you can get ideas for how to run a Children’s Day event, and register your event so we can see Children’s Day growing each year across the nation.

We sell Children’s Day bags with fun toys and activities for kids to play with at your event. We can send you posters to promote Children’s Day and we will have a video of Nanna that you can show at your event.

Aboriginal Childrens Day Website

29th  – 30th  Aug 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

Venue: Pullman Hotel – 192 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne Vic 3000

Website to be launched soon

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

Preliminary program and registration information available to download now!

Less than 3 weeks until our discounted early bird offer closes.

Visit  for more information.

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

Print

Location:             Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin NT
Theme:                 Disruptive Innovations in Healthcare
Register:              Register Here
Web:                     www.aida.org.au/conference
Enquiries:           conference@aida.org.au

The AIDA 2019 Conference is a forum to share and build on knowledge that increasingly disrupts existing practice and policy to raise the standards of health care.

People with a passion for health care equity are invited to share their knowledges and expertise about how they have participated in or enabled a ‘disruptive innovation to achieve culturally safe and responsive practice or policy for Indigenous communities.

The 23rd annual AIDA Conference provides a platform for networking, mentoring, member engagement and the opportunity to celebrate the achievements of AIDA’S Indigenous doctor and students.

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

2019 Marks 10 years since the formation of NATSIHWA and registrations are now open!!!

Come and celebrate NATSIHWA’s 10 year Anniversary National Conference ‘A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition’ which is being held in Alice Springs. We aim to offer an insight into the Past, Present and Future of NATSIHWA and the overall importance of strengthening the primary health care sector’s unique workforce of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners throughout Australia.

During the 9-10 October 2019 delegates will be exposed to networking opportunities whilst immersing themselves with a combination of traditional and practical conference style delivery. Our intention is to engage Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in the history and knowledge exchange of the past, todays evidence based best practice programs/services available and envisioning what the future has to offer for all Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Watch this space for the guest speaker line up, draft agenda and award nominations

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

Want to be kept updated on the WIHC in November 2019 ?

Inbox us your email address and we will add you to the mailing list or email our Principal Project Manager- Brandon.etto@nationalcongress.com.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

%d bloggers like this: