Aboriginal Primary Health Care Certificate 3 and 4 :@NSWTAFE ” Google School ” delivers to 38 Indigenous #NSW #QLD student graduates

Part of my job is to run clinics in the community, so having my Certificate IV qualification will allow me to check blood sugar, take blood samples and measure body mass index,”

Stephen Taylor from Nowra is studying this Certificate IV course to upskill in his job as an Aboriginal Community Support Worker and Chronic Care Coordinator, which involves monitoring the health of his clients thus minimising hospital visits. He believes these skills will increase his value to his community and to his employer

TAFE NSW Aboriginal Pathways students from across NSW and Queensland benefited from contemporary online learning during their recent studies in primary health care in Port Macquarie.

Originally published HERE

The students are studying the Certificate III or Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care and are developing valuable skills like assessing clients’ physical wellbeing, administering medications, providing nutritional guidance, and addressing social determinants of health.

According to Sharon Taylor, Key Account Manager for Aboriginal Pathways TAFE NSW, this is not only the first time Certificate III and IV Practice qualifications in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care have been held in Port Macquarie, but also the first time the qualifications have been delivered using the flexible technology of Google Classroom.

“Although they were all first time users, students and staff all spoke enthusiastically of this type of learning, highlighting as outstanding benefits the automatic saving function, online networking and collaborative features,” said Ms Taylor.

Both qualifications have a focus on culturally appropriate application, and workers in this industry are crucial to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Amarlee Kelly, one of the 38 students in the two classes, is an Aboriginal woman from Tweed Heads, in Bundjalung country on the north coast of NSW. For Ms Kelly, leaving family and country to study in Port Macquarie took her out of her comfort zone.

“I was very nervous and uncomfortable about leaving my husband,” said Ms Kelly.

“We have been married for 24 years, and we rarely do things without each other. [But] when Uncle Bill performed his amazing Welcome to Country, I was really able to get a feel for Birpai country, and after that I felt much more comfortable and was able to settle down and get to work.”

Ms Taylor added that with Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) accreditation, TAFENSW Aboriginal Pathways are able to offer the Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Practice qualification, which enables their graduates to become AHPRA- registered practitioners.

 

Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NACCHOagm2017 #NSW #TAS #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

1.1 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference abstracts / Expressions of Interest close 21 August

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations

2.WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) officially launches the ‘Pink Box’

3. 1 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Medical serice  very active campaign in testing the ear health of preschool and school-age Aboriginal children

3.2 NSW : Governor of NSW visits Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services

4. NT : Miwatj Health had a HUGE presence at the 2017 Garma Festival

5.VIC : KIRRAE Health Services at Framlingham Aboriginal Reserve funded to fight ice

6.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service Mt Isa supports another cataract blitz

6.2 QLD : Jobs and health benefits in $120M boost for Indigenous infrastructure

7.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Health Workers out to break HEP.C stigma

8. Deadly Choices QLD trains up the Nganampa health team

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference abstracts / Expressions of Interest close 21 August

NACCHO is now calling for Expressions of Interest (EOI) from Member Services for speakers, case studies and table top presentations for the 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

Register HERE

2.WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) officially launches the ‘Pink Box’

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service (DYHS) have officially launched the ‘Pink Box’, a free vending machine that allows a discrete way for women to obtain sanitary products.

In partnership with Share the Dignity charity, the suppliers of the Pink Box, the launch took place at DYHS head office in East Perth.

Mrs Gail Yarran delivered the Welcome to Country followed by Jenny Bedford, DYHS’s new CEO who officially opened the launch. The audience listened to speeches from Maternal & Child Health worker, Jillian Taylor and the Founder of Share the Dignity charity, Rochelle Courtenay before the official ribbon cutting ceremony.

Also see : Indigenous girls missing school during their periods: the state of hygiene in remote Australia

3. 1 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Medical serice  very active campaign in testing the ear health of preschool and school-age Aboriginal children

This time last year, Harrison Faley was struggling to make sense of daycare.

Stuck hearing as if he were underwater, his parents thought he was simply a typical, inattentive two-year-old. But in reality, otitis media, a very common middle ear disease for young children, was blocking his conductive hearing.

Report from HERE

“We were alerted by his daycare that his speech was lagging a bit and he was getting constant ear infections,” mother Harnah Faley recalled.

“The specialist asked us to wait until he had all his teeth, and when that happened we had him tested again, and he was down to 10 per cent function.”

Within two months, Harrison had grommets (tiny tubes) inserted to allow air to reach his middle ear.

“The improvement was pretty much instant,” Mrs Faley said, adding that along with his hearing, Harrison’s speech and development progressed significantly.

“If you ask him, he got the potatoes out of his ears,” she said.

Harrison was just one of 51 children to have a free ear check up at the Inverell Shire Public Library on Tuesday, August 1 as part of the first local otitis media awareness day.

Two audiometry nurses were present to do the screening, one from Armajun Aboriginal Health Service.

Of those screened, 25 per cent had middle ear fluid and a further 22 per cent had a Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, which can lead to otitis media.

Only half the children screened on the day had a ‘normal’ reading for ear health.

Although Aboriginal children are ten times more likely to have otitis media and 70 percent more likely to have recurring otitis media; there was a higher percentage of ‘normal’ readings in Inverell’s Aboriginal children (13 per cent of those screened).

Organisers believe this was due to Armajun’s very active campaign in testing the ear health of preschool and school-age Aboriginal children in this area.

Hearing Support Teachers from the NSW Department of Education talked on factors that contribute to otitis media and how parents can help reduce the risks.

The morning period was very busy, with one local preschool bringing twenty seven students aged 3-5 for screening. The rest of the children were brought in by their parents or grandparents throughout the day.

Library staff were proactive and kept the children entertained with craft activities as they waited. Volunteers from the Inverell branch of Quota International also helped make the day a success.

With so many children having indications of either otitis media or Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, conductive hearing loss teacher Beverly Walls said it was a timely reminder to parents to be vigilant when their children complain of ear ache or have difficulty understanding instructions.

3.2 NSW : Governor of NSW visits Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services

Another great afternoon at our Batemans Bay clinic with community and His excellency David Hurley, Governor of NSW and wife. Pictured above with CEO Robert Skeen .Many thanks to Aunty Muriel Slockee for her Welcome to Country and the deadly Koori Choir from the Batemans Bay Primary School. Another thank you to Marty Thomas who enchanted all on the Didgeridoo.

4. NT : Miwatj Health had a HUGE presence at the 2017 Garma Festival

Did you pay us a visit at Garma 2017!?

Miwatj Health had a HUGE presence at the 2017 Garma Festival. From Clinicians, to our Raypirri Rom team, we were everywhere!

Our clinic was a great success, with 26 staff assisting over the four days, including 3 Aboriginal Health Practitioners and an admin staff member from Galiwin’ku (Elcho Island). Thank you to everyone to dedicated their time (and long weekend) to help provide a much needed service for the festival.

Miwatj Health would also like to thank Captain Starlight for coming all the way from Darwin to entertain the children; the clinic would not have been the same without you.

Our #YakaNgarali Team also went out to Garma to educate community members on the harmful affects of smoking. They tested approximately 40 people using the Smokerlyzer (check out our videos to see how the Smokerlyzer works), while also quizzing participants of the festival to gain a greater understanding of their knowledge around smoking facts.


Overall, we had a super successful weekend and cannot wait for Garma 2018!

5.VIC : KIRRAE Health Services at Framlingham Aboriginal Reserve funded to fight ice

KIRRAE Health Services is one of just 13 Victorian community groups to receive state government funding to help in the fight against ice.

The health service based at the Framlingham Aboriginal Reserve will receive $10,000 for an early intervention and prevention program targeting males aged eight to 17.

The state government funding is aimed at tackling ice through “a range of localised activities, including workshops, forums, social media, music events and education programs aimed at sporting communities”.

Kirrae Health Services will use the funding through its Koko Blokes program. “Koko” is a Kirrae Whurrong word meaning “younger brother”.

The program deals with positive role-modelling and issues around drug and alcohol use, domestic violence and respect.

6.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service Mt Isa supports another cataract blitz

Seventeen patients were in Mount Isa this month for the north-west Queensland city’s latest “cataract blitz”.

Not –for-profit organisation Check UP funded the North west Hospital and Health Service (NWHHS) to provide the eye surgery, targeted at Indigenous people form remote communities.

It follows a cataract surgery “blitz” last October. Patients travelled from Doomadgee, Mornington Island, Normanton, Cloncurry and Camooweal this month. Their pre-surgery clinics were conducted by telehealth, a first for cataract surgery, according to outreach coordinator Amy Davy.

“Providing Telehealth as an option for our patients from outlying communities reduces the number of trips or length of stay during their surgical procedures, so we’re pleased with the success of this, and will be utilising telehealth in similar situations,” she said.

Ms Davy praised the work Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service Gidgee healing’s Blake Fagan, who provided transport for the patients, and NWHHS Indigenous liaison officer Melissa Nathan, who assisted the patients through their eye surgery.

Visiting ophthalmologist Andrew Foster conducted 19 operations in 2 days, completing a cataract surgery every half hour.

“This blitz” is a very good system for getting patients treated,” he said.

“Doing it in a group like this is very effective as they support each other, and know each other. It works very well, with no “fail to attends”.

Dr Foster is based on the Sunshine Coast and flies into Mount Isa every month to do eye surgery.

6.2 QLD : Jobs and health benefits in $120M boost for Indigenous infrastructure

Indigenous communities across Queensland are set to benefit from critical infrastructure upgrades, with a $120 million boost over four years to improve water, wastewater and solid waste infrastructure.

Visiting Mornington Island, Aurukun and Pormpuraaw this week, Minister for Local Government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Mark Furner said the Indigenous Councils Critical Infrastructure Program funding was vital for the health of communities.

“I’m extremely proud to announce the Palaszczuk Government’s commitment to strengthen indigenous communities has been backed with our $120 million investment,” Mr Furner said.

“The program is about ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote communities have infrastructure to improve living conditions and provide a sustainable future.

“This funding will be tailored to each community, supporting the infrastructure they need now and into the future, helping to close the gap on disadvantage.

“One of the great things about this program is that the councils actually develop the skills locally to manage the infrastructure and projects moving forward.”

Minister Furner said for councils in remote locations, access, distance and logistics meant the cost of the projects could be up to seven times higher than mainland and metropolitan areas.

“The level of funding provided for the Indigenous Councils Critical Infrastructure Program is crucial to meet the additional challenges many of these communities face.

“Communities will be pleased to know that the first stage of project approvals are already underway and some of the most vital infrastructure projects will commence shortly.”

On-site condition assessments have been conducted to help prioritise projects that are necessary to the health and safety of communities and designed to meet the specific needs of each location.

7.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Health Workers out to break HEP.C stigma

By Jillian Mundy

Don’t be shamed to be screened or treated for hepatitis C. It is now curable in as little as eight weeks with the latest medicine, which is really available in Australia. That’s the message Aboriginal health worker Aaron Everett and land manager Jarrod Edwards want to spread. The two Tasmanian Aboriginal men, spoke at the second World Indigenous Peoples, Conference on Viral Hepatitis in Alaska thi month, want to break the stigma around viral hepatitis.

Mr Edwards is keen to share the journey of his own diagnosis treatment and recovery from hep-C. “I want to encourage other Aboriginal people to get screened and if they test positive have the treatment, “he told the Koori Mail.

“The advances in the treatment have come a long way and the side –effects I got don’t exist now”.

Mr Edwards encouraged people to also talk about hep-C to break the stigma. He said he was shocked when an Aboriginal health check in 2006 returned positive for the illness.

“I was an intravenous drug user at the time, but I was always really clean and careful with injecting equipment. I really don’t know how I got it. The diagnosis hit me for a six,” he said.

At first he did not seek treatment attributing the reluctance to his lifestyle.

“It was a stigma thing. I felt dirty,“ he said. “It was a long journey though. It took me five years.

“It was the holistic, community approach of the Aboriginal health service that gave me the ability to begin my healing journey, which included working on country”.

Mr Edwards said treatment at the time took 12 months and included weekly injections, daily pills, anti-depressants and regular visits to a psychiatrist.

There were also side-effects such as hair loss, fatigue to the point of passing out and very fragile and dry skin.

Mr Edwards has no doubt that without treatment he would be dead. “My liver would have packed it in,“ he said.

Mr Edwards is now cured and, coupled with his lifestyle changes, is proud to be a father and productive member of his community.

He also attributes his healing to the support of his partner, Aboriginal health practitioner Candy Bartlett.

“I wanted to have a long-term relationship, a family, a home of our own and be able to come back and on country”, he said.

DON’T HESITATE

These days Mr Edwards urges people not hesitate in seeking treatment.

“Don’t be ashamed of it. It doesn’t matter how you got it; just go and treat it,” he says.

Mr Everett, one of the clinical team working with patients during screening and treatment for hepatitis C at the Aboriginal health service in Hobart, said people are often shamed about the virus.

“it’s not a highly spoken about virus, because of the stigma on how it might have been contracted, often through sharing injecting equipment,” he said.

Mr Everett wants people to be open about being screened and treated, to help break the stigma surrounding viral hepatitis and in turn help eliminate it.

“Come in and be checked. Don’t be ashamed. It is not a death sentence,“ he said. “But it’s a different story if left untreated, especially when combined with an unhealthy lifestyle or other health issues it can be an extra burden, yet can be totally cured.”.

New direct-acting antiviral medicines which were added to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) last year have revolutionised hep-C treatment by increasing the cure rate to close to 100% and reducing treatment duration and side-effects.

Viral Hepatitis is usually transmitted through the re-use of contaminated injecting equipment. It can be spread through unscreened blood transfusions and inadequate sterilisation of medical equipment (highly unlikely in Australia these days), It can also be transmitted sexually, from mother to child and through contaminated sharp grooming equipment.

People with hepatitis can be unaware, and unknowingly pass on the virus.

The conference Mr Edwards and Mr Everett are attending aims to ensure Indigenous communities around the world are given the same access to prevention, testing and treatment as other people.

The World Hepatitis Alliance aims to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030

8. Deadly Choices QLD trains up the Nganampa health team

Just like the Nganampa Health Service staff, you can eat healthy and be the best version of yourself.

Some great photos from when Deadly Choices were up in Umuwa to share their experiences, wisdom and host training for the Nganampa team

Please share

 

Aboriginal Health and the @AusLawReform inquiry into the incarceration rate of Aboriginal peoples

 

” The Terms of Reference for this Inquiry ask the ALRC to consider laws and legal frameworks that contribute to the incarceration rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and inform decisions to hold or keep Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in custody.

ALRC Home page

Download this 236 page discussion paper

discussion_paper_84_compressed_no_cover

Full Terms of reference part B below

The ALRC was asked to consider a number of factors that decision makers take into account when deciding on a criminal justice response, including community safety, the availability of alternatives to incarceration, the degree of discretion available, and incarceration as a deterrent and as a punishment

The Terms of Reference also direct the ALRC to consider laws that may contribute to the rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples offending and the rate of incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Submissions close on 4 September 2017.

Make a submission

Part A Proposals and Questions

1. Structure of the Discussion Paper

1.40     The Discussion Paper is structured in parts. Following the introduction, Part 2 addresses criminal justice pathways. The ALRC has identified three key areas that influence incarceration rates: bail laws and processes, and remand; sentencing laws and legal frameworks including mandatory sentencing, short sentences and Gladue-style reports; and transition pathways from prison, parole and throughcare. These were the focus of stakeholder comments and observations in preliminary consultations.

1.41     Part 3 considers non-violent offending and alcohol regulation. It provides an overview of the detrimental effects of fine debt on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, including the likelihood of imprisonment in some jurisdictions. Fine debt can be tied to driver licence offending, and the ALRC asks how best to minimise licence suspension caused by fine default. Part 3 also looks at ways laws and legal frameworks can operate to decrease alcohol supply so as to minimise alcohol-related offending in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

1.42     Part 4 discusses the incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. It contextualises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander female offending within experiences of trauma, including isolation; family and sexual violence; and child removal. It outlines how proposals in other chapters may address the incarceration rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, and asks what more can be done.

1.43     Part 5 considers access to justice, and examines ways that state and territory governments and criminal justice systems can better engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to prevent offending and to provide better criminal justice responses when offending occurs. The ALRC places collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations at the centre of proposals made in this Part, and suggests accountability measures for state and territory government justice agencies and police. The remoteness of communities, the availability of and access to legal assistance and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander interpreters are also discussed. Alternative approaches to crime prevention and criminal justice responses, such as those operating under the banner of ‘justice reinvestment’, are also canvassed.

2. Bail and the Remand Population

Proposal 2–1        The Bail Act 1977 (Vic) has a standalone provision that requires bail authorities to consider any ‘issues that arise due to the person’s Aboriginality’, including cultural background, ties to family and place, and cultural obligations. This consideration is in addition to any other requirements of the Bail Act.

Other state and territory bail legislation should adopt similar provisions.

As with all other bail considerations, the requirement to consider issues that arise due to the person’s Aboriginality would not supersede considerations of community safety.

Proposal 2–2        State and territory governments should work with peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to identify service gaps and develop the infrastructure required to provide culturally appropriate bail support and diversion options where needed.

3. Sentencing and Aboriginality

Question 3–1        Noting the decision in Bugmy v The Queen [2013] HCA 38, should state and territory governments legislate to expressly require courts to consider the unique systemic and background factors affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples when sentencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander offenders?

If so, should this be done as a sentencing principle, a sentencing factor, or in some other way?

Question 3–2        Where not currently legislated, should state and territory governments provide for reparation or restoration as a sentencing principle? In what ways, if any, would this make the criminal justice system more responsive to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander offenders?

Question 3–3        Do courts sentencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander offenders have sufficient information available about the offender’s background, including cultural and historical factors that relate to the offender and their community?

Question 3–4        In what ways might specialist sentencing reports assist in providing relevant information to the court that would otherwise be unlikely to be submitted?

Question 3–5        How could the preparation of these reports be facilitated? For example, who should prepare them, and how should they be funded?

4. Sentencing Options

Question 4–1        Noting the incarceration rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people:

(a)     should Commonwealth, state and territory governments review provisions that impose mandatory or presumptive sentences; and

(b)     which provisions should be prioritised for review?

Question 4–2        Should short sentences of imprisonment be abolished as a sentencing option? Are there any unintended consequences that could result?

Question 4–3        If short sentences of imprisonment were to be abolished, what should be the threshold (eg, three months; six months)?

Question 4–4        Should there be any pre-conditions for such amendments, for example: that non-custodial alternatives to prison be uniformly available throughout states and territories, including in regional and remote areas?

Proposal 4–1        State and territory governments should work with peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to ensure that community-based sentences are more readily available, particularly in regional and remote areas.

Question 4–5        Beyond increasing availability of existing community-based sentencing options, is legislative reform required to allow judicial officers greater flexibility to tailor sentences?

5. Prison Programs, Parole and Unsupervised Release

Proposal 5–1        Prison programs should be developed and made available to accused people held on remand and people serving short sentences.

Question 5–1        What are the best practice elements of programs that could respond to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples held on remand or serving short sentences of imprisonment?

Proposal 5–2        There are few prison programs for female prisoners and these may not address the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander female prisoners. State and territory corrective services should develop culturally appropriate programs that are readily available to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander female prisoners.

Question 5–2        What are the best practice elements of programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander female prisoners to address offending behaviour?

Proposal 5–3        A statutory regime of automatic court ordered parole should apply in all states and territories.

Question 5–3        A statutory regime of automatic court ordered parole applies in NSW, Queensland and SA. What are the best practice elements of such schemes?

Proposal 5–4        Parole revocation schemes should be amended to abolish requirements for the time spent on parole to be served again in prison if parole is revoked.

6. Fines and Driver Licences

Proposal 6–1        Fine default should not result in the imprisonment of the defaulter. State and territory governments should abolish provisions in fine enforcement statutes that provide for imprisonment in lieu of unpaid fines.

Question 6–1        Should lower level penalties be introduced, such as suspended infringement notices or written cautions?

Question 6–2        Should monetary penalties received under infringement notices be reduced or limited to a certain amount? If so, how?

Question 6–3        Should the number of infringement notices able to be issued in one transaction be limited?

Question 6–4        Should offensive language remain a criminal offence? If so, in what circumstances?

Question 6–5        Should offensive language provisions be removed from criminal infringement notice schemes, meaning that they must instead be dealt with by the court?

Question 6–6        Should state and territory governments provide alternative penalties to court ordered fines? This could include, for example, suspended fines, day fines, and/or work and development orders.

Proposal 6–2        Work and Development Orders were introduced in NSW in 2009. They enable a person who cannot pay fines due to hardship, illness, addiction, or homelessness to discharge their debt through:

  • work;
  • program attendance;
  • medical treatment;
  • counselling; or
  • education, including driving lessons.

State and territory governments should introduce work and development orders based on this model.

Question 6–7        Should fine default statutory regimes be amended to remove the enforcement measure of driver licence suspension?

Question 6–8        What mechanisms could be introduced to enable people reliant upon driver licences to be protected from suspension caused by fine default? For example, should:

(a)     recovery agencies be given discretion to skip the licence suspension step where the person in default is vulnerable, as in NSW; or

(b)     courts be given discretion regarding the disqualification, and disqualification period, of driver licences where a person was initially suspended due to fine default?

Question 6–9        Is there a need for regional driver permit schemes? If so, how should they operate?

Question 6–10      How could the delivery of driver licence programs to regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities be improved?

7. Justice Procedure Offences—Breach of Community-based Sentences

Proposal 7–1        To reduce breaches of community-based sentences by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, state and territory governments should engage with peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to identify gaps and build the infrastructure required for culturally appropriate community-based sentencing options and support services.

8. Alcohol

Question 8–1        Noting the link between alcohol abuse and offending, how might state and territory governments facilitate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, that wish to do so, to:

(a)     develop and implement local liquor accords with liquor retailers and other stakeholders that specifically seek to minimise harm to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, for example through such things as minimum pricing, trading hours and range restriction;

(b)     develop plans to prevent the sale of full strength alcohol within their communities, such as the plan implemented within the Fitzroy Crossing community?

Question 8–2        In what ways do banned drinkers registers or alcohol mandatory treatment programs affect alcohol-related offending within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities? What negative impacts, if any, flow from such programs?

9. Female Offenders

Question 9–1        What reforms to laws and legal frameworks are required to strengthen diversionary options and improve criminal justice processes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander female defendants and offenders?

10. Aboriginal Justice Agreements

Proposal 10–1       Where not currently operating, state and territory governments should work with peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to renew or develop Aboriginal Justice Agreements.

Question 10–1      Should the Commonwealth Government develop justice targets as part of the review of the Closing the Gap policy? If so, what should these targets encompass?

11. Access to Justice Issues

Proposal 11–1       Where needed, state and territory governments should work with peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to establish interpreter services within the criminal justice system.

Question 11–1      What reforms to laws and legal frameworks are required to strengthen diversionary options and specialist sentencing courts for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples?

Proposal 11–2       Where not already in place, state and territory governments should provide for limiting terms through special hearing processes in place of indefinite detention when a person is found unfit to stand trial.

Question 11–2      In what ways can availability and access to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander legal services be increased?

Proposal 11–3       State and territory governments should introduce a statutory custody notification service that places a duty on police to contact the Aboriginal Legal Service, or equivalent service, immediately on detaining an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person.

12. Police Accountability

Question 12–1      How can police work better with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to reduce family violence?

Question 12–2      How can police officers entering into a particular Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander community gain a full understanding of, and be better equipped to respond to, the needs of that community?

Question 12–3      Is there value in police publicly reporting annually on their engagement strategies, programs and outcomes with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities that are designed to prevent offending behaviours?

Question 12–4      Should police that are undertaking programs aimed at reducing offending behaviours in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities be required to: document programs; undertake systems and outcomes evaluations; and put succession planning in place to ensure continuity of the programs?

Question 12–5      Should police be encouraged to enter into Reconciliation Action Plans with Reconciliation Australia, where they have not already done so?

Question 12–6      Should police be required to resource and support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment strategies, where not already in place?

13. Justice Reinvestment

Question 13–1      What laws or legal frameworks, if any, are required to facilitate justice reinvestment initiatives for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples?

Part B The Term of reference

ALRC inquiry into the incarceration rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

I, Senator the Hon George Brandis QC, Attorney-General of Australia, refer to the Australian Law Reform Commission, an inquiry into the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in our prisons.

It is acknowledged that while laws and legal frameworks are an important factor contributing to over‑representation, there are many other social, economic, and historic factors that also contribute. It is also acknowledged that while the rate of imprisonment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and their contact with the criminal justice system – both as offenders and as victims – significantly exceeds that of non‑Indigenous Australians, the majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people never commit criminal offences.

Scope of the reference

  1. In developing its law reform recommendations, the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) should have regard to:
    1. Laws and legal frameworks including legal institutions and law enforcement (police, courts, legal assistance services and prisons), that contribute to the incarceration rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and inform decisions to hold or keep Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in custody, specifically in relation to:
      1. the nature of offences resulting in incarceration,
      2. cautioning,
      3. protective custody,
      4. arrest,
      5. remand and bail,
      6. diversion,
      7. sentencing, including mandatory sentencing, and
      8. parole, parole conditions and community reintegration.
    2. Factors that decision-makers take into account when considering (1)(a)(i-viii), including:
      1. community safety,
      2. availability of alternatives to incarceration,
      3. the degree of discretion available to decision-makers,
      4. incarceration as a last resort, and
      5. incarceration as a deterrent and as a punishment.
    3. Laws that may contribute to the rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples offending and including, for example, laws that regulate the availability of alcohol, driving offences and unpaid fines.
    4. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their rate of incarceration.
    5. Differences in the application of laws across states and territories.
    6. Other access to justice issues including the remoteness of communities, the availability of and access to legal assistance and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language and sign interpreters.
  2.  In conducting its Inquiry, the ALRC should have regard to existing data and research[1] in relation to:
    1. best practice laws, legal frameworks that reduce the rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander incarceration,
    2. pathways of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples through the criminal justice system, including most frequent offences, relative rates of bail and diversion and progression from juvenile to adult offending,
    3. alternatives to custody in reducing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander incarceration and/or offending, including rehabilitation, therapeutic alternatives and culturally appropriate community led solutions,
    4. the impacts of incarceration on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, including in relation to employment, housing, health, education and families, and
    5. the broader contextual factors contributing to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander incarceration including:
      1. the characteristics of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prison population,
      2. the relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander offending and incarceration and inter‑generational trauma, loss of culture, poverty, discrimination, alcohol and drug use, experience of violence, including family violence, child abuse and neglect, contact with child protection and welfare systems, educational access and performance, cognitive and psychological factors, housing circumstances and employment, and
      3. the availability and effectiveness of culturally appropriate programs that intend to reduce Aboriginal; and Torres Strait Islander offending and incarceration.
  3. In undertaking this Inquiry, the ALRC should identify and consider other reports, inquiries and action plans including but not limited to:
    1. the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody,
    2. the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory (due to report 1 August 2017),
    3. Senate Standing Committee on Finance and Public Administration’s Inquiry into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Experience of Law Enforcement and Justice Services,
    4. Senate Standing Committee on Community Affairs’ inquiry into Indefinite Detention of People with Cognitive and Psychiatric impairment in Australia,
    5. Senate Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs inquiry into Harmful Use of Alcohol in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities,
    6. reports of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner,
    7. the ALRC’s inquiries into Family violence and Family violence and Commonwealth laws, and​
    8. the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

The ALRC should also consider the gaps in available data on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander incarceration and consider recommendations that might improve data collection.

  1. In conducting its inquiry the ALRC should also have regard to relevant international human rights standards and instruments.

Consultation

  1. In undertaking this inquiry, the ALRC should identify and consult with relevant stakeholders including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their organisations, state and territory governments, relevant policy and research organisations, law enforcement agencies, legal assistance service providers and the broader legal profession, community service providers and the Australian Human Rights Commission.

Timeframe

  1. The ALRC should provide its report to the Attorney-General by 22 December 2017.

 

Aboriginal #Nutrition Health and #Sugar : @healthgovau Health Star Rating System review closes 17 August

 ” The Health Star Rating System has been marred by anomalies. Milo powder (44% sugar) increased its basic 1.5 Stars to 4.5 by assuming it will be added to skim milk. About one in every seven products bearing health stars goes against the Department of Health’s own recommendations.

Those of us working in public health question why obvious junk foods get any stars at all.”

See Sugar, sugar everywhere MJA insight article in full Part 3 below

  ” In 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2 years and over consumed an average of 75 grams of free sugars per day (equivalent to 18 teaspoons of white sugar)1. Added sugars made up the majority of free sugar intakes with an average of 68 grams (or 16 teaspoons) consumed and an additional 7 grams of free sugars came from honey and fruit juice. “

ABS Report abs-indigenous-consumption-of-added-sugars 

See Part 1 below for Aboriginal sugar facts

The Health Star Rating (HSR) Advisory Committee (HSRAC), responsible for overseeing the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the HSR system is undertaking a five year review of the HSR system.

The five year review of the system is well underway, with a public submission process opening on 8 June 2017 on the Australian Department of Health’s online Consultation Hub.

Since the consultation period has been opened there has been strong interest in the system from stakeholders representing a diverse range of views.

To ensure that as much evidence as possible is captured, along with stakeholders’ views on the system, a further two week extension to the consultation period has been agreed and it will now close on 17 August 2017

See full survey details Part 2 Below

Part 1 Aboriginal sugar facts

ABS Report

abs-indigenous-consumption-of-added-sugars

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consume around 14 per cent of their total energy intake as free sugars, according to data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that free sugars contribute less than 10 per cent of total energy intake.

Director of Health, Louise Gates, said the new ABS report showed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are consuming an average of 18 teaspoons (or 75 grams) of free sugars per day (almost two cans of soft drink), four teaspoons more than non-Indigenous people (14 teaspoons or 60 grams).

OTHER KEY FINDINGS

    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people derived an average of 14% of their daily energy from free sugars, exceeding the WHO recommendation that children and adults should limit their intake of free sugars to less than 10% of dietary energy.
    • Free sugars made the greatest contribution to energy intakes among older children and young adults. For example, teenage boys aged 14-18 years derived 18 per cent of their dietary energy from free sugars as they consumed the equivalent of 25 teaspoons (106 grams) of free sugars per day. This amount is equivalent to more than two and a half cans of soft drink. Women aged 19-30 years consumed 21 teaspoons (87 grams) of free sugars, which contributed 17 per cent to their total energy intake.
    • The majority (87%) of free sugars were consumed from energy dense, nutrient-poor ‘discretionary’ foods and beverages. Two thirds (67%) of all free sugars consumed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people came from beverages, led by soft drinks, sports and energy drinks (28%), followed by fruit and vegetable juices and drinks (12%), cordials (9.5%), and sugars added to beverages such as tea and coffee (9.4%), alcoholic beverages (4.9%) and milk beverages (3.4%).
    • Intakes were higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in non-remote areas where the average consumption was 78 grams (18.5 teaspoons), around 3 teaspoons (12 grams) higher than people living in remote areas (65 grams or 15.5 teaspoons).
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed 15 grams (almost 4 teaspoons) more free sugars on average than non-Indigenous people. Beverages were the most common source of free sugars for both populations, however Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people derived a higher proportion of free sugars from beverages than non-Indigenous people (67% compared with 51%).

Part 2 @healthgovau Health Star Rating System review closes 17 August

Introduction

The Health Star Rating (HSR) Advisory Committee (HSRAC), responsible for overseeing the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the HSR system, is undertaking a five year review of the HSR system. The HSR system is a front-of-pack labelling (FoPL) scheme intended to assist consumers in making healthier diet choices. The findings of the review will be provided to the Australia and New Zealand Ministerial Forum on Food Regulation (Forum) in mid‑2019.

In parallel with this consultation on the HSR system five year review, the HSRAC is conducting a dedicated investigation of issues and concerns raised about the form of the food (‘as prepared’) rules in the Guide for Industry to the HSR Calculator. These enable additional nutrients to be taken into account when calculating star ratings based on foods prepared according to on-label directions. A specific consultation process seeking input into this investigation opened on 19 May 2017 and will close at 11.59 pm 30 June 2017. The form of the food (‘as prepared’) consultation can be viewed on the Australian Department of Health’s Consultation Hub.

The HSR system

The HSR system is a public health and consumer choice intervention designed to encourage people to make healthier dietary choices. The HSR system is a voluntary FoPL scheme that rates the overall nutritional profile of packaged food and assigns it a rating from ½ a star to 5 stars. It is not a system that defines what a ‘healthy’ or ‘unhealthy’ food is, but rather provides a quick, standardised way to compare similar packaged foods at retail level. The more stars, the healthier the choice. The HSR system is not a complete solution to assist consumers with choosing foods in line with dietary guidelines, but should be viewed as a way to assist consumers to make healthier packaged food choices.  Other sources of information, such as the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the New Zealand Eating and Activity Guidelines, also assist consumers in their overall food purchasing decisions.

The HSR system aims to:

1. Enable direct comparison between individual foods that, within the overall diet, may contribute to the risk factors of various diet related chronic diseases;

2. Be readily understandable and meaningful across socio-economic groups, culturally and linguistically diverse groups and low literacy/low numeracy groups; and

3. Increase awareness of foods that, within the overall diet, may contribute positively or negatively to the risk factors of diet related chronic diseases.

The HSR system consists of the graphics, including the words ‘Health Star Rating’, the rules identified in the HSR system Style Guide, the algorithm and methodology for calculating the HSR identified in the Guide for Industry to the HSR Calculator, and the education and marketing associated with the HSR implementation.

The HSR system is a joint Australian, state and territory and New Zealand government initiative developed in collaboration with industry, public health and consumer groups. The system is funded by the Australian government, the New Zealand government and all Australian jurisdictions during the initial five year implementation period.

From June 2014, food manufacturers started to apply HSRs to the front of food product packaging. Further information on the HSR system is available on the HSR website. The New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) website also provides information on the HSR system in New Zealand.

Purpose and scope of the review
The five year review of the HSR system will consider if, and how well, the objectives of the HSR system have been met, and identify options for improvements to and ongoing implementation of the system (Terms of reference for the five year review).

With a focus on processed packaged foods, the objective of the HSR system is:

To provide convenient, relevant and readily understood nutrition information and /or guidance on food packs to assist consumers to make informed food purchases and healthier eating choices.

The HSRAC has agreed that the areas of communication, system enhancements, and monitoring and governance will be considered when identifying whether the objectives of the HSR system have been achieved.

Although HSRAC will need to be a part of the review process, a degree of independence is required and independent management and oversight of the review is an important factor to ensure credible and unbiased reporting. An independent consultant will be engaged to undertake the review. Specific detail about the scope of the review will be outlined in the statement of requirement for the independent consultant. A timeline for the five year review of the HSR system has been drafted and will be updated throughout the review.

Next steps in the review process

As part of the five year review, HSRAC is seeking evidence based submissions on the consultation questions provided in this discussion paper.

This consultation is open to the public, state and territory governments, relevant government agencies, industry and public health and consumer groups.

Making a submission

The HSRAC is seeking submissions on the merits of the HSR system, particularly in response to the consultation questions below. The aim of the questions is to assist respondents in providing relevant commentary. However, submissions are not limited to answering the questions provided.  Please provide evidence or examples to support comments. Some areas of this review are technical in nature therefore comments on technical issues should be based on scientific evidence and/or supported by research where appropriate. Where possible, please provide citations to published studies or other sources.

While the HSRAC will consider all submissions and proposals put forward, those that are not well supported by evidence are unlikely to be addressed as part of the five year review.

Enquiries specifically relating to this submission process can be made via email to: frontofpack@health.gov.au. Please DO NOT provide submissions by email.

After the consultation period closes the HSRAC will consider the submissions received and will prepare a summary table of the issues raised which will be published on the HSR website. All information within the summary table will be de-identifiable and will not contain any confidential material.

HSRAC will treat information of a confidential nature as such. Please ensure that material supplied in confidence is clearly marked ‘IN CONFIDENCE’ and is provided in a separate attachment to non-confidential material. Information provided in the submissions will only be used for the purpose of the five year review of the HSR system and will not be used for any other purpose without explicit permission.

Please see the Terms of Use and Privacy pages at the bottom of this page for further information on maintaining the security of your data.

For further information about the HSR system, including its resources and governance structure, please refer to the Australian HSR website and the New Zealand MPI website.

Part 3 Sugar Sugar MJA Insights

Originally published Here

IT’S hard to escape sugar, not only in what we eat and drink, but also in the daily news and views that seep into so many corners of our lives.

There’s nothing new about concern over sugar. I can trace my own fights with the sugar industry back to the 1960s, and since their inception in 1981, the Australian Dietary Guidelines have advised limiting sugary foods and drinks. The current emphasis in many articles in newspapers, magazines, popular books and online blogs, however, go further and recommend eliminating every grain of the stuff from the daily diet.

Taking an academic approach to the topic, the George Institute for Global Health has published data based on the analysis of 34 135 packaged foods currently listed in their Australian FoodSwitch database. They found added sugar in 87% of discretionary food products (known as junk foods in common parlance) and also in 52% of packaged foods that can be described as basic or core foods.

The George Institute’s analysis is particularly pertinent to the Department of Health’s Health Star Rating System, and found that some of the anomalies in the scheme could be eliminated by penalising foods for their content of added sugars rather than using total sugars in the product, as is currently the case.

The definition of “added sugars” used in Australia also needs attention, a topic that has been stressed in the World Health Organization’s guidelines. I will return to this later.

In Australia, the nutrition information panel on the label of packaged foods must include the total sugars present. This includes sugars that have been added (known as extrinsic sugars) as well as any sugars present naturally in ingredients such as milk, fruit or vegetables (intrinsic sugars).

There is no medical evidence to suggest that intrinsic sugars are a problem – at least not if they occur in “intact” ingredients. If you consume fruit, for example, the natural dietary fibre and the bulk of the fruit will limit the amount of the fruit’s intrinsic sugars you consume. However, if the sugar is extracted from the structure of the fruit, it becomes easy to consume much larger quantities. Few people could munch their way through five apples, but if you extract their juice, the drink would let you take in all the sugar and kilojoules of five apples in less than a minute.

The Australian Dietary Guidelines do not include advice to restrict fruit itself because there is high level evidence of its health value. The guidelines do, however, recommend that dried fruit and fruit juice be restricted – the equivalent of four dried apricot halves or 125 mL juice consumed only occasionally.

Contrary to the belief of some bloggers, Australia’s dietary guidelines have never suggested replacing fat with sugar. That was a tactic of some food companies who marketed many “low” or “reduced” fat foods where the fat was replaced with sugars or some kind of refined starch.

The wording of Australia’s guideline on sugar has changed. The initial advice to “avoid too much sugar” led to the sugar industry’s multimillion dollar campaign “Sugar, a natural part of life”. This included distributing “educational” material to the general public, politicians, doctors, dentists, pharmacists and other health professionals discussing the importance of a “balanced diet”.

In spite of fierce lobbying by the sugar industry, the next revision of the guidelines retained a sugar guideline, although it was watered down to “eat only moderate amounts of sugars”. Some school canteen operators reported that they had been confronted by sweet-talking sellers of junk foods omitting the word “only” from this guideline.

The evidence for sugar’s adverse effects on dental health have long been known, but the evidence against sugar and its potential role in obesity and, consequently, in type 2 diabetes and other health problems has grown stronger. The most recent revision of the National Health and Medical Research Council’s Dietary Guidelines, therefore, emphasises the need to “limit” added sugars and lists the foods that need particular attention.

Sugary drinks have been specifically targeted because the evidence against them is strong and extends beyond epidemiological studies. Double-blind trials now clearly link sugary drinks with weight gain, the only exceptions being a few trials funded by the food industry.

Added sugar is not the only topic for public health concern, and hence the government’s Health Star Rating System was set up to introduce a simple front-of-pack labelling scheme to assist Australians reduce their intake of saturated fat, salt and sugars from packaged foods.

A specially commissioned independent report (Evaluation of scientific evidence relating to Front of Pack Labelling by Dr Jimmy Chun Yu Louie and Professor Linda Tapsell of the School of Health Sciences, University of Wollongong) found that added sugars were the real problem, but the food industry argued that the scheme should include total sugars because this was already a mandatory inclusion on food labels and routine chemical analysis couldn’t determine the source of sugars.

This was a strange argument since food manufacturers know exactly how much sugar they add to any product, just as they know how many “offset” points the Health Star Rating System allows for the inclusion of fruit, vegetable, nuts or legumes. The content of these ingredients is only disclosed on the food label if used in the product’s name.

The Health Star Rating System has been marred by anomalies. Milo powder (44% sugar) increased its basic 1.5 Stars to 4.5 by assuming it will be added to skim milk. About one in every seven products bearing health stars goes against the Department of Health’s own recommendations.

Those of us working in public health question why obvious junk foods get any stars at all.

How can caramel topping or various types of confectionery, such as strawberry flavoured liquorice, each get 2.5 stars? Why do some chocolates sport 3.5 stars, while worthy products such as Greek yoghurt without any added sugars get 1.5 and a breakfast cereal with 27% sugar gets four stars?

The fact that over a third of Australian’s energy intake comes from discretionary products (40% for children) is the elephant in the room for excess weight. We need to reduce consumption of these products and allotting them health stars is not helping.

It’s clearly time to follow our dietary guidelines and limit both discretionary products and added sugar. Of the nutrients used in the current algorithm for health stars, the George Institute’s analysis shows that counting added rather than total sugars has the greatest individual capacity to discriminate between core and discretionary foods.

However, in moving to mandate added sugars on food labels and using added sugars in health stars, it’s vital to define these sugars. The World Health Organization has done so: “Free sugars refer to monosaccharides (such as glucose, fructose) and disaccharides (such as sucrose or table sugar) added to foods and drinks by the manufacturer, cook or consumer, and sugars naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates”.

Regular sugar in Australia could be described as cane juice concentrate. It has no nutrients other than its carbohydrate. Fruit juice concentrates are also just sugars with no nutrients other than carbohydrates. At present the Health Star Rating System allows products using apple or pear juice concentrate to be counted as “fruit” and used to offset the total sugars. This is nonsense, and gives rise to confectionery, toppings and some breakfast cereals scoring stars they do not deserve.

Other ways to boost health stars also need attention. Food technologists boast they can manipulate foods to gain extra stars (Health Star Rating Stakeholders workshop, Sydney, 4 August 2016). For example, adding wheat, milk, soy or other protein powder, concentrated fruit purees or a laboratory-based source of fibre such as inulin will all give extra “offset” points to reduce adverse points from saturated fat, sugar or salt. Indeed, some food technologists have even suggested they could revert to using the especially nasty trans (but technically unsaturated) fatty acid from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils to replace naturally occurring saturated fat.

My alternative is to go for fresh foods and minimise packaged foods. If the stars look too good to be true, check the ingredient list. But remember that Choice found sugar may go by more than 40 different names. Buyer beware!

NACCHO @TheAHCWA Aboriginal Health and the Cashless Welfare card debate

 

 ” Graphic video footage played recently to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and other influential politicians cuts to the core. It is horrific, sickening and gut-wrenching, and would affect any compassionate human being.

But the intent behind the carefully edited emotive video – further pushing a ( Cashless Welfare ) card to supposedly tackle every imaginable social problem in vulnerable communities – is ill-conceived and ideologically driven.

Michelle Nelson-Cox Chair  : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia press release Opinion piece (part 2 Below )

 

 ” We need to recognise that the best way of dealing with problems is with respect, working together, and focussed on commonly agreed goals. We do not need a new generation of community members under the control of those who want to use punitive measures to coerce and control them. When has this approach ever been shown to work?

We need to ask why we are not doing it differently, treating the very causes of the dislocation and alienation of our communities — facing up to and turning around the hopelessness and despair that beleaguers them.

The Rural Doctors have made it clear when they said: “Those that do have problems will not be helped by measures that feel punitive, such as switching them to a cashless debit card, rather than payments. Tough love is rarely successful in treating substance abuse – particularly when it’s from the Government.”

I support the Rural Doctors and our community organisations working with families dealing with these issues. This is where we have to take this debate.”

Shadow assistant minister for Indigenous affairs and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Senator for Western Australia, Patrick Dodson responds to article portraying the state as a ‘war zone’ .Full article HERE

” Senator Rachel Siewert has criticised a new video campaign showing graphic depictions of violence in Indigenous communities as shock tactics designed to scare the Federal Government into rolling out more cashless welfare cards in remote Western Australia.

Using violent imagery then offering a one-dimensional, paternalistic and previously failed approach to a complex problem shows that Andrew Forrest is more concerned about furthering his ideologies than looking at what works.

“I share concerns about disadvantage and agree we need to be addressing severe disadvantage in communities like Port Hedland. We need a multifaceted approach including addressing alcohol supply, drug and alcohol services, and wrap around services driven by the community.

“I agree we do need to be investing in communities but in approaches that work ‘ Senator Rachel Siewert

Read Senator Rachel Siewert full press release part 4 below

Mining magnate Andrew Forrest and local leaders from the East Kimberley region, last week launched #timetoact an online anti-violence campaign in the nation’s capital. It features a video that shows disturbing scene of violence.”

Watch video HERE

” The concerted push by outgoing WA Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan that the cashless welfare system should be expanded to somehow protect children from sexual abuse, particularly in the north-west town of Roebourne, is fundamentally flawed.

There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

Instead, greater investment is needed in programs that address social determinants and build strong families and communities.

Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.

AHCWA does not support simplistic apparent solutions imposed from outside Aboriginal communities. Rather, it advocates for greater investment in community designed and driven programs to build strong families and communities.

Our sector has been delivering positive outcomes in Aboriginal health for more than 40 years, but in that time we have often dealt with the unintended negative consequences of whatever “silver bullet” solution is politically fashionable at the time.

Extracts from Michelle Nelson-Cox Chair  : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia press release (part 1and 2 below)

 

Elder Ted Carlton with a card

Part 1 : AHCWA rejects Karl O’Callaghan’s call to expand cashless welfare

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia has challenged outgoing Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan to look in his own backyard and adequately police remote communities rather than advocate for greater disempowerment of indigenous Australians.

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox today rejected calls by Mr O’Callaghan, whose contract ends on August 15 after 13 years at the helm of WA Police, for an urgent expansion of the cashless welfare system to combat child sex crimes in regional WA.

“The cashless welfare card is not a panacea to complex social problems,” Ms Nelson-Cox said.

“While AHCWA supports the government’s commitment to improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal people and prevent child sexual abuse, we do not support the ill-conceived idea that cashless welfare cards can turn the tide on the abhorrent abuse of children.

“There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

“Instead, greater investment is needed in programs that address social determinants and build strong families and communities.

“Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

Ms Nelson-Cox said Mr O’Callaghan’s admissions in The West Australian newspaper that his officers could not protect children in remote communities was gravely concerning.

“At what point does the buck stop with police and governments to keep communities safe? Over the past 13 years, how have the high instances of sexual abuse not have been addressed earlier?” she said.

“There is a large police presence in Roebourne, and admissions by Karl O’Callaghan that ‘police were not capable of protecting children in those communities’ and ‘neither the police nor government can guarantee protection of these children’ shows a lack of commitment to work with communities to effectively address these issues.

“The reality is there are a huge number of people very unhappy with the way they have been affected by the cashless welfare system imposed by the Federal Government.

“If anything, this is a failure of policing in the Roebourne area to address these crimes.

“The cashless welfare card does not need to be expanded. The solution does not lie in the disempowerment of Aboriginal people, but rather additional police resources and a greater commitment to stamp out these shocking and abhorrent crimes.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) currently engaged as members.

Part 2 : AHCWA rejects Karl O’Callaghan’s call to expand cashless welfare

 

Graphic video footage played recentlt to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and other influential politicians cuts to the core. It is horrific, sickening and gut-wrenching, and would affect any compassionate human being.

But the intent behind the carefully edited emotive video – further pushing a card to supposedly tackle every imaginable social problem in vulnerable communities – is ill-conceived and ideologically driven.

The concerted push by outgoing WA Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan that the cashless welfare system should be expanded to somehow protect children from sexual abuse, particularly in the north-west town of Roebourne, is fundamentally flawed.

The belief that the cashless welfare card can prevent child sexual abuse is based on nothing more than a distorted perception that quarantining income will address all social problems in remote Aboriginal communities.

To date, there has been no conclusive evidence that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or sexual abuse.

In fact, the most comprehensive review of income management in the Northern Territory has proven that this strategy will not work and will likely only create further dependence.

WA communities like Roebourne do not need the next new idea imposed by white people who live elsewhere.

Instead, they need to work with Aboriginal people and support under resourced local initiatives already being worked on.

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) currently engaged as members.

AHCWA does not support simplistic apparent solutions imposed from outside Aboriginal communities. Rather, it advocates for greater investment in community designed and driven programs to build strong families and communities.

Our sector has been delivering positive outcomes in Aboriginal health for more than 40 years, but in that time we have often dealt with the unintended negative consequences of whatever “silver bullet” solution is politically fashionable at the time. These days, the cashless welfare card is seen as the quick fix.

The cashless welfare card has been delivered as part of a Cashless Debit Card Trial (CDCT), a program developed to reduce the harm associated with alcohol consumption, illicit drug use and gambling in Ceduna in South Australia and the East Kimberley in WA (Kununurra and Wyndham).

The trial began in early 2016, when participants were issued a debit card which could not be used to buy alcohol, gambling products or to withdraw cash.

The system quarantines 80 per cent of income support payments into a restricted account linked to the card, with the remainder of these payments accessible through a normal, unrestricted bank account.

Remarkably, and perhaps unsurprisingly, an evaluation of the current trial showed that the majority of people using the card, and their families, did not report gambling, using illicit drugs, or consuming alcohol in excess.

To put it simply, this trial has been socially disempowering for a huge number of community members. Strong resistance and opposition has been made clear at public meetings, strikes and petitions.

Admissions by Karl O’Callaghan in the video shown to the PM that “police can’t save them” shows a lack of commitment to work with communities to effectively address these issues.

If anything, his comments reflect a failure of policing in the Roebourne area to address these crimes and protect the town’s most vulnerable people.

We support any commitment to improve the safety and health of Aboriginal people, particularly children, in WA and turn the tide on the appalling abuse of our youngsters, but the answer is not an expansion of the cashless welfare card.

The solution does not lie in the disempowerment of Aboriginal people, which has been an ongoing tactic by governments. Instead it lies in additional police resources and a genuine commitment to work with communities to stamp out these shocking and abhorrent crimes.

We agree it is time to act – it is time for the police to act.

“Using violent imagery then offering a one-dimensional, paternalistic and previously failed approach to a complex problem shows that Andrew Forrest is more concerned about furthering his ideologies than looking at what works,” Senator Siewert said today.

“I share concerns about disadvantage and agree we need to be addressing severe disadvantage in communities like Port Hedland. We need a multifaceted approach including addressing alcohol supply, drug and alcohol services, and wrap around services driven by the community.”

Part 3  :  Graphic video campaign pushing for welfare card slammed as ‘one dimensional’  

Continued from opening                                

Mr Forrest was joined yesterday by Jean O’Reerie, Aboriginal Education Worker from Wyndham in East Kimberley- a Cashless Debit Card trial site, her colleague, local Bianca Crake, and the Mayor of Port Hedland, Mr Camillo Blanko.

Mr Forrest claims that the government’s current system to stop drug and alcohol fuelled violence against children in the Pilbara and East Kimberley region isn’t working.

Linking what he described as horrific child abuse to alcohol and drug use, Mr Forrest is pushing for the Cashless Welfare Card to be introduced into more West Australian communities.

“Elders of communities, mayors of major towns are standing up and saying enough is enough. We need the system to change. What we have had is not enough. It’s delivering our children into hell and they have to be protected,” he told a media conference yesterday.

Mr Forrest yesterday brough elders and civic leaders, from Western Australia and South Australia, to meet personally with the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, the leader of the opposition Bill Shorten and his deputy leader Tanya Plibersek.

Figures from the West Australian Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan’s department claimed that one in three children are being abused, in a town of 500 children – 158 were sexually assaulted, 36 men face 300 charges of child abuse and in another town six children committed suicide in six months. It was not specified whether the children affected were Indigenous or Non- Indigenous.

Jean O’Reerie an Aboriginal Education Worker from Wyndham in the East Kimberley was emotional as she described the situation in her community.

“We need help, we need the government to intervene and help us out as community leaders. We can’t do it on our own. We need change for our community, our kids are hurting,” she said.

“We, the grassroots people, live with it every day. The hurt, the suffering, and the abuse.”

Part 4 : Trying to scare people into supporting the cashless card a worrying ramp up of Andrew Forrest’s campaign: Senator Rachel Siewert

Andrew Forrest is trying to use similar shock tactics to those of the previous Howard Government to scare people into supporting the cashless welfare card, Australian Greens Senator Rachel Siewert said last week

“We are seeing a worrying ramp up of Andrew Forrest’s cashless welfare card campaign that uses children, violence and fear just like the Howard Government did in 2007 over the NT Intervention.

“The Howard Government did this to justify the Northern Territory Intervention to impose income management and the Basics Card, at the time the Little Children are Sacred report was used to scare people into supporting income management.

“The final evaluation of the NT Intervention shows that it met none of its objectives. Ten years on we are still seeing the number of children going into out of home care increasing and appalling disadvantage persists.

Using violent imagery then offering a one-dimensional, paternalistic and previously failed approach to a complex problem shows that Andrew Forrest is more concerned about furthering his ideologies than looking at what works.

“I share concerns about disadvantage and agree we need to be addressing severe disadvantage in communities like Port Hedland. We need a multifaceted approach including addressing alcohol supply, drug and alcohol services, and wrap around services driven by the community.

“I agree we do need to be investing in communities but in approaches that work. The Government invested over $1.2 billion in the NT Intervention which met none of its objectives. We should stop wasting money on income management style approaches and start looking at real solutions that work”.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Dental Health @AUS_Dental : It’s #DentalHealthWeek #SugaryDrinksProperNoGood

” Apunipima is participating in a range of activities over the next fortnight to celebrate Dental Health Week (7-13 August)

Our staff will be talking about the link between sugary drinks and tooth decay, and promoting the messages

#SugaryDrinksProperNoGood and #DrinkMoreWaterYoufla,

part of Apunipima’s Healthy Communities social marketing campaign, which aims to reduce sugary drinks consumption among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Cape York.”

From Apunipima’s Healthy Communities Mob Part 2 below

 ” The National Oral Health Plan outlines guiding principles that will underpin Australia’s oral health system and provides national strategic direction including targeted strategies in six Foundation Areas and across four Priority Populations. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People being a priority population.”

Download plan here

 Watch our interview with Aboriginal dentist Gari Watson on NACCHO TV

Part 1 : National Oral Health Plan identifes Aboriginal People as Priority Population

A proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have good oral health. On average, however, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience poor oral health earlier in their lifespan and in greater severity and prevalence than the rest of the population. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are also less likely to receive treatment to prevent or address poor oral health, resulting in oral health care in the form of emergency treatment.

  • There is limited representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the oral health workforce and many dental services are not culturally sensitive. For example, strict appointment times and inflexibility regarding ‘failure to attend’ may result in a fee to the consumer.
  • Trends indicate that the high-level dental decay in deciduous (baby) teeth is rising
  • Aboriginal people aged 15 years and over, attending public dental services, experience tooth decay at three times the rate of their Non-Indigenous counterparts and are more than twice as likely to have advanced periodontal (gum) disease
  • Aboriginal people experience complete tooth loss at almost five times the rate of the non-Indigenous population
  • The rate of potentially preventable dental hospitalisations for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is higher than other Australians. Accessibility of services is a key factor contributing to the current gap between the oral health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the rest of the population.
  • More than two in five Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the age of 15 defer or avoid dental care due to cost. This is compared with one in eight (12.2%) who delayed or did not go to a GP.

Improving the overall oral health of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people will require more than a focus on oral health behaviours. Culture, individual and community social and emotional wellbeing, history, demography, social position, economic characteristics, biomedical factors, and the available health services within a person’s community all form part of the complex causal web which determines an individual’s oral health status.

“Reducing sugary drinks will not only protect their teeth but also their wider health.This is yet another justification for the introduction of a health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages as a preventive public health measure”

This Dental Health Week Michael Moore, CEO of the ( PHAA)  Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) and other members of the Rethink Sugary Drink Alliance are urging Australians to reduce their consumption of sugary drinks.

Read over 25 NACCHO dental articles

Read over 25 NACCHO Nutrition  Articles

Read over 10 NACCHO Articles Sugar Tax

Dental Health Week Website

Dept of Health Dental Website

Part 2  #SugaryDrinksProperNoGood – It’s Dental Health Week!

Apunipima staff will run activities with children and young people as well as hold health information stalls in Weipa, Napranum and Mapoon to promote the campaign messages in Dental Health Week

‘The team will run a workshop for Western Cape College secondary students alongside Dr Matt More, Head of Dental Services for Torres and Cape Hospital and Health Service in Weipa,’ Apunipima Health Promotion Officer Kiarah Cuthbert said.

‘We will be talking to young people about the amount of sugar in popular drinks, such as soft drinks, sports drinks and energy drinks and the impact of that sugar on your teeth and overall health.’

‘From there, we will head to Mapoon to spend time at the primary school yarning with kids about the sugar in drinks. We will also invite the kids to take part in a local art competition with the winner’s work used to promote the #DrinkMoreWaterYoufla message in Mapoon.’

‘Apunipima staff will then hold a health information stall at Napranum store and run an after school activity at Napranum PCYC, where young people will also have the chance to take part in a local art competition to promote the #DrinkMoreWaterYoufla message.

These activities will be supported by Napranum Tackling Indigenous Smoking Health Worker, Ernest Madua who will also be yarning with people about what smoking can do to your teeth and mouth.’

Apunipima Child Health Nurse Robyn Lythall, Chronic Disease Health Worker Georgia Gibson and Dietitian Jarrah Marsh gave kids from Nola’s Daycare and George Bowen Memorial Kindergarten Apunipima ‘Drink More Water Youfla’ water bottles last week which will really save the staff lugging big containers of water!

The bottles are plastic, easily stored in the fridge and will have the children’s photos on them so the kids know which one is theirs!

Big esso (thank you) to the Apunipima teams that helped with this!

The few remaining water bottles are being kept for children receiving their four year old health checks and their immunisations to help them get healthy habits for school.

Staff are encouraging kids coming in for health checks and shots to fill their bottles from the watercooler at the Hopevale Primary Health Care Centre on their way out.

The Healthy Communities Project Team (Cara Laws, Tiffany Williams, Kiarah Cuthbert and Kani Thompson) would like to thank Hopevale staff for sharing the water bottles, which are merchandise from our Sugary Drinks Proper No Good – Drink More Water Youfla campaign.

Picture: Childcare worker Auntie Irene Bambie and Georgia Gibson

Acid, sugar in sugary drinks pose serious threat to teeth

Part 3 Australians urged to choose tap water this Dental Health Week

Many Australians know that sugary drinks are not a healthy dietary choice, but they may not realise the serious damage they cause to teeth.

In line with the theme of Dental Health Week (7–13 August 2017) – Oral Health for Busy Lives, the health and community organisations behind Rethink Sugary Drink are calling on Australians to think of their teeth before reaching for a sugary drink when out and about.

Chair of the Australian Dental Association’s Oral Health Committee, Professor David Manton, said sugary drinks contained sugar and acid that weakens tooth enamel and can lead to tooth decay.

“Dental decay is caused by sugars, especially the type found in sugary drinks. These drinks are often acidic as well. Sugary drinks increase the risk of decay and weaken the tooth enamel, so it’s best to avoid them,” Prof Manton said.

“The best advice is to stick to tap water. Carry a water bottle with you to avoid having to buy energy drinks, soft drinks, sports drinks and other sugary drinks when you’re on the go. You’ll be doing your bank balance a favour too.”

Chair of the Public Health Committee at Cancer Council Australia, Craig Sinclair, said knowing the oral health impacts associated with sugary drinks further highlighted the need for a health levy on these beverages in Australia.

“Australians, and our young people in particular, are drinking huge volumes of sports drinks, energy drinks, soft drinks and frozen drinks on a regular basis – some are downing as much as 1.5 litres a day,” Mr Sinclair said.

“While regular consumption is associated with increased energy intake, weight gain and obesity, it also heightens the risk of tooth decay.

“We know through economic modelling that a 20 per cent health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce consumption in Australia and prevent thousands of cases of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke over 25 years, while generating $400-$500m each year.

“This extra revenue could be used for public education campaigns and initiatives to prevent chronic disease, reduce dental caries and address childhood obesity.

“While a health levy is not the only solution for reducing sugary drink consumption, if coupled with a range of strategies it could have a significant impact on the amount Australians are drinking and minimise their impact.”

The Rethink Sugary Drink alliance recommends the following actions in addition to a health levy to tackle sugary drink consumption:

  • A public education campaign supported by Australian governments to highlight the health impacts of regular sugary drink consumption
  • Restrictions by Australian governments to reduce children’s exposure to marketing of sugar-sweetened beverages, including through schools and children’s sports, events and activities
  • Comprehensive mandatory restrictions by state governments on the sale of sugar-sweetened beverages (and increased availability of free water) in schools, government institutions, children’s sports and places frequented by children
  • Development of policies by state and local governments to reduce the availability of sugar-sweetened beverages in workplaces, government institutions, health care settings, sport and recreation facilities and other public places.

Protect your teeth from sugary drinks with these tips:

  • Follow the Australian dietary guidelines: Focus on drinking plenty of tap water (it has no acid, no sugar and no kilojoules), limiting sugary foods and drinks and choosing healthy snacks (e.g. fruits and vegetables).
  • Find out how much sugar is in your favourite drink using the nutrition information panel on your drink or on the Rethink Sugary Drink website – it might surprise you
  • Carry a water bottle and fill up at the tap, so you don’t have to buy a drink if you’re thirsty.
  • Be aware of sugar disguised as a ‘healthy’ ingredient such as honey or rice syrup. It might sound wholesome but these are still sugars and can still cause decay if consumed frequently.
  • If you do drink sugary drinks, use a straw so your teeth are less exposed to the sugar and acid.
  • Take a drink of water, preferably tap water that has been fluoridated, after a sugary or acidic drink to help rinse out your mouth and dilute the sugars.
  • Do not sip a sugary or acidic drink slowly or over a long duration. Doing so exposes your teeth to sugar and acid attacks for longer.

For more information, visit http://www.dentalhealthweek.com.au/

About Rethink Sugary Drink: Rethink Sugary Drink is a partnership between the Apunipima, Australian Dental Association, Australian Dental and Oral Health Therapists’ Association, Cancer Council Australia, Dental Health Services Victoria, Dental Hygienists Association of Australia, Diabetes Australia, Healthier Workplace WA, Heart Foundation, Kidney Health Australia, LiveLighter, The Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation, Nutrition Australia, Obesity Policy Coalition, Stroke Foundation, Parents’ Voice, the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) and the YMCA to raise awareness of the amount of sugar in sugar-sweetened beverages and encourage Australians to reduce their consumption. Visit www.rethinksugarydrink.org.au for more information.

Part 4  : Sugary drinks erode more than tooth enamel poor oral health brings knock-on effects

This Dental Health Week the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) and other members of the Rethink Sugary Drink Alliance are urging Australians to reduce their consumption of sugary drinks. “Reducing sugary drinks will not only protect their teeth but also their wider health”, said Michael Moore, CEO of the PHAA. “This is yet another justification for the introduction of a health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages as a preventive public health measure”, he added.

Australia is in the top ten of countries with the highest level of soft drink consumption. Around a third of Australians regularly consume sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) such as soft drinks, flavoured waters and energy drinks. These drinks are widely recognised by dental experts as a major contributor to tooth decay and erosion.

Mr Moore said, “It’s well known that sugary drinks are linked to dental health problems which can lead to significant amounts of discomfort and disability in themselves. However poor oral health is also associated with major chronic health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and respiratory disease. Additionally, there are often compounding health effects between these types of comorbidities. Sugary drinks also strongly contribute to weight gain and obesity, so they negatively impact on health in multiple ways”.

Mr Moore continued, “At the individual-health level, it’s very important people avoid consuming these drinks on a regular basis, while at the population-health level it’s time we introduce a health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages to reduce the harms they cause.”

“Research shows that a health levy on these drinks will effectively reduce their consumption, especially if implemented as part of a wider approach to address poor nutrition and diet-related disease. What is needed is a national nutrition policy, restrictions on the marketing of sugary drinks toward children, limiting their availability in schools and at events attended by children and young people and public education campaigns about the adverse health impacts of SSBs. These could easily be funded by the revenue generated by the levy”.

The theme of 2017 Dental Health Week is ‘Anywhere Anytime – Oral Health for Busy Lives’, which recognises that many Australians feel they don’t have time to properly care for their oral health due to their busy schedules. However, avoiding sugary foods and beverages which damage teeth is a simple preventive measure people can take and can be encouraged by governments.

“Along with maintaining proper oral health care, one of the easiest things people can do to protect their teeth and in turn their broader health, is to avoid sugar-laden drinks and to favour drinking tap water,” Mr Moore concluded.

 

Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NACCHOagm2017 #NSW #TAS #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA #ACT

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference abstracts / Expressions of Interest close 21 August

2.1 QLD : Apunipima Cape York Charkil-Om Celebrates first birthday

2.2 QLD : Minister Ken Wyatt launches new wing of ATSICHS Jimbelunga Nursing Centre 

3. WA : AHCWA Youth E-newsletter is to promote and share positive youth stories from within the communities

4.1 NSW Awabakal celebrates National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day with welcome to 40 babies

 4.2 NSW : Expressions of Interest (EOI) are open for the Aboriginal Chronic Conditions Network Executive Committee 

5. SA : International basketball legend supports the Tackling Tobacco Team at Nunkuwarrin Yunti

6. VIC : VAHS will be offering $1500 sponsorship grants to one team per sports carnival

 7. NT : Miwatj Mental Health Program leading the way in remote Australia

8. Clintons Walk announces plans for  Canberra September 3 to complete his  5,580 mile from Perth

9. TAS : Video of NAIDOC Week 2017 Our Language Matters

10. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference abstracts / Expressions of Interest close 21 August

NACCHO is now calling for Expressions of Interest (EOI) from Member Services for speakers, case studies and table top presentations for the 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

How to submit an EOI

Please provide the following information and submit via email to

mailto:NACCHO-AGM@naccho.org.au

by COB Monday 21st August 2017.

  • Name of Member Service
  • Name of presenter(s)
  • Name of program
  • Name of session
  • Contact details: Phone | Mobile | Email

Provide the key points you want to cover – in no more than 500 words outline the program/ project/ topic you would like to present on.

Describe how your presentation/case study supports the 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference theme ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

SUBMIT HERE

2.1 QLD : Apunipima Cape York Charkil-Om Celebrates first birthday

One of NACCHO’s latest ACCHO clinics Apunipima’s Charkil-Om Primary Health Care Centre on Cape York celebrates its first anniversary in August!

Charkil-Om, which means bone fish in local Thanakwith language, provides comprehensive primary health care to the remote community of Napranum which is about nine kilometres south of Weipa.

Opening picture above : R: Tackling Smoking Health Worker Ernest Madua, Receptionist Marissa Sabatino, Casual Receptionist Christine Hall (past employee), Cleaner Melissa Clermont,  Medical Officer Dr Lauren Finlay, Indigenous Health Practitioner Regina Coleman, Registered Nurse Alison Boyd, Midwife and Child Health Nurse Noelene Weightman.

Napranum community member, Traditional Owner and Tackling Indigenous Smoking Health Worker Ernest Madua Jnr explained what Charkil- Om means to him.

‘We now have a service that meets the needs of Napranum community members,’ he said.

‘The key to living longer healthier lives (Closing the Gap) is early detection, diagnosis and intervention for common and curable conditions. Too long our mob die too early, my people, my community deserves better, big thank you to Apunipima Charkil-Om for providing this opportunity.’

Charkil-Om Primary Health Care Centre manager Kelvin Coleman echoed Ernest’s sentiments, expressing pride in the professionalism and dedication of the Napranum and wider – Apunipima team.

‘I would like to acknowledge and thank the staff (too many to name) for their commitment and hard work that made Charkil-Om what it is today. THANK YOU ALL!’

‘This commitment to community has seen the Charkil – Om team get involved in a number of community events and initiatives – these include:

  • Participation in the local NAIDOC celebrations – we created a float and held a community barbeque BBQ;
  • Mind, Exercise, Nutrition… Do It! (MEND) Program (a healthy lifestyles program for families);
  • Need for Feed Programs (a cooking and healthy eating education program for young people);
  • Tackling Smoking video
  • Supporting Napranum Mokwi Men’s Group;
  • Preschool screening (providing preventative health checks for four year olds);
  • Tackling Indigenous Smoking program;
  • Membership of the Napranum Disaster Management Committee;
  • Successful ISO accreditation; and
  • Reestablishment of the Napranum Health Action Team (a community committee which communicates community health priorities to providers).’

Apunipima Chairperson Thomas Hudson said Charkil-Om’s achievements are in line with the Board’s vision.

‘On my last visit to Napranum, I received overwhelmingly positive feedback from community regarding Apunipima staff engagement and participation at sporting events and other local events within the community. These demonstrate the commitment the team shows to the community engagement, education, health promotion and prevention.’

‘On behalf of the Apunipima Board and team, I wish Charkil-Om a happy first birthday.’

2.2 QLD : Minister Ken Wyatt launches new wing of ATSICHS Jimbelunga Nursing Centre 

It was an honour to have Ken Wyatt Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health launch the new wings of Jimbelunga Nursing Centre today. Also joining us was Aunty Pam Mam the first Indigenous nurse to be employed by ATSICHS. She continued to work in the organisation for the majority of her working life, sixteen years of it at Jimbelunga.

Jimbelunga Nursing Centre has been providing an extensive range of aged health care and support services in the community since November 1994.

Located in Eagleby in the outer suburbs of Brisbane it provides Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with residential aged care and support, including, meals, laundry and medical and allied health services.

ATSICHS Brisbane received $12.5m in funding from the Federal Government to redevelop the Jimblelunga aged care facility. This enabled much needed upgrades to the existing facilities and the ability to expand, with an increase of 19 new beds for residents, taking the number from 55 to 74.

Stage one of new build and expansion project was completed in 2016 with residents moving in to this building in August. Stage 2 included the re-furbishment of the existing nursing home building known as Casuarinam, which saw the rooms turned into large sized single rooms with shared ensuites and a brand new 7 bed secure unit (formerly known as dementia units).

The final stages were completed recently with residents moving in.

3. WA : AHCWA Youth E-newsletter is to promote and share positive youth stories from within the communities

AHCWA Youth have just released the first edition of the AHCWA Youth E-Newsletter!

The purpose of the AHCWA Youth E-newsletter is to promote and share positive youth stories from within the communities, a brief update on what AHCWA Youth have been up to and also to share any Youth related projects run through the WA Aboriginal Medical Services.

Edition 1 is an introduction to the AHCWA Youth Program, and a new edition will be distributed every 3 months to the sector and wider community.

The new Youth E-Newsletter can be download or viewed here:

AHCWA Youth Series Newsletter

If you would like more information on the Youth Program at AHCWA or if you would like to subscribe to the E-Newsletters, please contact Hayley, our Aboriginal Youth Program Coordinator on Hayley.Thompson@ahcwa.org

AHCWA youth were so excited to run a health workshop with the Deadly Sista Girlz at St Mary’s College in Broome August 7

 
4.1 NSW Awabakal celebrates National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day with welcome to 40 babies

August 4 was  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day and to celebrate Awabakal thought they would share with you some of the photos from the Baby Welcoming Ceremony .

It was a great event with almost 40 babies welcomed into our community.

SEE NBN TV coverage HERE

A big thank you to our Elders and the Mums and Bubs members and team for putting everything together

See more pictures HERE

 4.2 NSW : Expressions of Interest (EOI) are open for the Aboriginal Chronic Conditions Network Executive Committee 

This newly formed Aboriginal Chronic Conditions Network (ACCN) will work to improve the experience and delivery of healthcare for Aboriginal people with chronic conditions in NSW.

To achieve this, the ACCN will guide and support the process of evidence-based reform in health services by developing, promoting and implementing new initiatives, frameworks and Models of Care. It will do this by enhancing and supporting the integration of care for Aboriginal communities accessing chronic care services in NSW in accordance with ACI values.

Purpose

This newly formed Aboriginal Chronic Conditions Network (ACCN) will work to improve the experience and delivery of healthcare for Aboriginal people with chronic conditions in NSW. To achieve this, the ACCN will guide and support the process of evidence-based reform in health services by developing, promoting and implementing new initiatives, frameworks and Models of Care. It will do this by enhancing and supporting the integration of care for Aboriginal communities accessing chronic care services in NSW in accordance with ACI values.

The ACCN will collaborate with key stakeholders including, other ACI Networks, Local Health Districts/Speciality Health Networks, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW, NSW Ministry of Health, Primary Health Networks, Consumers and other Non-Government Organisations.

The ACCN will provide advice and strategic direction to the ACC Network staff and oversee the development and implementation of local and state-wide initiatives as prioritised by the Network. All decision making around the priorities and project work of the Network will be determined by its members through the Network Executive.

Network and executive membership is open to all interested in Aboriginal Health!!  (Community members, and non-health related organisation most welcome)
 
To join the network, please :

5. SA : International basketball legend supports the Tackling Tobacco Team at Nunkuwarrin Yunti

As a proud sponsor of the Aboriginal Basketball Academy we got to hear the legendary Patrick Mills speak at a fundraising lunch, aimed at getting more of our young mob out on the courts and gaining opportunities to make the world stage, just like Patty.

Patty’s message was a simple one – believe in yourself, stay true to your dreams and commit to them 100%. Our team agreed he could not have been more humble and genuine.

Whatever your dream is, quitting the smokes is a sure path to helping achieve it through a healthier and longer life!

Great partnering with Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia and Woodville District Basketball Club Warriors for such a deadly event. #DontLetYourDreamsGoUpInSmoke

6. VIC : VAHS will be offering $1500 sponsorship grants to one team per sports carnival. 

This year VAHS will be offering $1500 sponsorship grants to one team per sports carnival. To apply for these sponsorships one team representative from each team must complete this survey which asks the following questions:

This is the link to the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VAHSCarnivals

1. Tell us about your club, including the team name, number of players, where you are all from etc.

2. VAHS will provide $1500 in total, what does your team intend to spend this money on?
E.g. uniforms, travel, accommodation, catering, registration fees etc.

3. VAHS values the importance of the following health promoting behaviours. Please tell us how your team will demonstrate these values throughout the carnival.
• Staying Smoke Free
• Choosing water over sugary drinks
• Eating healthy, nutritious foods
• Drinking alcohol responsibly
• Being aware of the dangers of gambling

Here are the carnival dates and closing dates for applications:

Vic Junior Carnival (Horsham)
Wednesday 27th-Thurs 28th September
Closing date for applications: Wednesday 2nd August
Winner announced: Friday 4th August
(1 netball team and 1 football team)

Statewide Koorie Football & Netball Carnival (Ballarat)
14th 15th October
Closing date for applications: Sunday 13th August
Winner announced: Friday 18th August
(1 netball team and one football team)

Women’s Football Carnival AFL Victoria Statewide Koorie Women’s Football Carnival
25th 26th November
Closing date for applications: Sunday 24th September
Winner announced: Friday 30th September
(1 football team)

Looking forward to another great year of carnivals!

#BePositive #BeBrave #BeFocused #BeStrong #StaySmokeFree

 

APPLY HERE

 7. NT : Miwatj Mental Health Program leading the way in remote Australia

Mental Health professionals gathered at the Garma Festival in East Arnhem Land yesterday to discuss social and emotional wellbeing and mental health, with a particular focus on the success of the Miwatj Mental Health Program.

The Miwatj Mental Health Program is a Yolŋu-led program based in Galiwin’ku on Elcho Island and is administered by the Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation, a Yolŋu community controlled Health Organisation.

The Program is leading in the treatment and management of Indigenous mental health. The Mental Health Team works collaboratively with families and the community to provide tailored care to individuals suffering from mental illness.

The Program is an integral part of the community in Galiwin’ku, and the team’s outreach program allows people to be treated in their homes where they feel most connected and at ease.

The concept of health in the Yolŋu culture involves not only the body, mind and spirit being in balance, but also a sense of equilibrium with family and community.

Chief Health Officer of the Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation Dr Lucas de Toca says the program operates on three streams, but the most important aspect is that it is managed and controlled by Yolŋu peoples.

“It is a community based program operating over a continuum of stepped care for all levels of mental illness. We operate three streams, including a therapeutic stream with counselling, a social and cultural stream with traditional approaches to care including family involvement, and a medical stream to deal with acute care and ensure patients with mental health issues receive the appropriate medical care,” said Dr de Toca.

“The three streams function in a coordinated fashion, interlinked through the work of aboriginal health practitioners who are extremely competent both in the medical as well as in the social and cultural aspects of providing care for patients.”

“We are in one of the most remote locations in Australia, but are still able to deliver a high quality and best practice model, following the recommendations of the Mental Health Commission as well as using traditional methods of healing and care.”

Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan, who has been visiting the Miwatj Mental Health Program for a number of years, was joined by Rarrtjiwuy Herdman and Djamaḻaka Dhamarraṉdji to discuss the success of the program and broader issues of social and emotional wellbeing at the Garma Festival.

“The Miwatj Mental Health Program is a huge success and we can all learn from its strengths – local people making local decisions about the care, services and needs of the people in their community,” said Mr Quinlan.

“This is remote country, and to see a service go from strength-to-strength in recent years, with tangible results, is a real success story for community mental health.  Certainly a program that could be adapted and used elsewhere in remote and rural Australia.”

To find out more about the Miwatj Mental Health Program http://miwatj.com.au/what-we-do/clinical-services/

8. Clintons Walk announces plans for  Canberra September 3 to complete his  5,580 mile from Perth

 

Clinton’s Walk For Justice calls for support rallies and events to be held all across the country on September 3, as Clinton’s big Canberra arrival event is held.

We’ll be calling on the Governor General to meet with Clinton and begin discussions about treaty – sovereign to sovereign.

We encourage all people – from the cities all the way out to the remote communities – to take part in a national day of action to push for treaty and address issues of injustice faced by both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

Follow Clinton on FACEBOOK

9. TAS : Video of NAIDOC Week 2017 Our Language Matters

NAIDOC Week 2017 Our Language Matters

As part of NAIDOC week, families and programs took part in a variety of activities celebrating the theme Our Language Matters.

Here are videos and photos of some of the celebrations:

Scarlett Spotswood & Stella Hall giving Welcome to Country, Launceston Mall, NAIDOC 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSno71b0L-I&feature=youtu.be

kanaplila-ripana (Youth Dance), perform nawama papiti (thunder & lightning) and warruwa (evil spirit) dances for NAIDOC Week, Launceston Mall, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDgAQVxrdSI&feature=youtu.be

pakana kitina (little Tassie Blackfellas) group singing in palawa kani, Launceston TAC, NAIDOC 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOnYaobNP28&feature=youtu.be

Cooper Marshall, giving Welcome to Country, Campbell Street Primary School Assembly, Hobart, NAIDOC 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bi0Kqze6XIk&feature=youtu.be

takariliya (families) palawa kani water writing, wura (duck) & kanamaluka (Tamar River), Launceston TAC, NAIDOC 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F0diargmfE&feature=youtu.be

Youth singing in palawa kani, Song Workshop, Launceston TAC, NAIDOC 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bv2mCPvswU&feature=youtu.be

NACCHO This weeks top Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts : #Aboriginal Health Workers #Dental #Pharmacy #Doctors #TacklingSmoking

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

2. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

3.Aboriginal Program Project Officer Cancer Council Victoria Closes 14  August

4.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

5. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

6- 7 Congress Senior Policy Officer and Media Communications Officer

8.Pharmacist – FIFO to Maningrida – Arnhem Land

9. ATSICHS Dental Services Brisbane : Oral Health Therapist

10.Tackling Indigenous Smoking Support Officer (OVAHS) close 16 August

11. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

12.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

13.Senior Research Fellow, CREATE Adelaide

14.Employment at Miwatj Health NT

15.Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program added 10 August

  Register or more INFO

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Drug & Alcohol – Durri AMS close 21 August

For over 30 years, Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service has provided essential and culturally appropriate medical, preventive, allied and oral health services to Aboriginal communities.  Located in the Macleay and Nambucca valleys on the Mid North Coast of NSW.  Durri is committed to making health care and education accessible to improve the health status and wellbeing of our community.

An exciting opportunity has arisen for a Aboriginal Health Worker with an interest in the area of Drug & Alcohol to join the passionate team at our Nambucca Heads clinic site.

This challenging role would suit an experienced and motivated Aboriginal Health Worker with a desire to achieve positive outcomes in indigenous health.  You will work with a dedicated team of healthcare professionals.

The successful candidate will enjoy beautiful beaches, World Heritage Rainforest, and relaxed lifestyle of the mid north coast whilst making a real difference in the community.

Benefits include 9.5% super, attractive salary sacrifice, training and access to an employee assistance program.

To apply to to our website:  www.durri.org.au, download a copy of the Application Pack and submit this along with your resume not exceeding 4 pages, and your submission for each of the selection criteria to: hr@durri.org.au, or mail to:

Application

Chief Operations Officer

Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Services

PO Box 136

Kempsey  NSW 2440

Applications close: 21 August 2017 at 5.00 pm 

Applicants must have a current Police and Working with Children Check Clearance and Confirmation of Aboriginality.

Pursuant to Section 14 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) Australian Aboriginality is a genuine occupational qualification for this position.

Applications that do not attach a completed selection criteria submission will not be considered. 

Contact: Paula 02 65602360

2. Aboriginal Health Worker : Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service Closes 20 August

The Wathaurong Aboriginal Health Service is a fast growing and innovative health service that aims to provide the local Aboriginal community with culturally appropriate, high quality care. The following position is now available:-

Aboriginal Health Worker
Part Time 22.8 hours per week (Ongoing)

The successful applicant will be part of a service aimed at providing intensive case work and direct support to Aboriginal people.  You will facilitate clinical assessments, work in partnership with the clinical practice, and provide cultural expertise to ensure the provision of holistic and culturally appropriate health care. You will also assist Aboriginal people to access appropriate primary care services, and liaise with internal and external practitioners to assist in the delivery of culturally appropriate services. You will work in North Geelong and also in Colac.   Qualifications as an Aboriginal Health Worker are desirable or a willingness to undertake study to achieve the qualification.

This is an identified position, open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants only.

If you have extensive experience in related areas of work and a solid understanding of the issues confronting Aboriginal communities then we want to hear from you.

A Position Description is available from www.wathaurong.org.au

A police check, Working with Children Card and a driving license are required for all positions.

Applications to be sent to Human Resources preferably via email jobs@wathaurong.org.au or post to Wathaurong Aboriginal Cooperative, PO Box 402, North Geelong 3215.  Applications that fail to answer the key selection criteria will not be considered.

Closing date for these positions is 20 August 2017

Wathaurong is a Child Safe organisation

Wathaurong is a smoke free workplace

3.Aboriginal Program Project Officer Cancer Council Victoria Closes 14  August

 
 
Description of position:
Cancer Council Victoria is looking for an Aboriginal Programs Project Officer to join the Screening, Early Detection and Immunisation Program.
The successful applicant will work in partnership with stakeholders to deliver community-based projects, support the implementation of innovative media and communications activities and engage with the workforce sector to support participation in cancer screening, early detection and immunisation programs and reduce the impact of cancer in the Victorian Aboriginal community.
This is a part-time (0.6 or 0.8 FTE) fixed term position until March 2018.
Applications for this role close at the end of the day on Monday 14th August.
Cancer Council Victoria has a Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan and is strategically working to help Close the Gap.
 
 

4.ACADEMIC SPECIALIST – INDIGENOUS EYE HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE (RE-ADVERTISED)

Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Salary: Level B $98,775 – $117,290 p.a. plus 9.5% superannuation or Level C $120,993 – $139,510 p.a. plus 9.5%superannuation

Indigenous Eye Health in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne has developed and is supporting implementation of the Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision. The work is of national and international significance and is demonstrating effective translational research through the systematic implementation of evidenced-based, sustainable public health reform in Indigenous eye health.

You will support the regional implementation of The Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision from a health system perspective and contribute to and lead improvements in Indigenous eye health across Australia. As part of a small, strategic and responsive team, you will collaborate with stakeholders within regions, jurisdictions and nationally to implement the Roadmap recommendations and provide technical advice and support. You will contribute to Roadmap advocacy and support submission of national and international peer reviewed publications and be actively involved in conference and meeting presentations.

To be successful in the position, you must have:
-Leadership experience or demonstrated potential for leadership and engagement in research or health systems
-Demonstrated understanding and knowledge of key issues related to Indigenous health
-Demonstrated experience working, communicating and engaging effectively with Indigenous communities
-Demonstrated capacity to maintain and contribute to industry partnerships and collaborations with a broad range of stakeholders.

This could be the next great step in your career. In addition, you will have access to many benefits enjoyed by our staff. To learn more about the benefits and working at the University, see http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/working/benefits and http://joining.unimelb.edu.au

This is a re-advertised position. Previous applicants need not re-apply.

Close date: 3 Sep 2017

Position Description and Selection Criteria

Download File 0043281_REVISED_Level B or C_July 2017.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/search/info/selection-criteria

5. Policy Adviser (Indigenous Health) Australian Medical Association

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this exciting role.

The AMA

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) is the most influential membership organisation representing registered medical practitioners and medical students of Australia.

The AMA exists to promote and protect the professional interests of doctors and the health care needs of patients and communities.

The Federal Secretariat of the AMA contributes to the achievement of this Mission through reinforcing the AMA’s peak status in the development and implementation of health policy and identifying and acting upon the main issues affecting members.

The Federal Secretariat also delivers relevant member services and works with members directly to grow and value membership of the AMA.

Public Health

The AMA’s Public Health team is responsible for the AMA’s work on population and community health issues, including prevention, substance abuse, child and youth health and Indigenous health. The Secretariat assists in developing the AMA’s policies and political advocacy on Public Health issues of national importance.

The Role 

The Policy Adviser (maternity leave cover, part-time) will provide high level policy and strategic advice to the AMA President on Indigenous health issues. The Policy Adviser will write policy responses and take a lead in the development of AMA policy on all Indigenous health issues.

The Policy Adviser will develop policy positions for consideration by the Task Force on Indigenous Health and resolutions informed by research and input from within the AMA and when required from other medical organisations and health stakeholders.

The Policy Adviser will take a lead in the development of strategies to advocate AMA policies and prepare written material to support AMA campaigns and advocacy on Indigenous health.

The Policy Adviser will manage the AMA Indigenous Medical Scholarship and coordinate support for scholarship recipients, and will also coordinate the production of the AMA’s annual Report Card on Indigenous Health,

The Policy Adviser will provide secretariat support for the AMA Taskforce on Indigenous Health, represent the AMA at meetings and on external committees such as the Close the Gap Campaign Steering Committee.

Selection Criteria

  • demonstrated experience in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the ability to communicate in a culturally sensitive manner
  • knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health issues
  • experience working as a Policy Adviser or similar type of role on Indigenous health issues;
  • established networks in the Indigenous health sector;
  • relevant qualifications or a combination of qualifications and experience relevant to the role;
  • demonstrated ability to contribute to policy development;
  • an ability to identify relevant issues and to collate and present information to substantiate policy advice;
  • demonstrated ability to work independently, using initiative to solve problems and produce high quality accurate work with a minimum of supervision and under tight deadlines;
  • excellent communication skills both written and verbal;
  • the ability to liaise effectively and build collaborative working relationships with stakeholders;
  • demonstrated ability to work effectively as part of a small team, including the ability to supervise staff;
  • experience in using modern computer software and office systems to analyse data, produce documents dealing with complex issues, and maintain accurate records;
  • an enthusiastic and flexible approach.

To apply for this role please submit a cover letter and an up to date resume via SEEK. For further information or for a confidential discussion in respect of this role please contact Alyce on 02 6270 5482. Remuneration for this role will be determined after assessment of relevant skills, experience and qualifications.

Closing Date for Applications – Tuesday 22 August 2017 – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

APPLY HERE

6- 7 Congress Senior Policy Officer and Media Communications Officer

Work for Congress! Congress is currently seeking a Senior Policy Officer, Media Communications Officer to work full-time at our new headquarters in Canberra.

Check out the job descriptions below and apply today

3.Media and Communications Officer

Apply HERE

4.Senior Policy Officer

Apply HERE

8.Pharmacist – FIFO to Maningrida – Arnhem Land

We are seeking an enthusiastic professional pharmacist passionate about providing quality services to the people of Maningrida in western Arnhem Land. This onsite position presents unique and rewarding challenges as part of the primary health care team.

About the Role

The position is full-time (40 hours per week) providing direct dispensing and counselling about medicines to clients of the Aboriginal Health service.

  • The pharmacist also acts as advisor to medical, nursing and allied health staff including Aboriginal staff on the safe and effective use of medicines in the community.
  • Dose administration aid packing is minimal as this is co-ordinated offsite

Skills and Requirements

  • A degree in pharmacy and registration as a pharmacist with the Australian Health Professional Registration Authority is essential
  • Experience and high level of performance in clinical pharmacy.
  • Demonstrated ability, or willingness to acquire the ability, to interact with Aboriginal people in a sensitive and culturally safe way.
  • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively in a multidisciplinary health care team
  • Ability to plan, negotiate and implement changes to day to day practice to ensure the highest standard of care possible to clients of the service.

Benefits

There is potential to increase the impact of clinical services for the people of Maningrida for the innovative person who can develop professional services to suit the population and the health service.

Other benefits include

  • Generous salary including remote living and relocation allowances
  • Conditions are negotiable and can be by fly in fly out from Darwin or living in the community
  • Professional support and mentoring is available from the co-ordinating pharmacy in Darwin

For further information please contact

Shelley Forester Ph: 0412700560

Email: shelley.forester@udcp.com.au

  • Applicants are required to provide a current CV and contact details for at least two referees.
  • Applicants are asked to submit a one page summary of how they meet the above criteria.

9. ATSICHS Dental Services Brisbane : Oral Health Therapist

Position Title
Oral Health Therapist
Department/Team
Department/Team Dental
Location
ATSICHS Dental Services
Salary Range
$70,835 – $80,508 base salary, plus Superannuation
Employment Status
12 month contract role with view to permanency
Reports To
Dental Services Manager
Direct Reports
Nil

Organisational History and Structure      

ATSICHS Brisbane is a not-for-profit community owned health and human services organisation delivering on the unique health and wellbeing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in greater Brisbane and Logan. We are the largest, most comprehensive Aboriginal Medical Health Service in Queensland, and Australia’s second oldest. We are determined to create a flourishing future and lasting legacy for our people and our community.

Our services include medical and dental clinics, mums and bubs programs, an aged care facility, family and child safety services, foster and kinship care, social and emotional wellbeing services, kindergarten programs and a youth service.

We have five core values which shape the way that we work:

  • Community
  • Respect
  • Collaboration
  • Quality
  • Accountability

Our vision for the future is that we are world leaders in Indigenous health and social support services provided in an urban setting. To do this we are focussing on four strategic priorities:

  1. Work smarter, work together
  2. Ensure easy to access services for every stage of life
  3. Champion healthy individuals and thriving families
  4. Build a strong and sustainable organisation.

Position Outline               

As a key member of the ATSICHS Brisbane team, the Oral Health Therapist is expected to personally contribute to the shaping and achievement of ATSICHS vision and goals. The Oral Health Therapist will provide three (3) key functions:

Supports dental care delivery:

Supports dental care delivery by providing general and emergency oral health care to Murri School Students as well as other eligible clients; diagnosing dental decay and gum diseases, provide dental examinations, cleaning, scaling and extracting, taking X-Rays and impressions for mouthguards, and brining complex dental items to the attention of Dentist. Educates students and patients by giving oral hygiene, plaque control, and postoperative instructions. Assist in encouraging students and patients to make an active change to their oral care with the aid of ATSICHS approved oral health educational material.

Operates within CQI and clinical governance framework:

Oral Health Therapists support processes that ensure the delivery of dental care is performed within the highest quality. Included activities involve CQI, contributing to policy implementation, audits and reporting of clinical incidents.

Actively contributes in developing a flourishing team:

Support fellow staff in a team environment to build collegiality and a sense of belongingness within the team and ATSICHS family. Staff will actively participate in team activities and contribute to a flourishing workplace culture that promotes the ethos and values of ATSICHS Brisbane as a long standing Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation.

Skills, Competencies, Qualifications, Education and Experience

Essential:

  • Certificate, Diploma or Degree in Oral Health Therapy and be eligible to register with AHPRA
  • Hold a current radiation licence
  • Demonstrated experience that demonstrates practical skills and knowledge in the provision of dental care to clients
  • Demonstrated ability to meet targets and performance outcomes
  • Ability to support a continuous improvement model for achieving outcomes
  • Proven ability to prioritise workload and meet deadlines
  • Effective communication skills – both in writing ad verbal
  • Working with Children’s Card (Blue Card) or be eligible to apply.

Desirable, but not mandatory:

  • Previous experience working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Knowledge of EXACT

How to Apply    

Applications can only be submitted through seek link

Applications must be submitted before 14th August 2017

ATSICHS HR on 07 3240 8900

APPLY HERE

10.Tackling Indigenous Smoking Support Officer (OVAHS) close 16 August

11. Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC)

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

To find out more, visit http://www.cmsac.com.au/about-us/

About the Opportunity

Exciting opportunities exist for 2 Full-Time, experienced and passionate Aboriginal Health Workers / Practitioners to join the CMSAC team.

Reporting directly to the Senior Registered Nurse, the Aboriginal Health Worker will be responsible for providing supportive, effective and efficient Primary Health Care services to clients in the clinic and within the community.

As an Aboriginal Health Worker / Practitioner, your responsibilities will include (but not limited to):

  • Work with members of the clinical team to deliver Primary Health services to clients
  • In collaboration with the multidisciplinary team, conduct health checks on clients
  • Using the Therapeutic Guidelines, perform consultations with clinic clients, including listening to their story, providing a basic physical examination and consulting with more experienced clinical staff as necessary, and to advise on the treatment and management of a client’s health problems
  • Assist the Senior Registered Nurse and Program Nurses to address areas of improvement
  • Provide education to clients and families on health care and health promotion
  • Demonstrate leadership in maintaining infection control principles
  • Have an understanding of CMSAC reporting requirements

About You

The successful applicant will have a demonstrated ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. You will have a sound understanding of the unique issues impacting the health of Aboriginal peoples whilst have experience in the provision of health promotion programs.

In addition to the above, the successful applicant will possess:

  • Certificate IV Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice
  • Current Apply First Aid certificate, or willingness to obtain
  • Current, unencumbered C-Class Manual Drivers Licence
  • Working with Children Check and a National Police Clearance, or willingness to obtain
  • The ability to pass a pre-employment drug and alcohol test

About the Benefits

CMSAC is dedicated to recognising and rewarding dedication. As such, you will enjoy an attractive remuneration package including salary sacrificing options!

In addition:

  • CMSAC will negotiate relocation assistance with the right candidate
  • You’ll enjoy a fantastic work/life balance, with Monday – Friday hours, 8:30am – 5.00pm and 5 weeks annual leave!

Applications close Monday 21 August at 5pm.

APPLY FOR THIS JOB

12.General Practitioner | Remote Aboriginal Health Service NT

The Role
Cornerstone Medical are seeking Vocationally Registered Doctor for an exciting permanent position within an Aboriginal Medical Service in the NT. You be will be responsible for providing holistic primary health care services alongside an experienced team of Registered Nurses and visiting specialists.The Centre
You will work alongside an experienced team of 1 additional GP, 14 nurses, allied health workers, and an experienced support team. The hours of work are 5pmwith no on call or after hours. There is a pharmacy onsite, numerous health programs and visiting specialists weekly.The location
You will be located on the beautiful and untouched coastline of NT; right on the coast. This is an is an indigenous community in one of the largest most remote towns of Australia’s Northern Territory. The renowned fishing town is the major service centre for the population of 2,300 as well as more than 30 outstations or homelands, with a school, health clinic, multiple food outlets, two supermarkets, service station, arts centre, créche and a tarmac airport with daily commercial flights to Darwin.The Criteria 
To be eligible for this position you must meet the following criteria:

  • MBBS
  • Vocational AHPRA registration
  • Interest in indigenous health, Chronic Disease and remote GP work

The Package
On appointment for this position, you will be offered:

  • OTE $240-350,000 per annum including
  • Free Accommodation and full relocation assistance
  • Quarterly return flights to Darwin with accommodation
  • Yearly retention allowance lump sum $35,000
  • Salary sacrificing up to $30,000
  • Professional development allowance and Attraction allowance
  • 4 return trips to Darwin per annum incl accommodation
  • House, vehicle, laptop and phone
  • Indemnity insurance reimbursed
This really is a fantastic opportunity to expand your career in Indigenous Health as a part of a supportive and community focused organisation.  For more information on this or other exciting opportunities please phone Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe today on 07 3171 2929 or email aoife@cmr.com.au
Aoife (Eva) McAuliffe
07 3171 2929

13.Senior Research Fellow, CREATE Adelaide

SAHMRI146
FTC – Full-time Contract
SAHMRI North Terrace

Applications close Friday 11, August 2017

12 Month Contract

Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit

The Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Chronic Disease Knowledge Translation and Exchange (CREATE)

At the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), we are committed to achieving innovative, ground-breaking health and medical research that fundamentally improves the quality of life for all people.

The Aboriginal Research Unit (Wardliparingga  Unit) within SAHMRI conducts health and well-being research that is of direct relevance to, and in partnership with, Aboriginal people in South Australia. Our research is focused on the significant difference between the health status and life opportunities available to Aboriginal people and other Australians. Our research is broad in nature, including epidemiology, health services research, evaluation and clinical trials.

The Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Chronic Disease Knowledge Translation and Exchange (CREATE) focuses on translating research to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, with particular focus on the prevention, treatment and management of chronic diseases. The Centre is a collaborative enterprise between The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), the Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit, SAHMRI; The Joanna Briggs Institute, University of Adelaide, and The School of Public Health, University of Adelaide.

The aim of CREATE is to assist the Aboriginal health sector to use existing knowledge (published and unpublished) on best practice chronic disease prevention and treatment as well as service delivery models to improve the coverage and appropriateness of their services and care.

CREATE is guided by a Leadership Group comprising of senior representatives from Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations around Australia.

The Senior Research Fellow, CREATE will provide academic and operational leadership to the CREATE team, acting as a conduit between the CREATE Chief Investigators and the Adelaide based research and administration team. The position has the responsibility for day to day oversight and support of specified research projects and staff, providing expertise and supervision as required.

The Senior Research Fellow, CREATE is broadly responsible for the achievement of a range of determined project outcomes, and is required to apply high level qualitative analytical skills and demonstrated excellence in written and verbal communication. Dissemination strategies will require CREATE findings are published within peer-reviewed journals and to translate these findings to stakeholders with influence on Aboriginal health policy and practice.

SAHMRI has a strong commitment to employment Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into these roles. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are therefore strongly encouraged to apply.

Everything we do is underpinned by our core values and our institute is dedicated to grow a culture that pursues, enables and demands research excellence. We’re proud of the work we do and work hard as a team to make a positive difference to the community.  Excellence, Innovation, Courage, Integrity and Teamwork are what help us achieve our goals. If these are also your qualities and goals, apply today.

For a copy of the position description please click here

Applications close: 11 August 2017

APPLY HERE

14.Employment at Miwatj Health NT

Miwatj Health offers a wide range of employment opportunities for health and other professionals, in a unique primary healthcare environment.

We offer satisfying career paths for doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Practitioners, allied health staff, public/population health practitioners, health informatics specialists, administrative, financial and management personnel.

If you are suitably qualified and are looking for a rewarding and challenging experience in one of the most diverse, beautiful and interesting regions of Australia, we invite you to apply for any of the current vacancies listed below.

All applications for current vacancies must include:

  • a current Resumé,
  • names and contact details of at least two referees, at least one of whom must be a employment referee.

We encourage applications from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly those with links to and knowledge of local communities in the region.

Separately from the list of current vacancies, you may also submit a general expression of interest, with a current Resume, and we shall retain it on file for future reference if an appropriate vacancy arises.

Miwatj strongly prefers that all applications and expressions of interest submit your application via our recruitment platform by clicking the link below.

You may contact HR via recruitment@miwatj.com.au. However, if that is not possible, EOI or resume may be mailed or faxed, to arrive by the closing date, to:
Miwatj Health – Human Resources Department
PO Box 519
Nhulunbuy NT 0881
Fax number (08) 8987 1670

See Website for all details and APPLY

https://miwatj.applynow.net.au/

Two New Vacancies are available within the Link Up Program.

Both positions are 12 month Contract position that may be extended subject to funding.

Link Up Caseworker:   (Click for more information)

Link Up Counsellor: (Click for more information)

Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program is funded by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (Federal), and also receives reunion funding from the Department of Premier & Cabinet, Aboriginal Affairs & Reconciliation (State).

Link Up provides family tracing, reunion and counselling services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their families who have been separated under the past policies and practices of the Australian Government. Assistance is also provided to people over the age of 18 years who have been adopted, fostered or raised in institutions.

For more information about Link Up (Click here)

Please feel free to communicate this opportunity through your networks.

Applications close – COB Monday 14th August 2017.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #SaveAdate #NACCHOAgm2017 #IIPD2017 #WeAreIndigenous #InternationalIndigenousDay August 9 #DIPI2017

NEW August 9  : International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2017

NEW 3 September  : Clintons Walk for Justice arrives in Canberra

New 4 -10 September National Stroke Week, the Stroke Foundation’s annual awareness campaign is taking place

12 – 14 September SNAICC National Conference

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

20-23 September : AIDA Conference 2017

New 29 Sept : Closing the Prison Gap Focus on the Children Tweed Heads NSW

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

10 October  : CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

18 -20 October  : 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

NEW 20 October : ‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference

NEW 18- 20 October First 1000 Days Summit Abstracts close August 11

26-27 October  :Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

30 October2 Nov  :NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra ABSTRACTS close 21st August 2017

14- 15 November  : 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

15 -18 November  :National Conference on Incontinence Scholarship Opportunity close 1 September

27-30 November  :Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

11-12 April 2018  :6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium  Canberra call for extracts

If you have a Conference, Workshop Funding opportunity or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media

mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

Noting Abstracts close 21st August 2017

NACCHO CONFERENCE WEBSITE

August 9  : International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2017

By resolution 49/214 of 23 December 1994, the United Nations General Assembly decided that the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples shall be observed on 9 August every year. The date marks the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations in 1982.

This year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples will be commemorated on Wednesday, 9 August at UNHQ in New York from 3.00pm to 6.00pm in the ECOSOC Chamber.

This year is of particular importance, as it is the Tenth Anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), and at the same time the theme of the event.

The UNDRIP is partnering with Twitter on an International Day emoji to be launched on 8 August. The emoji will follow our branding and will be linked to the hashtags #WeAreIndigenous  #IamIndigenous #InternationalIndigenousDay #IIPD2017 #DIPI2017  The emoji will be launched on @UN4Indigenous and @UN on 8 August and will be available through 11 August.

3 September  : Clintons Walk for Justice arrives in Canberra

We all have come a long way and now it time we finish this off and do why we went on this journey in the first place.

I’m almost there at end of a amazing journey. It has been a great honour to walk in the foot step of my ancients and I walk with prouded for my people and walk on song line that my ancients made for us to follow and understand why they was created in the first place for my people.

I do not know what going to happen when I reach Canberra, but I do know in my heart an mind I must try because it need to be done to change this country and this world we live in. But I hope it well be something that this country will never forget and it well help change this country way to do better to build a better country and a better world we live in.

All that matter now is to speak the truth from the heart to make this men in suit and everyone else who live here to change they way and do better than they know them self now.

I hope in year to come people well talk about the walk for justice that a man who was just young walk across a land thought different country for his people and for everyone else. Walk all the way to the capital city call Canberra to speak the truth and send a message he collected from his people and from every one else on this journey that made him did it in the first place.

The walk well live on and the name the spirit walker well live on when I go and pass on. A man who walk across a country bring hope and change and all the way to capital city to tell men in suit to change they way because he believe and he believe in a dream could made a difference.

Clintons Facebook Page

4 -10 September National Stroke Week, the Stroke Foundation’s annual awareness campaign is taking place

National Stroke Week, the Stroke Foundation’s annual awareness campaign is taking place 4 to 10 September 2017.

Australians are being asked to join the FAST response team by knowing the signs of stroke. Paramedics, nurses and doctors can only treat stroke if Australians recognise the signs of stroke and call 000 immediately.

Could your community recognise the signs of stroke F.A.S.T?

Face – Check their face. Has their mouth drooped?
Arms – Can they lift both arms?
Speech – Is their speech slurred? Do they understand you?
Time – Time is critical. If you see any of these symptoms Act FAST and call 000.

Sharing the FAST message with those around you could save their life.

REGISTER online to get your FREE Stroke Week kit

Once you register you will be sent a FREE Stroke Week kit including posters, campaign booklet and resources to support your activity.

Click here to register now.

What does an awareness activity involve?

  • Set up a public awareness display in your local shopping centre.
  • Host a public morning/afternoon tea.
  • Organise a healthy event i.e. social walk around the park or a healthy bake sale.
  • You can also add a health check to your activity. We provide the tools to make this simple.

Visit www.strokefoundation.org.au/strokeweek for more details.

Join the FAST response team for National Stroke Week.

12 – 14 September SNAICC National Conference

Includes 2 pre-conference masterclasses, 3 plenaries, 56 concurrent sessions, and a social/cultural program.

Register now!

13 September : Webinar Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services

Developed in consultation with NACCHO and produced by the Mental Health Professionals’ Network a federally funded initiative

Join our interdisciplinary panel as we explore a collaborative approach to reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services.

The webinar format will include a facilitated question and answer session between panel members exploring key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities.

The panel will discuss strategies to enhance cultural awareness and develop responsive services for Indigenous communities affected by incarceration. Strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing of individuals will also be explored.

When: Wednesday 13th September, 2017

Time: 4.30pm – 5.45pm (AEST)

Where: Online – via your computer, tablet or mobile

Cost: Free

Panel:

  • Dr Mark Wenitong (Medical Advisor based in QLD)
  • Dr Marshall Watson (Psychiatrist based in SA)
  • Dr Jeffrey Nelson (Clinical Psychologist based in QLD)
  • Julie Tongs (OAM) (CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service – Narrabundah ACT)

Facilitator:

  • Dr Mary Emeleus (General Practitioner and Psychotherapist based in QLD)

Read more about our panel.

Learning Outcomes:

Through an exploration of incarceration, the webinar will provide participants with the opportunity to:

  • Describe key issues and impacts of incarceration on individuals, families and communities
  • Develop strategies to enhance culturally aware and responsive services for Indigenous people and communities affected by incarceration
  • Identify strategies to increase self-esteem and enhance emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing

Before the webinar:

Register HERE

 

20-23 September AIDA Conference 2017

The AIDA Conference in 2017 will celebrate 20 years since the inception of AIDA. Through the theme Family. Unity. Success. 20 years strong we will reflect on the successes that have been achieved over the last 20 years by being a family and being united. We will also look to the future for AIDA and consider how being a united family will help us achieve all the work that still needs to be done in growing our Indigenous medical students, doctors, medical academics and specialists and achieving better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This conference will be an opportunity to bring together our members, guests, speakers and partners from across the sector to share in the reflection on the past and considerations for the future. The conference will also provide a platform to share our individual stories, experiences and achievements in a culturally safe environment.

Conference website

29 Sept : Closing the Prison Gap Focus on the Children Tweed Heads NSW

  • Emeritus Professor Judy Atkinson and Margaret Hayes will “Focus on the Children”, describing their work with young people excluded from mainstream schools due to their behaviour.
  • Leanne Phillips and Cathy Stillwell will talk about “Healing the Womyn Healing the Child”
  • Jyi Lawnton and Casey Bird will describe “Indigenous Policy and the Scientific Gaze”
  • Chris Lee and Associate Professor Helen Farley discuss “Making the Connection”, the use of technology to address the issues of literacy and numeracy in juvenile justice settings
  • Dr Anthea Krieg will talk about her work in Ceduna, South Australia, coordinating services to prevent incarceration of First Nations children.

More info bookings Website

30 Sept : The 2017 Human Rights Photography competition  Closes

The 2017 Human Rights Photography competition is now open to children and adults around the country, with a $600 camera prize up for grabs for the most outstanding image!

For almost a decade, the Australian Human Rights Commission has been holding photo competitions every couple of years. Our last competition attracted a record 450 entries.

Photography is a powerful medium with a long history in the promotion and advancement of human rights around the world. Photos foster empathy for the suffering and experience of others, community engagement and positive social change. No one can forget the impact of photos such as Nick Ut’s famous photo The Terror of War of child Kim Phuc after a napalm attack during the Vietnam War.

Our focus for this year’s competition will be the experiences of people at home. The theme for the 2017 competition is Home, inspired by Eleanor Roosevelt’s famous quote “Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home…

The shortlisted and winning photos to be displayed at the 2017 Human Rights Awards on 8 December in Sydney.

So, what are you waiting for?

About the competition

  • Enter at https://photocompetition.humanrights.gov.au/
  • There will be two categories for entries: Under 18 and 18 & over.
  • Overall winners will receive their prizes at the 2017 Human Rights Awards on December 8 in Sydney. A selection of photos from the Competition will also be on display.
  • Main prizes worth $600.
  • The competition will close on 30 September 2017.

If you have a query about the competition, please email photocomp@humanrights.gov.au

Photo Credit: Nimboi’s Bat by Sean Spencer, from the 2011 competition.

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

catsinam

Contact info for CATSINAM

18 -20 October 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference Broome

We are pleased to announce the 35th Annual CRANAplus Conference will be held at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa in Broome, Western Australia, from 18 to 20 October 2017.

THE FUTURE OF REMOTE HEALTH AND THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY

Since the organisation’s inception in 1982 this event has served to create an opportunity for likeminded remote and isolated health individuals who can network, connect and share.

It serves as both a professional and social resource for the Remote and Isolated Health Workforce of Australia.

We aim to offer an environment that will foster new ideas, promote collegiate relationships, provide opportunities for professional development and celebrate remote health practice.

Conference Website

18- 20 October First 1000 Days Summit Abstracts close August 11

Abstract submissions for the First 1000 Days Australia Summit are now open. Get them in by August 11th!

The First 1000 Days Australia Summit is a three-day event that will bring together Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders, researchers, community members, front- line workers and policy makers involved in areas relevant to the work of First 1000 Days Australia. Lectures, panel discussions and workshops will address topics such as caring and parenting, infant and child development, family strengthening, implementation and translation, as well as a number of other areas.

The theme for the Summit is ‘Celebrating our leadership, strengthening our families’. We invite interested presenters to submit abstracts for oral presentations, workshops and posters that align with the aims, principles and research areas of First 1000 Days Australia, and of First 1,000 Days international.

20 October : ‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference 


‘Most influential’ health leaders to appear in key forum at major rural medicine conference

RMA Presidents’ Breakfast
Friday 20 October 2017
Pullman Albert Park, Melbourne


www.ruralmedicineaustralia.com.au

Australia’s most influential health leaders will discuss critical health policy issues in a key Presidents’ Breakfast forum at the Rural Medicine Australia 2017 conference, to be held in Melbourne in October.Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), will host the forum and will be joined on the panel by Associate Professor Ruth Stewart, President of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM); Dr Bastian Seidel, President of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP); and Dr Tony Bartone, Vice President of the Australian Medical Association (AMA).

26-27 October Diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.

‘Translation at the Centre’ An educational symposium

Alice Springs Convention Centre, Alice Springs

This year the Symposium will look at research translation as well as the latest on diabetes and cardiovascular research, stroke and maternal and child health issues.  The event will be run over a day and a half.
The Educational Symposium will feature a combination of relevant plenary presentations from renowned scientists and clinicians plus practical workshops.

Registration is free but essential.

Please contact the symposium coordinator on 1300 728 900 (Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm) or via email at events@baker.edu.au  

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

We welcome you to attend the 2017 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference.

On the new NACCHO Conference Website  you find links to

1.Registrations now open

2. Booking Your Accommodation

3. Book Your Flights

4. Expressions of Interest Speakers, case studies and table top presentations Close

5. Social Program

6.Conferences Partnership Sponsorship Opportunities

7.NACCHO Conference HELP Contacts

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Where :Hyatt Hotel Canberra

Dates : Members’ Conference: 31 October – 1 November 2017
Annual General Meeting: 2 November 2017

CLICK HERE

14-15 November : 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the Lowitja Institute, Australia’s national institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, are proud to be co-hosting the 6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation.

This partnership indicates an alignment of priorities and a strong commitment from our two institutions to deliver a measurable, positive impact on the health and wellbeing of Australia’s First Peoples.

Under the theme “The Butterfly Effect: Translating Knowledge into Action for Positive Change”, the Symposium will be an opportunity to bring relevant expertise to the business of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research translation and put forward Indigenous perspectives that inform the most effective policies and programs. It will also be a forum to share knowledge of what successful research looks like at community level and what the key elements of success are.

We look forward to the participation of delegates with community, research and policy expertise, including outstanding keynote speakers Dr Carrie Bourassa (Canada) and Sir Mason Durie (New Zealand). We are confident that through our joint commitment to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, the Symposium will make a significant contribution to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, families and individuals. This commitment also signals the importance of working together as equal partners, Indigenous and non-Indigenous.

More info HERE

15 -18 November  :National Conference on Incontinence Scholarship Opportunity close 1 September

The Continence Foundation of Australia is offering 10 scholarships to support health professionals to attend the 26th National Conference on Incontinence. The conference will be held in Sydney on 15-18 November 2017.  The conference program and registration brochure can be found here.
This scholarship program is open to registered nurses and physiotherapists with an interest in continence care working in rural and remote areas of Australia. The scholarship includes full conference registration, including clinical workshops and social events, flights and accommodation. The top applicant also has the opportunity to participate in a placement at a Sydney continence clinic. Previous unsuccessful applicants are encouraged to apply.
 
Applications close Friday 1 September.
 
Applications are being taken online. Click here to find out more and to apply.  

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

iaha

Abstracts for the IAHA 2017 National Conference are now open!

We are calling for abstracts for concurrent oral presentations and workshops under the following streams:
– Care
– Cultures
– Connection

For abstract more information visit the IAHA Conference website at: https://iahaconference.com.au/call-for-abstracts/

11-12 April 2018 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium  Canberra call for extracts

About the Symposium

Drawing upon a tradition which commenced with the first rural and remote health scientific conference ‘Infront Outback’ held in Toowoomba in 1992, the 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium will be held in Canberra, 11-12 April 2018.

The Symposium will celebrate 20 years since the establishment of the first university department of rural health in 1997 and will highlight the research and knowledge that followed this innovation.

Outback Infront will celebrate the leadership that has emerged from the rural and remote health research community, while at the same time, support early career academics and the next generation of rural health researchers.

The Symposium will focus on rural and remote health research that informs strategic health policy and health service challenges in rural and remote Australia.

The Symposium will provide an opportunity to share and develop research that seeks to understand and deliver innovative change through building evidence that has the potential to transform health outcomes and service delivery.

Who should attend

The Symposium program will be designed to engage academics, policy makers, expert researchers in rural and remote health and clinician-researchers, as well as emerging and early career researchers.

It will also be relevant to policy makers, university departments of rural health, rural clinical schools, research collaborations and bodies, rural workforce organisations and health services delivery networks and providers.

Program

As well as key presentations from respected researchers in rural and remote health the Symposium will also feature Rogano presentations (scholarly debate on a current research project that answer “how to” questions and encourage scholarly thinking and debate) and a return of the popular Lightning Talk presentations to support early career academics and the next generation of rural health researchers.

Abstracts are now being sought for general presentations, Lightning talks and Rogano presentations

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Rural and Remote Health Research Alert : @RoyalFlyingDoc Health Care Access in the bush Survey

 

” The RFDS survey of country health consumer priorities was released 100 years to the day since the first patient was treated by a pioneering doctor in Western Australia, leading to the founding of the RFDS which is now recognised as Australia’s most reputable charity.

The survey of 450 country people drawn from every state and territory saw one-third of responses (32.5%) name doctor and medical specialist access as their key priority. Addressing mental health (12.2%) and drug and alcohol problems (4.1%) were second and third priorities

Around seven million Australians who reside in remote and rural areas.

Of these, more than half a million live in either remote, or very remote, areas of Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians are overrepresented in remote and very remote areas—almost half (45%) of all people in very remote areas and 16% in remote areas are Indigenous Australians, compared with a 3% Indigenous representation in the total population

The research paper “Health Care Access, Mental Health, and Preventative Health; Health Priority Survey Findings for People in the Bush

DOWNLOAD COPY HERE

RN032_Healths_Needs_Survey_Result_P1_U0FsohZ

Extract : 4.2.4 Indigenous health issues

Few respondents identified Indigenous health issues as important.

This was disappointing since across all remoteness areas, Indigenous Australians generally experience poorer health than non-Indigenous Australians (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2014) in relation to chronic and communicable diseases, mental health, infant health, and life expectancy (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, 2005).

However, this result is unsurprising considering the very low proportion of respondents who were Indigenous.

Indigenous Australians are five times as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to die from endocrine, nutritional and metabolic conditions such as diabetes, and three times as likely to die from digestive conditions (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015b).

Age-adjusted data demonstrated that in 2014–2015 Indigenous Australians were more than twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to be hospitalised for any reason (Australian Institute of Health andWelfare, 2016b).

Indigenous Australians are twice as likely as non-Indigenous Australians to be hospitalised for an injury (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015a), and 1.8 times as likely to die from an injury than non-Indigenous Australians (Henley & Harrison, 2015).

Indigenous Australians are three times as likely to die from chronic lower respiratory diseases and twice as likely to die as a result of self-harm (suicide) than non-Indigenous Australians (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016).

Compared to non-Indigenous Australians, Indigenous Australians demonstrate higher age standardised death rates for a number of illnesses and injuries (Australian Institute of Healthand Welfare, 2015c).

Indigenous Australians also experience higher prevalence rates of communicable diseases compared with non-Indigenous Australians, including shigellosis (2.6 times greater), pertussis (whooping cough) (54.3 times greater), and tuberculosis (6 times greater) (Abdolhosseini, Bonner, Montano, Young, Wadsworth, Williams, & Stoner, 2015).

Similarly, life expectancy is lower and mortality rates are higher among Indigenous Australians compared to non-Indigenous Australians.

In 2010–2012, the estimated life expectancy at birth was 10.6 years lower for Indigenous males (69.1 years) compared to non-Indigenous males (79.7 years) and 9.5 years lower for Indigenous females (73.7 years) compared to non- Indigenous females (83.1 years) (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015c).

Fatal burden of disease studies have also demonstrated the existence of health inequalities— the fatal burden of disease and injury in the Indigenous population is estimated to be 2.6 times that experienced by non-Indigenous Australians, with injuries (22%) and cardiovascular disease (21%) contributing the most to the fatal  burden of disease for Indigenous Australians (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015b).

Press Coverage : Rural and remote Australians remain deeply concerned about poor access to healthcare, and want the Federal Government to spend more to fix the problem.

That is the key finding from the latest Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) research, released last week as reported ABC

The RFDS surveyed more than 450 country Australians, and one-third nominated access to doctors and specialists as their single biggest healthcare concern.

A third of respondents called for more government funding of services, particularly for mental health and preventative care.

RFDS chief executive Martin Laverty said it raised a question for governments as to whether policies aimed at bridging that gap had failed.

“We have an oversupply of doctors in this country; the problem is, the doctors are simply not all working in areas where they’re most needed,” he said.

“It brings into question the success of repeated programs of Commonwealth governments to encourage doctors to work in remote and country Australia.

“The question for government is, are our incentives for doctors sending them to where they’re most needed?”

Access to doctors in remote areas a challenge

The survey found encouraging news in other areas.

Two-thirds of respondents said they needed to travel for one hour or less to see their GP or another non-emergency medical professional.

But for Australians living in more remote places, a visit to the doctor could mean a 10-hour round trip or more.

RFDS chief medical officer in Queensland Abby Harwood said governments could do other things to improve their access to care beyond putting more bodies on the ground.

“There is a lot of telephone and email consultation going on between people out bush and their GPs, but that requires actually having a pre-existing relationship with a healthcare provider who knows you,” she said.

“Technology such as video-conferencing is a fantastic opportunity, [but] currently the telecommunications infrastructure out in these areas is not quite sufficient to be able to do that reliably.”

GPs not paid by Medicare for teleconference consultations

Unlike specialists, who can bill Medicare for video-conferencing consultations with patients, GPs currently are not paid unless their patient attends a consultation in person.

Dr Harwood said that meant GPs who assisted remote patients over the phone or by teleconference were doing so on their own time and usually out of their own pocket.

“From my experience, most of us would just do it [for free] out of the service that we provide,” she said.

“At the moment it’s either the healthcare provider doing it for free, or the person accessing the GP is paying for it out of their pocket with no subsidy.

“When you consider the petrol bills, how much it costs in fuel to drive a 1,000km round trip, a lot of them would rather pay out of their own pocket to do that [if the doctor is not already doing it for free].”

Dealing with issues before crisis point

Dr Harwood seconded the call for a greater focus on preventative care for rural and remote patients, who were too often only dealing with medical issues once they had reached crisis point.

She said changing that made medical and economic sense.

“[When there’s a crisis] a patient then has to travel in and out of their regional centre or capital city, which obviously causes a lot of disruption and it’s expensive,” she said.

“I don’t think anyone has actually measured the full cost to Australia as a country, taking into account that social dislocation and the economic disruption when people need to leave their properties, leave their workplace.

“It’s been proven over and over again that good primary health care, delivered to people out there on the ground, can often prevent those crises from happening.”

 

Significant boost in GP numbers ‘in all areas’

Assistant Minister for Health David Gillespie, who has responsibility for regional health issues, is on leave.

But in a statement, a federal Department of Health spokeswoman said there had been a significant boost in GP numbers “in all areas of Australia” over the past decade.

“A 2017 budget announcement included funding of $9.1 million over four years from 2017-18 to improve access to mental health treatment services for people in rural and regional communities,” the statement read.

“Currently, Medicare provides rebates for up to 10 face-to-face consultations with registered psychologists, occupational therapists and social workers for eligible patients under the Better Access initiative.

“From 1 November 2017, changes to Medicare will take effect so that seven of the 10 mental health consultations can be delivered through online channels [telehealth] for eligible patients, that is, those with clinically diagnosed mental disorders who are living in rural and remote locations.

“Relevant services can be delivered by clinical psychologists, registered psychologists, occupational therapists and social workers that meet the relevant registration requirements under Medicare.”

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