feature tile text 'strong family relationships prove to be perinatal mental health protective factor' & photo of Aboriginal woman's hands above & below pregnant belly

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Perinatal mental health protective factors

feature tile text 'strong family relationships prove to be perinatal mental health protective factor' & photo of Aboriginal woman's hands above & below pregnant belly

Perinatal mental health protective factors

A recent Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service (KAMS) and Rural Clinical School of WA (RCSWA) paper that retrospectively analysed 91 perinatal mental health assessments from the Kimberley region found that almost all of the women had protective factors and these appeared to contribute to them not having anxiety or depression even if they had significant risk factors. The most prominent protective factor was positive relationships with family members.

The study found that for Aboriginal women, it is important that the health professional explores a woman’s whole context; that is, the way she experiences stress and risk and how her protective factors support her. This will help the woman and her health professional best understand and support her mental health and wellbeing. Assessing Aboriginal women’s perinatal mental health by only looking at risk is not enough.

Plain language reports and a link to the paper are available on the KAMS research website which can be accessed by clicking here.

black and white image of adult Aboriginal hand holding sleeping Aboriginal baby's hand

Image source: Centre of Perinatal Excellence website.

AHCWA launches Mappa platform

The Aboriginal Health Council of WA (AHCWA), in conjunction with its 23 member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHSs) and associated communities have initiated the development and launch of the Mappa platform live to all Western Australians.

Mappa is a free-to-use online mapping platform developed to address the lack of clarity at all levels in regards to healthcare services being delivered across rural, remote and metropolitan regions throughout WA. Mappa provided comprehensive, culturally appropriate and reliable information for health services, health professionals, patients, clients and their communities.

Mappa brings three worlds together: the patient/client journey world; the healthcare world; and the technology world. In doing this, the mapping platform seeks to help those who are not technology savvy and/or have English as a second or third language, busy healthcare providers, clinicians, GPs, allied healthcare providers and those who want an easy way to find a place, a community or a healthcare service and to know how long it will take to get there.

Mappa is about ‘getting the right care, in the right place, at the right time‘, while being with family, at home and on country.

To view the article about the Mappa platform in The West Australian – New Directions in Telehealth liftout (page 3) click here.

To access the Live Mappa Link click here.Mappa Mapping Health Services Closer to Home banner with vector of tree and tree roots in a teardrop pointing to a place on a map

NACCHO supports HIV Awareness Week

NACCHO supports the World Aids Day 2020 theme ‘now, more than ever’ saying it is time to close the gap on rates of HIV notifications amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities in Australia. NACCHO believes as per the National Agreement on Closing the Gap that there is a real opportunity to take Aboriginal-led approaches and partnerships to address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes.

NACCHO Deputy CEO, Dr Dawn Casey said, “Our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face unique issues and social determinants that affect health outcomes, including overcrowded housing. We have demonstrated that a partnership and commitment from the Australian Government’s Departments of Health with NACCHO and direct funding for ACCHOs to address the syphilis outbreak has produced some positive outcomes.”

To read NACCHO’s media release click here.banner text U and Me Can STOP HIV with red, aboriginal flag & Torres Strait Islander flag coloured HIV awareness ribbons

8,000 Katherine patients without GP

Katherine’s only general practice closed its doors last month, leaving the 8,000 patients on its books with no other option but to travel three hours to Darwin for a GP consultation. The decision to close was not an easy one for GP and practice owner Dr Peter Spafford – who has been a resident of the NT town for 19 years and owner of Gorge Health for 10 – but he felt he had no other option.
 
A 2018 workforce assessment conducted by the NT Primary Health Network (PHN) recommended the town, with a population of almost 10,000, needed nine GPs to provide a service equal to elsewhere in Australia. The reality on the ground, however, has been just two GPs, four at best. Constant waitlists have meant there’s always been a difficulty in providing full GP services to the community.

The solution, according to RACGP Rural Chair Dr Michael Clements, is multifaceted and requires a whole-of-system approach that considers everything from housing security and spousal employment to children’s education and the training environment.

To view the full article click here.

road sign Kathering 90 Alice Springs 1263

Image source: newsGP website.

Making the invisible visible

After more than 12 months of hard work, consultation and collaboration, the RACGP has launched a reconciliation action plan (RAP) as part of its vision of a healthcare system free of racism.
 
Designed to help establish a culturally safe organisation that supports continuous education and learning for staff and members, the RAP has been praised by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people within and outside of the college. The plan involves a commitment to improving the knowledge, skills and abilities required to deliver culturally responsive health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, which relies on a culturally inclusive and safe environment with strong relationships based on mutual respect.

To view The RACGP Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan October 2020 – September 2022 click here.

To view the related article published in newsGP click here.

Aboriginal woman with Aboriginal face paint looking sideways against a background of blue and white Aboriginal dot and line painting

Image source: newsGP.

World Scabies Program launched

The recently launched World Scabies Program (WSP), headed by Professor Andrew Steer, based on key research by Murdoch Childrens’ Research Institute (MCRI), conducted in partnership with the Fijian Ministry of Health and Medical Services (MHMS) and the Kirby Institute of UNSW Sydney, has shown that scabies prevalence can be reduced by more than 90% with a single community wide treatment.

Scabies is a parasitic infestation of the skin with the parasitic ‘itch mite’ Sarcoptes scabiei. The tiny mite burrows into the upper layers of the skin causing intensely itchy lesions which commonly become infected with bacteria and can lead to more serious conditions such and kidney disease and rheumatic heart disease. In humans, scabies is a particularly significant disease in children, but occurs in both sexes, at all ages, in all ethnic groups, and at all socioeconomic levels. Transmission of the mites from one person to the next is by direct skin to skin contact. Scabies is a significant disease worldwide in humans, wildlife, livestock and domestic animals and is a particularly serious problem in many remote Australia Indigenous communities, where overcrowded living conditions are a major factor contributing to high rates of transmission.

Fiji will be one of the first countries in the world to roll out a nationwide scabies elimination program and will be a model for other countries. Approximately one in every five Fijians is at risk of having scabies at any given time, with children at a higher risk. WSP will scale up this approach to the whole population of Fiji, with an aim to essentially eliminate scabies as a public health problem.

To learn more about the World Scabies Program click here.

scabies mite under a microscope

The scabies mite, Sarcoptes scabiei. Image source: SBS NITV website.

2021 Eye Health Conference abstracts open

Abstract submissions are now open for the 2021 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Eye Health Conference (NATSIEHC): The Gap and Beyond. The conference will bring elements from the postponed Close the Gap for Vision National Conference 2020 and, in 2021, will be delivered fully online.

The conference will be held virtually from 20–22 April 2021 with abstracts welcome from all working in, or interested in, improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye health. Topics should be relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye health and efforts to close the gap for vision and ultimately eliminate avoidable vision loss and blindness for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia. This could include eye care in primary care; eye care stakeholder collaborations; community-led and cultural engagement approaches and initiatives; workforce development; challenges in coordination and case management; improving outcomes and access to services; health system changes and reform.

For more information about abstract submissions click here. The closing date for abstract submissions is Monday 18 January 2021.banner 2021 National ATSI Eye Health Conference The Gap & Beyond 20-22 April 2021

First signs of ear disease at 8 weeks

Telethon Kids Institute researchers have found close to 40% of Aboriginal babies begin to develop middle ear infections between 2–4 months of age in a first of its kind study in metropolitan Perth. By 6–8 months this increased to over 50% of kids according to results published in Deafness and Educational International, clearly demonstrating the urgent need to prioritise early testing and treatment for Aboriginal children suffering debilitating ear infections, also known as otitis media (OM).

Clinical Associate Professor Deborah Lehmann AO, Honorary Emeritus Fellow at the Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, based at Telethon Kids Institute, said 650,000 Australian children are affected by OM each year and Aboriginal children have some of the highest rates in the world. “While our previous research has already shown Aboriginal children are disproportionately impacted by chronic ear disease, most studies have focused on kids in regional and remote areas and information about the true burden of OM in urban areas was very limited,” Professor Lehmann said.

To view the full article click here.

Aboriginal woman with Telethon Kids Institute logo on shift with Aboriginal man holding Aboriginal baby standing outside of a building

Image source: Telethon Kids Institute.

NACCHO CEO makes Australians who mattered list

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner has made the Sydney Morning Herald Good Weekend’s second annual 40 Australians Who Mattered list for her contribution to social justice. Pat’s citation says ‘For decades Pat Turner has being a passionate voice for Aboriginal equality and self-determination, inside and outside governments, particularly in the field of Indigenous health. Her strong leadership was highlighted this year in her role as the lead convenor of the Coalition of Peaks, which brings together more than 50 Indigenous community peak organisations. In July, Turner stood beside Prime Minister Scott Morrison to launch a new national agreement on Closing the Gap, which is supposed to make Indigenous-run organisations central to programs to reduce disadvantage in communities.

“She’s one of the most experienced public servants in Australia,” says federal Labor frontbencher and Wiradjuri woman Linda Burney. “She’s had an incredibly distinguished career spanning both community and government. She shows a willingness to speak truth to power, she understands how governments work and is absolutely committed to driving a proper partnership with Aboriginal people in relation to Closing the Gap.”

To view the full article click here.

portrait shot of Pat Turner sitting in a chair looking directly at the camera, hand to her cheek

Pat Turner AM, NACCHO CEO. Image source: The Sydney Morning Herald.

Activism against gender-based violence video  

Goolum Goolum Aboriginal Co-op has contributed to a video telling the story of what a gender equitable future looks like and the need to call out disrespect, sexism and discrimination. The video, produced with funding from Respect Victoria and the City of Ballarat, is part of the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence global campaign to end gender-based violence. The campaign is book-ended by the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on 25 November and International Human Rights Day on 10 December. These days were chosen in order to emphasise that violence against women is a human rights violation. 

To view the article about the video’s launch click here, and to view the video click here.banner with text '16 Days of Activism Respect Women: Call It Out' with vector images of people holding up letters that make up words 'Respect is....'

Dialysis trial focusing on culture

Bluey Roberts had been undergoing dialysis treatment in Adelaide’s major hospitals for the past three years. This year, however, he said things have changed for the better. “It’s more like home here,” Mr Roberts said while overlooking a smoking fireplace at Kanggawodli, a short-term accommodation facility in Adelaide’s north-west for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from across Australia.

Until recently, the site didn’t provide dialysis treatment options — but a trial of on-site facilities has seen immediate results, boosting attendance for vital services. For Bluey, a Ngarrindjeri elder and revered artist whose work features at institutions including the Art Gallery of SA, home is several hours’ drive away. But health difficulties linked to his dialysis needs left him in a challenging spot. “I wasn’t too good when I first came but I’m not too bad now, sort of settled down and got a lot better with my dialysis,” he says.

The six-month SA Health pilot of stationing dialysis machines at Kanggawodli makes it the only treatment location outside of a hospital in a metropolitan setting. Kanggawodli Manager Wade Allan said traditional owners often find hospitals overwhelming and alienating, which results in patients not committing to ongoing treatment.

To view the full article click here.

#swab4mob campaign launch

The Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW (AH&MRC) has partnered with The National Association of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Practitioners (NAATSIHWP) and other Aboriginal organisations to launch #swab4mob; a campaign aimed at urging Aboriginal communities to protect their families by getting COVID-19 testing if they feel unwell. While there is currently no available COVID-19 vaccine or cure, it is essential that continued testing rates are maintained to help with community control of the virus and assist with contact tracing.

AH&MRC CEO Robert Skeen stated: “The collective voice of Aboriginal communities and Aboriginal health organisations play an important role to help people maintain COVID-19-safe behaviours and high testing rates while there is no cure or vaccine available for COVID-19. Wash your hands, wear a mask in crowded areas, and if you are feeling unwell, even just a slightly, play your part to protect your Community and get a COVID-19 test.”

To view AH&MRC’s press release about the #swab4mob launch click here and to view the #swab4mob video click here.image from swab4mob video David Follent Chairman NAATSHIHWP

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Landmark mental health report welcomed

silhouette of hand holding white sketch of brain against landscape with sunset

Landmark mental health report welcomed

Beyond Blue today welcomed the release by the Prime Minister of the Final Report of the Productivity Commission Inquiry into Mental Health and the National Suicide Prevention Adviser’s Interim Advice. Beyond Blue Chair the Hon Julia Gillard AC said: “These are seminal reports that will shape the future of the mental health and suicide prevention systems in this country. Importantly, they put people at the centre of what we hope will be landmark reforms. Beyond Blue looks forward to working with governments, sector colleagues and, crucially, people affected by mental health issues and suicide, to remake these systems so they provide the right support at the right time for all people in Australia.”

The country’s leading provider of suicide prevention training says the release of the Productivity Commission’s Report into Mental Health is a reminder that co-ordination is a key to saving many more Australian lives. LivingWorks Australia CEO Shayne Connell said the Commission’s call for structural changes to the delivery of suicide intervention deserved widespread acceptance by the sector. “We echo the call for a whole-of-government approach to suicide prevention across different levels of government and portfolios,” Mr Connell said. “We continue to work with primary health networks supporting communities, priority populations, first responders, workplaces, financial touchpoints, veterans , health staff and in schools.”

Mental Health Australia has today welcomed the release of the Final Report from the Productivity Commission Inquiry into Mental Health, and the interim report from the National Suicide Prevention Adviser, and sees the government response to these reports as a crucial next step in the future of mental health reform and service delivery in Australia. Mental Health Australia CEO Dr Leanne Beagley said the Final Report from the Productivity Commission is a culmination of nearly two years of extensive consultation and consideration, and could not come at a more important and critical time. “Today’s release of the Final Report from the Productivity Commission Inquiry into Mental Health is a moment many of us have been waiting for. This is not just a vital report for our mental health sector, but for every Australian,” said Dr Beagley.

To access the Productivity Commission’s report click here, and click on the following organisation names to view their media releases: Beyond Blue, LivingWorks, Mental Health Australia, Carers Australia,     

COVID-19 sparks plague of health care ideas

Australians’ experience with COVID-19 has stimulated more active consumer and community involvement in health care decision-making, the Consumer Health Forum (CHF) says.

Authors writing in CHF’s ejournal, Health Voices, have reported on a range of developments spurred by COVID where consumers are having an influence. A standout has been Health Consumers Queensland which during COVID has formed working links with the State’s Health Department to develop consumer-effective policies, promoting online engagement with consumers to alert government on a range of areas including delayed access to health care, advice on testing and face masks.

The CEO of CHF, Leanne Wells, said a feature of the many of the 20 articles in this edition was the diversity of ways in which COVID had generated changes in thinking and services to meet the crisis. “The rush of the authorities to respond in the early stages of COVID-19 meant the value of consumer and community knowledge was often overlooked,” Ms Wells said. “But what followed that initial response was a greater realisation of the importance of community and consumer input in shaping more thoughtful and effective ways to counter COVID.

To view the CHF’s media release click here.

gloved hand holding COVID-19 test with blood vial in background

Image source: Community Care website.

Joint Council on CTG meets

Yesterday the Joint Council on Closing the Gap (CTG) convened for the first time since the historic National Agreement on Closing the Gap came into effect on 27 July 2020 with a review of the parties collective responsibilities for the implementation of the National Agreement on Closing the Gap.

Patricia Turner AM, Lead Convenor of the Coalition of Peaks and Joint Council Co-Chair said the meeting focussed on making sure strong partnerships are being established and strengthened to support the implementation of the National Agreement in each state and territory. Pat Turner said “The National Agreement commits governments to a new way of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, based on negotiation and shared decision-making, to address the inequality too many of our people still face.”

Consistent with the National Agreement, funding will initially be invested in the early childhood care and development, housing, health and disability sectors, with the Joint Council on CTG agreeing yesterday to investment in community-controlled early childhood and housing.

To view the Joint Council on CTG communique click here and read the NACCHO and Coalition of Peaks joint media release click here.tiles: Housing to Close the Gap! and Looking after our kids to Close the Gap with cartoon characters of two carpenters and two children with building blocks

WHO strategy to eliminate cervical cancer

Cervical cancer is one cancer the world can actually eliminate: it’s time to do it. The world already has the necessary tools; they just need to be made accessible. Following a Call to Action in May 2018 from the World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General, Dr Tedros, 194 countries collectively resolved to end needless suffering from a cancer that is both preventable and curable.

In August 2020, the World Health Assembly passed a resolution calling for the elimination of cervical cancer and adopting a strategy to make it happen. It is a testament to the enthusiasm for this important goal that, even in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, countries around the world have affirmed their support for this important priority. On 17 November, following the close of the 73rd World Health Assembly, WHO officially launched its cervical cancer elimination strategy.

While elimination is possible, we still need concerted efforts to address persistent inequities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. Compared to non-Indigenous women, Indigenous women are 2.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer and are 3.8 times more likely to die of cervical cancer.

To view further details about the launch of the WHO’s Global Strategy to Accelerate the Elimination of Cervical click here.

vector image of microscope over female reproductive organs

Image source: MedPage Today website.

Kamilaroi woman wins highest honour

A world-leading researcher and advocate for Indigenous health was among the University of Newcastle the 2020 University of Newcastle Alumni Excellence recipients. The Awards recognise innovation, creativity, and the exceptional leadership of alumni who have inspired others through their local, national and international achievements.

Professor Gail Garvey was awarded the Alumni Medal for Professional Excellence, the highest honour of the University of Newcastle’s Alumni Awards. A proud Kamilaroi woman, Professor Garvey is Senior Principal Research Fellow at the Menzies School of Health and Deputy Division Leader for the Wellbeing and Preventable Chronic Diseases Division.

Professor Garvey’s research career has focused on investigating cancer experiences and outcomes of Indigenous Australians. She has publicly advocated for better prevention and treatment of cancer in remote areas in Australia. Her work in cancer has illuminated critical shortcomings in health system performance for Indigenous Australians affected by cancer and has identified pathways to improve equity of access and outcomes.

To view the University of Newcastle’s article click here.

portrait image of Professor Gail Garvey

Professor Gail Garvey. Image source: Charles Darwin University Australia website.

Be You mental health education program extended

Be You – the national mental health in education initiative – will continue for two more years. Developed by Beyond Blue and delivered in partnership with Early Childhood Australia (ECA) and headspace, Be You provides every Australian educator with free online training, practical resources and guidance so they can confidently support the mental health of children and young people and look after their own mental health and wellbeing. In addition, early learning services and schools are supported by expert staff to implement and tailor Be You to match the specific needs of their learning community. Almost 11,000 schools and early learning services have adopted Be You since its launch in November 2018 – 70% of all Australian schools and a quarter of all early learning services. Educators have turned to Be You in record numbers in 2020.

ECA has welcomed this extension of Be You for another two years.  General Manager of the ECA Be You initiative, Judy Kynaston says ‘the extension will allow Be You to increase the number of participating early learning services and develop the capacity of educators to build foundations of lifelong mental health and wellbeing in children and young people.’

To view the Beyond Blue media release click here and ECA’s media release click here.be you and Beyond Blue logos

Australian Institute of Infectious Disease to be established

An Australian Institute for Infectious Disease in the heart of Melbourne’s renowned Parkville biomedical precinct to lead the fight against future pandemics. “The Victorian Budget 2020/21 will include an investment of $155 million towards the $550 million institute, with the University of Melbourne and its partners contributing a further $150 million and the remaining funds to be sought from the Commonwealth Government. Our contribution includes an immediate allocation of $5 million to complete a business case for the facility, which will combine the strengths of some of the world’s leading research institutes. The business case is due for completion in mid-2021 and construction of the Institute would create 350 jobs. Once operational, the Institute will provide a massive boost to the biomedical sector and could support up to 5,000 jobs, including up to 850 jobs at the Institute itself.”

The Victorian Chapter of the Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes (VicAAMRI) applauds Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews’ announcement today of a $155 million investment to establish the new Australian Institutes for Infectious Diseases and Global Health. This significant investment will build on Victoria’s place as a world leader in medical research, while creating new high-skilled jobs and economic opportunities for Victorians. “The Victorian Government has a long history of investing in medical research, and that support is a key reason that our medical research sector is the world leader that it is today,” said Professor Brendan Crabb AC, Chair of VicAAMRI and Director and CEO of the Burnet Institute.

To view the Victorian Government’s media release click here. and to view VicAAMRI’s media release click here.

two gowned masked researchers in a laboratory one looking through a microscope

Image source: Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.

Little support for GP role in mental health care

A proposal to scrap GP mental health treatment plans and replace them with an online assessment tool would undermine the holistic approach needed to care for patients with mental health concerns, according to AMA President Dr Omar Khorshid. The proposal is among the recommendations of the Productivity Commission’s long-awaited Mental Health Inquiry Report, which calls for a $2.6 billion overhaul of the system, estimating the total cost of poor mental health and suicide to be as much as $70 billion per year.

Dr Khorshid said the report recognises the crucial role that GPs play in delivering frontline mental health care, but then delivers proposals that result in diminished support for this role. “The AMA welcomes the report’s aspirations for a person-centred mental health care system, focusing on prevention and early help – both early in life and early in illness,” Dr Khorshid said. “But we cannot accept recommendations that take away support for GPs at a time when the burden of mental illness is growing.

“The report highlights the fact that GPs are the first port of call for Australians seeking mental health support, with one in five Australians having a mental health consultation with their GP every year, and a satisfaction rate of more than 80 per cent. “Yet it offers little in the way of extra support, other than the introduction of a Medicare item for GPs to get advice from a psychiatrist about a patient in their care. While this is sensible policy that recognises the expertise of psychiatrists and encourages collaboration, it falls short of the support GPs need.

“The report also proposes abolishing Medicare-funded GP mental health treatment plans, which are fundamental to providing well-coordinated care and engaging with a patient about their care needs.

To view the AMA’s media release click here.black and white image of a head bowed

Youth sexual health status revealed

The results are in for the latest Australia-wide sexual health survey of young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The GOANNA Survey was led by SAHMRI researchers in partnership with Aboriginal community organizations and included more than 1,300 participants aged 16-29 from urban, regional and remote parts of mainland Australia. The survey focused on relationships, sexual behaviours, use of health services and knowledge about sexually transmissible infections (STIs), HIV and hepatitis C.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research leader, Professor James Ward of the University of Queensland (formerly of SAHMRI) led the GOANNA survey for the second time. Professor Ward said rates of STIs, including chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis as well as HIV and hepatitis C, remain unacceptably high in many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, particularly in remote Australia. “These survey findings provide a snapshot on a range of factors that might contribute to risk for these infections” Professor Ward said.

To view the full article click here.

the Pill, the morning after pill, a condom, diaphram & IUD on blue surface

Image source: Medical Xpress.

Professor Kong receives prestigious award

Australia’s first Aboriginal surgeon, the highly acclaimed ear, nose and throat surgeon, Associate Professor Kelvin Kong has been awarded the prestigious Menzies Medallion. The medal recognises Associate Professor Kong’s leadership in Aboriginal health service delivery, advocacy and research, in particular his work to improve ear health in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. The Menzies Medallion is the highest award offered by Menzies School of Health Research, one of Australia’s leading medical research institutes dedicated to improving Indigenous, global and tropical health.

A proud Worimi man from Port Stephens, the breadth and depth of Associate Professor Kong’s work is far reaching and includes his role as chief investigator for the Menzies-led Centre for Research Excellence in Ear and Hearing Health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children. Currently practising in Newcastle as a surgeon, he specialises in paediatric and adult otolaryngology, head and neck surgery (ear, nose and throat surgery), and lectures in allied health at the University.

To view the full article click here.

Professor Kelvin Kong receiving Menzies Medallion

Professor Kelvin Kong with Menzies Medallion. Image source: The University of Newcastle website.

Woorabinda optical care funding in doubt

For years Gunggari woman and Woorabinda resident Florence Brown saw the world as if she were looking through a foggy window. But her vision is now clearer and brighter after free cataract surgery. “Everything’s changed for me,” Ms Brown said. “Hopefully I won’t suffer anymore after this.”

Ms Brown is one of 40 people from across central Queensland who have undergone eye surgery through Queensland-based charity Doctors for All, which has been servicing the area over the last year. But there are fears for the program’s future as funding dries up.

To view the full article click here.

image of Florence Brown with eye patch sitting in passenger side of a car with red Aboriginal dot patterned shirt

Florence Brown. Image source: ABC News website.

Australia-wide remote locations – Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

2021 Census Operations Manager (Remote) Locations x 50

50 Census operations roles are available now across Australia for the 2021 Census. Census Operation teams will help ensure people in regional and remote areas in NSW, NT, SA, Queensland and WA are counted in the Census. Census Operations teams will be responsible for collecting Census data from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and people living or working away from home. This includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and people living in regional and remote areas such as pastoralists.

In this role, they won’t just be helping the Census to collect and make statistics. They will be helping to inform how Census data contributes to service delivery for your community. For example, Census data is used to understand housing needs and priorities to plan affordable and culturally appropriate community housing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Census data also helps organisations, like the Bodhi Bus, provide affordable transport to remote communities allowing people to connect with family or local health clinics. The Wheatbelt Business Network uses Census data to help guide how they support women in rural business. These services help develop enterprise, support towns and contribute to the economic growth of the region.

To view the Census Operations Manager recruitment brochure click here; to view the list of remote locations click here and to access the applicant information kits and to apply click here.

Applications close Friday 27 November 2020.become an ABC Census Operations Manager Help tell your community's story 10-month contract $53.21 phr

eature tile, close up of an Aboriginal child's eye, text: more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accessing eye health services

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Access to and use of eye health services reaches all time high

eature tile, close up of an Aboriginal child's eye, text: more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accessing eye health services

Eye health service access reaches record high

According to the fourth annual report of the Indigenous eye health measures 2020 from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are accessing eye health services than ever before. The report provides an evidence base for monitoring changes in Indigenous eye health over time, access to and use of eye health services, and for identifying gaps in service delivery.

NACCHO Chair, Donnella Mills said, “What the AIHW report tells us is that more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are accessing eye health services and health assessments via the 715 Health Checks, the general health check-ups for our people.

“These improvements in eye health for our people is a reflection of the good work done by the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and proves the fact that culturally appropriate services deliver great results and needs to be supported.”

To view the NACCHO media statement in full click here.

Vision 2020’s media release AIHW data positive, but highlights work required to close the vision gap regarding the AIHW report can be accessed here.

AIHW banner for Indigenous eye health measures 2020 report pink yellow brown Aboriginal dot painting with bright blue solid circle in the centre

Aboriginal man with eye bandage set against rural landscape

Indigenous artist Peter Datjin. Image source: The International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness website.

feature tile: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders triumph over COVID-19

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: First Nations health leaders triumph over COVID-19

feature tile: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders triumph over COVID-19

First Nations health leaders COVID-19 triumph

Aboriginal health leaders have triumphed over Covid, but we are not hearing much about this success story. Professor Fiona Stanley, celebrates that achievement, in a wide-ranging interview about ideas for a healthier and better society, and about her life’s work. Professor Stanley is an epidemiologist and pioneering researcher who has focussed on the health of children and young people, and Aboriginal people in particular. She was the founding director, and is now the patron, of the Telethon Kids Institute, a multi-disciplinary research centre.

To listen to Fiona Stanley’s interview on ABC Radio National click here.

portrait image of Professor Fiona Stanley, short grey curly hair, Aboriginal coloured beads

Professor Fiona Stanley. Image source: ABC News.

A must watch today

A must watch today from 1.30 pm onwards is the Senate hearings relating to:

  • National Indigenous Australian Agency Department of Health
  • Cross-portfolio Indigenous Matters – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

Download the schedule for the Senate hearings here.

To watch the Senate hearings live click here. senate estimates logo vector image parliament house

Fears kids in care losing connection to culture

Indigenous groups are concerned by new research that shows an increasing number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care (OOHC) are being placed away from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and carers. A report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) found the rate of Indigenous kids in OOHC living with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers has fallen over the past two years, from 47.9% to 43.4%.  The overall number of Indigenous children in OOHC has increased from 15,500 to 18,000, while the OOHC rate per 1,000 Indigenous children has also risen from 48 to 54.

The Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care (SNAICC) CEO Richard Weston said this was a major concern. “It is worrying that more than half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are living without an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carer. These children are at high risk of losing connections to culture, family and community that are vital to their safety and wellbeing.”

To view the PRObono Australia article click here.

Can Australian close the gap?

In a recent episode of the Democracy Sausage Extra podcast Indigenous experts Professor Ian Anderson AO and Dr Virginia Marshall talk about about the new National Agreement on Closing the Gap, the importance of shared decision-making, and whether Australia is taking meaningful steps towards genuine reconciliation. They discuss whether the commitment of governments to sharing decision-making with Indigenous Australians through the new National Agreement on Closing the Gap will be a turning point for Indigenous health and wellbeing, what the agreement means for the broader reconciliation agenda, and whether, with little for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the recent Federal Budget, governments will ensure progress is supported financially in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. 

To listen to the discussion click here.Democratic Sausage podcase Can Australia close the gap podcase banner

Vision issues remain

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have experienced poorer eye health than non-Indigenous Australians for many years. According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) Indigenous eye health measures 2018 report, the three main causes of vision loss for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are refractive error, cataract and diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, according to a report from Vision 2020 Australia  last year, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are six times more likely to go blind and 12 times more likely to have cataracts than non-Indigenous Australians.

Ophthalmologist Dr Bill Glasson is co-Chair of the Indigenous and Remote Eye Health Service (IRIS) said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have three times the level of eye disease that the non-Indigenous population has, but have at least three times the wait to get any sort of service. He said ‘the sad thing is that for a lot of these people it’s a preventable or treatable loss of vision, in terms of cataracts, particularly,’ he said. Despite these figures, Dr Glasson says there has been a ‘significant improvement’ in rates of diabetic retinopathy in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – and he credits GPs for that change.

To view the full article in newsGP click here.

Aboriginal artist Peter Datjin with eye patch in outdoor setting

Indigenous artist Peter Datjin. Image source: The International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness website.

Addressing CPR hesitation during COVID-19

The National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce (the Taskforce) brings together 32 peak health professional bodies across Australia whose members are providing clinical care to people with COVID-19. The Taskforce has developed a suite of CPR Flowcharts in response to feedback from hospital and community representatives citing a hesitation to commence resuscitation of people in cardiac arrest during the COVID-19  pandemic, stemming from concerns about infection risk for responders. There was a clear need to provide healthcare providers, healthcare workers and members of the community with clear, national consensus guidance on resuscitation principles during the COVID-19 pandemic and key changes in the management of cardiac arrest.

To view the media release regarding the launch of the CPR flowcharts and to access the CPR Flowcharts Toolkit click here.text National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce words against background image of COVID-19 cells

National health strategy must include healing

The Healing Foundation is urging the Government to ensure healing is part of the National Preventive Health Strategy (NPHS) to address trauma and its accompanying health effects on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In its submission to the NPHS, The Healing Foundation highlights the absence of any support for Stolen Generations survivors, who experience alarming and disproportionate levels of adversity across key health areas. A comprehensive prevention strategy is needed to address the inevitable health effects of intergenerational trauma on the children and grandchildren of Stolen Generations survivors.

The Healing Foundation CEO Fiona Petersen said supporting intergenerational healing is one of the most significant preventive activities that can be taken to mitigate the often compounding and overwhelming health impacts of trauma and must be included in the strategy, which is due for completion by March 2021. Stolen Generations survivors have significantly poorer physical and mental health and are more likely to report chronic health conditions such as heart disease and stroke.

To view the Healing Foundation’s media release in full click here.

Aboriginal women holding Aboriginal flag with words 'Don't be Sorry, Do Sorry'

Image source: ABC News website.

eScript token used

A GP at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS) in Melbourne’s Fitzroy has become the first to write a fully conformant electronic prescription in Victoria, using her MMEx system to send the token to the patient’s mobile phone. MMEx has also become one of the first to roll out active ingredient prescribing in its cloud-based system.

MMEx was the first prescribing solution that is conformant with the full version of the electronic prescribing conformance profile to be added to the Australian Digital Health Agency’s conformance register. Previous exchanges have involved the fast track version of eScripts, which were rolled out quickly to meet the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

VAHS is an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service that operates a non-PBS in-house dispensary that has special approval to dispense, supply and compound medicines with the goal of providing low cost over the counter items and, in limited circumstances, prescriptions.

To read more click here.

Aboriginal person's hand holding mobile phone with screen showing electronic prescription details and QR code

Image source: RACGP Electronic prescribing Information for GPs fact sheet.

COVID-19 roadmap needs redirection

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) is calling on National Cabinet to review its May 2020 COVID-19 Roadmap. AMA Federal President, Dr Omar Khorshid, said that with COVID-19 successfully eliminated in many parts of the country – something that was considered unlikely when the plan was first developed – it is time to assess whether the roadmap remains fit for purpose. “We have learnt a great deal about COVID-19 since May, with both local and overseas experience showing just how hard it is to keep infection numbers in check. We believe that a renewed roadmap is necessary to continue to support our health response, as well as guide a sustainable economic recovery. Countries that have crushed COVID-19 have done much better from both a health perspective, as well as an economic perspective. We also know that even when countries have the virus well under control, it can quickly re-emerge when complacency takes hold and governments dismantle many of the restrictions on day-to-day life that had kept the virus at bay.”

To view the AMA’s media release click here.

ute with COVID19 testing sign, including arrow

Image source: G21 Geelong Region Alliance.

Disaster Mental Health Hub seeks case studies

The Disaster Mental Health Hub is funded by the Australian Department of Health and provides resources and training to healthcare professionals, first responders and community services teams. They are looking for stories that highlight how a community came together before, during or after a disaster and responded in a way that brought about a positive impact/outcome for the community or individuals. We are looking at how mental health was affected by these responses. 

The aim of the story/case study is to show healthcare providers (GPs, mental health professionals, allied health, first responders, etc) the importance to people/communities of things they value such as community, environmental, social values. This awareness raising is to highlight the significance of these values in supporting community recovery.

An example may be how elders and health services worked to close communities to protect them from COVID-19 and how that outcome was achieved. They are seeking no more than 2-3 paragraphs and a few images (if available) that show aspects of the story.

For more information email Jo Wellington, Digital Content Producer, The University of Melbourne on 03 9035 5599.

painting by Camilla Perkins for Mosaic of 5 Aboriginal people yarning in a circle

Camilla Perkins for Mosaic. Image source: Mosaic.

VIC Labor’s first female Aboriginal MP champions ACCHOs

Ex NACCHO Political Advisor, Yorta Yorta woman Sheena Watt, takes on the mandate of Victorian Labor Party’s first female Aboriginal Member of Parliament.
We wish her all the success in her important role in making a difference to our people and raising the voices of community in Parliament!
 
“I really love Aboriginal community control … I believe in strong, civil society, I believe in strong organisations that are connected to and accountable to the Aboriginal community.
 
“I want to acknowledge the many generations of people before me that have stood up to make strong, proud and thriving Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations,” said Sheena Watts in an interview with the National Indigenous Times.
 
Read the full interview here.

Victorian Labor MP, Sheena Watts Image source: National Indigenous Times

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Support needed to close the mental health gap

feature tile: outline of face side on, filled with tree roots

Support needed to close mental health gap

To mark World Mental Health Day and World Mental Health Week 2020, NACCHO Chair Donnella Mills has issued a Media Statement emphasising that the commitment in the National Agreement on Closing the Gap needs continued funding support to close the mental health gap. In Australia, the rate of suicide in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities continues to grow. NACCHO Chair Donnella Mills states, “Our people experience very high levels of trauma at nearly three times the rate of other Australians and recent statistics point out that we are twice as likely to commit suicide.”

Image source: Department of Health

“The new targets in the National Agreement on Close the Gap focuses on 16 socio-economic targets which were not included in the previous Closing the Gap strategy such as suicide, children in out-of-home care, adult incarceration and juvenile detention. To meet these targets, NACCHO believes sustained funding support for Aboriginal led, culturally appropriate mental health and suicide prevention programs is critical. We will not stop advocating for appropriate funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) until the Mental Health Gap is closed. We need funding support for sustainable community-led solutions to expand their mental health, social and emotional wellbeing, suicide prevention, and alcohol and other drug services, which use best-practice trauma-informed approaches,” said Ms Mills.

To read the NACCHO Chair’s media statement click here and to read the media release from Mental Health Australia click here.

Innovative program helps reunite families

Almost 400 children have been safely restored to their parents thanks to an innovative program designed to drive down the number of children in out-of-home care, which is funded by an Australian-first Social Benefit Bond (SBB).  NSW Minister for Families, Communities and Disability Services Gareth Ward said the Newpin program has achieved unprecedented restoration results for vulnerable families across NSW. “Newpin is designed to reunite families by providing long-term therapeutic support that builds parenting skills and addresses issues like mental health, isolation, social disadvantage or family violence,” Mr Ward said.  “Over the course of the seven-year pilot, more than 60% of children returned to the care of their parents. Treasurer Dominic Perrottet said the program demonstrates what can be achieved when Government works with organisations that have the right expertise to deliver the best outcomes for communities.

To view the media release click here.

mother watching small child as he draws on chalkboard

Image source: Social Ventures Australia.

Donnella Mills reaction to the Budget 2020 on ABC NewsRadio

Listen to NACCHO Chair Donnella Mills providing a reaction to the Budget 2020 to ABC NewsRadio, welcoming the increase in funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and stating that NACCHO will continue to press the Government for targeted infrastructure investment in our clinics.

To listen to the interview click here.

VIC ACCHOs to lead local responses to COVID-19

More than $500,000 in grants under the first round of the $10 million Aboriginal Community Response and Recovery Fund has been announced. The Fund – announced in July – was set up to provide support for communities during the pandemic, including emergency relief, outreach and brokerage, social and wellbeing initiatives – as well as cultural strengthening and virtual celebration opportunities.

Four Aboriginal organisations were successful in the first round, including Wathaurong Aboriginal Corporation in Geelong, The Victorian Aboriginal Community Services Association Limited in North Melbourne, the Ballarat and District Aboriginal Corporation and the Willum Warrain Aboriginal Association in Hastings.

To read the Victorian State Government’s media release click here.

Image source: Victorian Government Twitter.

Culturally appropriate care for chronically ill

A program by Blacktown-based service, Western Sydney Integrated Team Care (ITC), is ensuring chronically ill Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have improved access to quality holistic care in the greater Western Sydney region. The federally funded program is facilitated by Western Sydney Primary Health Network and is operated by WentWest. It has proven itself to be a success and over time tailored itself to the community’s needs. With the largest urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in Australia and one of the highest diabetes rates compared to the national figure, as well as heart and respiratory diseases, hepatitis and asthma becoming increasingly common within community, the importance of the service is not lost on the Western Sydney ITC team.

To view the National Indigenous Times article in full click here.

Aboriginal health worker standing in front of window with words Western Sydney ITC Program

Image source: National Indigenous Times.

More needed to address eye health services backlog

The Fred Hollows Foundation has welcomed the Government’s six month extension to telehealth services announced in the Federal Budget, but said more must be done to address the backlog of eye health services caused by COVID-19. The Foundation’s CEO Ian Wishart said urgent action was needed to address the backlog of cataract surgeries and other ophthalmic treatments because of the pandemic. “Already long waiting lists are getting longer. Without targeted investment to support cataract surgery for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, there is a real concern that gains made over the past decade in closing the eye health gap could be lost,” Mr Wishart said. “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples are three times more likely to be blind than other Australians and we know that more investment is needed to close the gap in eye health. We need commitment from all levels of government towards the implementation of Strong Eyes Strong Communities, a five year plan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye health and vision care.”

To read the article in full click here.

Aboriginal artist Peter Datjin with eye patch in outdoor setting

Indigenous artist Peter Datjin. Image source: The International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness website.

Healing through connection and culture report launched

Lifeline Australia, in partnership with The Centre of Best Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention, have launched the Wellbeing and Healing Through Connection and Culture Report. Authored by Professor Pat Dudgeon, Professor Gracelyn Smallwood, Associate Professor Roz Walker, Dr Abigail Bray and Tania Dalton, the report is the first literature review undertaken in Australia analysing the emerging research and knowledge, key themes and principles surrounding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural perspectives and concepts of healing and social and emotional wellbeing as they relate to suicide prevention.

To read the Lifeline Australia media release regarding the launch click here.

nine Aboriginal people on beach at dusk, dance & digeridoo

Image source: SNAICC website.

Record investment in WA Aboriginal communities

More than $750 million has been committed in the 2020–21 WA State Budget to enhance the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal communities. This record amount of funding aims to build the resilience and capacity of Aboriginal communities and individuals. The funding is split over three key policy areas: building strong communities, improving health and wellbeing and delivering social and economic opportunities. An important component is $9.77 million for Aboriginal regional suicide prevention plans in each region of WA, prioritising Aboriginal-led and locally endorsed initiatives. Suicide affects the whole community, and a whole-of-community approach is required to prevent it.

To view WA Mental Health Minister Roger Cook’s media release click here.

Aboriginal woman and male youth in foreground against building in remote Australia

Image source: Government of WA Department of Communities website.

More can be done to prevent diabetes related vision loss

Diabetes-related vision loss is the leading cause of blindness for working-aged Australians, yet it’s almost entirely preventable. A recent Australian study found that only half of the people with diabetes get the recommended annual eye checks. Around 1.7 million Australians have diabetes, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people three times more likely to develop diabetes than non-Indigenous Australians. There is potential to prevent blindness in more people with diabetes if the ongoing improvement of eye care that involves and empowers people with diabetes, their health teams, and communities to develop services, systems, new technology, and policies that meet their needs is pursued.

To view the full Micky Newsletter article click here.

Aboriginal woman and male youth in foreground against building in remote Australia

Image source: Fred Hollows Foundation website.

Health care equity post graduate scholarships available

The Centre for Research Excellence – Strengthening systems for Indigenous health care equity’s (CRE-STRIDE) goal is equitable health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities through quality improvement (QI) and collaborative research to strengthen primary health care systems. CRE-STRIDE’s research approach is based on growing evidence of the importance of community-driven, culture-strengthening interventions in Indigenous primary health care settings. CRE-STRIDE’s way of working puts the strengths, needs and aspirations of Indigenous people at the centre of the research process informed by methodologies that reflect Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing and advance international Indigenous scholarship.

CRE-STRIDE is offering scholarships to support honours, Masters of Research and PhD candidates. 

To view the CRE-STRIDE website click here and to view details about the scholarship program and how to submit an Expression of Interest click here.CRE-STRIDE banner - words CRE-STRICE in semi-circle, Aboriginal meeting symbols and yellow red grey dots in background against purple banner

Feature tile - Halls Creek 'Heart of Gold' town entry sign

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Halls Creek leaders recall day COVID-19 came to town

Feature tile - Halls Creek 'Heart of Gold' town entry sign

Halls Creek leaders recall day COVID-19 came to town

When coronavirus came to the small outback town of Halls Creek in WA it was “like a bomb went off”, according to Brenda Garstone, CEO of the Yura Yungi Aboriginal Medical Service. “We all had to run for cover,” she said. “We were scrambling. We didn’t know where to go, or what to do.” The WA Department of Health had warned that any community transmission in towns with remote communities would be devastating for the populations. When four healthcare workers at the local Halls Creek hospital returned positive tests, all at once, residents refused to attend the healthcare clinic for fear of picking up the virus, local shops emptied and Aboriginal men from the town’s night patrol went door to door, trying to communicate the seriousness of what was unfolding. While the outbreak was quickly contained, tensions in the small town have still not eased, with the community now fully aware of the threat COVID-19 poses.

To view the full article click here.

Halls Creek 'Heart of Gold' town entry sign

Image source: ABC News website.

Groundbreaking FASD diagnostic framework

Long wait times and centralised specialist doctors have left families in rural and remote areas waiting up to three years for a diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). But now a group of doctors, academics and Indigenous elders have come together in north-west Queensland to create a unique diagnostic tier system for the disorder. Local Indigenous leaders and Mount Isa rural doctor Marjad Page, a Kalkadoon, Waanyi and Ganggalidda man, wrote a dreamtime story to explain not only the disorder but the medical process to local Indigenous families. “The program is run from the Aboriginal medical service here in Mount Isa called Gidgee Healing, so it’s run out of a culturally appropriate medical service for the region,” Dr Page said.

To read the full article click here.

Gidgee Healing Dr Marjad Page portrait photo & Gidgee Healing logo

Dr Marjad Page. Image source: ABC News – ABC North West Queensland.

Six steps to stopping germs video launch

Australia is the only developed country still with high levels of trachoma and almost all cases occur in  remote Aboriginal communities. The Ending Trachoma project, which is run out of the Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA at Curtin University, aims to reduce the incidence of trachoma and skin infections in ‘trachoma at risk’ Aboriginal communities in remote WA through implementing environmental health strategies. They have developed a short video (see below) showing the importance of personal hygiene using ‘Milpa’s Six Steps to Stop Germs’ message. The video features women from the Nollamarra Football Team together with their children. It was developed by the Indigenous Eye Health at the University of Melbourne, with extensive input from Aboriginal community members and services in WA, SA and the NT. The message aims to encourage everyone, particularly kids, to stay healthy and strong and eliminate trachoma and other infectious diseases through following six steps.

For more information about the project click here.

COVID-19 offers unexpected opportunity to quit smoking

Smokers are worried. A respiratory disease is running rampant across the globe and people with unhealthy lifestyle habits appear to be especially vulnerable. Smokers hospitalised with COVID-19 are more likely to become severely unwell and die than non-smokers with the disease. At any point in time, most smokers want to quit. But COVID-19 provides the impetus to do it sooner rather than later. A recent study has found the proportion intending to quit within the next two weeks almost tripled from around 10% of smokers before COVID-19 to almost 30% in April. This heightened interest in quitting in the face of COVID-19 represents a unique opportunity for governments and health agencies to help smokers quit, and stay off smoking for good.

To view the full article in The Conversation click here.

two hands breaking cigarette in half

Image source: The Conversation.

Adolescent “never smoked” rate rises

Using data from the Australian Secondary School Students’ Alcohol and Drug Survey, a Prevention Centre PhD project led by Christina Heris found that the proportion Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents who have never smoked rose from 49% in 2005 to 70% in 2017. Additionally, rates of low smoking intensity increased by 10% from 67% in 2005 to 77 % in 2017 meaning that, overall, the number of cigarettes smoked in a day has decreased amongst smokers in the 12–17 age group.

Prevention Centre investigator Professor Sandra Eades, a Noongar woman, who supervised Christina’s project said “It’s fantastic to see that tobacco control is working for all students, including driving down rates among Aboriginal young people. But we know that young Aboriginal people experience more of the risk factors for smoking such as stress, racism and disadvantage. There is a need for governments to address these broader determinants.”

To view the full article click here.

Aboriginal child holding & looking atan unlit cigarette

Image source: Deadly Vibe.

Original articles sought for inaugural HealthBulletin

The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet is welcoming submissions from researchers, practitioners and health workers of original articles (not published elsewhere) for inclusion in their inaugural edition of the next generation of the Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin. They are seeking submissions that provide examples of research on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, including policies, strategies and programs that have the potential to inform and support everyday practice.

For further information about how to submit papers click here.

Australian Indigenous HealthInforNet HealthBulletin Call for papers banner

Image source: Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet website.

National COVID-19 healthcare worker guidelines

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a higher prevalence of respiratory conditions, many of which share symptoms with COVID-19. Healthcare workers examining a patient with respiratory symptoms are at risk of spreading infection between patients with the highest risk of transmission likely during throat and nose examination including when a swab is being collected.

Griffith University researchers have helped develop national guidelines to minimise healthcare workers’ risk of acquiring and spreading infection while examining Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients with respiratory symptoms. “These new guidelines aim to provide resources and support healthcare teams in prevention and management of COVID-19,’’ said Associate Professor Jing Sun from the School of Medicine who led the project.

For more information about the new national guidelines click here.

health professional in PPE removing swab from text tube

Image source: Flinders University website.

PPE innovation needed in remote health services

Clinicians, service providers and researchers have issued an urgent call for an Australian innovation in personal protective equipment (PPE) –  the ventilated hood – to be made available to remote health services, saying that without the hoods, the risk of coronavirus transmission within remote healthcare services and communities is grave.

To read the full article click here.

woman in hospitals bed under COVID-19 hood

Image source: Sydney Morning Herald.

JT Academy offers free employment advertising

Lendlease and JT Academy are encouraging all local employers to utilise the JT Academy FREE employment functions and resources. All you need to do is send the details of any job vacancies you have and let them help you find the best candidates – they will advertise your vacancy on their fully functioning job board for free!

This unique collaborative employment initiative, directed by Managing Director, Johnathan Thurston is fast becoming one the most ambitious employment initiatives Far North Queensland has ever seen. It harnesses the unique strengths of both Lendlease and JT Academy, who together are striving to provide direct job opportunities for local jobseekers.

For more information visit the JT Academy website here.

Jonathan Thurston in suit smiling, Job Board advertisement

Image source: Twitter #jtacademy.

Funding still required for rehab services

Weigelli Centre Aboriginal Corporation Inc Chairperson Ray Harris and CEO Daniel Jeffries have doubled down on the need for more funding to be made available for rehab services, saying revenue streams remained of concern with no additional recurrent funding available for rehab services. The Weigelli Centre and other services across the sector need additional funding to address the increasing need for drug and alcohol treatment services. The continuing challenges remain for services to provide support and assistance to Aboriginal individuals, families and their communities.

To read the full article in the Cowra Guardian click here.

Weigelli Centre Aboriginal Corporation metal sign

Image source: Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of NSW website.

CHF Big Ideas Competition

Do you have an idea which is going to change the way healthcare is delivered?

What about an idea which will transform how the health system works?

Consumers Health Forum (CHF) of Australia is invites you to send in videos of your ideas for innovation in health, to be part of the Big Ideas Forum at their Australian and NZ Shifting Gears Summit in March 2021. Your big idea could be something totally new, or it might be an example of something that has worked well in your community that could be expanded or tried in other places. You may like to base your idea on one or more of the key shifts highlighted in CHF’s 2018 White Paper Shifting Gears: Consumers Transforming Health. To view the White Paper click here.

For more information about the CHF Big Ideas Competition click here and for details about the CHF Summit 2021 click here.

4 people, each holding speech bubbles: Big Idea, Brain Storm, Think Different, Be Creative

Image source: Consumers Health Forum of Australia website.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: First Nations peoples’ COVID-19 response among the best in the world

feature tile First First Nations peoples' response among best in the world & image of Aboriginal man wearing face mask with Aboriginal flag

First Nations Peoples’ COVID-19 response among best

In a recent interview, Australia’s most respected paediatric epidemiologist, Professor Fiona Stanley, said that although Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are the highest-risk people in our community, they have done exceptionally well in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. According to Professor Stanley this is because “Indigenous people took control. They lobbied the government to close remote communities, get personal protective equipment and get tested. They took their vulnerable, old Indigenous people off the streets and put them in good housing. They’re doing better than almost any population worldwide.”

To read a transcript of the full interview click here.

image of Aboriginal man wearing face mask with Aboriginal flag

Image source: NITV website.

First permanent LOV eye clinic in Kimberley

$4.7 million has been allocated towards the first permanent Lions Outback Vision (LOV) eye clinic in the Kimberley. This clinic, to be located in Broome, with outreach services to Derby, Fitzroy Crossing, Halls Creek, Kununurra, Wyndham and Warmun, will enable residents across the Kimberley to receive treatment and prevention services for serious eye diseases on country and close to home.

To read the related media release click here.

Lions Outback Image bus with door open & health professional checking someone's eyes

Image source: National Rural Health Alliance.

Aquarobics classes get results

row of Aboriginal women in a pool holding on to the side

Image source: Great Lakes Advocate.

Six month extension for COVID-19 health measures

Millions of Australians will continue to receive medical care and support in their own homes with the Commonwealth Government investing more than $2 billion to extend a range of COVID-19 health measures for a further six months, to 31 March 2021. Medicare-subsidised telehealth and pathology services, GP-led respiratory clinics, home medicines delivery, public and private hospital services will all be extended, as well as further investments in PPE. These health initiatives play a major role in detecting, preventing and treating COVID-19.

To view the media release regarding this funding click here.

health worker in mask, covid cell image superimposed

Image source: Hospital Management.

COVID-19 double standard for the Barkly

Anyinginyi Health Service has expressed concern and frustration at the granting of an exemption from compulsory supervised quarantine for workers from Melbourne brought to Tennant Creek to work outside the town. Anyinginyi General Manager, Barb Shaw, said “This breaches the NT Government’s own policy to not allow exemptions from compulsory quarantine for people coming from a hot spot” and “the government must urgently explain its decision and immediately work with the Aboriginal community, including Anyinginyi Health Service, to ensure the safety of our community”.

To view the Anyinginyi Health Service’s media release click here and click here to view a supporting media release from the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT.text quote from Pat Turner 'I can't be any blunter...if COVID-19 gets into our communities, we are gone

WA grants for projects with COVID-19 focus

The first program to be funded under WA’s Future Health Research and Innovation (FHRI) Fund is now open and calling for projects with a COVID-19 focus. The FHRI Focus Grants: COVID-19 Program will initially provide up to $4 million for research and innovation that helps promote the health and wellbeing of Western Australians. The program is designed to fund research and innovation that addresses health and wellbeing challenges relevant to the COVID emergency. This could include projects related to infection prevention and control, surveillance, diagnostics and therapeutics as well as the direct or indirect impact of COVID-19 across a range of health conditions. Grants will be made available across three streams of funding – research, innovation and infrastructure.

To view the related media release click here.

COVID-109 virus cell

Image source: Medical Xpress.

Gynaecological cancer award nominations open

The rate of gynaecological cancers among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women is shocking. In the case of cervical cancer for example Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 2.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with, and 3.8 times more likely to die than non-Indigenous women.

Do you know someone who has made an exceptional contribution to improving the outcomes for women affected by gynaecological cancers?

You have only one week left to make a nomination for the 2021 Jeannie Ferris Cancer Australia Recognition Award.

Applications close at 5.00 pm (AEST) Wednesday 30 September 2020.

To view further details about the award and how to nominate someone click here.

Waminda senior regional manager Krissy Falzon at desk looking at her computer

Krissy Falzon, South Coast Womens Health & Welfare Aboriginal Corporation. Image source: South Coast Register.

Simon Says Ear Health Volume 2

Volume two of AHCWA’s Simon Says series has been released. The latest resources allow you to read along with Simon and his friends to learn about the flu and how you can keep yourself and your community safe. Physical copies are  available and you are welcome to print copies as you need them.

To view volume two of the Simon Says series click here.

cartoon of Aboriginal man with family standing behind him punching giant green flu virus

Image source: AHCWA Simon Says Volume 2.

Mental health wellbeing trial using horses

A group of Broome-based Indigenous health workers are helping develop a mental wellbeing trial that uses horses to help people to express themselves openly. Known as Yawardani Jan-ga — or horses helping — the trial capitalises on the ties between Aboriginal people and horses and rodeo culture in the Kimberley to enhance the social and emotional wellbeing of youngsters while building leadership skills. It is an adapted form of the global Equine Assisted Learning model, which uses horses to build emotional skills and personal development, and will be rolled out in the region.

To read The West Australian article about the trial click here.

young Aboriginal girl on horse & Aboriginal man trainer

Image source: ABC News.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Research Alert : @HealthInfoNet releases Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2019 social and cultural determinants, chronic conditions, health behaviours, environmental health , alcohol and other drugs

The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet has released the Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2019

This new plain language publication provides information for a wider (non-academic) audience and incorporates many visual elements.

The Summary is useful for health workers and those studying in the field as a quick source of general information. It provides key information regarding the health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the following topics:

  • social and cultural determinants
  • chronic conditions
  • health behaviours
  • environmental health
  • alcohol and other drugs.

The Summary is based on HealthInfoNet‘s comprehensive publication Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2019. It presents statistical information from the Overview in a visual format that is quick and easy for users to digest.

The Summary is available online and in hardcopy format. Please contact HealthInfoNet by email if you wish to order a hardcopy of this Summary. Other reviews and plain language summaries are available here.

Here are the key facts

Please note in an earlier version sent out 7.00 am June 15 a computer error dropped off the last word in many sentences : these are new fixed 

Key facts

Population

  • In 2019, the estimated Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population was 847,190.
  • In 2019, NSW had the highest number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (the estimated population was 281,107 people, 33% of the total Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population).
  • In 2019, NT had the highest proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in its population, with 32% of the NT population identifying as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders
  • In 2016, around 37% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people lived in major cities
  • The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is much younger than the non-Indigenous population.

Births and pregnancy outcomes

  • In 2018, there were 21,928 births registered in Australia with one or both parents identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (7% of all births registered).
  • In 2018, the median age for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers was 26.0 years.
  • In 2018, total fertility rates were 2,371 births per 1,000 for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.
  • In 2017, the average birthweight of babies born to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers was 3,202 grams
  • The proportion of low birthweight babies born to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers between 2007 and 2017 remained steady at around 13%.

Mortality

  • For 2018, the age-standardised death rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT was 1 per 1,000.
  • Between 1998 and 2015, there was a 15% reduction in the death rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT.
  • For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people born 2015-2017, life expectancy was estimated to be 6 years for males and 75.6 years for females, around 8-9 years less than the estimates for non-Indigenous males and females.
  • In 2018, the median age at death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT was 2 years; this was an increase from 55.8 years in 2008.
  • Between 1998 and 2015, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infant mortality rate has more than halved (from 5 to 6.3 per 1,000).
  • In 2018, the leading causes of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT were ischaemic heart disease (IHD), diabetes, chronic lower respiratory diseases and lung and related cancers.
  • For 2012-2017 the maternal mortality ratio for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women was 27 deaths per 100,000 women who gave birth.
  • For 1998-2015, in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT there was a 32% decline in the death rate from avoidable causes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 0-74 years

Hospitalisation

  • In 2017-18, 9% of all hospital separations were for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • In 2017-18, the age-adjusted separation rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was 2.6 times higher than for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2017-18, the main cause of hospitalisation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was for ‘factors influencing health status and contact with health services’ (mostly for care involving dialysis), responsible for 49% of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander seperations.
  • In 2017-18, the age-standardised rate of overall potentially preventable hospitalisations for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was 80 per 1,000 (38 per 1,000 for chronic conditions and 13 per 1,000 for vaccine-preventable conditions).

Selected health conditions

Cardiovascular health

  • In 2018-19, around 15% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported having cardiovascular disease (CVD).
  • In 2018-19, nearly one quarter (23%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults were found to have high blood pressure.
  • For 2013-2017, in Qld, WA, SA and the NT combined, there were 1,043 new rheumatic heart disease diagnoses among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, a crude rate of 50 per 100,000.
  • In 2017-18, there 14,945 hospital separations for CVD among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, representing 5.4% of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander hospital separations (excluding dialysis).
  • In 2018, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) was the leading specific cause of death of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT

Cancer

  • In 2018-19, 1% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported having cancer (males 1.2%, females 1.1%).
  • For 2010-2014, the most common cancers diagnosed among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in NSW, Vic, Qld, WA and the NT were lung cancer and breast (females) cancer.
  • Survival rates indicate that of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in NSW, Vic, Qld, WA, and the NT who were diagnosed with cancer between 2007 and 2014, 50% had a chance of surviving five years after diagnosis
  • In 2016-17, there 8,447 hospital separations for neoplasms2 among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • For 2013-2017, the age-standardised mortality rate due to cancer of any type was 238 per 100,000, an increase of 5% when compared with a rate of 227 per 100,000 in 2010-2014.

Diabetes

  • In 2018-19, 8% of Aboriginal people and 7.9% of Torres Strait Islander people reported having diabetes.
  • In 2015-16, there were around 2,300 hospitalisations with a principal diagnosis of type 2 diabetes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • In 2018, diabetes was the second leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • The death rate for diabetes decreased by 0% between 2009-2013 and 2014-2018.
  • Some data sources use term ‘neoplasm’ to describe conditions associated with abnormal growth of new tissue, commonly referred to as a Neoplasms can be benign (not cancerous) or malignant (cancerous) [1].

Social and emotional wellbeing

  • In 2018-19, 31% of Aboriginal and 23% of Torres Strait Islander respondents aged 18 years and over reported high or very high levels of psychological distress
  • In 2014-15, 68% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over and 67% of children aged 4-14 years experienced at least one significant stressor in the previous 12 months
  • In 2012-13, 91% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported on feelings of calmness and peacefulness, happiness, fullness of life and energy either some, most, or all of the time.
  • In 2014-15, more than half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over reported an overall life satisfaction rating of at least 8 out of 10.
  • In 2018-19, 25% of Aboriginal and 17% of Torres Strait Islander people, aged two years and over, reported having a mental and/or behavioural conditions
  • In 2018-19, anxiety was the most common mental or behavioural condition reported (17%), followed by depression (13%).
  • In 2017-18, there were 21,940 hospital separations with a principal diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) ‘mental and behavioural disorders’ identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander
  • In 2018, 169 (129 males and 40 females) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in NSW, Qld, WA, SA, and the NT died from intentional self-harm (suicide).
  • Between 2009-2013 and 2014-2018, the NT was the only jurisdiction to record a decrease in intentional self-harm (suicide) death rates.

Kidney health

  • In 2018-19, 8% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Aboriginal people 1.9%; Torres Strait Islander people 0.4%) reported kidney disease as a long-term health condition.
  • For 2014-2018, after age-adjustment, the notification rate of end-stage renal disease was 3 times higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than for non-Indigenous people.
  • In 2017-18, ‘care involving dialysis’ was the most common reason for hospitalisation among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • In 2018, 310 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people commenced dialysis and 49 were the recipients of new kidneys.
  • For 2013-2017, the age-adjusted death rate from kidney disease was 21 per 100,000 (NT: 47 per 100,000; WA: 38 per 100,000) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and NT
  • In 2018, the most common causes of death among the 217 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who were receiving dialysis was CVD (64 deaths) and withdrawal from treatment (51 deaths).

Injury, including family violence

  • In 2012-13, 5% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported having a long-term condition caused by injury.
  • In 2018-19, 16% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over had experienced physical harm or threatened physical harm at least once in the last 12 months.
  • In 2016-17, the rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander hospitalised injury was higher for males (44 per 1,000) than females (39 per 1,000).
  • In 2017-18, 20% of injury-related hospitalisations among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were for assault.
  • In 2018, intentional self-harm was the leading specific cause of injury deaths for NSW, Qld, SA, WA, and NT (5.3% of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths).

Respiratory health

  • In 2018-19, 29% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported having a long-term respiratory condition .
  • In 2018-19, 16% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported having asthma.
  • In 2014-15, crude hospitalisation rates were highest for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people presenting with influenza and pneumonia (7.4 per 1,000), followed by COPD (5.3 per 1,000), acute upper respiratory infections (3.8 per 1,000) and asthma (2.9 per 1,000).
  • In 2018, chronic lower respiratory disease was the third highest cause of death overall for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in NSW, Qld, WA, SA and the NT

Eye health

  • In 2018-19, eye and sight problems were reported by 38% of Aboriginal people and 40% of Torres Strait Islander people.
  • In 2018-19, eye and sight problems were reported by 32% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males and by 43% of females.
  • In 2018-19, the most common eye conditions reported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were hyperopia (long sightedness: 22%), myopia (short sightedness: 16%), other diseases of the eye and adnexa (8.7%), cataract (1.4%), blindness (0.9%) and glaucoma (0.5%).
  • In 2014-15, 13% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, aged 4-14 years, were reported to have eye or sight problems.
  • In 2018, 144 cases of trachoma were detected among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in at-risk communities in Qld, WA, SA and the NT
  • For 2015-17, 62% of hospitalisations for diseases of the eye (8,274) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were for disorders of the lens (5,092) (mainly cataracts).

Ear health and hearing

  • In 2018-19, 14% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported having a long-term ear and/or hearing problem
  • In 2018-19, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0-14 years, the prevalence of otitis media (OM) was 6% and of partial or complete deafness was 3.8%.
  • In 2017-18, the age-adjusted hospitalisation rate for ear conditions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was 1 per 1,000 population.

Oral health

  • In 2014-15, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 4-14 years with reported tooth or gum problems was 34%, a decrease from 39% in 2008.
  • In 2012-2014, 61% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5-10 years had experienced tooth decay in their baby teeth, and 36% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 6-14 years had experienced tooth decay in their permanent teeth.
  • In 2016-17, there were 3,418 potentially preventable hospitalisations for dental conditions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander The age-standardised rate of hospitalisation was 4.6 per 1,000.

Disability

  • In 2018-19, 27% of Aboriginal and 24% of Torres Strait Islander people reported having a disability or restrictive long-term health
  • In 2018-19, 2% of Aboriginal and 8.3% of Torres Strait Islander people reported a profound or severe core activity limitation.
  • In 2016, 7% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a profound or severe disability reported a need for assistance.
  • In 2017-18, 9% of disability service users were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with most aged under 50 years (82%).
  • In 2017-18, the primary disability groups accessing services were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a psychiatric condition (24%), intellectual disability (23%) and physical disability (20%).
  • In 2017-18, 2,524 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander National Disability Agreement service users transitioned to the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Communicable diseases

  • In 2017, there were 7,015 notifications for chlamydia for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, accounting for 7% of the notifications in Australia
  • During 2013-2017, there was a 9% and 9.8% decline in chlamydia notification rates among males and females (respectively).
  • In 2017, there were 4,119 gonorrhoea notifications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, accounting for 15% of the notifications in Australia.
  • In 2017, there were 779 syphilis notifications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accounting for 18% of the notifications in Australia.
  • In 2017, Qld (45%) and the NT (35%) accounted for 80% of the syphilis notifications from all jurisdictions.
  • In 2018, there were 34 cases of newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia .
  • In 2017, there were 1,201 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people diagnosed with hepatitis C (HCV) in Australia
  • In 2017, there were 151 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people diagnosed with hepatitis B (HBV) in Australia
  • For 2013-2017 there was a 37% decline in the HBV notification rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • For 2011-2015, 1,152 (14%) of the 8,316 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) were identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait people .
  • For 2011-2015, there were 26 deaths attributed to IPD with 11 of the 26 deaths (42%) in the 50 years and over age-group.
  • For 2011-2015, 101 (10%) of the 966 notified cases of meningococcal disease were identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • For 2006-2015, the incidence rate of meningococcal serogroup B was 8 per 100,000, with the age- specific rate highest in infants less than 12 months of age (33 per 100,000).
  • In 2015, of the 1,255 notifications of TB in Australia, 27 (2.2%) were identified as Aboriginal and seven (0.6%) as Torres Strait Islander people
  • For 2011-2015, there were 16 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people diagnosed with invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) in Australia
  • Between 2007-2010 and 2011-2015 notification rates for Hib decreased by around 67%.
  • In 2018-19, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reporting a disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue was 2% (males 2.4% and females 4.0%).

NACCHO Aboriginal #EyeHealth News Alerts : @IEHU_UniMelb The #ClosetheGap for Vision by 2020: The Gap and Beyond: National Conference 2020 goes virtual : View presentations from Minister @GregHuntMP @profhughrt Dr Janine Mohamed and Dr Kris Rallah-Baker

Since the postponement of the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: The Gap and Beyond: National Conference 2020, which was due to take place in Adelaide on the 18 and 19 March 2020, Indigenous Eye Health has been establishing suitable dates for the rescheduling of the conference, together with co-hosts Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA).

We look forward to sharing this further advice regarding the next conference as soon as we can.

Original press release HERE

In lieu of being able to hear the keynote presentations face-to-face at the conference, a number of our keynote speakers have kindly recorded presentations and video messages for conference delegates and the Indigenous eye health sector more broadly.

Please note that these presentations have been recorded at different times, including prior to the event and the conference postponement announcement, and so should be viewed with the understanding that they are not contemporary messages.

Professor Hugh Taylor AC

 

The Hon. Greg Hunt MP

 

Dr Janine Mohamed

Over the past 20 years, Dr Janine Mohamed has worked in nursing, management, project management, and workforce and health policy in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health sector.

Many of these years have been spent in the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector at state, national and international levels, and most recently as the CEO at the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM).

Dr Mohamed is now based in Melbourne and is the CEO of the Lowitja Institute. She was awarded an Atlantic Fellows for Social Equity Fellowship in 2019, and, in January 2020, a Doctorate of Nursing honoris causa by Edith Cowan University.

 

Dr Kris Rallah-Baker

Dr Kris Rallah-Baker is a Yuggera/Biri-Gubba-Juru man. Born in Canberra, he moved to Brisbane with his parents at the age of four, where he and his brother completed their schooling. Dr Rallah-Baker was a bright student who did well in all his subjects, and at the end of high school he chose to pursue further studies in medicine.

He’d been inspired as a young boy to join the medical profession after his nanna told him how her mother had passed away from pneumonia when his nanna was just 12-years-old.

As part of the Stolen Generation, she had been traumatised and had refused to see white doctors. Because of this, she didn’t get the medical assistance she needed, causing her to pass away before her time. “Her story was told frequently in our family and I credit her with the inspiration for me to become a medical doctor,” Dr Rallah-Baker says.

Dr Rallah-Baker knows firsthand how important it is to have Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples on the other side of the doctor’s desk. “Having Aboriginal ophthalmologists at the table brings a new perspective. These patients could be like me, they could be my uncle, they could be my cousins.

“The gap itself won’t be closed by me, but it helps the conversation move along.”

We thank them for taking the time to record their presentations so that they can be shared with you.

We think they are great and capture important information and messages.

Indigenous Eye Health and the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) are pleased to present the ‘Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: The Gap and Beyond: National Conference 2020’ keynote presentation videos.

You are welcome to contact Guy Gillor (guy.gillor@unimelb.edu.au) or Nick Wilson (nick.wilson@unimelb.edu.au) for more information about the videos, future conference considerations or other related matters.

View Conference Program

NACCHO leads PBS listing of medication to improve #eyehealth for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people : Download our NACCHO Press Release HERE

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are overrepresented in rates of eye disease and vision problems.

They are amongst the most common long-term health conditions reported by our communities and most of the vision loss associated with these issues is preventable.

“This successful collaboration with experts and industry is important to NACCHO as access to the right medication and the best medical treatment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, is our top priority.

In order to close the gap in health rates and experiences, more actions like this in the right direction must be made.”

Dr Dawn Casey, Deputy CEO of NACCHO Download Press Release 2 March 2020

Read over 50 Aboriginal Eye Health articles published by NACCHO

Read Aboriginal Health and ACCHO Pharmacies articles published by NACCHO

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) is proud to have led a successful submission to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) for an expansion to the listing of Prednefrin Forte on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS).

This item can now be prescribed on the PBS for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients as of 1 March 2020.

NACCHO worked with a range of experts and stakeholders to seek listing of Prednefrin Forte on the PBS for treatment of post-operative eye-inflammation.

This listing will mean that there is a greater range and better affordability of anti-inflammatory eye drops for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Eye disease is more common in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people compared to other Australians; eye health outcomes are poorer and cataracts more prevalent. Prednefrin Forte (prednisolone and phenylephrine eye drops) is a medication used to treat eye inflammation and swelling that is often considered first-line therapy by ophthalmologists after cataract surgery.

It has advantageous properties and pack size when compared to other similar medicines.

Allergan Managing Director, Nathalie McNeil said, “It has been a pleasure for Allergan to collaborate with NACCHO on this PBAC submission. We are excited about Prednefrin Forte’s contribution towards improved health outcomes for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.”

Vision 2020 Australia CEO Judith Abbott said, “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people currently experience blindness and low vision at three times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians.

“As Strong eyes, strong communities: a five-year plan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye health and vision highlights, improving access to timely, culturally sensitive and affordable eye health care is of vital importance.

We welcome this change to current drug scheduling, which will enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to access a broader and more affordable range of eye medications, when they are needed.”

NACCHO Media-Statement – NACCHO leads PBS listing of medication to improve eye health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peopleDownload