NACCHO Members #VoteACCHO #Election2019 Update and #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #NSW Katungul and Armajun #QLD @DeadlyChoices @Wuchopperen #VIC @VAHS1972 #NT @CAACongress #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #WA

This weeks feature #VoteACCHO Good News Story

5.1 QLD : Deadly Choices : Deadly Days Ahead for Queensland Murri Carnival

Plus

1.1 NACCHO Launches new #VoteACCHO website resources page for #Election2019

Press Release  : NACCHO welcomes ALP Pledge of additional $115.1 million to focus on Aboriginal health

1.2 National : Pat Turner ACOSS Budget Breaky panel Speaker

1.3 National : All NACCHO members should be aware of Corporation Act Changes 

2.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO one of only six high-performing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services who were selected as part of the Deadly Blues Origin Partnership

2.2 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service staff can’t wait for work to begin on their new $4.7 million building.

2.3 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service in Tenterfield couples the Walkabout Barber with mental health

3.VIC : VAHS ACCHO to open new clinic in northern suburbs of Melbourne

4. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO hosted our CTG event  with a screening of “Take Heart

5.2 QLD : Wuchopperen Health Service Cairns launches for their Deadly Choices Health Program 

6. WA  : Indigenous youth health forum focus  : Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial’s Empowered Young Leaders Project

7. NT : The Administrator of the Northern Territory, the honourable Vicki O’Halloran AM visits Congress Alukura to learn about the service to Aboriginal women and babies in Central Australia.

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

This weeks feature #VoteACCHO Good News Story

Deadly Choices QLD  : Deadly Days Ahead for Queensland Murri Carnival

Great to have the support of the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council, the Arthur Beetson Foundation and Moreton Bay Regional Council at the Launch of the 2019 Queensland Murri Carnival at South Pine Sports Complex.

Queensland rugby league royalty and Deadly Choices Ambassadors, Steve Renouf, Petero Civoniceva and Bo de la Cruz, came together at South Pine Sports Complex on Wednesday, to launch the 2019 QAIHC Arthur Beetson Foundation Queensland Murri Carnival.

This year’s format is bound to entice interest from right across Queensland, with up to 30,000 people expected at the venue across five days of competition from October 1-5.

Established in 2011, the Carnival draws on the popularity of rugby league in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, to promote the value of health and education to young Indigenous people.

“Upwards of 100 teams across Open Men’s and Women’s divisions, plus under-age grades in boys and girls will compete in our annual showpiece, focussed on community connection and overall health and well-being among participants and spectators,” confirmed ABF Director Brad Beetson.

“We encourage all Queensland communities to start thinking about their plans for the week, as the 2019 QMC will be an event not to be missed.

“On the back of last year’s successes at the Bindal Sharks in Townsville, we’ll see an expansion of underage competition with Under 13s, 15s and 17s for boys and Under 15s and 17s for the girls.

“With the support of the various Deadly Choices regional teams scattered throughout Queensland, we’re looking to have all regions well represented across the grades and in open competition.

“Our smoke-free, alcohol-free event will require participants to have their 715 health checks up to date, adults enrolled to vote, while youngsters also need a 90% school attendance rate.”

Local, State and Federal funding, coupled with the valued support of the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), Moreton Bay Regional Council and Queensland Rugby League (QRL), sees the annual showpiece make its debut appearance at South Pine Sports Complex.

“The Murri Rugby League Carnival is a major health promotion event in Queensland and contributes to increased health literacy and access to primary and preventative health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It’s so much more than just a football carnival”, said CEO of the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), Neil Willmett.

“The Murri Carnival achieves significant health and education outcomes, and the requirements for all participants to have a health check and those of school age to maintain a high level of school attendance emphasise the important messaging underpinning the event.

“QAIHC is proud to sponsor the Murri Carnival and its contribution to closing the gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,” said Mr Willmett.

“QAIHC is excited to be undertaking a study to explore how Carnival participation as a player, spectator, or an official, may influence levels of accessing health services and overall knowledge and understanding of preventive health, contributing important data to inform evidence-based health promotion.”

As proud hosts, the Moreton Bay Regional Council sees major benefit in its association with such a prestigious sporting tournament that attracts visitation from right across Queensland.

“Moreton Bay Regional Council is a proud sponsor of this deadly event and I’m looking forward to the carnival taking place at the South Pine Sports Complex, home of the Albany Creek Crushers, later this year,” Mayor Allan Sutherland said.

“Sport is more than just a game – it’s culture, community and opportunity. Sport has the power to give us something to strive for.

“It teaches discipline, work ethic and above all, solidarity with our peers and teammates.

“The Queensland Murri Carnival takes this to another level — championing the health, education and Deadly Choices for Indigenous people.

“We are proud to be sponsors of a carnival which stands for so much more than just a game.”

Registrations are now open for the QAIHC ABF Queensland Murri Carnival. Team coaches and managers need to ensure all their players are up-to-date with their 715 health checks, adults currently enrolled to vote, while youngsters must maintain a 90% school attendance rate.

If not, book in for your 715 at your local Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS), before going online to register for the QMC at www.murrirugbyleague.com.au.

1.1 NACCHO Launches new #VoteACCHO website resources page for #Election2019

“ Welcome to the launch of our NACCHO #Election2019 #VoteACCHO campaign for Affiliates, ACCHO members, stakeholders and supporters.

 The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is not a partisan political issue and cannot be sidelined any longer.

NACCHO has developed a set of 10 policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable. ” 

Donnella Mills Acting Chair NACCHO

Check out the new #VoteACCHO Website Page

and add #VoteACCHO to your Twitter Handle

NACCHO welcomes ALP Pledge of additional $115.1 million to focus on Aboriginal health

NACCHO welcomes the commitment made by Labor leader Bill Shorten to pledge an additional $115.1 million toward Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health if a Labor government is elected on 18 May.

“We are encouraged by the funding commitment made by the Labor Party today,” said NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills.

“This level of funding shows an acknowledgment of the unequal burden Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities face when it comes to health outcomes.”

“Our communities face a life expectancy gap of ten years less than non-Indigenous Australians – and this gap is only widening. And the death rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is more than double the rate of non-Indigenous children. How can this be?” Ms Mills said.

“The current national health policy hasn’t addressed the urgent needs that Indigenous peak organisations and medical professionals have been advocating for.”

“We hope to see a new direction embraced by all parties – one that places Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health at the forefront of national policy and one that has a genuine partnership and shared decision making with community health providers and organisations,” Ms Mills said.

Read or Download the Full NACCHO Press Release HERE

1.2 National : Pat Turner ACOSS Budget Breaky panel Speaker

At the ACOSS #BudgetBreaky #VoteACCHO event this morning our CEO of NACCHO Pat Turner said

1.That she’s sick of a ‘body parts’ approach to health funding. We need a comprehensive approach.

2 The Importance of preventative health and social determinants of health totally missed in budget and budget response

3.Calls on next Federal Govt to strengthen universal health care for every person in Australia, as well as resourcing the Aboriginal specialist services addressing additional health concerns using #SDOHand holistic care models

1.3 National : All NACCHO members should be aware of Corporation Act Changes 

Any changes to the Corporations Act either automatically apply to the CATSI Act or are closely followed by amendments dependent upon the relevant rules.

http://aicd.companydirectors.com.au/membership/company-director-magazine/2019-back-editions/april/advocacy

Particular changes of concern:

Maximum prison terms increase from five years to 15 years for serious criminal offences such as:

  • Recklessly or dishonestly breaching directors’ and officers’ duties (s184).
  • Dishonestly failing to comply with financial and audit obligations (s344(2)).
  • Intentionally or recklessly breaching the duties of officers or employees of the responsible entity of a registered scheme (ss601FD, 601FE).
  • Knowingly or recklessly providing defective disclosure documents or statements (ss952D, 952F, 1021D).

See ORIC Website

Changes to the CATSI Act

More accountability, less red tape

The Australian Government is proposing reforms to strengthen and improve the Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) 2006 (CATSI Act). The reforms are intended to benefit Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander corporations by reducing red tape, especially for small corporations. Other proposed changes seek to increase transparency for members. There are also minor changes to streamline and clarify some parts of the CATSI Act.

The proposed changes cover the topics of:

  • size classifications
  • rule books
  • business structures
  • meetings and reporting
  • membership
  • transparency of senior executives
  • payments to related third parties
  • special administrations
  • voluntary deregistration
  • compliance powers.

See ORIC website

2.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO one of only six high-performing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services who were selected as part of the Deadly Blues Origin Partnership

Nathan Blacklock, Chin Weerakkody, Jaden Hansen and Tom Learoyd-Lahrs at the Deadly Blues launch in Batemans Bay.

This week Katungul launched a new health campaign at its Batemans Bay Clinic that aims to encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to receive regular medical check-ups and improve their health.

From The Bega District News

The Deadly Blues health campaign, which involves the NSWRL, NRL clubs and other elite sports, is being run by the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) and has been backed by the Australian government with $1.2million in funding.

It aims to target chronic disease, nutrition, physical activity and smoking which can have a negative impact on Indigenous Australian communities.

 NRL’s Tom Learoyd-Lahrs and Nathan Blacklock with supporters at the launch.

It will begin this month in the lead-up to the Holden State of Origin series in June and July 2019.

When clients visit any of Katungul’s three clinics on the South Coast for a health check, they will receive a free NSWRL-inspired jersey.

Katungul is one of only six high-performing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services who were selected as part of the Deadly Blues Origin Partnership.

2.2 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service staff can’t wait for work to begin on their new $4.7 million building.

The service is currently finalising designs for the purpose-built centre, which has already received development approval from the Inverell Shire Council. A $2.35 million federal government grant will help fund the building.

With construction expected to begin before the end of the year, the new centre could be ready by early 2021.

“We’ve been here since 2011. It’s OK, but it’s not really fit for purpose. Downstairs we’ve done a lot of renovations, but we’ve renovated it all that we can, and it’s a rabbit warren,” chief executive officer Debbie McCowen said of the current centre.

She said Armajun had been lucky to find such a convenient location, but had outgrown the rented space. The upstairs area has limited use due to a lack of accessibility for patients and, because they are not purpose-built, several consultation rooms have awkward layouts.

“The new building for Armajun AHS will be beneficial to both staff and patients as it will add much needed space and accessibility to the health care that we can offer our patients,” registered nurse Tara Price said.

“The new centre will enable us to try to reduce the impact of early mortality on the current and next generation of Aboriginal people in our community.”

Dental services are currently limited to a small office with two desks for a dental manager, two dentists, two dental assistants and an oral health therapist. Staff are looking forward to having a two chair dental clinic as well as a new sterilisation room to create mouth guards and dentures – which are currently made in the carpark due to space limitations.

The new space also promises a gym, children’s area, an outside meeting area and 10 consultation rooms for both in-house and visiting medical professionals.

“We’ve been limited by the number of doctors we’ve been able to have, because of the size of the current building,” Ms McCowen said.

“We’ve got about 3500-4000 clients who use Armajun. And there’s a lot of services. We have the medical clinic, the dental clinic, we have the drug and alcohol service, we have a mental health service.” With an exercise physiologist for the gym and visiting specialists ranging from paediatricians to ear, nose and throat specialists to optometrists; Ms McCowen said there’s often “a lot of traffic”.

She hopes the new space might attract more permanent general practitioners, and says it will allow Armajun to expand their services. “This makes the service more sustainable and viable into the future.”

2.3 NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service in Tenterfield couples the Walkabout Barber with mental health,

Few can resist opening up to their hairdresser as they relax in the chair.

That’s the aim of an initiative that couples grooming with mental health, and it was all happening at Armajun Aboriginal Health Service in Tenterfield on Tuesday.

From The Tenterfield Star 

Walkabout Barber is the brainchild of Newcastle-based Brian Dowd, with the creed We cut hair anywhere. Mr Dowd and his team of cutters — and their customised Walkabout Barber truck — were part of a health roadshow the service was hosting, including dental and hearing checks.

The truck had visited Inverell, Tingah and Armidale communities earlier in the year. On this tour it stopped in at Ashford before Tenterfield, continuing on to Glen Innes the next day.

“Our main objective is to make people fresh on the outside, and to come out fresher on the inside,” Mr Dowd said.

“The barber’s chair is a magical experience especially for men. I’ve built the business as a healing space, for men and women to have a chat.”

The operation can do upwards of 60 cuts a day, so that’s a far reach. Mr Dowd said his barbers can also provide the styles and patterns that clients may find difficult to access in city areas.

He said that Armajun is an amazing partner to have on this journey, which is turning out to be a huge success.

It’s also providing employment for barbers to do a job they enjoy. Some of the crew come from Dubbo and Moree and just the previous day Mr Dowd had recruited someone from Ashford.

He’s going to need a lot more. A fixed Walkabout Barber location is about to open in Newcastle, and more trucks are on the way. One will be Walkabout Beautiful offering pedicures and manicures, and another one is heading to Western Australia.

One constant, however, will be the Walkabout moniker.

“The name sticks with our culture’s way of moving around,” Mr Dowd said.

He hopes the Walkabout truck will be a regular visitor to Tenterfield, in conjunction with Armajun. He feels positive repetition will be helpful, providing a safe place to not only receive a trim but also to have a talk especially about matters that people are finding difficult to discuss with family.

“I have to thank Armajun for the opportunity to let us do what we do,” he said.

3.1 VIC : VAHS ACCHO to open new clinic in northern suburbs of Melbourne

It’s finally completed!!!!! After 10 weeks of construction of our new Epping Clinic, it is now officially done!!! VAHS received the keys to our new building today.

VAHS will notify the community very soon on the official opening date but it’s definitely opening in a few weeks.

We need to add more medical equipment, supplies, I.T. hardware, accreditation and upskill the new staff members on our new clinical system. Stay tune for further updates! Very exciting!

4. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO hosted our CTG event  with a screening of “Take Heart

Winnunga hosted our CTG event recently with a screening of “Take Heart”, The quest to rid Australasia of Rheumatic Heart Disease (DVD) narrated by Stan Grant.

What powerful stories from such brave kids.

Also check out the Take Heart Info 

5.2 QLD : Wuchopperen Health Service Cairns launches for their Deadly Choices Health Program 

The Bumma Bippera Team were broadcasting live from Wuchopperen Health Service Ltd for their Deadly Choices launch 🚀

The Deadly Choices team

Check out these prizes at the Deadly Choices launch 

6. WA Indigenous youth health forum focus  : Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial’s Empowered Young Leaders Project

Young indigenous health and social workers from across the region united in Broome recently to brainstorm ideas for encouraging youth to speak up about their mental health.

From HERE

The workshop and forum was held across three days last fortnight, as part of the Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial’s Empowered Young Leaders Project, which provides resources for Aboriginal role models between 18 and 30 to drive change in the region.

The seminar consisted of a panel discussion about unique challenges faced by indigenous people in the region, a number of speakers, including senator Pat Dodson, as well as team-building and self-care activities.

EYLP working group member Jacob Smith said the event took a very positive approach and left many feeling ready to create change.

“The forum focused more on the strengths of us as young people and not just on the negatives, such as the statistics around suicide,” he said. “The goal was to build the people here up and empower them to recognise themselves as leaders and celebrate the role they can play in the community.

“It was put together by young people for young people and I think there are a lot of people leaving feeling very motivated with the tools and techniques to drive change.”

Soleil White, also a member of the working group, said self-care was a major topic highlighted throughout the three days.

“The realities of suicide can be very heavy and daunting and so it is important for us as young leaders to take care of ourselves before taking care of family and community,” she said.

“This includes coping mechanisms and skills to deal with the issues we are being faced with to have a strong body, spirit and mind.

“Overall I think this forum has absolutely been a success and a number of the delegates have expressed that it has been extremely helpful for them.”

The Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial was launched by the Federal Government in 2016 in response to the high rate of suicide in the region.

It is led by the WA Primary Health Alliance and Country WA Primary Health Networks in partnership with Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services and the region’s working group.

7. NT : The Administrator of the Northern Territory, the honourable Vicki O’Halloran AM visits Congress Alukura to learn about the service to Aboriginal women and babies in Central Australia.

Congress Alukura has always been at the forefront of providing comprehensive and cultural responsive health care to Aboriginal women and babies, embedded in the knowledge of our traditional Grandmothers.

We were thrilled to receive a visit from the Administrator of the Northern Territory, the honourable Vicki O’Halloran AM who was keen to learn about the unique service Alukura provides to Aboriginal women and babies in Central Australia.

NACCHO #VoteACCHO Aboriginal Health #Election2019 @billshortenmp and @SenatorDodson set to unveil a $115 million #Labor plan to tackle the Indigenous health crisis today in Darwin : Including $ for @DeadlyChoices #SuicidePrevention  #MentalHealth #RHD #SexualHealth #EyeHealth

“Labor believes innovative and culturally appropriate health care models are central to improving the health outcomes of First Australians and closing the gap, noting that improving Indigenous health was “critical to our journey towards reconciliation. Labor would be funding programs “co-designed with and led by First Nations peoples – driven by the Aboriginal health workforce “

The Opposition Leader, who is also Labor’s spokesman for Indigenous affairs, will unveil the commitment while on the campaign trail with his assistant spokesman Senator Pat Dodson in the Northern Territory today;

Summary of the Labor Party $115 million commitments against NACCHO #VoteACCHO Recommendations

See all 10 NACCHO #VoteACCHO Recommendations Here

Refer NACCHO Recommendation 4

$29.6 million to improve mental health and prevent youth suicide : to administer the mental health funds through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services

See our NACCHO Chair Press Release yesterday

Refer NACCHO Recommendation 6

Sexual health promotion would get a $20 million boost

$13 million would be invested to tackle preventable eye diseases and blindness.

$3 million in seed funding provided to Aboriginal Medical Services to develop health and justice programs addressing the link between incarceration and poor health

Deadly Choices campaign would get $16.5 million for advertising to raise awareness of health and lifestyle choices

Refer NACCHO Recommendation 3

$33 million to address rheumatic heart disease

Media report from

‘Critical to reconciliation’: Labor’s plan to close the gap on Indigenous health

Bill Shorten is set to unveil a $115 million plan to tackle the Indigenous health crisis, as he seeks to position Labor as the only party capable of closing the ten-year gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and their non-Indigenous peers.

The package includes $29.6 million to improve mental health and prevent youth suicide, which has rocked communities in remote areas including the Kimberley where a spate of deaths has been linked to intergenerational trauma, violence and poverty.

The Opposition Leader, who is also Labor’s spokesman for Indigenous affairs, will unveil the commitment while on the campaign trail with his assistant spokesman Senator Pat Dodson in the Northern Territory on Thursday.

“Labor believes innovative and culturally appropriate health care models are central to improving the health outcomes of First Australians and closing the gap,” Mr Shorten said, noting that improving Indigenous health was “critical to our journey towards reconciliation”.

Labor’s package is $10 million more than the $19.6 million Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced for Indigenous suicide prevention on Saturday, after the suicide of an 18-year-old girl from the Kimberley last week.

Indigenous health advocates have previously raised concerns that the Coalition’s wider mental health package could be consumed by “mainstream” services like Headspace.

Mr Shorten highlighted Labor would be funding programs “co-designed with and led by First Nations peoples – driven by the Aboriginal health workforce”.

The Labor plan is to administer the mental health funds through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, which employ teams of paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners in vulnerable communities.

Official statistics show a ten-year gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, with the rate of preventable hospital admissions and deaths three times higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Labor’s Indigenous health plan, which would be delivered over four years, also includes $33 million to address rheumatic heart disease, a preventable cause of heart failure, death and disability which is common in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Sexual health promotion would get a $20 million boost, while $13 million would be invested to tackle preventable eye diseases and blindness.

The Deadly Choices campaign would get $16.5 million for advertising to raise awareness of health and lifestyle choices and $3 million in seed funding provided to Aboriginal Medical Services to develop health and justice programs addressing the link between incarceration and poor health.

Mr Shorten said Labor would reinstate the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Equality Council, abolished by the Abbott Government in 2014.

Crisis support can be found at Lifeline: (13 11 14 and lifeline.org.au), the Suicide Call Back Service (1300 659 467 and suicidecallbackservice.org.au) and beyondblue (1300 224 636 and beyondblue.org.au) Or 1 of 302 ACCHO Clinics 

NACCHO #VoteACCHO Aboriginal #Mental Health and #SuicidePrevention : For #Election2019 #AusVotesHealth Prime Minister @ScottMorrisonMP and Indigenous Health Minister @KenWyattMP  Announce a  further $42m on mental health initiatives for young and some for Indigenous Australians

Young Indigenous people face many barriers to accessing healthcare including finding services that are safe and tailored to meet their needs.

This work will help change the way we deliver general mental health services so they draw on the value of culture, community and country to enrich the care provided to our First Nations people ”  

 Indigenous Health minister, Ken Wyatt. See extensive FACT SHEETS Part 2 below

“Our government will do  whatever it takes and whatever we can to break the curse of youth suicide in our country and ensure young people get the support they need”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison

Read over 130 Aboriginal Health and Suicide Prevention articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years  

Read over 200 Aboriginal Mental Health articles published by NACCHO over the past 7 years 

Visit our NACCHO #VoteACCHO Election Campaign page HERE 

#VoteACCHO Recommendation 4.

The incoming Federal Government must invest in ACCHOs, so we can address youth suicide

Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities.

  • Fund new Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management.
  • Fund regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance.
  • Provide accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

#VoteACCHO Recommendation 6.

The incoming Federal Government must allocate Indigenous specific health funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.

● Transfer the funding for Indigenous specific programs from Primary Health Networks to ACCHOs.

● Primary Health Networks assign ACCHOs as preferred providers for other Australian Government funded services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples unless it can be shown that alternative arrangements can produce better outcomes in quality of care and access to services.

Part 1 : Coalition vows to ‘break the curse of youth suicide’ with mental health package

The Coalition has pledged a further $42m on mental health initiatives for young and Indigenous Australians, on top of $461m in the budget for mental health and suicide prevention.

Extracts from The Guardian

Of the new funding, $22.5m will be spent on research grants to help find better treatments for mental health problems and $19.6m on the Indigenous advancement strategy to prevent suicide, particularly in the Kimberley.

In the first three months of this year, there were at least 35 suicides among Indigenous people, three of whom were only 12 years old.

The findings of an inquest into 13 suicides among young Aboriginal people in the Kimberley, handed down in February, found that crushing intergenerational trauma and poverty, including from the harmful effect of colonisation and loss of culture, were to blame.

The Morrison government has made “securing essential services” central to its re-election pitch, using its projection of a surplus in 2019-20 and perceived strength of economic management to pre-empt Labor attacks that it is not spending enough on health and other social causes.

Labor is promising to not only build bigger budget surpluses but also outspend the Coalition in health, beginning with its $2.3bn cancer package that it announced in the budget reply.

The research component of the Coalition’s mental health package has been allocated to a series of grants, including about emergency department management of acute mental health crises and culturally appropriate mental healthcare for Indigenous Australians.

Past 2 #VoteACCHO

1. Indigenous Mental Health and Suicide Prevention

  • The rate of suicide among Australians, particularly young First Australians is one of the most heartbreaking challenges we face as a country.
  • We have provided $88.8 million for Indigenous-specific mental health services, as well as local, culturally-safe mental health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders through our $1.45 billion investment in PHNs.
  • The Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt MP, has championed new measures to address Indigenous suicide prevention measures. Under the Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan the Morrison McCormack Government is providing $14.5 million to support Indigenous leadership to help our health care system provide culturally safe and appropriate care, as well as new funding to enable young Indigenous people to participate in place-based cultural programs; build a centre of excellence in childhood wellness; and adapt psychological treatments to meet the needs of Indigenous Australians.
  • The Morrison McCormack Government is also making a new $19.6 million investment through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy to prevent Indigenous youth suicide, particularly in the Kimberley. This new $19.6 million investment will help build resilience and leadership skills in at-risk communities and provide new pathways for engagement, including some which the Kimberley Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Forum told us are needed to support fellow young people.

2. Mental Health

  • The mental health of Australians is a priority for the Morrison McCormack Government.
  • One in five people in Australia experience a common mental disorder each year. Nearly half of the Australian population will experience mental illness at some point in their lives, but less than half will access treatment.
  • We are doing more than any other previous government to safeguard the mental wellbeing of Australians, providing record funding of $4.8 billion in 2018-19.
  • We are delivering more frontline services that meet the specific needs of local communities through a record $1.45 billion investment in our Primary Health Networks. We are providing long-term support for local psychologists, mental health nurses, and social workers, ensuring that the right services are available in the right place and at the right time.
  • We have expanded the headspace network, boosted headspace services, and established the Mental Health in Education Initiative with Beyond Blue to provide young Australians with additional help and support.
  • We have pioneered Medicare telehealth services allowing Australians in rural areas to access care from their homes. We have also expanded free or low-cost digital services, accessible through our new head to health portal to cater for those who prefer to access support online.
  • We have been the first to fully recognise the need for intensive support for Australians with eating disorders – the deadliest of all psychiatric illnesses – by creating specific Medicare funded services, a National Helpline, and providing $70.2 million for new residential treatment centres.
  • We have introduced key reforms such as a Productivity Commission Inquiry into Mental Health, changes to private health insurance, and innovative models of care such as the $114.5 million trial of 8 mental health centres.
  • Investing in mental health and suicide prevention is not a choice, it is a must.
  • The Liberal and Nationals Government’s track record in delivering a strong economy ensures we can invest in essential services such as youth mental health and suicide prevention services.

3.Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention

  • The tragedy of suicide touches far too many Australian families. Suicide is the leading cause of death of our young people – accounting for one-third of deaths of Australians aged 15-24.
  • The Government will provide $503.1 million for a Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan to prevent suicide and promote the mental wellbeing of young Australians. This represents the single largest investment in youth suicide prevention in the country’s history.
  • We are prioritising three key areas as our nation’s best protection against suicide – strengthening the headspace network, Indigenous suicide prevention and early childhood and parenting support.
  • We will ensure young people get help where and when needed by investing an additional $375 million to expand and improve the headspace network. headspace provides youth-friendly services for the challenges facing young Australians: across physical health, alcohol and other drug use, vocational support and mental health.
  • To strengthen Indigenous youth suicide prevention, we will invest $34.1 million including support for Indigenous leadership that will help our health care system deliver culturally appropriate, trauma-informed care as well as services that recognise the value of community, cultural artistic traditions and protective social factors. Out support includes $19.6 million for measures to prevent Indigenous youth suicide, particularly in the Kimberley.
  • To support parents and their children we will invest $11.8 million in a range of initiatives to help parents recognise when their children are struggling, improve mental health skills training in schools, enhance peer support networks and boost counselling support services for young people.
  • We are also providing an additional $22.5 million in specific youth and Indigenous health research projects as part of our $125 million ‘Million Minds Mission’.
  • The Liberal and Nationals Government established this ten-year $125 million Mission through the Medical Research Future Fund. It will unlock key research into the cause of mental health as well as better treatments and therapies.
  • For Australians living in rural and regional we are ensuring that services are available where they are most needed by establishing more than 20 new headspace sites in rural and regional Australia, and by providing new mental health telehealth services funded through Medicare.
  • .

Natural Disasters

  • We are also addressing the mental health needs of those affected by natural disasters through:
    • $5.5 million for additional mental health services in Victoria, Queensland and Tasmania. This includes Medicare items for GPs to provide telehealth services to flood affected communities in Queensland.
    • $21.9 million for the Empowering our Communitiesinitiative to support community-led mental health programmes in nine drought-affected Primary Health Network regions.

Background

Mental Health Facts

  • One in five Australians aged 16 to 85 experiences a common mental illness (e.g. anxiety disorder, depression) in any year; nearly half (45 per cent) of all Australians will experience a mental health problem over the course of their lives. In 2016, one in seven children aged 4 to 17 years was assessed as having a mental health disorder in the previous 12 months.
  • Approximately 730,000 Australians experience severe mental health disorders. Another 4-6 per cent of the population (about 1.5 million people) are estimated to have a moderate disorder and a further 9-12 per cent (about 2.9 million people) a mild disorder.
  • Mental illness costs the Australian economy over $60 billion per year (around four per cent of Gross Domestic Product).

Suicide and Self-harm Facts

  • In 2017, 3,128 people died from intentional self-harm (12.6 deaths per 100,000 people), rising 9.1% from 2,866 in 2016. The 2017 rate is on par with 2015 as the highest recorded rate of suicide in the past 10 years. Most states saw an increase in their suicide rates, with Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory experiencing the largest rises. However, there were declines in Tasmania, South Australia and Victoria.
  • Suicide remained the leading cause of death among people aged between 15-44 years, and the second leading cause of death among those 45-54 years of age.
  • While intentional self-harm accounts for a relatively small proportion (1.9 per cent) of all deaths in Australia, it accounts for a higher proportion of deaths among younger people (36 per cent of deaths among people aged 15 to 24).

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health launches its #VoteACCHO campaign for #Election2019 calling on all political parties to include these TOP 10 policy recommendations in their #AusVotesHealth election platforms

“ Welcome to the launch of our NACCHO #Election2019 #VoteACCHO campaign for Affiliates, ACCHO members, stakeholders and supporters.

 The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is not a partisan political issue and cannot be sidelined any longer.

NACCHO has developed a set of 10 policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable. ” 

Donnella Mills Acting Chair NACCHO

See NACCHO Press Release Aboriginal Health needs to be an Election Priority

For more information about our NACCHO #Election2019 goals and how to get involved, visit over the next five weeks our #VoteACCHO campaign website :

For campaign assistance or feedback contact Email Colin Cowell 

www.naccho.org.au/VoteACCHO

Contents of this NACCHO #VoteACCHO Campaign Communique

1.What can stakeholders and supporters do to support our #VoteACCHO campaign ?

2.What can NACCHO 8 Affiliates /145 Members do to support our #VoteACCHO campaign ?

3.What are the TOP 10 recommendations that all political parties must include in their election platforms and make a real commitment to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

4.Summary all major parties Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policies

1.What can stakeholders and supporters do to support our #VoteACCHO campaign ?

See your #VoteACCHO Page Here

  1. Make sure that you and all of your community members, family and friends are enrolled to voteby 8pm local time Thursday 18 April 2019.
  2. Follow NACCHO on Twitter Instagram Facebook.
  3. Sign up to the NACCHO Communiqueand receive all #VoteACCHO press releases and social media graphics that will be released throughout the campaign.
  4. Use the following hashtags on social media during the run-up to the election – #VoteACCHO|Plus #auspol | #NACCHOAustralia | #ACCHOS | #IndigenousHealth | #ClosingTheGap | #AusVotesHealth
  1. Share on Social Media NACCHO’s Recommendations for the Election 2019
  2. Call, write or tag on Social Media your local MP and all candidates in your electorate.

2.What can NACCHO 8 Affiliates and 145 Members do support our #VoteACCHO campaign

See your #VoteACCHO Page Here

Noting all Affiliate and Members will be sent by email additional resources

3.What are the TOP 10 recommendations that all political parties must  include in their election platforms and make a real commitment to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Download the NACCHO Press Release HERE

and PDF Copy of these recommendations HERE

The proposals are:

1. Increase base funding of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations

  • Increase the baseline funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations to support the sustainable delivery of high quality, comprehensive primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.
  • Work together with NACCHO and its State Affiliates to agree to a new formula for the distribution of comprehensive primary health care funding that is relative to need.

2.Increase funding for capital works and infrastructure upgrades

  • Increase funding allocated through the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme for:
    • capital works and infrastructure upgrades, and
    • Telehealth services.
  • Around $500 million is likely to be needed to address unmet needs.

3.End rheumatic heart disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

  • Support END RHD’s proposal for $170 million over four years to integrate prevention and control levels within 15 rural and remote communities across the country.
  • END RHD is a national contingent of peak bodies committed to reducing the burden of RHD for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia and NACCHO is a co-chair. Rheumatic heart disease is a preventable cause of heart failure, death and disability that is the single biggest cause of disparity in cardiovascular disease burden between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians

4.Address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide rates

  • Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities:
    • New Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management
    • Regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance; and
    • Accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

5.Improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander housing and community infrastructure

  • Expand the funding and timeframe of the current National Partnership on Remote Housing to match at least that of the former National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing.
  • Establish and fund a program that supports low cost social housing and healthy living environments in urban, regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

6.Allocate Indigenous specific health funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations

  • Transfer the funding for Indigenous specific programs from Primary Health Networks to ACCHOs.
  • Primary Health Networks assign ACCHOs as preferred providers for other Australian Government funded services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples unless it can be shown that alternative arrangements can produce better outcomes in quality of care and access to services

7.Expand the range and number of MBS payments for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce

  • Provide access to an increased range and number of Medicare items for Aboriginal health workers, Aboriginal health practitioners and allied health workers.

8. Improve the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs

  • Expand the authority to write Close the Gap scripts for all prescribers.
  • Simplify the Close the Gap registration process and expand who may register clients.
  • Link medicines subsidy to individual clients and not practices through a national identifier.
  • Improve how remote clients can receive fully subsidized medicines in non-remote areas.
  • Integrate the QUMAX and s100 Support programs into one unified program.

9.Fund Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations to deliver dental services

  • Establish a fund to support ACCHOs deliver culturally safe dental services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • Allocate Indigenous dental health funding to cover costs associated with staffing and infrastructure requirements.

10.Aboriginal health workforce

  • Increased support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and increased support for workforce for the ACCHO sector which includes the non-Indigenous health professionals on which ACCHOs rely
  • Develop an Aboriginal Employment Strategy for the ACCHS sector

For more information about our Election goals and how to get involved, visit: www.naccho.org.au/VoteACCHO

4.Summary all major parties Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policies

To be updated HERE daily throughout the Campaign 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NACCHO Members #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #VoteACCHO #NSW Werin# NT Ampilatwatja @DanilaDilba #VIC MDAS #QLD @Apunipima @QAIHC_QLD Nhulandu #WA Wirraka Maya SWAMS #SA Nunkuwarrin Yunti #TAS

1.1 National : NACCHO to launch #VoteACCHO campaign to emphasis that Aboriginal health should be an election priority for all parties  

1.2 National : More support to the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector is needed to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples access to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

2. NSW : Werin ACCHO Port Macquarie says the 2019 Elders Olympics were the best ever

3.VIC :THE focus was firmly on health at Mallee District Aboriginal Service’s Close the Gap event

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Australian Indigenous Basketball (AIB) All Stars Women’s national team have produced a perfect run to win the International Indigenous and Cultural Basketball Tournament held last week in Porirua, New Zealand.

4.2 QLD : Nhulundu Health Service ACCHO Gladstone hosts the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) CEO Mr Neil Willmett

5. SA : Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO attended the National Tackling Indigenous Smoking Conference in Alice Springs last week 

6.1 WA : Wirraka Maya ACCHO  Transition into Adulthood (TTA) Team have organised for World Champion Boxers, Todd Kidd and Gregory Eadie to join the team this week.

6.2 WA : SWAMS ACCHO staff member recognised for their outstanding service to SWAMS and the community

7.1 NT : Community celebrates opening of new Ampilatwatja ACCHO Health Centre

7.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO participate in Stars Foundation Softball Event 

8. TAS : Dr Tanya Schramm, a GP, Palawa woman and lecturer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health at the University of Tasmania, as she spoke to newsGP on National Close the Gap Day this year.

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1  NACCHO to launch #VoteACCHO campaign to emphasis that Aboriginal health should be an election priority for all parties  

With the election being called on 18 May, the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) will be urging all candidates, regardless of party or political leanings to prioritise the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities.

NACCHO will be asking all  politicians to support 10 key recommendations ahead of the election on 18 May :

You will be able to download #VoteACCHO campaign resources from the NACCHO Website ( From Monday  15 April )

Check our NACCHO #VoteACCHO Edition Monday for full details

1.2 More support to the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector is needed to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples access to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

“The government needs to support all ACCHOs to deliver culturally appropriate NDIS services so that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with disability right across the country people are not left out

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are missing out and the NDIS model needs to be adjusted to ensure equity of access. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to fully participate, the solution is found in properly supporting ACCHOs that chose to deliver NDIS services.

We know that ACCHOs are an essential component of successful delivery of the NDIS to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. The evidence is clear that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders access services where they feel culturally safe and when supported properly, and ACCHOs are best positioned to meet this need.

Our communities are disproportionately affected by disability and there is a great need for culturally appropriate disability support services close to where our people live,”

NACCHO Acting Chair Donnella Mills says NACCHO welcomes the announcement of $4.5 million to support Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS) in the Kimberley, Pilbara and Goldfields to deliver two programs to improve awareness and access to the NDIS.

Read and or DOWNLOAD the full NACCHO Press Release HERE

Read over articles Aboriginal Health and NDIS published over past 7 years

2.1 NSW : Werin ACCHO Port Macquarie says the 2019 Elders Olympics were the best ever.

The Elders Olympics is more about a mob coming together with the idea of promoting and talking about better health outcomes.

This is about improving the health standards of the Aboriginal community, particularly the Elders, which is very important to us.

This event aims to promote health and well being, getting outside and having some fun.

“There are no running events as such, but there are plenty of skill games.

Organiser Cindy O’Brien-Younie

Originally published HERE

 

The event was held at Port Macquarie’s Stuarts Park on Thursday April 11. Organised by the Werin Aboriginal Elders team, representing their auspicing body Werin Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre, 519 competitors and support workers participated on the day.

There was also plenty of spectators on hand to soak up the atmosphere.

The 36 teams were from across NSW including Werris Creek, Moree, Blue Mountains, St Marys, and north to Ballina.

There are no running events as such, but there are plenty of skill games.

Since winning the 2018 event, and therefore laying claim to hosting the following year’s event, Cindy and fellow organiser – and sister – Gloria O’Brien-Rudyk have been working tirelessly behind the scenes.

Cindy says two major sponsors came onboard in the past week or two which the organising committee was “very grateful for”.

“There is an organising committee behind this event and we have done really well in getting this event happening,” she said.

She said the final week leading into the event had tested their nerves.

“It was very tough and sometimes difficult but we learnt some new lessons about delegation,” she admitted.

“But when you see the beautiful bright colours of everyone’s shirts and hearing the mob say how wonderful this event is and the best they’ve attended, it is all worth it.

“The other major reason behind the success of this year’s event is the support of many schools, CSU, area health, TAFE, colleges and the Port Macquarie Chamber of Commerce.”

Wauchope Men’s Shed donated several items for raffle prizes, which is part of the fundraising effort.

Newcastle Knights provided all the footballs for the pass the ball competition along with a signed football jersey. South Sydney has also provided a signed 2014 football, which will be offered as part of the fundraising effort.

The Aboriginal Elders Olympics follows the strategic Close the Gap initiative designed to bridge the gap between health in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities

3.1 VIC :THE focus was firmly on health at Mallee District Aboriginal Service’s Close the Gap event

Health checks, giveaway bags and an all-day barbecue were present throughout the day while local staff engaged with community members.

Celebrated nationwide and now in its 10th year, Close the Gap day aims to improve health outcomes for Aboriginals.

From HERE

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Australian Indigenous Basketball (AIB) All Stars Women’s national team have produced a perfect run to win the International Indigenous and Cultural Basketball Tournament held last week in Porirua, New Zealand.

PORIRUA, NEW ZEALAND – The Apunipima Australian Indigenous Basketball (AIB) All Stars Women’s national team have produced a perfect run to win the International Indigenous and Cultural Basketball Tournament held last week in Porirua, New Zealand.

The All Stars downed the Kingdom of Hawaii 91-90, in a thrilling championship finale, the victory securing the first-ever international gold medal for an Australian Indigenous Basketball women’s
representative side.

Prior to defeating the Kingdom of Hawaii by one-point in the double-overtime decider, the All Stars also displayed their dominance in preliminary round matches, taking down Ngati Toa (New Zealand) 82-75, Raukawa Invitational (New Zealand) 80-58, and Hawaii 90-86. Read More

4.2 QLD : Nhulundu Health Service ACCHO Gladstone hosts the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) CEO Mr Neil Willmett

At Nhulundu Health Service – Gladstone. Pictured (left to right): Neil Willmett, Lee-ann Dudley (Chairperson), Jenny Kerr (Clinical Practice Manager) and Matthew Cooke (NHS-CEO)

5. SA : Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO attended the National Tackling Indigenous Smoking Conference in Alice Springs last week 

6.1 WA : Wirraka Maya ACCHO  Transition into Adulthood (TTA) Team have organised for World Champion Boxers, Todd Kidd and Gregory Eadie to join the team this week.

They are here to support the final week of the Box Fit program for Term 1, of the academic school year.

Box Fit has taken place every Tuesday and Thursday of school term 1, which has encouraged resilience and athletic focus for students aged between 12 and 17.

The team have been conducting workshops in South Hedland High and Strelley Community School, interacting with the students and teaching the basics of Boxing techniques.

Don’t miss the Big night, tomorrow Friday the 13th. Join us at the JD Hardie Youth Zone, for the Boxing Exhibition Night. The event is open to all the public, starting from 6pm to 9:30pm. We hope to see you there.

6.2 WA : SWAMS ACCHO staff member recognised for their outstanding service to SWAMS and the community

Congratulations to SWAMS staff member Amanda Wallam and South West Elder, Mr Dennis Jetta who were recognised for their outstanding service to SWAMS and the community at the recent AHCWA conference.

Pictured: AHCWA Award recipients

7.1 NT : Community celebrates opening of new Ampilatwatja ACCHO Health Centre

Local Federal Member Warren Snowdon and Senator Patrick Dodson attended the opening with John Paterson CEO AMSANT and Donna Ah Chee CEO Congress

In the 1970s the large cattle station of Utopia was handed back to the traditional owners on a land buy-back scheme. This area was then governed by the Utopia/ Urapunga Council. In the 1990s the traditional owners of the Ampilatwatja area of this land sought and established their own distinct council and land boundaries. The local governing body is the Aherrenge Association Incorporated.

Ampilatwatja is the largest of three communities under the Aherrenge Association. It is located 320 km north-east of Alice Springs via the Plenty and Sandover Highways. The people of Ampilatwatja form part of the Alyawarr tribe. There are a number of out-stations, the main ones being Irrultja and Atnwengerrp.

The population of remote Aboriginal communities is subject to a large degree of fluctuation with movements related to cultural practices, logistical issues such as needing to access health care services, sporting weekends and so on. The ABS 2001 census of population for Ampilatwatja and outstations was 468 residents. The September 2005 census was 540 residents. Approximately 150 residents live on the outstations.

Ampilatwatja has a 24 hour dirt airstrip for mail delivery and RFDS medical evacuations. There are no routine passenger service flights to the community and the airstrip closes with heavy rains.

Read more about the Ampilatwatja Health Service HERE

Ampilatwatja is a dry community with no alcohol permit system and this bylaw is very strictly enforced by community. There is one community store which is in close contact with the health team and does not sell deep fried takeaway foods. There are no petrol sniffers in the community.

Ampilatwatja has a school which operates on an ESL teaching model with children split into 2 groups, junior and senior.

7.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO participate in Stars Foundation Softball Event 

Is was amazing seeing our young women show great sportsmanship and leadership qualities on the day.

8. TAS : Dr Tanya Schramm, a GP, Palawa woman and lecturer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health at the University of Tasmania, as she spoke to newsGP on National Close the Gap Day this year.


Dr Tanya Schramm and Dr Tim Senior participate in a Q&A about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health on National Closing the Gap Day.

Boosting cultural respect in mainstream health services

FROM GP NEWS

Researchers have designed an intervention to help make mainstream general practice more accessible to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

Obviously the gap isn’t really closing, so that’s a pretty obvious indication that we’ve got to do a lot more. And, as primary healthcare, we’re the first port of call.’

That is Dr Tanya Schramm, a GP, Palawa woman and lecturer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health at the University of Tasmania, as she spoke to newsGP on National Close the Gap Day this year.

According to Dr Schramm, cultural safety and respect is a vital part of the effort to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander access to primary healthcare.

‘If we, as Aboriginal people, are coming to a mainstream general practice, we should be able to expect culturally respectful and safe healthcare to the same standard we could receive at to the Aboriginal Health Service [AMS],’ she said.

‘It’s not as simple as just popping up a couple of flags and a bit of artwork in your waiting room. [Practices] need to go in behind that and make sure that they are providing culturally safe consultations within that context.’

The desire to make mainstream primary healthcare more accessible for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is the motivation behind research recently published in the Medical journal of Australia, ‘Cultural respect in general practice: A cluster randomised control trial’.

Professor Siaw-Teng Liaw, lead author and Professor of General Practice at the University of New South Wales, believes addressing this issue is vital because many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may not actually have access to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations [ACCHOs].

‘A substantial number [of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people] live in urban areas – and that is a substantial number of Aboriginal people who should be better resourced,’ he told newsGP.

‘Because, when we look at the statistics for AMS and ACCHOs, there are relatively less in urban areas compared to rural and remote.

‘So we feel urban Aboriginal people are not as well looked after.’

Dr Tim Senior, Medical Advisor for RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, agrees more needs to be done to improve experiences within the mainstream.

‘Every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisation tells us there are still too many Indigenous Australians experiencing racism in the health system,’ he told newsGP.

‘Many Aboriginal people expect they will have a bad experience in health services because they have usually had bad experiences in the past – there are many reasons why Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may not want to attend our practices, and may not want to take our advice when they do.’

In order to help prevent further such experiences, Professor Liaw and his team created, in extensive consultation with the Aboriginal community, a toolkit to assist mainstream practices to provide culturally respectful care.

The researchers then conducted a randomised controlled trial over a 12-month period involving selected practices in Sydney and Melbourne, with some receiving the toolkit plus additional training and support.

‘We ran a half-day workshop [during which] the practice staff were taken through the toolkit and a background of Aboriginal history and dispossession,’ Professor Liaw explained.

‘At that workshop, they were introduced to the cultural mentors, who we recruited in each state to be available to the practice for a year to help them implement some of the things in the toolkit. The mentor was then available through an online discussion group or by phone number.

‘The other part of the intervention was at the PHN [Primary Health Network] level, which at that time was the Medicare Local, which we encouraged to form a care partnership with the local ACCHO.

‘So once we got the toolkit, the workshop and the cultural mentor in place, we implemented it as best as we could, and collected the data at baseline and compared it at 12 months.’

Professor Liaw and his team found the trial practices were extremely receptive to and engaged with the program, and that patients also had a positive experience of it.

‘We collected qualitative information from the practices and Aboriginal patients nominated by them, and the output was really positive from their perspective. Most of [the practices] wanted to continue with it,’ he said.

‘After we finished the trial, we also ran the workshops with the control practices, and they were all very keen as well.’

But despite these encouraging results, analysis revealed that quantitative outcomes – which were measured by the number of Aboriginal health checks carried out and recording of clinical risk factors such as cardiovascular, weight and blood sugar – did not differ significantly between participating and control practices.

While Professor Liaw was disappointed with these results, he also acknowledges the issues the researchers are trying to tackle may simply require more time to show significant change.

‘This is a complex intervention and to translate the toolkit, workshops and the cultural mentor suggestions into an organisational thing will probably require more than 12 months, because it might take a while to come to grips with it, and then work out a protocol to do it,’ he said.

However, another positive development has resulted from the research: buy-in from a participating PHN, which also means the research team can continue to monitor results on a much larger scale.

‘One of the PHNs involved in the study in Sydney is happy to roll it out,’ Professor Liaw said.

‘So we’re going to roll it out in one of the local government areas, and we will follow through what happened to the ones that participated in the trial, and also with this one, in the longer term. And then if they get more funding, we’ll roll it out to other local government areas, as well.’

Dr Senior is pleased with this news and is hopeful it is a signal of further engagement from PHNs with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

‘The cultural respect program in this research may be a useful framework for PHNs, but the most crucial step will be for them to work on developing and enhancing true partnerships with their local Aboriginal communities, and local ACCHOs,’ he said.

‘It’s this local community engagement that will be crucial, and if the cultural respect program can be used in this context, then they may have some successes.’

Meanwhile, Professor Liaw and his team have been happy with the study’s results in terms of increasing cultural knowledge and respect within practices, and are hoping for improved quantitative results, as well, with a view to the long game.

‘We plan to do some interviews in about 12 months and see whether there’s any longer term changes,’ he said.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts to #CloseTheGap : Features Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO SA Mamu ACCHO QLD #Doctors incl Yerin ACCHO #NSW Bega Garnbirringu Health Service @WinnungaACCHO #Sunrise ACCHO NT @MenziesResearch Plus ACCHO’s in #NT #NSW #SA #WA #QLD #ACT #TAS #VIC

Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

 ACCHO Workforce Scholarship NEWS

Lowitja are offering 16 full bursaries

SCHOLARSHIPS CLOSING APRIL 12 – IAHA and the RFDS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Scholarship.

1.1 Job/s of the week 

2.Queensland

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

7.3 Katungul ACCHO 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1. ACCHO Workforce Scholarship News : 

Lowitja are offering 16 full bursaries

The 2019 Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference is offering bursaries to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and community members to attend the conference.

There are two types of bursaries available. We are offering 16 full bursaries, which cover:

  • Full Conference registration, including the Welcoming Ceremony and Conference dinner
  • Domestic flights (economy) to Darwin
  • 3 nights accommodation (incl. breakfast) for those travelling from interstate
  • 4 nights accommodation (incl. breakfast) for those travelling from a remote area

We also offer conference attendance bursaries.

These cover costs up to the amount of AU$2000.

We will be asking bursary recipients to assist with some conference duties, and to be available for media and promotional activities during the event.

Who can apply:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students currently enrolled in a course or discipline related to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing (including VET, undergraduate, Masters or PhD) and
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members currently employed in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation, in the health and community service sector in Australia.

Selection criteria:

  • Eligible Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander current student or community person working in the sector
  • Benefit to studies and/or organisation has been demonstrated
  • Plans to further and/or share knowledge gained at the conference has been demonstrated
  • Applicant has demonstrated that they are an emerging leader in their environment
  • A reference has been submitted supporting the application.

How to apply:

  • Complete the application form below before midnight Friday 12 April 2019.
SCHOLARSHIPS CLOSING APRIL 12 – IAHA and the RFDS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Scholarship.
JCU Centre for Rural and Remote Health, Mount Isa (MICRRH) and IAHA Student Placement Scholarship Closing 12 April

Contact admin@iaha.com.au for more info

1.1 Jobs of the week 

Operations Support Coordinator – Sunrise Health Service

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation now has a great opportunity for an Operations Support Coordinator to join their team. This is a full-time role on a 9-month maternity leave contract, commencing in late May.

This role will see you responsible for organising core administrative and operational services for the Primary Health Care (PHC) branch and providing administrative support to the Director of Primary Health Care, Director of Public Health and Planning and other key stakeholders and departments as required.

More specifically, your day-to-day duties may include (but will not be limited to):

  • Overseeing the logistics for locum PHC staff placements to cover leave and vacancies as required;
  • Supporting and overseeing the SHSAC Travel Coordinator;
  • Providing procurement support for key clinical consumables including point of care testing;
  • Assisting and supporting the PHC Managers with local recruitment processes;
  • Coordinating and facilitating meetings, workshops and planning days; and
  • Assisting with Medical Records Requests from external stakeholders.

About the Benefits

This is a fantastic opportunity for an individual looking to grow and develop their experience by working for this fantastic health organisation!

You will receive an attractive salary circa $82,248 – $86,533 (commensurate with skills and experience) plus super and relocation assistance may also be negotiable for the right person.

Additional benefits include:

  • 6 weeks leave per year;
  • Up to 10 days of study leave;
  • Access to company vehicle for work-related travel;
  • Laptop and Phone;
  • Accommodation for any overnight stays while working in the communities;
  • Salary packaging options up to $15,899 per year.

Working at Sunrise Health Service and living in the Katherine region has lifestyle benefits that are unique to the Northern Territory. With Australia’s most stunning landscapes on your doorstep and an incredible outdoor lifestyle on offer, the Northern Territory is the place to be to make the most of life’s adventures.

About the Organisation

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (SHSAC) provides comprehensive primary health care services through nine remote health centres to some 4000-people living in the Katherine East region.

They value their people and are committed to providing culturally respectful holistic health programs blending traditional healing practices with current evidence-based practice to address physical, social, emotional and cultural well-being.

If you are a bright and enthusiastic individual who loves taking on new challenges and developing your existing skillset, don’t wait – Apply Now!

To read more & submit your application, click here.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO Adelaide :

  1. Social & Emotional Wellbeing Counsellors
  2. Health Marketing and Communications Officer

Social & Emotional Wellbeing Counsellors

  • Rare opportunity to join a prominent community program reuniting Aboriginal families
  • 2 On-going full time positions
  • Competitive remuneration circa $69,255 – $73,817 per annum + super + salary sacrificing options
  • Positions based in the Mid North Yorke Peninsula region
We encourage you to circulate this email through your networks and welcome and referrals you may have.

About Nunkuwarrin Yunti

Nunkuwarrin Yunti, the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and wellbeing of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their families in the greater metropolitan areas of Adelaide and regional areas to advance their social, cultural and economic status. The Organisation places a strong focus on a client centered approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for clients.

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti has an exciting opportunity for two (2) Counsellors to join their Link-Up team.

Your primary purpose will be to provide social and emotional wellbeing counselling services and group interventions to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in order to facilitate healing and improvements in wellbeing. This will be achieved through:

·        Provision of therapeutic counselling services to individuals, families and groups;

·        Maintaining working relationships with community groups, organisations and agencies;

·        Establishing a referral network of professional counsellors, traditional healers and relevant health professionals;

·        Assisting in the planning, development, implementation and promotion of services which enhance the coping capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and individuals and which ensure that services are delivered in a culturally safe manner;

·        Provide education/awareness presentations to the wider community in relation to social and emotional wellbeing services and improvements for Aboriginal people and community

To deliver key program components some out-of-hours work and travel will be required.

About You

Ideally you will have a minimum of a Diploma in Narrative Approaches, Counselling or Mental Health or similarly relevant field you will possess previous counselling experience with the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander community.

You will have an understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues, as well as those issues relating to individuals who have been removed from their families and communities, either through forcible removal and institutionalisation, fostering, and/or adoption. This should include a knowledge of relevant therapeutic models of intervention and trauma informed perspectives. A background in individual and group counselling services, along with the ability to manage a complex client caseload is essential; as too is the ability to coordinate and facilitate group workshops.

Due to the nature of this role, applicants from an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background are encouraged to apply.

Please note: A current SA Driver’s Licence and the ability to drive in the course of work activities is a requirement of this role. Employment will also be subject to a National Police Clearance.

Please click here to view a full position description.

For further information or any queries, please contact Rick Hartman, Manager – Link-Up on (08) 8406 1600 or email ricardoh@nunku.org.au

Application is to be emailed to Human Resources hr@nunku.org.au

Please note applications close by COB 19 April 2019.

Please include your CV and a cover letter addressing the following:

1.     Please outline your experience in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and families.

 

 

Health Marketing and Communications Officer

  • Implement and evaluate local health marketing campaigns to achieve improvements in health.
  • Lead the organisation in improvements in key communication channels
  • On-going, full-time position (1.0FTE)
  • Competitive remuneration of $68,528.46 per annum + super + salary sacrificing options

We encourage you to circulate this email through your networks and welcome and referrals you may have.

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is seeking interest from an experienced individual to work effectively with the organisation to identify and implement marketing and communication activities that will effectively promote the organisation and services and support local design and evaluation of health promotion campaigns.

The position is located within the Community Health Promotion and Education Unit and will be based inWakefield St, Adelaide and report directly to the unit manager.

About you

The successful candidate will bring:

•         Qualifications in a relevant area such as marketing & promotion or communication or associated field

•         Experience in designing and implementing campaigns that promote services and community engagement

•         An understanding of Primary Heath care approaches to health.

•         A strong understanding and knowledge of social, health and cultural issues affecting the Aboriginal and Torres Islander population in Adelaide and the greater metropolitan region.

For further information and job description, please visithttps://nunku.org.au/working-with-us/current-vacancies/or contact Eva Pratt, Manager Community Health Promotion and Education on (08) 8406 1605 or emailevap@nunku.org.au

To Apply

Please include your CV and a cover letter of no more than two (2) pages addressing the following:

  1. Please outline your experience in the designing and implementing health campaigns that promote services, community engagement and empowerment
  2. Please outline your experience in social media communications, online communications and website content management systems

Please forward your Cover Letter, current CV and completed application form to hr@nunku.org.au  

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates are strongly encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5:00 Monday 29th April 2019 Adelaide time.

Yerin ACCHO General Practitioner opportunities


Download Yerin info PDF Here

Yerin_JobAd_GP_Apr_2019

Senior Medical Officer  Bega Garnbirringu Health Service.

Download PDF HERE

Senior Medical Officer (1)

Closing date, Tuesday, 30th April 2019; 4.30pm.

More Info

Doctors wanted for Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services is a community controlled health service providing holistic health care to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the ACT and surrounding areas. The Service manages various programs and employs more than 70 staff. Employees enjoy attractive remuneration, salary sacrificing, support of continuing professional education, satisfying work in a proven multidisciplinary team environment.

General Practitioners

The role of the GP is to enhance the clinical services offered at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services. The aim of the clinical services team is to optimise the health outcomes for clients through providing best practice, evidence based clinical services and where appropriate to identify where a client requires referral to another team of the service or an external service provider.

Are you a Doctor who is passionate about Aboriginal Health and playing the part to close the gap in health between mainstream and Aboriginal Australia?

If you are, then opportunities exist at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health & Community Services for permanent part time General Practitioners to work 5days/week either between the hours of 9.00am to 1.00pm or 1.00pm to 5.00pm.

Enquiries for the above positions may be directed to the CEO, Julie Tongs on 62846222 or email Julie.Tongs@winnunga.org.au

For more information and/ or a copy of the position description please call Roseanne Longford, HR Manager on 6284 6259 or email Roseanne.Longford@winnunga.org.a

All applications should be addressed and mailed to Julie Tongs, CEO

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service 63 Boolimba Crescent, Narrabundah ACT 2604 or by email to Roseanne.Longford@winnunga.org.au

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal community controlled health service providing comprehensive primary health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Innisfail and surrounding districts including Tully, Babinda and Ravenshoe.

We are recruiting to the position of Health Services Manager based at Innisfail. Your role is to provide strategic direction and leadership for the implementation and delivery of comprehensive PHC Services within Mamu Health Service Limited, strategic initiatives related to models of Primary Health Care (PHC), and strategic initiatives associated with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander PHC programs.

This position is also responsible for business planning, administration, financial management and working collaboratively as part of the Senior Management Team.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check and hold a current Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian

If you are interested please download an application package from our website on www.mamuhsl.org.au.  Applications close Friday 12th April 2019 at 5.00pm

Under section 25, of the Anti-discrimination Act 1991, there is a genuine occupational requirement of the incumbent to be of Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islander descent

AHCWA Western Australia

If you are passionate about improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Western Australia then the below opportunities may interest you.

Alcohol and Drug Counsellor (FIFO 8:2)

Organisation: Spinifex Health Service, Tjuntjuntjara, Spinifex Lands, WA
Employment Type: Full time (8:2 roster), Fixed Term 12 Month Contract with a view to extend

Remuneration: $83,562 (negotiable for the right candidate) + superannuation + salary sacrifice + annual district allowance of $4333

About the Organisation

The Spinifex Health Service (SHS) is an expanding Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Service located in the Tjuntjuntjara Community on the Spinifex Lands, 680km north-east of Kalgoorlie in the Great Victoria Desert region of Western Australia.

SHS provides a comprehensive primary health care service from the Tjuntjuntjara Clinic, servicing approximately 200 people with a strong focus on chronic disease management, child and maternal health, social & emotional well-being, aged care and Home and Community Care (HACC).

To find out more about SHS, please visit http://www.spinifexhealth.org.au

About the Opportunity

As the Drug and Alcohol Counsellor, you will assist adults and young people to make healthy lifestyle choices, particularly in relation to alcohol and drugs.

Working within a strategic plan framework informed by the Health Committee (a sub Committee of the PTAC Board) and closely with the mental health team including a visiting Psychologist, your day to day responsibilities will include (but not be limited to) the following:

  • Implementing a range of strategies and interventions that support community and client awareness of Social and Emotional Wellbeing, Mental Health and Alcohol and Drug services;
  • Providing both individual and group education sessions on positive / healthy lifestyles choices focusing on community identified issues;
  • Planning, developing, preparing, promoting and delivering education and other activities consistent with program goals for footprints for better health;
  • Providing case-management and support for clients on an as needs basis.

To be successful, you will have a qualification in counselling, psychology, social work, alcohol and drug education and mental health or a related field paired with a commitment to Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing.

You will have an understanding of the social determinants of health affecting Aboriginal people and the ability to communicate sensitively in a cross-cultural environment. Your strong interpersonal, communication and organisational skills will enable you to strengthen existing community partnerships, establish and sustain stakeholder relationships and determine priorities in order to meet agreed timelines and achieve results.

To view the full position and selection criteria please visit http://www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

About the Benefits

$83,562 (negotiable for the right candidate) + superannuation + salary sacrifice + annual district allowance of $4333

  • 8:2 FIFO roster – travel provided from Kalgoorlie to the community and back each swing
  • Accommodation and utilities (including wifi) provided at a cost of $40 per week
  • Relocation allowance (including airfares from your place of origin to the community and the cost of freighting your belongings up to the cost of 1 Pallet)
  • 4 weeks annual leave
  • At your own cost, you can bring your partner out to the community on your swing!

This position offers the opportunity to engage in a dynamic, challenging and fast-paced role where no two days are the same. You’ll be working closely with remote Aboriginal communities and making a drastic impact to the health and well-being outcomes of these communities. You’ll enjoy fantastic career progression and growth as you advance your skills, with ongoing training and support provided.

Not only this, but you’ll be working in some of the most beautiful outback regions that Australia has to offer!

To find out more about the Tjuntjuntjara Community, please visit http://www.spinifex.org.au

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close at 5pm, 15 April 2019

For more information please contact Sarah Calder on 08 9227 1631

As per section 51 of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA) SHS seeks to increase the diversity of our workforce to better meet the different needs of our clients and stakeholders and to improve equal opportunity outcomes for our employees.

VIEW all opportunities HERE 

CATSINaM Nursing and Midwife jobs in all States and Territories

The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) is the sole representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives in Australia.

CATSINaM’s primary function is to implement strategies to increase the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into nursing and midwifery professions.

Search Here by State and Territory 

Menzies : Research Program Manager

$117,691 – $136,988 pro-rata salary package (comprising gross salary $93,073 – $109,095 pro-rata, superannuation & salary packaging benefits)

Part time (0.6 FTE) contract until 30 November 2019 based in Darwin

Menzies NHMRC-funded Centre of Research Excellence in Ear and Hearing Health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children (CRE_ICHEAR) is dedicated to reducing educational and social disadvantage associated with ear disease and hearing loss, particularly in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

The Research Program Manager will:

  • Provide secretariat support to the CRE_ICHEAR Leadership Group.
  • Administer research grants and student scholarships.
  • Monitor and contribute to progress against CRE_ICHEAR objectives which include Indigenous capacity building, research outputs, research translation, stakeholder engagement and collaboration.
  • Participate in research activities such as electronic surveys, systematic reviews, evidence summaries and grant applications.
  • Review and monitor CRE_ICHEAR budgets and monitor financial status in conjunction with the Child Health Division’s Business Manager.
  • Liaise with various Corporate Services units within Menzies to meet obligations and mitigate risks.
  • Maintain the CRE_ICHEAR website, Facebook page and Twitter accounts and work with the Menzies Communications team to promote CRE activities.

The successful applicant will have:

  • Tertiary qualifications in a health or related field, along with relevant work experience.
  • High level oral and written communication skills in preparing and publishing high quality reports, reviews and grant applications.
  • Ability to identify, build and maintain networks and relationships.
  • Demonstrated qualities in integrity, ability to work cross-culturally, resourcefulness, initiative in the delivery of service to stakeholders and a positive attitude.
  • Experience with computer software applications, in particular Microsoft Excel, Word, Power Point, Outlook and Endnote or the ability to adapt new technologies.
  • Willingness and ability to travel interstate for face to face meetings, likely one week 6-monthly.
  • Driver’s license and working with children clearance.

Contact: Prof Amanda Leach on 08 8946 8560 oramanda.leach@menzies.edu.au

Closing date:  14 April 2019

Applications should be emailed tohumanresources@menzies.edu.au and should include the following information:

  • A brief covering letter identifying the position being applied for.
  • A statement addressing the selection criteria in the position description.
  • A curriculum vitae (resume).
  • Names and contact details of three referees.

 Menzies : Research Nurse or Midwife (2 positions available)

$107,399 – $115,578 pro-rata salary package (comprising gross salary $84,184 – $91,359 pro-rata, superannuation & salary packaging benefits)

2 year part time (0.6 FTE) contract based in Darwin

The D-Kids trial was awarded funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council to determine whether daily vitamin D supplementation compared to placebo given to Indigenous Australian mothers reduces the incidence of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in the infants’ first twelve months of life.

The Research Nurse will:

  • Ensure the trial meets standards of Good Clinical Practice, including informed consent, participant eligibility assessments and adverse event monitoring.
  • Be responsible for participant recruitment, clinical data and specimen collection and follow-up visits according to the study protocol and standard operating procedures.
  • Conduct visits to participating communities in urban and remote areas via either air or road (manual 4WD) under limited supervision.

The successful applicant will have:

  • Tertiary nursing or midwifery qualification and registration with the relevant Profession Health Board Licensing Authority.
  • Understanding and knowledge of health issues affecting the wellbeing of Indigenous children in contemporary Australian society.
  • Highly developed ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing to a range of audiences.
  • Strong record keeping skills, attention to detail, problem-solving skills, resourcefulness, punctuality and a positive attitude.
  • Experience with computer software applications, in particular Microsoft Excel.
  • Willingness and ability to travel on light aircraft or 4WD to remote communities as part of a team, for up to a week at a time, twice a month.
  • The ability to maintain a current Australian driver’s license and Working with Children Clearance.

Contact: Verity Powell on 08 8946 8603 orverity.powell@menzies.edu.au

Closing date:  14 April 2019

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply

Applications should be emailed tohumanresources@menzies.edu.au and should include the following information:

  • A brief covering letter identifying the position being applied for.
  • A statement addressing the selection criteria in the position description (maximum one page)
  • A curriculum vitae (resume).
  • Names and contact details of three referees.

For information on how to apply for these positions and to obtain the Position Description and Selection Criteria please visitwww.menzies.edu.au/careers or phone 08 8946 8624. 

2.1 JOBS AT Apunipima ACCHO Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited has been providing primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for over 35 years. Our workforce has a range of professional, clinical, allied health, social emotional wellbeing and administration positions.

  • We have two sites in Cairns and a growing number of supplementary services and partnerships.
  • We have a diverse workforce of over 200 employees
  • 70 percent of our team identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people

Our team is dedicated to the Wuchopperen vision: Improving the Quality of Life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. If you would like to make a difference, and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, please apply today.

Expressions of Interest

We invite Expressions of Interest from:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Clinical Psychologists
  • Dietitians
  • Diabetes Educators
  • Exercise Physiologists
  • Medical Officers (FAACGP / FACCRM)
  • Registered Nurses
  • Midwives
  • Optometrists
  • Podiatrists
  • Speech Pathologists

In accordance with Wuchopperen’s privacy processes, we will keep your EOI on file for three months.

 Current Vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 30 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3  JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

 

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

 

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 2 POSITIONS VACANT

.

http://www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies

 

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

Check website for current Opportunities

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service (GWAHS) is an entity of Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service. GWAHS provides a culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care service for the local Aboriginal communities of western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains. GWAHS provides multidisciplinary services from sites located in Mt Druitt and Penrith.

The clinical service model includes general practitioners (GPs), Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, nursing staff, reception and transport staff. The service also offers a number of wraparound services and programs focused on child and maternal health, social and emotional wellbeing, Drug and Alcohol Support, chronic disease, as well as population health activities.

GWAHS is committed to ensuring that patients have access to and receive high quality, culturally appropriate care and services that meet the needs of local Aboriginal communities.

WEBSITE

7.3 Katungul ACCHO

Download position descriptions HERE 

8. Tasmania

 

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

University of Newcastle : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Care Services Research Assistant and Aboriginal Cultural Liaison

Newcastle, Maitland & Hunter, NSW

$67,185 to $77,936 pa (pro-rated for p/t) + super Healthcare & MedicalClinical/Medical Research

  • Travelling interstate will be required as part of this role
  • The role is based at the Hunter Medical Research Institute
  • Initially part time (0.6 FTE) for 6 months then may be renewed for full time

Work in the SISTAQUIT program contributing to trial implementation in the

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Care Services Research Assistant and Aboriginal Cultural Liaison

Faculty of Health and Medicine

School of Medicine and Public Health

Research Assistant and Aboriginal Cultural Liaison

Job Ref# 3925

About Us

At the University of Newcastle, our staff are curious. We think big, see opportunity and are open to ideas and ask why.  We share wisdom and partner with colleagues in Australia and around the globe to create an enduring impact. And we’re courageous – bold thinkers who have the confidence to take risks and to inspire change.  We attract, foster and retain remarkable professional staff who actively contribute to our reputation.  The University has an international reputation for research excellence and we continue to build on our research strengths, engagement with industry and partnering with outstanding international universities.

The Centre for Cancer Research, Innovation and Translation is a Priority Research Centre within the School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine at University of Newcastle.

Associate Professor Gillian Gould has a team that is developing interventions for Aboriginal smokers.

SISTAQUIT is a study of national importance to train health providers to deliver evidence-based care to pregnant Aboriginal women who smoke.

Is NEW for you?

This role will contribute to the cultural liaison for the cluster RCT in approximately 30 services in NSW and 4-5 other states, help set up the trial at the sites and support data collection and the on-site research facilitators.

Research activities include; Aboriginal Community consultations with ACCHS and their community members and relevant boards, site visits to ACCHS, engagement and training of Research Facilitators at ACCHS sites, site support, conducting interviews and surveys, data analysis, and the development of resources to support implementation.

What will you do?

This role will involve assistance with the cluster randomised controlled trial of the SISTAQUIT intervention in NSW and other states. The role will involve contributing to the management and trial implementation in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Care Services (ACCHS) and medical services nationally.

This role will involve travelling to sites to conduct on-site training, which includes; WA, SA, NT, QLD, VIC and NSW.  When not travelling the role is based at Hunter Medical Research Institute in Newcastle.

About you

  • Under section 31 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) female gender is a genuine occupation qualification of this role, as the position concerns predominantly sensitive Indigenous ‘women’s business’.
  • A degree in Psychology or Health with subsequent relevant experience; an equivalent combination of relevant experience and/or education/training.
  • Demonstrate success in the delivery of strengths-based initiatives and programs that are founded on positive connections, values and perspectives in the Indigenous community.

For a full job description visit https://www.newcastle.edu.au/aboutuon/jobsatuon/jobvacancies

Applications for this position will only be accepted from those with Australian residency or a valid work permit.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants are encouraged to apply.

As part of the University’s commitment to increasing Indigenous employment within its workforce, this role is a targeted Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander position. The University holds an exemption under Section 126 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) in relation to its targeted recruiting programs. Please note that both Indigenous and non-Indigenous candidates can apply, however priority will be given to Indigenous candidates who can demonstrate their Indigenous heritage by way of providing their Confirmation of Aboriginality with the completed application and successfully meet the selection criteria.

What NEW can offer?

From a flexible working environment to discounts in private health insurance and gym memberships, we offer access to a wide range of employee benefits including salary packaging. You can learn more about these at  https://www.newcastle.edu.au/aboutuon/jobsatuon/benefitsataglance

We provide opportunities for all people regardless of their background and experience, and this philosophy is reflected across all that we do.

The remuneration is from $67,185- $77,936 pa (pro-rated for part time) + 9.5% super and is commensurate with experience.

Your next steps

Click on ‘Apply for this job’. Your application will be assessed on selection criteria. Read all information about the role so you understand what is required. In addition:

  • Follow all directions and complete all necessary fields of the application; and
  • In your selection criteria demonstrate clearly how your skills and experience meet each point and should be a maximum of four pages.

Closing Date: 3 weeks

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Community Control and #Justice Health : @NACCHOChair Donnella Mills full speech at the @_PHAA_   #JusticeHealth2019 Conference #ClosingtheGap #justicereinvestment

” Given ACCHOs commitment to providing services based on community identified needs, it is not surprising, then, to learn that we are starting to address justice inequities by developing innovative partnerships with legal services.

Health justice partnerships are similar to justice reinvestment in that they target disadvantaged population groups and are community led. They differ in that funding is not explicitly linked to correctional budgets and secondly, the primary population groups targeted through these partnerships are those people at risk of poor health.[i]

Health justice partnerships in the ACCHO context address people’s fears and distrust about the justice system, by providing a culturally safe setting in which to have conversations about legal matters.

I believe that the development of collaborative, integrated service models such as Law Yarn can provide innovative and effective solutions for addressing not only the overrepresentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the justice system, but also the health gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Selected extracts from Donnella Mills Acting Chair of NACCHO keynote speaker 9 April 

See PHAA #JusticeHealth2019 Website

Aboriginal community control and justice health

A justice target has been proposed to focus government efforts towards closing the gap on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ overrepresentation in the justice system.

Discussion of the role of community leadership to address this serious issue must begin with a commitment to self-determination, community control, cultural safety and a holistic response. Aboriginal community controlled health services understand the interplays between intergenerational trauma, the social determinants of health, family violence, institutional racism and contact with the justice system.

As trusted providers within their communities, they deliver services based on community identified needs.

The presentation explores how the principles, values and beliefs underpinning the Aboriginal community controlled health service model provide the foundations for preventing and reducing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the justice system

I would like to acknowledge that the land we meet on today is the traditional lands for the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation, and that we respect their spiritual relationship with their Country.

I also acknowledge the Gadigal people as the traditional custodians of this place we now call Sydney. Their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Gadigal people today.

This is also true for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples that are here this morning. We draw on the strength of our lands, our Elders past and on the lived experience of our community members.

For those who don’t know me, I am a proud Torres Strait Islander woman with ancestral and family links to Masig and Nagir.

I thank the Public Health Association of Australia for welcoming me here so warmly. I am delighted to be here today to share ideas with you on a topic that I care so deeply about.

Scene setting

Some of you may be aware that, late last month, a Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap was signed between the Council of Australian Governments and the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies.

The agreement sets out how governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives will work together on targets, implementation and monitoring arrangements for the Close the Gap strategy.

NACCHO and almost 40 other peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander bodies negotiated the terms and conditions of this historic agreement on the understanding that when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are included and have a real say in the design and delivery of services that impact on them, the outcomes are far better. This understanding informs the premise of my presentation.

I am here to talk to you about how the principles, values and beliefs underpinning the Aboriginal community controlled service model provide the foundations for preventing and reducing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the justice system.

But first, a little bit about NACCHO, for those of you who are unfamiliar with our work.

NACCHO, which stands for the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, is the national peak body representing 145 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations – ACCHOs – across the country, on Aboriginal health and wellbeing issues.

Our members provide about three million episodes of holistic primary health care per year for about 350,000 people.

In very remote areas, our services provide about one million episodes of care in a twelve-month period. Collectively, we employ about 6,000 staff (56 per cent whom are Indigenous), which makes us the single largest employer of Indigenous people in the country.

SLIDE 2: Rates of representation in prisons and youth detention facilities

It is timely to come together and consider justice health issues in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. It is likely that, for the first time, a justice target may be included in the Close the Gap Refresh strategy.

I am heartened to know that, for the first time, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies will guide the finalisation of targets and oversee the strategy’s implementation, monitoring and evaluation. I am hopeful that, for the first time, we can begin to address the issues and see some improvements.

All of you hear today will have read and heard the shocking statistics, the increasing rates of incarceration among Indigenous Australians.

Last month it was reported that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men are imprisoned at a rate 14.7 times greater than non-Indigenous men, and for women the rate is even higher, 21.2 times higher than non-Indigenous women.[ii]

Our women represent the fastest growing population group in prisons; their imprisonment rate is up 148% since 1991.[iii]

Imprisoning women affects the whole community. Children may be removed and placed in out-of-home care. Research has found there are links between detainees’ children being placed into out-of-home care and their subsequent progression into youth detention centres and adult correctional facilities.[iv] Communities suffer, and the cycle of intergenerational trauma and disadvantage is perpetuated.

Figures on the incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in detention facilities reveal alarmingly high trends of overrepresentation:

  • On an average night in the June quarter 2018, nearly 59% of young people aged 10–17 in detention were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, despite Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people making up only 5% of the general population aged 10–17.
  • Indigenous young people aged 10–17 were 26 times as likely as non-Indigenous young people to be in detention on an average night.[v]

A concerning factor is the link between disability and imprisonment. A Senate Inquiry found that about 98% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners also have a cognitive disability.[vi]

People living with physical disabilities such as hearing loss, and people with undiagnosed cognitive or psycho-social disabilities may struggle to negotiate the justice system and their symptoms are likely to be correlated with their offending behaviours, and receive punitive responses rather than treatment and care.

SLIDE 3: Overrepresentation – causal factors

Our experiences of incarceration are not only dehumanising. They contribute to our ongoing disempowerment, intergenerational trauma, social disadvantage, and burden of disease at an individual as well as community level. Indeed, ‘imprisonment compounds individual and community disadvantage.’[vii]

The question – why Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are overrepresented in prisons – is complex. It can partly be explained by exploring how structural, geographic, historic, social and cultural factors intersect and impact individuals’ lives.

While people have some agency in how they respond to the circumstances they are born into, they are also constrained by many generations’ experiences of marginalisation, discrimination, poverty and disadvantage. This is particularly relevant and disturbing when one considers Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ experiences in navigating the justice system.[viii]

Issues of access and equity also disadvantage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in their dealings with the justice system. Some of these may relate to their geographical location – remote and very remote regions have limited legal services. Given the limited service infrastructure available in remote settings, geography also determines people’s access to community based options.

Some of the other barriers faced by our people relate to the lack of language interpreters and inappropriate modes and technologies of communication. People have different levels of English language literacy and IT capacities. These factors can result in peoples’ experiences of structural discrimination in the justice system and result in miscarriages of justice.[ix]

We have heard of the over-policing of Indigenous Australians and how this impacts on their exposure to the justice system. In his submission to the Senate Inquiry into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experiences of law enforcement and justice services, Chief Justice Martin referred to ‘systemic discrimination’ through over-policing:

Aboriginal people are much more likely to be questioned by police than non-Aboriginal people. When questioned they are more likely to be arrested rather than proceeded against by summons. If they are arrested, Aboriginal people are much more likely to be remanded in custody than given bail. Aboriginal people are much more likely to plead guilty than go to trial, and if they go to trial, they are much more likely to be convicted. If Aboriginal people are convicted, they are much more likely to be imprisoned … and at the end of their term of imprisonment they are much less likely to get parole … So at every single step in the criminal justice process, Aboriginal people fare worse than non-Aboriginal people.[x]

There are other contributing factors that explain the overrepresentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the justice system. The inadequate resourcing of Aboriginal community controlled legal services plays a major role in the growing level of unmet need in communities.[xi] As noted by the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Services:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people don’t just need access to more legal services; they need greater access to culturally appropriate legal services. … Cultural competency is essential for effective engagement, communication, delivery of services and the attainment of successful outcomes.[xii]

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ experiences of institutional racism and discrimination, the trauma caused to members of the Stolen Generations and entire families and communities, which continues today with increasing numbers of children being placed in out-of-home care, contribute to the distrust, fear and unwillingness of many people to engage with legal services.

The Senate Inquiry into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experiences of law enforcement and justice services heard that ‘for Aboriginal people in particular, there is this historical fear of about walking into a legal centre’.[xiii]

Governments’ inertia and lack of commitment to genuinely addressing the issues have contributed to a worsening situation. The National Indigenous Law and Justice Framework 2009-2015 was never funded, attracted no buy in from state and territory governments, and the review findings of the Framework were never made public.

SLIDE 4: Justice reinvestment

Increasing funding for the corrective service sector will not and does not address the issue of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the justice system. As Allison and Cunneen note, ‘the solutions to offending are found within communities, not prisons.’[xiv] They are referring to justice reinvestment, a strategy and an approach, whereby correctional funds – a portion of money for prisons – are diverted back into disadvantaged communities.

The concept of justice reinvestment centres on the belief that imprisoning people does not address the causal factors that give rise to their exposure to the justice system. Ignoring the causal factors leads not only to recidivism and repeat incarceration, it also reproduces intergenerational cycles of disadvantage and exposure to the justice system.

Reinvesting the money into community identified and led solutions not only addresses causation; it also strengthens communities. Depending on the project, justice reinvestment may not only help to reduce people’s exposure to the justice system; it may also improve education, health, and employment outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Allison and Cunneen’s analysis of justice reinvestment projects in Northern Australia shows how the underpinning principles of this approach reaffirm self-determination and strengthen cultural authority and identity. Justice reinvestment projects address the driving factors of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ interactions with the justice system: their historical experiences of colonisation, discrimination, dispossession and disempowerment.[xv]

It is encouraging to note that in its 2016 report of the inquiry into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services, the Finance and Public Administration References Committee recommended that the Commonwealth Government support Aboriginal led justice reinvestment projects.[xvi] In December 2017, the Australian Law Reform Commission recommended that Commonwealth, state and territory governments should provide support for:

  • the establishment of an independent justice reinvestment body; and
  • justice reinvestment trials initiated in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.[xvii]

SLIDE 5: Closing the gap on justice outcomes: best practice approach

Emerging out of these inquiries is a growing understanding that closing the gap on justice outcomes must begin with a commitment to self-determination, community control, cultural safety and a holistic response.

Appropriately resourced, culturally safe, community controlled services are essential for addressing these barriers. Best practice approaches for developing solutions to preventable problems of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the justice system must begin with enabling their access to trusted services that are governed by principles and practices of self-determination, community control, cultural safety and a holistic response.[xviii]

NACCHO’s member services – the ACCHOs – embody these principles. The cultural safety in which ACCHOs’ services are delivered is a key factor in their success. They provide comprehensive primary care consistent with clients’ needs.

This includes home and site visits; provision of medical, public health and health promotion services; allied health, nursing services; assistance with making appointments and transport; help accessing child care or dealing with the justice system; drug and alcohol services; and providing help with income support.

The Aboriginal Community Controlled Health model of care recognises that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples require a greater level of holistic care due to the trauma and dispossession of colonisation, dispossession and discrimination, which are linked to our poor health outcomes and over-representation in prisons.

ACCHOs understand the interplays between intergenerational trauma, the social determinants of health, family violence, and institutional racism, and the risks these contributing factors carry in increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the criminal justice system. We understand the importance of comprehensive health services that are trauma informed; and providing at risk families with early support. Within the principles, values and beliefs of the Aboriginal community controlled service model lie the groundwork for our communities’ better health outcomes.

SLIDE 6: Health justice partnerships

Given ACCHOs commitment to providing services based on community identified needs, it is not surprising, then, to learn that we are starting to address justice inequities by developing innovative partnerships with legal services.

Health justice partnerships are similar to justice reinvestment in that they target disadvantaged population groups and are community led. They differ in that funding is not explicitly linked to correctional budgets and secondly, the primary population groups targeted through these partnerships are those people at risk of poor health.[xix]

Health justice partnerships in the ACCHO context address people’s fears and distrust about the justice system, by providing a culturally safe setting in which to have conversations about legal matters.

In testimony given to a Senate Inquiry, an ACCHO representative describes how:

We form relationships with the health services and actually provide a legal service, for example, within the Aboriginal medical service. We have a lawyer embedded in the Aboriginal medical service in Mount Druitt so that when the doctor sees the person and they mention they have a housing issue – ‘I’m about to get kicked out of my place’ – they can say, ‘Go and see the lawyer that is in the office next door.’[xx]

ACCHOs are increasingly recognising the benefits of working with legal services to develop options that enable services to be delivered seamlessly, safely, and appropriately for their communities. Lawyers may be trained to work as part of a health care team or alternatively, health care workers may be upskilled to start a non-threatening, informal conversation about legal matters with the clients, which results in referrals to pro bono legal services.

 Case study: Law Yarn

As a lawyer and Chair of the Cairns-based Wuchopperen Health Service, I was aware of the need to provide better legal supports for my community. In conversations with local Elders and LawRight, Wuchopperen entered into a justice health partnership in 2016. LawRight is an independent, not-for-profit, community-based legal organisation which coordinates the provision of pro bono legal services for individuals and community groups.

The aim of the partnership was to improve health outcomes by enhancing access to legal rights and early intervention. Initially, it was decided that, as community member and lawyer employed by LawRight, I would provide the free legal services at Wuchopperen’s premises.

One of the challenges of justice health partnerships is ongoing funding, and in 2017 we were forced to close our doors for several months. We knew the partnership was addressing a real need in our community, so we submitted a funding proposal to the Queensland Government, and received funding of $55,000 to trial ‘Law Yarn’.

Law Yarn is a unique resource that supports good health outcomes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. It helps health workers to yarn with members of remote and urban communities about their legal problems and connect them to legal help. A handy how-to guide includes conversation prompts and advice on how to capture the person’s family, financial, tenancy or criminal law legal needs as well as discussing and recording their progress.

Representatives from LawRight, Wuchopperen Health Service, Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Service and the Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Legal Services came together and created a range of culturally safe resources based on LawRight’s successful Legal Health Check resources.

SLIDE 8: Law Yarn – your law story

SLIDE 9: Four aspects of Law

These symbols have been created to help identify and represent the four aspects of law that have been identified as the most concerning for individuals when presenting with any legal issues. If these four aspects can be discussed, both the Health worker and Lawyer can establish what the individual concerns are and effectively action a response.

Each symbol is surrounded by a series of 10 dots; these dots can be coloured in on both the artwork and the referral form by the Health worker to help establish what areas of law their clients have concerns with.

SLIDE 11: Launch of Law Yarn

Law Yarn was officially launched at Wuchopperen Health Service, Cairns, on 30 May 2018 by the Queensland Attorney General as a Reconciliation Week Event.

The trial has been funded to 30 June 2019 and will be comprehensively evaluated by independent academic researchers who specialise in this field.

Legal and health services throughout Australia have expressed interest in this holistic approach to the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. And we are hopeful that the evaluation findings will support the rollout of our model to ACCHOs across Australia.

In conclusion, I believe that the development of collaborative, integrated service models such as Law Yarn can provide innovative and effective solutions for addressing not only the overrepresentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the justice system, but also the health gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Address the legal problems, and you will have better health outcomes. Justice health partnerships provide a model of integrated service delivery that go to the heart of the social determinants of health, key causal factors contributing to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ over-exposure to the justice system.[xxi] With Aboriginal community control at the front and centre of service design, these partnerships are able to deliver both preventive law and preventive health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

SLIDE 12: Thank you

[i] Health Justice Australia. 2017. Integrating services; partnering with community. Submission to national consultation on Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

[ii] https://www.lawcouncil.asn.au/media/media-releases/recommendations-to-reduce-disproportionate-indigenous-incarceration-must-not-be-ignored

[iii] Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[iv]. Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[v] Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. 2018. Youth detention population in Australia. AIHW Bulletin 145.

[vi] Ibid., 2010 Senate Inquiry into hearing health in Australia.

[vii] Australian Human Rights Commission. 2009. Social Justice Report, pp. 53-54, cited in Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House.

[viii] Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[ix] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House; Law Council of Australia. 2018.

[x] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House. Testimony from Chief Justice Martin.

[xi] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House; Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[xii] National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service, Submission No. 109 to ALRC, 60, cited in Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[xiii] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House, p. 31. Testimony from Ms Porteous, NACLC, Committee Hansard, 23 September 2015, p. 28.

[xiv] Allison, Fiona and Chris Cunneen. 2018. Justice Reinvestment in Northern Australia. The Cairns Institute Policy Paper Series, p. 5.

[xv] Allison, Fiona and Chris Cunneen. 2018. Justice Reinvestment in Northern Australia. The Cairns Institute Policy Paper Series, p. 8.

[xvi] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House.

[xvii] Australian Law Reform Commission. 2017. Pathways to Justice—An Inquiry into the Incarceration Rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, Final Report No 133, p. 17.

[xviii] Thorburn, Kathryn and Melissa Marshall. 2017. The Yiriman Project in the West Kimberley: an example of justice reinvestment? Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse, Current Initiatives Paper 5; McCausland, Ruth, Elizabeth McEntyre, Eileen Baldry. 2017. Indigenous People, Mental Health, Cognitive Disability and the Criminal Justice System. Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse. Brief 22; AMA Report Card on Indigenous Health 2015. Treating the high rates of imprisonment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as a symptom of the health gap: an integrated approach to both; Richards, Kelly, Lisa Rosevear and Robyn Gilbert. 2011. Promising interventions for reducing Indigenous juvenile offending Ibid. Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse, Brief 10.

[xix] Health Justice Australia. 2017. Integrating services; partnering with community. Submission to national consultation on Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

[xx] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House, p. 31. Testimony from Ms Hitter, Legal Aid NSW, Committee Hansard, 23 September 2015, p.28

[xxi] Ibid., p. 4; Chris Speldewinde and Ian Parsons. 2015. Medical-legal partnerships: connecting services for people living with mental health concerns. 13th National Rural Health Conference, Darwin; Barry Zuckerman, Megan Sandel, Ellen Lawton, Samantha Morton. Medical-legal partnerships: transforming health care. 2008. The Lancet, Vol 372.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #SaveADate @KidneyHealth April 8 -14 #KidneyHealthWeek #iKidneyCheck Plus @AusHealthReform Defining #culturalsafety – a public consultation. The consultation ends 15 May 2019

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

15 May Cultural Safety Consultation closes

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

8- 14 April Kidney Health Week

9 April Webinar : What will #Budget2019 mean for health consumers?

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured Save a dates date

15 May Cultural Safety Consultation closes 

This engagement process is important to ensure the definition is co-designed with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, health professionals and organisations across Australia.

Cultural safety is essential to improving health and wellbeing outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and we are committed to a genuine partnership approach to develop a clear definition “

NHLF Chair, Pat Turner said the forum’s partnership with the Strategy Group meant that the definition is being led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health experts, which is an important value when developing policies or definitions that affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

The NHLF has been operating since 2011 and is national representative committee for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health peak bodies who provide advice on all aspects of health and well-being.

Help define this important term for the scheme that regulates health practitioners across Australia.

AHPRA, the National Boards and Accreditation Authorities in the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme which regulates registered health practitioners in Australia have partnered with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders and the National Health Leadership Forum (NHLF) to release a public consultation.

Together, they are seeking feedback on a proposed definition of ‘cultural safety’ to develop an agreed, national baseline definition that can be used as a foundation for embedding cultural safety across all functions in the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme and for use by the National Health Leadership Forum.

In total, there are 44 organisations represented in this consultation, which is being coordinated by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Strategy Group (Strategy Group), which is convened by AHPRA, and the NHLF (a list of representatives is available below).

Strategy Group Co-Chair, Professor Gregory Phillips said the consultation is a vital step for achieving health equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. (see Picture below )

‘Patient safety for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples is inextricably linked with cultural safety. We need a baseline definition of ‘cultural safety’ that can be used across the National Scheme so that we can help registered health practitioners understand what cultural safety is and how it can help achieve health equity for all Australians’, said Prof Phillips.

The NHLF has been operating since 2011 and is national representative committee for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health peak bodies who provide advice on all aspects of health and well-being.

The consultation is a continuation of the work by the National Scheme’s Strategy Group that has achieving health equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples as its overall goal. Members of the Group include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders and members from AHPRA, National Boards, Accreditation Authorities and NSW Councils.

AHPRA’s Agency Management Committee Chair, Mr Michael Gorton AM, said the far reach of this work is outlined in the Strategy Group’s Statement of intent, which was published last year.

‘The approach to this consultation is embodied in the Strategy Group’s Statement of intent, which has commitment, accountability, shared priorities, collaboration and high-level participation as its values. As a scheme, we are learning from our engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders, who are the appropriate leaders in this work. I thank these leaders, and the experts who have shared their knowledge and expertise with us, for their generosity and leadership which will lead to better health outcomes’, said Mr Gorton.

The six-week consultation is open to the public. Everyone interested in helping to shape the definition of ‘cultural safety’ that will be used in the National Scheme and by NHLF members is warmly invited to share their views.

The consultation is open until 5:00pm, Wednesday 15 May 2019.

For more information:

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

Kidney Health Week: 8 – 14 April, 2019

” I’m Alice, I’m 31, and I have chronic kidney disease. When I found out my kidneys were failing, I didn’t understand what it meant or what my kidneys do, but now I do. The kidneys are one of the main organs in your body and if they aren’t well, you can get really sick, and end up in hospital on dialysis.

Before my health issues, I remember running around with my brother and cousins and doing everything kids are allowed to do. But when I turned 10, I couldn’t anymore. I felt like my freedom had been taken away from me. I asked all the time ‘why does this have to happen to me?’

Starting dialysis was terrifying. I didn’t know anything about it until I had been on it myself. It’s annoying knowing the fact that I’m going to be on it dialysis for the rest of my life. My advice is to go get your kidneys checked every 6 months. Having kidney disease is just as bad as having cancer but nobody knows about it until they get it.”

See Alice’s Webpage to donate 

This Kidney Health Week, Kidney Health Australia is asking Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
communities to visit their local Indigenous Health Centre to complete simple tests – blood, urine and blood pressure – to see if they are at risk of developing chronic kidney disease.

Download Kidney Health Week Supporter Kit with all the tools and resources you need to assist Kidney Health Australia to raise awareness of kidney disease. This includes social media text and images, newsletter copy, and key messages for your staff, affiliates, supporters as appropriate.

Kidney Health Week 2019 Supporter Kit – Alliances

Kidney Health Australia CEO, Chris Forbes, explained that while Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people represent less than 2.5 percent of the national population, they account for approximately eleven percent of people commencing kidney replacement therapy each year and the incidence of end-stage kidney disease for Indigenous peoples in remote areas of Australia is 18 to 20 times higher than that of comparable non-Indigenous peoples.

TAKE THE TEST HERE 

9 April What will #Budget2019 mean for health consumers?

What will  mean for health consumers? Join us next Tuesday for our webinar to learn more.

Register here 

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

Thank you for your interest in the 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference will bring together Indigenous leaders, government, industry and academia representing Housing, health, and education from around the world including:

  • National and International Indigenous Organisation leadership
  • Senior housing, health, and education government officials Industry CEOs, executives and senior managers from public and private sectors
  • Housing, Healthcare, and Education professionals and regulators
  • Consumer associations
  • Academics in Housing, Healthcare, and Education.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference #2019WIHC is the principal conference to provide a platform for leaders in housing, health, education and related services from around the world to come together. Up to 2000 delegates will share experiences, explore opportunities and innovative solutions, work to improve access to adequate housing and related services for the world’s Indigenous people.

Event Information:

Key event details as follows:
Venue: Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre
Address: 2684-2690 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD 4218
Dates: Monday 20th – Thursday 23rd May, 2019 (24th May)

Registration Costs

  • EARLY BIRD – FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION: $1950 AUD plus booking fees
  • After 1 February FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION $2245 AUD plus booking fees

PLEASE NOTE: The Trade Exhibition is open Tuesday 21st May – Thursday 23rd May 2019

Please visit www.2019wihc.com for further information on transport and accommodation options, conference, exhibition and speaker updates.

Methods of Payment:

2019WIHC online registrations accept all major credit cards, by Invoice and direct debit.
PLEASE NOTE: Invoices must be paid in full and monies received by COB Monday 20 May 2019.

Please note: The 2019 WIHC organisers reserve the right of admission. Speakers, programs and topics are subject to change. Please visit http://www.2019wihc.comfor up to date information.

Conference Cancellation Policy

If a registrant is unable to attend 2019 WIHC for any reason they may substitute, by arrangement with the registrar, someone else to attend in their place and must attend any session that has been previously selected by the original registrant.

Where the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her place to another person, or to another event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

    • Registrations cancelled less than 60 days, but more than 30 days before the event are eligible for a 50% refund of the registration fees paid.
    • Registrations cancelled less than 30 days before the event are no longer eligible for a refund.

Refunds will be made in the following ways:

  1. For payments received by credit or debit cards, the same credit/debit card will be refunded.
  2. For all other payments, a bank transfer will be made to the payee’s nominated account.

Important: For payments received from outside Australia by bank transfer, the refund will be made by bank transfer and all bank charges will be for the registrant’s account. The Cancellation Policy as stated on this page is valid from 1 October 2018.

Terms & Conditions

please visit www.2019wihc.com

Privacy Policy

please visit www.2019wihc.com

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens 

The opening of the 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round has been moved forward! The National NAIDOC Grants will now officially open on Thursday 24 January 2019.

Head to www.naidoc.org.au to join the National NAIDOC Mailing List and keep up with all things grants or check out the below links for more information now!

https://www.finance.gov.au/resource-management/grants/grantconnect/

https://www.pmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/grants-and-funding/naidoc-week-funding

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

SAVE THE DATE for the 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference!!!

We’re so excited to announce the date of our 10 Year Anniversary Conference –
A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition!!! 

NATSIHWA recognises that importance of members sharing and learning from each other, and our key partners within the Health Sector. We hold a biennial conference for all NATSIHWA members to attend. The conference content focusses on the professional support and development of the Health Workers and Health Practitioners, with key side events to support networking among attendees.  We seek feedback from our Membership to make the conferences relevant to their professional needs and expectations and ensure that they are offered in accessible formats and/or locations.The conference is a time to celebrate the important contribution of Health Workers and Health Practitioners, and the Services that support this important profession.

We hold the NATSIHWA Legends Award night at the conference Gala Dinner. Award categories include: Young Warrior, Health Worker Legend, Health Service Legend and Individual Champion.

Watch this space for the release of more dates for registrations, award nominations etc.

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO Aboriginal #AusVotesHealth and #Budget2019 5 of 5 : Download or Read Opposition Leader @billshortenmp full #BudgetReply Speech Includes a #FirstNations #Voice in the #Constitution #Medicare #Education and #Training #NDIS #Cancer

“To summarise what our first four years of Labor’s Medicare cancer plan means for Australians – up to 6 million free cancer scans, 3 million free appointments with specialists and an affordable medicine guarantee.

This is our vision for the future, our vision to build Medicare. We can pay for it and we can deliver it because of our reform decisions. We choose our healthcare system over bigger tax loopholes.

So in conclusion, my fellow Australians, I suspect that some in the government will spend a lot of time telling you to be afraid, afraid of change, afraid of new ideas, afraid of our future, afraid of each other. I expect we will see more of that in the campaign ahead. I have a different view.

I’m optimistic about our nation’s future because this country has so much going for us, a continent to call our own, next to the fastest growing economies in the world. The resources to be an energy superpower. We have the skills and science and get up and go to create new industries, and best of all, we have our people. Australians are hardworking, caring, brave, smart and generous.

We will never be the biggest country many the world, we will never seek to impose our ideology on other nations but I believe if we’re not the biggest, we should still aim to be the best, the best in education and skills, the best in health and aged care and looking after people with dementia, the best in fair wages and fair reward for your work.

That is the real choice that our country faces at this election, it is the decision which every Australian has the right to make. Do we want the best healthcare system in the world or the biggest tax loopholes? Do we want our children to get the world’s best education or the world’s most generous tax subsidies? Do we want a fairer, more equal country where the economy works in the interests of everyone, or do we want another three years of drift with the top end of town profiting much better than everybody else? My team and I have made the reformed decisions to put a fair-go action plan forAustralia, so Australia can be the best we should be.

Labor offers stability and unity and a vision for the nation, we choose hope over fear, we choose the future over the past. We choose the best support possible for people with cancer. We choose fair wages and good jobs. We choose Tafe and apprenticeships

We choose a voice to First Australians enshrined in our constitution.

We choose renewables and we choose real action on climate change. We choose the ABC. We choose equality for women of Australia, equality for everyone. If these things matter to you, if you believe that when all is said and done about politics the most important things are family and health, if you believe that handing on a better deal to your kids than the one you inherited from your parents, if you believe that is what is the sort of vision we should have for Australia, then when you cast your vote in May, choose a Labor government for all Australians.

Bill Shorten Budget reply speech read in full below or Download HERE

Bill Shorten Budget Reply Speech

This weeks NACCHO Budget Coverage 

Post 1: NACCHO Intro #AusVotesHealth #Budget2019

Post 2: NACCHO Chair Press Release

Post 3:  Health Peak bodies Press Release summary

Post 4 : Government Press Releases

Post 5 : Opposition responses to Budget 2019 

Read all Budget 2019 Posts 

View NACCHO TV interview with NACCHO Chair HERE

Women and men of Australia.

A Budget should sketch the big picture.

Build for the long term, write Australia large.

Be ambitious, be as bold as the Australian people.

That’s what a Labor Government will do, strive for the best.

Because Australians deserve the best.

But instead, on Tuesday night, we received an exercise in numerology.

A recitation of numbers. No passion, no national story, no vision laid out to divine where the country is and where the country is going. And no reform.

The same promises made and broken, six years running.

Yes, there is a third Prime Minister.

A third Treasurer.

But where it mattered, the same Liberal Budget.

The same void where an energy policy should be.

The same failure on stagnant wages and rising cost-of-living.

The same denial on climate change.

The same $14 billion cut to schools.

And the same $2.8 billion cut to hospitals.

So tonight, the first commitment I can give Australians – and one of the most important:

If we win the next election, we will put back every single dollar the Liberals have cut from public schools and public hospitals.

Now Mr Speaker, to be fair –

There was one new feature in this Budget, albeit troubling.

The short-changing of the National Disability Insurance Scheme by $1.6 billion, to prop up a flimsy budget surplus forecast.

Now it looks a lot more like dodgy accounting than good economic management.

I freely acknowledge government members sincerely care about people with disability.

But the truth is, the record of the last six years, the government has made a record of poor decisions regarding the NDIS.

Sacking the board.

Delaying the signing of funding agreements with the states.

Capping staff numbers for the National Disability Insurance Agency – leading to an outbreak of contractors and consultants undermining the system.

And then – after all these policies that hamstring delivery of services – the

Government shrugs, and say the $1.6 billion wasn’t needed, because of a lack of demand.

There are thousands of Australians who have embraced the promise of the NDIS but whose legitimate demands have simply not been met.

The young man in Ballarat who has waited more than two years for a wheelchair, waited so long that he ended up in hospital with pressure sores.

The family whose daughter has an intellectual disability, who have waited ten months for funding for the speech therapy she needed to learn to make friends at school.

Or the family of a profoundly deaf young man who was denied interpreters and training in Auslan and has spent the last two and a half years appealing the decision.

All these people… the carers seeking modest respite…the parents, the loved ones, filling out the forms, calling time and time again for promises not fulfilled, waiting on the phones….

They do not tell me there is a lack of demand, they’re talking about a desperate need.

Working with the Member for Jagajaga, with people with disability, their carers and an army of advocates to help create the National Disability Insurance Scheme is one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever been part of.

And tonight I can give every Australian living with disability and the people who love them this personal commitment: that if we are elected as the next government

We will lift the NDIA cap on staff numbers, so we can get the support out the door, keep the promises made to people with disabilities.

And we will put people with disability back at the centre of decision-making in the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

We will get the NDIS back on track.

I acknowledge our opponents have finally seen the light on supporting the bigger, better and fairer tax cuts for 10 million Australians that I put put forward at my last budget reply speech.

And tonight I can confirm that, from 1 July –

If you earn between $48,000 and $126,000 – no matter who you vote for in May – you will get the same tax refund.

But the Liberal tax plan does not do enough for 2.9 million Australians who earn less than $40,000. About 57 per cent of these are women. Child care workers and classroom assistants. Hairdressers, office managers.

And they are parents returning to work, part-time.

In a lot of cases, these are the very same workers in retail, hospitality, pharmacy and fast food who have already had their penalty rates arbitrarily cut.

Tonight, I am pleased to say that in Chris Bowen’s first Budget –

Labor will provide a bigger tax refund than the Liberals for 3.6 million Australians.

All told, an one billion dollars, for low-income earners in this country.

There’s always a lot of talk about tax from those opposite – but here is the simple truth:

6.4 million working people will pay the same amount of income tax under Labor as the Liberals.

And another 3.6 million will pay less tax under Labor.

But we will not be signing-up to the Liberals’ radical, right-wing, flat-tax experiment, way off in the future.

A scheme which would see a nurse on $50,000 paying the same tax rate as a surgeon on $200,000. We won’t back a plan that gives a retail worker on $35,000 less than $5 a week… …while an investment banker pockets more than $11,000 a year.

This is not a tax plan, it’s a ticking debt bomb.

And it is neither fair nor responsible to lock-in these billions of dollars in tax giveaways flowing disproportionately to a relatively few Australians – and so far into the future.

Especially when you consider the foreboding we see in the global environment.

  • Brexit
  • Trade wars
  • The write-downs in global growth  The massive increase in global debt
  • The drop in the 10-year bond yields.

This is the time when Australia should be building a strong surplus, a fiscal buffer.

The Liberals talk about being back in the black – but the Budget papers reveal a much paler shade of grey.

What we need is a fighting fund for the nation, a strong surplus to protect us from international shocks.

Surpluses built on real reform – not cutting schools and hospitals, not shortchanging the NDIS and not banking on the price of ore in a blue sky environment.

And tonight I recommit that is what Labor will take to the next election – stronger surpluses, paying down national debt faster.

Guaranteeing everything from our commitment to defence spending at 2 per cent of GDP, drought relief for farmers and keeping our borders secure.

Nearly six years ago, my united team and I made a choice.

We decided not to be the kind of Opposition who just stay quiet, cross our fingers and hope the Government would tear itself apart.

We decided to lead the reform debate, with a bold agenda.

We believe the Australian people are hungry for a united, stable government with a real vision for the future, one that can make hard decisions.

We believe government has a responsibility to leave the place better than we found it.

That’s why we’re going to stop the intergenerational unfairness in our tax system.

If you’re currently negatively gearing the rules won’t change.

If you want to use it on new homes, you still can.

But we cannot have property investors playing with loaded dice against our young people, Generation Y and the Millennials.

And instead of patronising millions of young Australians with lectures about cutting back on smashed avo. Why don’t we tell them the truth:

Getting together a 20 per cent deposit – plus stamp duty – is so much, much harder than it was 20 or 25 years ago. And it’s even more difficult, when your government uses your taxpayer money to subsidise the property investors bidding against you.

The intergenerational bias that the tax system has against young people must be called out.

A government has to be brave enough and decent enough to stop the bias against first home buyers and young Australians. And we will be that government. The same goes for dividend imputation. If the tax office pays a tax credit to someone who pays no tax, this is a gift.

It’s a gift that is costing taxpayers nearly $6 billion every year – and growing so fast that it will soon be more than what we spend on public schools.

Now it’s not illegal, it’s not immoral – but it’s just not sustainable anymore.

And Mr Speaker – reform which delivers intergenerational fairness to our young must include real action on climate change. The climate change debate has poisoned this parliament for ten years – and it has most certainly paralysed the current Government. So tonight let’s deal in simple facts:

Climate change is real.

It’s doing real damage to our economy – and our environment.

And we can measure cost of inaction: bushfires, droughts, floods, in extreme weather and damage to our farmland and our Reef.

For the sake of the Australia that we hand on to our children, a Labor Government will reform, will not shirk the task of reform – it will take real action on climate change.

Now tonight – and at this election – Labor is offering the Australian people a fully funded Fair Go Action Plan.

  • Building an economy that works for everyone.
  • Investing in an education system that creates opportunity for everyone.
  • Fixing the wages system so it delivers for everyone.
  • Reforming the tax system so it is fair for everyone.
  • And funding a health system that is there for everyone.

We believe Australia does best when working class and middle class Australia gets a fair go.

When the economy is managed in the interests of everyone.

When the people who create our national wealth, get their fair share of the national wealth.

And when everyone has an equal chance to fulfil their potential.

This is why investing in the future, always begins with education.

This is where the difference between Labor and the Government could not be more stark.

Nine out of ten new jobs created in the next four years will require either a university degree or a TAFE qualification. Only a Labor Government will be prepared to properly fund both. We’ll uncap university places, opening the doors of higher education to an additional 200,000 Australians.

And when it comes to vocational education, Labor is backing public TAFE all the way. I’ve been fortunate to have visited about 30 TAFEs around Australia since the last election. The teachers and students are inspirational.

So tonight I’m pleased to announce that we are going to double the size of our Rebuilding TAFE fund – up to $200 million to renovate campuses in regional and outer-suburban Australia.

This will mean:

  • This will mean new facilities for training nurses in Caboolture and Devonport.
  • New workshops in Midland and Bellevue, to make sure the METRONET train carriages work goes to apprentices.
  • A new construction centre for tradies in Chadstone and Frankston.

And so much more.

Labor will also pay the upfront fees for 100,000 TAFE places to get more Australians training in high-priority courses.

And tonight I am proud to announce that 20,000 of these places will be allocated to a new generation of aged care workers and paid carers for the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

My mother was a great teacher. She taught me that you can measure a nation’s values by how much it values education. I want every child in Australia to get the one-on-one attention that they need to thrive.

I want Aboriginal kids to get genuine equal opportunity, children with disability or learning difficulties getting the support they need.

I want every child participating in sport, trying drama, learning music, going on camps, getting access to new technology.

And not as optional extras, to which parents pay increasing levies, not and luxuries that rely on the teachers raising the money themselves.

I want it guaranteed.

Guaranteed because every school in Australia should offer every child the same world of opportunity.

And there’s one more thing that we will do to make Australian schools the best in the world – we’ll make Tanya Plibersek the Minister for Education.

Experts tell us ninety per cent of a child’s brain develops before the age of 5.

And two years of preschool or kindergarten is the rule in countries at the top of the global education ladder:

  • South Korea
  • Norway
  • New Zealand
  • France
  • And the United Kingdom

Last year, China enrolled 46 million three year olds in pre-school programs. Australia is falling behind in the early years education – and that affects our children right through their educational lives.

If you vote Labor, we will guarantee universal access to pre-school or kinder for every three year old and every four year old in Australia. 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year.

Two years of pre-school is global best practice – and it’s only just good enough for our kids.

Our vision for education and training is all about putting Australia on the high road to the future:

High skill workers. High quality products. High value services. And higher-wage jobs. This means backing local businesses and industries. We backed a tax cut for small and medium businesses.

And we will provide an extra 20 per cent tax break for every business that invests in productivity-boosting equipment above  $20,000 – whether that’s a big manufacturer buying new technology, or a tradie getting a new ute.

And we will invest in industries where Australia can be best in the world – I speak of:

  • Agriculture and Tourism
  • Hydrogen Energy
  • Science and research
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Mineral exploration, to unearth new wealth

Defence industry – and commercial ship-building, to revive our Merchant Marine and see more Australian ships, flying the Australian ensign. Embracing renewables will also create thousands upon thousands of new jobs for Australia.

Labor will provide a $2000 payment to families who want to join the fight against climate change and the fight to lower their power bills by installing a battery storage system.

And here’s the remarkable thing – we already have every single resource to make a lithium battery, right here in Australia.

So instead of the usual trope of shipping the minerals overseas and buying back the finished product at vastly inflated prices, let’s make the batteries here.

And let’s do this with electric vehicles and charging equipment and stations too.

Supported by Australia’s first Electric Vehicle Policy. And rather than relying on China and India to accept our plastic and waste… …or to leave it choking our waterways and killing our marine life, let’s recycle it here at home.

When it comes to clean technology, I believe we can make three words famous right around the world: Made in Australia.

Building an economy that works for everyone means a massive building program, right across our nation.

We will reinvigorate jobs in the construction sector:

  • With our Build-to-Rent plan.
  • Targeting Negative Gearing to new housing.
  • Renovating the national energy grid with new pipelines, interconnectors, hydro and storage.
  • Launching the biggest affordable housing program since the Second World War – building a quarter of a million new homes.

And we will invest in safe accommodation for women fleeing violent relationships.

Because too often, when the worst happens, people still say: “Why didn’t she leave?” What we should ask is: “Where would she go?”

Labor has transport plans and projects ready to go in every state and territory:

  • Cross River Rail in Brisbane
  • Western Sydney Metro
  • Suburban Rail Loop in Melbourne
  • The Bridgewater Bridge in Tassie
  • South Road in South Australia
  • METRONET in Perth
  • Upgrading the roads around Kakadu  And Phase 2 of the ACT light rail.

And – thanks to Albo’s hard work – the work is just beginning.

Labor will continue to develop and support the development Northern Australia: including overdue upgrades for the beef roads and the Rocky ring road.

And tonight I can announce we will deliver $1.5 billion to upgrade the Gateway Motorway from Bracken Ridge to the Pine River – and the next stage of the Bruce Highway from the Northern Suburbs to Caboolture.

There’s another big difference between Liberal and Labor on infrastructure.

In their budget you have to vote for the current Prime Minister at this election… … then you have to vote for whoever is their leader at the next election……and that’s before anyone even digs a hole.

Our projects are not on the never-never, they are locked in to our first budget.

There’s another difference that I offer the Australian people, frustrated by the constant short-termism in the infrastructure debate.

If we are elected, I will invite the then-Opposition Leader to be involved in nominating directors to Infrastructure Australia, so we take the politics out and we make generational decisions in infrastructure for once and for all time.

And every time we invest Commonwealth dollars in infrastructure projects.

We’ll make the rule that 1 in 10 people employed must be an Australian apprentice.

The bad news is that over the last six years under the Liberals, apprenticeships have fallen by 150,000.

The good news is because of our vision:

  • in infrastructure
  • housing construction
  • the NDIS
  • TAFE and training
  • early childhood education
  • energy
  • and the digital economy

…a Labor Government can repair the damage done.

Tonight, I say we will help train 150,000 apprentices for the jobs of the future. We will provide additional support for businesses which take them on – both young people and mature age workers looking to re-train and to learn new skills.

And we’ll create an Apprentice Advocate – because the tragic death of an 18 year old apprentice on the Macquarie Park site last week, reminds us that we’ve got to protect our apprentices and they have the same right to come home safe as everybody else.

The next election will be a referendum on wages.

We need to get wages growth going again – for workers, for the economy, for confidence and consumption. Because when we boost the spending power of working people, that money flows back into the tills of small businesses.

In the last six years, three Liberal Prime Ministers and three Liberal Treasurers have signed-off on official forecasts for wages growth…they have been wrong 27 times in a row.

27 times they have promised and not delivered.

On Tuesday night, the Treasurer boldly said he would “like” wages growth to be higher. He would “like” that.

After six years of stagnation: liking and wishing and hoping is not a plan for working people.

For the last six years, we’ve tried it their way, the Government’s way, the invisible hand, leave it to the market – we know how that ends

Since the last election, wages have risen by around five per cent – while company profits have increased nearly forty per cent.

Only Labor has a concrete, practical plan to get wages moving again.

  1. If we win the election we will legislate to restore the arbitrary cuts to Sunday and public holiday penalty rates in our first 100 days.
  2. We will stop companies using sham contracts and dodgy labour hire arrangements to cut people’s pay.
  3. Our Tradie Pay Guarantee means that subbies working on Commonwealth projects get paid on time, every time.

And we will help the 1.2 million lowest-paid Australians, by creating a living wage. Of course, we will consult with employers and the independent umpire, and of course we will take into account the capacity of business in the economy to sustain the wages’ growth. But I don’t want any Australian adult who works full time, to be trapped in poverty.

A sensible, overdue plan to achieve moderate but meaningful improvement in wages.

And whenever we talk about fair pay, it includes equal pay and fairer conditions for the women of Australia.

  • A new push for better pay in women-dominated industries like early education.
  • New measures to help boost the superannuation of working women.
  • And 10 days of paid leave for people dealing with family violence.

This is what you get from a political party that walks the walk on equality for women – and has so many talented women in our ranks in parliament right now.

At this election, Mr Speaker, we are offering a genuine alternative for regional Australia.

  • Better support for our dairy farmers to get a fair deal.
  • Working to restore the Murray Darling to health.
  • Helping restock the cattle herd of North Queensland.
  • New investments in eliminating mobile black spots – and a more reliable NBN for small business.

And not only will we put back the $83 million the Liberals cut from the ABC…

We’ll provide another $10 million to support regional news and emergency broadcasting, especially in areas affected by natural disasters such as Townsville, Tasmania and regional Victoria.

We can also give regional communities this simple, important pledge: no more privatising and out-sourcing human services in the bush. If you’re a pensioner or a veteran living in the regions, you shouldn’t be stuck on hold for hours waiting for help.

You should be able to speak to a human being, face-to-face.

You deserve no less.

And to my fellow Australians

Tonight I want to conclude by talking to you directly in your lounge rooms, about our vision for the most significant investment in Medicare in a generation.

Cancer is one of the biggest killers in our national. Not for nothing is it called the Emperor of all Maladies. One in two of us will be diagnosed with cancer at some stage in our life.

145,000 of our fellow Australians are diagnosed with cancer each year.

And 50,000 die.

One way or another, we will all witness the ordeal. I saw it with my Mum and her battle with breast cancer. Chloe and I have seen it with dear friends of ours – some old, some far too young. Cancer is frightening, it’s isolating, it’s exhausting.

And – all too often though – it is impoverishing.

For so many people, cancer makes you sick and then paying for the treatment makes you poor.

And I think a lot of Australians would be surprised to learn that all those vital scans and tests and consultations with specialists are not fully covered by Medicare. Instead, they cost hundreds of dollars, adding up to thousands, out of your own pocket.

Australia has the highest rates of skin cancer in the world – and most people pay over $5000 for the first two years of their treatment. One in four women diagnosed with breast cancer pay over $10,000 for two years of scans and tests.

Some men with prostate cancer are paying more than $18,000. And if you’re in Stage 4 cancer, you have to quit work, so your finances are already under horrendous strain. If you live in the regions, there are the added costs of travel and accommodation.

Every year 300,000 Australians who need radiology just don’t get it – because they can’t afford it.

That’s three hundred thousand of us.

We are a smart country, we’ve got the best health care staff, we are a rich country, we are a generous country – and we are better than the statistics I read out.

If someone you love has cancer, you’d sell the roof over your head if it would help, you’d sell the shirt off your back – but should you have to?

Our fellow Australians pay your taxes to Canberra. You pay your Medicare levy.

And if I am elected Prime Minister, I’m going to make sure the health care system is there for you when you need it most.

So tonight, I am announcing the most important investment in Medicare since Bob Hawke created it.

Labor’s $2.3 billion Medicare Cancer Plan.

To my fellow Australians, I will explain what that will be used for.

First, if we win the election, we will invest $600 million towards eliminating all of the out-of-pocket costs for diagnostic imaging.

Over four years, this will mean six million free cancer scans, funded by Medicare.

  • CT scans
  • PET scans
  • Mammograms
  • X Rays
  • Ultrasounds

Reducing the out-of-pocket costs for cancer patients from hundreds of dollars, to zero. And this will apply to MRIs too.

Today, only half the MRI machines, that amazing technology – half the machines in Australia are covered by Medicare.

People in the bush and the regions often have to drive hours, or pay thousands.

If we win the election, not only will we provide new MRI machines to communities where they are needed most. We are going to change the game.

We will guarantee that every single MRI machine which meets national standards, every single machine is covered by Medicare for cancer scans – full stop.

The second part of our plan is to deal with the cost of seeing a specialist.

As anyone knows, treating cancer relies on a marvellous team of experts.

  • Medical oncologists in charge of your diagnosis and ongoing chemotherapy and immunotherapy.
  • Surgeons performing your operations and monitoring your recovery.
  • Radiation oncologists designing targeted radiation therapy plans to destroy cancer cells.

These appointments are part of your weekly routine, often for years.

There is the trips, the waiting, the treatment, the recovery. Thousands of dollars.

A new Labor Government will invest $433 million to immediately cover specialist consultations for cancer patients.

What this means over the next four years, is it means that an additional 3 million appointments will be bulk-billed – with no out-of-pocket costs.Reducing what you pay from hundreds of dollars – to zero.

And thirdly: our Affordable Medicine Guarantee.

Every drug recommended by the independent experts, will be listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

Not just cutting the cost of your treatment – cutting the cost of your cancer medication too.

Cancer is a curse.

I wish I could stand here tonight and guarantee you that we will find a cure.

But no politician can give that promise.

We will continue to support our scientists in their work, we will invest in the research and the clinical trials. And until the day that we find a cure, I promise the men and women of Australia this:

Under Labor – if you are battling cancer, you can focus on getting well, without worrying about going broke.

I can promise that if you are in the fight of your life – a Labor Government will be alongside you every step of the way.

To summarise what our first four years of Labor’s Medicare Cancer Plan means for Australians:

  • Up to 6 million free cancer scans
  • 3 million free appointments with specialists
  • And an affordable medicine guarantee

This is our vision for the future.

This is our vision to build Medicare.

And we can pay for it – and deliver it – because of our reform decisions.

We choose our health care system over bigger tax loopholes.

So in conclusion, my fellow Australians – I suspect that some in the government will spend a lot of time telling you to be afraid.

Afraid of change. Afraid of new ideas.

Afraid of the future. Afraid of each other.

I expect we’ll see more of that in the campaign ahead.

I have a different view.

I’m optimistic about our nation’s future, because this country has so much going for us.

A continent to call our own, next to the fastest-growing economies in the world.

The resources to be an energy superpower.

The skills and the science and the get-up and go to create new industries.

And best of all, we have our people: Australians are hard-working, caring, brave, smart and generous.

We will never be the biggest country in the world, we will never seek to impose our ideology on other nations  – but do I believe that if we’re not the biggest, we can still aim to be the best.

The best in education and skills.

The best in health and aged care and looking after people with dementia.

The best in fair wages and fair reward for your work.

That is the real choice that our country faces at this election, that’s the decision every Australian has to make.

Do you want the best health care system in the world?

Or the biggest tax loopholes?

Do you want your children to get a world’s best education?

Or the world’s most generous tax subsidies?

Do we want a fairer, more equal country where the economy works in the interests of everyone?

Or do we want another three years of drift, with the top end of town profiting much better than everybody else.

My team and I have made the reform decisions to put forward a Fair Go Action plan for Australia, so that Australia can be the best that we should be.

Labor offers stability and unity and a vision for the nation.

We choose hope over fear.

We choose the future over the past.

We choose the best support possible for people with cancer.

We choose fair wages and good jobs.

We choose TAFE and apprenticeships.

We choose a Voice for the First Australians enshrined in our constitution.

We choose renewables and we choose real action on climate change.

We choose the ABC.

We choose equality for women of Australia – equality for everyone.

And if these things matter to you, if you believe that when all is said and done about politics, the most important things are family and health.

If you believe that handing on a better deal to your kids than the one you inherited from your parents –

If you believe that’s what sort of vision we should have for Australia –

Then – when you cast your vote in May – choose a Labor Government, for all Australians.

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #AusVotesHealth and #Budget2019 4 of 5 : Press Release from Ministers @GregHuntMP @KenWyattMP : But have the major health threats been ignored in this 2019/20 Federal Health Budget ?

This weeks NACCHO Budget Coverage 

Post 1: NACCHO Intro #AusVotesHealth #Budget2019

Post 2: NACCHO Chair Press Release

Post 3:  Health Peak bodies Press Release summary

Post 4 : Government Press Releases

Post 5 : Opposition responses to Budget 2019 

Read all Budget 2019 Posts 

Overview Health Expenditure Croakey and Sean Parnell The Australian

1.Guaranteeing Medicare

2.Strengthening primary care

3.Improving access to medicines Includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 

4.Supporting our hospitals

5.Addressing youth mental health and suicide prevention

6. Investing in life saving and job creating medical research

7.Patients

8.Investing in preventive health

9. Supporting senior Australians

10. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

More detailed information on various components of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander expenditure below  OR

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Overview Health Expenditure  Croakey and Sean Parnell The Australian

Back in Black or Highway to Hell? Major health threats ignored in 2019/20 Federal Budget

  “Prime Minister Scott Morrison may be ‘Back in Black’ but his 2019/20 Health Budget is unlikely to make him number one with the health sector.

While there are a few new numbers in the Budget’s hit parade, the bulk of the spending initiatives are a hackneyed playlist of old tunes that fail to deliver the reforms called for repeatedly by health groups and experts.

Warning bells are sounding all over the health sector – increased obesity levels, the health threats of climate change and record rates of chronic disease – yet the current government doesn’t appear to be listening.

Our health system already can’t cope with current levels of demand and there is little in tonight’s Budget that will relieve this pressure. Ignoring the calls from experts and health groups for a re-orienting of our health system away from acute care towards prevention and public health, this Budget provides a suite of short-term measures which barely deal with the symptoms of an ailing system, let alone address their underlying causes.

The frustration of health groups about this failure to acknowledge the looming threats to our health system was evident in many post-Budget statements, including the Public Health Association of Australia which stated that “the budget does little to prevent a future illness tsunami.”

Below, Jennifer Doggett revisits the songs from AC/DC’s classic album to highlight the positives and negatives of this important pre-election Budget. “

Read Croakey article Here

Overview Health Expenditure Sean Parnell The Australian

Doctors will get more funding to help older Australians manage chronic illness, mental healthcare providers will be able to reach more people in need, and researchers will benefit from a 10-year grants program.

In its $104 billion health budget, the Morrison government has made targeted investments in Medicare, but also brought forward the restoration of indexation for 176 GP items to July 1. Thawing that aspect of the Medicare freeze six months early will cost $187.2 million, but comes as the Coalition faces calls from health groups for higher rebates and the prospect of another Labor ­“Mediscare” campaign.

While the government has yet to decide the fate of the healthcare homes initiative, or respond to primary care proposals from its Medicare review, it has allocated $201.5m more for practice incentive payments.

Its most promising, yet underdeveloped, primary care announcement in the budget involves $448.5m over three years for a new model of funding chronic disease care. The approach, to be introduced in July 2020, will allow GPs to enter into agreements with patients over 70 and be given more personalised, co-ordinated care funded through Medicare.

The details will be subject to further consultation.

With Australia’s rising suicide rate, and continued concern over the comparatively high number of deaths in indigenous communities, the government has also allocated $736.6m to improve the nation’s mental health resources.

This will include 30 more headspace centres — most expected to be announced during the election campaign — to take the total number funded by the commonwealth to 145 by 2021, at an ongoing cost of $120m a year.

“It’s a national tragedy that we lose so many people to suicide and that so many people live a life of quiet desperation,” Josh Frydenberg said last night. “Tonight I say: we hear you and we are with you.”

There was funding for a further 23 MRI machines — taking the total to 53 — and continued investment in drug subsidies as recommended by a committee of experts.

With the Medical Research ­Future Fund to achieve its $20bn balance in 2020-21, the government has outlined a $5bn, 10-year funding plan, while maintaining its $3.5bn commitment to the ­National Health and Medical ­Research Council. The $5bn will come from MRFF distributions, established using savings from health cuts in the 2014 budget.

Health Minister Greg Hunt has already announced research ‘‘missions’’ into brain cancer, mental health, genomics, ageing, aged care and dementia, indigenous health, stem cells, cardiovascular disease and traumatic brain injury. Another $1.2bn will be dedicated to translation and commercialis­ation, taking ideas from the laboratory to hospital bedsides, while new institutes will also be funded.

Any perceptions of interference in the grants program will be addressed by the creation of a Health and Medical Research Office for the MRFF, at a cost of $20m over four years, although the NHMRC will have a small reduction in its budget next year.

The government has factored in the states agreeing to its public hospital funding proposal, even though Victoria and Queensland are holding out. The ­Coalition will continue to announce projects to benefit from its $1.25bn community health and hospitals program ahead of the election.

RECORD INVESTMENT ADVANCES LONG TERM NATIONAL HEALTH PLAN

Federal Treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, delivered his first Australian Government Budget on Tuesday evening, 2 April 2019.

The following links provide information on the Budget and its implications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Australian Government Budget details:

The Liberal National Government is investing a record $104 billion in 2019—20, up from

$75 billion in 2012—13, as part of a comprehensive, patient-focused investment of

$435 billion over the next four years. It guarantees Medicare, makes a range of life-saving medicines and services more accessible and affordable, reduces out-of-pocket costs, strengthens primary care and mental health and invests in breakthrough medical research.

The Budget consolidates and continues our health reform agenda. It reinforces the four pillars of our long term national health plan — guaranteeing Medicare and improving access to medicines, supporting our hospitals, prioritising mental health and preventive health and investing in health and medical research.

We are addressing community need through a range of investments under our $1.25 billion landmark Community Health and Hospitals Program (CHHP) to keep people healthy and out of hospital.

We are acting on aged care reform. Improvements to accessibility, quality and safety continue apace with a further investment of $7 billion since the last Budget.

The Government is investing record funding for Health:

  • Medicare boosted by $6 billion o with $1.1 billion for Primary Care Hospital funding boosted by $5 billion

0 on top ofthe $1.25 billion CHHP

  • Aged Care funding boosted by $7 billion
  • $40 billion for life-saving and life-changing medicines provisioned in the forward estimates
  • $5 billion for a 10 year Medical Research Future Fund investment plan
  • $736.6 million for mental health including youth suicide prevention
  • $1 billion for Indigenous health
  • Over $1 billion for child dental services

1.Guaranteeing Medicare

We are increasing Medicare funding by $6 billion, up from $19.5 billion in 2012—13, to $24.9 billion in 2018—19, to $30.7 billion in 2022—23. The Medicare Guarantee Fund, established in 2017—18, allocates $36.6 billion in guaranteed funds for spending on the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) in 2019-20.

We are increasing the Medicare rebate for important diagnostic services, including ultrasound and X-ray imaging to reduce the costs to patients. This will support Australians’ access to bulk-billed diagnostic imaging services. It will encourage radiologists, obstetricians, cardiologists and other specialties to maintain or increase their level of bulk-billing. The Government is investing $198.6 million in this initiative.

We are investing $151.9 million to expand the number of Medicare-eligible MRI machines to more than 50 newly funded units in the past 12 months. New MBS services for MRI of the breast, costing $32.6 million over four years, will help diagnosis for around 14,000 breast cancer patients each year.

The independent experts continue to recommend improvements to the MBS. New and amended Medicare-eligible services will support breast cancer, prostate cancer and brain        surgery patients, people having X-rays, and patients in private hospital emergency departments and intensive care units.

We are committed to reducing out-of-pocket health care costs for Australians. The

Government supports all the recommendations of, and will implement the first stage of our response to, the report of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on Out-of-Pocket Costs.

We will make publicly available the fees and resulting out-of-pocket costs charged by medical specialists, with an initial focus on specialist fees for gynaecology, obstetrics, and cancer services. This will be supported by a community awareness campaign, including a website. It will increase transparency, and enable people, particularly those with private health insurance, to be more informed about costs when choosing a specialist.

2.Strengthening primary care

Improving Indigenous health remains a key target of our refreshed Closing the Gap framework. Funding is boosted to $4.1 billion from 2019—20 to 2022—23 and more than $10 billion over a decade.

Download Budget Report

2019-20_Health_PBS_2.02_Outcome_2

We are delivering a $1.1 billion ‘Strengthening Primary Care’ package, building on the $512 million package in the 2018—19 MYEFO, to support Australia’s doctors and specialists to deliver improved access and outcomes for patients. The Government will invest

$448.5 million in increased funding to deliver a new population based funding approach to support GPs to provide enhanced care and services, initially focussing on Australians over 70 years.

Australians over the age of 70 will be able to voluntarily enter into an agreement with their general practiioner, and receive more personalised, coordinated care, with usual services continuing to be rebatable for the patient under Medicare. GPs and others in their practice will be able to provide consultations, referrals, scripts and test results remotely — without seeing patients face-to-face. This will make it easier and more convenient for people to access timely care and medical advice.

Our investment complements and strengthens Medicare. Doctors will be further supported by a $201.5 million boost for the Practice Incentives Program Quality Improvement Initiative, including retention of the Aged Care Access Incentive, and $187.2 million to increase rebates for 176 GP services from I July 2019.

We will further tackle the ever increasing burden of chronic disease through our Public Health and Chronic Disease program. Funding of $17.2 million over five years will develop several national strategic action plans aimed at improving the lives of Australians living with chronic conditions — specifically, osteoporosis, kidney health, rare diseases, heart disease and stroke, and children’s health. We will also provide a new heart health check under Medicare to better address cardiovascular disease.

Eligible Australian children will continue to be able to access basic dental services and claim up to $1 ,000 in benefits under the Child Dental Benefits Schedule, with the Government investing over $1.0 billion for the next three years from 1 January 2020.

We will spend $12 million over the next three years to extend the reach of the childhood immunisation education campaign to save lives by protecting children from serious diseases.

We are implementing a National Rural Generalist Pathway, allocating $62.2 million over five years to ensure rural generalists are trained, recognised and resourced to meet the critical health needs of rural Australians.

Improving Indigenous health remains a key target of our refreshed Closing the Gap framework. Funding is boosted to $4.1 billion from 2019—20 to 2022—23 and more than $10 billion over a decade.

3. Improving access to medicines

The Liberal National Government has provisioned $40 billion in the forward estimates for life-saving and life-changing medicines. We are averaging 31 new or amended listings per month — approximately one per day.

We continue our commitment to ensure people have affordable access to medicines when they need it, through listing all medicines on the PBS that have received a positive recommendation from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC).

From I May 2019, Ibrance@ will be available on the PBS for the treatment of inoperable advanced metastatic breast cancer. Patients will pay $6.50 or $40.30 for the drug. Without subsidy, they would pay $55,000 per year.

From 1 May 2019, Bavencio will be available on the PBS for the treatment of metastatic merkel cell carcinoma, a rare and highly aggressive type of skin cancer. Without subsidy, they would pay $150,000 per year.

From 1 May 2019, Besponsa@ will be available on the PBS for the freatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Without subsidy, they would pay $120,000 per year.

Tagrisso@ is now available on the PBS for the treatment of lung cancer, which would otherwise cost patients $88,000 per course of treatment.

Opdivo@ + Yervoy@ is now available on the PBS for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma, which would otherwise cost patients $254,200 per course of treatment.

Venclexta@ is now available on the PBS, in combination with rituximab for the treatment of adult patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, which would otherwise cost patients around $165,000 per course of treatment.

We are allocating $15 million for a one-off increase to community pharmacy to continue providing support to consumers, to improve the safe use of medication.

4.Supporting our hospitals

We have increased funding for the nation’s public hospitals by $5 billion, up from

$13.3 billion in 2012-13, to $21.7 billion in 2018-19, to $26.2 billion in 2022-23.

In addition, patients in every state and territory will have access to improved health and hospital services under our landmark $1.25 billion Community Health and Hospitals Program (CHHP).

Projects will be delivered through Primary Health Networks, grant funding, and transfer payments to state and territory governments. They include the Comprehensive Children’s Cancer Centre at Sydney’s Children’s Hospital, NSW; Centre for Excellence in Cellular

Immunotherapy at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria; James Cook University — Cairns Tropical Enterprise Centre, Queensland; Repatriation Hospital — Brain and Spinal Centre, South Australia; improved health outcomes for individuals living with brain and spinal cord injuries in Queensland; Peel Health Campus, Western Australia; Ambulatory Care Centre, Alice Springs, Northern Territory; Canberra Hospital Intensive Care Unit, Australian Capital Territory; and North West Cancer Centre linear accelerator, North West Regional Hospital, Tasmania.

The CHHP complements our record investment in public hospitals, which will more than double from $13.3 billion in 2012—13 to $29.1 billion in 2024—25. Our new five year National Health Reform Agreement will deliver more than $30 billion in additional public hospital funding from 2020—21 to 2024—25.

5.Addressing youth mental health and suicide prevention

The Government is boosting mental health funding by $736.6 million, with $461.1 million focused on addressing youth mental health and suicide prevention. The high rate of suicide, particularly among young people, is a national tragedy which we are taking strong action to address. Recognising that the causes of suicide are complex and extend into social services and finances, the Prime Minister will make suicide prevention a key personal priority by creating a Suicide Prevention Co-ordinator in his department to coordinate suicide prevention initiatives across the whole of Government.

The Government’s $461.1 million commitment to addressing youth mental health and suicide prevention is guaranteed, including by providing:

  • $15 million to ensure that communities and services can respond quickly to areas affected by high incidences of suicides and self-harm by creating a new national information system.
  • $15 million to empower Indigenous suicide prevention.
  • $111 million to expand the headspace network by 30 — from the current 115 services to 145 by 2021, to enable more young people to access support.
  • $152 million to reduce wait times at headspace centres around the country. This will bring our total investment in headspace to over $120 million a year.
  • $2 million investment in the Young Ambassadors for Mental Health project, which will enrich these services by enabling young ambassadors with lived experience of mental health issues to get out into the community to promote mental health literacy, and improve how people seek help.
  • $110 million to continue the Early Psychosis Youth Services program at 14 headspace centres to provide specialist clinical services for young people at the early stages of severe mental illness.

Our Government is also dedicated to supporting the mental health of adults around the country in order to promote wellbeing and prevent suicides. To improve how people access care, and the quality of services, we will deliver a trial of adult mental health centres in eight locations nationally, at a cost of $115 million. These will provide walk-in, coordinated care and advice for anyone with concerns, and will address what is seen by many as a missing gap in the health system. We will improve perinatal mental health services by providing $43.9 million to support Australians affected by perinatal mental illness during or after pregnancy, or experiencing grief after the death of an infant. By investing $11.5 million in a National Mental Health Workplace Initiative we will support businesses — from sole traders to multinationals — and workers to create a mentally healthy workplace, giving workers the opportunity to maintain the best possible mental health and wellbeing.

We are also investing an additional $112 million in mental health through the CHHP with a focus on youth and Indigenous mental health and suicide prevention, and integrated community mental health.

6.Investing in life saving and job creating medical research

The Government is ensuring record funding of $6 billion over the forward estimates for medical research, with $3.5 billion for the National Health and Medical Research Council, $0.5 billion for the Biotechnology Translation Fund, and $2.3 billion for the MRFF — up from $222 million in 2018-19 to $650 million in 2022-23.

The Government is committing to a new $5 billion 10-year MRFF investment plan across four themes Patients, Researchers, Missions and Translation. Under the Patients theme, the government will invest $614 million in the rare cancers, rare diseases clinical trials program.

The Government’s 10-year investment plan will give researchers and industry certainty and direction through the four key areas:

7.Patients

The Government will commit a further $931.0 million for a total of $1.3 billion allocated under the Investment Plan to improve the health of Australians through the development of new treatments and cures informed by the latest research and using cutting edge technology, which includes:

  • Clinical Trials for Rare Cancers, Rare Diseases and Unmet Needs – a further

$354.0 million for a total of $614.2 million;

  • Emerging Priorities and Consumer Driven Research – a further $554.0 million for a total of $633.0 million; and
  • Global Health – Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance and Drug Resistant Tuberculosis – a further $23.0 million for a total of $28.4 million.

Researchers

The Government will commit a further $444.6 millionfor a total of $792.8 million allocated under the Investment Plan to support our best health and medical researchers to make breakthrough discoveries, develop their skills and progress their careers in Australia, which includes:

  • Frontier Health and Medical Research – a further $330.0 million for a total of $570.0 million;
  • Industry Researcher Exchange and Training – existing allocation of $32.0 million; and Clinical Researchers – a further $114.6 million for a total of $190.8 million.

Missions

The Government will commit a further $1.2 billion for a total of $1.4 billion allocated under the Investment Plan for long tenn focused missions to address complex and sizeable health issues requiring a concerted effort to transition great ideas through to proof-of-concept and beyond, which includes:

  • Australian Brain Cancer Mission — a further $2.0 million for a total of $ 123.6 million (including $65.3 million in philanthropic contributions, $5.0 million in clinical trials funding and $3.4 million in research funding);
  • Million Minds Mental Health Research Mission – existing allocation of $125.0 million;

Genomics Health Futures Mission – a further $430.2 million for a total of $500.0 million;

  • Ageing, and Aged Care and Dementia Mission – a new investment of $ 185.0 million;
  • Indigenous Health Futures – a new investment of $125.0 million for a total of $160.0 million;
  • Stem Cell Mission – a new investment of $ 150.0 million;
  • Cardiovascular Mission – a new investment of $220.0 million; and Traumatic Brain Injury – a new investment of $50.0 million.

Translation

The Government will commit a further $1.2 billion for a total of $ I .5 billion allocated under the Investment Plan to progress research ideas from the lab to the clinic, ensuring new medical discoveries are part of the clinical practice of GPs, specialists and hospitals, which includes:

  • Preventive and Public Health Research – a further $60.0 million for a total of $260.4 million.
  • Primary Health Care Research – a new investment of $45.0 million;
  • Rapid Applied Research Translation Centres – a further $ 143.0 million for a total of $218.0 million;

Medical Research Commercialisation – a further $254.0 million for a total of $311.3 million;

  • National Critical Infrastructure – a new investment of $605.0 million; and Data Infrastructure – focus on registries, biobanks & linkage platforms – a new investment of $80.0 million.

8.Investing in preventive health

The Budget funds a range of preventive health initiatives to tackle some of Australia’s most pressing social and health challenges. These include lifestyle-related blood diseases, drugs, family and domestic violence, and unhealthy eating.

We are allocating $45.4 million to implement national awareness and prevention strategies to reduce the impact of blood borne viruses, such as HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C, and sexually transmissible infections, such as syphilis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia. These strategies focus on the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

More alcohol and other drug treatment and support services will be established in remote, rural and regional areas, costing $9.6 million. An additional 65 specialist service providers will operate after hours and on weekends across hundreds of under-serviced areas.

Funding of $4.3 million will provide local support for families and communities struggling with the impacts of illicit drug misuse, including ice.

We will also invest $7.2 million establishing a take-home naloxone program to reduce deaths associated with opioids. Naloxone is a proven treatment in reversing the effect of an opioid overdose.

Family and domestic violence has a profound impact on women and children’s health and wellbeing, families and communities, and society. A ‘Recognise, Respond, Refer’ pilot, already under way in Brisbane, will receive a $7.5 million boost to be extended across five Primary Health Network regions to train GPs and their staff to recognise and manage family violence. A complementary $2.1 million training initiative will further improve the domestic violence response of GPs and primary care workers nationally.

The Government will allocate $20 million for a pivotal anti-smoking campaign.

9.Supporting senior Australians

We have increased funding for aged care by $7 billion over the forward estimates, up from $13.3 billion in 2012-13 to $20.5 billion in 2018-19 to $25.4 billion in 2022-23.

We have increased the number of home care packages from 60,308 in 2012—13 to 124,032 in 2018—19 and 157,154 in 2022—23 as part of our ongoing response to senior Australians’ clear preference to receive aged care in their own homes and live independently for longer.

With the rapid growth in home care, the Government is providing $5.6 million to strengthen compliance to tackle the risk of poor quality service and fraud. The Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission — Australia’s new cop on the aged care beat — will have a key role, including increasing home care audits.

The Commonwealth Home Support Program will be extended for a further two years to

30 June 2022, representing an investment of $5.9 billion. This will give certainty to around 1500 organisations, such as meals-on-wheels, supporting almost one million older Australians as they age and start to require assistance while still living in their own home.

In residential aged care, the Government has invested $320 million in 2018—19 as a one-off increase to the general subsidy through to 30 June 2020. This will support the increase in residential places from 186,000 in 2012-13 to 212,000 in 2018-19 to 243,000 in 2022-23. We will also work to significantly improve monitoring and reporting of serious incidents involving residents, including incidents involving physical or chemical restraint.

Funding of $7.7 million will help to ensure the use of medication, in particular inappropriate use of psychotropics and antibiotics, in residential aged care is brought into line with best practice and community expectations. Clinical pharmacists will work directly with aged care providers to better inform them about appropriate use. Providers will be obliged to provide medication management data.

Building the aged care workforce for the future is a high Government priority. We are allocating $2.6 million to step up industry-led implementation of the Aged Care Workforce Strategy. This will improve capability, conditions and career opportunities for more than 366,000 aged care workers.

10. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

The Coalition Government has delivered a stronger economy that ensures we can make record investments in services and opportunities for First Australians.

The 2019-20 Budget includes measures across many Departments that delivers record investments into health, safety, education and employment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

For the first time in a decade the budget will be back in surplus and we are investing the dividends of our strong budget management to make lives better for First Australians.

“This Budget focusses on empowering communities and through job creation, through education and by continuing to deliver the services that keep communities safe, healthy and culturally prosperous.

“The Government’s investments announced in the Budget ensure Indigenous Australians can seize the opportunities we are creating for all Australians from a stronger economy.”

The budget continues the Coalition Government’s efforts to invest in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to deliver services for their communities. Since coming to government we have doubled the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service providers from 30 per cent to 60 per cent.

The cross-portfolio investment in initiatives to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians include:

  • The continued investment of $5.2 billion in the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS).
  • An additional $5.3 billion to support more than 224,000 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander students through the Indigenous loading component of our schools funding package (to 2029).
  • $1 billion for Indigenous health through the Department of Health.
  • $37.5 million to support better housing for residents of remote Indigenous communities in South Australia.
  • $276.5 million for the Indigenous Youth Education Package to give more Indigenous students the support and mentoring they need through their secondary studies.
  • $35 million to support initiatives to address drivers of violence under the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.
  • $2.5 million for the eSafety Commissioner as part of the Fourth Action Plan of the National Action Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children.The eSafety Commissioner will work with and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in communities across Australia to identify, report and protect themselves and their children form technology-facilitated abuse.
  • $5 million towards regionally specific Indigenous Suicide Prevention Initiatives that are tailored to the needs of each community and led by local Indigenous Youth leaders.
  • $35 million contribution to support securing tourism and jobs in Kakadu in Jabiru.
  • $7.3 million to undertake a co-design process with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to detail options for Constitutional Recognition and a Voice to Parliament.
  • $62.4 million over four years under the Skills Package to support participation in the labour market with VET,language, literacy, numeracy, and digital literacy skills assistance in remote communities.
  • $36.4 million over five years for extending the Family Tax Benefit to families of ABSTUDY recipients aged 16 and over who study away from home.
  • A $45.4 million commitment by the Commonwealth over four years for the Barkly Regional Deal to deliver a suite of short, medium and long-term initiatives to support economic and social development in the Barkly region.
  • Regional deals in Hinkler, Albury/Wodonga and Adelaide will pursue opportunities for Indigenous Businesses and employment.
  • Legal Assistance Package – annual increases to baseline funding for Legal Aid Commissions, Community Legal Centres and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services with a single National Mechanism to be developed by the end of 2019.
  • $5 million for getting kids to school through working community by community and school by school to invest in remote and very remote areas for projects that support and promote school attendance.

The $5.2 billion Indigenous Advancement Strategy includes targeted programmes and activities to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians can take advantage of the opportunities the economy is creating. The Indigenous Advancement Strategy delivers on the ground funding in partnership with communities, ensuring children are attending school, adults are in employment and communities are safe.

The $200 million Indigenous Youth Education Package includes initiatives to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander secondary school students. The package will fund additional secondary school scholarships and residential support for students who move away from home to study, and more student support through academy and mentoring projects.

Additionally, the Government is supercharging growth in the Indigenous business sector by expanding the Indigenous Procurement Policy (IPP) by introducing a new 3 per cent value target for all Commonwealth contracts to be awarded to Indigenous business within the next decade. The IPP has resulted in more than $1.83 billion in contracts to more than 1,470 Indigenous companies since it was created in 2015. In contrast fewer than 30 Indigenous companies won a paltry $6.2 million worth of contracts across the Australian Government in the 2012-13 financial year.

Through the Indigenous Business Sector Strategy we are already delivering the $90 million Indigenous Entrepreneurs Fund, $27 million for the Indigenous Entrepreneurs Capital Scheme, $55 million for the Business Development Assistance Program, $21 million for additional microfinance as well as a $20 million Performance Bond Facility.

Through our commitments to housing, better services,reducing the incidents of family and domestic violence,empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, driving investment in the Indigenous businesses, all through deeper engagement and more local decision making, we are delivering a better future for First Australians.