NACCHO Aboriginal Health #IHMayDay17 : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD #NT #TAS @KenWyattMP

1.1 NSW Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service commemorated Bringing Them Home report 20 years

1.2 NSW : Orange Aboriginal Medical Service (OAMS) Holistic Wellbeing Centre planned

2. ACT Aspiring marathon runner Cara Smith has a healthy future

3. QLD : Apunipima Stands Up Against Domestic and Family Violence in Kowanyama and Pormpuraaw

4.SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

5. WA Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia – AHCWA

6. Tas : The Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (TAC)

7.VIC VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team celebrates NRL Indigenous Round

 8. NT Miwajtj Health : Unfolding public health emergency in north-east Arnhem Land

 

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media     Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 NSW Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service commemorated Bringing Them Home report 20 years

Two decades have passed since the Bringing Them Home report, but the healing continues for the Eurobodalla’s Indigenous community.

From the local News

Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service commemorated the anniversary on Monday with a formal gathering and smoking ceremony at their Batemans Bay centre.

Guest speakers Shanna Provost and Muriel Slockee shared their experiences as part of the hidden and stolen generations.

Ms Provost said sharing personal stories was vital to healing the trans-generational scars.

“These events are really important for community members to get together to provide support to each other,” she said.

Many still felt the effects of the damage done to the stolen generations.

“It is a sad story and this is a safe place for all people to sit in the sadness of that story,” she said.

It’s a long journey, it’s a long road to travel. As a nation, we are only starting on that journey. – Shanna Provost

The report was tabled in the Australian Parliament in 1997 and documented the effect of the stolen generations on Indigenous communities. The report handed down more than 50 recommendations in response to the findings, but many are yet to be implemented.

“It’s a long journey, it’s a long road to travel. As a nation, we are only starting on that journey,” Ms Provost said.

She hoped the next 20 years would see young Indigenous people continue to rise to more prominent roles in the community.

Mrs Slockee, a child of the stolen generations, said it was painful to witness the lasting effect of forcible removal.

“Bringing Them Home still is really sore,” Mrs Slockee said.

“Children are still being stolen, it still hurts, it’s just happening in a different way.

“I hope that when we have our jubilee, we can celebrate by stopping all this rubbish and being open and honest as a nation to our first people.

“We need a fair go.”

Katungul’s commemorations will conclude on Friday, May 19, with a day of coil weaving, oyster shucking, ochre face painting, possum cloak photos and a communal canvas painting. Activities start 10am.

1.2 NSW : Orange Aboriginal Medical Service (OAMS) Holistic Wellbeing Centre planned

THE Orange Aboriginal Medical Service (OAMS) is charging ahead to expand its offerings, all it needs now is a little more funding.

From Local

OAMS has received development approval from Orange City Council for an $780,000 wellbeing centre at Cameron Place.

It will be located next to its existing $4 million premises at Perc Griffith Way, which was completed in 2014.

Chief executive officer Jamie Newman said the centre would incorporate nutritional and exercise services for those recovering from an operation or illness, mothers before and after pregnancy and those with mental illnesses.

He said the idea had come from clients’ requests

2. ACT Aspiring marathon runner Cara Smith has a healthy future

“Indigenous people face health and education issues. Young females, young mothers with two, three, seven children. It’s so easy to fall into a trap but there’s no excuse not to exercise, not to walk or run,”

Cara Smith is one of only six women selected for the Indigenous Marathon foundation program and will compete in the New York City Marathon at the end of the year. Photo: Rohan Thomson from Canberra Times

Aspiring marathon runner Cara Smith braves the Canberra cold to train at 3am so she can spend more time with son Zac, but her desire to change a family history of diabetes and obesity is her No. 1 motivation.

The 29-year-old is one of 12 athletes as part of the latest intake for the Robert de Castella inspired Indigenous marathon project.

They will train for six months before targeting a goal of completing the New York marathon on November 5.

The Queanbeyan mother of one wants to be the trigger for family change for one-year-old Zac to ensure he lives a healthy life.

“I have a family history of diabetes and obesity and I don’t want that for my son. I want to be healthy and I want to be active and I want it to be a part of his [Zac Jnr] daily life,” Smith said.

Former marathon world champion de Castella started the project in 2011 as a vehicle to promote healthy lifestyles for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Smith will balance full-time work with family duties as she begins a tough training schedule to be ready for the 42-kilometre run.

She has never run a marathon, having only completed a half marathon in New Zealand 13 months ago, and will again test herself in another half marathon on the Gold Coast in July.

She is running up to 30 kilometres a week in preparation for not only the Gold Coast but to run her first full length marathon.

“It was scary and exciting to be honest, when [coach] Adrian Dodson-Shaw gave me the call I couldn’t believe it,” Smith said.

“My husband Zac [Snr] is so supportive so that helps a lot and I try not to think about my son [Zac Jnr], otherwise I get caught up and just want to spend time with him.”

Although in the early stages of the program, Smith is already feeling the intensity. She trains four times per week and draws motivation from her family as the work load looks to increase.

“My baby [Zac], he’s my driving force and motivation, he’s a reminder of what I can achieve. ” Smith said.

Running her first marathon, Smith also looks to inspire all indigenous females to get active and improve their health.

“Indigenous people face health and education issues. Young females, young mothers with two, three, seven children. It’s so easy to fall into a trap but there’s no excuse not to exercise, not to walk or run,” Smith said.

Smith will be one of 50,000 to compete in the New York marathon when she completes her journey with the Indigenous Marathon Foundation and knows exactly what will be going through her mind.

“Butterflies, don’t fall, don’t stop, my son, my husband, mom, dad , brother, sister. It’s exciting but I’ve worked hard to get here, I want to show everyone from Northern NSW [New South Wales] what we can do,”

3. QLD : Apunipima Stands Up Against Domestic and Family Violence in Kowanyama and Pormpuraaw

May is Domestic Violence Prevention Month. Domestic violence prevention is always a part of Apunipima’s wellbeing conversation, and for the month of May Apunipima is advocating and supporting capacity in Community to have the conversation around domestic violence and prevention.

Picture above from White Ribbon Day

Domestic and family violence can be both in the form of physical and emotional abuse. The messages are:

  • Learn to identify domestic violence and when it could be taking place
  • Create a supportive environment, know who you can go to and where safe places are in your community
  • Be prepared to leave, have a bag packed, know how to exit and if children need to exit too
  • Both men and women can be a victim of domestic and family violence

A number of events in community will be marking the importance of preventing domestic and family violence.

Kowanyama

Apunipima is partnering with the Women’s Shelter and community in Kowanyama to facilitate yarning circles, candlelight vigil, and a march to raise awareness about Domestic Violence Prevention. Men and women from the Men’s Group, Women’s Group, school, Apunipima, and other organisations in the community will be participating in the March. A Reflections session will be held to make time to think about those who have been lost to domestic violence in Community.

  • May 16th & May 25th Women’s Shelter Yarning Circle
  • May 29th Women’s Group and Candlelight Vigil and Reflections Session
  • May 30th Domestic Violence Prevention March

 

Pormpuraaw

Apunipima is partnering up with the school and Women’s Shelter to deliver Domestic Violence Prevention education through the Pormpuraaw Healthy Kids programme.

  • May 23rd Healthy Kids Domestic Violence Education Session

Help is available. If you are a victim of domestic violence, help is available. You can:

  • Go to a Women’s Shelter
  • Call the 24/7 confidential helpline – 1800 RESPECT
  • Call 000 (or 112 from a mobile) in an emergency
  • DVConnect Womensline – phone 1800 811 811 (24 hours, 7 days)
  • DVConnect Mensline – phone 1800 600 636 (9am to 12 midnight, 7 days)
  • Kids Helpline – phone 1800 551 800 (24 hours, 7 days)
  • Elder Abuse Helpline – Queensland phone 1300 651 192, rest of Australia phone (07) 3867 2525 (9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday)
  • State-wide Sexual Assault Helpline – phone 1800 010 120 (7.30am to 11.30pm, 7 days)

4.SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

Time to Join The Movement. Get ready for World No Tobacco Day on the 31st May and make a pledge http://tacklingtobacco.nunku.org.au/join-the-movement/

5. WA Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia – AHCWA

The Youth Affairs Council of Western Australia are conducting a final survey on the Aboriginal Youth Services Investment Reform process in WA.

It is important for the sector to provide feedback on our understanding of the Reforms, so that future processes can be improved. If you are or your organisation has been involved, please follow the link – it will take 20 to 25 minutes to fill out.

Please share! 🙂

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SX85KWV

6. Tas : The Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (TAC)

Three Tasmanian Aboriginal children have starred in a new animated television series, broadcast in one of the state’s Indigenous languages.

The new animated television series Little J and Big Cuz is set in “nana’s backyard” and looks at everyday situations for Aboriginal children.

The 13-episode series has been recorded in both English and several of Australia’s Indigenous languages, including Tasmania’s palawa kani which is made up of nine dialects.

It was spoken across Tasmania until colonisation, when the Indigenous community was forced to speak English.

The language was revived in the 1990s and has been taught across the state ever since.

Three local school children, who have been learning the language, were chosen to be involved in the series.

Seth Gardiner, 11, has been learning palawa kani for three years.

“[I find it] fun because you get to interact with other people and speak our own language,” he said.

“Our alphabet is different to English, we don’t have some of the letters.

“We went to the studio and we had to stand in front of the microphones and we had to go over our script again and again until it was perfect.

“The character I’m playing is … in a wheelchair and his favourite animal is kangaroos and he’s doing show and tell.”

Peta Cabalza, 10, has also been learning the language for several years.

“It can be a tricky language,” she said. “It was really nice to be able to do the voices.”

Twelve-year-old Skye Cox was also involved.

The Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (TAC) describes palawa kani as being “the revived form of the original Tasmanian Aboriginal languages. It incorporates authentic elements of the original languages remembered by Tasmanian [Aboriginal peoples] from the 19th to the 21st centuries. It also draws on an extensive body of historical and linguistic research”.

“There are no living speakers of the original Tasmanian languages.

“Spoken records of the original sounds are limited to a few sounds that can only just be heard when Fanny Cochrane Smith spoke on the records of her songs in 1899.

“So to attempt to recover the original sounds and meanings, we have to start from written records made by early Europeans of the sounds they heard, and the meanings they thought they understood when they heard our ancestors speak.”

Keeping the language alive

Rosetta Thomas, a youth language worker at the TAC’s Launceston office, is one of several Tasmanian adults who voice the other characters in the episode.

She started learning palawa kani on Cape Barren Island when she was 12, and is now passing on her language skills to school children.

“Language is a really big part of our history and our culture and it means a lot to us and it’s great to pass on to the children, so it can be happening for future generations,” she said.

Ms Thomas said the cartoon was a great opportunity for the kids to showcase the language to a wider audience.)

“They’re famous, so they say. They’re super-excited. The kids who’re involved have worked really hard for years,” she said.

“I think it’s fabulous for the community, for families, for children to be able to view this for future years and see how far we’ve come from starting language learning in the late 1990s to where it is today.”

The lack of a cartoon speaking to Indigenous kids in Aboriginal language had irked the show’s director, Tasmanian Tony Thorne.

“Never before has an Australian animated show targeted an Indigenous four- to six-year-old audience. As an Indigenous person this seemed wrong,” he said.

The series, being screened on NITV, involved animators from Hobart company Blue Rocket and received financial support from Screen Tasmania.

7.VIC VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team celebrates NRL Indigenous Round

 

The Healthy Lifestyle Team celebrated the Indigenous round at the NRL in Brisbane with a joint Deadly Choices and Victorian Aboriginal Health Service guernsey worn by the kids at the half time entertainment! #DeadlyChoices #VAHSHLT #StaySmokeFree Brisbane Broncos #IndigenousRound Melbourne Storm Gold Coast Titans Manly Warringah Sea Eagles

8. NT Miwajtj Health : Unfolding public health emergency in north-east Arnhem Land

“If these children don’t stop, they will have a very serious brain damage issue,” 

In an effort to educate young people about the dangers of sniffing, Miwatj’s mental health team has been meeting with the families of those involved.

It has also developed a poster in English and Yolngu Matha, which explains that continued sniffing could lead to death.

“The community has taken steps and are still looking at other steps to stop what is happening,”

Joan Djamalaka Dhamarrandji, an Aboriginal health practitioner at Miwatj Health ( Member of AMSANT and NACCHO ) which runs clinics across north-east Arnhem Land.

Authorities are warning of an unfolding public health emergency in north-east Arnhem Land, where dozens of young people are recording dangerously high lead levels after sniffing aviation fuel.

Security camera vision obtained by the ABC shows children climbing onto the fuselage of planes on Elcho Island and siphoning avgas from fuel tanks in the wings.

Watch vision here

“If these children don’t stop, they will have a very serious brain damage issue,” said Joan Djamalaka Dhamarrandji, an Aboriginal health practitioner at Miwatj Health, which runs clinics across north-east Arnhem Land.

Petrol sniffing is not uncommon in remote communities, but rarely does it involve avgas, which contains lead.

At least 70 young people on Elcho Island are known to have sniffed the volatile substance, with the youngest believed to be seven years old.

About 30 more young people have elevated lead levels at Gapuwiyak.

Children in Milingimbi are also believed to be sniffing avgas.

Nine children and one adult have been transported from the region to Royal Darwin Hospital for medical treatment.

“This is a public health emergency,” said Dr Lucas de Toca, the chief health officer for Miwatj Health.

“We are talking about a high number of children with high blood lead levels.”

Yolngu leaders on Elcho Island are deeply concerned and have held community meetings in an effort to end the problem.

“Our kids are ending up in hospital by getting infected by chemicals which is bad for them,” said John Gurrumgurrum Burarrwanga from Makarr Dhuni, an organisation which represents clan groups on Elcho Island.

Lead levels of sniffers well above health guidelines

National health guidelines require investigations of blood lead levels higher than five micrograms per decilitre.

The majority of Elcho Island sniffers have levels six to 10 times that amount.

“We are seeing levels that are almost unprecedented in current society,” Dr de Toca said.

The health risk is particularly great for children, with lead exposure causing long-term physical and behavioural problems, as well as learning difficulties.

Young people have been breaking into the airport and sniffing avgas since March last year.

The behaviour follows a previous sniffing outbreak, which involved aerosol spray cans, in 2015.

“The issue became an absolute crisis because it became a practically every night event,” said Yvonne Sutherland, the chief executive of the local Marthakal Group, which runs the airport.

Concerns of avgas explosion

Ms Sutherland is concerned not only for the health of the children, but also the safety of aircraft.

There is also the real risk of an explosion involving avgas, which is extremely flammable.

“If we are not careful, and this is probably one of my highest concerns … we may have a fireball that will be just devastating for everybody,” Ms Sutherland said.

Marthakal has taken numerous steps to prevent access to avgas, including increased security lighting and CCTV coverage at the airport.

It also tried relocating three of its charter planes each night to Nhulunbuy, hundreds of kilometres away, over a two-week period last year.

But at a cost of $32,000 for the fortnight, it was an unsustainable measure.

Hopes guard dog will curtail break-ins

The Department of Chief Minister has now provided $70,000 for a guard dog and security officer to be stationed at the airport for 10 hours each night over the next three months.

“That’s been extremely successful,” Ms Sutherland said.

“There has not been a single incursion into the airport since the security guard was installed.”

Marthakal believes building a high-secure facility to lock its planes in overnight would be the best long-term solution.

That would cost about $400,000, but Ms Sutherland said it would be money well spent.

“If the avgas [sniffing] continues, the impost on the health and disability budget will be enormous,” she said.

‘Kids are important’

In an effort to educate young people about the dangers of sniffing, Miwatj’s mental health team has been meeting with the families of those involved.

It has also developed a poster in English and Yolngu Matha, which explains that continued sniffing could lead to death.

“The community has taken steps and are still looking at other steps to stop what is happening,” Ms Dhamarrandji said.

Community leaders want extra government funding for local staff to expand health education campaigns in Yolgnu Matha, as well as extra recreational programs to keep young people on the island engaged.

“Kids are very important to our life because they are the future generations,” Mr Burarrwanga said.

“So we don’t want these things happening in the community or elsewhere.”

The Northern Territory Government says it has set up a “critical response” involving all stakeholders affected by avgas sniffing.

“Any volatile substance abuse is very dangerous and concerning,” said Jim Rogers from the NT Department of Chief Minister.

“However the emergence of avgas sniffing and the potential long-term consequences of elevated blood lead levels is a significant concern.”

 

NACCHO TOP #IHMayDay17 #JobAlerts : This week in Aboriginal Health : Doctors, Aboriginal Health Workers

This weeks #Jobalerts for #IHMayDay17

Please note  : Before completing a job application check with the ACCHO that job is still available

1. AHMRC NSW CEO Chief Executive Officer

2.VAHS  Health Promotion Team

3 -8 http://www.iuih.org.au/Jobs/IUIH-Vacancies

9. Sunrise Health NT Mental Health Registered Nurse

10.Sunrise Health Program Coordinator (PHaMs)

11-14 .Danila Dilba Health Service Darwin 

15.Urapuntja Community  NT : Psychologist 

16. Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service – GP

17.Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

18 . Congress Alice Springs :Remote Area Nurses/Aboriginal Health Practitioners 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1. AHMRC NSW CEO Chief Executive Officer

2.VAHS Health Promotion Team

Are you looking for something different?
Passionate about health and well being?

Check out this new position open with the VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team based at VAHS Preston.

3-11 For all Job Ads see links and downloads HERE

3.IUIH Senior Legal Officer

Applications close 9am on Thursday 18 May 2017

The role of Senior Legal Officer will include:

1. Overseeing the establishment of the IUIH Legal Service with core components including:
2. Direct legal services – advice and casework
3. Information and referral service
4. Legal education and development – organisation and community

This is an exciting opportunity to join a committed team working from Bowen Hills and across the Moreton Bay region as required.

EOI-Download

Enquiries about the position can be directed to hr@iuih.org.au

Applications (resume and brief covering letter addressing the key requirements in the PD) are to be submitted via SEEK to be considered.

4.IUIH Indigenous Outreach Worker (CTG)

Applications close 9am on Thursday 18 May 2017

Based at the Salisbury office, the Indigenous Outreach Worker will support improved access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to available health care services in the Metro Brisbane South region.  This includes effective liaison with local Indigenous communities, identification of barriers to access, implementation of practical solutions and provision of assistance to identified Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to manage primary health care related needs.

EOI-Download

Enquiries about the position can be directed to Helen Quelch by email at helen.quelch@iuih.org.au

Applications (resume and brief covering letter addressing the key requirements in the EOI) are to be submitted via SEEK to be considered.

5.IUIH Psychologist – Child focus

Applications close 9am on Friday 19 May 2017

Working from MATSICHS Caboolture you will provide, in accordance with the Institute Model of Care, culturally appropriate clinical care and supportive health services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community as a member of a multi-disciplinary primary health care team, ensuring effective assessment, service delivery and referral practices are delivered in accordance with best psychology practice.

EOI-Download

Enquiries about the position can be directed to Jess O’Reilly by email at Jessica.OReilly@iuih.org.au

Applications (resume and brief covering letter addressing the key requirements in the EOI) are to be submitted to hr@iuih.org.au

6.IUIH Project Officer (CTG) – Brisbane North

Applications close 9am on Friday 19 May 2017

The Project Officer will provide support to mainstream general practice to improve access to private general practice for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people. This will include working directly with a defined number of approved mainstream general practices in the familiarisation of CTG initiatives designed to support these general practices in the provision of appropriate and timely care for Indigenous people in their region, especially those at risk of or who already have a chronic disease.

This is a great opportunity to join a committed multi-disciplinary team working across the Moreton Bay region and other IUIH premises as required.

EOI-Download

Enquiries about the position can be directed to Helen Quelch by email at helen.quelch@iuih.org.au

Applications (resume and brief covering letter addressing the key requirements in the EOI) are to be submitted via SEEK to be considered.

7.IUIH Project Officer (CTG) – Brisbane South

Applications close 9am on Friday 19 May 2017

The Project Officer will provide support to mainstream general practice to improve access to private general practice for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people. This will include working directly with a defined number of approved mainstream general practices in the familiarisation of CTG initiatives designed to support these general practices in the provision of appropriate and timely care for Indigenous people in their region, especially those at risk of or who already have a chronic disease.

This is a great opportunity to join a committed multi-disciplinary team working from Salisbury and other IUIH premises as required.

EOI-Download

Enquiries about the position can be directed to Helen Quelch by email at helen.quelch@iuih.org.au

Applications (resume and brief covering letter addressing the key requirements in the EOI) are to be submitted via SEEK to be considered.

8. IUIH General Practitioner

We are seeking a General Practitioner to provide services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients and families as part of a multi-disciplinary team of medical and health staff, within the operational framework of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled health service.

The position is located at Strathpine clinic although the position may be required to work at other locations within the Moreton region from time to time, including Caboolture, Morayfield and Deception Bay.

EOI-Download

Enquiries about the position can be directed to Layla Scott by email at layla.scott@iuih.org.au

Applications can be addressed to hr@iuih.org.au

9. Sunrise Health NT Mental Health Registered Nurse
About the Organisation

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation’s (SHS) main purpose is to improve the health and wellbeing of the people in the region east of Katherine in the Northern Territory using a holistic approach that includes a high standard of medical care, the promotion of social justice and the overcoming of the sickness that affects so many people in the region. This is done through the organisation’s health clinics and health education, mixing together traditional Indigenous culture and the best of mainstream medicine.

Sunrise provides a fulfilling and stimulating work environment in a diverse range of areas for those seeking a career in Indigenous Health.

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service has an extremely rewarding opportunity for a Mental Health Registered Nurse to join their dedicated, multidisciplinary team in the Katherine region, on a full-time basis.

Reporting to the Population Health Program Manager, you will beresponsible for providing expert support to clients requiring mental health care, their families, and the remote based staff providing care.

To be considered, you must be a Registered Nurse with experience in Mental Health and have demonstrated knowledge and skills managing Mental Health conditions.

Although the SHS office is located in Katherine, you will need to live and work in remote communities during the week. SHS provides accommodation for employees living and working in these communities.

Candidates with previous experience in Communicare will be highly regarded.

As this role will see you living and working in remote communities and such you will need a current driver’s license, 4WD drive experience, and the willingness to travel on light aircraft.

Please note: The successful candidates must be willing to undergo a Police Check and a Working With Children Check.

About the Benefits

Your dedication will be rewarded with an attractive remuneration package circa $97,151 – $104,375.

This package includes:

  • 6 weeks leave per year;
  • Up to 10 days study leave;
  • Salary packaging options;
  • Full support from the health team; and
  • Relocation assistance

Please Note: to apply, you will be required to upload a current resume as well as respond to the questions below.

Don’t miss this opportunity to direct a dedicated team in producing improved mental health outcomes for the community –

Apply Now

10.Sunrise Health Program Coordinator (PHaMs)

Program Coordinator (PHaMs)
About the Organisation

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation’s (SHS) main purpose is to improve the health and wellbeing of the people in the region east of Katherine in the Northern Territory using a holistic approach that includes a high standard of medical care, the promotion of social justice and the overcoming of the sickness that affects so many people in the region. This is done through the organisation’s health clinics and health education, mixing together traditional Indigenous culture and the best of mainstream medicine.

About the Program

The Personal Helpers and Mentors (PHaMs) service aims to provide increased opportunities for recovery for people whose lives are severely affected by mental illness. This Program takes a strengths-based recovery approach and assists people aged 16 years and over whose ability to manage their daily activities and to live independently in the community is impacted because of severe mental illness.

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service has an extremely rewarding opportunity for a Program Coordinator (PHaMs) to join their dedicated, multidisciplinary team in Katherine, on a full-time basis.

Reporting to the Population Health Program Manager, you will beresponsible for leading, managing, and coordinating of the Personal Helpers and Mentors Program (PHaMs). This program assists by providing a range of skill development and support programs and is non-clinical in its focus.

To be considered, you must hold a tertiary qualification in a relevant Mental Health discipline with a demonstrated ability to engage and support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in non-clinical Mental Health or related programs. You will also have previous experience in Communicare.

This role will see you living and working in the remote Ngukurr Community and, as such, you will need a current driver’s license, 4WD drive experience, and the willingness to travel on light aircraft.

Please note: The successful candidates must be willing to undergo a Police Check and a Working With Children Check.

About the Benefits

Your dedication will be rewarded with an attractive remuneration package circa $59,085 – $94,110.

This package includes:

  • 6 weeks leave per year;
  • Up to 10 days study leave;
  • Salary packaging options;
  • Full support from the health team; and
  • Relocation assistance

Don’t miss this opportunity to direct a dedicated team in producing improved mental health outcomes for the community –

Apply Now!

11 -14 Danila Dilba Health Service

Danila Dilba Health Service is going through a dynamic period of expansion, growth and review and currently has the following vacancy

We offer:

  • Attractive salary with salary packaging benefits
  • Six weeks annual leave
  • Flexible hours
  • Training and development
COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORKER *$66,322

2 Positions – Full Time – Fixed Term

These positions will work in partnership with Primary Health Care Teams to support individuals and families to build resilience using an approach that builds on community and cultural strengths.

SOCIAL WORKER*$101,200

1 Position – Full Time – Fixed Term

This position is responsible for providing high quality mental health, AOD and social and emotional wellbeing services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

 CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST *$107,666

1 Position – Full Time – Fixed Term

This position is responsible for the provision of high quality mental health and social and emotional wellbeing services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. These services may include clinical evidence based counselling, brief psychological interventions, case management, trauma informed practice and coordination of care/aftercare.

 

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people encouraged to apply.
Danila Dilba Health Service is an Aboriginal community controlled organisation that provides comprehensive, high-quality primary health care and community services to Biluru (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) people in Yilli Rreung (greater Darwin) region.
Details: www.daniladilba.org.au

 

15.Urapuntja Community  NT : Psychologist 

URAPUNTJA HEALTH SERVICE ABORIGINAL CORPORATION

POSITION DESCRIPTION – PYSCHOLOGIST

Title                                     Psychologist

Responsible To                 Clinic Manager

Location                             Amengernternenh Community, Utopia and Ampilatwatja        Community

SUMMARY OF POSITION

The Urapuntja Community is situated on the Sandover Highway some 280 km north east of Alice Springs. Urapuntja Community comprises 16 Outstation communities spread out over some 3230 square km of desert. There are some 900 people who are mainly Anmatyerre and Alyawarra speaking people. Distances to the outstations vary from 5 to 100 kms from the clinic.

Urapuntja Health Service developed from many years of negotiations by Aboriginal people to have their own health service. Urapuntja is a community controlled health service with a Board of Directors which is elected from and by the community at the Annual General Meeting held each year. The Directors meets regularly to discuss issues and make decisions relevant to the Organisation.

The Psychologist position has been funded by the NTPHN to provide services to the residents of both the Urapuntja and Ampilatwatja Health Service areas.

The Psychologist will work as a member of the Social and Emotional Wellbeing Team as well as the clinical team, to provide psychological services addressing the needs of all clients using the bio-psychosocial to community members who self- refer or are referred by a provider. At times the Psychologist will work under the supervision of the Clinic Manager. At other times the Psychologist will be required to work with limited assistance. The Psychologist will be required to travel by 4WD vehicle to provide clinical services to remote outstations in both the Urapuntja and Ampilatwatja Health Service Areas.

 

DUTIES OF THE POSITION

  1. Create, develop and nurture culturally appropriate interactions within Primary Health Care (PHC) teams and with the community.
  2. Develop a positive culture within integrated PHC teams through development of “core” behavioural health skills including cooperative interpersonal relationship building strategies.
  3. Make appropriate referrals to other providers and seek resources to aid team members and community residents.
  4. Perform assessment and provide brief treatment for a wide range of psychological and behavioural health needs using brief therapy.
  5. Maintain currency of job knowledge and skills and assist PHC team members to self-care.
  6. Utilises professional communication and conflict resolution skills with team members, various brief therapeutic modalities including group learning circles, individual, child, family, couples counselling, and family support services.
  7. Direct Caseload that involves documentation and procedural adherence; includes Medicare billing as appropriate and provide identified social and emotional wellbeing services to clients.
  8. Provide evidence-based culturally appropriate interventions (including assessment, therapy and case management) on individual, group and family levels.
  9. Ensure the development of Mental Health Care Plans in collaboration with GP’s, for all eligible clients in the service, and facilitate the provision of co-ordinated clinical care and treatment for referred clients.
  10. Follow defined service quality standards and relevant Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) policies and procedures to ensure high quality, safe services are being provided within a safe workplace.

Further

  1. Contribute to opportunities to Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) processes, quality and service delivery outcomes
  2. Participate in opportunistic and community screening activities
  3. Work with other community health program staff and seek advice and assistance from a General Practitioner
  4. Enter data accurately into the Communicare system
  5. Collect specified data on all client contacts in accordance with Clinic and funding body requirements
  6. Liaise with other staff within Urapuntja Health Service in regards to patient care, referrals and follow up as required
  7. Assist other health staff requiring community, cultural and/or linguistic assistance with clients where culturally appropriate
  8. To provide quality and professional service of care and work ethics at all times
  9. Work within strict confidentiality guidelines, ensuring all client and organisational information is kept secure
  10. Undertake any other duties at the request of the Clinic Manager which are considered relevant to the position and the level of classification

 

SELECTION CRITERIA

Essential

  • Recognised qualifications in Psychology with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) registration to practice as a Psychologist.
  • Proven ability to be self-directed and self-motivated as well as working effectively as a member of a team.
  • Demonstrated knowledge of current issues, standards and trends in the delivery of mental health and social and emotional well-being services to Aboriginal people.
  • Demonstrated recent experience in the mental health and social and emotional wellbeing assessment, treatment and rehabilitation methods appropriate to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) people.
  • Proven ability to be able to develop the behavioural health and working skills required by each employee working within a PHC team.
  • Proficiency in and commitment to the use of electronic information systems for the maintenance of clinical and service delivery records.
  • Hold a current Northern Territory (NT) manual driver’s licence or ability to obtain, ability and willingness to undertake travel by 4WD or light aircraft to remote communities, and capacity to reside in a remote community.
  • A good level of health and fitness that matches the requirements of the role. Note: If so required by UHSAC at any time, you must undergo a satisfactory medical examination (including a pre-employment medical examination) for the purpose of determining whether you are able to perform the inherent requirements of your position. Any such medical examination will be at the employer’s cost, and copies of any medical report will be provided to you. You must advise UHSAC of any illness, injury, disease, or any other matter relating to your health or physical fitness which may prevent you from performing your duties, or which may affect your ability to work safely.
  • Excellent communication skills, in particular the ability to communicate sensitively in a cross-cultural environment
  • Current Drivers Licence
  • Ochre Card (Working with Children Clearance)

 

Desirable

    • Masters in Clinical Psychology qualification.
    • Awareness of/sensitivity to Aboriginal culture and history
    • Experience in using a Patient Information and Recall System and in data collection and analysis including the ability to use word processing, spreadsheet, and database software to produce effective reports.
    • Previous experience working with primary health care teams.
  • Experience working in the area of Indigenous Primary Health

 

  • Highly developed cross cultural communication skills and willingness to take cultural advice from Aboriginal staff
  • Previous experience working with remote Aboriginal communities and Aboriginal organisations and groups

 

16.Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service – GP

Medical practice in rural and remote Australia

 

17. Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service (2 GP’s)

 

Galangoor Duwalami Primary Healthcare Service is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled primary health care service, operating in both Hervey Bay and Maryborough, servicing the entire Fraser Coast area.

Galangoor Duwalami collaborates with health and well-being partner agencies to enable integrated continuity of care for the community, and continue to work to contribute to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy and program reform in Queensland to address the Burden of disease and Close the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

General Practitioner (GP) two positions available

This is an exciting opportunity to join an innovative and flexible employer, enthusiastic and committed team and make a direct impact on improved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Fraser Coast area.

The Practice:

Galangoor Duwalami (meaning a ‘happy meeting place’) is located on the Fraser Coast in sunny Queensland, with two clinics (Hervey Bay and Maryborough). Originally established in 2007 we offer a comprehensive suite of Health Services within the Fraser Coast region.

The Hervey Bay clinic is situated at the beachside, while a newly built practice in the heart of Historical Maryborough, offers exceptional facilities with 10 consulting rooms including a mums and bubs room, new equipment and large reception. The practice is Community Controlled and has a well-established clientele and reports indicate continued growth.

This is a rewarding prospect for a compassionate, engaging, visionary and thorough General Practitioner with an ability to work within a diverse interdisciplinary team exhibiting admirable communication skills.

  • Two positions available – 2 Part Time – hours negotiable OR 1 Full Time and 1 Part Time
  • Well balanced working environment – Monday to Friday from 0830 to 1700.
  • No on-call requirements
  • Competitive Salary Package
  • Salary packaging
  • Annual Leave plus Study Leave
  • 9.5% Superannuation Entitlement

Key Requirements:

Must Have:

  • Qualified Medical Practitioner, holding current registration with the Medical Board of Australia
  • Eligible for unrestricted Medicare Provider Number

Download this Information GP Advertisement

Application Process:

A Position Description is available by email. All applications, including a covering letter, are to be e-mailed to: ann.woolcock@gdphcs.com.au

For further details regarding this position please contact Ann Woolcock on 07 41945554.

 

18. Congress Alice Springs :Remote Area Nurses/Aboriginal Health Practitioners 

REMOTE AREA NURSES/ABORIGINAL HEALTH PRACTITIONERS

Utju and Santa teresa

  • Base salary: $72,364 – $106,314 (p.a)
  • Total effective package: $94,168 – $133,712 (p.a)*
  • Fixed term 2 year contract

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 40 years’ experience providing comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal people living in Central Australia. Congress is seeking Remote Area Nurses/Aboriginal Health Practitioners who are interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

Remote Area Nurses/Aboriginal Health Practitioners are integral members of the Congress Health Service, providing high quality, comprehensive and culturally safe clinical care for the Various Congress Auspice Remote Sites. The positions work within a multidisciplinary team to ensure high standards of integrated clinical care and client flow.

Central Australia offers a unique lifestyle in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere in the heart of Australia. Its attractions include Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Watarrka (Kings Canyon) and a host of other world heritage sites.

As well as a wonderful lifestyle and rewarding work, Congress offers the following:

  • Competitive salaries
  • Six (6) weeks annual leave
  • 9.5% superannuation
  • Generous salary packaging
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Family friendly conditions
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)
  • District allowance and Remote Benefits

For more information on these positions please contact Clinic Managers, Jason King on (08) 8956 0911 and email: jason.king@caac.org.au for Santa Teresa and Kimberley Williamson on (08) 8956 7308 and email: kimberley.williamson@caac.org.au

Applications close: Monday 22 May 2017.

*Total effective package includes: base salary, district allowance, superannuation, leave loading, and estimated tax saving from salary packaging options.

Contact Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or mailto:vacancy@caac.org.aufor more information. Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

For more information about jobs at Congress visit www.caac.org.au/hr.

To apply for this job go to: http://www.caac.org.au/hr & enter ref code: 3480143.

Aboriginal Health Events / Workshops #SaveADate #NAIDOC2017 Awards close 7 April #NACCHOAGM17 and Members Meeting

Awards Funding $ and surveys OPEN

April 7  National NAIDOC Committee Award closing date to 2:00pm (AEST) Friday 7 April 2017 see below for full info

April : NACCHO #IPAG Aboriginal Health Consultation  Mylife #MyLead Consultation opens for #NATSIHP : Closes 30 April

April – May   : NEW : Get NDIS Ready with a Roadshow NSW Launched

save-a-date

Events and Workshops

26- 29 April The 14 th National Rural Health Conference Cairns

29 April:14th World Rural Health Conference Cairns

10 May: National Indigenous Human Rights Awards

23-25 May Conference Aboriginal People with Disability

26 May :National Sorry day 2017

27 May to June 3 National Reconciliation Week

6 June : Stomp out the Gap : Cathy Freeman Foundation

1-2 July Aboriginal Health Conference  Perth

2-9 July NAIDOC WEEK

7 July Awabakal 40th Anniversary Dinner

8-9 August 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis Alaska in August 2017

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra Details to be released soon

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

 

If you have a Conference, Workshop Funding opportunity or event and wish to share and promote contact

Colin Cowell NACCHO Media Mobile 0401 331 251

Send to NACCHO Media mailto:nacchonews@naccho.org.au

save-a-date

April 7  National NAIDOC Committee Award closing date to 2:00pm (AEST) Friday 7 April 2017

The National NAIDOC Committee have extended the 2017 National NAIDOC Award nominations to encourage more people to acknowledge the contributions and talents of outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals by nominating them for a 2017 National NAIDOC Award.

Winning a National NAIDOC Award can have a significant impact not only the winner but also their family and the wider community. Award winners will have the honour of being celebrated at the highly prestigious National NAIDOC Awards Ceremony and Ball to be held in Cairns on Saturday, 1 July 2017.

Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people contribute to Australian society through music, art, culture, community, education, environment, sport, employment and politics. If you know someone who you think deserves an award, the Committee encourages you to nominate them in one of the ten categories covering the fields of art, education and training, sport, environment and leadership.

The National NAIDOC Committee wish to extend the nomination closing date to 2:00pm (AEST) Friday 7 April 2017. Nomination forms can be found at http://www.naidoc.org.au

NAIDOC Week 2017 will run nationally from 2-9 July and is an occasion for all Australians to come together to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – the oldest continuing cultures on the planet.

The 2017 theme – Our Languages Matter – aims to emphasise and celebrate the unique and essential role that Indigenous languages play in cultural identity, linking people to their land and water and in the transmission of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, spirituality and rites, through story and song.

For more information including competition and nomination forms and ideas on how to celebrate, visit www.naidoc.org.au

April : NACCHO #IPAG Aboriginal Health Consultation  Mylife #MyLead Consultation opens for #NATSIHP : Closes 30 April

My Life, My Lead is a new online public consultation portal to highlight the issues that support or impede Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to have good health.

The Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, MP, said that the launch of the new portal will give more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people an opportunity to lead the discussion about the life they live now, and the life they want in the future for themselves, their families and their communities.

The Australian Government is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders and communities, and other stakeholders to improve progress against the goals to improve health outcomes for Indigenous Australians, and is  welcoming participation in the IPAG Consultation 2017 from a broad range of stakeholders.

You can have your say by taking part in the online submission to the IPAG consultation 2017.

The online submission will be open from Wednesday 8 March 2017 and will close 11.59 pm Sunday 30 April 2017.

April – May   : Get NDIS Ready with a Roadshow NSW Launched

ndis

The Every Australian Counts team will be hitting the road from March – May presenting NDIS information forums in the NSW regional areas where the NDIS will be rolling out from July.

We’ll be covering topics including:

  • What the NDIS is, why we need it and what it means for you
  • The changes that the NDIS brings and how they will benefit you
  • How to access the NDIS and get the most out of it

These free forums are designed for people with disability, their families and carers, people working in the disability sector and anyone else interested in all things NDIS.

Please register for tickets and notify the team about any access requirements you need assistance with. All the venues are wheelchair accessible and Auslan interpreters can be available if required. Please specify any special requests at the time of booking.

Find the team in the following locations: 

Click on a link above to register online now! 

Every Australian Counts is the campaign that brought about the introduction of the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Now it is a reality, the team are focused on engaging and educating the disability sector and wider Australian community about the benefits of the NDIS and the options and possibilities that it brings.

 7 April National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers 

 

Join the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) for a one day CPD networking workshop focussed on current workforce development opportunities.

Register

7 April Perth   Register Free Entry  Here

11 April Broome  Register Free Entry Here

28 June Cairns Register Free Entry Here

Upskill and strengthen your skill level in a specialised area and find out what is happening through program development, education and funding opportunities.

Hear from organisations such as: PHN Primary Heath Network, CranaPlus, Autism QLD, Rheumatic Heart, PEPA Program of Experience in the Palliative Approach, Aboriginal Learning Circle, Diabetes Australia, IBA Indigenous Business Australia, HESTA Superannuation, 1800 RESPECT, Hearing Australia and more to be annuonced in the coming months (tailored for your specific region).

Current topics on the agenda:

Who is NATSIHWA? – an update on what is happening on a national level.

NATSIHWA Membership Benefits – Why join? Access to online members portal, web resources, weekly eNewsletter and social media.

Scope of Practice – An update on the development of the national framework for the scope of practice for ATSIHW’s and ATSIHP’s.

AHPRA – Who is AHPRA and what do they do? Why register with AHPRA? CPD requirements of ongoing registration.

Modern Award – An update on the progress of the modern award process with Fair Work Australia.

Workforce Development – Career development, training opportunities, CPD Points, GNARTN Tool, Scholarships.

26- 29 April The 14 th National Rural Health Conference Cairns c42bfukvcaam3h9

INFO Register

29 April : 14th World Rural Health Conference Cairns

acrrm

The conference program features streams based on themes most relevant to all rural and remote health practitioners. These include Social and environmental determinants of health; Leadership, Education and Workforce; Social Accountability and Social Capital, and Rural Clinical Practices: people and services.

Download the program here : rural-health-conference-program-no-spreads

The program includes plenary/keynote sessions, concurrent sessions and poster presentations. The program will also include clinical sessions to provide skill development and ongoing professional development opportunities :

Information Registrations HERE

10 May: National Indigenous Human Rights Awards

nihra-2017-save-the-date-invitation_version-2

” The National Indigenous Human Rights Awards recognises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who have made significant contribution to the advancement of human rights and social justice for their people.”

To nominate someone for one of the three awards, please go to https://shaoquett.wufoo.com/forms/z4qw7zc1i3yvw6/
 
For further information, please also check out the Awards Guide at https://www.scribd.com/document/336434563/2017-National-Indigenous-Human-Rights-Awards-Guide

 23-25 May Conference Aboriginal People with Disability

Save the date: Conference for #Aboriginal People with #disability May 23, 24, 25 in #WaggaWagga

On 23, 24 and 25 May 2017 FPDN is hosting a conference for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability. Community members and service providers are also welcome. Sponsorship is available for First Peoples with disability.

Website

The agenda will be published in April 2017.

Download the PDF Save the Date – Living Our Way Conference

26 May :National Sorry day 2017
 
bridge-walk
The first National Sorry Day was held on 26 May 1998 – one year after the tabling of the report Bringing them Home, May 1997. The report was the result of an inquiry by the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission into the removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families.

27 May to June 3 National Reconciliation Week
 
 6 June : Stomp out the Gap : Cathy Freeman Foundation

More info Here

 1-2 July Aboriginal Health Conference  Perth .

We would like to invite NACCHO and any partnering organisations to submit an Abstract on these projects for consideration in our Aboriginal Health Conference taking place at the Parmelia Hilton Perth on the 1-2 July 2017.

Abstract submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal health and well-being.

Underpinned by a strong conference theme; Champions | Connection | Culture, it will provide an inspirational platform for those with evidence based approaches, improved health outcomes and successful projects in

  • Aboriginal Health;
  • Community Engagement;
  • Education;
  • Workforce Development.

If you are currently engaged in work, research or other collaborations relating to Aboriginal health you are encouraged to submit an abstract of 300 words. Abstracts will be reviewed by our Education Steering Committee. Abstracts that fulfil the requirements as outlined in the Submissions Guidelines will be considered. Due consideration will be given to originality and quality.  Receipt of abstracts will be acknowledged within one week of them being received and successful applicants will be notified by 23 May 2017. Successful abstracts will be published in the Conference Program handbook.

Attached for your reference is the Abstract Submission Form and the Abstract Submission Guidelines.

Download Here abstract-submission-form_2017-v1

Closing date for abstract submission is Monday 10 April 2017.

Should you have any further questions or queries, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Should you have any further questions or queries, please don’t hesitate to contact the Events team.
events@ruralhealthwest.com.au | T: 6389 4500 | F: 6389 4501
 
2-9 July NAIDOC WEEK
 
17_naidoc_logo_stacked-01

The importance, resilience and richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages will be the focus of national celebrations marking NAIDOC Week 2017.

The 2017 theme – Our Languages Matter – aims to emphasise and celebrate the unique and essential role that Indigenous languages play in cultural identity, linking people to their land and water and in the transmission of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, spirituality and rites, through story and song.

More info about events

8-9 August 2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis Alaska USA

2nd World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Viral Hepatitis in Anchorage Alaska in August 2017 after the 1st which was held in Alice Springs in 2014.

Download Brochure Save the date – World Indigenous Hepatitis Conference Final
Further details are available at https://www.wipcvh2017.org/

10 October CATSINAM Professional Development Conference Gold Coast

catsinam

Contact info for CATSINAM

30 October2 Nov NACCHO AGM Members Meeting Canberra

Details to be released

27-30 November Indigenous Allied Health Australia : IAHA Conference Perth

iaha

save-a-date

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Workforce Funding Applications open : $10 million to train junior doctors in regional/rural Aboriginal Medical Services / General Practices

team

“I am pleased to announce with Minister Gillespie, that applications are now open for organisations to develop training rotations under the Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund ( RJDTIF)

The RJDTIF is designed to enable rural based junior doctors completing their intern year to gain experience in rural general practice, in addition to their hospital based rotations.

At least 60 junior doctors will be supported under the program each year, at a cost of up to $10 million.

They will train in a variety of primary care settings, such as general practice and Aboriginal Medical Services.

This will improve the pathway for new graduates into challenging and rewarding careers as doctors with the skills needed by rural communities. ”

Joint Press Release 6 March The Hon Greg Hunt MP Minister for Health and The Hon Dr David Gillespie MP Assistant Minister for Health

Photo above : Greg Hunt, Ken Wyatt and David Gillespie at the recent swearing in of the Health Minister’s team 

Coalition to deliver more doctors for regional and rural Australia

  • Funding for rural based junior doctors to access a rotation in primary care setting
  • Rotations must be undertaken in primary care settings in regional and rural areas
  • Supports at least 60 full-time places annually, equal to 240 accredited intern rotations

Hundreds of new junior doctors are set to experience work as a general practitioner in regional and rural Australia through a new Coalition Government initiative.

The opening of the Coalition Government’s Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund (RJDTIF) will work as part of the Integrated Rural Training Pipeline measure to help tackle one of Australia’s biggest health challenges – locating doctors, particularly GPs, in regional, rural and remote Australia.

Minister Gillespie said doctors who live and train in regional and rural areas are more likely to practice in similar areas once they qualify.

“Having practiced most of my 33 years in medicine in regional Australia, I know how important training doctors in regional areas is in our overall efforts to attract and retain doctors in the bush,” Minister Gillespie said.

“The RJDTIF is an innovative step by the Coalition Government to address the medical workforce shortage in rural Australia and, in turn, improve the health outcomes of people living in these areas.

“Our Government is committed to strengthening rural training for junior doctors in rural areas.

How to Apply

Agency:

Department of Health

Close Date & Time:

12-Apr-2017 14:00 PM (ACT Local Time)
Show close time for other time zones

Location:

ACT, NSW, VIC, SA, WA, QLD, NT, TAS

Selection Process:

Open Competitive

Description:

This is an opportunity to apply for funding for rural based junior doctors to access an accredited intern rotation in a rural primary care setting. This opportunity builds on rural training networks funded by the states and territories, will develop rural training capacity and will strengthen rural training pathways.
Accredited intern rotations must be undertaken in primary care settings in Australian Statistical Geography Standard – Remoteness Areas (ASGS-RA) 2 to 5.
The RJDTIF will foster the development of innovative rural junior doctor training within the larger rural training networks for interns, established within state and territory health systems through supporting at least 60 full-time equivalent (FTE) places annually, comprising around 240 accredited intern rotations annually into primary care settings.

Eligibility:

The details of eligibility are listed at Section 4 of the Grant Guidelines

Grant Activity Timeframe:

Funding will commence in 2018 and cease 30 June 2020.

Total Amount Available (AUD):

$26,674,000.00

Instructions for Lodgement:

Email your completed application and Attachment 1 to grant.atm@health.gov.au by 2pm, 12 April 2017.

Please include ‘Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund’ and ‘H1617G021’in your email title.

Other Instructions:

Note last questions close 5 April 2017. Include ‘Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund’ and ‘H1617G021’in your email title.
Ensure your application meets the eligibility criteria and addresses the selection criteria.

Addenda Available:

Yes

 

 

NACCHO #closingtheGap Aboriginal Health and the #Redfernstatement Its time for this new approach

redfernstatementsocial_turnbull

“Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations deliver 2.5 million episodes of care a year in their local communities – and are the only health and leadership models making inroads on Close the Gap targets.

Our teachers, education professionals and family violence experts are delivering real results on the ground in their communities every single day – despite chronic underfunding and an ad hoc policy approach based on three year election cycles.

“Today we are seeking a new relationship, a genuine partnership and a commitment to ongoing structured engagement,”

National Congress of Australia’s First People’s Co-chair Dr Jackie Huggins said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations have worked with our people on the ground for decades and have shown they have solutions.

 ” We acknowledge the strength of culture and kinship, and those strong bonds that can helpshape higher expectations and better outcomes.

I want to pay tribute in particular to the Indigenous women who demonstrate that strength every day. The mums and the grandmas and aunties and sisters, who never give up.

We must ensure that the education system, and all those in it, believe in the dreams of our young people. That we support each student and lift them up, and give them every opportunity to get the most out of their education.

I know that you would all agree that a solid education is the surest way to get from the firstIndigenous doctor, to the 500th and then the 5,000th “

Prime Minster Address to the Indigenous Business Reception see article 2 below

Aboriginal leaders seek new relationship with government through historic Redfern Statement

Aboriginal leaders seek new relationship with government through historic Redfern Statement Australia’s leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peaks will today demand a new relationship with government as they deliver the historic Redfern Statement direct to the Prime Minister at Parliament House.

In the lead up to today’s 9th Closing the Gap Report to Parliament, the leaders will call on the Prime Minister to support the historic Redfern Statement, a road map to better address the appalling disadvantage gap between Australia’s First

Peoples and non-Indigenous Australians by working with them as genuine partners.

National Congress of Australia’s First People’s co-chair Mr Rod Little said: “After 25 years, eight Federal election cycles, seven Prime Ministers, eight Ministers for Indigenous Affairs, 400 recommendations, and countless policies, policy changes, reports, funding promises and funding cuts, it’s time to draw a line in the sand.

“We need a new relationship that respects and harnesses our expertise, and guarantees us a seat at the table as equal partners when governments are making decisions about our lives.”

The Redfern Statement was released during last year’s Federal Election campaign by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders from health, justice, children and families, disability, and family violence prevention sectors.

The statement calls for changes across these sectors through structured engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and is supported by more than 30 major mainstream organisations, including  the Australian Medical Association and Law Council.

Read the full Redfern Statement here: http://nationalcongress.com.au/aboutus/redfern-statement/

ABOUT THE REDFERN STATEMENT

The historic Redfern Statement calls for changes that address housing, health, education, justice, disability and representation for Aboriginal people, including:

Restoration of funding cut from the Indigenous Affairs Budget;

• Urgent reforms to the controversial Indigenous Advancement Strategy;

• Renewed commitment to closing the gap within a generation, with the inclusion of justice targets aimed at reducing incarceration and family violence;

• Re-establishment of the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs;

• Restoration of funding for the National Congress of First Peoples – as a representative voice for Aboriginal people;

Restoration of funding to national peak bodies to co-design policy and drive implementation – allowing this new partnership to function effectively;

• Implementation of recommendations by the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation – including an agreement-making framework (treaty) and constitutional reform.

The Redfern Statement has been developed by national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak and representative bodies including:

National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples

First Peoples Disability Network (FPDN)

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (NATSILS)

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (NACCHO)

National Family Violence Prevention Legal Services (FVPLS)

SNAICC – National Voice for our Children

The Healing Foundation, and The National Health Leadership Forum (NHLF).

The Statement also has the overarching support of The Change the Record Coalition; Close the Gap Steering Committee, and Family Matters campaigns.

Prime Minster Address to the Indigenous Business Reception :

untitled

Thank you, Shelley and thank you Tina and your family for that really moving Welcome to

Country.

Picture above Dakota Tompkins interviewing the Prime Minister

Yoonggu gulanyin ngalawiri, dhunayi, Ngoonawal dhowrrra.

Today we are meeting together on Ngunnawal country and we acknowledge and pay our respects to their elders.

I acknowledge and pay my deep respects to your people, the Ngunnawal people, who as you said Tina, have walked these lands, and met on these lands, forever, for time beyond our imagination, for time out of mind.

I extend our respects to all of your elders past and present and to the future elders, to the young dancers tonight, and to all our First Australian People and their elders, including of course, all of the outstanding achievers and role models here today.

Of course I want to acknowledge and welcome all of my ministerial and parliamentarycolleagues, especially Nigel Scullion, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs and of course Ken Wyatt, Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health and – as you know – the first Indigenous Australian to be a Minister in a Commonwealth Government.

Welcome all.

Now today is the 9th anniversary of the National Apology to the Stolen Generations.

We acknowledge today, as we did in the House earlier, the loss, the grief, and the heartache past policies created for our First Australians.

But despite these injustices and that trauma, you and your people have shown a courage and resilience which is extraordinary.

Tonight, we acknowledge the remarkable lives of so many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, who are thriving and succeeding in their chosen fields. Your stories are not deficit, but of surplus; not of despondency but of a relentless and determined optimism.

You lead and you inspire by your example. So many lives of achievement. Rishelle Hume, a senior human resources consultant at Chevron, whose work supporting Aboriginal people to grow in their careers spans two decades and many industries.

Cherisse Buzzacott, an Arrente woman who is helping women give birth safely and providing vital midwifery support to women in remote parts of the Northern Territory.

Or the Kongs—a family of firsts. Marilyn and Marlene were the first Indigenous medical graduates at Sydney University. Marlene became a GP and public health expert; Marilyn became the first Indigenous obstetrician and their brother Kelvin, the first Indigenous surgeon in Australia. Kelvin and his wife are here with us this evening.

Another young doctor, Vinka Barunga, is now the first Indigenous doctor in Derby, a town two hours out of Broome, where she grew up swimming, fishing and playing with a plastic stethoscope. She’s a proud Worora woman, going back to her community. She would have been here tonight, but work has called her away.

We also have with us Dr Cass Hunter, Mibu Fischer, and Karlie Noon—all working at CSIRO on research that impacts Indigenous communities. Karlie has just won a scholarship, one of two new CSIRO Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scholarships, to undertake postgraduate studies in STEM subjects. Congratulations, Karlie.

Tanya Denning, a talented journalist and producer now managing the National Indigenous Television station that celebrates Indigenous Culture, voices and storytelling.

And so many others; people working caring for country, in health, social services,education, science, technology, law, the arts, politics, public service, defence and much more.

We acknowledge the strength of culture and kinship, and those strong bonds that can helpshape higher expectations and better outcomes.

I want to pay tribute in particular to the Indigenous women who demonstrate that strength every day. The mums and the grandmas and aunties and sisters, who never give up.

We must ensure that the education system, and all those in it, believe in the dreams of our young people. That we support each student and lift them up, and give them every opportunity to get the most out of their education.

I know that you would all agree that a solid education is the surest way to get from the firstIndigenous doctor, to the 500th and then the 5,000th. To make sure that in years to come, we’re not talking about one or two hundred Indigenous lawyers or accountants, but thousands of them.

So I want to thank all the organisations, some of whom are here tonight, for their investment in the dreams of these young people: Aurora Foundation, the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience, Career Trackers, AFL Cape York House, and many more, but too many to name.

And already we can point to progress. In the seven years to 2015, the gap in Year 12 attainment shrunk by close to 15 percent, and in the decade to 2015, the number of

Indigenous students enrolling in higher education nearly doubled.

The higher the level of education, the smaller the gap between Indigenous and non- Indigenous employment. For tertiary-educated Indigenous people, there is no gap. There is no gap.

We are making progress, and you are part of it.

And each of you are Ambassadors for change. Your determination and resilience is a demonstration to others that through hard work, anything is possible. Your stories are vitally important, your example is vitally important in creating that change.

Indigenous life is extraordinarily diverse and extraordinarily rich. It unfolds in the remotest parts of our nation as well as in the heart of our busiest cities and suburbs; far away in the Tiwi Islands, right here in the centre of Government, in the bush and on the coast. It encompasses extraordinary talent, vision and determination.

So Tonight I want to challenge all those present, and people right across Australia to tell your stories. To widen our lens. To focus the attention of our nation, on your hard work and your achievements.

We want to have a nation where our indigenous children are limited only by their imagination.

To show Indigenous children from Shepparton to the Tiwi Islands, from Redfern to Alice Springs, that they can be anything they set their mind to.

That little girl can be anything she sets her mind to, Tina. That’s the dream, that’s the goal.

So that being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander means to be successful; to achieve, to have big dreams and high hopes, and to draw strength from your identity as an Indigenous man or woman in this great country.

There is a room full of role models right here.

When we include the stories like those we honour tonight, we shine a light on the richness and diversity of our First Australians. We light, you light, the way for others to follow.

So Congratulations on your success and thank you for paving the way for so many

Indigenous Australian success stories to come.

I am now honoured to invite another great role model, another inspiration, my dear friend,

the very wise Ken Wyatt, Minister for Aged Care, Minister for Indigenous Health, the first Indigenous Member of the House of Representatives and first Indigenous Minister in a Commonwealth Government.

[END]

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health “Ministerial Champions ” visit our remote #ACCHOS #CapeYork and #DerbyWA

 

derby

 ” Ministerial champion ”  for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt toured the Derby Aboriginal Health Service  with NACCHO CEO  Pat Turner : See background story 2 below

cape-york

Story 1

 ” Ministerial Champion for Wujal Wujal ” Leeanne Enoch MP, Minister for Innovation, Science and Digital Economy and Minister for Small Business recently visited the Apunipima Cape York Health Council.

Image (L-R) Director-General Jamie Merrick, Minister Enoch, Apunipima CEO Cleveland Fagan

The Minister, accompanied by the Government Champion for Wujal Wujal, Jamie Merrick, Director-General, Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation met with Apunipima’s senior managers to discuss the services and activities Apunipima provides to Wujal Wujal – a remote Aboriginal community which lies 70 km south of Cooktown.

wujal-wujal-map

The Champions program is based around supporting Mayors and communities to achieve the social and economic outcomes which they identify as important.

Apunipima CEO Cleveland Fagan said he welcomed the visit with the Minister and Director-General.

‘We were pleased to meet with Minister Enoch and Mr. Merrick to discuss our role in supporting the community and leadership in Wujal Wujal to achieve the goals that matter to the community.’

‘Apunipima provides culturally appropriate primary health care to the people of Wujal Wujal including a GP, Maternal and Child Health Nurse and Midwife, Podiatrist, Dietitian and Diabetes Educator.’

‘There are some real success stories when it comes to the health of the people of Wujal Wujal – 100 percent of children aged 12, 24 and 60 months are fully immunised, 75 percent of newborn bubs are within the normal weight range and nearly 90 percent of clients with type 2 diabetes have a GP Management Plan in place.’

‘There are some challenges, particularly around smoking rates and obesity and we will be working with community to address these health issues.’

‘We look forward to continuing to work closely with Minister Enoch and the Queensland Government to continue to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Cape York.’

Story 2 Derby Aboriginal Health Service

derby_aboriginal_health_service_council_logo

Mission

To deliver holistic primary health care services which;

  • ŸAre based on the social justice principles of equity and access
  • ŸAddress the needs of Aboriginal people, and
  • ŸRespect and reflect the cultural values of the communities we serve.

The Derby Aboriginal Health Service has been established by Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people, with the purpose of;

  • Empowering Aboriginal people in the prevention and management of ill-health, and in the promotion of well-being for individuals, families and communities, as well as;
  • Empowering Aboriginal people in the processes of decision-making, planning and service delivery

p1a1vlkj751l8l153v1gpgrf71nr2g

History

In early 1995 Winun Ngari Aboriginal Corporation received funding from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) to carry out a comprehensive health planning exercise for Aboriginal people and communities in the Jayida Buru Ward of the Malarabah ATSIC Regional Council of the West Kimberley.

dampierpeninsulamap

This region includes Aboriginal Communities in and around Derby town, south of Derby along the Fitzroy Valley, north east of Derby and along the Gibb River Road and Outstations north along the coast and up into the Mitchell Plateau.  The Jayida Buru Health Strategy was the result of this process, and was the first health strategy for Aboriginal people in the Derby region which was developed from the Aboriginal perspective.

Amongst its findings was recognition that:

“…there appears to be little acknowledgement of the diverse needs of these population groups in the structure and operation of most mainstream services in the Derby region.  These services often operate under constraints imposed by a Perth based policy and practise…and an organisational culture that excludes Aboriginal people from information and decision making”.

The Strategy outlined five key objectives;

  • Aboriginal community and self-management of health related issues
  • ŸService and program planning based on identical local health need
  • ŸA comprehensive, integrated and coordinated range of programs and services
  • ŸEquitable access to services
  • ŸAppropriate levels of resource allocation

and determined that;

“There are compelling reasons for the establishment of an Aboriginal Health Service in the Jayida Buru region; the health needs of the Aboriginal people in the region greatly exceed the capacity of the mainstream provider; the scope and models of mainstream service provision are not currently culturally appropriate or readily accessible; and there is no choice of health provider available to us.”

In April 1997 the Winun Ngari Aboriginal Corporation Committee established a Derby Aboriginal Medical Service (DAMS) Committee.  This committee, with the support of the Winun Ngari Committee and Administration, began its struggle to establish a culturally appropriate health service to address the concerns raised through the Jayida Buru Health Strategy.

Funding from the Office of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (OATSIH) was received in early 1997.   On September 17, the first committee of the Derby Aboriginal Health Service Council was elected.

NACCHO Promotion

nhn

NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

km-kw

While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Chronic Disease #prevention

 

prevention

 ” The Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance recommends that the Australian Government introduce a health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages, as part of a comprehensive approach to decreasing overweight and obesity, and with revenue supporting public education campaigns and initiatives to prevent chronic disease and address childhood obesity.

A health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages should not be viewed as the single solution to the obesity epidemic in Australia.

Rather, it should be one component of a comprehensive approach, including restrictions on children’s exposure to marketing of these products, restrictions on their sale in schools, other children’s settings and public institutions, and effective public education campaigns[42].

Health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages

ACDPA Position Statement

Key messages

  •  The Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance (ACDPA) recommends that the Australian Government introduce a health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages (sugary drinks)i, as part of a comprehensive approach to decreasing overweight and obesity.
  •  Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is associated with increased energy intake and in turn, weight gain and obesity. Obesity is an established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and certain cancers.
  •  Beverages are the largest source of free sugars in the Australian diet. One in two Australians usually exceed the World Health Organization recommendation to limit free sugars to 10% of daily intake (equivalent to 12 teaspoons of sugar).
  •  Young Australians are the highest consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages, along with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and socially disadvantaged groups.
  •  Young people, low-income consumers and those most at risk of obesity are most responsive to food and beverage price changes, and are likely to gain the largest health benefit from a levy on sugary drinks due to reduced consumption.
  •  A health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages in Australia is estimated to reduce consumption and potentially prevent thousands of cases of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke over 25 years. The levy could generate revenue of $400-$500 million each year, which could support public education campaigns and initiatives to prevent chronic disease and address childhood obesity.
  •  A health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages should not be viewed as the single solution to the obesity epidemic in Australia. Rather, it should be one component of a comprehensive approach, including restrictions on children’s exposure to marketing of these products, restrictions on their sale in schools, other children’s settings and public institutions, and effective public education campaigns.

i ‘Sugar-sweetened beverages’ and sugary drinks are used interchangeably in this paper. This refers to all non-alcoholic water based beverages with added sugar, including sugar-sweetened soft drinks and flavoured mineral waters, fortified waters, energy and electrolyte drinks, fruit and vegetable drinks, and cordials. This term does not include milk-based products, 100% fruit juice or non-sugar sweetened beverages (i.e. artificial, non-nutritive or intensely sweetened). 2

About ACDPA

The Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance (ACDPA) brings together five leading non-government health organisations with a commitment to reducing the growing incidence of chronic disease in Australia attributable to overweight and obesity, poor nutrition and physical inactivity. ACDPA members are: Cancer Council Australia; Diabetes Australia; Kidney Health Australia; National Heart Foundation of Australia; and the Stroke Foundation.

This position statement is one of a suite of ACDPA statements, which provide evidence-based information and recommendations to address modifiable risk factors for chronic disease. ACDPA position statements are designed to inform policy and are intended for government, non-government organisations, health professionals and the community.

www.acdpa.org.au

Chronic disease

Chronic diseases are the leading cause of illness, disability, and death in Australia, accounting for around 90% of all deaths in 2011[1]. One in two Australians (i.e. more than 11 million) had a chronic disease in 2014-15 and almost one quarter of the population had at least two conditions[2].

However, much chronic disease is actually preventable. Around one third of total disease burden could be prevented by reducing modifiable risk factors, including overweight and obesity, physical inactivity and poor diet[2].

Overweight and obesity

Overweight and obesity is the second greatest contributor to disease burden and increases risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and some cancers[2].

The rates of overweight and obesity are continuing to increase. Almost two-thirds of Australians are overweight or obese and one in four Australian children are already overweight or obese[2]. Children who are overweight are also more likely to grow up to become overweight or obese adults, with an increased risk of chronic disease and premature mortality[3].

The cost of obesity in Australia was estimated to be $8.6 billion in 2011-12, comprising $3.8 billion in direct costs and $4.8 billion in indirect costs[4]. If no further action is taken to slow obesity rates in Australia, the cost of obesity over the next 10 years to 2025 is estimated to total $87.7 billion[4].

Free sugars and weight gain

There is increasing evidence that high intake of free sugarsii is associated with weight gain due to excess energy intake and dental caries[5]. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommends reducing free sugar intake to less than 10% of total energy intake (equivalent to around 12 teaspoons of sugar), or to 5% for the greatest health benefits[5].

ii ‘Free sugars’ refer to sugars added to foods and beverages by the manufacturer, cook or consumer, and sugars naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates.

In 2011-12, more than half of Australians usually exceeded the recommendation to limit free sugar intake to 10%[6]. There was wide variation in the amounts of free sugars consumed, with older children and teenagers most likely to exceed the recommendation and adults aged 51-70 least likely to exceed the recommendation[6]. On average, Australians consumed around 60 grams of free sugars each day (around 14 teaspoons)[6]. Children and young people were the highest consumers, with adolescent males and females consuming the equivalent of 22 and 17 teaspoons of sugar each day respectively [6].

Beverages contribute more than half of free sugar intake in the Australian diet[6]. In 2011-12, soft drinks, sports and energy drinks accounted for 19% of free sugar intake, fruit juices and fruit drinks contributed 13%, and cordial accounted for 4.9%[6]. 3

Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption

In particular, sugar-sweetened beverages are mostly energy-dense but nutrient-poor. Sugary drinks appear to increase total energy intake due to reduced satiety, as people do not compensate for the additional energy consumed by reducing their intake of other foods or drinks[3, 7]. Sugar-sweetened beverages may also negatively affect taste preferences, especially amongst children, as less sweet foods may become less palatable[8].

Sugar-sweetened beverages are consumed by large numbers of Australian adults and children[9], and Australia ranks 15th in the world for sales of caloric beverages per person per day[10].

One third of Australians consumed sugar-sweetened beverages on the day before the Australian Health Survey interview in 2011-12[9]. Of those consuming sweetened beverages, the equivalent of a can of soft drink was consumed (375 mL)[9]. Children and adolescents were more likely to have consumed sugary drinks than adults (47% compared with 31%), and consumption peaked at 55% amongst adolescents[9]. Males were more likely than females to have consumed sugary drinks (39% compared with 29%)[9].

Australians living in areas with the highest levels of socioeconomic disadvantage were more likely to have consumed sugary drinks than those in areas of least disadvantage (38% compared with 31%)[9]. Half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed sugary drinks compared to 34% of non-Indigenous people[9]. Amongst those consuming sweetened beverages, a greater amount was consumed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders than for non-Indigenous people (455 mL compared with 375 mL)[9]. 4

The health impacts of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption

WHO and the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) recommend restricting or avoiding intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, based on evidence that high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages may increase risk of weight gain and obesity[7, 11]. As outlined earlier, obesity is an established risk factor for a range of chronic diseases[2].

The Australian Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting intake of foods and drinks containing added sugars, particularly sugar-sweetened beverages, based on evidence of a probable association between sugary drink consumption and increased risk of weight gain in adults and children, and a suggestive association between soft drink consumption and an increased risk of reduced bone strength, and dental caries in children[3].

Type 2 diabetes

Sugar-sweetened drinks may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes[3]. Evidence indicates a significant relationship between the amount and frequency of sugar-sweetened beverages consumed and increased risk of type 2 diabetes[12, 13]. The risk of type 2 diabetes is estimated to be 26% greater amongst the highest consumers (1 to 2 servings/day) compared to lowest consumers (<1 serving/month)[13].

Cardiovascular disease and stroke

The consumption of added sugar by adolescents, especially sugar-sweetened soft drinks, has been associated with multiple factors that can increase risk of cardiovascular disease regardless of body size, and increased insulin resistance among overweight or obese adolescents[14].

A high sugar diet has been linked to increased risk of heart disease mortality[15, 16]. Consuming high levels of added sugar is associated with risk factors for heart disease such as weight gain and raised blood pressure[17]. Excessive dietary glucose and fructose have been shown to increase the production and accumulation of fatty cells in the liver and bloodstream, which is linked to cardiovascular disease, and kidney and liver disease[18]. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the major causes of chronic liver disease and is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease[18].

There is also emerging evidence that sugar-sweetened beverage consumption may be independently associated with increased risk of stoke[19].

Chronic kidney disease

There is evidence of an independent association between sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption and the development of chronic kidney disease and kidney stone formation[20]. The risk of developing chronic kidney disease is 58% greater amongst people who regularly consume at least one sugar-sweetened soft drink per day, compared with non-consumers[21].

Cancer

While sugar-sweetened beverages may contribute to cancer risk through their effect on overweight and obesity, there is no evidence to suggest that these drinks are an independent risk factor for cancer[7]. 5

A health levy on sugar-sweetened beverages

WHO recommends that governments consider taxes and subsidies to discourage consumption of less healthy foods and promote healthier options[22]. WHO concludes that there is “reasonable and increasing evidence that appropriately designed taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages would result in proportional reductions in consumption, especially if aimed at raising the retail price by 20% or more”[23].

Price influences consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages[24, 25]. Young people, low-income consumers and those most at risk of obesity are most responsive to food and beverage price changes, and are likely to gain the largest health benefit from a levy on sugary drinks due to reduced consumption[23]. While a health levy would result in lower income households paying a greater proportion of their income in additional tax, the financial burden across all households is small, with minimal differences between higher- and lower-income households (less than $5 USD per year)[26].

A 2016 study modelled the impact of a 20% ad valorem excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Australia over 25 years[27]. The levy could reduce sugary drink consumption by 12.6% and reduce obesity by 2.7% in men and 1.2% in women[27]. Over 25 years, there could be 16,000 fewer cases of type 2 diabetes, 4,400 fewer cases of ischaemic heart disease and 1,100 fewer strokes[27]. In total, 1,600 deaths could potentially be prevented[27].

The 20% levy was modelled to generate more than $400 million in revenue each year, even with a decline in consumption, and save $609 million in overall health care expenditure over 25 years[27]. The implementation cost was estimated to be $27.6 million[27].

A separate Australian report is supportive of an excise tax on the sugar content of sugar-sweetened beverages, to reduce consumption and encourage manufacturers to reformulate to reduce the sugar content in beverages[28]. An excise tax at a rate of 40 cents per 100 grams was modelled to reduce consumption by 15% and generate around $500 million annually in revenue[28]. While a sugary drinks levy is not the single solution to obesity, the introduction of a levy could promote healthier eating, reduce obesity and raise revenue to combat costs that obesity imposes on the broader community.

There is public support for a levy on sugar-sweetened beverages. Sixty nine percent of Australian grocery buyers supported a levy if the revenue was used to reduce the cost of healthy foods[29]. A separate survey of 1,200 people found that 85% supported levy revenue being used to fund programs reducing childhood obesity, and 84% supported funding for initiatives encouraging children’s sport[30].

An Australian levy on sugar-sweetened beverages is supported by many public health groups and professional organisations.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Funding alert : $13.1m infrastructure grants for existing regional, rural and remote general practices.

rand-r

 ” Grants may be used for a range of infrastructure projects, including construction, fit-out and/or renovation of an existing general practice building, supply and installation of information and communication technology equipment or medical equipment.

Grants of up to $300,000 will be provided to successful applicants in 2017. All successful applicants will be required to match the Commonwealth funding contribution.”

Assistant Minister for Rural Health Dr David Gillespie

“Improved training facilities, such as communication technology, will also ensure that rural doctors can increase their own training opportunities, so they can continue to keep their skills current and maintain their practice at the high level that they strive for and that rural communities deserve.”

Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) see full press release below

The Australian Government has committed $13.1 million in funding under the Rural General Practice Grants Program (the Program) for grants up to $300,000 each to deliver improved health services through additional infrastructure, increased levels of teaching and training for health practitioners, and more opportunities to deliver ‘healthy living’ education to local communities.

The Program will provide an opportunity for general practices within Modified Monash Classification 2-7 to deliver increased health services in rural and regional communities.

The Program commences with a call for Expressions of Interest (EOI), in which suitable organisations will be identified and subsequently invited to submit a full application.

Project Officer Details Name: Health State Network
Ph: 02 6289 5600 E-mail: Grant.ATM@health.gov.au
Closing date 2:00 pm AEDST on 13 December 2016

Submit your detail here

Teaching, training and retaining the next generation of health workers in rural, regional and remote Australia is a priority for the Coalition Government.

Assistant Minister for Rural Health Dr David Gillespie said the Coalition Government has moved to streamline the former Rural and Regional Teaching Infrastructure Grants program to better respond to the needs of rural communities and support the work of rural general practices.

“A more streamlined and simplified two-step application process is now open through the new Rural General Practice Grants (RGPG) program,” Dr Gillespie said.

“General practice in rural Australia faces unique challenges in healthcare including the ability to attract and retain a health workforce.

“The RGPG program will enable existing health facilities to provide teaching and training opportunities for a range of health professionals within the practice and for practitioners to develop experience in training and supervising healthcare workers.

“I believe that strong, accessible primary care in regional Australia helps alleviate pressure on the public hospital system and at the same time it also provides opportunities for earlier intervention and better patient outcomes.”

“Our Government wants Australians, no matter where they live, to have access to quality health services,” Dr Gillespie said.

“I also want our health professionals who live and work in rural, regional and remote Australia to have access to teaching and training opportunities so they remain in general practice and in the communities that need them the most.”

Grant documentation will be available from the Department of Health’s Tenders and Grants page at www.health.gov.au/tenders.

Rural doctors congratulate government on new grants program

Australian rural doctors are today welcoming the announcement of a streamlined Rural General Practice Grants (RGPG) program, just announced by Dr David Gillespie, Assistant Minister for Rural Health.

Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), said that the announcement was a reflection of the importance the Coalition Government places on rural and remote health care.

“We are extremely pleased that Minister Gillespie has been so proactive in his Rural Health portfolio, and he has shown a great understanding of the need for increased training facilities to enable the education of the next generation of rural doctors,” Dr McPhee said.

“The RGPG will allow more of our highly skilled doctors in rural areas to improve their training capacity, allowing them to take on more young doctors in training and ensure they have access to quality educational opportunities in rural areas.

“Research shows us that young doctors who undertake training in rural areas, and have a good experience in their placement, are more likely to choose rural medicine as a career.

“Grants enabling doctors to improve and expand their training facilities will play a key role in the recruitment and retention of the rural doctor workforce of the future,” Dr McPhee said.

While infrastructure grants have been available for rural practices for some time, the application process was onerous, complicated and time consuming, putting it out of the reach of many small practices who did not have the time or expertise to successfully apply.

Grants can be used for a range of projects, including construction, fit-out and/or renovation of an existing general practice building, supply and installation of information and communication technology equipment or medical equipment.

“Simplifying and streamlining the process will ensure that these smaller clinics will no longer be disadvantaged by the system,” Dr McPhee said.

Many doctors enjoy the opportunity to engage with young doctors and be a part of their training journey. We look forward to more of our colleagues being able to participate in this way thanks to the Coalition’s commitment to rural health.

“Improved training facilities, such as communication technology, will also ensure that rural doctors can increase their own training opportunities, so they can continue to keep their skills current and maintain their practice at the high level that they strive for and that rural communities deserve.

“We thank Minister Gillespie for his recognition of the importance of this area.”

The third Rural Health Stakeholder Roundtable was held at Parliament House in Canberra on the 16 November 2016.

rural-health

Twenty years ago one of Australia’s greatest health challenges was a lack of doctors coming through the system.

Today, that challenge has been overcome with latest research predicting a surplus of 7000 doctors by 2030,” the Federal Minister for Rural Health, Dr David Gillespie, said today.

“The new challenge is no longer the number of doctors in our nation’s health workforce, but where they are distributed.

“This issue, along with the need for greater numbers of allied health professionals in the bush, are among the major topics to be discussed at the third Rural Health Stakeholder Roundtable at Parliament House in Canberra today,” Dr Gillespie said.

“The Roundtable was attended by an impressive representation of rural health stakeholders, from rural doctors associations, medical educators, rural health consumer and advocacy groups, Aboriginal medical services, rural and remote allied health organisations and health workforce professionals.

“We have an outstanding health workforce in the regional, rural and remote areas of this country and today’s roundtable is designed to get all the key players together with government to work out the very best strategies to support them and the work they do for our more isolated communities.”

Minister Gillespie said the Coalition Government is investing record funding in health as part of its commitment to strengthen the regional, rural and remote health system so that Australians living in these areas have access to the best care available.

“Our Government is working in partnership with these people to deliver health care to rural and remote communities through a broad range of initiatives as part of our record funding investment in the health portfolio.”

The Roundtable will discuss today the establishment of the National Rural Health Commissioner (the Commissioner), a new role to champion the cause of rural practice.

The Commissioner will work with rural, regional and remote communities, the health sector, universities, specialist training colleges and across all levels of Government to improve rural health policies.

Another priority item on the agenda is the development of the National Rural Generalist Pathway. This will improve access to training for doctors in rural, regional and remote Australia, and recognise the unique combination of skills required for the role of a rural generalist.

“General practitioners with advanced skills in areas such as general surgery, obstetrics, anaesthetics and mental health are commonly required in the bush also,” Dr Gillespie said.

“We want to make sure these skills are encouraged, developed and properly remunerated.”

Minister Gillespie said the Coalition Government had increased its investment in education and training initiatives both in medical and allied health professions to create a longer term ‘pipelines’ of boosting the rural health workforce.

“The new multidisciplinary training pipeline incorporating the Rural Clinical Schools and University Departments of Rural Health across regional Australia will be a critical component as we boost the capacity of training through our investment in Regional Training Hubs to bring more doctors and allied health professionals to the bush,” he said.

In response to recommendations put forward to the Rural Classification Technical Working Group, an independent group that has assisted the Government to implement the new geographical classification system, I announce today that more support will be provided to medical practitioners working in Cloncurry, Queensland and Roebourne, Western Australia.

“I am pleased to also announce an additional workforce support in the form of a rural loading will be applied to all doctors working in these two towns from 1 January 2017,”  Minister Gillespie said.

“The additional loading will be up to $25,000 per annum through the General Practice Rural Incentives Program and will recognise exceptional circumstances faced in attracting and retaining a workforce in these locations.

“The Coalition Government’s broader health reforms will have direct benefits for regional, rural and remote health, with the patient at the centre of care. Localised, integrated, community-driven health care is the order of the day,” Dr Gillespie said.

“The Rural Health Stakeholder Roundtable is a central part of informing policy reform in rural Australia and I am looking forward to fruitful discussions with participants today.”

rand-r

NACCHO #ABS Aboriginal Health Download Report : Consumption of Food Groups from the Australian Dietary Guidelines, 2012-13

fresh-foods

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders consume too little of the five major food groups and too much sugar and other discretionary foods, according to figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) today.

DOWNLOAD the Report

abs-naccho-consumption-of-food-groups-from-the-australian-dietary-guidelines

Like the rest of the population, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ diets fail to meet the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines, which recommend minimum serves for vegetables, fruit, dairy products, lean meats and alternatives, and grain-based foods.

ABS Director of Health, Louise Gates said the latest results showed Aboriginal and Torres Strait adults consumed an average of 2.1 serves of vegetables per day, which is less than half of the 5-6 serves recommended by the Guidelines.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults consumed almost one serve (or 30 per cent) less vegetables than non-Indigenous people,” said Ms Gates.

“They also consumed just one serve of fruit on average, half the recommended two serves per day.”

In remote Australia, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed less than one serve (0.9) of fruit (e.g. less than one medium sized apple) and less than one serve (0.9) of dairy products (e.g. less than one cup of milk) per day, which was lower than those living in urban areas (1.3 serves for both fruit and dairy products).

However, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote areas consumed around half a serve more of grain foods and lean meats and alternatives than people living in urban areas.

“The data also shows that 41 per cent of the population’s total daily energy intake came from energy-dense, nutrient-poor ‘discretionary foods’, such as sweetened beverages, alcohol, cakes, confectionery and pastry products,” said Ms Gates.

On average, this equates to over six serves of discretionary foods per day, triple the number of vegetable serves consumed. The Australian Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting discretionary foods to occasional, small amounts.

KEY FINDINGS

The 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADG or the Guidelines) recommend that Australians “Enjoy a wide variety of nutritious foods from the Five Food Groups every day and drink plenty of water”.1

This publication provides analysis on the consumption of the Five Food groups from the Australian Dietary Guidelines using nutrition data collected in the 2012-13 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (NATSINPAS).

FIVE FOOD GROUPS

In 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed an average total of 10 serves of foods from the Five Food Groups per day.

Vegetables and legumes/beans group

    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged two years and over consumed an average of 1.8 serves of vegetables and legumes/beans per day compared with 2.7 among non-Indigenous people.
    • The number of vegetable serves consumed increased with age, with children aged 2-18 years consuming 1.4 serves per day on average compared with 2.1 among adults aged 19 years and over.
    • The average daily consumption of vegetable and legumes/beans serves for each age-sex group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was considerably less than the respective recommendations.

Fruit group

    • Around 1.2 serves of fruit (including fruit juice and dried fruit) were consumed per day on average by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged two years and over, compared with 1.5 serves per day in the non-Indigenous population.
    • Fresh or canned fruit made up 62% and one-third (34%) came from fruit juice.
    • Children consumed more serves of fruit than adults, averaging 1.6 serves per day compared with 1.0 respectively.
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in non-remote areas consumed more serves of fruit on average than those living in remote areas (1.3 serves compared with 0.9).
    • The average daily consumption of 1.0 serves of fruit by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults was half the recommended two serves.

Milk, yoghurt, cheese and alternatives group

    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged two years and over consumed an average of 1.2 serves of milk, yoghurt, cheese and alternatives per day, compared with 1.5 serves among non-Indigenous people.
    • Dairy milk made up almost two-thirds (65%) of this food group, followed by cheese (30%).
    • The average daily consumption of milk, yoghurt, cheese and alternatives for each age-sex group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with the exception of children aged 2-3 years and girls 4-8 years, was considerably lower than the respective recommend number of serves.

Lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds, and legumes/beans group

    • The average consumption of lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds and legumes/beans was around 1.6 serves per day for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged two years and over, slightly less than for non-Indigenous Australians (1.7 serves).
    • People living in remote areas consumed more serves of lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds and legumes/beans than those living in non-remote areas (2.0 serves compared with 1.4).
    • Lean red meats made up almost half (49%) of the serves of lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds and legumes/beans. The contribution of lean red meats was higher for people living in remote areas compared with non-remote (61% compared with 44%)
    • The average daily consumption of lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds and legumes/beans for each age-sex group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with the exception of girls 2-3 years, was considerably less than the respective recommendations.


Grain (Cereal) foods group

    • On average, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged two years and over consumed around 4.1 serves of grain (cereal) foods per day, compared with 4.5 serves among non-Indigenous Australians.
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in remote areas consumed more serves of grain (cereal) foods on average than those in non-remote areas (4.6 serves compared with 4.0 serves)
    • One-quarter (25%) of grain (cereal) foods consumed were from wholegrain and/or high fibre varieties.
    • The average number of serves of grain (cereal) foods consumed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander boys aged 4-13 years and girls aged 4-11 was equal to or greater than the recommendation.

WATER

The Guidelines also include the recommendation that Australians drink plenty of water. In 2012-13, the average amount of plain water, including both bottled and tap, consumed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was around one litre per day (997 ml), 76 ml less than the average for non-Indigenous people (1,073 ml). An additional 262 ml of water was consumed from other non-discretionary beverages such as tea and coffee. Plain water contributed just under half (48%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ total beverage consumption, slightly less than that of non-Indigenous Australians (50%).

UNSATURATED SPREADS AND OILS

The Guidelines also recommend a daily allowance for unsaturated fats, oils and spreads. In 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 2 years and over consumed an average 1.4 serves of unsaturated spreads and oils from non-discretionary sources.

DISCRETIONARY FOODS

The Guidelines recommend that discretionary foods (i.e. those not necessary for nutrients but are often high in saturated fat, salt, sugar or alcohol) are only consumed sometimes and in small amounts. However, over two-fifths (41%) of total daily energy in 2012-13 came from foods and beverages classified as discretionary. 2

According to the Guidelines, a serve of discretionary food is around 500-600 kJ. Based on this, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed an average of 6.1 serves of discretionary foods per day, which was higher than the non-Indigenous population average of 5.5 serves. The leading contributors to serves of from discretionary foods were alcoholic beverages (10%), soft drinks (9.1%), potato products such as chips and fries (8.2%), pastries (7.1%), cakes and muffins (6.4%) and confectionary (6.3%).

This graph shows the mean serves consumed from the five Australian Dietary Guidelines food groups and unsaturated spreads and oils from non-discretionary sources plus serves of discretionary foods for Australians aged 2 years and over by Indigenous status

(a) Based on Day 1. See Glossary for definition.
(b) From non-discretionary sources unless otherwise specified.
(c) A discretionary serve is defined as 500-600 kJ. Discretionary serves were derived by summing energy from discretionary foods and dividing by 550 kJ. Does not include meats that do not meet the ADG criteria but are not flagged as discretionary.
Sources: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, 2012-13 and the National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, 2011-12.

ENDNOTES

1. National Health and Medical Research Council, 2013, Australian Dietary Guidelines. Canberra: Australian Government. <https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/n55_australian_dietary_guidelines_130530.pdf >, Last accessed 27/10/2016

2. See discussion of Discretionary foods from 4364.0.55.007 – Australian Health Survey: Nutrition First Results – Foods and Nutrients, 2011-12, <http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/by%20Subject/4364.0.55.007~2011-12~Main%20Features~Discretionary%20foods~700 >

More details are available in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Consumption of food groups from Australian Dietary Guidelines (cat. no. 4727.0.55.008), available for free download from the ABS website, http://www.abs.gov.au.

partnerships-naccho

1. Call to action to Present
at the 2016 Members Conference closing 8 November
See below or Download here

2.NACCHO Partnership Opportunities

3. NACCHO Interim 3 day Program has been released

4. The dates are fast approaching – so register today

 

NACCHO #APSAD @APSADConf Aboriginal Health and #ICE :New study show #Ice use in rural Australia has more than doubled since 2007

 

An ice pipe in Melbourne, Monday, July 2, 2007. The item was one of 76,00 dangerous products seized last financial year, a record total haul for an Australian state or territory. (AAP Image/Julian Smith) NO ARCHIVING

” The study has raised particular concerns given rural Australians already have poorer health outcomes, with shorter life expectancies and significantly higher mortality rates, mental illness, chronic disease, family and domestic violence and more.

 A complex, variable picture has emerged of methamphetamine use across the country, What is clear is that there has been a disproportionately larger increase in the misuse of methamphetamine, including crystal methamphetamine, in rural locations compared to other Australian locations.

 At the same time, it’s very concerning there has been no increase in the number of people accessing help in rural areas. We need to urgently establish whether existing support services simply don’t have the capacity to deal with demand for drug treatment, or whether there are there significant reasons.

 Contributing factors to rural drug problems include lower educational attainment, low socioeconomic status, higher unemployment, isolation and the deliberate targeting of rural communities by illegal distribution networks.

Professor Ann Roche, Director of the National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction at Flinders University.

Read 51 NACCHO Articles about Aboriginal Health and Ice

 

Australians is on the rise have now been confirmed with the first documented evidence released today at the APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drugs Conference.

The study – the most detailed examination to date – found lifetime and recent methamphetamine and recent crystal methamphetamine (ice) use is significantly higher among rural than other Australians, at rates double or more.

In addition, recent crystal methamphetamine use in rural Australia has more than doubled since 2007 – increasing by 150 per cent from 0.8 per cent to 2.0 per cent of people reporting lifetime and recent use.

“For some time now there have been anecdotal reports suggesting a high and increasing level of methamphetamine use in rural Australia, but this was unsupported by evidence.

Now we have this proof, the next challenge is to understand why and determine how we can best tackle this problem,” said Professor Ann Roche, Director of the National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction at Flinders University.

Significantly, more rural men and employed rural Australians use methamphetamine than their city, regional or Australian counterparts, with use most prevalent in men aged 18-25 years.

Recent methamphetamine use in rural teens aged 14-17 years also appears to be much higher than in urban areas.

The study has raised particular concerns given rural Australians already have poorer health outcomes, with shorter life expectancies and significantly higher mortality rates, mental illness, chronic disease, family and domestic violence and more.

“Our findings warrant targeted attention, especially given the pre-existing health and social vulnerabilities of rural Australians. We need tailored strategies and interventions to address this growing health problem,” said Professor Roche.

The research is being presented for the first time at the annual summit of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs (APSAD), the APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drugs Conference, held in Sydney from 30 October to 2 November.

Ice campaign/youth: Did the federal government’s campaign, ‘What are you doing on ice’ really work?

Barriers to treatment: What are the most significant obstacles preventing people seeking treatment for their methamphetamine use? Available upon request

Women/Methamphetamines: A look at the specific treatment barriers faced by women and how to overcome them.

The global burden of methamphetamine disorders: An overview of the proportion of disease burden attributable to substance use disorders and differences in the distribution and burden of amphetamine use disorders between countries, age, sex, and year.

New treatment for methamphetamine addiction: Treatment options for methamphetamine dependence are currently limited, but a drug licensed in Australia for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder could be an important innovation.

Comorbid mental and substance use disorders: The top 10 causes of burden of disease in young Australians (15-24 years) are dominated by mental health and substance use disorders.

OTHER MONDAY HIGHLIGHTS

 Opening by The Hon. (Pru) Prudence Jane Goward, MP NSW Minister for Medical Research, Minister for Prevention of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, and Assistant Minister for Health

Cannabis as Medicine in Australia: Where are we now, where are we heading to, where might we end up? Professor Nicholas Lintzeris

Friend or Enemy? Emeritus Professor Geoffrey Gallop, Director, Graduate School of Government, University of Sydney and Former Premier of Western Australia

About APSAD Sydney 2016

The APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drugs Conference is the southern hemisphere’s largest summit on alcohol and other drugs attracting leading researchers, clinicians, policy makers and community representatives from across the region. The Conference is run by the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs (APSAD), Asia Pacific’s leading multidisciplinary organisation for professionals involved in the alcohol and other drug field.

agm

This year’s theme: Strengthening Our Future through Self Determination

As you are aware, the  2016 NACCHO Members’ Meeting and Annual General Meeting will be in Melbourne this year 6-8 December
1. Call to action to Present
at the 2016 Members Conference closing 8 November
See below or Download here

2.NACCHO Partnership Opportunities

3. NACCHO Interim 3 day Program has been released

4. The dates are fast approaching – so register today

An ice pipe in Melbourne, Monday, July 2, 2007. The item was one of 76,00 dangerous products seized last financial year, a record total haul for an Australian state or territory. (AAP Image/Julian Smith) NO ARCHIVING