NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Nutrition: #Sugar and #Salt are killing our mob, so let’s #Rethinksugarydrink and #unpackthesalt #GHC2018 @DeadlyChoices

 ” At least 1.1 million litres of so-called “full sugar” soft drink was sold in remote community stores last financial year. One remote community store drawing half of total profits from soft drink sales,

I think particularly in remote communities and very remote communities sugar is just killing the population.

[It’s] putting them into that very high risk area before they get to an age where those chronic diseases are evident.

But I think we are on the crest of the wave of understanding in the communities of the connection between health outcomes and the sort of foods you eat “

In the wake of recent progress report on Closing the Gap, the Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion made this observation

“I think we can all agree that poor diet in communities with consumption of fat, salt and sugar has a large impact on life expectancy in communities,” he said.

“Full sugar soft drinks are a major contributor.”

Outback Stores, which runs 36 small supermarkets in remote Aboriginal communities,the company’s chief executive Steven Moore told the committee the figures for soft drink sales are “astounding”.

” An inspiring television campaign featuring Victorian Aboriginal community members sharing how cutting back on sugary drinks has helped their health and wellbeing was launched early this year .

The ‘Our Stories’ campaign features local Aboriginal health champions yarning about their personal journeys of cutting back on sugary drinks and creating healthier environments for Aboriginal communities.

The Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc (VACCHO) and 17 other leading health bodies working on Rethink Sugary Drink are behind the campaign.” 

 View the Rethink Sugary Drink campaign and details of their Webinar Part 2 Below 

 ” Government to work with the food industry and community stores to implement retail intervention strategies to positively influence access to and consumption of healthy food choices for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities “

Extract from NACCHO Network Submission to the Select Committee’s Obesity Epidemic in Australia Inquiry. 

Download the full 15 Page submission HERE

Obesity Epidemic in Australia – Network Submission – 6.7.18

Amata SA was an alcohol-free community, but some years earlier its population of just under 400 people had been consuming 40,000 litres of soft drink annually.

See NACCHO Story

Read and or Subscribe to 50Aboriginal Health and Nutrition articles 

Read and or Subscribe to 27 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and sugar tax articles 

Read over 50 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Obesity articles published in past 6 years 

 ” Given the high rates of hypertension, CVD and CKD in the Indigenous Australian population, particularly in remote communities, lowering salt intake could significantly reduce chronic disease burden.

Salt intakes of the remote Indigenous Australian population are far above recommendations, likely contributing to the high prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular mortality experienced by this population.

Salt-reduction strategies could considerably reduce salt intake in this population without increasing risk of iodine deficiency at the population-level.

Indigenous Australians experience premature mortality due to chronic disease at a highly disproportionate rate, and much earlier age, compared with non-Indigenous Australians .

 Risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in Indigenous Australians is nearly twice that of non-Indigenous Australians [2], and CVD is responsible for approximately 3 years of the life-expectancy gap experienced by this population .

 The high prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the Indigenous Australian population is growing concern, particularly in very remote areas; nearly four in ten Indigenous Australians living in very remote Australia have indicators of CKD .

Dietary improvement strategies are a priority for reducing chronic disease risk and improving health equity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.”

Read research in full HERE

Part 1: Draft salt targets for food manufacturers are welcome but regular monitoring is key to success, says the Heart Foundation, VicHealth and The George Institute for Global Health

 

Draft salt targets for food manufacturers are welcome but regular monitoring is key to success, the Heart Foundation, VicHealth and The George Institute for Global Health said last week

The call came with the release of a recent consumer survey by VicHealth, which found that more than 70 per cent of people want home brand products to contain less salt, and 60 per cent would pick a low- salt product off the supermarket shelf over a salty version.

At a parliamentary breakfast , the coalition of organisations representing the Victorian Salt Reduction Partnership supported the Federal Government’s current consultation on draft salt targets for a range of processed and packaged foods including ready meals, pizza, processed meats and baked goods.

The consultation is part of the Healthy Food Partnership, under which the Government, the public health sector and the food industry work together to encourage healthy eating.

The coalition encouraged the Federal Government to:

  1. Set and monitor targets to reduce salt in identified food categories
  2. Measure and monitor changes in population salt intake, and
  3. Highlight the importance of reducing salt as part of a national healthy eating campaign

Heart Foundation CEO Victoria Kellie-Ann Jolly welcomed the Federal Government’s public consultation on draft targets.

“We have long advocated for food reformulation and are pleased to see the Government taking steps to address this issue. We know adopting targets to reduce hidden salt in processed and packaged foods is an effective way to reduce Australia’s average salt intake at a population level,” Ms Jolly said.

“Seventy-five per cent of the salt in our diets is hidden in processed and packaged foods. Excess salt can increase your blood pressure, which is a major risk for heart attack, stroke and kidney disease.

“Through our Unpack the Salt campaign, we’ve seen how benchmarking products like pasta sauces opens up a dialogue with manufacturers and is key for encouraging them to consider reducing salt in their processed and packaged foods. If salt levels are adjusted incrementally over time, consumers’ taste expectations adjust accordingly.”

VicHealth CEO Jerril Rechter said community attitudes towards salt are changing. “Consumers are becoming more health conscious which in turn, drives demand for healthier, packaged and processed foods, putting pressure on food manufacturers to reformulate their products,” Ms Rechter said.

“With the majority of consumers calling for healthier, reduced salt products on our supermarket shelves, it’s time that industry and the Government meets this demand.

“We also know that not everyone understands the impact of too much salt on their health. A national healthy eating campaign is needed to ensure people can make an informed decision about the food they eat.”

The George Institute for Global Health’s Dr Jacqui Webster warned Australia seriously lags in its efforts to address salt intake at a population level.

“The United Kingdom has one of the lowest salt intakes of any developed country. They achieved a 15 per cent reduction through strong government leadership that set salt targets for the food industry and actively monitored their progress,” Dr Webster said.

“If Australia is to meet its commitment to the World Health Organization target of a 30 per cent reduction in salt by 2025, then we need more urgent action. That’s why we welcome the Federal Government’s commitment through the Healthy Food Partnership to drive change through targets for sodium levels in foods.

“To ensure the success of these targets, we need the Federal Government to commit to funding implementation and monitoring as well as delivering a national healthy eating campaign, with a focus on the importance of reducing salt.

“Eating too much salt increases blood pressure which is one of the biggest contributors to premature death and disability in Australia. Reducing Australian salt consumption would save thousands of lives each year as well as millions in healthcare costs.”

For more information about salt reformulation please visit Unpack the Salt website.

Part 2 Re Think sugary drink Webinar 

An inspiring new television campaign featuring Victorian Aboriginal community members sharing how cutting back on sugary drinks has helped their health and wellbeing was launched early this year .

The ‘Our Stories’ campaign features local Aboriginal health champions yarning about their personal journeys of cutting back on sugary drinks and creating healthier environments for Aboriginal communities.

View Video 2

The Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc (VACCHO) and 17 other leading health bodies working on Rethink Sugary Drink are behind the campaign.

Michelle Crilly is a young Yorta Yorta woman who features in one of the three advertisements. She shares her experience in making the choice to switch from sugary drinks to water.

“I was driving home one day, probably about three years ago. I was 20, and I had some chest pain. And being so young I got really worried,” Ms Crilly said.

“I used to be addicted to Slurpees. I’d also drink about 4–5 cans of soft drink every day… [Now] I exercise every day and I don’t have as much anxiety and I don’t feel depressed anymore.”

In the advertisement, Michelle urges others in the Aboriginal community to follow her lead.

“Keep going with your healthy lifestyle changes. It doesn’t happen overnight but eventually it will become a part of your daily routine,” she said.

Around two thirds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 14–30 regularly drink sugary drinksi.

“Given the considerable burden of overweight and obesity-related chronic disease in the Aboriginal population, targeted campaigns are required to increase awareness and reduce consumption of sugary drinks among the Victorian Aboriginal community,” said Louise Lyons, Director of Public Health and Research at VACCHO.

“Some people might not realise but sugary drinks, like soft drinks, energy drinks and sports drinks, are loaded with ridiculous amounts of sugar. All that extra sugar is no good for our bodies, so drinking too much can lead to tooth decay and weight gain, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart and kidney disease, stroke and some cancers.”

Sugary drinks are a major contributor to Australia’s obesity problem, said Craig Sinclair, Chair of the Public Health Committee at Cancer Council Australia – a partner of Rethink Sugary Drink.

“The ‘Our Stories’ campaign shows there is no need for any kind of sugary drinks in a healthy diet. We recommend Australians take a look and see just how much sugar is in these drinks – some have as many as 17 teaspoons of sugar – and choose water instead.”

The advertisements ran for two months on regional WIN television in Victoria and were shared widely on social media by health and community organisations.

How much sugar is in your drink?

Find out how much sugar is in your favourite drink using the table above – it might surprise you.

If you’re ordering a fast food meal, don’t go with the default regular/sugar soft drink, see what other options there are.

Carry a water bottle, so you don’t have to buy a drink if you’re thirsty.

If you’re thirsty, have some water first.

Be wary of any health or nutrition claims on the drinks you buy. Many producers are now trying to make their sugar sweetened beverages sound healthier than they actually are. Refer to the amount for sugar on the nutrition panel if in doubt and consider the size of the bottle as well

If you consume sugary alcoholic drinks, see if there are lower sugar options. Even alcohol alone is loaded with kilojoules so cutting back on the booze is also good.

Try to avoid going down the soft drink aisle at the supermarket and beware the specials at the petrol station.

 

Sport, physical activity and nutrition go hand-in-hand so sports clubs and recreation centres play a vital role in helping people lead healthy and active lives.

Selling sugary drinks in a sporting environment undermines the healthy choices Australians are making. It is more important than ever to make sports clubs and recreation centres part of the solution.

In this webinar, on 5 September, our knowledgeable presenters discuss ways sport and recreational environments can implement or maintain changes they have made to reduce sugary drink availability.

The presentation will celebrate the success of thriving organisations and offer practical tips and strategies for sport and recreational groups looking to reduce the availability of sugary drinks.

We are also excited to launch a Rethink Sugary Drink competition. The Victorian based competition serves as a great opportunity for sports clubs and recreation centres to reduce their sugary drink availability or celebrate the changes these organisations have made. Tune in to see what prizes are in store!

DATE: Wednesday 5 September 2018

START TIME: 1pm

WEBINAR DURATION: 1 hour and 10 minutes

REGISTER ONLINE HERE

PRESENTERS:

We welcome your comments below on solutions

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Racism Debate #itstopswithme : Download @AusHumanRights Report, Anti-Racism in 2018 and Beyond : “Aboriginal people experience racism in systemic and institutional ways “

“The causes of racism are multiple. It can be caused not just by ignorance but also by arrogance; it can be caused by malice as well as by lazy assumptions.

While is some cases, the causes lay in attitudes and behaviour, in others, they lay within systems and institutions,”

The outgoing Race Discrimination Commissioner, Dr Tim Soutphommasane, has this week called for urgent action on measures to reduce racism at the  launch of his final report before stepping down this week.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience racism in systemic and institutional ways.

In 2016, 46 per cent of Indigenous respondents reported experiencing prejudice in the previous six months, compared to 39 per cent for the same period two years before.

Thirty-seven per cent reported experiencing racial prejudice in the form of verbal abuse, and 17 per cent reported physical violence

In 2015-16, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accounted for 54 per cent of complaints received by the Commission under the Racial Discrimination Act.

Download report here Anti-Racism in 2018 and Beyond

For many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, systemic racism is bound up in historical disadvantage and mistreatment. Practices such as that of removing Aboriginal children from their families have caused huge amounts of hurt and pain for individuals, families and communities. This shows up in lots of different ways – poor health, high rates of mental illness and family breakdowns.”

See Section 2 Below 

“On an individual level, exposure to racism is associated with psychological distress, depression, poor quality of life, and substance misuse, all of which contribute significantly to the overall ill-health experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Prolonged experience of stress can also have physical health effects, such as on the immune, endocrine and cardiovascular systems.”

Pat Anderson is chairwoman of the Lowitja Institute,  (and a former chair of NACCHO) see her opinion article below link ” This article has been read over 22,000 times in past 4 years 

NACCHO Aboriginal health and racism : What are the impacts of racism on Aboriginal health ?

There is an underbelly of racism in this country, of ignorance, and of fear” Senator Pat Dodson responds to maiden senate speech by Senator Anning WATCH VIDEO

True or False? We fact-check Senator Fraser Anning on his comments regarding Muslims, crime and welfare. http://bit.ly/2PdDH8H

Human Rights Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Website

 

 

The Report, Anti-Racism in 2018 and Beyond, is part of the National Anti-Racism Strategy – a partnership-based strategy –  which was launched in 2012.

Watch Video

Today’s report reveals the increasing need for strong anti-racism policies and leadership, given the rise of anti-immigration and far-right populism.

“Since 2015, race has dominated headlines and driven public debates in a way that many would not have anticipated when the National Anti-Racism Strategy was last evaluated,” said Dr Soutphommasane.

“Anti-racism efforts must give voice to the individuals and communities who experience it. Racial prejudice and discrimination have profound silencing effects on those who are their targets,” he said.

The Report looks at the multiple causes of racism and the need for organisations, communities and individuals to not only identify racism, but call it out and build strategies that change behaviours.

Dr Soutphommasane says each and every one of us can make a difference.

 1.What is Racism 

Racism takes many forms and can happen in many places. It includes prejudice, discrimination or hatred directed at someone because of their colour, ethnicity or national origin.

People often associate racism with acts of abuse or harassment. However, it doesn’t need to involve violent or intimidating behaviour. Take racial name-calling and jokes. Or consider situations when people may be excluded from groups or activities because of where they come from.

Racism can be revealed through people’s actions as well as their attitudes. It can also be reflected in systems and institutions. But sometimes it may not be revealed at all. Not all racism is obvious. For example, someone may look through a list of job applicants and decide not to interview people with certain surnames.

Racism is more than just words, beliefs and actions. It includes all the barriers that prevent people from enjoying dignity and equality because of their race.

Many people experience racist behaviour.

The Challenging Racism Project has found that 20 per cent of Australians surveyed had experienced racial discrimination in the form of race hate talk, and about 5 per cent had been attacked because of their race. According to the Scanlon Foundation’s Mapping Social Cohesion survey in 2016, 20 per cent of Australians had experienced racial or religious discrimination during the past 12 months.

Some groups experience racism at higher rates. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and those from culturally diverse backgrounds, often have to deal with systemic forms of discrimination. Such experiences limit the access that members of these groups enjoy to the opportunities and resources offered to many people from Anglo-Australian backgrounds.

For many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, systemic racism is bound up in historical disadvantage and mistreatment. Practices such as that of removing Aboriginal children from their families have caused huge amounts of hurt and pain for individuals, families and communities. This shows up in lots of different ways – poor health, high rates of mental illness and family breakdowns.

Migrants and refugees also regularly experience racism, in particular those who have recently arrived. Media reports and commentary that use negative stereotypes about refugees and migrants can fuel prejudice against these groups in the wider community. These attitudes can make it difficult for new arrivals to find housing and jobs, and to feel connected to their communities.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : From #NT #QLD #NSW #VIC #WA Features New Optimal Care Pathway for our mob with cancer provides principles & guidance to ensure that #cancer care is culturally safe and responsive @CancerAustralia

1.VIC : Melanie Hill Lane Aboriginal Health Worker and Cancer Survior from MDAS ACCHO Kerang has been part of developing Australia’s first Indigenous Cancer Protocol

2.1 NSW : Penrith is set to become the home of a new primary health care service that will help to address the health needs of the local Aboriginal community.

2.2 NSW: Summer Hunt now in charge at Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation #becauseofherwecan

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs : Blow Breathe Cough video activity in Western Arrernte

3.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Deadly Choices Building up a new generation of future leaders

4.1 WA: AHCWA : Commencing the delivery of the Certificate II Family Well-being

5.1 QLD : Rapid Response Syphilis Testing at Wuchopperen Health Service

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

 

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.VIC : Melanie Hill Lane Aboriginal Health Worker and Cancer Survior from MDAS ACCHO Kerang has been part of developing Australia’s first Indigenous Cancer Protocol

“Melanie Hill Lane with her children (From L) Dakoda 11, Chardae 9,Taj 13 and Kai 16. Picture: Daryl Pinder.”

When Melanie Lane was diagnosed with cancer six years ago, she became part of a grim and growing statistic: the rising number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders afflicted by the disease, with a 40 per cent greater likelihood of dying from it than non-indigenous Australians.

A non-smoker and Aboriginal health worker, the mum of four was blown away by her surprise lung tumour diagnosis at the age of 37 during a scan for an unrelated complaint.

Now recovered, she says the treatment and round of surgeries that cleared her two years later — including a partial lung removal — would probably have been a vastly better experience with a new cancer protocol being launched this week by Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt.

Download Optimal care pathway for Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander people with cancer

optimal-care-pathway-for-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-with-cancer

The Australian-first “Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer” includes a detailed series of printed resources to be distributed throughout the health system aimed at practitioners and patients. It works from the principle that indigenous Australians have specific cultural needs and their outcomes will be better if these are taken into account.

Low screening rates and later-stage diagnoses are troubling hurdles, according to Jacinta Elston, pro-vice-­chancellor (indigenous) at Monash University and, like Ms Lane, a contributor to the new Cancer Australia resource.

“We know Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are not getting the best out of the system,” said Professor Elston, a breast cancer survivor herself. “Whether it’s late presentation to healthcare services or lack of access to same-stage treatment, which could be to do with cultural appropriateness of services or people living in poverty not having the same access.

“Or Stolen Generations, where people have a lot of other things going on in life, or people living with chronic diseases; if you’re living with other diseases … then being in the right mindset to do all the right preventative things might be difficult.”

With cancer now the second- leading cause of death of indigenous Australians after cardiovascular disease, Mr Wyatt predicted the new approach could have a significant effect on attempts to close the gap on indigenous health disadvantage.

“The impacts of trauma across generations of our people, including historical events, must be acknowledged and addressed,” he said. “It is important for health services and programs to understand that the biological impact of stress and trauma can be an underlying cause of poor health.”

VIEW VIDEO

Prof Tom Calma explains how the new Optimal Care Pathway will help to ensure quality care for Indigenous Australians with cancer to improve their treatment experience & outcomes

A new, first of its kind, Optimal Care Pathway released today identifies approaches to quality care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer to improve their cancer treatment experience and outcomes.

Cancer is the third leading cause of fatal burden of disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are, on average, 40 per cent more likely to die from cancer than non-Indigenous Australians.

Healthcare that is patient-focused and that is respectful of, and responsive to, the preferences, needs and values of patients, is critical to good health care outcomes.

The Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer provides health services and health professionals across all sectors in Australia with principles and guidance to ensure that care is responsive to the needs of Indigenous people.

Cancer Australia is calling on health professionals and health services involved in the delivery of cancer care at every level to read, use, adopt and embed the Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer into their practice.

The Optimal Care Pathway is accompanied by consumer resources, which outline what patients should expect on the cancer pathway, and the care they should be offered, from tests and diagnosis, through to treatment and care after treatment, management of cancer that has spread, and end-of-life care.

Cancer Australia has partnered with the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Victoria, in collaboration with Cancer Council Victoria, to develop this first population-based Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer.

Cancer Australia gratefully acknowledge the contribution of Cancer Australia’s Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control, who provided high level expert advice and guidance throughout the development of the Optimal Care Pathway.

For more information

2.1 NSW : Penrith is set to become the home of a new primary health care service that will help to address the health needs of the local Aboriginal community.

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) recently announced the opening of the new Penrith Aboriginal Medical Service clinic, which is set to help fill the gap in the health needs of Aboriginal locals.

WACHS’ Executive Manager of Business Services, Adam Stuart, said the clinic will deliver a comprehensive primary health care service, similar to the services offered at their Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service centre in Mt Druitt.

“We look forward to establishing a new service to really address something that is probably a gap in the health needs of the Aboriginal population in that area,” he said.

“There is a whole range of access barriers sometimes to the hospital system, so this is about a service that provides a culturally safe service for that area and that community.”

The new clinic will create six positions with a GP, nurses, Aboriginal health workers and transportation aids set to help make up the service.

Mr Stuart said these services were a recognition of the Aboriginal population’s health needs in the Nepean Blue Mountains region.

“We know that the Aboriginal population in the Nepean and western Sydney area is one of the largest numbers in the country and the demographics of that population show they are a lot younger community,” he said.

“The other thing is that we know that the disparities in health outcomes is well documented, so we want to look at a primary health care service that can assist in going some way in addressing that need.”

Mr Stuart said it was important to provide better access to care for the Aboriginal community.

“We are trying to address those access barriers and what we would consider our preventable hospital admissions that can be prevented by timely access to appropriate primary health care,” he said.

Located in Lawson Street, Penrith, the establishment of the clinic was a result of funding provided by the Department of Health and the Ministry of Health in 2017.

“We want to acknowledge the support of NSW Ministry of Health and the local health district for providing $1.5 million in capital works funding,” Mr Stuart said.

2.2 NSW: Summer Hunt now in charge at Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation #becauseofherwecan 

Above :Incoming Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation CEO Summer Hunt, chairperson Jan Etrich and outgoing CEO Barry Stewart.

COOMEALLA Health Aboriginal Corporation (CHAC) has appointed Summer Hunt as its new chief executive officer.

Ms Hunt will transition to the role after three years working as deputy CEO to Barry Stewart.

Mr Stewart and Ms Hunt were appointed in 2015 in the roles of CEO and deputy CEO respectively, and at that time implemented a three-year plan for Mr Stewart to oversee a set of key changes required to stabilise and improve the organisation. Ms Hunt undertook an intensive on-the-job training program before moving into the CEO role.

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs : Blow Breathe Cough video activity in Western Arrernte 

Australian Hearing and Menzies School of Health Research have collaborated to create an animated version of this classroom favourite: the Blow Breathe Cough activity in Western Arrernte . Check it out!

View Video HERE 

3.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Deadly Choices Building up a new generation of future leaders

Deadly Choices ran a session on Leadership at Moulden Primary School with the grade 5s, followed by playing a traditional Indigenous game called Edor. Our Deadly Choices team recently added Moulden Primary school, meaning we can now deliver education on healthy lifestyles to school kids of all ages. Building up a new generation of future leaders.

4.1 WA: AHCWA : Commencing the delivery of the Certificate II Family Well-being

With the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia – AHCWA commencing the delivery of the Certificate II Family Well-being, AHCWA Youth Committee members have taken the opportunity to participate and develop our skills. We have found it to be very beneficial not only for our professional careers in the Health Sector, but also our personal lives 💫

For more info on the Certificate II Family Well-Being, please contact AHCWA on 9227 1631.

5.1 QLD : Rapid Response Syphilis Testing at Wuchopperen Health Service

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited  rolled out rapid, point of care testing for syphilis on Monday 13 August.

The tests are part of an $8.8 million Australian government initiative to combat the syphilis outbreak in northern Australia.

Wuchopperen CEO Dania Ahwang said she welcomed the new tests.

‘These tests will make a difference to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in northern Australia, and may even save lives.’

‘We welcome the Australian Government’s investment in this critically important public health issue.’

‘I urge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 – 39 to come in for a point of care test from Monday onwards. If you are outside that age group and have concerns, standard blood tests are always available.’

Wuchopperen Medical Director Dr Jacqueline Mein said the new tests offered a range of benefits.

‘The finger prick test takes 15 minutes to get a result compared to a standard blood test which can take a number of days to get processed,’ she explained.

‘This means that the client can get their results fast, and any follow up tests or treatment can be booked in on the spot.’

‘Point of care testing reduces the risk of the condition being passed on while clients are waiting for their results, or of not being able to get in touch with a client once the results are in.’

‘I
n the event of a positive test, it also makes it easier to find out who a client may have passed the condition on to.’

Wuchopperen has received 3000 tests, and will be offering them to all clients aged 15 – 39. The tests are available from the Manoora and Edmonton facilities from Monday 13 August.

Image: Registered Nurse Amon Nteziryayo conducting a rapid test

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and the #StolenGeneration : Download #ActionPlanForHealing @AIHW and @HealingOurWay Report that has uncovered an alarming and disproportionate level of #StolenGenerations disadvantage

We now know that around 17,000 members of the Stolen Generations are living across Australia today and that they experience higher levels of adversity in relation to most of the 38 key health and welfare outcomes analysed in the report,” 

Even compared to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the same age group, who are already at a disadvantage, Stolen Generations members are suffering more.

It’s important to remember that behind all the data, are real people who are living with adversity every day and who have shared their stories many times over the past decade.

Healing Foundation Board Chair Professor Steve Larkin says the report, which was commissioned by The Healing Foundation, has uncovered an alarming level of social and economic disadvantage for our Stolen Generations and their descendants. See full press release Part 1 below 

Download full report HERE 

aihw-ihw-Stolen Generation Report

While the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd Government failed to commission this important work following the National Apology in 2008, I am pleased that we now have a comprehensive understanding of the demographics and needs of surviving members of the Stolen Generations.

The Stolen Generations have experienced a lifetime of trauma, grief and loss, a legacy which is still felt in families and communities across Australia,

The results are significant and illustrate the enduring devastation of past government policies.

I thank the AIHW and the Healing Foundation for their comprehensive work on this report, the first analysis of its kind.

“These findings will help all governments to better support the Stolen Generations and their families.

Minister of Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion see full Press Release Part 2

A Shorten Labor Government will respond to the legacy of pain and trauma that the Stolen Generations, their families and their communities continue to experience today. A Shorten Labor Government will establish a Stolen Generations Compensation Scheme.

To each of the survivors removed from their families, country and culture we will offer an ex gratia payment of $75,000. As well as a one-off payment of $7000 to ensure the costs of their funeral are covered.

See Labor Party Press Release HERE 

Labor Party Stolen Generation response Press Release

 

A new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare highlights the urgent need to overhaul policies and services for Australia’s Stolen Generations and tackle the impact of Intergenerational Trauma in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, according to The Healing Foundation Board Chair Steve Larkin.

According to today’s report the Stolen Generations are more than three times as likely to have been incarcerated in the last five years, almost twice as likely to rely on government payments and 1.5 times as likely to experience poor mental health. They are also more likely to suffer chronic health conditions like cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

“For the first time, we have comprehensive data to illustrate a direct link between poor health and welfare outcomes and the forced removal of tens of thousands of children from their families,” said Professor Larkin

“And we can also see the ongoing impact on subsequent generations.”

The AIHW report shows that the descendants of the Stolen Generations consistently experience poorer health and social outcomes, compared to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. For example, they are almost twice as likely to have experienced violence, 1.5 times as likely to have been arrested by police (in the last 5 years) and 1.2 times as likely to have used substances (in the preceding 12 months).

Professor Larkin said the level of disadvantage outlined in the report was appalling but should not come as a surprise.

“The Stolen Generations were denied a proper education or a decent wage, which put them at a financial loss right from the start. But more fundamentally, they endured significant childhood trauma when they were taken from their families, isolated, institutionalised and often abused.

“If people don’t have an opportunity to heal from trauma, it continues to impact on the way they think and behave, which can lead to a range of negative outcomes, including poor health, substance abuse, suicide and violence.

“This leads to a vicious cycle of trauma, and its many insidious symptoms, and increasing levels of social and economic disadvantage, across generations,” said Professor Larkin.

“This report shows us that one third of today’s adult Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community are descendants of the Stolen Generations and that number is going to keep growing.

“If we don’t break the trauma cycle soon, adversity for our people will keep increasing, the gaps with non-Indigenous Australians will keep widening and so will the cost to the Australian taxpayer.”

Today’s demographic report is the first step in The Healing Foundation’s Action Plan for Healing project, which the federal government funded last year.

Professor Larkin said we need to act quickly to scale up appropriate services, address reparations at a national level and deal with the complex aged care needs that have been outlined in the report.

“We also need a National Intergenerational Trauma Strategy to halt the spread of trauma and attack the root cause of many social and health problems.

“It’s too late for many of the Stolen Generations who died young and tragically because of the poor health and welfare issues outlined in this report, but we can do better for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people still experiencing the impacts,” he said.

The Healing Foundation is a national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation that partners with communities to heal trauma caused by the widespread and deliberate disruption of populations, cultures and languages over 230 years. This includes specific actions like the forced removal of children from their families.

Download the Above as a PDF 

HF_Stolen_Gererations_2Page_Infographics_Aug2018_V1 (1)

Part 2 Government  Press Release

The Turnbull Government has today released a landmark analysis conducted by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) in partnership with the Healing Foundation into the outcomes and current needs of the Stolen Generations.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations and descendants: Numbers, demographic characteristics and selected outcomes report found that there are an estimated 17,000 members of the Stolen Generations alive in 2018 who continue to experience significant social and economic disadvantage compared to other Indigenous Australians.

The report estimated that an average of 11 percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people born before 1972 were removed from their families.

The Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion said this report was a critical analysis needed to enable governments to better meet the contemporary needs of members of the Stolen Generations.

“The Turnbull Government will consult with the Indigenous Advisory Council and continue to work with members of the Stolen Generations to ensure that the Stolen Generations and their families receive the support they require.”

The Commonwealth has provided around $50 million to the Healing Foundation since 2009 to support their work and is currently delivering more than $44 million to over 100 organisations to provide social and emotional wellbeing activities including to support members of the Stolen Generations and their families.

The report was commissioned by the Australian Government in partnership with the Healing Foundation. This work was undertaken in response to the Healing Foundation’s Report titled Bringing them Home 20 years on: an action plan for healing,  which recommended a comprehensive analysis to understand the current needs of the Stolen Generations.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities #Doctors wanted #Rural and Remote Plus #NT@AMSANTaus @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #NSW @ahmrc #QLD @ATSICHSBris @DeadlyChoices @IUIH_ @Apunipima #VIC @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 ACCHO Job/s of the week 

1.2 NACCHO JOBS -Canberra Office

1.3 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Royal Flying Doctor Service /IAHA 

Aboriginal Male Health 20 Scholarships 

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland

2.Queensland 

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 Rumbalara ACCHO  PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rura

7.2  South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

7.3 Yerin : Permanent Full Time Aboriginal Permanency Support Manager (OOHC)

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

University of Melbourne in Indigenous Eye Health.

Project Officer UNSW

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

1. 1 ACCHO Job/s of the week

Gidgee Healing is currently seeking a General Practitioner to deliver integrated, comprehensive primary health care services at their Normanton Primary Health Care.

You will be supported by a team of dedicated clinic staff including Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Medical Receptionists, Practice Managers and visiting Specialists and Allied Health providers; in addition to community and secondary service providers.

ESSENTIAL CRITERIA:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding unconditional current registration with AHPRA
  • Vocationally Registered, FRACGP or FACRRM
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number
  • Knowledge, understanding and sensitivity towards the social, economic and cultural factors affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health.

ABOUT US:

Gidgee Healing is a dynamic Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service that provides a comprehensive and growing range of primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people residing in the Mount Isa, North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria regions. Our services include General Practice, maternal and child health, social and preventative health, health promotion and education, allied health and specialist services. Gidgee Healing is also the lead agency for headspace Mount Isa and the Normanton Recovery and Community Wellbeing Service. The organisation strives to provide high quality health and wellbeing services in a culturally welcoming environment, to enhance the accessibility and uptake of health services by our clients and support the early identification and management of illness and chronic diseases.

ABOUT NORMANTON:

Normanton, come and enjoy the endless blue skies and beautiful, warm weather. If you’re after a tree change, then Normanton is the place for you. With the Gulf of Carpentaria only an hour’s drive away, so much to see and do, in and around Normanton and its surrounding areas.

Normanton is unique and fascinating, something for most enthusiasts; there is the Gulflander train that operates from Normanton to Croyden, which was built in the 1890’s for the gold rush.

A photo opportunity with Krys, a statue of a saltwater crocodile, 8.64 metres long that was taken from the Norman River.

The famous Purple Pub, one of the most photographed places in town. Normanton is also famous for the cloud formation, Morning Glory.

For nature lovers, there is Mutton Hole Conservation Park, 9000 hectares of wetlands between Karumba and Normanton, don’t forget to bring your binoculars for the beautiful birdlife and the odd crocodile!

If fishing is your passion, then this is your paradise; with the Norman River and Karumba, only up the road, take a fishing charter or fish safely from the bank on the mouth of the Norman River in Karumba or the Gulf itself. The Barramundi fishing is great, come and try your luck!

After a hard day fishing, why not spend a lazy afternoon, relaxing in the idyllic Sunset Tavern, Karumba and watch the amazing view of our sunsets, absolutely spectacular!

Applications close COB Monday 20th August, 2018

To apply online, please click on the appropriate link below. Alternatively, for a confidential discussion, please contact Roxann Parker on (07) 4749 6501, quoting Ref No. 822865.

APPLY HERE

 

Aboriginal Corporation  Medical Practitioner X 2

About the business

Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (PWHSAC) provides comprehensive Primary Health Care services to Aboriginal people in a proactive and culturally appropriate way.  PWHSAC is based in Port Augusta with clinics in Davenport Community, Copley and Nepabunna.

About the role

Medical Practitioners work with our experienced Aboriginal Health Workers and allied health professionals (Physio, Diabetic Educator, Imms Nurse etc with many visiting specialists).

Benefits and perks

In return for your hard work and dedication you will be rewarded with an attractive salary base, together with superannuation, generous salary packaging up to $16,000. through Maxxia, to increase you take home pay.  Substantial additional benefits through Rural Incentive payments also apply.

Relocation assistance

Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is also willing to negotiate relocation assistance and generous accommodation subsidies for the right candidate.

APPLY HERE

Rural GP – Aboriginal Health Service – Coastal South Australia

The RDWA is working with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service (CKAHS) to recruit a full time GP. This is a highly rewarding role and would suit a GP who thrives on a broad scope of practice and is committed to improving the health outcomes of the community. An excellent package is on offer and includes housing, generous remuneration between $240,000 – $260,000, relocation assistance, and top tier Commonwealth Government funded financial incentives.

The Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service is located on South Australia’s spectacular Eyre Peninsula. The practice provides a culturally appropriate service to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the township of Ceduna and surrounding outreach services.

Ceduna is a busy regional hub with a population of over 3,500. Boasting beautiful beaches and excellent fishing waters, it is a popular tourist spot and a hub for aquaculture including oyster farming. The town is well serviced with schools, government agencies and retail shops. There are daily flights to Adelaide.

The team at CKAHS consists of Aboriginal Health Workers, a Practice Manager, Practice Nurse and Clinical Coordinator and is well supported by regular visiting Specialist and Allied Health workers. The Ceduna District Health Service (Hospital) and GP Plus Health Care Centre are co-located with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service. Inpatient care and emergency on-call is managed by the town GPs as part of a shared roster. Doctors are well supported by excellent retrieval services and support networks for immediate specialist advice via phone or video link.

Criteria

  • 4 years of general practice experience
  • Emergency medicine experience

For more detailed information or to apply, contact the RDWA Recruitment Team on 08 8234 8277 or via email: recruitment@ruraldoc.com.au

(CKAHS) to recruit a full time GP. This is a highly rewarding role and would suit a GP who thrives on a broad scope of practice and is committed to improving the health outcomes of the community. An excellent package is on offer and includes housing, generous remuneration between $240,000 – $260,000, relocation assistance, and top tier Commonwealth Government funded financial incentives.

The Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service is located on South Australia’s spectacular Eyre Peninsula. The practice provides a culturally appropriate service to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the township of Ceduna and surrounding outreach services.

Ceduna is a busy regional hub with a population of over 3,500. Boasting beautiful beaches and excellent fishing waters, it is a popular tourist spot and a hub for aquaculture including oyster farming. The town is well serviced with schools, government agencies and retail shops. There are daily flights to Adelaide.

The team at CKAHS consists of Aboriginal Health Workers, a Practice Manager, Practice Nurse and Clinical Coordinator and is well supported by regular visiting Specialist and Allied Health workers. The Ceduna District Health Service (Hospital) and GP Plus Health Care Centre are co-located with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service. Inpatient care and emergency on-call is managed by the town GPs as part of a shared roster. Doctors are well supported by excellent retrieval services and support networks for immediate specialist advice via phone or video link.

Criteria

  • 4 years of general practice experience
  • Emergency medicine experience

For more detailed information or to apply, contact the RDWA Recruitment Team on 08 8234 8277 or via email: recruitment@ruraldoc.com.au

 

1.2 NACCHO JOBS -Canberra Office

1.2.1 Senior Policy Officer – National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

The person selected will be a senior member of a policy team including public health medical officers responsible for the development and review of Indigenous health and associated policies.

The person will also be required to represent NACCHO on national reference groups and working parties and at meetings with Government Departments and other agencies. The person would be expected to deliver highly complex correspondence and papers for the Executive, Board and other stakeholders and work with the team to advance the development and implementation of processes, procedures and tools that support the deliver of high quality policy advice.

Conditions of engagement

This position will be offered on a full-time, fixed-term contract for 3 years. An attractive salary of $120,000 pus superannuation will be offered to the successful applicant. NACCHO is a Public Benevolent Institution and therefore staff have access to taxation benefits.

More info and Apply

1.2.2 National Program Coordinator for the QUMAX Program (Quality Use of Medicines for Aboriginal Peoples)

NACCHO manages the QUMAX program on behalf of the Pharmacy Guild of Australia.  The program is designed specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and aims to improve how medicines are used. The program is accessed by some 80 Community Controlled Health Services nationally.

About the role

The person selected will have had experience in managing grants programs, be self- motivated and interested in continuous improvements. The person will be expected to work directly with Community Controlled Health Services and with the Pharmacy Guild of Australia’s QUMAX program manager.  The position is located in NACCHO’s Medicine Policy team.

More Info and APPLY 

1.3 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Royal Flying Doctor Service /IAHA 

The IAHA RFDS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Scholarship supports students to do clinical placements in the rural & remote regions of Aust. Applications close COB Mon 27 Aug. Enquire at admin@iaha.com.au or call 02 6285 1010.

2. Aboriginal Male Health 20 Scholarships 

 

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland


 

 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

2.1 There are 8 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd

Goolburri Health Adv Family Wellbeing and Participation Branch is a division of Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd established to auspice funds from the Department of Child Safety Youth and Women (Child Safety Services), South West Region.

The vision of the organisation is to provide both family wellbeing support, family participation and foster and kinship care functions to and with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families within the South West Region.

We are seeking expressions of interest for the following positions:

BackTrack Kids and Kin Project Officer – SW Region (Full-Time)
To establish and map kinship and community connections for children currently in Out of Home Care – not with Kin or community – and begin the contact and reconnection process with Kin and community.

Administration Officer – SW Region (Toowoomba based) (Part-Time)
To support the Project Officer to create project processes, project database, relevant documentation and in planning visits and travel.

Applications close 5:00pm, Friday 24th August 2018 and must be in writing.
Please forward to:
Family Wellbeing Services Manager
Email: fwb@goolburri.org.au
Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd
PO Box 1198
TOOWOOMBA QLD 4350

Application packages can be obtained by telephoning 07 4637 9953 during business hours.

All positions are “Identified” positions which means it is a genuine occupational requirement that they be filled by Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander persons, as permitted by and arguable under Section 24, 104 and 105 of the Queensland Anti-Discrimination Act (1991). Applicants must have a current Queensland driver’s license a Working with Children Check (Blue Card) and Criminal History Check.

Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co Ltd is an equal opportunity employer and encourages Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply.

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 There are 13 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

 

 

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 17 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3 There are 2 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

 

Current Vacancies
  • Administration Support Officer – SIF

  • Counsellor (Specialised) / Social Worker – Various Roles

  • Support Worker (Community Services)
  • Clinic Receptionist

  • Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

 

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

Job Vacancy Psychologist May 2018
Job Vacancy Case Management Worker
Job Vacancy General Practitioner FCS May 2018
Job Vacancy Psychiatrist – Child and Adolescent

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

Mental Health Clinician (three positions)
General Practitioner Swan Hill
Team Leader, Alcohol and Other Drugs and Mental Health
Kinship caseworker (Mildura)
Kinship caseworker (Swan Hill)
Kinship Reunification Caseworker (Mildura)
Kinship Reunification Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Home-Based Care Caseworker (Mildura)
Home-Based Care Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Aboriginal Family-Led Decision-making Caseworker (Swan Hill)
First Supports Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Caseworker, Prevention and Early Intervention (Swan Hill)
Koori Pre School Assistant (Mildura)
Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Swan Hill)
Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Service (ACSASS) case worker (Swan Hill)
Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Service (ACSASS) case worker (Robinvale)
Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Mildura)
Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Swan Hill)
Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Robinvale)
Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Mildura)
Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Service (ACSASS) case worker (Mildura)
Mental Health Nurse
General Practitioner Mildura

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 Rumbalara ACCHO  PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

New Position – Full time – 38 Hours per week 

The position exists to ensure that the management of the general practice:

  • Fully supports the delivery of quality clinical care by all clinicians working in the practice

  • Provides for the self-sustained operation of the practice (break-even at minimum)

Key Selection Criteria:

  • Understanding of, and commitment to, Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander culture

  • Understanding of general practice

  • Management experience in a small business, ideally general practice management

  • Demonstrated leadership capabilities

  • Development, implementation, and monitoring of policies and processes that ensure effective and efficient operation of a healthcare service

  • Experience in leading healthcare service accreditation

  • Quality management experience

  • Commitment to continuing professional education

  • Valid driver’s license

For further information on this role contact Mr. Soenke Tremper or Ms Cindy McGee on 03- 58200 – 035

Salary Packaging is available

You will be required to hold a valid Victorian Employee Working with Children Check and a current police check completed within the last 2 weeks prior to commencement.

For consideration for an interview, you must obtain a Position Description from Marieta on (03) 5820 6405 or email: marieta.martin@raclimited.com.au and address the Key Selection Criteria, include a current resume, copies of qualifications and a cover letter.

Applications close at 4pm on Tuesday, 28th August 2018 and are to be addressed to:

Human Resources Dept. Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative
PO Box 614
Mooroopna Vic 3629

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

AHMRC Job WEBSITE

7.2  South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

 

The Community Support Officer will be responsible for supervising and reporting on family contact, transport of children, young people and their families to supervised contacts, respite and other scheduled activities. The Community Support Officer may also be required to engage in mentoring activities.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Qualifications, Knowledge and Experience

Essential

* A tertiary qualification in Social Work / Welfare / Community Services / Disability Services or related fields or equivalent experience in a relevant sector

* Demonstrated ability in working with Aboriginal people, their communities and organisations

* The ability to develop and maintain effective working relationships with stakeholders, other agencies and service providers

* Proficiency in report writing and demonstrated ability to develop, organise and maintain records and reports in a timely manner

* Demonstrated computers skills, including the use of all Microsoft Office applications

* Ability to work autonomously under limited supervision, exercising sound professional judgement and seeking advice and consultation when appropriate as well as working as part of a wider team

* Personal organisation skills including time management and ability to prioritise competing demands

* Understanding of the importance of handling sensitive and confidential client or service information

* Clear Working with Children Check and National Police History Check

* Current, valid Driver’s Licence and willingness to transport clients, and travel overnight in regional and interstate areas if required

Desirable

* Aboriginality*

PERSONAL QUALITIES AND ATTRIBUTES

* Effective conflict resolution skills, negotiation, mediation and decision making skills

* Demonstrates initiative and an ability to problem solve

* Good literacy skills

* Effective communication skills including written and verbal communication with the ability to exercise these skills with people at all levels

For a full Position Description and an Application form, please email hr@southcoastams.org.au

7.3 Yerin : Permanent Full Time Aboriginal Permanency Support Manager (OOHC)

Permanent Full Time Aboriginal Permanency Support Manager (OOHC)

Yerin is seeking a suitability qualified Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander individual who will manage the Permanency Support Program (OOHC) team and work with other service providers to ensure high quality service. This role will see you working as part of a team and at times in isolation.

The successful applicant will have Tertiary Qualifications in Community Services or equivalent and a minimum 2 years’ experience managing Permanency Support Programs (OOHC), current working with Children’s Check and current NSW Drivers Licence and undergo a National Criminal History Check.

You’ll also have access to salary sacrificing options up to $15,950 to increase the value of your take home pay.

All applicants MUST obtain an application pack and complete all information contained in the pack, prior to lodging your application for the position. DO NOT APPLY VIA SEEK

This is an identified Position under Section 9A of the NSW Anti-Discrimination Act 1977.

For a confidential discussion about the position please contact Belinda Field, CEO Ph: 02 43511040.

To obtain an application pack – contact Jo Stevens E: recruitment@yerin.org.au or Ph: 02 43511040.

Applications close 5pm 1 September 2018

8. Tasmania

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

University of Melbourne in Indigenous Eye Health.

We currently have a position advertised for a PA/Administrator to join our team in Melbourne. We are really keen to have this job included in your communique for tomorrow. Is this a possibility? Job link below:

http://jobs.unimelb.edu.au/caw/en/job/897300/personal-assistant-indigenous-eye-health

10.2 Project Officer UNSW

UNSW Medicine is a national leader in learning, teaching and research, with close affiliations to a number of Australia’s finest hospitals, research institutes and health care organisations. With a strong presence at UNSW Kensington campus, the faculty have staff and students in teaching hospitals in Sydney as well as regional and rural areas of NSW including Albury/Wodonga, Wagga Wagga, Coffs Harbour and Port Macquarie.

The National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) was established at the University of New South Wales by the Commonwealth Government in 1986 to extend the knowledge base required for effective treatment of individuals with alcohol and other drug related problems and to enhance the overall research capacity in the drug and alcohol field. The Centre is highly regarded, both nationally and internationally, for its contribution to drug and alcohol research.

The Project Officer will oversee project planning, coordination, monitoring and reporting within The Centre of Research Excellence in Mental Health and Substance Use (CREMS). In particular the Project Officer will assist with the adaptation, development, evaluation and dissemination of culturally-appropriate evidencebased information about crystal methamphetamine (“ice”) for and in collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The role of Project Officer reports to a Senior Research Fellow

More INFO APPLY 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health NEWS : @AIHW report : The consumption of #alcohol, #tobacco and other #drugs is a major cause of preventable disease and illness in our communities

The consumption of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs is a major cause of preventable disease and illness in our comminities

There are a wide range of data sources available that contribute to our understanding of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use.

This web report from AIHW is intended to be a general reference for contemporary data on alcohol, tobacco and other drugs in Australia.

SEE Full Report 

This report consolidates the most recently available information regarding the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, meth/amphetamines and other stimulants, the non-medical use of pharmaceutical drugs, illicit opioids (heroin) and new (and emerging) psychoactive substances (NPS).

Key trends in the availability, consumption, harms and treatment are identified and detailed data are presented for vulnerable populations.

These population groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, homeless people, older people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or queer (LGBTIQ), people in contact with the criminal justice system, people with mental health conditions, young people and people who inject drugs

Key findings Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 

  • There has been significant declines in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people smoking and consume alcohol that exceeds lifetime risk guidelines (consuming more than two standard drinks per day on average).
  • The prevalence of smoking by Indigenous people has declined from 55% in 1994 to 45% in 2014–15.
  • The proportion of Indigenous people that consume alcohol as levels that exceed lifetime risk guidelines has reduced from 19% in 2008 to 15% in 2014–15.
  • In 2011, tobacco use accounted for 12% of the burden of disease for Indigenous Australians. This accounts for 23.3% of the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.
  • In 2016, more than 1 in 4 (27%) Indigenous Australians used an illicit drug in the last 12 months. This was 1.8 times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians (15.3%).
  • The most commonly used illicit drug by Indigenous Australians is cannabis (16.7%), followed by the non-medical use of pharmaceutical drugs (11.0%).
  • Of clients of alcohol and other drug, treatment services, 15% were Indigenous Australians aged 10 and over, which is an overrepresentation relative to their population size.

Currently there are almost 800,000 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people (see Box ATSI1) living in Australia, accounting for 2.8% of the Australian population [1]. There are substantial differences in measures of health and welfare between Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians.

Box ATSI1: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The terms ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’ is preferred in Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) publications when referring to the separate Indigenous peoples of Australia. However, the term ‘Indigenous’ Australians is used interchangeably with ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander’ in order to assist readability.

The Australian Burden of Disease Study identified that Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people experience a burden of disease that is 2.3 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians [2]. The gap in the disease burden is due to a range of factors including disconnection to culture, traditions and country, social exclusion, discrimination and isolation, trauma, poverty, and lack of adequate access to services [3]. Tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs are key risk factors contributing to the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians [2].

Box ATSI2. Data sources examining tobacco, alcohol and other drug use by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

There are a number of data sources that provide information about tobacco, alcohol and other drug use by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey (NATSISS) [4] and the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (AATSIHS) [5] collected by the ABS are designed to obtain a representative sample of Indigenous Australians. In relation specifically to tobacco smoking, the ABS has consolidated data from six large, national, multistage random household surveys to identify trends between 1994 and 2014–15 [6].

The AIHW’s National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) uses a self-completion questionnaire to capture information about drug and alcohol use among the general Australian population; however it is not specifically designed to obtain reliable national estimates for Indigenous people. In 2016, 2.4% of the NDSHS (unweighted) sample aged 12 and over (or 568 respondents) identified as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin. The estimates produced by the NDSHS should be interpreted with caution due to the low sample size [7].

There are also other data sources that provide information relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

  • Australia’s Burden of Disease study analyses the impact of nearly 200 diseases and injuries in terms of living with illness (non-fatal burden) and premature death (fatal burden). In 2015, a report was released that provides estimates of burden of disease between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians [8].
  • The National Perinatal Data Collection covers each birth in Australia and includes information on Indigenous mothers and their babies [6].
  • The Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Dataset (AODTS-NMDS) contains information on treatment provided to clients by publicly funded alcohol and other drug services including Indigenous clients [9].
  • The Online Services Report (OSR) contains information on the majority of Australian Government-funded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander substance use services [6].

Tobacco smoking

While tobacco smoking is declining in Australia, it remains disproportionately high among Indigenous Australians. Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has shown:

  • In 1994, the Indigenous Australian survey data showed that 55% of Indigenous Australians aged 18 and over were smokers; 20 years later, in 2014–15, this had declined to 45% (Table S3.4).
  • Over a similar 20-year period, the National Health Survey (NHS) the proportion of non-Indigenous smokers aged 18 and over declined, from 24% in 1995 to 16% in 2014–15 (Table S3.5).
  • There appears to have been no change to the gap in smoking prevalence between the Indigenous Australian adult population and the non-Indigenous Australian adult population from 1994 to 2014–15. Even though the Indigenous Australian smoking rates are declining, the non-Indigenous rate is declining at a similar rate, therefore the gap remained constant [6] (Figure ATSI1).

Most of the decline in smoking occurred in non-remote areas. Over the 20-year period, the proportion of Indigenous Australians aged 18 and over in non-remote areas who were smokers declined from 55% to 42%, while the proportion in remote areas remained relatively stable at between 54% and 56% (Table S3.4).

In 2014–15, Indigenous males were more likely than Indigenous females to be smokers (47% compared with 42%) [1].

Geographic trends

The 2014–15 NATSISS provides estimates of tobacco smoking for Indigenous Australians by jurisdiction. According to the 2014–15 NATSISS, 39% of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over smoked daily. Those from the Northern Territory (45%) and Western Australia (42%) surpassed this national average, while Indigenous Australians from South Australia (35%) were the least likely to be a current daily smoker [4] (Table S3.3).

Tobacco smoking in pregnancy

Indigenous Australians are at an elevated risk of smoking during pregnancy compared with non-Indigenous Australians. The National Perinatal Data Collection showed that:

  • Indigenous mothers accounted for 19% of mothers who smoked tobacco at any time during pregnancy in 2015, despite accounting for only around 4% of mothers.
  • The age-standardised rate of Indigenous mothers smoking during pregnancy has decreased from 50% in 2009 to 45% in 2015.
  • Almost 1 in 2 (45%) Indigenous mothers reported smoking during pregnancy—compared with 12% of non-Indigenous mothers (age-standardised).
  • The age-standardised rate of Indigenous mothers quitting smoking during pregnancy (14%) is about half that of non-Indigenous mothers (25%) (based on mothers who reported smoking in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy and not smoking after 20 weeks of pregnancy) [10].

Alcohol consumption

Abstinence (non-drinkers)

  • The 2016 NDSHS found that Indigenous Australians aged 14 and over were more likely to abstain from drinking alcohol than non-Indigenous Australians (31% compared with 23%, respectively) and abstinence among Indigenous Australians has been increasing since 2010 when it was 25% [7] (Table S3.1).
  • This pattern is consistent with data from the 2012–13 AATSIHS, where 28% of Indigenous Australians reported abstaining from drinking compared with 18% of non-Indigenous Australians [5].

Lifetime risk

  • The 2014–15 NATSISS found that the proportion of Indigenous Australians aged 15 years and over who exceeded the NHMRC lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol consumption (consuming more than 2 standard drinks per day on average) decreased between 2008 and 2014–15 (19% compared with 15%; non age-standardised proportions). The overall change is largely due to a decline in non-remote areas (19% in 2008 to 14% in 2014–15) [4] (Table S3.6).
  • Comparisons between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are only available using age-standardised data from the 2012–13 AATSIHS and is not comparable to the 2014–15 NATSISS. The findings showed that lifetime risky drinking of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over was similar to that of non-Indigenous Australians (9.8% compared with 9.7%; age-standardised) [5] (Table S3.7).

Single occasion risk

  • According to the 2014–15 NATSISS, 30% of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over exceeded the single occasion risk guidelines for alcohol consumption (non age-standardised proportions), which is a decline since 2002 (35%).
  • Comparisons between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are only available using age-standardised data from the 2012–13 AATSIHS and is not comparable to the 2014–15 NATSISS. The 2012–13 AATSIHS reported that 1 in 2 (50%) Indigenous Australians exceed the single occasion risky drinking guidelines (more than 4 standard drinks on a single occasion in past year). This was 1.1 times the rate that non-Indigenous Australians (44%) that exceeded these guidelines [5] (Table S3.7).

Risky alcohol consumption

  • According to the 2016 NDSHS, almost 1 in 5 Indigenous Australians (18.8%) consumed 11 or more standard drinks at least once a month. This was 2.8 times the rate that non-Indigenous Australians (6.8%) consumed this amount of alcohol [7] (Table S3.1).

Geographic trends

Between 2002 and 2014–15 there was a decline in the proportion of Indigenous Australians that resided in New South Wales Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory that exceeded the lifetime and single occasion risk guidelines (Figure ATSI2). Indigenous Australians residing in Tasmania (36%), the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) (35%), Queensland (33%) and Western Australia (33%) had higher rates of exceeding the single occasion drinking guidelines than the national average [4] (Table S3.8).

Indigenous Australians residing in Western Australia (16%), New South Wales (16%) and Queensland (15%) surpassed the national average for exceeding lifetime risk guidelines [4] (Table S3.9).

Illicit drug use

In the 2014–15 NATSISS, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 and over were asked whether they had used illicit substances in the last 12 months, and the types of illicit substances they had used during that period [4]. The data showed that:

  • Almost one-third (30%) of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over reported having used illicit substances in the last 12 months, up from 22% in 2008.
  • Males were significantly more likely than females to have used illicit substances (34% compared with 27%), as were people in non-remote areas compared with those in remote areas (33% compared with 21%).
  • Cannabis was the most commonly reported illicit drug used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the last 12 months at 19% (25% of males compared with 14% of females).
  • The non-medical use of analgesics and sedatives (such as painkillers, sleeping pills and tranquilisers) was also relatively common (13%), with females (15%) being more likely than males (11%) to have used analgesics and sedatives.
  • One in twenty (5%) Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over reported having used amphetamines or speed in the last 12 months (6% of males compared with 3% of females) [4] (Figure ATSI3).

The 2016 NDSHS data showed that (other than ecstasy and cocaine), Indigenous Australians aged 14 and over recent used of illicit drugs was at a higher rate than non-Indigenous Australians (Table S3.1). Rates of illicit drug use in 2016 for Indigenous Australians aged 14 and older were:

  • Over one in four (27%) used any illicit drug in the last 12 months—1.8 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (15.3%)
  • One in five (19.4%) used cannabis in the last 12 months—1.9 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (10.2%)
  • Around one in 10 (10.6%) used a pharmaceutical for non-medical use—2.3 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (4.6%) [7] (Table S3.1)
  • 3.1% used meth/amphetamines in the last 12 months—2.2 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (1.4%).

The differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians were still apparent even after adjusting for differences in age structure (Figure ATSI4). There were no significant changes in illicit use of drugs among Indigenous Australians between 2013 and 2016, however due to the small sample sizes for Indigenous Australians, the estimates of the NDSHS should be interpreted with caution.

Geographic trends

Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over residing in the Northern Territory (22%) were the least likely to report substance use, while those from the Australian Capital Territory (41%) and Victoria (40%) were the most likely to report using substances.

Indigenous Australians from the Northern Territory (22%) and Queensland (29%) were the only jurisdictions below the national average (30%) [4] (Table S3.3).

Health and harms

The health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are considerably lower than for non-Indigenous Australians. For instance:

  • 35.1% of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people compared with 58.3% of non-Indigenous Australia self-assessed their health as ‘excellent’ or ‘very good’ (age-standardised per cent).
  • 32.5% of Indigenous Australians compared with 12.3% of non-Indigenous Australians reported high/very high psychological distress (age-standardised per cent).
  • 71.0% of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people reported having a long-term health condition compared with 55.3% of non-Indigenous Australians (age-standardised per cent) [4] (Table S3.6).

Almost 1 in 2 Indigenous Australians with a mental health condition were a daily smoker (46%) and about 2 in 5 (39%) to have used substances in the last 12 months. This was higher than for Indigenous  Australians with other long-term health conditions (33% and 24%, respectively) or those with no long term health condition (39% and 29% respectively) [4] (Table S3.11).

The Australian Burden of Disease Study provides an indication of the risk factors that contribute to the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. In 2011, tobacco use accounted for 23.3% of the gap, and alcohol and drug use contributed to 8.1% and 4.1% of the gap, respectively [8] (Table S3.12).

Treatment

Indigenous Australians are also overrepresented in drug and alcohol treatment services. In 2016–17, the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Dataset (AODTS-NMDS) showed that 15% of clients were Indigenous Australians aged 10 and over (Table S3.13). Indigenous Australians (3,313 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely to receive AOD treatment services than non-Indigenous Australians (430 per 100,000 population) were. Specifically where:

  • Amphetamines was the principal drug of concern, Indigenous Australians (1,204 per 100,000 population) were 8 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (155 per 100,000 population).
  • Heroin was the principal drug of concern Indigenous Australians (911 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (123 per 100,000 population) were.
  • Cannabis was the principal drug of concern Indigenous Australians (867 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (126 per 100,000 population) were.
  • Alcohol was the principal drug of concern Indigenous Australians (136 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (26 per 100,000 population) [9] (Table S3.14).

Dependence on opioid drugs (including codeine, heroin and oxycodone) can be treated with pharmacotherapy therapy using substitute drugs such as methadone or buprenorphine. The National Opioid Pharmacotherapy Statistics Annual Data collection (NOPSAD) provides information on clients receiving opioid pharmacotherapy treatment on a snapshot day each year. For jurisdictions where data was provided, in 2017:

  • Around 1 in 10 clients (9%) were Indigenous, an overrepresentation relative to their population size.
  • Indigenous Australians were almost 3 times as likely (70 clients per 10,000 population) to receive pharmacotherapy treatment as non-Indigenous Australians (26 clients per 10,000 population) [11] (Table S3.15).

Data from the OSR shows that 2015–16, there were 80 organisations around Australia that provided alcohol and other drug treatment services to around 32,700 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients [6]. The OSR data also shows that:

  • All 80 organisations reported that alcohol was one of the top five common substance-use issue, followed by cannabis (94%) and amphetamines (70%)
  • Treatment episodes were more likely to be to occur in non-residential settings (87%)
  • One third of all treatment episodes were in Very remote areas (32%) and the highest proportion of clients were located in Major cities (35%).

Policy context

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 includes a suite of products that give the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according to a range of 68 performance measures across 3 tiers: Tier 1—health status and outcomes, Tier 2—determinants of health, and Tier 3—health system performance. The measures are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework and cover data that has been collected on the entire health system, including Indigenous-specific services and programs, and mainstream services [12].

National Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Peoples Drug Strategy 2014–2019

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Drug Strategy 2014–2019 was a sub-strategy of the National Drug Strategy 2010–2015 and remains a sub-strategy under the National Drug Strategy 2017–2025. The overarching goal of this sub-strategy is to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by preventing and reducing the harmful effects of alcohol and other drugs (AOD) on individuals, families and their communities [13].

 NACCHO Aboriginal Hearing Health : #OMOZ2018 Ear Health Project Officers will spearhead a new $7.9 million #HearingforLearning program to fight hearing loss among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander childre

Hearing for Learning aims to dramatically lift the capacity for communities to identify ear disease within the first few months of life.

Infants rarely show signs of ear pain, so infections are not detected and diseases like otitis media persist and progress.

By 12 months of age, only five per cent of First Nations children in remote communities have bilateral normal hearing, compared with over 80 per cent of children in the rest of Australia.

Children with undiagnosed hearing loss tend to fall behind at school due to delayed speech and language development.

This can have a huge impact on their early years, future employment opportunities and their chance of a happy and successful life.”

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt AM

The Territory Labor Government promised to put children at the centre of our decision-making, because we want a brighter future for our kids – a future filled with opportunity.

When we focus on the first 1000 days of a child’s life, we know we get better outcomes for their future, and that’s what this partnership aims to do.

Hearing health has an enormous impact on a child’s development, and by addressing this at a community level, the entire community will benefit.” 

NT Chief Minister Michael Gunner

Watch video 

 

Read over 40 Aboriginal Ear and Hearing articles published by NACCHO over last 6 years

Hearing is essential for strong early childhood development and chronic hearing problems in children cause education difficulties leading to entrenched disadvantage.

The Hearing for Learning Initiative is a ground-breaking 5-year investment combining public and private funding to solve this serious health and education problem “

Professor Alan Cass Director Menzies School of Health Research

When we learned about the chronic nature of ear disease in children living in remote communities in the Northern Territory, we could not ignore the fact that this likely leads to profound disadvantage in health, education and employment outcomes.

We believe more must be done and the next step is to support the community to deliver a solution.

Philanthropy plays a unique role in recognising and piloting new approaches, however, it requires partnership with government to deliver these approaches at scale.

The Government is to be applauded for putting this unique partnership together to solve what has now become a serious epidemic.

Neil Balnaves AO, Founder, The Balnaves Foundation and Chancellor, Charles Darwin University

Dozens of local Ear Health Project Officers will spearhead a new $7.9 million program to fight hearing loss among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in the Northern Territory.

The Hearing for Learning initiative will be established in 20 urban, rural and remote sites, where up to 40 local people will strengthen and complement the work of fly-in fly-out (FIFO) ear specialists.

“This is an exciting new opportunity to remove the preventable blight of hearing loss from current and future generations,” said Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt AM.

“These local ear health warriors will integrate with existing primary care services, to help protect the hearing of up to 5,000 children from birth to 16 years old.

“Lifting the capacity of local families to recognise, report and treat ear problems early promises to help our children reach their full potential.”

The initiative will be implemented by the Menzies School of Health Research and co-led by Professor Amanda Leach and Associate Professor Kelvin Kong.

The Hearing for Learning is a ground-breaking 5-year initiative by the Northern Territory Government, founded on scientific research by Northern Territory scientists at Menzies School of Health Research, combining public and private funding to solve this serious health and education problem.

$2.4 million from NT Government

$2.5 million from The Balnaves Foundation

$3 million from the Federal Government

Hearing for Learning aims to dramatically lift the capacity for communities to identify ear disease within the first few months of life,” said Minister Wyatt.

“Infants rarely show signs of ear pain, so infections are not detected and diseases like otitis media persist and progress.

“By 12 months of age, only five per cent of First Nations children in remote communities have bilateral normal hearing, compared with over 80 per cent of children in the rest of Australia.”

“Children with undiagnosed hearing loss tend to fall behind at school due to delayed speech and language development,” Minister Wyatt said.

“This can have a huge impact on their early years, future employment opportunities and their chance of a happy and successful life.”

The Menzies School of Health Research aims to make Hearing for Learning a care model that can be replicated across the nation.

Hearing for Learning will complement the Government’s existing ear health programs, including Healthy Ears, which together will receive funding of $81.8 million over four years from 2018–19.

This includes $30 million for a new outreach program to provide annual hearing assessment, referral and follow-up treatment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children before they start school.

NACCHO Aboriginal #Hearing Health News : 1.⁦⁦⁩#Earhealthforlife 2. Delegates gather for #OMOZ2018 to help close the hearing gap 3. #Hearing #Mentalhealth #communications

” The Otitis Media Australia Conference (OMOZ) this week in Darwin will attract Australia’s leading ear health investigators.

Darwin is a significant location for @OMOZ_2018 as the NT has the highest recorded prevalence of otitis media in the world, up to 90% of children in some communities.

OMOZ provides a forum for all researchers, clinical practitioners, health workers, policy makers, audiologists, speech therapists, ENT surgeons, consumers, educators and primary health care services investigating the prevention and treatment of chronic ear disease and hearing loss in Australia. “

See Part 1 Below to Download full OMOZ 2018 Program 

Conference Website

Read over 40 NACCHO Ear health and hearing articles

 ” The #EarHealthForLife network is committed to a national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Hearing Health Taskforce that can provide evidence-based advice to Government about hearing health. Recognising the extent of missing data and inconsistent metrics on hearing health acrossAustralia, we are also committed to better embedding hearing health in the Closing the Gap targets and associated strategies, and an agreed national standard “

 Part 2 Download Here : Ear Health for Life Booklet A national approach to monitoring ear health

2018-05-15_earhealthforlife_booklet

 “Hearing loss is widespread among Indigenous people because of endemic childhood ear disease. This hearing loss has been described by a senate enquiry as ‘the missing piece of the puzzle in Indigenous disadvantage’[20]. This article seeks to explore a too long neglected issue that, when addressed, has the capacity to improve life outcomes for many Indigenous Australians.

The neglect of this issue in part arises because these communication issues are not‘visible’to those affected or those they communicate with. The hearing loss happens so early and so pervasively that is often ‘normalised’ among those affected.

These origins of communications problems are often obscured by a focus on cross cultural differences as sufficient explanation of communication difficulties that are evident. Most mental health workers are currently ill equipped to understand the communicative needs of people with listening difficulties and the common consequential psycho-social problems.”

Howard D, Barney J (2018) Minced words: the importance of widespread hearing loss as an issue in the mental health of Indigenous Australians. Read Extracts part 3 Below 

Part 1 Download Program 

OMOZ 2018 Program pdf

The conference provides an opportunity to share and learn about the latest evidence-based research and best practice treatment and prevention methods. All aspects of science, public health, policy, pathology, surgery, technology, hearing services, education and community engagement will find an audience. Indigenous researchers, practitioners and officeholders are encouraged to attend.

OMOZ 2018 is committed to excellence in evidence-based research and practice to reduce rates of otitis media and hearing loss in Australia.  This biannual conference encourages innovation by collaborating to find new approaches to solving this problem.

Part 3 Introduction

Download full Paper HERE

bulletin_review_howard final

When we think of people who are hard of hearing, we generally think of someone over fifty who has noise-induced hearing loss.

This stereotype is largely accurate for non-Indigenous Australians. Among this group, 85 per cent of people that are hard of hearing are over fifty [1].

The situation is very different for Indigenous Australians. Among them, hearing loss is far more pervasive and occurs across the entire age profile [2]. This is mainly due to the high incidence of middle ear disease among Indigenous children.

One of childhood’s most common illnesses, otitis media often causes conductive hearing loss [3].

This condition may be temporary, but when it recurs persistently, the cumulative total of time that children spend with ear disease can be substantial.

Crucially, the associated hearing loss occurs during critical periods of development in auditory, cognitive and psycho-social competencies [4, 5].

Persistent ear disease can damage the middle ear structures in ways that result in some degree of permanent mild-to-moderate conductive hearing loss [3]. Thus, from very early on in children’s lives otitis media can result in fluctuating mild-to-moderate levels of hearing loss, auditory processing problems and even permanent hearing loss. Individually and in combination, these impacts can have adverse effects on the psycho-social development of a child, with significant lifelong consequences.

Conversely, people who experience hearing problems later in life have already acquired their language skills, coped with schooling and completed major stages of their family and occupational life. When children experience early onset hearing problems, their cognitive and psycho-social development and subsequent engagement in family life, education and employment can all be affected. The younger the age at which hearing loss occurs, the greater the impacts across life [4, 6].

A common consequence of frequent mild to moderate conductive hearing loss from childhood ear disease is auditory processing problems, which can manifest as greater difficulties understanding what is said when it is noisy [7].

Auditory processing has been described as ‘what we do with what we hear’; how the brain processes the sounds perceived. Long periods of fluctuating hearing loss during critical developmental periods can impact markedly on a child’s auditory processing skills development [7]. Auditory processing problems can exist after hearing loss from ear disease has been resolved, or co-exist with permanent hearing loss from persistent ear disease

Acoustic environment

The acoustic environment greatly influences communication outcomes for people with hearing loss and auditory processing problems. In a good listening environment (where the signal being listened to is loud enough to be easily heard and there is little background noise), people with mild listening difficulties may cope almost as well as those with no hearing problems.

In an adverse acoustic environment, however, people with hearing loss and/or auditory processing problems often find it more challenging to understand what is said as compared to others[15].

Thisdiscrepancy in performance can be difficult for others to understand and can give rise, firstly, to people with listening problems thinking they are less intelligent or less competent than others, and, secondly, to others thinking ‘they can hear when they want to’.

That is, they are judged as not motivated to listen or purposefully ignoring what is said. These kinds of damaging judgments can initiate a cascade of social and emotional problems. Children are often excluded from social connections with family and friends, may be blamed and punished for not listening, or develop self-damaging negative beliefs about their own capacity.

Psycho-social outcomes related to early problems understanding what is said

Non-Indigenous people with hearing loss describe experiencing more anxiety, depression and interpersonal problems [8, 9, 10]. Non-Indigenous Australian children with a history of middle ear disease also report more psycho-social problems [11].

Indigenous children and adults have been found to have more behavioural problems [12, 13] and social problems [14], whilst Indigenous adults with listening problems describe higher levels of psychological distress [6]. Many of Indigenous clients working with psychologists will have mild hearing loss and/or auditory processing problems that contribute to their presenting problems. In our experience, often neither the practitioner nor client are aware of this important factor influencing communication and presenting mental health problems. Cross cultural issues often contribute to this invisiblity

Cross-cultural factors obscure hearing problems

Hearing loss and auditory processing problems among Indigenous people are often obscured by a focus solely on cultural differences as sufficient explanation for certain responses; responses that are in fact related to hearing loss and/or auditory processing problems. These include misunderstanding what is said, extreme shyness, taking longer to respond or not responding in conversation

Indigenous people with communication problems related to hearing loss often experience greater difficulties in unfamiliar Western environments. These problems inhibit the ability to learn what is needed in order to operate effectively in non-Indigenous cultural domains [6]. People may avoid engagement with certain non-Indigenous people and contexts because the unfamiliar social processes are challenging.

Regular avoidance of contact with non- Indigenous people and processes thus acts to restrict exposure to cross cultural experiences. Over time, this means that people with hearing problems don’t have the same level of opportunity to develop a better understanding of Western cultural processes.

This regular avoidance and resulting limited cross-cultural understanding means that what begins as difficulties in understanding what is said, evolves into problems fully understanding what is heard and observed in culturally unfamiliar contexts.

An implication of this is that achieving successful engagement with Indigenous people with hearing loss and/or auditory processing problems often requires facilitation by known Indigenous people within familiar cultural processes [12]. Family members and friends are often crucial to interpret and provide communication support to enable successful engagement.

Issues in mental health practice

Widespread hearing loss and auditory processing problems among Indigenous people have a number of implications for mental health practice.

Enabling Compensatory Strengths

There is inevitably a history of negative social experiences as a result of early and frequent hearing loss. A strengths focused approach is generally recommended for work with Indigenous clients [16]. This is especially important to counter the frequent criticisms from others and habitual negative self-perceptions when people have had longstanding difficulties in understanding what is said to them. Helping clients to recognise their strengths, including the compensatory strengths that are commonly developed in response to hearing difficulties can help to create a reframed self-perception. One that is more realistic, positive and resilient. Common compensatory strengths developed include the following.

Visual Observation

People with early onset hearing loss and auditory processing problems often develop sophisticated and astute powers of visual observation. Their skills include lip-reading, face-watching and reading body language, as well as a highly developed capacity to assess attitudinal and emotional reactions from these observations.

These skills develop both from the greater focus on the use of visual cues for communication in Indigenous cultures [17], as well to compensate for the challenges experienced because of listening problems. This means communication with them that is visually rich is more successful.

In addition to exploring and recognising a client’s visual strengths, it can be helpful to make use of these skills for communication during sessions. For example, a practitioner can use visual materials to support explanations of different points; using a white board, or a tablet, or just pen and paper.

Social support

Indigenous cultures foster problem solving through mutual social support. Seeking help to clarify communications by familiar people who can be trusted not to judge or shame is one of the most common coping strategies used by Indigenous people with hearing loss.

Familiarity

Being familiar with people and social processes greatly reduces listening demands. Where one person has established a positive relationship with another, it provides a framework of shared knowledgethatfosterssuccessfuluseofavarietyofcommunication skills.

“You have to know the person to read their expressions, not all mean exactly the same. With new people I can’t judge what they mean, so it’s hard to know when they’re joking, angry, sad, etc. unless I know them.” (Indigenous worker with auditory processing problems) [6, p23].

Anticipation

Being familiar with processes and people, enables people with hearing loss to make assumptions about topics that will be likely talked about. This involves habitually thinking ahead, trying to anticipate what will happen next, what will be said and to plan what they may want to say or ask in response. When they anticipate accurately, conversation is more predictable, and communication becomes more successful.

Anticipation is commonly used to cope with expressive language problems that often co-exist with comprehension problems because of hearing loss and/or auditory processing problems. People are often shamed if put on the spot in a conversation to speak about something. They have difficulties or need more time to formulate what to say. Being judged because of such difficulties in expressing themselves commonly prompts stress and anxiety.

Being able to anticipate what will be talked about helps to avoid being shamed by faltering efforts to express themselves. Expressive language problems related to childhood ear disease should be considered when clients display ‘scripted monologues’ during sessions or meetings. They may talk their way through the monologue, often ignoring or appearing discomfited by interruptions. It may be difficult for them to respond to questions until they have finished their prepared talk.

Avoidance

When dealing with unfamiliar people and unfamiliar processes, people with listening problems often experience anxiety and this can lead to using avoidance tactics to resolve their discomfit. For example, children with hearing loss may not answer a question in class [12, 14] or they may avoid going to school [18]; a patient may not attend an appointment with an unknown medical specialist [19]; or an employee with limited literacy may avoid literacy support training [6]. This type of avoidance limits engagement and the benefits to be gained from greater engagement with schooling, health, training, employment and psychological services.

Avoidance is the least successful of the above coping strategies and often contributes to limiting social, educational and occupational opportunities.

Managing listening overload

Whatever the setting, most psychologists tend to rely on ‘talking therapies’. However, clients who make extensive use of the above cognitively demanding strategies will tire more quickly than others in intensive listening situations – there is a danger of experiencing‘listening overload’. People may listen for a time, then ‘tune-out’, too tired for further effort to understand. At these times, discussions are liable to be experienced as a sequence of poorly understood, disconnected verbal interactions; ‘minced words’. The indication that someone is no longer ‘listening effectively’ is often that ‘face-watching’ ceases and is replaced by an unfocused gaze and minimal or ‘off the topic’ responsiveness.

Overall, it is often helpful to structure talk differently in sessions when working with clients with listening problems. The following list outlines some of these:

* Talk less and about what’s most important.

* Where possible give an overview of what sessions will cover.

* If ‘listening overload’ is evident consider having shorter sessions or including activities that are less demanding on listening capacity.

* Highly visual pre-reading is helpful, if there are no literacy problems.

* Use diagrams and illustrations to help explain.

* Clearly indicate when you are changing the topic of conversation.

* Use language the client knows and consider the experiences that are familiar to them.

* Create pattern and structure in discussions where possible, to help clients anticipate.

* Give the client written notes, (text messages, email or hand written) about what was discussed in the session.

* In group work, give clients forewarning about being asked to speak publicly and on what topic.

* Also in group sessions actively minimise ‘cross talk’, where some participants have private conversations that create background noise that obscures the main conversation.

Therapy techniques that demand minimal listening (EMDR, art therapy) are often more comfortable for clients with listening problems than those that require a lot of listening and talking. Overall, consider that clients with listening problems may like to have clear expectations about what will happen next during sessions, so they can mentally anticipate what may be said to them and what they may like to say. When they know what is ahead they are more likely to return and participate in constructive ways.

The use of hand held amplification devices should also be considered with some clients, if acceptable to them. These are devices about the size of a mobile phone that amplify the speaker’s voice to the client who listens through headphones. These devices are especially useful if discussions do take place in noisy environments. Amplification during any large group presentations, with a microphone that can be handed around, is highly desirable.

Discussion 

Hearing loss is widespread among Indigenous people because of endemic childhood ear disease. This hearing loss has been described by a senate enquiry as ‘the missing piece of the puzzle in Indigenous disadvantage’[20]. This article seeks to explore a too long neglected issue that, when addressed, has the capacity to improve life outcomes for many Indigenous Australians.

The neglect of this issue in part arises because these communication issues are not‘visible’to those affected or those they communicate with. The hearing loss happens so early and so pervasively that is often ‘normalised’ among those affected. These origins of communications problems are often obscured by a focus on cross cultural differences as sufficient explanation of communication difficulties that are evident. Most mental health workers are currently ill equipped to understand the communicative needs of people with listening difficulties and the common consequential psycho-social problems.

This article is one of the first (of hopefully many more to come) focusing on the interrelated communication and psycho-social issues arising from hearing loss and auditory processing problems among Indigenous people in Australia. What is discussed has also has relevance for many others around the world.

Middle ear disease is in large part a disease of disadvantage. It is commonly found around the world in underprivileged communities and in developing nations [23]. However, to date it has been only in ‘first world’ nations that research has mapped the prevalence of middle ear disease and associated hearing loss among disadvantaged Indigenous people. However, similar problems are likely to exist for approximately a billion people worldwide in developing nations [23].

A smaller but significant number of non-Indigenous people in Australia and elsewhere also are likely to have psycho-social problems that have been contributed to by chronic middle ear disease in childhood, or auditory processing problems from other origins. Aside from specific cultural issues described, the information in this article is also relevant for practitioners working with them.

 

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #BreastCancerAwareness #getChecked : 1.Download #Indigenous Resources from @CancerAustralia and 2.NACCHO supports this Sundays #StandWithMeAtTheG #FieldOfWomen @bcnapinklady

If I hadn’t been diagnosed with breast cancer I wouldn’t be here today. People forget that Aboriginal women get breastcancer. We need Aboriginal women to get themselves checked because there is treatment available and it can save your life “

Aunty Pam Pedersen speaking at the Peter Maccallam Cancer Centre signing of a MOU with VACCHO August 9

Twenty years ago, breast cancer was not often talked about publicly. It was discussed in whispers, and many women spoke of a feeling of shame at diagnosis.

Women felt like a number, not an individual, and were subjected to radical surgery. They were given little information and even less support. They held little hope for a future.

Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA) began during this time, born out of one woman’s determination to make the breast cancer journey better.

Others soon joined her cause, and for 20 years, BCNA has worked tirelessly to ensure every Australian diagnosed with breast cancer receives the very best support, information, treatment and care.

Today, BCNA is the peak national organisation for Australians affected by breast cancer.”

#StandWithMeAtTheG this Sunday. This year, 18,235 Aussies will hear the words,‘You have breast cancer’. #FieldOfWomen brings these stats to life as women, men and children stand together on the @MCG in the shape of the @bcnapinklady.

View Video Here

Australia’s Lots to live for video on social media will start a conversation between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about breast cancer and how early detection can save lives.

If you are an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, it is vitally important you know the normal look and feel of your breasts, the symptoms to look out for and the importance of seeing their doctor if you find a change.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Australia, including among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, yet Indigenous women are 16 per cent less likely to survive than non-Indigenous women.”

Professor Jacinta Elston ( breast cancer survivor )  Chair of the Cancer Australia Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control : She is a descendent of both the Kalkadoon people of North-West Queensland and the South Sea Islander people.

See full report below

About 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are diagnosed with cancer every day. Indigenous Australians have a slightly lower rate of cancer diagnosis but are almost 30 per cent more likely to die from cancer than non-Indigenous Australians1.

Cancer Australia is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to reduce the impact of cancer on Indigenous Australians.

Our work includes:

  • raising awareness of risk factors and promoting awareness and early detection for the community
  • developing evidence-based information and resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by cancer and health professionals
  • providing evidence-based cancer information and training resources to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers
  • increasing understanding of best-practice health care and support, and
  • supporting research.

We have a range of resources which provide information to support you and the work you do:

 

See Key Facts Breast cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women or Part 2 Below

A new breast awareness video designed for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to share with family and friends on social media aims to increase early detection of breast cancer and improve survival.

Cancer Australia CEO, Dr Helen Zorbas, said the video, titled Lots to live for, had been produced to put vital knowledge about the importance of breast awareness and early detection of breast cancer in the hands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and communities.

“Finding breast cancer early, while it is still confined to the breast, significantly increases the chances of survival,” Dr Zorbas said. “Early detection of breast cancer through breast awareness and increasing participation in mammographic screening are important ways to improve survival outcomes and address the disparity in breast cancer survival between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women.”

Professor Jacinta Elston, Chair of the Cancer Australia Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control, and an Aboriginal woman from Townsville, supported the video’s message and encouraged women to share it on social media.

“Studies have shown that social media has been used effectively in getting health messages out into our community,” Professor Elston said.

See opening message

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women aged between 50 and 74 years are also encouraged to have a free breast screen every two years. Mammographic screening is the best early detection test for reducing deaths from breast cancer.”

Professor Elston, who is herself a breast cancer survivor, acknowledged that some Indigenous women may be reluctant to discuss a breast change, due to shame, embarrassment, fear or stigma, but that this could seriously impact on their breast cancer outcomes.

“Changes in your breast may not be due to cancer, but if you find a change that is new or unusual, it’s important to see a doctor without delay,” Professor Elston said. “We need to look after our health – for ourselves and our families.”

The Lots to live for video, which features NITV’s Marngrook Footy Show presenter Leila Gurruwiwi, is designed to be easily accessible and shareable on social media platforms widely used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Cancer Australia is committed to improving cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,” Dr Zorbas said.

Visit www.canceraustralia.gov.au/atsi for more information.

Part 2 Key Facts Breast cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Key statistics

Incidence

  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.
  • The number of breast cancer diagnoses among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women increased by over 60% between the years 2004-08 and 2008-12.

Survival

  • The breast cancer survival rate was 16% lower for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women than for non-Indigenous women between 2006-2010.

Mortality

  • Breast cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women after lung cancer (between 2007 and 2011).
  • In 2010-2014, there were 154 deaths from breast cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australia.

Factors affecting breast cancer outcomes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women:

  • are less likely than non-Indigenous women to have a screening mammogram
  • may choose not to visit a doctor when they notice changes in their breasts.
  • are less likely to undergo cancer treatment
  • are less likely to complete cancer treatment
  • are more likely to have 1 or more other health problems such as heart disease and/or diabetes.

As a result of these factors, breast cancer may be more advanced when diagnosed.

Key messages

Finding breast cancer early

  1. Breast awareness and early detection of breast cancer for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women
  • Finding breast cancer early means there are more treatment options and the chances of survival are greatest.
  • More than half of breast cancers are diagnosed after a woman or her doctor notices a change in the breast.
  • This shows how important it is that women are aware of the normal look and feel of their breasts and are confident in reporting unusual breast changes.

How can Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women get to know the normal look and feel of their breasts?

  • Women of all ages, daughters, mothers, aunties and grandmothers, are encouraged to get to know the normal look and feel of their breast.
  • They don’t need to be an expert or know a special way to check their breasts. They can do this as part of everyday activities such as dressing, looking in the mirror, or showering.

Changes to look out for

There are a number of changes to look out for:

  • A new lump or lumpiness
  • A change in the size or shape of your breast
  • A change in the nipple
  • Discharge from the nipple
  • Any unusual pain
  • A change in the skin of your breast

What to do if women find a change?

While most breast changes are not due to cancer, if a woman finds a change in her breast that is new or unusual for her, it’s important to see a doctor without delay.

Screening mammograms

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women aged between 50 and 74 years are encouraged to attend mammographic breast screening every two years. Mammographic screening is the best early detection test for reducing deaths from breast cancer.

Where to go to have a breast screen?

BreastScreen Australia provides free breast screening for women 50-74 years and has services in all states and territories. To find out more call 13 20 50.

Lots to Live For!

Cancer Australia’s new video Lots to Live For was developed to put vital knowledge about the importance of breast awareness and early detection of breast cancer in the hands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and communities.

The Lots to Live For video, which features Marngrook Footy Show presenter Leila Gurruwiwi, is designed to be accessible and shareable on social media platforms widely used by Indigenous communities.

Visit https://www.facebook.com/canceraustralia/ or

https://twitter.com/CancerAustralia #LotsToLiveFor @CancerAustralia

For more information

Visihttp://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/atsi

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #selfdetermination #International day of the #WorldsIndigenousPeople 9 August : #WeAreIndigenous and we Walk for Makarrata –  One Message, One Goal, Many Voices #ulurustatement

On this annual observance, let us commit to fully realizing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, including the rights to self-determination and to traditional lands, territories and resources.”

UN Secretary-General António Guterres See Part 2 below 

Our desire for Makarrata is about self-determination, genuine partnership and moving beyond survival.  It’s about putting our future into our own hands,

Makarrata was needed because the Apology and successive reforms from both sides of politics have not on their own delivered healing and unity for the nation, or enough progress for Aboriginal people.” 

NSWALC Chairman, Cr Roy Ah-See Part 1 Below 

What is the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples?

A declaration is a statement adopted by governments from around the world. Declarations are not legally binding, but they outline goals for countries to work towards.

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (the Declaration) represents 20 years of negotiation between Indigenous peoples, governments and human rights experts, and argues that Indigenous peoples all around the world are entitled to all human rights, including collective rights.

The rights within the Declaration, which was formally adopted by Australia in 2009, set standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of Indigenous peoples.

Why have a Declaration for Indigenous peoples?

The Declaration is necessary to combat the policies of assimilation and integration employed by colonisers throughout the world that have uprooted, marginalised and dispossessed First Nation peoples. This common history of dispossession created many circumstances that remain unique to Indigenous cultures. These groups bear similar marks of colonisation, while continuing to practice their incredibly diverse cultures and traditions.

The rights of all people are protected through international law mechanisms. However, what these fail to provide to Indigenous peoples are the “specific protection of the distinctive cultural and group identity of indigenous peoples as well as the spatial and political dimension of that identity, their ways of life.”[1] Prior to the Declaration there was a lack of a legal guarantee of Indigenous communities to their collective rights, such as ownership of traditional lands, the return of sacred remains, artefacts and sites, and the guarantee of governments to honour treaty obligations.

What does the Declaration mean for Australia?

The Declaration sets out rights both for individuals and collective groups. This reflects the tendency of Indigenous groups around the world, to organise societies as a group (a clan, nation, family or community). An example of these group rights is the acknowledgment that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities have the right to own country, hold cultural knowledge as a group and the right to define their groups.

Some other rights secured in the document include, the right to equality, freedom from discrimination, self-determination and self-government. Many of these rights are already secured through Commonwealth and State legislation. However, the Declaration is Australia’s promise that mechanisms will be put in place to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples will be able to benefit from these rights.

The significant disadvantages currently faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia only serve to highlight the ongoing relevance and importance of the Declaration.

What is self-determination and why is it important?

Self-determination is a key part of the Declaration, and is a right unique to Indigenous communities around the world. Self-determination can only be achieved through the consultation and participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the formation of all policies and legislation that impacts upon them. Self-determination is characterised by three key elements that require Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to have:
 Choice to determine how their lives are governed and the paths to development
 Participation in decisions that affect the lives of First Nation peoples.
 Control over their lives and futures, including economic, social and cultural development.

A campaign for Makarrata launches in Sydney today Thursday August 9, when Aboriginal people and their supporters will walk from Hyde Park to the NSW Parliament.

Led by the NSW Aboriginal Land Council (NSWALC) and Coalition of Aboriginal Peak Organisations (CAPO), the walk will call on Parliamentarians to join a movement for a better future for Aboriginal people, and all Australians.

NSWALC Chairman, Cr Roy Ah-See said that the walk will promote a positive alternative agenda for Aboriginal affairs in the state. .

Makarrata is gift from the Yolngu language. It means coming together after a struggle. It has been used nationally since the National Aboriginal Conference in the late 1970’s and featured prominently in the historic Uluru Statement from the Heart.

 

“What we have seen to date are disconnected stepping stones towards a vague future focused on survival. What we need is a clear pathway for Aboriginal people to thrive, and for all Australians to walk with us on this journey.

“Our successes have been many, but we still face significant challenges.  We want to see increased prosperity for Aboriginal families across the state, with more of our people going to university and getting better jobs.

“We want to see our children flourishing; walking proudly and successfully in two worlds. Taking part in the economy and enriching the country with their culture.

“By walking with us we are asking all political parties to commit to genuine partnership, to face our challenges together, and grow and support our successes.

“NSW is where the struggle started, and it is right that the largest state, with the largest population of Aboriginal people in the country takes genuine steps towards Makarrata,

“We are looking for all Australians to join us on our journey towards Makarrata,” Cr Ah-See said.

Walk with us, join us at www.makarrata.org.au

 

Part 2

There are an estimated 370 million indigenous people in the world, living across 90 countries. They make up less than 5 per cent of the world’s population, but account for 15 per cent of the poorest. They speak an overwhelming majority of the world’s estimated 7,000 languages and represent 5,000 different cultures.

Indigenous peoples are inheritors and practitioners of unique cultures and ways of relating to people and the environment. They have retained social, cultural, economic and political characteristics that are distinct from those of the dominant societies in which they live. Despite their cultural differences, indigenous peoples from around the world share common problems related to the protection of their rights as distinct peoples.

Indigenous peoples have sought recognition of their identities, way of life and their right to traditional lands, territories and natural resources for years, yet throughout history their rights have always been violated. Indigenous peoples today, are arguably among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of people in the world. The international community now recognizes that special measures are required to protect their rights and maintain their distinct cultures and way of life.

2018 Theme: Indigenous peoples’ migration and movement

As a result of loss of their lands, territories and resources due to development and other pressures, many indigenous peoples migrate to urban areas in search of better prospects of life, education and employment.

They also migrate between countries to escape conflict, persecution and climate change impacts. Despite the widespread assumption that indigenous peoples live overwhelmingly in rural territories, urban areas are now home to a significant proportion of indigenous populations. In Latin America, around 40 per cent of all indigenous peoples live in urban areas — even 80 per cent in some countries of the region. In most cases, indigenous peoples who migrate find better employment opportunities and improve their economic situation but alienate themselves from their traditional lands and customs. Additionally, indigenous migrants face a myriad of challenges, including lack of access to public services and additional layers of discrimination.

The 2018 theme will focus on the current situation of indigenous territories, the root causes of migration, trans-border movement and displacement, with a specific focus on indigenous peoples living in urban areas and across international borders. The observance will explore the challenges and ways forward to revitalize indigenous peoples’ identities and encourage the protection of their rights in or outside their traditional territories.

The observance of the International Day will take place on Thursday 9 August 2018 from 3:00 pm to 6:00 pm in the ECOSOC Chamber at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. The programme can be found in Events. More information in the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) page.

International Year of Indigenous Languages

View above interactive map HERE

Languages play a crucially important role in the daily lives of all peoples, are pivotal in the areas of human rights protection, peace building and sustainable development, through ensuring cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue. However, despite their immense value, languages around the world continue to disappear at an alarming rate due to a variety of factors. Many of them are indigenous languages.

Indigenous languages in particular are a significant factor in a wide range of other indigenous issues, notably education, scientific and technological development, biosphere and the environment, freedom of expression, employment and social inclusion.

In response to these threats, the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) adopted a Resolution (A/RES/71/178) on ‘Rights of Indigenous Peoples’, proclaiming 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages.

On Twitter, follow #WeAreIndigenous#IndigenousDay#IndigenousPeoplesDay, and #UNDRIP