NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #MensHealthWeek 3 of 3 #OchreDay2018 News 1. @GregHuntMP announces a National Male Health Strategy to support the health of men and boys 2. @MyHealthRec Men encouraged to connect with their health with a #Myhealthrecord

During 2018 Men’s Health Week it is important to remember that in Australia, like most countries, males have poorer health outcomes on average than females.

More males die at every stage of life. Males have more accidents, are more likely to take their own lives and are more prone to lifestyle-related chronic health conditions than women and girls at the same age.

This is why I am announcing today, the beginning of a process to establish a National Male Health Strategy for the period 2020 to 2030. “

The Hon. Greg Hunt Minister for Health full press release Part 1

The AMA welcomes today’s announcement of the establishment of a 10-year National Male Health Strategy that will target the mental and physical health of men and boys.

The AMA called for a major overhaul of men’s health policy in April this year, including a new national strategy to address the different expectations, experiences, and situations facing Australian men.

Australian men are less likely to seek treatment from a general practitioner or other health professional, and are less likely to have the supports and social connections needed when they experience physical and mental health problems

We look forward to engaging with the Turnbull Government to develop initiatives to address the reasons why men are reluctant to engage with GPs, and the consequence of that reluctance, and to invest in innovative models of care than overcome these barriers “

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said the AMA was pleased that the Federal Government recognised that Australian males have poorer health outcomes, on average, than Australian females. In full Part 2 below

Encouraging men to discuss their health with their doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare specialist can be difficult.

My Health Record supports and assists men to have these conversations, enabling better connected care and, ultimately, better health outcomes,”

My Health Record gives men and the broader community the capacity to upload important health information including allergies, medical conditions and treatments, medicine details, test results and immunisations; supporting them in remembering the dates of tests, medicine names, or dosages “

Australian Digital Health Agency Chief Medical Adviser Clinical Professor Meredith Makeham said My Health Record provided many valuable benefits for men. in full Part 3 Below

NACCHO Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek and #OchreDay2018 Launch :

Download 30 years 1988 – 2018 of Aboriginal Male Health Strategies and Summit recommendations

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launched its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

The two day conference is free: To register

Part 1 Greg Hunt press release

The Australian Government will establish a decade-long National Male Health Strategy that will focus on the mental and physical health of men and boys.

During 2018 Men’s Health Week it is important to remember that in Australia, like most countries, males have poorer health outcomes on average than females.

More males die at every stage of life. Males have more accidents, are more likely to take their own lives and are more prone to lifestyle-related chronic health conditions than women and girls at the same age.

This is why I am announcing today, the beginning of a process to establish a National Male Health Strategy for the period 2020 to 2030.

Building on the 2010 National Male Health Policy, the strategy will aim to identify what is required to improve male health outcomes and provide a framework for taking action.

The strategy will be developed in consultation with key experts and stakeholders in male health, and importantly, the public will be invited to have a say through online consultation later this year.

Australian men and boys are vital to the health and happiness of their families and communities, but need to pay more attention to their own mental and physical wellbeing.

During Men’s Health Week, men are encouraged to talk about their health with someone they trust.

I encourage all men to take time this week to think about their own health and wellbeing and participate in events happening across the country.

The Turnbull Government provides funding to a number of organisations that focus on the health of men and boys including Men’s Health Information Resource Centre at Western Sydney University, Andrology Australia and the Australian Men’s Health Forum.

The National Male Health Strategy builds on and complements the National Women’s Health Strategy 2020 to 2030 I announced at the National Women’s Health Summit in February.

Part 2 AMA WELCOMES NATIONAL MALE HEALTH STRATEGY

The AMA welcomes today’s announcement of the establishment of a 10-year National Male Health Strategy that will target the mental and physical health of men and boys.

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said the AMA was pleased that the Federal Government recognised that Australian males have poorer health outcomes, on average, than Australian females.

“In Australia, men have a life expectancy of approximately four years less than women, and have a higher mortality rate from most leading causes of death,” Dr Bartone said.

“Australian men are less likely to seek treatment from a general practitioner or other health professional, and are less likely to have the supports and social connections needed when they experience physical and mental health problems.

“An appropriately-funded and implemented National Male Health Strategy is needed to deliver a cohesive platform for the improvement of male health service access and men’s health outcomes.

“This does not mean taking funding away from women’s health strategies. Initiatives that address the health needs of one gender should not occur at the expense of the other.

“Men and women should be given equal opportunity to realise their potential for a healthy life.

“The AMA congratulates Health Minister, Greg Hunt, for his decision to begin the process to establish a National Male Health Strategy for the period 2020 to 2030.

“We look forward to engaging with the Turnbull Government to develop initiatives to address the reasons why men are reluctant to engage with GPs, and the consequence of that reluctance, and to invest in innovative models of care than overcome these barriers.

“Compared to women, Australian men not only see their GP less often but, when they do see a doctor, it is for shorter consultations, and typically when a condition or illness is advanced.

“Men’s Health Week is an opportune time for Australian men to do something positive for their physical or mental health – book in for a preventive health check with a trusted GP, get some exercise, have an extra alcohol-free day, or reach out to check on the wellbeing of a mate.”

The AMA Position Statement on Men’s Health 2018 is at https://ama.com.au/position-statement/mens-health-2018

Background

  • Australian men are more than twice as likely to die in a motor vehicle accident than Australian women.
  • Men have a lower five-year survival rate for all cancers than women.
  • Australian men experience approximately 75 per cent of the burden of drug-related harm.
  • More than three in four suicide deaths in Australia are men, and intentional self-harm is the leading cause of death in men under 54 years of age.
  • Men are more likely to be in full-time work and may have less time for medical appointments.
  • Men are traditionally employed in high-risk jobs, especially in the trades, transport, construction, and mining industries.
  • Australian men are twice as likely as Australian women to exceed the lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol consumption, with one in four men drinking at a rate that puts them at risk of alcohol-related disease.

 

Part 3

Creating a My Health Record is one way men can be proactive about their health and make it a priority this Men’s Health Week, running between June 11 – 17.

My Health Record is a secure online summary of a person’s health information that can be accessed at any time by the individual and their healthcare providers.

Australian Men’s Shed Association Executive Officer David Helmers said My Health Record will make it easier for men who may find visiting healthcare professionals difficult or uncomfortable.

“We know that men often avoid having conversations about their health – particularly when those conversations involve visiting a healthcare provider.

“My Health Record takes some of the pain out of keeping a consistent record of our health and is a great platform for ongoing health management.

“Right from the get-go males are more likely to be involved in accidents or become ill, so as we age, it becomes even more important to stay on top of health information,” Mr Helmers said.

33 year-old Nick Morton was forced to take a serious look at his overall health after suffering a heart attack while working in North Queensland.

“I had a rupture in my artery wall – it was a big wake-up call going into cardiac rehab and I was the youngest by 20 years. I ended up really thinking about my health and becoming more aware of my medical history so I registered with My Health Record,” Mr Morton said.

After Nick returned to the family doctor back in his home state, his Melbourne based doctor was able to securely log onto My Health Record and view Nick’s Queensland medical history.

“It helped me having a digital copy of everything instead of having to go to my GP or cardiologist with a binder full of all my records,” Mr Morton said.

All Australians will have the benefit of receiving a My Health Record before the end of 2018, unless they choose not to have one.

Getting familiar with what is included in an individual’s personal record can assist in being prepared in an emergency like the one Nick Morton experienced. Nick now advocates a more proactive approach.

“I thought I was in control of my health and took it for granted like most blokes my age. There’s no excuse not to keep track of your health. Go to your GP and ask about my Health Record.”

Australian Digital Health Agency Chief Medical Adviser Clinical Professor Meredith Makeham said My Health Record provided many valuable benefits for men.

“Encouraging men to discuss their health with their doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare specialist can be difficult.”

“My Health Record supports and assists men to have these conversations, enabling better connected care and, ultimately, better health outcomes,” Dr Makeham said.

My Health Record gives men and the broader community the capacity to upload important health information including allergies, medical conditions and treatments, medicine details, test results and immunisations; supporting them in remembering the dates of tests, medicine names, or dosages.

A major advantage of having a My Health Record is individuals having 24-hour, 7 day per week access to their own health information.

For further information visit www.myhealthrecord.gov.au or call 1800 723 471

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities Inc CEO @ahmrc @TISprogramme #NT #Sunrise @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

Job of the Week CEO AHMRC Expression of interest

 

Purpose of the position:

The CEO establishes the core values and strategy of the workplace and is accountable for developing, communicating and executing strategic plans to facilitate the sustainable business success of the AH&MRC. The CEO will lead the development of annual goals and will work with Senior Management Team to guide the successful implementation of strategies that promotes the organisation’s values.

The AH&MRC CEO is ultimately responsible to the Chairperson and the Board of Directors (the Board) for implementing strategic and operational policy and for the continued growth and viability of the organisation.  The CEO will be building the confidence, reputation and profile of the AH&MRC amongst the Members and across the Aboriginal health sector of NSW.  The CEO will develop and grow the organisation’s services to members and provide strategies and advice to the Board.

Depending on the notice period of the successful applicant this position is expected to commence around August/September for a period of a three (3) year contract, based in our Surry Hills office (66 Wentworth Ave, NSW).

Criteria:

  1. Knowledge of the Aboriginal Health sector
  2. Demonstrated experience working at a high level
  3. Current CEO experience and management
  4. This vacancy is an identified Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander recruitment under Part 22, section 22.9 of the AH&MRC Constitution. Applicants for this role must satisfy the Aboriginality criteria you will need to provide information on how you satisfy the Aboriginality

A detailed position description is attached which includes the duties of the position and the salary.

EOI should be forwarded to the HR department via email to gagic@ahmrc.org.au included with the application should be a current CV and a Cover Letter outlining the above criteria.

Please contact the HR Department via email gagic@ahmrc.org.au should you wish to discuss the position further.

Applications close Friday, 22 June 2018

 Download AHMRC_CEO_PD_May_2018

Rural Doctor job of the week

Gidgee Healing is currently seeking a General Practitioner to deliver integrated, comprehensive primary health care services at their Burke St Clinic in Mount Isa.

You will be supported by a team of dedicated clinic staff including Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Medical Receptionists, Practice Managers and visiting Specialists and Allied Health providers; in addition to community and secondary service providers.

ESSENTIAL CRITERIA:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding unconditional current registration with AHPRA
  • Vocationally Registered, FRACGP or FACRRM
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number
  • Knowledge, understanding and sensitivity towards the social, economic and cultural factors affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health.

ABOUT US:

Gidgee Healing is a dynamic Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service that provides a comprehensive and growing range of primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people residing in the Mount Isa, North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria regions. Our services include General Practice, maternal and child health, social and preventative health, health promotion and education, allied health and specialist services. Gidgee Healing is also the lead agency for headspace Mount Isa and the Normanton Recovery and Community Wellbeing Service. The organisation strives to provide high quality health and wellbeing services in a culturally welcoming environment, to enhance the accessibility and uptake of health services by our clients and support the early identification and management of illness and chronic diseases.

THE LIFESTYLE:

The North West offers a relaxed and casual lifestyle, with a wealth of camping and exploring, scenic national parks, gorges, as well as pristine river, lake and open water fishing and recreation.

Applications close COB Friday 15th June, 2018

To apply online, please click on the appropriate link below. Alternatively, for a confidential discussion, please contact Lauren Taylor on (07) 4743 6681, quoting Ref No. 798746.

APPLY HERE

General Practitioners Awabakal

We are currently seeking two dedicated and talented General Practitioners to join our growing team. A strong interest in, and commitment to Aboriginal Health is a must. You will form an essential part of our multidisciplinary team, serving the local community in strong consultation with a network of excellent nursing, allied health and administration specialists.

Our GP’s will rotate across our Medical Facilitates based at Hamilton, Raymond Terrace and Cardiff, and through Outreach programs.

Why work for Awabakal?

Awabakal is a dynamic and innovative community organisation with the support and wellbeing of the Aboriginal community in Newcastle, Hunter Valley, Lake Macquarie and Port Stephens at the heart of everything we do.

Our highly skilled teams across medical, aged care, housing and preschool services are passionate and driven to provide the most progressive and flexible services to our local Aboriginal communities and we actively empower our staff to be creative and forward thinking.

The positions:

You will work as an integral part of Awabakal’s Medical team, and report to the Senior Medical Officer.

The role will require you to provide quality, integrated, best practice primary health care to the patients of the Aboriginal Medical Service, both within the confines of the medical practice and through Outreach programs.

You will improve the health of the Awabakal community by improving patient access to appropriate treatment and health care plans.

What you need to be successful:

Professional medical registration with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Authority (AHPRA)

Fellowship of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners FRACGP

Fellowship of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or equivalent

Accredited GP registrar supervisor (desirable)

Demonstrated relevant experience as a General Practitioner as a vocationally registered/fellow in a community setting

Demonstrated experience of working effectively with Aboriginal clients and community

Demonstrated understanding of cultural issues impacting access to care for Aboriginal people

Extensive experience with patient consultation

Experience with Medicare Billing

Current Class C Drivers Licence

Salary:

Our teams are professional, hardworking and passionate, best describing our culture as innovative, flexible and supportive and we are committed to ensuring our leadership team members reflect our important organisational values.

A competitive salary will be negotiated with the right candidate, to match skills, experience and qualifications.

Please note as part of Awabakal’s recruitment process, prior to an offer of employment being made, recommended candidates will be required to undertake and provide a current Working with Children and National Police Check, and demonstrate evidence of current registration, and original qualifications.

All General Practitioners employed by Awabakal are required to maintain individual medical indemnity insurance, always, and as appropriate to their position at Awabakal. Medical indemnity insurance is an essential requirement of registration with the Medical Board of Australia.

How to Apply:

To apply please forward your resume and supporting covering letter, or alternatively contact Dr Dean Wright on 0419 638 796 or Jessica Gossage, Human Resource Consultant on (02) 4940 8743 for a confidential discussion.

We site www.yerin.org.au

Check out the Website

Jobs of the week 

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Research and Evidence Manager

We seek a high calibre professional, to undertake a range of research projects in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $100,000 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* South Brisbane location

* This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Research and Evidence Manager.

Role Overview

The Research and Evidence Manager will be responsible for managing the Research Division, consisting of the Health Information Team and Research Team (including funded programmes).  This includes undertaking a diverse range of research projects including the development of a research plan that will strengthen the capacity of QAIHC to develop innovative, culturally responsive and evidence informed programs and policy responses in high profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Understanding of Indigenous Health.

* Demonstrated capability in conducting evaluation projects, including design, analysis and interpretation of data.

* Knowledge of ethics committees.

* High level quantitative and qualitative data analysis skills.

* Ability to conduct literature reviews to a high standard including search, collation and summarising skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled health organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Health Policy Manager

An exciting opportunity for a high calibre professional, to provide high quality policy advice in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

  • Indigenous Health Organisation
  • Salary: $100,000 + superannuation
  • Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging
  • South Brisbane Location
  • This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Health Policy Manager.

Role Overview

The Health Policy Manager, will provide leadership to a small team responsible for providing high quality policy advice on complex and high-profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

  • Specific policy development knowledge.
  • Experience in developing state or national health policy.
  • Understanding of relevant state and federal government decision making process.
  • Understanding of the AICCHOs and the issues facing them.
  • Demonstrated experience of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.
  • Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Workforce Coordinator – Medicare Specialist

We are seeking a Medicare Specialist to support and train clinics in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* South Brisbane location

* Salary: $82,500 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The Medicare Specialist will be responsible for supporting QAIHCs Member Services across Queensland in the management and use of electronic patient information and recall systems and in maximising access to health incentives, Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and Medicare Benefits Schedule opportunities.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Medical claims and incentives programs is essential in this role, in particular:

o Medicare

o Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

o Practice Incentives Program

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders, including relevant government departments, networks and specialist providers

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills

* Project management experience

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business

* A certificate IV in Training and Assessment and knowledge of the VET sector is desirable

* A current drivers licence is required

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – mailto:applications@qaihc.com.au

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 10th June 201

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

There are 5 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website

MAMU HEALTH SERVICE LIMITED

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal community controlled health service providing comprehensive primary health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Ravenshoe and surrounding districts.  We are recruiting the following positions for our Ravenshoe Clinic:-

Aboriginal & or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Practice Certificate III/IV Fixed Term. Applicant must have previous experience in similar role.

Traineeship – Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) HLT30113 Certificate III – If you have a passion to work in the health industry we are offering a Traineeship in Certificate III ATSI Primary Health Care (Practice) fixed term (12- 14 months) (It is a genuine occupational requirement that the position be filled by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person as permitted by Section 25, 105 & 106 Queensland Anti-Discrimination (1991) Act.)

Registered Nurse – A Full time position is available. Applicants must have previous experience in working with the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people. This is a Rural & Remote position which offers an attractive employment package including accommodation & fuel allowance.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check, and a Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian.

To apply for this vacancy, a full application package can be obtained from our website on http://www.mamuhsl.org.au, or please don’t hesitate to contact Julie Browne on 07 4061 9988 or jbrowne@mamuhsl.org.au to register your interest.

Please submit your resume and written responses addressing the Knowledge, Skills and Personal Attributes/Selection Criteria outlined in the Position Description to: The Chief Executive Officer Mamu Health Service Limited PO Box 1537 INNISFAIL Q 4860 Applications close at 5.00 pm on Friday 8th June 2018

Mamu Website

Ravenshoe Positions:

RAV-067 Trainee Health Worker_Position Description

RAV-066 ATSI Health Worker_3

RAV-060 Registered Nurse_Position Description3

Innisfail Positions:

IFL-267 Trainee Health Worker

IFL-264 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL-263 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL 269 Community Liason Officer_Female (002)

IFL-261 Sport Rec Officer_Position Description_110518 (003)

FOR ALL POSITIONS

APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY 8th JUNE 2018 5.00PM

 

There are 3 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

+ Clinical Optometrist (Full Time or Part Time position based at Windsor) + Indigenous Outreach Worker (Ongoing Full Time position based at Strathpine) + Medical Quality Coordinator (Regional Fixed Term Position)

 There are 14 JOBS at ATSICHS Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 28 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

Director, Primary Health Care

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (SHSAC) is an independent, community controlled health service, directed by a Board of representatives from the remote Aboriginal communities. SHSAC has a philosophy of community participation and a strong focus on Care Coordination and Chronic Disease prevention and management including population health, health promotion and awareness.

The Director, Primary Health Care (DPHC) plays an Executive leadership role ensuring the organisation is operationally sustainable and responsive to the needs of people within the remote areas. This includes effective planning and management of human, financial and physical resources and the evaluation of services, ensuring effective systems are in place to support daily practice and the maintenance of all health related accreditation and standards underpinned by high quality service delivery.

Your new role

As the DPHC, you’ll provide professional direction to staff, influence the achievement of the strategic and operational goals, and provide progressive planning and operational service delivery advice to the Executive Management Team. As an advocate for change, you’ll shape an environment of strategic thinking, develop policies and cost savings measures, MOU’s and provide regular analysis of community health data.

Taking the lead in the review of activities and operations Clinic by Clinic including staffing levels, resource and accommodation requirements, you’ll collaborate with other managers and health service providers to ensure their participation in the activity and service delivery planning processes. You’ll manage and regularly review structures, budgets and operational costs across 9 Clinics in excess of $9m; audit all fiscal expenditure under your control and ensure full compliance and oversight of all clinical governance matters.

Via sound forward planning, you’ll support the Health Centre Managers with innovative and effective plans and solutions to workforce, recruitment and retention issues arising from working in rural and remote areas, to ensure an improved, merit based qualified and adequate remote health workforce across all of the Health Centres.

With the ability to inspire confidence and trust, and resolve workplace conflict, you’ll drive an effective, positive and united culture; fostering cohesive, respectful communication and a ‘one team’ outlook throughout remote clinics and head office. Continuously working to maximise access to accredited health services by community members, you’ll forge strong relationships at both community and professional level, working proactively to strengthen regional consensus and solidarity on health service delivery policy.

What you’ll need to succeed

You’ll have proven Executive / Senior level expertise in the management of complex operational and contentious issues in a health context, providing strategic leadership and advice with the management of clinical operations and strict budgets, complex projects, policy development, and improved resource mobilisation and efficiency. With contemporary problem solving, people and risk management skills, you’ll have the capability to lead significant change and negotiate through differences to achieve positive outcomes.

With a relevant tertiary qualification (i.e. Masters, MBA or PhD) and current health practitioner registration or eligibility, you’ll have a thorough understanding of the provision of advanced clinical care and health programs, and clinical leadership.

What you’ll get in return

On offer is an attractive package for a 1 year maternity cover contract. Benefits include salary packaging, 6 weeks Leave, 10 days study leave and relocation.

What you need to do now If you’re interested, please click apply now or forward a copy of your CV to mailto:hayley.schwab@hays.com.au

PLEASE NOTE – Please direct all applications to Hays who are exclusively managing the recruitment for this vacancy on behalf of Sunrise H

There are 5 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

 

Deputy Chief Executive Officer

About the Organisation

The name Derbarl Yerrigan is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River. Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC) is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation which was established in 1974 as the Perth Aboriginal Medical Service and later changed its name to DYHSAC in 1998

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

To view and download the application pack, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

Durri servicing the Macleay and Nambucca Valleys – making a difference

 

Durri’s vision is to achieve and maintain better health and wellbeing outcomes for our Aboriginal people and communities.

Durri aims to be an employer of choice in Aboriginal health, supporting a skilled and flexible workforce.

Durri is a great place to work – a family friendly and culturally sensitive work environment that values people.

If you have a passion for indigenous health and are committed to closing the gap, then why not join us?

Please view our current vacancies .

We are currently hiring for 2 Senior Policy & Research Officers
The link to the role on Ethical Jobs is here:

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Bendigo

Closing Date : 24 June

More Info apply: http://www.murrayphn.org.au/aboriginal-internship

Job Ref : N2018 – 37

 

Academic Leader: Indigenous Health (Identified*) – 180357

School of Medicine

Closing Date: 02/07/2018

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #TopEndFASD18 : “Let’s Make #FASD History” says Top End Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) forum with 6 key messages to be taken into account addressing FASD:

 ” The forum delegates agreed that there was an urgent need for action to prevent FASD in our Top End communities, and across the Northern Territory.

It is essential that our responses do not stigmatise women or Aboriginal people.

It is important that we don’t lay blame, but instead work together, to support our women and young girls.

Everyone is at risk of FASD, so everyone must be informed the harmful effects of drinking while pregnant.

Our men also need to step up and support our mothers, sisters, nieces and partners, to ensure that we give every child the best chance in life.”

A landmark Top End Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) forum* was held in Darwin on 30-31 May 2018

Read over 25 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and FASD articles published over 6 years

“ Territorians want and deserve access to high quality health services,” Ms Fyles said.

Alcohol abuse impacts on individuals, families, businesses and our community in many different ways, including the risk of causing permanent and irreversible damage to a baby if alcohol is consumed during pregnancy.

That’s why reducing alcohol related harm is a key priority of the Territory Labor Government.

Our Government will develop a whole of government framework to prevent FASD with universal and targeted strategies to address FASD “

Minister for Health, Natasha Fyles, today welcomed 180 delegates to the inaugural Top End Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Forum in Darwin see Ministers Press Release Part 2 below

#TopEndFASD18  Bringing together Aboriginal leaders, FASD experts, Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, government representatives, medical professionals, and Non-Government organisations. Approximately 180 delegates representing 37 organisations across the Northern Territory.

FASD is often considered to be a ‘hidden’ disability, because more often than not, the physical characteristics of the individual are not easily recognised. Instead, an individual may present with learning and behavioural difficulties, which may present for a range of disorders.

As a result, FASD is not easily identified and individuals can go undiagnosed and receive inadequate treatment and support.

The forum heard from the NT Minister for Health and the Attorney General Natasha Fyles, NT Children’s Commissioner, Colleen Gwynne, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Dr James Fitzpatrick, NOFASD and FASD Hub.

The forum also heard from Aboriginal community controlled organisations Danila Dilba, Wurli Wurlinjang, Anyinginyi Health Services, Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory and the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency.

Over two days, the forum delegates discussed the impacts of FASD on individuals, families and communities and acknowledged that alcohol misuse and its consequences are an issue for all Territorians, particularly our most vulnerable. Delegates also heard the evidence on how the prevalence of FASD impacts many of our services, including health, education and justice. Delegates learnt that trauma runs deep, and healing and making the right connections is crucial.

The delegates raised the following key messages to be taken into account in addressing FASD:

 1.Prevention and raising awareness

FASD is entirely preventable, much of its impacts are also irreversible. The harms caused by alcohol in our communities are not acceptable and we will all work together to develop prevention and intervention strategies that are culturally appropriate and relevant for our 2

people and communities. It is acknowledged that current and proposed alcohol control measures in the NT are a critical component of prevention.

2. Collaborative Approaches

The forum identified an urgent need for Aboriginal organisations, government agencies, NGOs and local communities to work together to develop policies and programs for women, men, children and communities in the Top End communities and to contribute to the development of an NT FASD Strategy. This needs to be Aboriginal community-led by the health, education, justice and child protection sectors.

 3.Access to FASD resources

It was evident that there is a need for more investment in developing culturally appropriate tools and resources for local Aboriginal communities and key stakeholders working on the frontline and also at the strategic level.

4.Assessment and Treatment services

An identified priority need is for the establishment of multi-disciplinary neuro-developmental assessment and treatment services that are strategically linked with existing service settings, including primary health care, education, child protection and the justice system.

5.Support for children and families

Research is needed to better understand how best to support children and families with FASD and other related issues that also often affect families, such as trauma. We refer to the Fitzroy Valley as a best practice model, as many strong women and leaders in the community worked in partnership with FASD experts and research institutes.

6.Workforce

The skilling and expansion of the workforce needed for prevention, assessment and treatment of FASD, particularly the community based remote Aboriginal workforce, was identified as an important need.

From this forum, we have heard the experiences about the high levels of despair and sense of disempowerment and hurt of our people and these are sad stories. We were also enlightened by the enthusiasm, dedication, passion and hope from local communities, all professions and services, that want to do more and can do more to make FASD History!

*APO NT will be producing a full report on the outcomes of the FASD Forum over the coming weeks.

Generational Change: Putting the spotlight on Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

30 May 2018

Minister for Health, Natasha Fyles, today welcomed 180 delegates to the inaugural Top End Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Forum in Darwin.

“Territorians want and deserve access to high quality health services,” Ms Fyles said.

“Alcohol abuse impacts on individuals, families, businesses and our community in many different ways, including the risk of causing permanent and irreversible damage to a baby if alcohol is consumed during pregnancy.

“That’s why reducing alcohol related harm is a key priority of the Territory Labor Government.

“Our Government will develop a whole of government framework to prevent FASD with universal and targeted strategies to address FASD.

“This strategy was supported by recommendations in the recent Riley Review into Alcohol Policy and Legislation Alcohol Report and is now an important part of the Territory Labor Government’s Alcohol Harm Minimisation Action Plan to deliver sweeping alcohol reforms for generational change.”

The NT Department of Health funded the Aboriginal Peak Organisations NT (APONT) to deliver the 2 day forum.

The themes of the Forum are:

  • Increase knowledge and raise awareness about FASD in Top End communities and the impact of alcohol during pregnancy on the developing baby;
  • Understand the impact of FASD on children, youth and their families
  • Identify the challenges, issues and solutions for governments, service providers and other key stakeholders;
  • Identify culturally appropriate resources, tools and protocols
  • Establish a Top End FASD Network.

Minister Fyles said that Forum provides an important consultation opportunity with the health sector and community to feed into the development of the NT’s FASD Strategy, for release later this year.

“Stories will be shared and ideas and actions generated to inform the Strategy, which in turn will help guide communities and Government to work together in partnerships to prevent FASD,” Ms Fyles said.

“The NT FASD Strategy will promote the screening of alcohol use before and during pregnancy; appropriate multi-disciplinary assessment; early intervention, support and case management; and will develop targeted education campaigns for those who are most at risk from alcohol-related harms.

“This work is supported in our Government’s 10-Year Early Childhood Development Plan to lead cultural change in reducing alcohol consumption and harms in the community.

“Our whole of government approach to respond to FASD will be crucial to preventing this completely preventable lifelong and permanent condition.”

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and the #UluruStatement promoted during #NRW18 and @TheLongWalkOz Thanks to @AMAPresident @EssendonFC @VAHS1972 @quitvic @DeadlyChoices

” What you (Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews ) said about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander advancement being led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is absolutely right,

The great Australian Chris Sarra said very wisely … governments have got to stop doing things to Aboriginal people and start doing things with them and that is my commitment.”

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has told a Reconciliation event The Long Walk he is committed to following the lead of Indigenous people, less than a year after rejecting their call for an enshrined voice in parliament.

After Premier Daniel Andrews spoke of his government’s efforts to create a state Treaty at the Long Walk event at Melbourne’s Federation Square, Mr Turnbull said the two leaders were “starting to agree on more things all the time”.

During a summit at Uluru in May 2017, Indigenous leaders rejected symbolic constitutional recognition in favour of an elected parliamentary advisory body and a treaty.

But in October, Mr Turnbull said a new representative body was not desirable or capable of winning acceptance at a referendum

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #treaty : #Uluru Summit calls for the establishment of a First Nations Voice enshrined in the Constitution

Australian Medical Association has thrown its support behind last year’s Uluru Statement from the Heart: It was a fairly clear-cut decision for us to make.

We recognise the issue regarding the will to want to have the right to self-determination. We recognise the health inequities, the social justice inequities, the wellness inequities that confront our Indigenous population.

And this Statement is just another way of trying to ensure that we can continue to work and get all governments, both State, Federal, and Territory, to work towards closing the gap, improving the social determinants of health, and recognising the need and the required improvements that are necessary to address the gap that currently exists.

The ACCHOs, or Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, are a very important part of the health delivery process. It recognises that the usual relationships, when it comes to health facilities in a different way, it’s a different connectivity. “

The recently elected Australian Medical Association’s President, Tony Bartone, who participated in the Long Walk spoke with ABC Radio reporter, Dan Conifer . See full interview and AMA press release Part 1 and 2 below

 

 ” Politicians, footballers and campaigners have joined thousands of Australians in the Long Walk event to support moves to improve Indigenous health and celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

It has been 14 years since AFL champion Michael Long’s momentous journey from his home in Melbourne to the Prime Minister to get the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people back on the national agenda.

Indigenous health is focal point of this year’s walk, with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service Australian Medical Association (AMA) and Quit Victoria both throwing their support behind the event.

Ill health forced Essendon great Michael Long to miss this year’s Long Walk.

Part 1 : Australian Medical Association has thrown its support behind last year’s Uluru Statement from the Heart

The AMA Federal Council has endorsed the Uluru Statement from the Heart, which calls for a First Nations’ voice in the Australian Constitution.

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said today that the AMA has for many years supported Indigenous recognition in the Australian Constitution, and that the Uluru Statement is another significant step in making that recognition a reality.

“The Uluru Statement expresses the aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in regard to self-determination and status in their own country,” Dr Bartone said.

“The AMA is committed to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

“Closing the gap in health services and outcomes requires a multi-faceted approach.

“Cooperation and unity of purpose from all Australian governments is needed if we are to achieve meaningful and lasting improvements.

“This will involve addressing the social determinants of health – the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age.

“Constitutional recognition can underpin all these endeavours, as we work to improve the physical and mental health of Indigenous Australians.”

Dr Bartone said the AMA was proud to announce its endorsement of the Uluru Statement during National Reconciliation Week.

Part 2 :The recently elected Australian Medical Association’s President, Tony Bartone, who participated in the Long Walk spoke with ABC Radio reporter, Dan Conifer

ELIZABETH JACKSON: Within the next couple of years, your local doctor’s surgery could be adorned with posters supporting Indigenous Constitutional change. The highly influential

Australian Medical Association has thrown its support behind last year’s Uluru Statement from the Heart. The peak body says including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the nation’s founding document could help make Indigenous patients healthier. The AMA’s President Tony Bartone has told our political reporter Dan Conifer the organisation is unequivocal in its support.

TONY BARTONE: It was a fairly clear-cut decision for us to make. We recognise the issue regarding the will to want to have the right to self-determination. We recognise the health inequities, the social justice inequities, the wellness inequities that confront our Indigenous population. And this Statement is just another way of trying to ensure that we can continue to work and get all governments, both State, Federal, and Territory, to work towards closing the gap, improving the social determinants of health, and recognising the need and the required improvements that are necessary to address the gap that currently exists.

DAN CONIFER: Can you just explain for us how something like the Uluru Statement from the Heart, and the changes that it calls for, would support health outcomes, would improve life expectancy and so on?

TONY BARTONE: They’re fairly fundamental aspirations that are part of the Uluru Statement, and those aspirations and recognitions really speak to a number of emotional, physical, and broader social, environmental issues that really will address, as we say, the social determinants of health. We can’t really seek to close the gap when it comes to health outcomes until we address the fundamental building blocks.

DAN CONIFER: Now, one of the key elements of the Uluru Statement is about involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in decision-making processes. In the medical profession, how has involving Indigenous Australians driven improvements?

TONY BARTONE: The ACCHOs, or Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, are a very important part of the health delivery process. It recognises that the usual relationships, when it comes to health facilities in a different way, it’s a different connectivity. Put another way, it recognises the inherent qualities and behavioural patterns of our Indigenous population, and that is different from a traditional Western-type setting which we’ve become experienced with.

DAN CONIFER: And if a referendum were to be held on any of the elements of the Uluru Statement, how would the AMA, individual doctors and specialists around the country, take part or be involved in that campaign?

TONY BARTONE: We would use all avenues open to us, both in terms of our advocacy and communication with our members, to ensure that the information and the sharing of that information, in terms of the wider community, patients who come to our surgery, the access points that we do have, are used to the fullest in terms of ensuring a proper address of the Statement’s initiatives.

DAN CONIFER: So we could see Vote Yes posters or pamphlets or badges in GP surgeries when this, or if this comes to a vote?

TONY BARTONE: What we’d see is the Association taking a front foot in our communication and advocacy on behalf of members. Of course, each individual member is free and would be wanting to participate to perhaps even a fuller extent, which would lead to putting up of posters and sharing that material in a surgery environment. But we would take a front foot more at an Association level to ensure that we communicate with our stakeholders, with our leaders in Parliament, and with the community in general through our media connectivity to communicate that wish and desire.

Part 3 The Long Walk ,VAHS and Quit Victoria promotes Indigenous health

Smoking rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost three times the national average of non-Indigenous people, although the prevalence in Indigenous communities is falling steadily.

In Victoria, 41 per cent of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population are smokers.

Quit Victoria’s Aboriginal Tobacco Control Program Coordinator Jethro Pumirri Calma-Holt told SBS News the health of Indigenous Australians should be kept at the top of the agenda.

“Indigenous health is something that needs to be invested in by everyone and that’s part of national reconciliation week.”

“What Michael Long did all those years ago has created a really big legacy for everyone to follow in his footsteps,” he said

Check it out the legend himself Anthony McDonald-Tipungwuti wearing the VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt out during the warm up for Dream Time at the G. The other players also wore the shirts as well… What a moment !

If you want your very own VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt just like Tippa the only way you can get one is to complete a health check at VAHS. So call us and book your health check on 03 9419 3000

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @RuralDoctorsAus #Remote #NRW2018 #IHMayDay18 #ACCHO Job Opportunities Inc #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #NRW2018 #IHMayDay18 #Jobalerts

All jobs a listed Part 2 below

 

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

 

Rural doctors and other rural health professionals have always been concerned about the health and welfare of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

With two thirds of all Indigenous Australians living in rural or remote areas, we are often on the frontline of Indigenous healthcare provision.

Because of this, we are acutely aware of the inequities suffered by Indigenous Australians and their communities in terms of health outcomes, chronic disease and life expectancy.

We all have a role to play when it comes to Closing the Gap.”

The Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA )  has chosen National Reconciliation Week to launch its revised policy, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, which puts forward actions that need to be taken by Australia’s governments and other stakeholders like RDAA to Close the Gap in Indigenous health outcomes.

RDAA President, Dr Adam Colza, said the policy “puts right at the centre” the need to recognise the fundamental importance of socio-economic, environmental and cultural factors in improving health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Download NACCHO RDAA Revised Aboriginal Health Policy May 2018

RDAA Press Release : Reconciliation — “at the heart” of Closing the Gap

The Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) says the crucial role of Australia’s journey towards reconciliation — in empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and improving their health outcomes — should not be underestimated.

“We know that additional, special efforts are still required to raise the health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait\ Islander people to that of other Australians” he said.

“Crucially, these efforts will not just rely on improving health infrastructure or improving access to healthcare alone.

“They must also include recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia’s Constitution; recognition of Indigenous intergenerational trauma and the negative health effects that stem from it; and recognition of the importance of homeland, infrastructure, education, transport and employment on the health status of Indigenous Australians.

“These are not just throw-away lines — they are major determinants of health and well-being, and they must be factored into all strategies to better support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

“They are just as important to Closing the Gap as ensuring access to basic living conditions like clean and continuous water supply, good housing, functional sewerage systems, a reasonable diet and nutrition, and education.

“Other crucial factors that are key to improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians include:

  • involvement, partnership and leadership from local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in determining the type of health services best suited to local needs and resources
  • support for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services
  • a culturally respectful and consultative approach to policy and program development on all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health issues
  • an ongoing commitment in the healthcare sector to improving cultural sensitivity and understanding, to ensure the health and hospital system does not deter Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from seeking care.

“And we all have a responsibility to recognise the trauma that multiple generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have been through — and why reconciliation is so important for all of us in moving forward.”

The theme of National Reconciliation Week is Don’t Keep History A Mystery: Learn. Share. Grow. All Australians are being encouraged to learn more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories, to share that knowledge and help Australia grow as a nation.

Visit http://www.reconciliation.org.au for more information on National Reconciliation Week and visit www.rdaa.com.au to read the RDAA policy, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (see Resources and Policy Papers).

Rural Doctor job of the week

Gidgee Healing is currently seeking a General Practitioner to deliver integrated, comprehensive primary health care services at their Burke St Clinic in Mount Isa.

You will be supported by a team of dedicated clinic staff including Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Medical Receptionists, Practice Managers and visiting Specialists and Allied Health providers; in addition to community and secondary service providers.

ESSENTIAL CRITERIA:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding unconditional current registration with AHPRA
  • Vocationally Registered, FRACGP or FACRRM
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number
  • Knowledge, understanding and sensitivity towards the social, economic and cultural factors affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health.

ABOUT US:

Gidgee Healing is a dynamic Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service that provides a comprehensive and growing range of primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people residing in the Mount Isa, North West and Lower Gulf of Carpentaria regions. Our services include General Practice, maternal and child health, social and preventative health, health promotion and education, allied health and specialist services. Gidgee Healing is also the lead agency for headspace Mount Isa and the Normanton Recovery and Community Wellbeing Service. The organisation strives to provide high quality health and wellbeing services in a culturally welcoming environment, to enhance the accessibility and uptake of health services by our clients and support the early identification and management of illness and chronic diseases.

THE LIFESTYLE:

The North West offers a relaxed and casual lifestyle, with a wealth of camping and exploring, scenic national parks, gorges, as well as pristine river, lake and open water fishing and recreation.

Applications close COB Friday 15th June, 2018

To apply online, please click on the appropriate link below. Alternatively, for a confidential discussion, please contact Lauren Taylor on (07) 4743 6681, quoting Ref No. 798746.

APPLY HERE

Jobs of the week 

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Research and Evidence Manager

We seek a high calibre professional, to undertake a range of research projects in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $100,000 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* South Brisbane location

* This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Research and Evidence Manager.

Role Overview

The Research and Evidence Manager will be responsible for managing the Research Division, consisting of the Health Information Team and Research Team (including funded programmes).  This includes undertaking a diverse range of research projects including the development of a research plan that will strengthen the capacity of QAIHC to develop innovative, culturally responsive and evidence informed programs and policy responses in high profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Understanding of Indigenous Health.

* Demonstrated capability in conducting evaluation projects, including design, analysis and interpretation of data.

* Knowledge of ethics committees.

* High level quantitative and qualitative data analysis skills.

* Ability to conduct literature reviews to a high standard including search, collation and summarising skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled health organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Health Policy Manager

An exciting opportunity for a high calibre professional, to provide high quality policy advice in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

  • Indigenous Health Organisation
  • Salary: $100,000 + superannuation
  • Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging
  • South Brisbane Location
  • This is an Indigenous – identified position.  Applicants must be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person (pursuant to Section 25 of the Queensland Anti-discrimination act 1991).

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

We are seeking a high calibre professional for the newly created position of Health Policy Manager.

Role Overview

The Health Policy Manager, will provide leadership to a small team responsible for providing high quality policy advice on complex and high-profile policy areas in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector in Queensland.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

  • Specific policy development knowledge.
  • Experience in developing state or national health policy.
  • Understanding of relevant state and federal government decision making process.
  • Understanding of the AICCHOs and the issues facing them.
  • Demonstrated experience of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.
  • Relevant tertiary qualifications and demonstrated experience in a similar role.

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Workforce Coordinator – Medicare Specialist

We are seeking a Medicare Specialist to support and train clinics in the Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* South Brisbane location

* Salary: $82,500 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 28 Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (AICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The Medicare Specialist will be responsible for supporting QAIHCs Member Services across Queensland in the management and use of electronic patient information and recall systems and in maximising access to health incentives, Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and Medicare Benefits Schedule opportunities.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Medical claims and incentives programs is essential in this role, in particular:

o Medicare

o Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

o Practice Incentives Program

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders, including relevant government departments, networks and specialist providers

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills

* Project management experience

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business

* A certificate IV in Training and Assessment and knowledge of the VET sector is desirable

* A current drivers licence is required

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – mailto:applications@qaihc.com.au

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 10th June 201

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

There are 5 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website

Men’s Health Worker Social Emotional Wellbeing

3 x full time fixed term (FIFO from Cairns) positions
Servicing Kowanyama, Wujal Wujal and Mapoon Communities

With over 230 team members, Apunipima Cape York Health Council is one of Australia’s leading Aboriginal Community Controlled health services, delivering a broad spectrum of comprehensive primary health care services to 11 communities of Cape York.

We are currently seeking applications for three full time fixed term Men’s Health Workers, who will provide and coordinate a range of quality and culturally appropriate primary health care services, to Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islander men over the age of 16 who are affected by alcohol and violence. The program aims to improve the safety and wellbeing of families and the broader communities to increase their sense of healing and personal wellbeing.

An attractive salary package is available for these positions dependent on qualifications and experience, including options for generous salary sacrifice, a great team environment, supportive networks and diverse duties, which make for an exciting opportunity.

Applications close 8 June

Under s25 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1991, there is a genuine occupational requirement for the incumbent to be Indigenous to the Aboriginal and/or Torres
Strait Islander Community

MAMU HEALTH SERVICE LIMITED

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal community controlled health service providing comprehensive primary health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Ravenshoe and surrounding districts.  We are recruiting the following positions for our Ravenshoe Clinic:-

Aboriginal & or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Practice Certificate III/IV Fixed Term. Applicant must have previous experience in similar role.

Traineeship – Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) HLT30113 Certificate III – If you have a passion to work in the health industry we are offering a Traineeship in Certificate III ATSI Primary Health Care (Practice) fixed term (12- 14 months) (It is a genuine occupational requirement that the position be filled by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person as permitted by Section 25, 105 & 106 Queensland Anti-Discrimination (1991) Act.)

Registered Nurse – A Full time position is available. Applicants must have previous experience in working with the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people. This is a Rural & Remote position which offers an attractive employment package including accommodation & fuel allowance.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check, and a Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian.

To apply for this vacancy, a full application package can be obtained from our website on http://www.mamuhsl.org.au, or please don’t hesitate to contact Julie Browne on 07 4061 9988 or jbrowne@mamuhsl.org.au to register your interest.

Please submit your resume and written responses addressing the Knowledge, Skills and Personal Attributes/Selection Criteria outlined in the Position Description to: The Chief Executive Officer Mamu Health Service Limited PO Box 1537 INNISFAIL Q 4860 Applications close at 5.00 pm on Friday 8th June 2018

Mamu Website

Ravenshoe Positions:

RAV-067 Trainee Health Worker_Position Description

RAV-066 ATSI Health Worker_3

RAV-060 Registered Nurse_Position Description3

Innisfail Positions:

IFL-267 Trainee Health Worker

IFL-264 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL-263 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL 269 Community Liason Officer_Female (002)

IFL-261 Sport Rec Officer_Position Description_110518 (003)

FOR ALL POSITIONS

APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY 8th JUNE 2018 5.00PM

 

There are 3 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

+ Traineeship Coordinator (Ongoing Full Time position based at Windsor) + Clinical Optometrist (Full Time or Part Time position based at Windsor) + Social Health Care Coordinator – MATSICHS (Ongoing Full Time position located at Morayfield)

 There are 14 JOBS at ATSICHS Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 28 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

There are 3 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

 

Deputy Chief Executive Officer

About the Organisation

The name Derbarl Yerrigan is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River. Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC) is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation which was established in 1974 as the Perth Aboriginal Medical Service and later changed its name to DYHSAC in 1998

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

To view and download the application pack, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

Durri servicing the Macleay and Nambucca Valleys – making a difference

 

Durri’s vision is to achieve and maintain better health and wellbeing outcomes for our Aboriginal people and communities.

Durri aims to be an employer of choice in Aboriginal health, supporting a skilled and flexible workforce.

Durri is a great place to work – a family friendly and culturally sensitive work environment that values people.

If you have a passion for indigenous health and are committed to closing the gap, then why not join us?

Please view our current vacancies .

We are currently hiring for 2 Senior Policy & Research Officers
The link to the role on Ethical Jobs is here:

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Bendigo

Closing Date : 24 June

More Info apply: http://www.murrayphn.org.au/aboriginal-internship

Job Ref : N2018 – 37

 

Academic Leader: Indigenous Health (Identified*) – 180357

School of Medicine

Closing Date: 02/07/2018

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Justice #NRW2018 #IHMayDay18 : Queensland Attorney General @YvetteDAth launches #LawYarn a cutting edge health and justice resource at Wuchopperen ACCHO : A unique resource which supports good health outcomes


‘Legal problems with money, housing, court and families will lead to poor health if they are not resolved. Poor health impacts on your capacity to make good decisions and care for your children, for example resulting in engagement with the courts or child protection system.

‘It is no coincidence Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders – among the most incarcerated people in the world – also have some of the poorest health outcomes in the world.’

Wuchopperen Chairperson, NACCHO Deputy Chairperson and LawRight lawyer Donnella Mills said health and legal needs are often interlinked.

“We know that legal problems with money, housing, families and crime can often lead to poor health outcomes for people if they are not resolved,” Mrs D’Ath said.

The State Government allocated $55,000 to not-for-profit community legal organisation LawRight to develop a legal ‘health check’ project to help identify the potential legal needs of Indigenous people

Law Yarn helps health practitioners yarn with members of the Indigenous community about their legal problems and connect them with legal help.”

At today’s launch in Cairns, Mrs D’Ath said Law Yarn was a free, innovative conversation starter to help Indigenous people identify their legal issues

See Ministers Press Release Part 2

 

Queensland Attorney General Yvette D’ath has launched the cutting edge health and justice resource ‘Law Yarn’ at Wuchopperen today.

Download the Law Yarn Edition

Lawright Yarn Edition 1

So… what is Law Yarn ?

Law Yarn is a unique resource which supports good health outcomes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Law Yarn helps health workers to yarn with members of remote and urban communities about their legal problems and connect them to legal help.

Legal problems with money, housing, crime and families will lead to poor health if they are not resolved.

Without Law Yarn the problems won’t be identified and will instead be ignored. This turns them into bigger problems

What are the key legal problems faced by the community

Law Yarn uses images of cyclones, mangroves, stars and journeys to help vulnerable communities recognise their legal problems in context and learn where to get help

Law Yarn, an initiative of community legal service LawRight, will see specially trained Wuchopperen health staff yarn with clients about legal issues which might be affecting them, and connect them to the free on-site legal services delivered by LawRight and Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Service.

The health staff will use the highly visual, culturally appropriate Law Yarn tool to help clients feel at ease, and identify and discuss legal problems.

Wuchopperen staff are currently being trained to use the resource, with the program being rolled out in the second half of 2018.

Law Yarn will run until the end of June 2019 and will then be evaluated by distinguished legal academics Fiona Allison, Chris Cunneen and Melanie Schwartz.

Part 2: Law Yarn to help improve Indigenous health

Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D’Ath has launched a legal ‘health check’ for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in Cairns, as part of National Reconciliation Week.

Mrs D’Ath said Law Yarn would be trialled at Wuchopperen Health Service Limited, the Cairns-based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander medical service where LawRight and the Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Service (QIFVLS) operate weekly legal services.

“Health practitioners will be trained to help a person complete their Law Yarn,” she said.

“The resources use Indigenous symbols by artist Rikki Salam to represent the main legal problems – money, housing, family and crime – to help structure the yarn.

“A handy how-to guide includes conversation prompts and advice on how to capture the person’s family, financial, tenancy or criminal law legal needs as well as discussing and recording their progress.”

Mrs D’Ath said LawRight has worked with Wuchopperen and QIFVLS and consulted with the Health Justice Partnerships Network and Health Justice Australia to make this innovative project happen.

“The trial will undergo independent academic evaluation but other Australian legal and health services have already shown an interest in the resource,” she said.

 

 

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #NRW2018 News Alerts : 1. @RACGP The importance of culturally appropriate healthcare spaces 2. @AusHealthcare @Aus_Lighthouse Recognising the historic experience of #Indigenous patients is key to reconciliation

Patients have the right to respectful care that promotes their dignity, privacy and safety.

Equipped with greater cultural awareness and the ability to ensure cultural safety, GPs will provide better quality and more appropriate care to all of their patients.
 
It will also ensure they are well-rounded and more effective doctors.’

Associate Professor Peter O’Mara, Chair of RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, believes GPs can make important contributions towards creating a safe and culturally welcoming environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

A/Prof Peter O’Mara, NACCHO Chair John Singer Minister Ken Wyatt & RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel launch the National guide at Parliament house 28 March

He views National Reconciliation Week (27 May – 3 June) as an opportunity to improve the relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians.

To mark National Reconciliation Week, Morgan Liotta from newsGP looks at the importance of cultural safety in general practice and highlights some useful resources for GPs and practice teams.

See Full RACGP Press Release Part 2 Below

The inequitable situation whereby Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are 30% less likely to receive appropriate care after a heart attack demands action.

 Working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and health organisations is the most effective tool for building cultural safety in our public hospitals, reducing discharge against medical advice and improving care pathways after discharge.

Understanding the true history of Australia allows non-Indigenous clinicians and health administrators to be aware of the background to our current situation, learn about their stereotypes, reflect on practices and build trust with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.’

Dr Chris Bourke, a Gamillaroi man and Director of Strategic Programs at the AHHA, said the five dimensions of reconciliation—race relations, equality and equity, institutional integrity, unity and historical acceptance—directly relate to the Lighthouse goal of achieving better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients who go to hospital after a heart attack.

Hospitals are developing stronger links with ACCHO’s / Aboriginal Medical Services; this means discharges are better planned, so patients are more likely to access follow up appointments, take ongoing medication and use cardiac rehabilitation services.

See Full Press Release Part 2 Below

Part 1 The RACGP The importance of culturally appropriate healthcare spaces

Given GPs are considered the first point of contact for most Australians when accessing healthcare, a culturally responsive general practice environment can play a significant part in improving that access, and can be crucial to closing the gap in health outcomes.

Ada Parry is a community representative on the RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Board. She agrees that cultural awareness benefits all aspects of a healthcare relationship – from a patient’s greeting as they enter a practice to fostering an ongoing connection throughout the care.

‘A really simple step is to have a friendly face at reception. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people go to mainstream health services and want to be treated like everyone else,’ Ms Parry told newsGP.

 

‘It is important to understand that some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients may have a different culture or cultural practices to non-Indigenous Australians.

‘If [healthcare professionals] don’t show that they care about those differences, this can really affect their patients.’

Ms Parry strongly believes that taking the time to get to know patients, to hear their story and help them understand their illness and treatments can make a big difference.

‘People need to get past stereotypes and stop making assumptions,’ she said.

‘The approaches that work for most of your patients may not always work for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

‘Treat patients the way you would like to be treated.’

Associate Professor O’Mara agrees, emphasising that the strength of culturally responsive care is not only for patients.

‘The role healthcare professionals, organisations, medical colleges and governments have in providing safe and appropriate spaces for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients could not only benefit the patients, but also the healthcare providers themselves,’ he said.

NACCHO & will be running free half day workshops to support practice teams to maximise the opportunity for prevention of disease for Indigenous clients . For busy GPs, members , practice nurses or ACCHO practice managers

Details HERE

GP resources

The RACGP has a number of educational resources and standards that help to support the cultural needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples:

Part 2 AHHA Recognising the historic experience of Indigenous patients is key to reconciliation

Understanding the history behind why Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients are five times more likely to leave hospital against medical advice is key to achieving reconciliation in the hospital system, the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA) and the Heart Foundation said this week.

National Reconciliation Week is this week, and the theme ‘Don’t Keep History a Mystery’ highlights the importance of all Australians exploring our past, learning more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures, and developing a deeper understanding of our national story.

Reitai Minogue, national manager for the Lighthouse Hospital Project, said, ‘Closing the heart health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians requires understanding why many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients have a distrust of hospitals.

‘Historic experiences such as racism, miscommunication and mistreatment have influenced the level of distrust, which is reflected in the fact that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients are five times more likely to leave hospital against medical advice.’

The Lighthouse Hospital Project, a federally funded joint program by the AHHA and the Heart Foundation, is working with 18 hospitals around the nation to transform the experience of healthcare for Indigenous patients by trying to make their environments more culturally safe.

Examples of positive changes include improving the hospital environment with local artwork, bush gardens and cultural spaces for family, and expanding and better supporting the Aboriginal workforce. Hospitals are developing stronger links with Aboriginal Medical Services; this means discharges are better planned, so patients are more likely to access follow up appointments, take ongoing medication and use cardiac rehabilitation services.

About the Lighthouse Hospitals Project

The Lighthouse Hospitals Project is a joint initiative of AHHA and the Heart Foundation. The $10 million third phase of the Lighthouse Hospitals Project is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health through the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program.

NSW: Coffs Harbour Health Campus, John Hunter Hospital, Liverpool Hospital, Orange Health Service and Tamworth Rural Referral Hospital.

NT: Royal Darwin Hospital.

Qld: Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service, Mount Isa Base Hospital, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Prince Charles Hospital and Townsville Hospital and Health Service.

SA: Flinders Medical Centre. Vic: Bairnsdale Regional Health Service.

WA: Broome Regional Health Campus, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Kalgoorlie Health Campus, Royal Perth Hospital and Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #NSW @awabakalltd #QLD @TAIHS__ #VIC @VAHS1972 #SA #WA #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre #ACT #NT Plus @FaCtS_Study #IGAwards2018

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

2.QLD : Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Services (TAIHS),Wins AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

3.1 NSW : Why Aboriginal Community Controlled Health organisations like Katungul Aboriginal Community Corporation and Medical Service (ACC&MS) works best for Aboriginal people.?

3.2 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO Quit Crew Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4 .VIC : Yohanand sees his role as helping to run VAHS so it can improve Indigenous health in Victoria.#NRW2018

5.WA : Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya ACCHO , offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke

6. SA : Ultramarathon is no sweat for Zibeon Fielding in quest to raise funds for remote dialysis treatment

7. NT : AMSANT  : Inaugural NT Aboriginal Leadership and Governance Forum to be held Alice Springs

8.1 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO featured in primary health magazine

8.2 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : A treaty with Aboriginal people of Tasmania

9.ACT May 28 Australia’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations that place culture at the heart of their governance are invited to apply for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards (IGAs), which were launched today.

Reconciliation Australia and BHP Billiton are proud to run the awards for the first time in partnership with the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute, a national centre of governance excellence.

Established in 2005, the IGAs publicly recognise and celebrate outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations and projects that make extraordinary contributions to communities and the nation.

Organisations that are displaying effective Indigenous governance are encouraged to apply, with prizes including corporate mentoring, feedback from the judging panel, media and networking opportunities, and a share in $60,000.

Reconciliation Australia CEO Karen Mundine said it was important to showcase the high achievers in Indigenous governance, so that they get the accolades they deserve – and so that broader Australia understands their important contributions.

“For more than a decade, the IGA winners have shown that so much is possible when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander develop innovative and robust systems of governance by putting culture at the heart of what they do,” Ms Mundine said.

Australian Indigenous Governance Institute CEO Michelle Deshong said governance was the foundation stone that enabled Indigenous peoples and communities to build a prosperous future.

“The ability to come together, set goals, and put things in place to achieve their goals, allows people to build a self-determined future,” Ms Deshong said.

“For Indigenous peoples, this means navigating a complex and interconnected web of cultural, environmental, economic and political influences. Celebrating those who have done this well fills us with ideas, confidence and inspiration.”

The two award categories are Category A: Indigenous-led incorporated organisations and Category B: Indigenous-led non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Winners in each of the two categories will receive $20,000, and highly commended organisations in each category will each be awarded $10,000. Ms Mundine said the IGAs have a history of attracting high caliber nominations from organisations around the country, from the bustling capital cities to our most remote communities.

“In 2018, we want to see applications from organisations and projects that are making a difference in their communities, through community engagement, varying governance models and cultural practices.

Applications or recommendations for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards can be made online at http://www.reconciliation.org.au/iga or by calling 02 6273 9200. Applications close Saturday 30 June 2018.

There are two award categories:

  • Category A: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in Indigenous incorporated organisations.
  • Category B: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Each category is looking for governance that demonstrates:

  • Innovation
  • Effectiveness
  • Self-determination and leadership
  • Cultural relevance and legitimacy
  • Future planning, sustainability and governance resilience.

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

The Australian National University is seeking partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families. We want to partner and work with local organisations and communities to make sure the research benefits the community.

Who are we?

We work at the Australian National University (ANU). The study is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers. Professor Victoria Hovane (Ngarluma, Malgnin/Kitja, Gooniyandi), along with Associate Professor Raymond Lovett (Wongaibon, Ngiyampaa) and Dr Jill Guthrie (Wiradjuri) from NCEPH, and Professor Matthew Gray of the Centre for Social Research and Methods (CSRM) at ANU will be leading the study.

Study Question: What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

How are we going to gather information to answer the study question?

A Community Researcher (who we would give funds to employ) would capture the data by interviewing 100 community members, running 3 focus groups for Men / Women / Youth (over 16).  We would interview approx. 5 community members to hear about the story in your community.

We know Family Violence happens in all communities. We don’t want to find out the prevalence, we want to know what your communities needs to feel safe. We will also be mapping the services in your community, facilities and resources available in a community.  All this information will be given back to your community.

What support would we provide your service?

We are able to support your organisation up to $40,000 (including funds for $30 vouchers), this would also help to employ a Community Researcher.

Community participants would be provided with a $30 voucher to complete a survey, another $30 for the focus group, and another $30 for the interview for their time.

What will we give your organisation?

We can give you back all the data that we have captured from your community, (DE identified and confidentialised of course).We can give you the data in any form you like, plus create a Community Report for your community. There might be some questions you would like to ask your community, and we can include them in the survey.

How long would we be involved with your community / organisation?

Approximately 2 months

How safe is the data we collect?

The data is safe. It will be DE identified and Confidentialised. Our final report will reflect what Communities (up to 20) took part in the study, but your data and community will be kept secret.  Meaning, no one will know what data came from your community.

If you think this study would be of benefit to your community, or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Victoria Hovane and the FaCtS team on 1800 531 600 or email facts.study@anu.edu.au.

2.QLD : Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Services (TAIHS),Wins AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

 ” A very BIG congratulations to our deadly health team for winning the AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award.  This is an incredible recognition for all the hard work our health staff do, and the commitment they show to our community. And, thanks to Aunty Di Ross for making the trip to Melbourne and attending the dinner on Friday night, so that she could accept the award on our behalf “

TAIHS ACCHO MOB

AGPAL is excited to announce the winners for the AGPAL & QIP Excellence Awards.

With six award categories open for nominations,our judging panel were wowed by the numerous stories of team work, innovation, safety and quality, and quality improvement initiatives. We thank everyone who took the time to submit a nomination.

The Excellence Winner and Highly Commended Recipient for each category was announced at the AGPAL& QIP 2018 Conference Gala Dinner, held on Friday 18 May 2018 at the Grand Hyatt Melbourne. These achievements were recognised over the period 30 June 2015 to 30 December 2017.

Due to the high calibre of nominations for the QIP Community Organisation of the Year Award, our judging panel created an extra award category announced on the night to recognise the significant efforts two organisations have undertaken to recognise diversity.

Please join us in congratulating each of the AGPAL & QIP award winners, listed below.

 

AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

Excellence Winner – Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Services (TAIHS), Queensland

Highly Commended – Nidjalla Waangan Mia, Western Australia

Please join us in congratulating each of the AGPAL award finalists, listed below.

Finalists  AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Queensland

Awabakal Medical Service, New South Wales

Ngaanyatjarra Health Service, Northern Territory

3.1 NSW : Why Aboriginal Community Controlled Health organisations like Katungul Aboriginal Community Corporation and Medical Service (ACC&MS)works best for Aboriginal people.?

The CEO of a NSW based  Aboriginal community controlled health service says it’s important for  Government and other  non -Aboriginal health practitioners to understand what they actually do and why throwing lots of money at  health service delivery is not the only solution.

A recent   mainstream media report suggested that  the roll out  of Aboriginal only services is  “driving a dangerous racial wedge and putting Australia on a slippery slope towards its own form of apartheid “….. but  despite the claim the Katungul Aboriginal Community Corporation and Medical Service (ACC&MS) has  successfully provided   health care to  Koori people on the Far South Coast of New South Wales for the last 46 years.

CEO Robert Skeen told CAAMA  NEWS  that as well as being the largest employer of Koori  people on the far south  coast  ….Katungul also  has a large knowledge  base of older  people  who  are still actively involved in the sector.

Listen to the full interview here :

3.2 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO Quit Crew Tackling Indigenous Smoking

This Sunday the 27th of May the Awabakal Quit Crew will be heading over to Boolaroo Rugby fields, home to the mighty Awabakal United Eagles Women’s League tag and Men’s Rugby League Team.

The Quit Crew will have giveaways and prizes to be won. Join us from 12pm – 4pm

4 .VIC : Yohanand sees his role as helping to run VAHS so it can improve Indigenous health in Victoria.#NRW2018

They were one of my clients before, and that got me reading the Federal Government’s Closing the Gap report. That’s when I became aware of the differences in health outcomes between Aboriginal people and the rest of Australia,

The biggest fact that stood out to me was life expectancy, where the average gap with the rest of Australia is more than 10 years. In this day and age?

It’s well documented that many Aboriginal people would rather not go to a mainstream clinic, which is why a lot health issues have gone unaddressed for years. A health service run by Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people makes it easier for them to talk about the issues they’re facing.”

Yohanand – who also goes by John – came across the life expectancy figures when working as a senior consultant at chartered accountants Saward Dawson, who have many not-for-profit clients, including VAHS

With an annual turnover of around $20 million and some 200 staff, the VAHS is Victoria’s largest Aboriginal-controlled health service, and John says community control allows it to make a difference

Download Summary-of-VAHS-Strategic-Plan-2017-2022

Yohanand is now VAHS’s Chief Financial Officer, a position he gained in early 2017, just before starting his MBA at Melbourne Business School thanks to a scholarship funded by our Senior Executive MBA Class of 2003.

“If it wasn’t for the scholarship, I wouldn’t have even thought about applying for the program. It really encourages me that there are other people out there who think about the challenges we face and how hard it is to attract people with the skills that are needed to run a business.”

As a not-for-profit organisation, Melbourne Business School is committed to helping passionate people like Yohanand improve the lives of others.

Yohanand sees his role as helping to run VAHS as well as possible so it can improve Indigenous health in Victoria.

“It’s won’t be me that makes a change in health outcomes for Indigenous Victorians, but I can help hire the right people and have as many clinics operate across Victoria as possible to achieve that outcome.

“I’ve always been very passionate about the not-for-profit sector, and I want to make sure that, wherever I work at, I’m always making a difference that will last beyond me. It’s not just about me being there.”

5.WA : Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya ACCHO , offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke.

Are you aware of the dangers of passive smoking?

Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya, offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke.
If you need help quitting smoking, give us a call on 08 9172 0444#WMHSAC #BeAtYourBest #WirrakaMaya

VIEW HERE

6. SA : Ultramarathon is no sweat for Zibeon Fielding in quest to raise funds for remote dialysis treatment

 ” Mr Fielding was running to raise money for The Purple House, an organisation that provides dialysis to some of Australia’s most remote communities.

Aside from the more than $40,000 raised so far, he wants to promote a healthy lifestyle to other Indigenous Australians.”

From ABC TV COVERAGE

Photo: Rob De Castella and Zibeon Fielding celebrate after the big race. (Facebook: Indigenous Marathon Project)

I’m knackered. My legs are blown out, I’m about to kick the feet up and have a sleep.”

Starting at 4am in the APY Lands town of Indulkana, Zibeon Fielding has just finished a 62-kilometre ultramarathon.

The feat, which is about the same as running one and a half full marathons, comes just five weeks after Mr Fielding completed the Boston Marathon.

It would be hard to find two more different experiences.

“The temperature and the weather conditions were horrible that day, and it was just bucketing down rain,” he said of running in Boston.

“It was minus 15 degrees and you couldn’t feel any circulation from your elbow to your fingertips.”

In the APY Lands, Mr Fielding completed the entire ultramarathon on an unsealed road, which varies from gravel to red dirt.

He also had to contend with wildlife — early on he spotted a pack of dingoes while he was still running in the dark.

“You’re out running on your own, where in Boston there are thousands of other runners,” he said.

Mr Fielding was running to raise money for The Purple House, an organisation that provides dialysis to some of Australia’s most remote communities.

Aside from the more than $40,000 raised so far, he wants to promote a healthy lifestyle to other Indigenous Australians.

“I’m here to make a change, with Indigenous people and their health and wanting to be a role model and lead a brighter and better future,” he said.

“I want to see more of our people becoming healthy so they can have better lives.”

‘The first 42 kilometres was just a warm-up’

The seasoned runner is an alumni of the Indigenous Marathon Project.

In 2016, he and 11 other Indigenous Australians ran the New York Marathon after six months of training.

World champion marathon runner Rob De Castella developed the initiative and was on hand for the entire ultramarathon, encouraging Fielding along the way.

“I’m incredibly proud,” he said.

“This is the face of Indigenous Australia that I want all Australians to see.

“I think it is so important for our country to have these really bright, shining lights — our Aboriginal and Islander men and women.”

Mr De Castella said the 62-kilometre run was no easy feat.

“To run 62 kilometres, that’s a marathon, and then you almost need to keep going for another half marathon,” he said.

“We talk about hitting the wall at 30 kilometres, and the struggle to get through — the battle of the mind over the body over that last 12 kilometres.

“The 42 kilometres was just a warm-up for Zibeon.”

He said Mr Fielding’s achievements were a testament to kind of change he wanted to see coming out of the Indigenous Marathon Project.

“It’s not about taking a group of Indigenous people to New York to run a marathon, it is about what they do afterwards,” Mr De Castella said.

“The journey really starts when you cross the finish line and that’s exactly what we’ve seen with Zibeon.

“Doing something that is hard — running a marathon in six months — gives you an incredible sense of pride and self-respect.

As for his next challenge, Mr Fielding hasn’t ruled out going even further.

But first, food.

“Hopefully I’ll get a snag, if I could find a burger that’d be great,” he quipped.

7.1 NT : AMSANT  : Inaugural NT Aboriginal Leadership and Governance Forum to be held Alice Springs

The Office of Aboriginal Affairs’ Inaugural NT #Aboriginal #Leadership and #Governance Forum will be held in Alice Springs next Friday, 25 May. #AGMP Manager, Wes Miller, will be a panelist at the event.

Registration is free and open now at www.tinyurl.com/yaupmbhg. We hope to see you there!

7.2 NT : AMSANT  : Re shaping the Youth Justice System

8.1 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO featured in primary health magazine

Download a copy primaryhealthmatters8-v5

WHEN Primary Health Tasmania started looking at commissioning mental health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, our research pointed to a need for a strong focus on social and emotional wellbeing.

To do this, we needed to build our understanding about how resources could best be used to improve social and emotional wellbeing by turning to local Aboriginal communities themselves.

Primary Health Tasmania worked with seven organisations to co-design services aimed at building resilience and empowering people to have a role in managing their mental health.

Australian Government-funded activity encompasses a range of culturally appropriate events, from on country experiences and grief and loss workshops, to mental health

Programs designed to build the capacity of service providers to better support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal clients were also commissioned.

They aim to help strengthen different organisations’ health-related knowledge.

The following organisations have been commissioned to deliver services to support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people:

  • Cape Barren Island Aboriginal Association (north east)
  • Circular Head Aboriginal Corporation (north west)
  • Flinders Island Aboriginal Association (north east)
  • Karadi Aboriginal Corporation (south)
  • Rural Health Tasmania (north west)
  • South East Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (south)
  • Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (statewide).

“These programs were crafted by listening to the expert advice of these organisations, most of which are Aboriginal community-controlled organisations,” Primary Health Tasmania’s Susan Powell says.

Adopting a co-design approach that included the learnings of established local organisations was critical to giving the programs the best chance of success for Aboriginal people taking part in them, she says.

“We asked them to propose services they thought had the best chance of improving the social and emotional wellbeing of local Aboriginal people, based on what they know is needed and will work,” Ms Powell says. 

8.2 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : A treaty with Aboriginal people of Tasmania

9.ACT May 28 Australia’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday

This year will proudly have Australia’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday on Monday 28th May. Reconciliation Day and is a time to learn more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories, to share that knowledge and help us grow

Members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community can access Transport Canberra’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Bus to attend the event. The bus will be departing from Bay 4 of the Queanbeyan bus interchange on Morisset Street from 9.30am on Monday 28 May, and will shuttle between the interchange and the event throughout the day. See below schedule for approximate timings – places are limited.

9.30am – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4
10am – Glebe Park

10.30am – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4

11am – Glebe Park

11.30am – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4

12pm – Glebe Park

12.30pm – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4

1pm – Glebe Park

2.15pm – Glebe Park to Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities Inc #Nurses #Doctors etc #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @SNAICC @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

Job of the week 

Deputy Chief Executive Officer

About the Organisation

The name Derbarl Yerrigan is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River. Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC) is an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation which was established in 1974 as the Perth Aboriginal Medical Service and later changed its name to DYHSAC in 1998.

We provide holistic and integrated primary health care services to Aboriginal people living in the Perth metropolitan region. DYHSAC employs 138 staff across its head office in East Perth and clinics in Maddington, Midland and Mirrabooka.

DYHSAC targets the social, emotional, cultural and physical wellbeing of Aboriginal people living on Noongar country. Our staff deliver comprehensive primary health care services at each DYHSAC clinic including:

  • Preventative care focussed on early detection and management of chronic illness across all ages;
  • Post-natal and antenatal care to women and families;
  • Early childhood, school age, and adolescent health programs;
  • Team-based management of chronic diseases with a focus on preventing disease progression and complications and maintaining quality of life;
  • Dental services to DYHSAC clients aged 13 years and above, including the development of full dental plans;
  • Access to a comprehensive suite of services provided by mental health and allied health care professionals and specialist services; and
  • Pharmacy and transport services to DYHSAC clients.

For more information, please visit the DYHSAC website, www.dyhs.org.au

About the Opportunity

The Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is currently seeking to appoint a Deputy Chief Executive Officer (D/CEO).

This position provides an exciting and challenging opportunity for a suitably experienced professional, with the ability to oversee the day-to-day operations of a well-established Aboriginal community controlled health service currently operating through an extensive change management process.

The D/CEO will work directly with the CEO, Executive Management Team and Board of Directors, managing the day to day operations and delivery of primary healthcare services to the local Aboriginal communities across four sites in the Perth metro area (East Perth, Midland, Mirrabooka and Maddington).

Currently operating through a period of change, DYHSAC is seeking an individual with extensive executive management experience including a proven ability to achieve key strategic objectives in a dynamic and challenging environment.

As an inspiring and collaborative leader, the D/CEO will work strategically to enable transformative change by strengthening the organisation and creating a sustainable future for improved health outcomes for our local Aboriginal communities.

Primary responsibilities include but are not limited to:

  • Driving and implementing extensive cultural workplace changes
  • Achieving the strategic objectives and responsibilities of the organisation
  • Diversifying and growing revenue streams to increase service delivery
  • Strengthening the organisation’s stakeholder relations, community engagement and patient satisfaction
  • Building and sustaining strong financial performance
  • Developing and maintaining a collaborative and effective working relationship with the Board of Directors aspiring to a shared vision

To view the full position description and selection criteria, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

To view and download the application pack, please visit www.ahcwa.org.au/employment

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

There are 2 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The link to  job vacancies on website is

MAMU HEALTH SERVICE LIMITED

Mamu Health Service Limited is an Aboriginal community controlled health service providing comprehensive primary health care services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Ravenshoe and surrounding districts.  We are recruiting the following positions for our Ravenshoe Clinic:-

Aboriginal & or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Practice Certificate III/IV Fixed Term. Applicant must have previous experience in similar role.

Traineeship – Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) HLT30113 Certificate III – If you have a passion to work in the health industry we are offering a Traineeship in Certificate III ATSI Primary Health Care (Practice) fixed term (12- 14 months) (It is a genuine occupational requirement that the position be filled by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person as permitted by Section 25, 105 & 106 Queensland Anti-Discrimination (1991) Act.)

Registered Nurse – A Full time position is available. Applicants must have previous experience in working with the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people. This is a Rural & Remote position which offers an attractive employment package including accommodation & fuel allowance.

All applicants must be willing to undertake an AFP Criminal History Check, and a Blue Card with Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian.

To apply for this vacancy, a full application package can be obtained from our website on http://www.mamuhsl.org.au, or please don’t hesitate to contact Julie Browne on 07 4061 9988 or jbrowne@mamuhsl.org.au to register your interest.

Please submit your resume and written responses addressing the Knowledge, Skills and Personal Attributes/Selection Criteria outlined in the Position Description to: The Chief Executive Officer Mamu Health Service Limited PO Box 1537 INNISFAIL Q 4860 Applications close at 5.00 pm on Friday 8th June 2018

Mamu Website

Ravenshoe Positions:

RAV-067 Trainee Health Worker_Position Description

RAV-066 ATSI Health Worker_3

RAV-060 Registered Nurse_Position Description3

Innisfail Positions:

IFL-267 Trainee Health Worker

IFL-264 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL-263 ATSI Health Worker_2

IFL 269 Community Liason Officer_Female (002)

IFL-261 Sport Rec Officer_Position Description_110518 (003)

FOR ALL POSITIONS

APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY 8th JUNE 2018 5.00PM

 

There are 3 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

+ Traineeship Coordinator (Ongoing Full Time position based at Windsor) + Clinical Optometrist (Full Time or Part Time position based at Windsor) + Social Health Care Coordinator – MATSICHS (Ongoing Full Time position located at Morayfield)

 There are 14 JOBS at ATSICHS Brisbane

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

Jobs of the week 28 positions in the NT Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

There are 7 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs

More info and apply HERE

There are 21 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

More info and apply HERE

There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

Maternal and Child Health Team Manager

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti have a rewarding opportunity for a Registered Nurse (RN3) to join their vibrant team as a Maternal and Child Health Team Manager, based in Adelaide, on a full-time basis.

Leading the Strong Mums Solid Kids program the Maternal and Child Health Team Manager will focus on the line management, leadership and coordination activities of team of 6+ staff. With limited professional and management supervision, the Maternal and Child Health Team Manager will achieve continuity and quality of client care and be primarily accountable for the outcomes of practices in the practice setting.

What You Need to Succeed

Our ideal candidate will be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Registration Authority (AHPRA) Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia; and bring the following:

  • Knowledge and an understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies and culture and the issues which may impact on maternal child and family wellbeing
  • Proven experience leading a multi-disciplinary team within a professional practice framework, and of a broad range of health professionals
  • Demonstrated experience coordinating and managing service level operations within a comprehensive primary health care context and effectively oversee clinical governance in the area of midwifery and/or child and family health
  • Ability to communicate sensitively and effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and ensure culturally appropriate service delivery
  • Excellent time management skills and the ability to work under pressure in a complex, busy workplace
  • Previous experience working in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service or community primary health care that demonstrate best practice outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients will be highly regarded but is not essential.

To view the full position description, please click here.

About the Organisation

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia, providing a range of health care and community support services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and deliver improvement in the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and advance their social, cultural and economic status.

More info Apply HERE

We are currently hiring for 2 Senior Policy & Research Officers
The link to the role on Ethical Jobs is here:

ACCHO Member : Stakeholder PHN Murray

Position: Aboriginal Access Advisor Intern

Location : Bendigo

Closing Date : 24 June

More Info apply: http://www.murrayphn.org.au/aboriginal-internship

Job Ref : N2018 – 37

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #NDIS News : 1. Aboriginal people with disabilities and their families need our support and 2. the Ombudsman releases report into the National Disability Insurance Agency’s handling of reviews

 ” In 2014 the Australian government commenced rolling out the NDIS. But Aboriginal participation in the new scheme remains unacceptably low.

This means that despite increases in the funding available, there is a real danger that without culturally appropriate services, supports and pathways the Aboriginal community will not get access to all of the opportunities that the NDIS represents.

Daily our mob lives with the impacts of disability more than any other section of the Australian population: almost half of our Indigenous population aged 15 years and over live with disability or a restrictive long-term health condition and experience disability at more than twice the rate of the general Australian population which increases further with the inclusion of psychosocial disability (mental health).

We need solutions to ensure that all Aboriginal people and their families have access to quality disability services that respect their culture and meet their needs.”

Joseph Archibald is a Gamilario man living on Birpai country mid-north NSW coast. He is manager of Windaan Aboriginal Services. Joseph has worked in the disability sector across areas including sector capacity building for Aboriginal engagement and Aboriginal employment and workforce strategy with industry peak National Disability Services (NDS) and NDIS service development with Galambila Aboriginal Health Service

Read over 20 recent NACCHO Aboriginal Health and NDIS articles HERE

Commonwealth Ombudsman Michael Manthorpe today released a report into the National Disability Insurance Agency’s (NDIA) handling of reviews of decisions under the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013 highlighting complaints and stakeholder feedback including significant backlogs, delays in decision making and poor communication practices.”

In releasing the report, Mr Manthorpe acknowledged the considerable pressure the NDIA has been under to meet bilateral targets since the national rollout of the NDIS, which began in July 2016.

Download a copy of report Here

Report-on-NDIA-administration-of-reviews-under-the-Act_1

However, the Ombudsman stressed this must not be used as a reason to deprioritise or delay other work, including reviews.

“It is clear from this report there are a number of areas in which the NDIA can, and should improve its administration of participant-initiated reviews. Without significant efforts to improve the timeliness of its approach and its communication with participants, there remains a risk that participants’ rights to review will be challenged and the review process will continue to be unwieldy, unapproachable and the driver of complaint volumes” Mr Manthorpe said.

Since mid-2016, complaints to the Commonwealth Ombudsman about the NDIA’s review process have represented around 32 per cent of all NDIA complaints.

The report makes 20 recommendations aimed at improving the NDIA’s administration of reviews, all of which were accepted by the NDIA. The Ombudsman’s Office will continue to monitor the implementation of the recommendations in the report, which is available at:

Media Part 2

People with disabilities are facing delays of up to nine months when they attempt to have their bungled National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) plans fixed, an investigation has found.

From the ABC Report

Key points:

  • NDIS participants seek reviews when their plan does not fit with their needs, for example if they receive funding for fewer hours of care than needed
  • Ombudsman’s report found up to 8,000 people are still waiting for an outcome on their reviews
  • Agency accepted finding that it was not prioritising urgent cases, where people could be at risk of harm or homelessness

People seek reviews for many reasons, including when their plan includes wrong or inadequate equipment and support, for example if they receive funding for fewer hours of care than needed.

“[Delays] pose a particular risk to those who may be at risk of losing services or experiencing deterioration in their capacity if their plan is not adjusted quickly,” the report said.

The Ombudsman said it received 400 complaints about the National Disability Insurance Agency’s (NDIA) review processes over the 18 months to January.Reports to the watchdog included:

“In one case, a participant did not know why her plan was changed because the NDIA had not told her it had accepted (and given effect to) her request for a plan review,” the report said.

“Some participants have told us they have been waiting for up to eight or nine months for a decision on their review request, without any update on its progress or explanation of the time taken.”

The Ombudsman described the review processes as “unwieldy”, “unapproachable”, and lacking “fairness and transparency”.

The Commonwealth Ombudsman’s report into the NDIS’s plan review system has revealed up to 8,000 people are stuck waiting for an outcome.

  • The agency not prioritising urgent cases where, for example, people could be at risk of harm or homelessness
  • NDIA staff and contractors discouraging people from seeking a review
  • The NDIA not acknowledging requests for review or responding to enquiries

The NDIA has accepted the Ombudsman’s 20 recommendations.

“The NDIA has established a dedicated team to manage outstanding reviews.

Social Services Minister Dan Tehan reinforced the message that the NDIA was dealing with the issues outlined in the report.

“Obviously when you undertake a reform of this scale there will always be issues that we need to work through … we’re doing everything we can to speed up the process.

“”These problems need to be fixed, and fixed right now,” Ms Macklin said.

“Get peoples’ plans right the first time so we just don’t need all these reviews done, and people waiting for much-needed support.”

Federal Labor’s social services spokeswoman Jenny Macklin said it was “an absolutely damning report”.

“This was something that was identified some months ago and special teams have been put in place to address this issue,” he said.

“The NDIS is a world-first reform, the size and scale of which means the scheme will not be without challenges.”

“[The agency] has started determining the most practical way to implement responses,” a spokesman said in a statement.

More than 140,000 Australians are now covered by the NDIS — a number expected to reach 475,000 by early next decade.

Example of AWABAKAL ACCHO NDIS Promotion

You are invited to our FREE information sessions to learn more about the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

AWABAKAL NDIS GATHERING
14 June 2018
• 10am to 12pm at Wickham Office
• 2pm – 4pm at Cardiff Office

We will explain:
• What is the National Disability Insurance Scheme?
• Accessing the National Disability Insurance Scheme.
• What is funded by the National Disability Insurance Scheme?
• What supports are available if I am not eligible for the National Disability Insurance Scheme?
• Your Consumer Rights when accessing Service Providers
• What is a service agreement?

Yarn to people who have been National Disability Insurance Scheme participants for several years about exercising their rights as consumers.

LOCATION: 10am to 12pm 64 Hannell st Wickham
2pm to 4pm 15 Kelton St Cardiff

For further information contact Suzy Trindall – CDAH
M: 0428 840 953 E: suzy@cdah.org.au

Part 3 Aboriginal people with disabilities and their families need our support

FROM INDIGENOUSX / THE Guardian

Before I worked in the sector, I didn’t know much about disabilities and felt it had little to no relevance to my personal life. How wrong I was. I have been a carer for immediate and extended family and have grown up around family members with disability, but as in many of our Indigenous communities across the country, care and acceptance were our cultural norm and labels were not required.

Pictured above : Editor of NACCHO Communique and Stroke Foundation Consumer Council Co chair & Board Member 2017 Colin Cowell (left ) with fellow stroke survivor Tania Lewis at an NDIS workshop in Coffs Harbour conducted by Joe Archibald (right )

Read Tania’s story HERE

The question of how much of a difference access to quality formal disability supports could have made to the lives of my family members with disability, as well as our lives as carers, is more relevant now then ever.

We need solutions to ensure that all Aboriginal people and their families have access to quality disability services that respect their culture and meet their needs.

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) boasts some pretty impressive statistics, including the largest social reform since Medicare, increased funding in the sector from about $8bn per year to $22bn in 2019-20, and providing supports to about 475,000 people.

In 2014 the Australian government commenced rolling out the NDIS. But Aboriginal participation in the new scheme remains unacceptably low. This means that despite increases in the funding available, there is a real danger that without culturally appropriate services, supports and pathways the Aboriginal community will not get access to all of the opportunities that the NDIS represents.

Daily our mob lives with the impacts of disability more than any other section of the Australian population: almost half of our Indigenous population aged 15 years and over live with disability or a restrictive long-term health condition and experience disability at more than twice the rate of the general Australian population which increases further with the inclusion  of psychosocial disability (mental health).

Research and statistics demonstrate the overwhelmingly adverse intersectional impact of being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and having disability across a range of wellbeing and social indicators including health, educational attainment, employment participation, personal safety and exposure to the out of home care and criminal justice systems. Indigenous youth in juvenile detention are recorded as having very high rates of significant intellectual disabilities or mental health conditions.

Aboriginal people living with disability, their carers and families need our support.

Every day Indigenous families enter the NDIS system and service marketplace, many with little support and knowledge of what to do and where to go. This will continue as the NDIS evolves and adapts its generic approach, after having already acknowledged more culturally appropriate strategies and pathways are needed to create equity.

There are cohorts of participants for which supply shortages are high-risk due to the increased cost of service provision and limited availability of workforce, including those who: are in outer regional, remote or very remote areas; have complex needs; are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds; are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians; or have acute care needs such as in crisis situations.”

For those who have knowledge of the NDIS space you don’t have to look hard to identify the significant risks in becoming a participant or service provider within an evolving scheme. Acknowledging NDIS is a tough market and costs are yet to reflect the “high risk” and specialist service delivery required to achieve effective outcomes, so it is essential to identify what you do well.

We need culturally appropriate services with sustainable models that can compete in the NDIS open market and be around for our communities for the long term.

Seek to collaborate with existing culturally appropriate services.

Our mob still requires a lot of advocacy in the disability space, and services cannot meaningfully address the needs of Aboriginal communities alone. Adopting models that work closely with Aboriginal families and local partner organisations is important, such as our partnership with Galambila Aboriginal Health Services. It complements existing strengths and services pathways to provide comprehensive care coordination across disability, primary health and allied health services. We know that isolating disabilities from our other services does not work in achieving the positive engagement and outcomes for overall health and wellbeing of our communities.

Historically culture and community supports have been excluded from formal disability service provision, but the right supports and services can empower our families to maintain community and culture in services as much as possible.

At Windaan we have made a commitment to weather the storm of NDIS service delivery and seek out partners where our values and vision align. This allows our Indigenous communities to receive services they’re entitled to and deserve.

  • Guardian Australia is proud to partner with IndigenousX to showcase the diversity of Indigenous peoples and opinions from around the country.