Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC

A now 16

1.1 International : Community Health Centres Survey 2017

2.1 National  : NACCHO and Heart Foundation Resources survey 2017

2.2 National : Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic

2.3 NACCHO Presents #FASD Poster at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

Members

3.QLD : TAIHS ACCHO Townsville leads the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­Indigenous families

4.NSW : Wellington ACCHO Health Choices and community the focus at inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout

5. WA : AHCWA Members complete training course

6. VIC : Mallee ACCHO #MDAS to hold Pamper and Pap event for women clients

7. SA: AHCSA Sexual Health and Maternal Health Tackling Smoking Teams

8. NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs CEO’s present at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 International Community Health Centres Survey 2017

Ai

The International Federation of Community Health Centres (IFCHC) is seeking input from staff and board members of Community Health Centres (CHCs) around the world, as well as associations that represent CHCs. If this applies to you, we encourage you to answer the brief survey below. The survey takes approximately 5 minutes to complete. All questions with an * are required.
All other questions are optional. Survey responses will help IFCHC to focus its operational activities for the near future.

 

2.1 National  : NACCHO and Heart Foundation Resources survey

Aherat

The Heart Foundation is committed to improving the heart health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

In this survey, we are seeking your feedback on how we can improve the use and effectiveness of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources, for both health professionals and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

 
We would greatly appreciate your time and opinions on our information resources and tools, to better understand the:
– use and awareness of our resources,
– cultural appropriateness of our resources for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community,
– suitability of the language, format and style of our resources.
 
We recognise that your time is valuable and thank you for your help. Link below

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Resource Survey – ACCHO

 

2.2 National : Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic

23473063_10156062233410572_5601521828224431954_n

The Koori Mail latest edition on sale Nov 15 , features the The National Centre of Indigenous Excellence TATU – Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic.

The TATU Schools Program created the comic, encouraging students to discuss the benefits of a smoke free lifestyle, and develop community ideas to reduce the harm caused by tobacco use.

‘Traditional smoke heals – tobacco smoke kills.

2.3 NACCHO Presents #FASD Poster at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

IMG_0071

NACCHO Policy Officer Bridie Kenna pictured with symposium chair Professor Sandra Eades and FASD project members Dr Nikki Percival and Hayley Williams .Bridie was presenting  a poster on the FASD Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Project. A collaboration between NACCHO, Menzies School of Health Research and the Telethon Kids Institute.

3.QLD : TAIHS ACCHO Townsville leads the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­Indigenous families

 

0d59057fc7cfb5c1cbbd5f3d8885cdd9

TOWNSVILLE will lead the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­indigenous families. The Townsville Aboriginal and Islander Health Service (TAIHS) will steer the new initiative, called the First Thousand Days Australia.

Picture Above : Heather Lee, TAIHS Integrated Services Manager/ Midwife of Maternal and Child Heath, Kerry Arabena, Chair of Indigenous Health at the University of Melbourne and new family, Emma Woods and Shane Mitchell with 5 month old twin girls Ahliyah and Shanielle, pictured at the TAIHS clinic for the launch of the first Australian trial of the First Thousand Days. Picture: Shae Beplate

It will be rolled out across North Queensland and focus on babies’ first two years of life beginning at conception. This period is when the foundations of optimum health, growth, and neurodevelopment across the lifespan are established.

This international movement, which ­focuses on nutrition, has been broadened by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander health researchers and practitioners to ­include child protection, early life ­literacy, the role and contribution of men and the range of other issues that impact on indigenous parents and infants in Australia.

TAIHS chair Morris Cloudy said ­although they had a successful record of ­providing quality health care and social ­services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait community, there remained many obstacles to ensuring kids received the best possible opportunities in life.

“We believe that this model will assist us in addressing these gaps,” he said.

Heather Lee, midwife and manager of TAIHS’ Child and Maternal Health services, said it was important for future generations.

“The aspiration for me personally is to have healthier women, children and dads in our community.”

Ms Lee said TAIHS aimed to ­decrease the number of chronic diseases within the community.

Chair of ­Indigenous Health at the University of ­Melbourne Professor Kerry Arabena, who heads the One Thousand Days initiative nationally, said it was a unique indigenous-designed and managed intervention that would improve co-ordination between services and organisations catering to Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander child and maternal health.

“It will also ensure that the so-called ­social determinants of health, including housing, education, employment and ­exposure to racism and discrimination, are addressed,” she said.

4.NSW : Wellington ACCHO Health Choices and community the focus at inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout

AW r0_287_5520_3392_w1200_h678_fmax

History was made in Dubbo at the weekend with the inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout held at Apex Oval. More than 20 men’s and mixed teams competed across five divisions on Saturday and Sunday, with organisers Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) and NSW Touch hailing it a great success.

“We’ve certainly had a couple of thousand people through the gates,” WACHS marketing and communications manager Jodie Evans said.

“I think what we’ve proven is you can have all ages and all shapes and sizes actually playing and no one actually has any issues with that, and having mixed teams is great too, it just brings different elements into it.

“Next year we hope to build on the women’s sides and certainly bring the kids in.

NSW Touch game development officer Stacey Parker said she was impressed by the “outstanding” quality of play on show, with players coming from as far away as Western Australia.

“We look forward to what’s going to happen in 2018,” she said. “Hopefully we can double the numbers.”

Touch football wasn’t the only focus of the weekend, with the crew from QuitBFit on hand at the smoke and alcohol-free event to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Current and former NRL stars were on hand to help spread the message, including Scott Prince (who played with the All-Blacks), Timana Tahu, Nathan Merritt, Cody Walker and Will Smith.

“We’re trying to get that communication through from a young age that smoking isn’t great for you and drinking so much soft drink,” Evans said.

“It’s all about healthy eating and living, and sport is obviously vital to that.”

“Being at the inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout was something special and something I won’t forget,” Prince said. “It was great to see the family coming together to promote healthy choices.”

5. WA : AHCWA Members complete training course

23405766_735081490018371_3841182220096053269_o

Staff from AHCWA, Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service – East Perth office, Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation and the Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service recently completed an Internal Auditor Training Course at AHCWA’s head office in Highgate.
The two-day training course enabled the participants with the skills and knowledge to prepare for and participate in a quality audit. The types of audits may include external or internal systems audit or process or products/service audits.
Participants were given the opportunity to work through the process of reviewing designated documentation; identifying and developing checklists and audit-related documentation; preparing audit schedules; gathering, analysing and evaluating information; and reporting findings to the lead auditor in a fun and interactive setting.
Thanks to Claire, the Quality & Compliance Officer at AHCWA and Christine from SAI Global for organising and delivering a very informative, interesting and useful course.

6. VIC : Mallee ACCHO #MDAS to hold Pamper and Pap event for women clients

AMMAFTER a successful pilot event last year, Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) will hold the second Pamper and Pap day on November 30 at MDAS Commun­ity Hall.

Prevention and health promotion officer Jade Klaebe said  MDAS had decided to make the event annual.

“We held this event at around the same time last year for the first time, and we had 67 Aboriginal women attend.

7. SA: AHCSA Sexual Health and Maternal Health Tackling Smoking Teams

DOpF3SQUQAAG0Nw

The team was up at Coober Pedy hosting a Womens Pamper Day….lots of fun, laughter & education.

8. NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs CEO’s present at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

ANT 1

 

ANTANT 2

Aboriginal Women’s Health @DiabetesAus #Diabetes #WDD2017 Our #SuperSHEroStrong Karen West Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa QLD

 ” It’s World Diabetes Day today and around the global, we’re acknowledging the extraordinary effort of women who are living with or caring for someone with diabetes.

Diabetes doesn’t take a break & neither do our Diabetes Super SHEroes! Who’s your SuperSHEro?

Our Hero : Karen West Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa QLD

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.

See Part 2 Below

Part 1 : Gestational diabetes – the epidemic posing an immediate threat to thousands of pregnancies, and a future threat to the health of mothers, babies and families.

NACCHO has published over 130 articles Aboriginal Health and Diabetes over the past 5 years

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/diabetes/

Health experts this week warned of the alarming increase in gestational diabetes which in the past 12 months has affected 38,000 Australian women during pregnancy.

“In the last ten years, more than 200,000 women have developed gestational diabetes. Latest projections show that over the next decade more than 500,000 women could develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy,” said Professor Greg Johnson, CEO of Diabetes Australia

14 November was World Diabetes Day and Diabetes Australia has warned that gestational diabetes is now the fastest growing type of diabetes in Australia.

“Importantly, gestational diabetes poses a dual threat – firstly without appropriate management and care, it can be a serious risk to mother and baby during the pregnancy, and secondly it poses a serious future risk for both mother and baby developing type 2 diabetes and other health issues,” he said.

“After gestational diabetes, women are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and children born to mothers who have gestational diabetes are also at an increased risk of being overweight or obese, or developing type 2 diabetes later in life.”

“The alarming increase in number of women developing gestational diabetes presents an intergenerational diabetes issue and threatens to make the type 2 diabetes epidemic even bigger in future.”

“Our latest projections suggest that gestational diabetes could trigger over 250,000 women to develop type 2 diabetes or prediabetes in the coming decade.”

“Developing gestational diabetes is one of the biggest risk factors for type 2 diabetes and we need to ensure Australian mums and families get the support they need after gestational diabetes to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. We need to break this intergenerational cycle of diabetes.”

A/Professor Alison Nankervis, an Endocrinologist at the Royal Melbourne and Royal Women’s Hospital said the short term complications for mother and baby can be serious, but the risk of complications can be reduced with good treatment and care.

“Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born. The abnormal blood glucose levels can affect both the mother and baby,” A/Professor Nankervis said.

“The condition makes pregnancy higher risk for both. Babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes are more likely to be born prematurely or via C-section, be larger babies, have shoulder dystocia and a range of other complications.”

“Women with gestational diabetes may need intensive glucose management to avoid serious problems. But with the best possible management and care, the risks can be reduced and women can avoid complications.”

A/ Prof Nankervis said growth in gestational diabetes was already putting pressure on health services with the number of women with the condition doubling at the Royal Women’s Hospital since 2014.

“There are a number of factors contributing to the growing rates of gestational diabetes including the age women are falling pregnant, the changing ethnic makeup of Australia’s society, and the weight of women when they fall pregnant. The growth of gestational diabetes has been exacerbated by recent lowering of the diagnostic threshold,” she said.

Professor Johnson said diabetes in pregnancy was a major priority in the Australian National Diabetes Strategy 2016-20 but there was still no clarity on the implementation plans from the Australian Government and the State and Territory Governments.

“New approaches are needed for pre-pregnancy, during pregnancy, and after pregnancy,” said Professor Johnson.

“There needs to be help for women to be a healthy weight before pregnancy. We need to improve access to diabetes education and support for women with gestational diabetes during pregnancy as well as ensuring they are getting the care and support they need after the birth.”

“This includes seeing their GP for follow up testing to detect type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, and access to type 2 diabetes prevention programs and health professionals including diabetes educators, dietitians and exercise physiologists who can help with lifestyle management to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes.”

“Sitting back and doing nothing is not an option. This is an avalanche that will bury the health system if we don’t act,” he said.

Melbourne mum Karla Jennings developed gestational diabetes during pregnancy and subsequently developed type 2 diabetes at the young age of 30.

“I had great support while I was managing gestational diabetes but it wasn’t enough to prevent me from developing type 2 diabetes,” she said.

“The day of my type 2 diabetes diagnosis was devastating. I cried and I cried for days.”

“It was much harder for me to accept than being diagnosed with gestational diabetes but I am determined to manage diabetes and keep living my life.”

“I do think it is critical that Australia does more to support mums like me and help reduce the number of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the future.”

Diabetes Australia is the national body for people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk. Diabetes Australia is committed to reducing the impact of diabetes.

We work in partnership with diabetes health professionals, researchers and the community to minimise the impact of diabetes.

PART 2

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.

Watch the short video below for a quick guide to the benefits of the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS).

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.

The following information is from the ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ flipcharts for Indigenous Australians. It is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical

The ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ resource was originally developed by Healthy Living NT with funding provided by the Department of Health and Ageing through Diabetes Australia. The reprinting and distribution of the most recent addition has been made possible with funding by the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) – an initiative of the Australian Government administered by Diabetes Australia.

How do you feel? (Symptoms)

If you have any of the following symptoms you should talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.

  • Feeling tired or weak
  • Go to the toilet a lot
  • Feeling thirsty
  • Leg cramps
  • Feeling itchy
  • Sores and boils that won’t heal
  • Blurry vision
  • Pins and needles
  • Feeling grumpy or angry.

Through a simple test, a doctor can find out if they’re the result of diabetes.

What is it? (About diabetes)

Sugar (glucose) gives your body energy. The sugar (glucose) moves from your blood into your muscles with something called insulin. With diabetes your insulin isn’t working properly, so the sugar (glucose) doesn’t get into your muscles and body easily and there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood.

Everyone has a little bit of sugar (glucose) in their blood. The optimum sugar (glucose) level is between 4 to 6 mmol/L (after fasting).

Sugar (glucose) is fuel that comes from some of the food you eat and drink. It gives your body energy to do all sorts of things:

  • Walk
  • Think
  • Play sports
  • Hunt
  • Work
  • Rake
  • Gardening
  • Resting.

To help the sugar (glucose) move into your muscles and body cells your body needs something called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas – a body part which is near your stomach.

Insulin helps keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

With diabetes, the insulin isn’t helping the sugar (glucose) move from your body into your muscles and body cells. So it stays and builds in your body, making your blood sugar (glucose) level high.

Type 2 Diabetes

There are different types of diabetes. A lot of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is when your body stops the insulin working properly.

Fat bellies, not being active enough, eating a big mob of fatty food can stop the insulin working properly in your body.

Being active, eating healthy and being a healthy weight can help your insulin work better to keep your sugar (glucose) normal. Sometimes people might need to take tablets and insulin everyday to keep their sugar (glucose) levels normal.

Gestational Diabetes

Another type of diabetes is gestational diabetes. This happens when you are pregnant, but not all women get it. It goes away after pregnancy but you and your baby can get type 2 diabetes later in life.

Pre Diabetes

There is also Pre Diabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT). This happens when your sugar (glucose) level is high, but not high enough to be called diabetes. It doesn’t mean you have diabetes now, but it does mean you might get it later. Being active and eating healthy you can slow down the start of type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes

Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 1 diabetes. This usually happens in kids and teenagers. Type 1 diabetes is when your body kills the insulin making part in the pancreas and no insulin is made in your body. To give the body the insulin it needs, insulin injections are needed every day for the rest of their life.

What do I do? (Management of diabetes)

When there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood it damages your heart, kidneys, feet, eyes and nerves.

You can keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal by:

Eating healthy

  • Have plenty of bush tucker and have shop foods and home cooked meals that are low in fat, sugar and salt.
  • Have something from each of the core food groups every day. They give you energy, fight sickness and help care for your body to keep it strong.
  • Drink plenty of water.

Avoiding and eat less fat, sugar and salt

  • Eat less fat as it makes you put on weight and gives you problems with your heart.
  • Pick meat with no fat or only small bits of fat on it. Cut the fat off the meat and take the skin off chicken.
  • Drain the juices (fat) after cooking meat and scoop out the fat from the top of stews.
  • Avoid cooking with or having fats like butter, oil, margarine or dripping.
  • It is better to boil, steam, stew, grill, microwave or stir-fry food.

Being a healthy weight (not too fat and not too skinny)

  • Do this by eating less, eating healthy and being more active.

Keeping active

  • It helps you lose weight and keep it off and it keeps you healthy.
  • It helps your insulin to work properly.
  • Walk, job, play sport, hunt, garden, work around the place.
  • Be active for 30 minutes or more every day OR do 10 minutes 3 times a day.

Taking your medicine

  • Take your medicine at the times the doctor tells you.
  • Take them with or after eating in the morning, afternoon and supper time every day.
  • Refill your medicine box in the morning (get some more medicine before it gets low and so you don’t run out).
  • Take your medicine with you when you go to see family, walkabout or away from home.
  • Put your medicines somewhere cool, dry and safe so they won’t go bad.
  • Keep your medicines out of reach of kids.

Remember to:

  • Have your check-ups with your doctor, health worker or nurse. Have regular check-ups for your eyes, feet, kidneys, blood pressure, skin and teeth. If you notice anything different about your body talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.
  • Check your sugar (glucose) levels at the times your doctor, health worker or nurse tells you.
  • See your doctor, health worker or nurse straight away if you feel sick.
  • Check your feet and skin for sores and/or cracks every day.

Why take medicine for? (Medications for diabetes)

Indigenous

Diabetes medicine helps to keep your body strong and well and it helps to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

When eating healthy, being active and being a healthy weight isn’t working at keeping your sugar (glucose) levels normal, you might need to take tablets and/or insulin.

The doctor might put you on tablets called Metformin to help your insulin work better and to lower the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood.

After a while the pancreas gets tired from working too hard and can’t make enough insulin, so your doctor might put you on tablets called Sulphonylurea. This medicine helps your body make more insulin.

Or, after awhile, the doctor might need to add another lot of tablets called Glitazone or Acarbose.

Remember to have your medicine with or after eating, in the morning, afternoon or supper time. Take them at the time the doctor tells you to.

All tablets work differently and some can have side effects.

If the following problems don’t go away or if you are still worried about them, then talk to your doctor.

  • Feel sick like you want to vomit (nausea)
  • A sore belly
  • Diarrhoea
  • Sugar (glucose) levels going too low
  • Have fluid build-up (retention)

When your sugar (glucose) levels get too high and stays high the doctor might put you on tablets and give you insulin.

  • Having insulin doesn’t mean you have type 1 diabetes.
  • Insulin isn’t like tablets so it shouldn’t be swallowed.
  • You inject the insulin under your skin in different places on your belly.

Talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse about insulin and what is right for you.

Having too much insulin or taking too many Sulphonylurea tablets can make your sugar (glucose) levels go too low (under 3) and make you hypo (hypoglycaemia).

You can also go hypo (hypoglycaemia) if you are:

  • Not eating, not eating enough or eating too late
  • Being extra active
  • Drinking grog (alcohol).

You might not feel anything when you have a hypo (hypoglycaemia), but sometimes you might feel:

  • Shaky
  • Hungry
  • Get headaches
  • Weak
  • Confused
  • Angry
  • Talk like you’re drunk when you’re not
  • Sweaty.

When you have these feelings or think you are having a hypo (hypoglycaemia), get your sugar (glucose) level up fast by drinking or eating something sweet.

Keep your sugar (glucose) level normal and stop having another hypo (hypoglycaemia) by eating a sandwich or meal after you have something sweet.

Remember, after taking your tablets or insulin:

  • Keep them somewhere cool, dry and safe (maybe in the fridge at home or at the clinic) so that they won’t go bad
  • Keep them out of reach of children
  • Get rid of your syringes/needles and finger pricking needles by putting them in a “sharps container” or “hard plastic” empty container with a lid (see if the clinic has one).

Remember when you go see family, walkabout or are away for home take your tablets and/or insulin with you.

Why me? (Risk factors)

Nobody knows how or why some people get diabetes but there are some things we know that can add to your chances of getting it. You have more chance of getting it when you are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, but not all Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islande people have diabetes.

Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people live different to how they used to live. Changes that add to your chances of getting diabetes are:

  • Not as active
  • More overweight
  • Eating fatty salty, sugary foods.

People living the old way were:

  • Active
  • Leaner and fit
  • Eating healthy food (bush tucker).

Other chances of getting diabetes include:

  • It is in your family tree or when someone in your family has diabetes
  • You had diabetes when pregnant
  • You get older
  • You eat too much and you eat too many fatty and sugary foods
  • You are overweight
  • You are not active enough
  • You have pancreatitis (a sickness of the pancreas).

There are things you can’t change or stop you from getting diabetes:

  • It’s in your family
  • You are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
  • You are pregnant with diabetes
  • You are getting older.

The things you can do to slow down the start of diabetes:

  • Eat healthy and be a healthy weight
  • Be active
  • Don’t drink too much grog.

Nobody knows why or how people get diabetes. After a while it can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves making you really sick.

Talk to your doctor, clinic, nurse or health worker about having a test to find out if you have diabetes. You can’t always feel it or see it happening, so you might not kn

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Sugartax News : @Apunipima Dr Mark Wenitong launches #SugaryDrinksProperNoGood

 

 ” This campaign is straightforward – sugary drinks are no good for our health.It’s calling on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks.’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Cape York experience a disproportionate burden of chronic disease compared to other Australians.’

‘Regular consumption of sugary drinks is associated with increased energy intake and in turn, weight gain and obesity. It is well established that obesity is a leading risk factor for diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease and some cancers. Consumption of sugary drinks is also associated with poor dental health.

Water is the best drink for everyone – it doesn’t have any sugar and keeps our bodies healthy.’

Apunipima Public Health Advisor Dr Mark Wenitong

Read over 30 NACCHO articles Health and Nutrition HERE

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/nutrition-healthy-foods/

Read over 15 NACCHO articles Sugar Tax HERE  

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/sugar-tax/

Apunipima Cape York Health Council  launched its Sugary Drinks Proper No Good – Drink More Water Youfla social marketing campaign on Thursday 2 November.

The campaign was developed with, and for, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cape York, and is supported by the national Rethink Sugary Drink Alliance – a group of organisations, including Apunipima, Diabetes Australia and the Cancer Council, concerned about the health impacts of sugary drinks.

The launch will see the campaign webpage (part of the Rethink Sugary Drink website) go live, and the release of three videos featuring NRL legend Scotty Prince inviting people to Drink More Water Youfla.

Channel 7 News Coverage

#SugaryDrinksProperNoGood and #DrinkMoreWaterYoufla.

VIEW HERE

Media was invited to Apunipima’s Cairns office where the three clips were distributed, a sugary drinks display set up, and Apunipima Public Health Medical Advisor Dr Mark Wenitong was for interview and photos opportunities.

‘This campaign is straightforward – sugary drinks are no good for our health. It’s calling on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks like soft drinks, sports drinks and fruit drinks,’ Dr Wenitong said.

Head of Prevention at Cancer Council Victoria and spokesperson for Rethink Sugary Drink Alliance Craig Sinclair said Apunipima’s campaign was prevention – focused and could save lives.

‘This is a vitally important campaign that has the capacity to not only improve lives but save them.’

‘It may sound simple, but cutting out sugary drinks can have a big impact on your health. Sugary drinks are key contributor to being overweight or obese which puts you at risk of cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, and kidney disease. Apunipima Cape York Health Council is to be congratulated for taking this innovative prevention-led approach.’

The campaign was funded by the Australian government via the Northern Queensland Primary Health Network (NQPHN).

‘We’re pleased to be supporting Apunipima in this comprehensive health promotion initiative to address consumption of sugary drinks, which are one of the key contributors to overweight and obesity,’ said NQPHN CEO Mr Robin Moore.

‘Apunipima have a strong track record of developing and undertaking effective health promotion initiatives for our local communities, and are a key agency improving the skills and knowledge of the health promotion workforce across the region.’

‘NQPHN is committed to helping to close the gap and we are confident this initiative will make a significant contribution to that goal.’

Prominent Far Northern doctor calls for Australian sugar tax

A PROMINENT doctor has reignited calls for a sugar tax, in order to prevent the Far North’s chronic disease rate from climbing even higher.

Apunipima Cape York Health Council has launched a federally-funded social media campaign, to discourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from consuming sugary drinks.

The “Sugary Drinks Proper No Good — Drink More Water Youfla” campaign, featuring videos by NRL legend Scotty Prince.

It calls on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks, like soft drinks, sports drinks, and fruit drinks.

The campaign has been launched to tackle the high rate of chronic diseases in the Far North such as Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Apunipima public health medical advisor Dr Mark Wenitong said a sugar tax placed on junk food and beverages would go a long way to helping reduce this rate.

“We’ve seen this happen in a few South American countries, in Mexico,” he said.

“If those countries can introduce (a sugar tax) as a health benefit to their population, then I don’t see why we can’t.

“I know the beverage industry will often say ‘this will affect the most disadvantaged people, because they’ll have to pay’, our answer to that is, it’s killing most disadvantaged people already, because they’ve got higher risk factors.

“It affects their chronic disease status more than other people in Australia.”

Cairns Hospital, earlier this year, became one of the first hospitals in Queensland to implement strategies to restrict patient and staff access to soft drinks.

Vending machines and the two cafes at the hospital only sell sugar-free soft drinks.

Dr Wenitong said the Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service should go an extra step by restricting other junk food being sold at its facilities, like chocolate bars and chips.

“At some stage, I think they’ll have to think about the accessibility of those things, particularly for younger people,” he said.

“I don’t think it’s a bad idea, by at least making them less visible and less accessible, so kids just don’t see them and want them.”

CHHHS executive director Tina Chinery said they had received no complaints from patients, staff or visitors when their healthier drink strategy was rolled out earlier this year.

“Healthcare facilities play an important role in promoting the health and wellbeing of patients, staff and visitors,” she said.

“Cairns Hospital is leading by example and creating environments that support patients, staff and visitors to make healthy choices easy.”

#NACCHOagm2017 @RACGP and NACCHO promote updated guide to preventive Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health assessments

RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health was on hand yesterday at the NACCHO (National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation) Annual Conference and AGM in Canberra to reinforce the partnership between the two organisations.

First published in newsGP. Reproduced with permission of the RACGP.

The National guide is currently being updated for its third edition

That partnership is demonstrated in the co-development of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (the National guide), which is currently being updated for its third edition.

The guide is designed as a practical resource for all health professionals delivering primary care to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.

‘The National guide has been extremely well received by the Aboriginal community controlled health sector,’ Assoc Prof Sophia Couzos, NACCHO National guide Project Lead, told newsGP. ‘Everyone has been pleased with the issues addressed in the National guide.’

Those issues include lifestyle, child and young people’s health, rheumatic heart disease, eye health, hearing loss, sexual health and blood-borne viruses, antenatal care, mental health, cardiovascular disease prevention, chronic kidney disease, type 2 diabetes, prevention and early detection of cancer, and preventive health for older people.

‘The National guide is a clinical tool in terms of prevention, but also a tool for education for healthcare providers, Assoc Prof Couzos said. ‘People also plan to use it as a policy tool and to inform programs supporting best practice.’

According to Lauren Trask, NACCHO National Guide Implementation Officer, the publication remains consistent with the national policy platform around quality improvement initiatives.

‘The National guide provides linkage with the Quality Improvement module in the fifth edition of the RACGP’s Standards for general practices,’ she told newsGP. ‘It also has exciting and challenging new chapters, and reinforces the environmental and social determinants of health for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander patients.’

The updated third edition of the National guide is scheduled for release in February 2018, with RACGP and NACCHO hosting a series of workshops across the country to support its implementation.

 

 

 

Day 1 Program #NACCHOagm2017 Aboriginal Health Conference : Media Alert : Hear our national #ACCHO ” Voices ” in Canberra

 

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation leaders and health experts from across Australia will come together in Canberra today to examine key policy issues and projects that are making a difference in closing the gap in Indigenous health.

The theme of the conference is Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow.

NACCHO would like to acknowledge that we will be gathering on the traditional Ngunnawal and Ngambri lands and acknowledge owner’s past, present and future “

Download the full conference program here https://www.nacchoconference.com.au/program/

Social Media

Follow on Twitter: #NACCHOagm2017 @NACCHOAustralia

Facebook : A limited number of sessions and interviews will be broadcast via our FACEBOOK Page @NacchoAboriginalHealth

National Media Contact: Jenny Stokes 0478 504 280

NACCHO Social Media: Colin Cowell 0401 331 251

NACCHO Contact at Conference: Oliver Tye 0450 956 942

9.00 – 9.20 am

Matilda House Welcome to Ngunnawal and Ngambri Country,

9.20 – 9.30 am

Welcoming Address to open the 2017

NACCHO Conference Our Health counts:

Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Speaker:

9.30 – 9.50 am

Secretary of the Department of Health @healthgovau

Speaker: Glenys Beauchamp PSM 

9.50 – 10.15 am

Topic: Enhanced Multijurisdictional response to STI and Blood Borne Viruses in Indigenous Communities

Speaker: Professor Brendan Murphy

10.15 – 10.30 am

NACCHO CEO Pat turner and David Quilty of the Pharmacy Guild of Australia @PharmGuildAus

MoU joint signing: Improving access to medicine for Indigenous Australians.

10.30 – 10.50 am

Topic: Mayi Kuwayu: a national study of culture and wellbeing among Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander peoples

Speaker: Dr Ray Lovett @ANU_NCIS @Mayi_Kuwayu

11.15 – 11.45 am

ACCHS role in advocacy

Speaker: Danila Dilba CEO Olga Havnen @DanilaDilba

11.45 am – 12.05 pm

Topic: #Earl Health for Life

Speaker: Associate Professor Kelvin Kong Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS)

And Dr Matthew Brown deadly Ears Program at Children’s Health Queensland @KelvinKongENT

12.05 – 12.30 pm

Topic: remote region challenges

Speaker: Sandy Davies @SandyDavies8

11.15 – 11.45 am

FASD Prevention in local communities

Speaker: Dr James Fitzpatrick

1.40 – 2.00 pm

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

(3rd edition) NACCHO in partnership with the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) @RACGP

Speaker: Associate Professor Sophia Couzos

1.40-2.30pm

Topic: Yarning Circle NACCHO Governance explained with a Q&A session

Speaker: Pat Turner assisted by Kate Gumley

Full details of days activities

https://www.nacchoconference.com.au/program/

#NACCHOagm2017 Aboriginal Health Conference : Media Alert : Hear our national #ACCHO ” Voices ” in Canberra this week

  ” Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation leaders and health experts from across Australia will come together in Canberra this week to examine key policy issues and projects that are making a difference in closing the gap in Indigenous health.

The theme of the conference is Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow.

NACCHO would like to acknowledge that we will be gathering on the traditional Ngunnawal and Ngambri lands and acknowledge owner’s past, present and future “

Download the full conference program here https://www.nacchoconference.com.au/program/

 The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM will provide a forum for our Aboriginal community controlled health (ACCHO ) services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Social Media

Follow on Twitter: #NACCHOagm2017 @NACCHOAustralia

Facebook : A limited number of sessions and interviews will be broadcast via our FACEBOOK Page @NacchoAboriginalHealth

National Media Contact: Jenny Stokes 0478 504 280

NACCHO Social Media: Colin Cowell 0401 331 251

NACCHO Contact at Conference: Oliver Tye 0450 956 942

Download the full conference program here https://www.nacchoconference.com.au/program/

The conference will also:

  • Launch a new Memorandum of Understanding between NACCHO and the Pharmacy Guild of Australia to improve access to medicine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Reveal what the 2016 Census statistics tell us about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
  • Launch the Mayi Kuwayu Study – an Aboriginal led longitudinal survey of more than 400,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults to provide the first large scale evidence of relationship between cultural engagement and health
  • Highlight PWC’s landmark report into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island incarceration rates.

The conference will be opened by the Secretary of the Department of Health, Glenys Beauchamp and Professor Brendan Murphy will later address delegates about an Enhanced Multijurisdictional Response to Sexually Transmitted Infections and Blood Borne Viruses in Indigenous Communities.

Background : We honour on our conference poster  the first Aboriginal ” Voices to go to Canberra”

 ” Jimmy Clements and another Wiradjuri man, John Noble were one of the earliest practitioners of what the politics of visibility, of being present where you are not meant to be and where your presence creates discomfort.

Regardless of whether they were as unaware or indifferent to the meaning of the event, as is often suggested, their presence was a powerful act, contesting claims of the erasure of Indigenous people from the land and place.”

For its poignancy and historical significance, is the image of Jimmy Clements, an old Wiradjuri man, sitting in the dust with his dogs and holding an Australian ensign, at the 1927 opening of Parliament House in Canberra.

A few days later the Canberra Times – again with an emphasis on Indigenous connection to country – reported:

“Where his dusky forebears have gathered in native ceremonial for centuries past, a lone representative of a fast diminishing race saluted visiting royalty. Despite the grotesque garb and untamed mane, the Aborigine comported himself not without dignity. With his three faithful dogs, he made an immediate target for a battery of cameras.”

Jimmy Clements (c. 1847 – 28 August 1927) was an Aboriginal elder from the Wiradjuri tribe , and was present at the opening of the Provisional Parliament House in Canberra on 9 May 1927.

He was also known as “King Billy”[1] and also by Nangar or Yangar.[2]

Clements and another Wiradjuri man, John Noble, had walked for nearly a week over the mountains from Brungle Mission near Gundagai, New South Wales.[3]

The two men were the only indigenous people to attend the first opening of parliament.

Clements was initially told to move on by police at the ceremony due to his attire but due to popular support from other members of the crowd he was among prominent citizens who were presented to the Duke and Duchess of York (later King George VI and Elizabeth the Queen Mother).[1]

The National Archives of Australia describes it as “possibly the first recorded instance of Aboriginal protest at Parliament House in Canberra”.

It was the precursor to so much activism – from the 1938 Day of Mourning, the fight for recognition and much else in 1967, and the ongoing battle for land rights that manifested with the enduring tent embassy, just across the road, on Australia Day 1972.

The sign out front reads: Sovereignty never ceded.

Monash University’s Maryrose Casey wrote of Clements and Noble in the International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies: “Regardless of whether they were as unaware or indifferent to the meaning of the event, as is often suggested, their presence was a powerful act, contesting claims of the erasure of Indigenous people from the land and place.

Clements died on 28 August 1927, aged 80, in Queanbeyan, New South Wales near Canberra

See Guardian Article

NACCHO Aboriginal #HealthStarRating and #Nutrition @KenWyattMP Free healthy choices food app will dial up good tucker

“Users simply scan the barcode of a product with their phone to see if it’s a healthy choice,

Once scanned, the app gives a ‘thumbs up’, ‘thumbs down’, or ‘thumbs sideways’ message, according to how healthy the product is.

“One of the app’s best features is that, once it’s downloaded, all the information is on your phone and there’s no need for the internet, so it’s ideal for people living in remote areas.”

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said the Uncle Jimmy’s Good Tucker app was easy to use and a first for remote communities.

Read over 30 NACCHO Articles about Healthy Food and Nutrition

The GOOD TUCKER app has been launched with the intention to assist people living in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to make healthier food and beverage choices at the local store.

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt AM gave the official thumbs up to the free app today. The app allows shoppers to scan a food or beverage product’s barcode and instantly reveal if it is a healthy option, should be consumed in moderation or avoided altogether.

DOWNLOAD INFO HERE

The app has been championed by the Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies), the University of South Australia (UnisSA) and Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up! , which has been promoting awareness and the benefits of a healthy diet to Indigenous children for more than 10 years.

Graham “Buzz” Bidstrup, CEO of Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up!, said there was an overwhelming need for the app.

“We know that there is over consumption of ultra-processed foods particularly in remote Indigenous Australian communities. These foods are typically energy dense and high in added sugar and salt which fuels the obesity epidemic and a raft of early onset chronic diseases.

“The GOOD TUCKER app shows at a glance how healthy or unhealthy a product is with a simple thumbs up, sideways or down message. The Thumbs rating is derived from a combination of the products’ Health Star Rating and Australian Bureau of Statistics’ discretionary food classification,” Mr Bidstrup said.

The app has been more than two years in the making with joint input from Menzies, UniSA and Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up!.

Associate Professor Julie Brimblecombe, head of the nutrition program at Menzies, said she hoped the GOOD TUCKER app would help to tackle the significant health gap facing many people living in remote communities.

We know that nutrition plays a huge role in contributing to poor health. Making even small changes to our diets, such as consuming a little less salt and added sugar, and eating less fat (particularly saturated fat) and energy (kilojoules) could help prevent diseases including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity and type 2 diabetes.

This app will help people to change their shopping habits as well as generate new learning about healthy food choices for community residents and store managers,” Assoc Prof Brimblecombe said.

The GOOD TUCKER app, which is powered by the highly successful FoodSwitch app, provides Thumbs ratings for tens of thousands of products on sale in food stores all across Australia.

It also provides guidance about take-away foods, such as pizzas and burgers and other non-packaged, non-barcoded items like fresh fruit and vegetables.

Prior to the launch the app was trialled by Indigenous musicians and performers at the Bush Band Bash concert in Central Australia , Wiraduri woman, Johanna Campbell said she found it educational and easy to use and is looking forward to it being introduced into rural and remote communities across Australia.

“The GOOD TUCKER app is great. To be able to scan the barcode on a food packet to find out if it is healthy or not will be really useful. Some foods are not so obviously unhealthy, so to be able to receive a thumbs up, sideways or down will help buy healthier options at the store,” Ms Campbell said.

Dr Tom Wycherley from UniSA’s Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), said the app uses imagery and branding that is easily interpretable and familiar to communities.

“The GOOD TUCKER app builds on existing Thumbs Up! branding that has been seen in many communities for over 10 years and provides information in a culturally appropriate form. Early feedback is really positive but the real test now will be to see if this can noticeably change food choices.”

A full evaluation of the app is planned to take place after the release.

The GOOD TUCKER app works on:

1. Apple mobile devices that have a camera with auto-focus. Requires iOS 7.0 or later.

2.Android devices running versions 4.0.x and above that have a camera with autofocus.

As all the information is in the app there is no need for the user to be in internet or phone range to use the app

Part 2 Minister Wyatt’s Press Release  :Free healthy food app dials up good tucker for remote Indigenous communities

A new mobile phone app launched today promises to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in remote areas make healthy food choices.

The thumbs rating is based on the Government’s Health Star Rating system and the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

“The app is named in honour of legendary singer Jimmy Little, who established the Jimmy Little Foundation and dedicated much of his life to promoting better Indigenous health,” said Minister Wyatt.

“People in remote communities can face considerable food challenges, from the combination of limited supplies, particularly the difficulty in getting fresh fruit and vegetables, and limited storage.

“Uncle Jimmy’s app will complement our work to make good food more accessible in remote areas, through the Outback Stores scheme. The accredited stores provide healthy food cheaper than in other remote area stores and implement a nutrition strategy that includes health promotion activities and cooking demonstrations.

“Improving food choices is one of the most effective ways of helping close the gap in Indigenous health, with poor diet behind 10 per cent of diseases.”

The Good Tucker app was created by the Jimmy Little Foundation, in partnership with the Menzies School of Health Research, the University of South Australia and the George Institute for Global Health.

The app links with the Health Star Ratings system, which has more than 7,500 food products displaying the Health Star Rating logo.

Background

The GOOD TUCKER app was developed by Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up!, The University of South Australia and Menzies School of Health Research in partnership with The George Institute, to provide a simple way for people to identify the healthiest food and drink options available in stores.

Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up! was established in 2007 by legendary Australian entertainer Dr. Jimmy Little AO with veteran musician and founding CEO Graham “Buzz” Bidstrup.

The Thumbs Up! program uses music and new media to bring awareness of good nutrition and healthy lifestyle to Indigenous children living in regional and remote communities across Australia. Thumbs Up! engages with the whole of community, including traditional owner groups, schools, local food stores, health services and community groups.

 How do I get the Good Tucker app?

iPhone1 users: Download Good Tucker from the App Store1, either online or on your device.

Android2 smartphone users: Download Good Tucker from Google Play2, either online or on your Android smartphone.

The app is free of charge. An internet connection (mobile/cellular data or Wi-Fi) is required to download it and to share information by social media and email. Standard usage charges may apply – check with your internet and mobile service providers for more information.

Once the Good Tucker app has been downloaded onto your phone you do NOT need to have phone or internet connection for it to operate. All information on products will be stored on the phone.

Other FAQs about the APP

Welcome to the Good Tucker APP!

A simple and easy way of checking out how healthy a food product is.

Download from

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Ulurustatement #COAG : Pat Anderson expresses dismay over political silence on #Ulurustatement

As a health professional it beggars belief that COAG can meet on this yet the Referendum Council work and Uluru outcome ‘Voice Treaty Truth’ is not raised,

It highlights that politicians and policy makers do not understand Closing the Gap is inextricably linked to Voice Treaty Truth.

Structural reform is the missing ingredient in addressing disadvantage and the fact that no one at COAG acknowledged that shows they have no idea what they are doing.”

Ms Anderson will use the ­annual Charles Perkins oration ­tonight (October 25 ) to say the ­almost complete silence from government — five months after the Uluru constitutional convention recommended the advisory body — proves its urgent need.

See NACCHO Uluru Statement earlier this year

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #treaty : #Uluru Summit calls for the establishment of a First Nations Voice enshrined in the Constitution

Establishing a proposed Indigenous parliamentary advisory body would mean Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were “at last in the main building, not in the demountable out the back”, a frustrated Lowitja Institute chair Pat Anderson will say.

From todays Australian

Her address will come on the heels of Cape York lawyer Noel Pearson furiously lashing out at white Australia’s failure “to take responsibility for your country” on the issue. “I’m angry about the intransigence and the lack of responsibility taken, angry that our people are constantly seeking the sentiment of Australia and not getting a response,” Mr Pearson told a packed Sydney Institute gathering on Monday.

Ms Anderson will question why a COAG meeting this week specifically addressing indigenous issues, including recalibrating the Closing the Gap targets, failed to address constitutional reform.

See our NACCHO post for COAG Communique earlier this week

Aboriginal Health #COAG #ClosetheGap :’Historic’: Sweeping overhaul of #Indigenous #ClosingtheGap strategy welcomed

She­ ­co-chaired the council appointed by Malcolm Turnbull and Bill Shorten to make concrete proposals. The ‘Voice Treaty Truth’ slogan refers to the three key issues identified in the Uluru Statement from the Heart, formalised at the end of the three-day convention in May.

They were the constitutionally enshrined body to provide an indigenous “voice” to parliament, as well as formal treaty-making and truth-telling processes.

The Law Council of Australia yesterday threw its “full and unqualified support” behind the call for a parliamentary body, which would have no veto powers and would not constitute an extra chamber of parliament, but whose role would be merely to advise governments.

“We are calling for genuine commitment from all parliamentarians to implement the Referendum Council’s recommendations swiftly,” Law Council president Fiona McLeod SC said. “The Law Council considers (them) to be a necessary and important step towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ self-determination.”

Referendum Council member and East Arnhem Land leader Galarrwuy Yunupingu warned Mr Turnbull at the Garma cultural festival in August that he would press him to act on the Referendum Council recommendations. Mr Turnbull has questioned whether the plan was delivered with enough detail, but Ms Anderson will say tonight that “the details of how to establish such a body would need to be carefully negotiated with the parliament once its establishment was agreed through referendum”.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Alert : Shifting the Health Dial: 5 year Productivity Commission review and 6 key recommendations

 ” Better health care creates no losers : Australia is beset by a rising wave of complex chronic health conditions that will lead to many years of life spent in ill health, lower involvement in work and rising costs for the health care system. Suppliers rather than patients are the centre of the current system — an anachronism built on paternalism.

Prevention and management of these conditions by integrating care provided by GPs and other clinicians with care in hospitals is one antidote. Change can be orchestrated locally if the Australian, State and territory Governments move away from centralised control.

It is time to move to full adoption of patient-centred care, where the outcomes for, and experiences of, people are the key focus, but getting buy-in from clinicians is a critical part of this.

Reform of Australia’s health care system will not just be better for patients, but may save up to $140 billion over the next 20 years ”

For all 6 Recommendations see PART 3 Below

Download Paper 4 : Healthier Australians

productivity-review-supporting4

All Productivity Papers can be viewed here

  • 4.9 million adults (nearly 30% of the adult population) are obese (p. 45)

Part 1 :Health system overhaul could boost economy: Productivity Commission- Media Report

A DRAMATIC overhaul of Australia’s health system could boost the economy by $200 billion over two decades, a Productivity Commission ­report has found.

The review blames a lack of communication between healthcare specialists for contributing to many of the issues faced by every Australian, and calls for a “reboot” of the way the system is integrated.

The 1200-page “Shifting the Dial” report, released 24 October , has found that despite the average Australian living to 82.8 years — the third highest among developed countries — Australians are spending the longest amount of time in ill health.

The wide ranging review also warns that fundamental flaws in the university system have led to one in every five graduates being unable to get a full-time job.

Productivity Commission chairman Peter Harris criticised “non-existent communication between different parts of the health system” and recommended the federal government consider strategic overhauls to the way the sector operates.

The review warns that 17.5 per cent of Australians have mental or behavioural problems and a suicide rate double the economically best-performing countries.

It found less than 20 per cent of GPs know when their patients have been into an emergency ward, compared with 68 per cent in the Netherlands and 56 per cent in New Zealand.

Treasurer Scott Morrison said the findings should force governments and the sector to consider the effectiveness of the health system.

“Improving the health of Australians is not just about enhancing our quality of life, it’s an economic growth strategy,” Mr Morrison will say when launching the findings today.

“Healthy and happy people are naturally more productive people.”

The report suggests linking university funding to the success of students, seizing on data showing almost 25 per cent of graduates who find jobs take work in areas not relevant to the degree they had studied

Productivity Commission report reinforces that health is wealth—and it’s time for change

‘Individual health leads to national wealth, and it’s great to see that the Productivity Commission has recognised this in its Shifting the dial: 5 year productivity review report released today’, says Alison Verhoeven, Chief Executive of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA).

‘It’s also gratifying that the report recommends shifting the focus of our health system from providers to patients.

‘AHHA has been advocating for some years now for better patient-centred and integrated care, with attached funding and care pathways, and information flows.

‘We have also been advocating for health funding mechanisms based on value and outcomes, rather than on service volumes—which the Commission is also recommending.

‘We also support the Commission’s call for better integration of primary care and hospital care at a local level, with a view to boosting preventative measures and minimising unnecessary hospital admissions.
 
‘We think it is incumbent on the Commonwealth to use the recommendations in this report as a starting point for negotiating its post-2020 public hospital funding agreement with the states and territories.

‘This could also be a good opportunity for the Commonwealth and the states and territories to work in partnership to deliver a unified primary healthcare and hospital system focused on people receiving the care they need and want, at the right time in the right place by the right provider.’
 
(Source: AHHA)

Part 2 : Productivity Commission media briefing

Mediocrity beckons if we let it

In the future, we cannot rely on high commodity prices or, given an ageing Australia, labour participation rates, to drive national income.

We might try to invest more to add to growth, but capital must be paid for, and investment to GDP rates are already at historically high levels, so there may not be much room to move.

That means that innovation and learning — doing things better — is the key for prosperity. Yet this has languished in Australia (and many other countries) for a decade.

A new agenda focused on individuals

Getting better outcomes involves new agendas involving the non market economy (mainly education and healthcare), the innovation system, using data, creating well-functioning cities, and re-building confidence in institutions. And no one wants clogged cities or arteries.

Better health care creates no losers

Australia is beset by a rising wave of complex chronic health conditions that will lead to many years of life spent in ill health, lower involvement in work and rising costs for the health care system. Suppliers rather than patients are the centre of the current system — an anachronism built on paternalism.

Prevention and management of these conditions by integrating care provided by GPs and other clinicians with care in hospitals is one antidote. Change can be orchestrated locally if the Australian, State and territory Governments move away from centralised control.

It is time to move to full adoption of patient-centred care, where the outcomes for, and experiences of, people are the key focus, but getting buy-in from clinicians is a critical part of this.

Reform of Australia’s health care system will not just be better for patients, but may save up to $140 billion over the next 20 years.

Australia’s education system is a mixed bag of excellence and mediocrity

Slipping school results and concerns about teaching quality raise questions about how Australians will adapt to the wave of changes in the economy over the coming decades.

The vocational education and training system is in disarray.

It will not be too long before universities will be the key vehicle for skill formation, yet their teaching function plays a subordinate role to their research role, and the outcomes for many graduates are poor.

Better teaching quality, re-building the VET sector, genuine options for acquiring new skills as people switch jobs and careers, using new technological models for educating people, and creating teaching-only universities are just a few of the many changes that need to be made.

Excising Utopia from Australia’s city policies

Australian cities are under pressure — rising population and congestion, poor infrastructure decisions, ad hoc and anticompetitive planning and zoning, and an unsustainable funding basis for roads. Stamp duties are bad taxes, a bonanza in times of rising housing prices, but unfair and inefficient.

Road funds that respond to where people want roads is one step to change, as is a switch to taxes on unimproved land value. There are good models of zoning and planning that could readily be adopted, and infrastructure decisions could be enhanced by taking out the ‘Utopia’ factor in their preparation.

Cooperative reform is still possible

While Australians’ trust in governments and their institutions is low and fragile, there are practical things that can be done to make governments work better.

A key will be that the Council of Australian Governments chooses to restore its role as a vehicle for economic and social reform.

The scope for the vital big reforms will require commitment to a joint reform agenda by all jurisdictions. This should be negotiated in 2018, collecting all ideas into a cohesive whole.

Prosecute the usual suspects too

Of course, market-based reforms are evident and available — to address the persistent failure of Australia’s energy market, redundant regulations, and flaws in workplace relations — but we know this already.

General

  • From 2003-04 to 2015-16, the gains to market sector GDP from ‘doing things better’ have been nearly zero (p. 33)
  • The ‘non-market’ sector (including health care and social services, education and training, and public administration and safety) accounts for 27% of employment in Australia (p. 192)

Health

  • More than 10 million Australians have three or more long-term conditions (SP4, p. 10)
  • Years of life spent in ill-health are nearly 11 years — highest in the OECD (p. 45)
  • 4.9 million adults (nearly 30% of the adult population) are obese (p. 45)
  • 11.7 million people have no or low exercise levels (2 in 3 adults) ( p. 45)
  • Moving from poor health to fair health increases labour participation rates by 34 percentage points (SP4. p. 14)
  • 75% of acute bronchitis is treated with antibiotics. The appropriate rate is close to zero (p. 61)
  • Unnecessary waiting in doctor’s rooms costs Australians around $1 billion annually in lost time (p. 64)
  • 40% of people with a health-related qualification have inadequate health literacy (p. 65)

Part 3 Recommendation :

2.1 Implement nimble funding arrangements at the regional level

The Australian, State and Territory Governments should allocate (modest) funding pools to Primary Health Networks and Local Hospital Networks for improving population health, managing chronic conditions and reducing hospitalisation at the regional level.

HOW TO DO IT

Set aside a small share (say 2 to 3 per cent) of activity-based funding to hospitals to create a Prevention and Chronic Condition Management Fund (PCCMF) for each Local Hospital Network (LHN) to commission activities that improve population health and service quality, or reduce hospitalisations and broader health expenditures.

Where they are directly related to prevention and management of chronic conditions, allocate the expected funding from the Practice Incentives Program and other Medical Benefit Schedule items to Primary Health Networks (PHNs) in each region.

Give LHNs autonomy about how they spend from their PCCMF (including a license to fund innovations) and give them certainty over future funding contributions to allow planning.

Assess the returns from PCCMF investments. Let LHNs retain some of the returns from PCCMFs, with the remainder shared among Australian, State and Territory Governments.

Disseminate the lessons from effective interventions funded through PCCMFs to other regions.

Ensure formal collaboration between LHNs and PHNs to improve population health and the effectiveness and efficiency of primary health care. Where relevant, involve other regional groups with capabilities in managing population health, including Local Governments and community organisations.

The Australian Government should allow LHNs to commission the services of GPs by amending section 19 of the Health Insurance Act 1973, with the proviso that the LHNs operate in formal agreement with their region’s PHN. The Australian Government should also remove any administrative constraints on PHNs allying with LHNs to commission GP services.

Amend the Australian Government’s prospective Health Care Home model so that LHNs and PHNs can introduce local variants, with supplementary funding and design features determined by them through collaboration.

Clinician buy-in is essential to achieving change and will be led by PHNs, which have often built good relationships with local leaders.

Further details are in Conclusions 6.1, 6.2 and 6.3 of Supporting Paper 5.

Recommendation 2.2 Eliminate low-value health interventions

Australian governments should revise their policies to more rapidly reduce the use of low-value health interventions.

HOW TO DO IT

More quickly respond to international assessments indicating low-value medical interventions.

Create more comprehensive guidelines and advisory ‘do not do’ lists.

Disseminate best practice to health professionals, principally through the various medical colleges, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care and similar state-based bodies.

Collect and divulge data at the hospital and clinician level for episodes of care that lead to hospital-acquired complications and for interventions that have ambiguous clinical impacts (such as knee arthroscopies).

Provide accessible advice to patients about potentially low-value services and improve their health literacy using the measures covered by Recommendation 2.3.

Ensure that ongoing processes for reviewing existing Medical Benefit Schedule items are more rapid and comprehensive than occurred under the arrangements prior to the Robinson Review.

Give priority to de-funding interventions that demonstrably fail cost effectiveness tests, moving from volume to value.

Remove the tax rebate for private health insurance ancillaries.

More details are in Conclusion 7.1 of Supporting Paper 5.

Recommendation 2.3 Make the patient the centre of care

All Australian governments should re-configure the health care system around the principles of patient-centred care, with this implemented within a five year timeframe.

HOW TO DO IT

Develop well-defined measures of people’s experience of care and the outcomes they observe (so-called Patient Reported Experience and Outcome Measures — PREMs and PROMs), and integrate these into disease registries. The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care should be the orchestrator of these developments.

Publish results so clinicians, hospitals and patients see how the system is working at a grass roots level.

Consult with consumer groups representing patients and with the various medical colleges to achieve acceptance of the new model and its implications for practices.

Improve patient health literacy to a level that far more people would have a capacity to self-manage chronic conditions, make informed end of life decisions, and be able to solicit from, and interpret information given by, clinicians (Supporting Paper 5).

Use My Health Record and other IT platforms to involve people in their health decisions.

Give people a greater capacity for making choices between alternative suppliers, underpinned by transparent measures of prices and performance.

Give greater weight to patient convenience, and develop and disseminate technologies that assist this.

Systematically include an understanding of patient-centric care in the education and training of new health professionals, and use the various professional bodies to disseminate an understanding of the issues to existing health professionals.

Use data analysis to identify very high service users across all major service types and discover the reasons for their high use (Recommendation 2.4). Use this to customise care plans and other targeted early interventions to improve their health status and reduce their use of services.

Recommendation 2.4 Use information better

Australian governments should cooperate to remove the current messy, partial and duplicated presentation of information and data, and provide easy access to health care data for providers, researchers and consumers.

HOW TO DO IT

Identify the key relevant health datasets, including those that provide aggregated information about population health, and ensure that:

  • links to health datasets and survey results are included on the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare website
  • registers of health care data are created and published on data.gov.au, in line with recommendation 6.4 of the Productivity Commission’s inquiry into Data Availability and Use (PCDAU).

Implement recommendation 6.6 of the PCDAU regarding the establishment of the Office of the National Data Custodian, which will have responsibility for the implementation of data management policy for health care and other data.

Streamline approval processes for access to data, in line with recommendation 6.7 of the PCDAU.

In doing so, priority should be given to making health datasets available, with a focus on projects that:

  • allow evaluation of initiatives by Primary Health Networks and Local Hospital Networks at the regional level
  • use data analytics to discover bottlenecks in integrated care systems, prospectively identify high-risk groups, identify the long-run effectiveness of preventative measures, and better isolate low-value interventions.

Governments should cooperate to reduce the existing inconsistencies in the multiple population health surveys and hospital and other satisfaction/experience surveys, accompanied by the development of benchmarks for gauging the relative performance of health care providers and purchasers across all national regions.

Any webpages or other sources that provide information to consumers about health care services should be comprehensive and maintained, and if that is not cost-effective, they should cease to be funded by governments.

Ensure uptake of electronic medical records by health professionals and hospitals by making them easy to use, and in some cases, linking access to additional funding to their adoption of integrated information systems.

Use My Health Record for both information and as a platform for providing clinically proven advice to patients, with the potential development of links between it and wearable technologies.

The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, in collaboration with other State and Territory Government agencies, should be a clearinghouse for the results of evaluations of regional innovations, and report on the diffusion of substantiated best practices across regions.

Create a cooperative ‘Champions Program’ that uses people with hands-on-experience with innovations to assist others to copy them.

Recommendation 2.5 Embrace technology to change the pharmacy model

The Australian Government should move away from community pharmacy as the vehicle for dispensing medicines to a model that anticipates automatic dispensing in a majority of locations, supervised by a suitably qualified person. In clinical settings, pharmacists should play a new remunerated collaborative role with other primary health professionals where there is evidence of the cost-effectiveness of this approach.

HOW TO DO IT

Identify the best dispensing technologies from those that are currently available.

Determine the necessary credentials for the supervisor of automated dispensing, but with those qualifications involving substantially less training than currently are required for pharmacists.

Consult with the relevant training institutions — most likely in the vocational education and training sector — to develop courses for such qualifications.

Inform the various university departments of pharmacy about the reduced need for future supply of pharmacists.

Determine the locations for automated dispensing, taking into account accessibility and security, but eliminating unnecessary boundaries on locations now endemic in pharmacy planning rules.

Trial the technologies in remote and rural areas where there are currently shortages of pharmacists.

In consultation with Primary Health Networks, Local Hospital Networks, the various medical colleges and any other relevant clinical bodies, define the role of pharmacists in a collaborative clinical model.

Identify where it is cost effective to use pharmacists in primary health, taking into account the capabilities of lower-cost health professionals, and the increasingly greater capacity for information systems to provide accurate advice about medicines to GPs and other professionals.

Phase in the changes after the Sixth Pharmacy Agreement has lapsed, using the time to test it in some natural settings to refine the model.

Recommendation 2.6 Amend alcohol taxation arrangements

The Australian Government should move towards an alcohol tax system that removes the current concessional treatment of high-alcohol, low-value products, primarily cheap cask and fortified wines.

HOW TO DO IT

Ideally, this would be achieved through a uniform volumetric tax rate for alcoholic beverages, calibrated to reflect the health impacts of alcohol consumption. Exemptions could be made for the first 1.15 per cent of alcohol (consistent with the current policy for beer).

A transition period would be needed to allow the wine industry time to adapt.

Phasing out the existing range of concessional alcohol excise rates — including for draught beer and brandy — would also help to simplify the tax system and make it less distortionary.

Alternative models that would avoid significant price reductions for expensive products — with the regressive income impacts this would entail — could include a modified WET (wine equalisation tax) system with a minimum volumetric tax or the introduction of floor price regulation.

However, further work on these options is needed to determine their feasibility in light of likely administrative burdens and implementation issues.

Tax measures should be accompanied by other policies that increase education about alcohol and assist people with alcohol-related conditions.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Alcohol : #NT set to lead the nation on alcohol policy reform says @AMSANTaus

 ” This report has the potential to be a game-changer in responding to the alcohol-related harms that are far too prevalent here in the Northern Territory.

“It is really heartening to see how much the review has listened to the long-standing policy solutions that AMSANT has been advocating for more than a decade.

Implementing this report will reduce premature death, hospitalisations, domestic violence and child neglect. It will help significantly to close the health gap in the NT. ”

Mr John Paterson CEO  Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT (AMSANT) today welcomed the final report of the NT Review of Alcohol Legislation and Policy released last Thursday.

Download the Final Report HERE

NT Alcohol Policies and Legislation Review

“It is really heartening to see how much the review has listened to the long-standing policy solutions that AMSANT has been advocating for more than a decade”, he said.

“For a very long time we have been concerned about the harms being caused by cheap grog, too many outlets and take-away licenses, too much alcohol promotion and lack of adequate data, amongst other issues.

“This report addresses all of these issues and goes further, providing a comprehensive response to alcohol problems in the NT. Previous attempts at reform, such as the “Enough is Enough” program, not been far-reaching enough to have a major impact, but we are confident that this report provides the policy options to effectively deal with the NT’s alcohol problems.

“AMSANT thanks the Gunner Government for their immediate and emphatic response to the report in supporting all but one of the 220 recommendations.

The leadership shown by our Chief Minister on this key public health issue is commendable.

“The Territory is on the cusp of finally coming to terms with alcohol and the harm it causes. Instead of being the jurisdiction famous for its “bloody good drinkers”, we now have an opportunity to lead the nation in action to address alcohol.

“Implementing this report will reduce premature death, hospitalisations, domestic violence and child neglect. It will help significantly to close the health gap in the NT.

Research shows that in any population, the most disadvantaged people are most impacted by alcohol and have the most to gain from an effective public health response”, he concluded.

Riley review: Floor price on alcohol, 400sqm rule to be scrapped in wake of NT alcohol policy paper

Photo: Michael Gunner (centre) says he agrees with nearly all the recommendations of Trevor Riley (left). (ABC News: Felicity James)

Published HERE

The review by former chief justice Trevor Riley could usher in some of the biggest-ever changes to the Northern Territory’s alcohol policies.

Already the Gunner Government has said it will accept in principle nearly all of the 220 recommendations from the review, including a floor price or volumetric tax on alcohol products and a policy shift away from floor-size restrictions.

Major recommendations of the Riley Review:

  • The NT Liquor Act be rewritten
  • Immediate moratorium on takeaway liquor licences
  • Reduce grocery stores selling alcohol by phasing out store licences
  • Floor price/volumetric tax on alcohol products designed to reduce availability of cheap alcohol
  • Shift away from floor size restrictions for liquor outlets and repeal 400-square-metre restrictions
  • Reinstating an independent Liquor Commission
  • Legislating to make it an offence for someone to operate a boat or other vessel while over the limit
  • Establish an alcohol research body in the NT
  • Trial a safe spaces program where people can manage their consumption and seek intervention

“I got that one wrong going into the election and it has been good to see that Trevor [Riley] has come forward with this report with a much more considered, better way of dealing with density and sales of take-away outlets,” Mr Gunner said following the release of the report.

The Government has also said it will enact today a “complete moratorium” on all new take-away alcohol licences, including at greenfield sites.Attorney-General Natasha Fyles said the Northern Territory had the highest rate of alcohol consumption of anywhere in the world.

But the AHA’s opposition to Dan Murphy’s in the NT continues.

“We see that there are some recommendations in there in relation to additional licencing fees… to put an additional impost on businesses above the GST… we would see would be unfair,” he said.

“If the spirit of the review is followed in the Liquor Act, then the end result will be a reduction in alcohol in the volume of alcohol in the community.”

The national branch of the Australian Hotels Association does not support a floor price but the Northern Territory branch is in favour of it and has widely accepted the Riley review.

The figure would be indexed against ordinary wages and evaluated after three years.

“Floor space doesn’t impact on the amount of alcohol out there… it’s the price that makes the alcohol obtainable… if we’ve got people selling bottles of wine for $3, that’s cheaper than water, it seems to me you’ve clearly got a problem,” he said.

It said the relationship between the size of these premises and any increased harm is less clear, dismissing the claim that floor space was a contributing factor to alcohol related harm.

Floor price a more powerful way to reduce harm

He also acknowledged the Territory’s problem with alcohol-related harm and promised to sell liquor responsibly, if the licence was to be granted.

In a statement he said the company planned to move ahead with their application for a liquor licence in the Northern Territory.

Dan Murphy’s will try to operate in the NT

Other reforms include introducing licensing inspectors to help police at bottle shops, a move the NT Police Association has been pushing for.

Once the review is in place, one of the first priorities would be to reinstate an independent Liquor Commission, followed by a complete rewrite of the Liquor Act, which is expected to take 12 months.

“It is time that the Northern Territory gets rid of the tag of being an alcohol-fuelled community,” Ms Fyles said

He said details of how the floor price on alcohol will operate are yet to be determined, and any such price would be abolished if the Federal Government were to introduce its own volumetric tax.

Another recommendation that the Government has said it will back is a law to make it an offence for a person to operate or navigate a vessel on the water with a blood-alcohol content above 0.05 per cent.

Chief Minister Michael Gunner conceded that he made an error in pushing for the 400-square-metre rule, which had been dubbed a “Dan Ban” because it was seen as preventing Dan Murphy’s from opening a large store in Darwin.