NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth @georgeinstitute Download new screening tool to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people combat depression

“ This tool, which was developed in conjunction with Aboriginal communities and researchers, will help us address easily treated problems that often go undiagnosed. It will also help us to assess the scale of mental health problems in communities.

Up until now, we couldn’t reliably ascertain this in a culturally appropriate way, which has remained a huge concern.

We need better resources and funding for mental health across Australia, but particularly for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and within under-resourced health services. We hope this tool will be a turning point.”

Lead researcher Professor Maree Hackett, of The George Institute for Global Health, said mental health problems experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have been overlooked, dismissed and marginalised for too long. 

A culturally-appropriate depression screening tool for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples not only works, it should be rolled out across the country, according to a new study.

Researchers at The George Institute for Global Health, in partnership with key Aboriginal and Torres Strait primary care providers conducted the validation study in 10 urban, rural and remote primary health services across Australia.

The screening tool is an adapted version of the existing 9-item patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9) used across Australia and globally accepted as an effective screening method for depression. The adapted tool (aPHQ-9) contains culturally-appropriate questions asking about mood, appetite, sleep patterns, energy and concentration levels. It is hoped the adapted questionnaire will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of depression in Aboriginal communities.

The results of the validation study were published in the Medical Journal of Australia 1 July 2019

Download the 7 page study  mja250212

The aPHQ-9 is freely available in a culturally-appropriate English version, and can be readily used by translators when working with First Nation communities where English is not the patients first language.

It is estimated up to 20 per cent of Australia’s general population with chronic disease will have a diagnosis of comorbid major depression. [1]

Approximately similar proportions will meet criteria for moderate or minor depression. Mental illness and depression are also considered to be key contributors in the development of chronic disease.

Across the nation, chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) accounts for 80 per cent of the life expectancy gap experienced by Aboriginal people [2]  

How the tool works

The adapted tool, which was evaluated with 500 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, contains culturally-appropriate questions.

For example, the original (PHQ-9) questionnaire asks:

  • Over the last two weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems: Little interest or pleasure in doing things?
  • Feeling down, depressed or hopeless

The adapted (aPHQ-9) tool instead asks:

  • Over the last two weeks have you been feeling slack, not wanted to do anything?
  • Have you been feeling unhappy, depressed, really no good, that your spirit was sad?

Download: Adapted Patient Questionnaire with scoring (PDF 117 KB)

Download: Adapted Patient Questionnaire without scoring(PDF 114 KB)

Professor Alex Brown, of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, who was co-investigator on the study, said the importance of using culturally appropriate language with First Nations people cannot be underestimated.

“In Australia, as with many countries around the world, everything is framed around Western understandings, language and methods. Our research recognises the importance of an Aboriginal voice and giving that a privileged position in how we respond to matters of most importance to Aboriginal people themselves.

“What we found during this study was that many questions were being lost in translation. Instead of a person scoring highly for being at risk of depression, they were actually scoring themselves much lower and missing out on potential opportunities for treatment.

“It was essential that we got this right and that we took our time speaking with Aboriginal people and ascertaining how the wording needed to be changed so we can begin to tackle the burden of depression.”

Aboriginal psychologist Dr Graham Gee, of the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, saidAboriginal communities have unacceptably high rates of suicide which need to be addressed. “Identifying and treating depression is an important part of responding to this major challenge. It’s clear this tool is much needed.”

The new tool will be available for use at primary health centres across Australia and will be available to download here from Monday July 1.

The George Institute for Global Health

The George Institute for Global Health conducts clinical, population and health system research aimed at changing health practice and policy worldwide.

Established in Australia and affiliated with UNSW Sydney, it also has offices in China, India and the UK, and is affiliated with the University of Oxford.  Facebook at thegeorgeinstitute  Twitter @georgeinstitute Web georgeinstitute.org.au

[1] https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/mentalhealthservices/mentalhealthservicesinaustralia/reportcontents/summary/prevalenceandpolicies

[2] https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/indigenousaustralians/contributionofchronicdiseasetothegapinmort/contents/summary

Additional Media 

Doctors can now use the new tool

Extract from the Conversation 1 July 2019

In 2014-15, more than half (53.4%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples aged 15 years and over reported their overall life satisfaction was eight out of ten or more. Almost one in six (17%) said they were completely satisfied with their life. These positive data are testament to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ ongoing endurance.

But over the years, events like colonisation, racism, relocation of people away from their lands, and the forced removal of children from family and community have disrupted the resilience, cultural beliefs and practices of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. In turn, these factors have impacted their social and emotional well-being.

This may explain why Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are twice as likely to be hospitalised for mental health disorders and die from suicide than their non-Aboriginal counterparts.

Teenagers aged 15 to 19 are five times more likely than non-Indigenous teenagers to die by suicide.

The importance of being able to more accurately identify those at risk can’t be understated.

While screening all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples who present to general practice for depression is not recommended, the new questionnaire is a free, easy to administer, culturally acceptable tool for screening Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples at high risk of depression.

People who might be at heightened risk of depression include those with chronic disease, a history of depression and those who have been exposed to abuse and other adverse events.

Without a culturally appropriate tool, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with depression and suicidal thoughts might fly under the radar. This questionnaire will pave the way for important discussions and the provision of treatment and services to those most in need.

If this article has raised issues for you or you’re concerned about someone you know, call Lifeline on 13 11 14. Visit the Beyond Blue website to access specific resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Maree Hackett, Professor, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW and Geoffrey Spurling, Senior lecturer, Discipline of General Practice, The University of Queensland

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #715HealthCheck 3 of 3 : @healthgovau Your Health is in Your Hands – Download resources to boost the rates of the #715healthcheck. Information available for patients and health professionals!

” A 715 it’s a health check that Aboriginal and Torres Strait on the people’s can have done on an annual timetable.

But it should be comprehensive in nature, and offer you not just the usual, hi, how are you?

What’s your name? Where do you live?

But take full consideration of your social background and social histories, ask you about your family history.

Is there anything important not just in your own personal medical background, but that of your family, so we can take that into consideration?

We know that we have many families with long backgrounds of chronic disease, for example, diabetes, cardiovascular risk, and they’re super important we’re considering how we tailor our history, our examination, our investigations, and then a treatment plan for you.

 It goes through the steps of that history and they’ll ask you questions about, you got a job at the moment, where are you working?

What are you exposed to? What are your interest? Do you play sport?

Are you involved in any other sort of social activities, cultural activities, for example, which I think is really important.

They’ll then make determinations around the kinds of examination if they need to tailor that at all, depending upon your age, and where you live and your access to services and what your history brought up, for example, male, female, young or old.

And then the investigations and X-ray, for example, or some bloods taken, and referrals as appropriate.

For allied health professionals, pediatrists, nutritionists, diabetes educators, but also perhaps you might need to see a cardiologist or a diabetes and endocrinologist as a specialist.

And then we wrap that all up in a specific and individualised kind of plan for you, that we discuss and we negotiate and we try to educate so that you then are able to play a part in your own health and take responsibility for some of those aspects.

But also you then get to choose what you share with family and the other providers.

It’s supposed to be a relationship and partnership for your health, that you understand, that you agree to and then together, you can move forward on how to be healthy and stay healthy.

From interview with Dr Ngaire Brown 

Download resources below or from HERE

Podcasts

Annual health checks for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can access a health check annually, with a minimum claim period of 9 months. 715 health checks are free at Aboriginal Medical Services and bulk bulling clinics to help people stay healthy and strong.

We acknowledge that many individuals refer to themselves by their clan, mob, and/or country. For the purposes of the health check, we respectfully refer to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander throughout.

Your Health is in Your Hands

Having a health check provides important health information for you and your doctor.

Staying on top of your health is important. It helps to identify potential illnesses or chronic diseases before they occur. It is much easier to look at ways to prevent these things from occurring, rather than treatment.

The 715 Health Check is designed to support the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients of all ages. It is free at Aboriginal Medical Services and bulk billing clinics.

What happens at the health check?

Having the health check can take up to an hour. A Practice Nurse, Aboriginal Health Worker or Aboriginal and Torres Starlit Islander Health Practitioner may assist the doctor to perform this health check. They will record information about your health, such as your blood pressure, blood sugar levels, height and weight. You might also have a blood test or urine test. It is also an opportunity to talk about the health of your family.

Depending on the information you’ve provided, you might have some other tests too. You’ll then have a yarn with the doctor or health practitioner about the tests and any follow up you might need. It’s also good to tell them about your family medical history or any worries you have about your health.

Information for patients

Only about 30 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are accessing the 715 health check. Resources have been developed to help improve the uptake of 715 health checks in the community.

These are available for patients, community organisations, PHNs and GP clinics to download or order

Read all NACCHO 715 Health Check articles Here

Frequently Asked Questions

What happens at the health check?

Health checks might be different depending on your age.

Having the health check should take between 40-60 minutes. A health practitioner might check your:

  • blood pressure
  • blood sugar levels
  • height and weight

You might also a have blood test and urine test.

It’s also good to tell your health practitioner about your family medical history or any worries you have about your health.

Follow up care

Once you finish the check, the Practice Nurse, Aboriginal Health Worker or Doctor might tell you about other ways to help look after your health. They might suggest services to help you with your:

  • heart
  • vision
  • hearing
  • movement
  • mental health

You may also get help with free or discounted medicines you might need. Your Doctor can give you information about Closing the Gap scripts if you have or at risk of having a chronic disease.

Where can you access a 715 health check?

You can choose where you get your 715 health check. If you can, try to go to the same Doctor or clinic.

This helps make sure you are being cared for by people who know about your health needs.

Do I need to pay for the 715 health check?

The health check is free at your local Aboriginal Medical Service. It is also free at bulk billing health clinics. If you are unsure whether it will be free at your local Doctor, give them a call to ask about the 715 health check before you book.

Why Should I Identify?

It’s important to tell the Doctor if you are Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander so that they can make sure you get access to health care you might need. Medicare can help record this for you, and their staff are culturally trained to help.

Call the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Access line on 1800 556 955.

Information for Health Professionals

For more information about for health professionals and medical practitioners delivering the 715 health checks please go to Supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

Video Case Studies

Social Media Tiles

2 boys stand with a woman in a school basketball court. They look happy and healthy/
An Aboriginal Health worker measures the weight of a child was part of the 715 health check.
A doctor takes a man’s pulse as part of the 715 health check.

Aboriginal Health Hero’s @ashbar96 #BartyParty : NACCHO pays tribute to our two French Opens winners #EvonneGoolagong 1971 and now #AshBarty 2019 #Dream #Believe #Learn #Achieve

 

“ I think the pathways and progress we’ve made for Indigenous youth in Australia has been incredible.

I think there have been more opportunities, there’s more publicity, people are actually aware that there is a pathway for Indigenous youth, not only in tennis but in all sports.

But tennis is now becoming a nationwide sport for Indigenous youth.

It’s incredible to know what Evonne has done and how passionate she is about it. If I can have any small part in that, that would be incredible.”

Ash Barty speaking after winning the 2019 French Open 8 June

Her win will inspire a generation of Australian girls to play tennis and as an Indigenous Australian, just like the 1971 champion, Evonne Goolagong Cawley ( 13-time major champion ) See Part 2 and 3 below 

” Goolagong grew up in the wheat town of Barrellan in New South Wales, one of eight children. Her mother Melinda was a homemaker and father Kenny a sheepshearer.

Their simple one-story home was a tin shack with dirt floors and no electricity. But moreover, Goolagong was born into Aboriginal heritage, the only family of its kind in town, and as light-skinned members of the Wiradjuri tribe, the Goolagong kids faced prejudice, and faced a cloudy and uncertain future.

The Australian government’s policy at the time was to forcibly remove Aboriginal children from their families and relocate them to camps where they could be properly educated and integrated into white society.   

“Every time there was a shiny car, my mum must have worried if was the welfare people coming for her kids,” Goolagong has explained in many media interviews when the topic of her Aboriginal roots was questioned.

We had no idea. We thought the welfare man was there to take us away.”

Evonne pictured this week with Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO Adelaide

Since 2005, she has run the Goolagong National Development Camp for Indigenous girls and boys, which uses tennis as a vehicle to promote better health, education and employment. See Part 4 below

See Evonne Goolagong Foundation Website 

Extracts from the Guardian

Everything you need to know about Ash Barty was summed up in the immediate aftermath of her first grand slam success. Within minutes, the 23-year-old, a teenage prodigy turned cricketer and turned back into a tennis player again, was busy trying to share the glory with those she feels have helped her along the way.

From her family – her parents and her two sisters – to her team, and coach Craig Tyzzer, Barty almost always speaks of “we” when it comes to describing her exploits.

She may be a grand slam champion for the first time, but as far as she is concerned, it has been a team effort.

“I’m extremely lucky to have a team around me that love me for Ash Barty the person, not the tennis player,” she said, sitting with the Coupe de Suzanne Lenglen within reach, just an hour or so after her 6-1, 6-3 triumph over the Czech teenager Markéta Vondroušová.

“I’m extremely lucky to have an amazing family, a truly amazing family that no matter, win lose or draw, the text messages and the facetiming is the same. It’s just a really good group of people around me that make the tennis very easy.”

If it wasn’t already clear, Barty is a hugely popular player, as evidenced by the outpouring of congratulations on social media, and directly to Barty via texts and instant messages.

From Petra Kvitová to Nick Kyrgios and from numerous players and coaches on both the ATP and WTA Tours, Barty’s achievement was hailed by her peers. “It’s incredibly kind, especially from your peers, I suppose,” said Barty, who shared a handshake and hug with Rod Laver after the match.

“And people that you see every single week and most weeks of the year, it’s very kind of them to compliment [me], my game.

But I think it’s also a compliment to my team. It’s just been an incredible journey, the way we have tried to work and develop and grow this game that I have and this game style and kind of Ash Barty brand of tennis, I suppose. It’s amazing. I haven’t seen any of it yet. It’s just been nice to take a minute or two with my team and celebrate what we have achieved.”

There have been some tough days for first-time finalists here at Roland Garros over the years, from Natasha Zvereva being double-bagelled by Steffi Graf in 1988 to Elena Dementieva’s 6-2, 6-2 defeat by Anastasia Myskina in 2004. Barty and Vondroušová were both appearing in their first grand slam final but while the Czech failed to produce her best, Barty was close to perfect in her execution of her game.

And hers is a game to bring a smile to the face of anyone who loves to see variety on the court.

Compete, enjoy and try to do the best you can – that’s her mantra – and the way she plays, with slice, power, angles, drop shots, volleys, kick serves, everything you can imagine, is a joy to watch. As Kirsten Flipkens, the Belgian player, tweeted on Saturday evening: “Just love to watch her play (with a gamestyle similar to mine, just 20 times better. Slice for life! Impressive, Kiddo”.

Three years after she returned from an almost two-year hiatus from the Tour, Barty has a grand slam title to her name, a surprise only in the fact that the first one should come at Roland Garros, rather than, say, Wimbledon, where her style of play would seem to be perfectly suited.

It was at Wimbledon where she won as a junior, aged 15, but her ability to hit every shot, as encouraged by her first coach, Jim Joyce, means she is a threat on every surface.

September 2018 #USOpen Doubles Title

Barty will rise to world No 2 on Monday, only a handful of points behind Naomi Osaka, and she admitted that reaching top spot was a goal.

Barty will celebrate with her family when she heads to the UK for the grass-court season, building to Wimbledon, where she will be a big threat for the title. It’s entirely possible she will be the world No 1 before the summer is out, but whatever success she has, she will ensure her family and team share the credit.

Part 2. Evonne discovers spiritual centre court 1993 

When she competed on the world professional tennis circuit Evonne Cawley would always look forward to the traditional dancing that tournament organisers would put on to welcome international players.

But she always wondered why, at the Australian events, no equivalent celebration of Indigenous culture ever took place.

“In almost every other country, I went to the native people would put on a dance,” Cawley recalled this week. “I used to think, “why doesn’t this happen at home ?. It always made me feel a little sad.”

For Cawley, the sporting heroine who as “our girl” Evonne Goolagong rose from the obscurity of small town life in NSW to capture her first Wimbledon crown as a teenager in 1971, such memories are becoming increasingly relevant as she seeks to unravel the mysteries of her own aboriginality.

It is a journey of self-discovery which this week took her, for the first time, to Australia’s red centre, to a dinner with 120 Aboriginal women in Alice Springs and to the awesome grandeur of Uluru, symbolic sentry to 40 000 years of Indigenous Australian culture.

“ I ve reached a stage in my life where I need to find out about where I come from – about everything to do with being an Aboriginal person,”said Cawley.

In the ancient Pitjantjatjara language of the Anangu custodians of Uluru the process is written “ara mulapa ngaranyi pulkara kulintjaku”- the proper thing is to really listen.

As she follows this new road Cawley has found a great source of strength in the old Aboriginal women she has met  along way , women she described as the most interesting people I have ever met.”

At dinner in Alice Springs she sat down with traditional Aboriginal women who have never seen a big city, hardly ever left the desert. Gushing with joy, she explained how they held hands together and sang old favourite mission songs like “One Day at a Time”.

“ The dinner was a really special time for me, “Cawley said. “ I had never been to anything like it before and I felt a great sense of unity with the women. I really felt there was a lot of bonding there.”

Cawley’s search for her Aboriginal identity reveals the little-known downside of her life in the jet-set world of professional tennis.

Thrust into the limelight as a teenager by the sheer natural artistry and grace of her sporting talent she inevitably became an international celebrity, feted from nation to nation by the sport’s floating gallery of movie stars, money moguls and royalty.

Front Page The Australian September 11-12 1993

Part 3 Evonne Goolagong 13-time major champion

Evonne Goolagong was not born into tennis royalty with a gold plated racquet, fancy outfits, and private lessons at a posh country club.

From the Tennis Hall of Fame 

Furthermore, she didn’t matriculate her game with a used wooden racquet on public courts.

Her introduction to tennis has perhaps the most humble origins in tennis history, yet she overcame major stumbling blocks to become the No. 1 player in the world, won 13 majors and ranked 12th all-time in championship wins.

Goolagong’s first racquet as a youngster was made from a wood fruit box that resembled a paddle – it was absent of any strings. For hours on end she would hit a ball against any flat surface she could find.

A young Evonne was spotted peering through a fence at Barellan War Memorial Tennis Club by club president Bill Kurtzman, who asked her if she’d like to join in. Had Kurtzman not made the gracious and human offer, it’s likely her road to the Hall of Fame, let alone a revered place in history as a two-time Wimbledon Ladies Singles champion (1971, 1980) and keeper of four straight Australian Open Singles titles (1974-77) would not have materialized.

Word obviously traveled fast, as renowned Sydney-based tennis coach Vic Edwards was tipped off to the prodigy and made a 400 mile trip west to the wheat-farming country to see what all the fuss was about.

Even as a developing player, Goolagong had the grace and movement on court that would be a staple of her splendid career. Edwards was enamored with Goolagong, whose name is Aboriginal. He persuaded her parents to let him take the 14-year-old to Sydney for schooling at Willoughby Girls School (where she completed her School Certificate in 1968), coaching, and boarding.

She became part of his family in 1965, with Edwards protecting her from racial slurs, as she competed in big city tournaments, teaching her to believe in herself and talents. Edwards instilled confidence in Goolagong and prepared to her to become the first non-white to play in apartheid South African in a tournament in 1972. At age 15, Goolagong won the New South Wales Championship and in 1967 competed in her first Australian Nationals.

Goolagong would compile an illustrious resume, appearing in 26 major finals (18 singles, six women’s doubles and two mixed doubles), capturing seven singles, five doubles and one mixed double championship.

Overall, she earned 72 singles, 45 doubles and three mixed doubles tour championships and compiled a 704-165 (81 percent) singles record. During the 1970s, Goolagong was a household name and face – attractive, carefree, and admittedly prone to lapses in concentration that caused folks to say “Evonne’s gone walkabout.”

Goolagong was graceful, almost poetic in how beautifully she played the game. Not only did tennis fans marvel in her smooth and effortless movements, but her opponents could also get caught in the ballet that was on the other side of the net.

“She was like a panther compared to me,” said Billie Jean King after losing to Goolagong in the semifinals of the 1974 Virginia Slims Championship at the Los Angeles Sports Arena. “She had more mobility and she played beautifully. I started watching her, and then I’d remember all of a sudden that I had to hit the ball.”

In 2005, Martina Navratilova told Sports Illustrated, “She was such a pretty player. She didn’t serve-and-volley, she would sort of saunter-and-volley.”

Goolagong preferred a baseline game that observers said was reminiscent of Ken Rosewall‘s – her backhand was classically stroked liked Rosewall’s with slice and accuracy. Her groundstrokes were precise and fluid, balls struck hard each time.

“She can be down love-40, apparently beaten, and she’s still trying to hit winners,” Margaret Court told the New York Times. “She won’t play safe tennis, and her shots are quite unpredictable. They’re likely to come back in any direction. The harder you hit the ball to her, the more she likes it. It’s best to slow the game up, rather than try to outbelt her … and she loves a wide ball … she’ll have a crack at anything.”

At the 1971 Australian Open, Goolagong lost to her idol Court in three well-played sets, 2-6, 7-6, 7-5.

At the French Open, the No. 3 seeded Goolagong won her first major singles championship, defeating fellow Aussie and unseeded surprise finalist Helen Gourlay, 6-3, 7-5.

It helped that No. 1 seed Court and No. 2 seed Virginia Wade were eliminated in the third and first rounds respectively. Goolagong didn’t face a seeded player until the quarterfinals, No. 6 Françoise Dürr, and squashed the native favorite, 6-3, 6-0.

A few months later, her tennis dream came true when she decisively defeated Court to win Wimbledon, 6-4, 6-1. “To beat Margaret Court … I was over the moon about winning,” Goolagong said. Outside of defeating the defending champion Court, Goolagong needed a huge semifinal, 6-4, 6-4 victory over King to advance. She nearly became a repeat champion in 1972, but King evened matters with a decisive 6-3, 6-3 victory in the final.

“It was the age of nine that I dreamed about winning Wimbledon,” Goolagong said, appearing as a guest on the television news program Where They Are Now Australia in 2007. “I read this cartoon magazine story called Princess Magazine, about a young girl who was found, trained and taken to this place called Wimbledon, where she played on this magical center court and eventually won. Every time I went to hit against a wall I used to pretend I was there, and every time I went to sleep I would dream about playing on that magical court”

Goolagong made her Wimbledon debut in 1970, and at the time, just stepping inside the hallowed All England Club may have seemed like heaven for the Aussie, but she had unfinished business ahead.

“I remember a cocktail party the night before Wimbledon started and the head of Dunlop (Goolagong’s racquet sponsor) took me out on court when there was no net, just deep silence,” Goolagong recalled. “I said, ‘Wow, I am here … my dream has come true, I am really here.’ I remember playing a girl named Peaches Bartkowitz – what a name – an American top player who beat me pretty convincingly (6-4, 6-0).

When I got off the court my coach said, ‘maybe I better enter you into the “plate” event for second and third round losers, that way you’ll get used to the atmosphere, the crowds, the court. I played in that and ended up winning it.”

The following year, the fairy tale came true with the cherished victory in London and Goolagong ended the 1971 touring season as the Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year.

Wimbledon had a love affair with Goolagong, who dubbed her “Sunshine Supergirl” and she long maintained that the crowning moment in her career came at Wimbledon in 1980, when she defeated Chris Evert in the final to become the first mother since Dorothea Lambert Chambersto accomplish that feat in 1914.

The nine years between championships matched Bill Tilden for the longest gap between titles in history. “After I defeated Margaret Court at Wimbledon in 1971, I found out later she was pregnant and I thought, ‘so that’s why she played so badly,’” Goolagong joked. “Of course I was pregnant in 1980 and was so thrilled to have won again.”

Goolagong captured the Australian Open four times and three consecutively (1974-76), defeating Evert (7-6, 4-6, 6-0); Navratilova (6-3, 6-2) and Czech Renata Tomanova (6-2, 6-2).

The three-peat at Melbourne has only been accomplished by Court, Steffi GrafMonica Seles, and Martina Hingis. Goolagong also appeared in six consecutive finals (1971-77), a record shared with Hingis and stands alone in total finals (7), achieved from 1971-76. Three of her wins (1975-77) came without losing a set, a remarkable mark shared only with Graf. The only asterisk on her championship-filled career was the U.S. Open, where she was a finalist four consecutive times (1973-76), and unable to claim a championship, though the 1973, 1974, and 1975 defeats all came in tightly-contested three set matches against Court, King, and Evert.

Goolagong was nearly perfect in doubles, winning seven major tournaments; 1971 Australian with Court, 1974 Australian and Wimbledon alongside American Peggy Michell; 1975 Australian with Michell; 1976 and 1977 Australian with compatriot Helen Gourlay. She won the 1972 French Open Mixed Doubles Championship with Aussie partner Kim Warwick.

Goolagong made history in October, 1974. As a 23-year-old, she won the third annual and season-ending Virginia Slims Championship played at the Los Angeles Sports Arena. She upset King in the semifinals, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3 and then upset Chris Evert in the final, 6-3, 6-4. She earned $32,000, equal to the top cash prize in the history of women’s tennis. Goolagong also won the season-ending Slims in 1976, again defeating Evert. She was a finalist in 1978, losing to Martina Navratilova. She ranked in the Top 10 for nine years. She married Roger Cawley in 1975 and added the surname while still on tour.

Nagging injuries forced her into retirement in 1983. She moved to South Carolina, where she became the touring professional at the Hilton Head Racquet Club. The family purchased 70 acres and built a 20-court tennis center. She began working with Tennis Australia and launched the Evonne Goolagong Getting Started program for young girls.

For her service to tennis, Goolagong was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire in 1972 and Officer of the Order of Australia in 1982.  Home! The Evonne Goolagong Story was published in 1993. Since 2005, she has run the Goolagong National Development Camp for Indigenous girls and boys, which uses tennis as a vehicle to promote better health, education and employment.

Part 4 

Part 4 ABOUT THE EVONNE GOOLAGONG FOUNDATION PROGRAMS

DREAM – BELIEVE – LEARN – ACHIEVE!

Under the auspices of the Evonne Goolagong Foundation, the Goolagong National Development Camp targets Indigenous young people between the ages of 12 and 21 for four main purposes:

  1. Use tennis as a vehicle to promote and help provide high quality education and teach better health through diet and exercise.
  2. Increase the number of young Indigenous people playing tennis both competitively and socially
  3. Support young Indigenous people who have the potential to play at the elite level and make a career in tennis either as a player, coach or administrator.
  4. Develop in all young people who come through the camps the ability to lead, plan and organise so they can contribute these skills in their own Communities when they return as well as work effectively with non-Indigenous individuals and organisations.

See Evonne Goolagong Foundation Website 

Since 2012, in partnership with the Australian Government the Dream, Believe, Learn, Achieve programme each year has run ‘Come and Try’ days across each State and Territory with some participants chosen to receive assisted coaching.

Progression to a Goolagong State Development Camp (GSDC) can follow with the aim of selection to the Goolagong National Development Camp (GNDC) held each January in Melbourne during the first week of the Australian Open.

Mentored school scholarships are awarded from the GNDC. To date, almost 4900 youngsters have entered the programme and in 2017 thirty youngsters have progressed to the GNDC 2018.

 

NACCHO Our Members #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : Features #WNTD2019 @TISprogramme Photos from @NACCHOChair #NSW @ahmrc @ReadyMob @Galambila #Redfern ACCHO @awabakalltd #VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @Apunipima @DeadlyChoices #SA @AHCSA_ #WA @TheAHCWA #NT @CAACongress @Kwhb_OneShield

For World No Tobacco Day 31 May NACCHO celebrates and highlights examples of the great work many of our Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services throughout Australia are doing in tobacco control.

1.National

2.New South Wales

3.Victoria

4.Queensland

5.Western Australia

6.South Australia

7.Tasmania

8.Northern Territory

9.ACT

10. Sista Quit

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.National

On World No Tobacco Day NACCHO participated in the National #CommunityControl Twitter Festival that spotlighted the work of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in tobacco control.

The Festival was sponsored by the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW (AH&MRC) and hosted by Croakey Professional Services.

For full Croakey coverage of the event

Read the first one here

The second one here

And the third here

During the period when Croakey was publishing about the Twitter Festival (13 May-3 June 2019), 299 Twitter accounts sent more than 2,000 tweets using the #CommunityControl hashtag, creating more than 17 million Twitter impressions.

See the Symplur Analytics here, and the Twitter transcript here.

Read all NACCHO Smoking articles HERE 

2.New South Wales

2.1 AHMRC

 

It’s vital that brief tobacco interventions are embedded into routine health care and checks. Our staff love to yarn with community to help them quit. You can read about the #ATRACYarning Tool here: https://buff.ly/2JLvWaF 

We have developed the #ATRAC Yarning Tool which has been incorporated into smoking cessation programs across the country. The tool has assisted many health workers to initiate meaningful smoking cessation discussions with clients.

2.2 Redfern ACCHO

2.3 Ready Mob Coffs Harbour to Port Macquarie

The Tackling Indigenous Smoking program team Ready Mob is a federally funded program based out of Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Coffs Harbour, covering the Mid North Coast region from Coffs Harbour through to Port Macquarie.

My name is Kristy Pursch and my ancestral ties are to the Butchulla people of Fraser Island in Queensland. I have lived in NSW for the past 20 years and brought my children up in beautiful Gumbaynggirr country for the past 14 years.

Ready Mob is an acronym for Really Evaluate and Decide Yourself, Make Ourselves Better which is all about self determination, we don’t tell our mob what to do we just provide the tools and education so that people can make their own informed decisions.

Our strategy to work in and with our local communities is to use local places and local faces. Our relationships in communities are paramount to our effectiveness as a health promotion program.

There are 8 people in our team and all are Aboriginal people with the majority working within their own ancestral lands. This connection and investment in our own local people is integral at ensuring our approach is both determined by and effective for our local mob.

Second and third hand smoke causes just as much damage to small lungs as smoking resulting in more acute respiratory infections, severe asthma attacks and can cause middle infections.

Encouraging our smokers to ‘take a look around and see, who are you sharing your smoke with?’ A non shame based campaign encouraging introspection and positive decision making especially around the impacts smoking causes to those around you.

As with all our campaigns the call to action is to seek quit support by calling the Quitline or visiting your GP and local Aboriginal Medical Service

2.4 Tharawal ACCHO Dr Tim Senior

And working in #communitycontrol means they know the service is set up for them, and they have friends and relatives employed there and on the board! And we have staff and programs that will help.

So for example, I have access to free nicotine replacement, as well as the medicines on the PBS. And especially important are our health workers and our mums and bubs and social and emotional wellebeing programs. And dentists.

Fundamentally, my goal as a GP in #CommunityControl is to enable people to make decisions about their life, NOT tell people what to do. (We’ve tried that for >200 yrs. It doesn’t work!)

And having a relationship with a patient, means the discussion we have can be very practical.

I’ve never met anyone who doesn’t know that smoking is bad for them. But stress, poverty, boredom, habit, socialising underscored by addiction are all reasons people continue to smoke.

We can offer practical advice for all of these things, in complete confidence, with onward referral as appropriate

FYI, these are the smoking cessation guidelines.

2.5 Awabakal ACCHO

2.6 Yerin ACCHO Gosford 

3.Victoria

3.1 VACCHO

3.2 Goolum Goolum Aboriginal Co-Operative

World No Tobacco Day @ Goolum. Great day, great feed and celebrating #smokefreemob champions.

4.Queensland

4.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

Last week TIS Health Workers Brett and Clara celebrated WNTD in Kowanyama with a morning tea and an educational stall

4.2 Deadly Choices 

5.Western Australia

5.1 AHCWA 

5.2 Join the TIS team now at Wirraka Maya for World no Tobacco Day.

Have your Smoke reading taken, along with Quit Smoking support and information.

 

6.South Australia

6.1 AHCSA

AHCSA Staff came together to raise awareness about World No Tobacco Day today and joined the mob by taking the 2019 Puyu Blasters Pledge.

Are you interested in taking the pledge? Follow the link to find out how..

6.2 Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

The Tackling Tobacco Team helped the team and kids of Playford and was given the chance to have a hit of tennis with the Deadly and Legendary Evonne Goolagong-Cawley. The ‘Come and Try’ clinics are for 5 to 15 year old boys and girls, with an emphasis on having fun and being healthy!

6.3 AHCSA Puyu Blaster

Today the Puyu Blaster and the Aboriginal Dental Program visited Berri Primary School to celebrate World No Tobacco Day this week. We look forward to coming back. Thanks for having us!

Who are the Puyu Blasters?

We all are!

Puyu Blasters is a community based approach to addressing the issue of smoking within our communities.

The Puyu Blasters Team is hosted by the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia and it’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) Program.

The AHCSA TIS Program has been funded to support regional approaches to reducing the gap in prevalence of smoking among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People compared to that among non-Indigenous, through;

  • Reducing uptake of smoking
  • Increasing smoking cessation and
  • Reduced exposure to environmental tobacco smoke

7.Tasmania ( TBC )

8.Northern Territory

8.1  Congress Alice Springs

Our Health Promotions team would like to thank everyone who came down to Araluen Park on Saturday to participate in the World No Tobacco Day Colour Smash Fun Run/Walk.

To View all Facebook Photos 

We had a massive turn out and all had a lot of fun!

#filltheskywithcolournotsmoke #smokefreethewaytobe

8.2 Katherine West Health Board

The Quitskills Team would like to acknowledge the traditional people of the Katherine region for welcoming the Quitskills educators onto their country to deliver smoking cessation training.

We would also like to acknowledge the hard work of the team from Katherine West Health Board whose aim is to provide a holistic clinical, preventative and public health service to clients in the Katherine West Region of the Northern Territory of Australia.

We wish you the greatest success in achieving your aim.

Smoke breath 🤢
Keep your breath fresh by staying smoke free!

Yarn with your local Health Centre about how to quit smoking
What’s Your Smoke Free Story?

8.3 Danila Dilba ACCHO

On May 31 Danila Dilba Community Services and Northern Territory Government AOD teams set up information stalls around Darwin and Palmerston for World No Tobacco Day. Thank you to everyone who popped in for a yarn! If you are ready to start your quit journey or thinking about quitting smoking, contact your local Danila Dilba Clinic and book an appointment with a GP, Aboriginal Health Practitioner or Tobacco support team.

Make every day World No Tobacco Day! #Notobacco #WorldNoTobaccoDay#KickinTobacco #LiveLongLiveStrong

9.ACT _TBC 

10. Sista Quit

Our new centre in Coffs Harbour will support excellence in we are seeking three full-time researchers (as many as possible to be Indigenous) and offering Indigenous PhD scholarship – get in touch

See details here on NACCHO Communique 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #SaveADate : This weeks feature #ChildrensDay Plus @LowitjaInstitut @ausprogress #Progress2019 @IAHA_National @SNAICC @CATSINaM @IAHA_National @2019wihc #NACCHOAgm2019 #OCHREDay

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

20 – 21 June First Nations led content and free tickets at Progress 2019

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

2-5 August Garma Festival 

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

August 4 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

We Play, We Learn, We Belong
We play on our land.
We learn from our ancestors.

We belong with our communities.

In 2019, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day is celebrating the early years, and promoting the importance of early years education and care for our little ones.

We recognise the critical role that family, community, country and culture play in their development.

And we will continue to fight for better access to culturally appropriate early childhood education for our children through Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations.

Our 2019 Ambassador is Nanna from the animated children’s series Little J & Big Cuz.

We are delighted to have Nanna representing Children’s Day this year.

Children’s Day has been celebrated on the 4th of August for more than 30 years. It’s a special time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to celebrate our children, and for all Aussies to learn about our cultures.

Around the 4th of August, schools, kinders and communities run Children’s Day events. On this website you can get ideas for how to run a Children’s Day event, and register your event so we can see Children’s Day growing each year across the nation.

We sell Children’s Day bags with fun toys and activities for kids to play with at your event. We can send you posters to promote Children’s Day and we will have a video of Nanna that you can show at your event.

Aboriginal Childrens Day Website

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

20 – 21 June First Nations led content and free tickets at Progress 2019

Progress 2019 is a two day conference to bring together 1,500 change makers from

across First Nations, racial justice, environment, social services, refugees, health, aid and union movements in Australia. Over the two days we’ll work to breakdown silos, build partnerships and campaigns to create stronger movements and set the tone for the new term of government.

Progress will take place at Melbourne Town Hall on Thursday 20th and Friday 21st June and we’re offering free tickets to all First Nationsparticipants –registerhere and use the code: full scholarship-progress2019.

At Progress 2019 we’re working to make sure issues of First Nations justice and self-determination are central to the conference agenda. On Thursday there will be a First Nations stream, which is being coordinated by Larissa (details on sessions below). It’ll be a chance to connect with folks from across the country, hear from people working with communities and organising at scale and talk about what First Nations people need from the rest of the movement.

We have free tickets available for First Nations people to attend Progress 2019 and we’d love if you could pass this email through your contacts and to First Nations people you work with. And if you have any suggestions for people to invite please let us know!

Some sessions that are being led by Larissa Baldwin that might be of interest to you:

· Progress 2019 opening plenary – Rod Little (National Congress), Larissa Baldwin (Getup!), Bruce Pascoe (Author), Lara Watson (ACTU), Ruby Wharton (WAR) and other First Nations community advocates will open Progress 2019 with a discussion about truth telling, the role of First Nations people in organising First Nations communities, how we’re agitating against the status quo, and what comes next.

· A breakout conversation on land justice, co-developed with Karrina Nolan from Original Power. Karrina and Larissa will be joined by Gadrian Hoosan (Borroloola community leader) and Dwayne Coulthard (SA advocate organising his community against underground coal seam gasification) for an open discussion to celebrate our achievements, and examine the challenges and opportunities ahead.

· Two First Nations caucus spaces – the first will be a breakout session after the opening plenary, offering the chance for participants to meet and greet, and space to talk about our issues. The second will be an informal caucus over lunch.

First Nations speakers on other sessions in the agenda include:

· Nayuka Gorrie,

· Tarneen Tarneen Onus-Williams

· Roxy Moore

· Ari Gorring

· Veronica Turner

· Judy Kay

· Phil Winzer

· Zane Sikulu

· Jeff Amatto

· Emily Wurramara (performing)

· Larissa Behrendt (tentative)

You can check out our full program here.

 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

Symposium: Our Voice, Our Truth
Kick off NAIDOC week in Canberra with a Symposium event with keynote speakers and expert panel on the topic of good governance through strong leadership. A daylong event, fully catered with morning and afternoon tea, lunch and post-event drinks and canapes with entertainment to conclude.
This is an exclusive ticketed event in a stunning lakeside venue with limited seats available.
6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

VOICE. TREATY. TRUTH.

We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people for a better future.

The Indigenous voice of this country is over 65,000 plus years old.

They are the first words spoken on this continent. Languages that passed down lore, culture and knowledge for over millennia. They are precious to our nation.

It’s that Indigenous voice that include know-how, practices, skills and innovations – found in a wide variety of contexts, such as agricultural, scientific, technical, ecological and medicinal fields, as well as biodiversity-related knowledge.  They are words connecting us to country, an understanding of country and of a people who are the oldest continuing culture on the planet.

And with 2019 being celebrated as the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages, it’s time for our knowledge to be heard through our voice.

For generations, we have sought recognition of our unique place in Australian history and society today. We need to be the architects of our lives and futures.

For generations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have looked for significant and lasting change.

Voice. Treaty. Truth. were three key elements to the reforms set out in the Uluru Statement from the Heart. These reforms represent the unified position of First Nations Australians.

However, the Uluru Statement built on generations of consultation and discussions among Indigenous people on a range of issues and grievances. Consultations about the further reforms necessary to secure and underpin our rights and to ensure they can be exercised and enjoyed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

It specifically sequenced a set of reforms: first, a First Nations Voice to Parliament enshrined in the Constitution and second, a Makarrata Commission to supervise treaty processes and truth-telling.

(Makarrata is a word from the language of the Yolngu people in Arnhem Land. The Yolngu concept of Makarrata captures the idea of two parties coming together after a struggle, healing the divisions of the past. It is about acknowledging that something has been done wrong, and it seeks to make things right.)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people want their voice to be heard. First Nations were excluded from the Constitutional convention debates of the 1800’s when the Australian Constitution came into force.  Indigenous people were excluded from the bargaining table.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have always wanted an enhanced role in decision-making in Australia’s democracy.

In the European settlement of Australia, there were no treaties, no formal settlements, no compacts. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people therefore did not cede sovereignty to our land. It was taken away from us. That will remain a continuing source of dispute.

Our sovereignty has never been ceded – not in 1788, not in 1967, not with the Native Title Act, not with the Uluru Statement from the Heart. It coexists with the sovereignty of the Crown and should never be extinguished.

Australia is one of the few liberal democracies around the world which still does not have a treaty or treaties or some other kind of formal acknowledgement or arrangement with its Indigenous minorities.

A substantive treaty has always been the primary aspiration of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movement.

Critically, treaties are inseparable from Truth.

Lasting and effective agreement cannot be achieved unless we have a shared, truthful understanding of the nature of the dispute, of the history, of how we got to where we stand.

The true story of colonisation must be told, must be heard, must be acknowledged.

But hearing this history is necessary before we can come to some true reconciliation, some genuine healing for both sides.

And of course, this is not just the history of our First Peoples – it is the history of all of us, of all of Australia, and we need to own it.

Then we can move forward together.

Let’s work together for a shared future.

Download the National NAIDOC Logo and other social media resources.

2-5 August Garma Festival 

Garma Website

4 August  National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day 2019

29th  – 30th  Aug 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

Venue: Pullman Hotel – 192 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne Vic 3000

Website to be launched soon

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

Preliminary program and registration information available to download now!

Less than 3 weeks until our discounted early bird offer closes.

Visit for more information.

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

SAVE THE DATE for the 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference!!!

We’re so excited to announce the date of our 10 Year Anniversary Conference –
A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition!!! 

NATSIHWA recognises that importance of members sharing and learning from each other, and our key partners within the Health Sector. We hold a biennial conference for all NATSIHWA members to attend. The conference content focusses on the professional support and development of the Health Workers and Health Practitioners, with key side events to support networking among attendees.  We seek feedback from our Membership to make the conferences relevant to their professional needs and expectations and ensure that they are offered in accessible formats and/or locations.The conference is a time to celebrate the important contribution of Health Workers and Health Practitioners, and the Services that support this important profession.

We hold the NATSIHWA Legends Award night at the conference Gala Dinner. Award categories include: Young Warrior, Health Worker Legend, Health Service Legend and Individual Champion.

Watch this space for the release of more dates for registrations, award nominations etc.

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

November date TBA World Indigenous Housing Conference

Want to be kept updated on the WIHC in November 2019 ?

Inbox us your email address and we will add you to the mailing list or email our Principal Project Manager- Brandon.etto@nationalcongress.com.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO #VoteACCHO Aboriginal Health #Election2019 @billshortenmp and @SenatorDodson set to unveil a $115 million #Labor plan to tackle the Indigenous health crisis today in Darwin : Including $ for @DeadlyChoices #SuicidePrevention  #MentalHealth #RHD #SexualHealth #EyeHealth

“Labor believes innovative and culturally appropriate health care models are central to improving the health outcomes of First Australians and closing the gap, noting that improving Indigenous health was “critical to our journey towards reconciliation. Labor would be funding programs “co-designed with and led by First Nations peoples – driven by the Aboriginal health workforce “

The Opposition Leader, who is also Labor’s spokesman for Indigenous affairs, will unveil the commitment while on the campaign trail with his assistant spokesman Senator Pat Dodson in the Northern Territory today;

Summary of the Labor Party $115 million commitments against NACCHO #VoteACCHO Recommendations

See all 10 NACCHO #VoteACCHO Recommendations Here

Refer NACCHO Recommendation 4

$29.6 million to improve mental health and prevent youth suicide : to administer the mental health funds through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services

See our NACCHO Chair Press Release yesterday

Refer NACCHO Recommendation 6

Sexual health promotion would get a $20 million boost

$13 million would be invested to tackle preventable eye diseases and blindness.

$3 million in seed funding provided to Aboriginal Medical Services to develop health and justice programs addressing the link between incarceration and poor health

Deadly Choices campaign would get $16.5 million for advertising to raise awareness of health and lifestyle choices

Refer NACCHO Recommendation 3

$33 million to address rheumatic heart disease

Media report from

‘Critical to reconciliation’: Labor’s plan to close the gap on Indigenous health

Bill Shorten is set to unveil a $115 million plan to tackle the Indigenous health crisis, as he seeks to position Labor as the only party capable of closing the ten-year gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and their non-Indigenous peers.

The package includes $29.6 million to improve mental health and prevent youth suicide, which has rocked communities in remote areas including the Kimberley where a spate of deaths has been linked to intergenerational trauma, violence and poverty.

The Opposition Leader, who is also Labor’s spokesman for Indigenous affairs, will unveil the commitment while on the campaign trail with his assistant spokesman Senator Pat Dodson in the Northern Territory on Thursday.

“Labor believes innovative and culturally appropriate health care models are central to improving the health outcomes of First Australians and closing the gap,” Mr Shorten said, noting that improving Indigenous health was “critical to our journey towards reconciliation”.

Labor’s package is $10 million more than the $19.6 million Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced for Indigenous suicide prevention on Saturday, after the suicide of an 18-year-old girl from the Kimberley last week.

Indigenous health advocates have previously raised concerns that the Coalition’s wider mental health package could be consumed by “mainstream” services like Headspace.

Mr Shorten highlighted Labor would be funding programs “co-designed with and led by First Nations peoples – driven by the Aboriginal health workforce”.

The Labor plan is to administer the mental health funds through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, which employ teams of paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners in vulnerable communities.

Official statistics show a ten-year gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, with the rate of preventable hospital admissions and deaths three times higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Labor’s Indigenous health plan, which would be delivered over four years, also includes $33 million to address rheumatic heart disease, a preventable cause of heart failure, death and disability which is common in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Sexual health promotion would get a $20 million boost, while $13 million would be invested to tackle preventable eye diseases and blindness.

The Deadly Choices campaign would get $16.5 million for advertising to raise awareness of health and lifestyle choices and $3 million in seed funding provided to Aboriginal Medical Services to develop health and justice programs addressing the link between incarceration and poor health.

Mr Shorten said Labor would reinstate the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Equality Council, abolished by the Abbott Government in 2014.

Crisis support can be found at Lifeline: (13 11 14 and lifeline.org.au), the Suicide Call Back Service (1300 659 467 and suicidecallbackservice.org.au) and beyondblue (1300 224 636 and beyondblue.org.au) Or 1 of 302 ACCHO Clinics 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health launches its #VoteACCHO campaign for #Election2019 calling on all political parties to include these TOP 10 policy recommendations in their #AusVotesHealth election platforms

“ Welcome to the launch of our NACCHO #Election2019 #VoteACCHO campaign for Affiliates, ACCHO members, stakeholders and supporters.

 The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is not a partisan political issue and cannot be sidelined any longer.

NACCHO has developed a set of 10 policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable. ” 

Donnella Mills Acting Chair NACCHO

See NACCHO Press Release Aboriginal Health needs to be an Election Priority

For more information about our NACCHO #Election2019 goals and how to get involved, visit over the next five weeks our #VoteACCHO campaign website :

For campaign assistance or feedback contact Email Colin Cowell 

www.naccho.org.au/VoteACCHO

Contents of this NACCHO #VoteACCHO Campaign Communique

1.What can stakeholders and supporters do to support our #VoteACCHO campaign ?

2.What can NACCHO 8 Affiliates /145 Members do to support our #VoteACCHO campaign ?

3.What are the TOP 10 recommendations that all political parties must include in their election platforms and make a real commitment to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

4.Summary all major parties Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policies

1.What can stakeholders and supporters do to support our #VoteACCHO campaign ?

See your #VoteACCHO Page Here

  1. Make sure that you and all of your community members, family and friends are enrolled to voteby 8pm local time Thursday 18 April 2019.
  2. Follow NACCHO on Twitter Instagram Facebook.
  3. Sign up to the NACCHO Communiqueand receive all #VoteACCHO press releases and social media graphics that will be released throughout the campaign.
  4. Use the following hashtags on social media during the run-up to the election – #VoteACCHO|Plus #auspol | #NACCHOAustralia | #ACCHOS | #IndigenousHealth | #ClosingTheGap | #AusVotesHealth
  1. Share on Social Media NACCHO’s Recommendations for the Election 2019
  2. Call, write or tag on Social Media your local MP and all candidates in your electorate.

2.What can NACCHO 8 Affiliates and 145 Members do support our #VoteACCHO campaign

See your #VoteACCHO Page Here

Noting all Affiliate and Members will be sent by email additional resources

3.What are the TOP 10 recommendations that all political parties must  include in their election platforms and make a real commitment to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Download the NACCHO Press Release HERE

and PDF Copy of these recommendations HERE

The proposals are:

1. Increase base funding of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations

  • Increase the baseline funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations to support the sustainable delivery of high quality, comprehensive primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.
  • Work together with NACCHO and its State Affiliates to agree to a new formula for the distribution of comprehensive primary health care funding that is relative to need.

2.Increase funding for capital works and infrastructure upgrades

  • Increase funding allocated through the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme for:
    • capital works and infrastructure upgrades, and
    • Telehealth services.
  • Around $500 million is likely to be needed to address unmet needs.

3.End rheumatic heart disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

  • Support END RHD’s proposal for $170 million over four years to integrate prevention and control levels within 15 rural and remote communities across the country.
  • END RHD is a national contingent of peak bodies committed to reducing the burden of RHD for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia and NACCHO is a co-chair. Rheumatic heart disease is a preventable cause of heart failure, death and disability that is the single biggest cause of disparity in cardiovascular disease burden between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians

4.Address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide rates

  • Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities:
    • New Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management
    • Regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance; and
    • Accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

5.Improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander housing and community infrastructure

  • Expand the funding and timeframe of the current National Partnership on Remote Housing to match at least that of the former National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing.
  • Establish and fund a program that supports low cost social housing and healthy living environments in urban, regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

6.Allocate Indigenous specific health funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations

  • Transfer the funding for Indigenous specific programs from Primary Health Networks to ACCHOs.
  • Primary Health Networks assign ACCHOs as preferred providers for other Australian Government funded services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples unless it can be shown that alternative arrangements can produce better outcomes in quality of care and access to services

7.Expand the range and number of MBS payments for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce

  • Provide access to an increased range and number of Medicare items for Aboriginal health workers, Aboriginal health practitioners and allied health workers.

8. Improve the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs

  • Expand the authority to write Close the Gap scripts for all prescribers.
  • Simplify the Close the Gap registration process and expand who may register clients.
  • Link medicines subsidy to individual clients and not practices through a national identifier.
  • Improve how remote clients can receive fully subsidized medicines in non-remote areas.
  • Integrate the QUMAX and s100 Support programs into one unified program.

9.Fund Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations to deliver dental services

  • Establish a fund to support ACCHOs deliver culturally safe dental services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • Allocate Indigenous dental health funding to cover costs associated with staffing and infrastructure requirements.

10.Aboriginal health workforce

  • Increased support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and increased support for workforce for the ACCHO sector which includes the non-Indigenous health professionals on which ACCHOs rely
  • Develop an Aboriginal Employment Strategy for the ACCHS sector

For more information about our Election goals and how to get involved, visit: www.naccho.org.au/VoteACCHO

4.Summary all major parties Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policies

To be updated HERE daily throughout the Campaign 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NACCHO Members #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #VoteACCHO #NSW Werin# NT Ampilatwatja @DanilaDilba #VIC MDAS #QLD @Apunipima @QAIHC_QLD Nhulandu #WA Wirraka Maya SWAMS #SA Nunkuwarrin Yunti #TAS

1.1 National : NACCHO to launch #VoteACCHO campaign to emphasis that Aboriginal health should be an election priority for all parties  

1.2 National : More support to the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector is needed to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples access to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

2. NSW : Werin ACCHO Port Macquarie says the 2019 Elders Olympics were the best ever

3.VIC :THE focus was firmly on health at Mallee District Aboriginal Service’s Close the Gap event

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Australian Indigenous Basketball (AIB) All Stars Women’s national team have produced a perfect run to win the International Indigenous and Cultural Basketball Tournament held last week in Porirua, New Zealand.

4.2 QLD : Nhulundu Health Service ACCHO Gladstone hosts the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) CEO Mr Neil Willmett

5. SA : Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO attended the National Tackling Indigenous Smoking Conference in Alice Springs last week 

6.1 WA : Wirraka Maya ACCHO  Transition into Adulthood (TTA) Team have organised for World Champion Boxers, Todd Kidd and Gregory Eadie to join the team this week.

6.2 WA : SWAMS ACCHO staff member recognised for their outstanding service to SWAMS and the community

7.1 NT : Community celebrates opening of new Ampilatwatja ACCHO Health Centre

7.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO participate in Stars Foundation Softball Event 

8. TAS : Dr Tanya Schramm, a GP, Palawa woman and lecturer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health at the University of Tasmania, as she spoke to newsGP on National Close the Gap Day this year.

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1  NACCHO to launch #VoteACCHO campaign to emphasis that Aboriginal health should be an election priority for all parties  

With the election being called on 18 May, the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) will be urging all candidates, regardless of party or political leanings to prioritise the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities.

NACCHO will be asking all  politicians to support 10 key recommendations ahead of the election on 18 May :

You will be able to download #VoteACCHO campaign resources from the NACCHO Website ( From Monday  15 April )

Check our NACCHO #VoteACCHO Edition Monday for full details

1.2 More support to the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector is needed to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples access to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

“The government needs to support all ACCHOs to deliver culturally appropriate NDIS services so that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with disability right across the country people are not left out

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are missing out and the NDIS model needs to be adjusted to ensure equity of access. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to fully participate, the solution is found in properly supporting ACCHOs that chose to deliver NDIS services.

We know that ACCHOs are an essential component of successful delivery of the NDIS to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. The evidence is clear that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders access services where they feel culturally safe and when supported properly, and ACCHOs are best positioned to meet this need.

Our communities are disproportionately affected by disability and there is a great need for culturally appropriate disability support services close to where our people live,”

NACCHO Acting Chair Donnella Mills says NACCHO welcomes the announcement of $4.5 million to support Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS) in the Kimberley, Pilbara and Goldfields to deliver two programs to improve awareness and access to the NDIS.

Read and or DOWNLOAD the full NACCHO Press Release HERE

Read over articles Aboriginal Health and NDIS published over past 7 years

2.1 NSW : Werin ACCHO Port Macquarie says the 2019 Elders Olympics were the best ever.

The Elders Olympics is more about a mob coming together with the idea of promoting and talking about better health outcomes.

This is about improving the health standards of the Aboriginal community, particularly the Elders, which is very important to us.

This event aims to promote health and well being, getting outside and having some fun.

“There are no running events as such, but there are plenty of skill games.

Organiser Cindy O’Brien-Younie

Originally published HERE

 

The event was held at Port Macquarie’s Stuarts Park on Thursday April 11. Organised by the Werin Aboriginal Elders team, representing their auspicing body Werin Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre, 519 competitors and support workers participated on the day.

There was also plenty of spectators on hand to soak up the atmosphere.

The 36 teams were from across NSW including Werris Creek, Moree, Blue Mountains, St Marys, and north to Ballina.

There are no running events as such, but there are plenty of skill games.

Since winning the 2018 event, and therefore laying claim to hosting the following year’s event, Cindy and fellow organiser – and sister – Gloria O’Brien-Rudyk have been working tirelessly behind the scenes.

Cindy says two major sponsors came onboard in the past week or two which the organising committee was “very grateful for”.

“There is an organising committee behind this event and we have done really well in getting this event happening,” she said.

She said the final week leading into the event had tested their nerves.

“It was very tough and sometimes difficult but we learnt some new lessons about delegation,” she admitted.

“But when you see the beautiful bright colours of everyone’s shirts and hearing the mob say how wonderful this event is and the best they’ve attended, it is all worth it.

“The other major reason behind the success of this year’s event is the support of many schools, CSU, area health, TAFE, colleges and the Port Macquarie Chamber of Commerce.”

Wauchope Men’s Shed donated several items for raffle prizes, which is part of the fundraising effort.

Newcastle Knights provided all the footballs for the pass the ball competition along with a signed football jersey. South Sydney has also provided a signed 2014 football, which will be offered as part of the fundraising effort.

The Aboriginal Elders Olympics follows the strategic Close the Gap initiative designed to bridge the gap between health in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities

3.1 VIC :THE focus was firmly on health at Mallee District Aboriginal Service’s Close the Gap event

Health checks, giveaway bags and an all-day barbecue were present throughout the day while local staff engaged with community members.

Celebrated nationwide and now in its 10th year, Close the Gap day aims to improve health outcomes for Aboriginals.

From HERE

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Australian Indigenous Basketball (AIB) All Stars Women’s national team have produced a perfect run to win the International Indigenous and Cultural Basketball Tournament held last week in Porirua, New Zealand.

PORIRUA, NEW ZEALAND – The Apunipima Australian Indigenous Basketball (AIB) All Stars Women’s national team have produced a perfect run to win the International Indigenous and Cultural Basketball Tournament held last week in Porirua, New Zealand.

The All Stars downed the Kingdom of Hawaii 91-90, in a thrilling championship finale, the victory securing the first-ever international gold medal for an Australian Indigenous Basketball women’s
representative side.

Prior to defeating the Kingdom of Hawaii by one-point in the double-overtime decider, the All Stars also displayed their dominance in preliminary round matches, taking down Ngati Toa (New Zealand) 82-75, Raukawa Invitational (New Zealand) 80-58, and Hawaii 90-86. Read More

4.2 QLD : Nhulundu Health Service ACCHO Gladstone hosts the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) CEO Mr Neil Willmett

At Nhulundu Health Service – Gladstone. Pictured (left to right): Neil Willmett, Lee-ann Dudley (Chairperson), Jenny Kerr (Clinical Practice Manager) and Matthew Cooke (NHS-CEO)

5. SA : Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO attended the National Tackling Indigenous Smoking Conference in Alice Springs last week 

6.1 WA : Wirraka Maya ACCHO  Transition into Adulthood (TTA) Team have organised for World Champion Boxers, Todd Kidd and Gregory Eadie to join the team this week.

They are here to support the final week of the Box Fit program for Term 1, of the academic school year.

Box Fit has taken place every Tuesday and Thursday of school term 1, which has encouraged resilience and athletic focus for students aged between 12 and 17.

The team have been conducting workshops in South Hedland High and Strelley Community School, interacting with the students and teaching the basics of Boxing techniques.

Don’t miss the Big night, tomorrow Friday the 13th. Join us at the JD Hardie Youth Zone, for the Boxing Exhibition Night. The event is open to all the public, starting from 6pm to 9:30pm. We hope to see you there.

6.2 WA : SWAMS ACCHO staff member recognised for their outstanding service to SWAMS and the community

Congratulations to SWAMS staff member Amanda Wallam and South West Elder, Mr Dennis Jetta who were recognised for their outstanding service to SWAMS and the community at the recent AHCWA conference.

Pictured: AHCWA Award recipients

7.1 NT : Community celebrates opening of new Ampilatwatja ACCHO Health Centre

Local Federal Member Warren Snowdon and Senator Patrick Dodson attended the opening with John Paterson CEO AMSANT and Donna Ah Chee CEO Congress

In the 1970s the large cattle station of Utopia was handed back to the traditional owners on a land buy-back scheme. This area was then governed by the Utopia/ Urapunga Council. In the 1990s the traditional owners of the Ampilatwatja area of this land sought and established their own distinct council and land boundaries. The local governing body is the Aherrenge Association Incorporated.

Ampilatwatja is the largest of three communities under the Aherrenge Association. It is located 320 km north-east of Alice Springs via the Plenty and Sandover Highways. The people of Ampilatwatja form part of the Alyawarr tribe. There are a number of out-stations, the main ones being Irrultja and Atnwengerrp.

The population of remote Aboriginal communities is subject to a large degree of fluctuation with movements related to cultural practices, logistical issues such as needing to access health care services, sporting weekends and so on. The ABS 2001 census of population for Ampilatwatja and outstations was 468 residents. The September 2005 census was 540 residents. Approximately 150 residents live on the outstations.

Ampilatwatja has a 24 hour dirt airstrip for mail delivery and RFDS medical evacuations. There are no routine passenger service flights to the community and the airstrip closes with heavy rains.

Read more about the Ampilatwatja Health Service HERE

Ampilatwatja is a dry community with no alcohol permit system and this bylaw is very strictly enforced by community. There is one community store which is in close contact with the health team and does not sell deep fried takeaway foods. There are no petrol sniffers in the community.

Ampilatwatja has a school which operates on an ESL teaching model with children split into 2 groups, junior and senior.

7.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO participate in Stars Foundation Softball Event 

Is was amazing seeing our young women show great sportsmanship and leadership qualities on the day.

8. TAS : Dr Tanya Schramm, a GP, Palawa woman and lecturer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health at the University of Tasmania, as she spoke to newsGP on National Close the Gap Day this year.


Dr Tanya Schramm and Dr Tim Senior participate in a Q&A about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health on National Closing the Gap Day.

Boosting cultural respect in mainstream health services

FROM GP NEWS

Researchers have designed an intervention to help make mainstream general practice more accessible to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

Obviously the gap isn’t really closing, so that’s a pretty obvious indication that we’ve got to do a lot more. And, as primary healthcare, we’re the first port of call.’

That is Dr Tanya Schramm, a GP, Palawa woman and lecturer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health at the University of Tasmania, as she spoke to newsGP on National Close the Gap Day this year.

According to Dr Schramm, cultural safety and respect is a vital part of the effort to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander access to primary healthcare.

‘If we, as Aboriginal people, are coming to a mainstream general practice, we should be able to expect culturally respectful and safe healthcare to the same standard we could receive at to the Aboriginal Health Service [AMS],’ she said.

‘It’s not as simple as just popping up a couple of flags and a bit of artwork in your waiting room. [Practices] need to go in behind that and make sure that they are providing culturally safe consultations within that context.’

The desire to make mainstream primary healthcare more accessible for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is the motivation behind research recently published in the Medical journal of Australia, ‘Cultural respect in general practice: A cluster randomised control trial’.

Professor Siaw-Teng Liaw, lead author and Professor of General Practice at the University of New South Wales, believes addressing this issue is vital because many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may not actually have access to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations [ACCHOs].

‘A substantial number [of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people] live in urban areas – and that is a substantial number of Aboriginal people who should be better resourced,’ he told newsGP.

‘Because, when we look at the statistics for AMS and ACCHOs, there are relatively less in urban areas compared to rural and remote.

‘So we feel urban Aboriginal people are not as well looked after.’

Dr Tim Senior, Medical Advisor for RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, agrees more needs to be done to improve experiences within the mainstream.

‘Every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisation tells us there are still too many Indigenous Australians experiencing racism in the health system,’ he told newsGP.

‘Many Aboriginal people expect they will have a bad experience in health services because they have usually had bad experiences in the past – there are many reasons why Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may not want to attend our practices, and may not want to take our advice when they do.’

In order to help prevent further such experiences, Professor Liaw and his team created, in extensive consultation with the Aboriginal community, a toolkit to assist mainstream practices to provide culturally respectful care.

The researchers then conducted a randomised controlled trial over a 12-month period involving selected practices in Sydney and Melbourne, with some receiving the toolkit plus additional training and support.

‘We ran a half-day workshop [during which] the practice staff were taken through the toolkit and a background of Aboriginal history and dispossession,’ Professor Liaw explained.

‘At that workshop, they were introduced to the cultural mentors, who we recruited in each state to be available to the practice for a year to help them implement some of the things in the toolkit. The mentor was then available through an online discussion group or by phone number.

‘The other part of the intervention was at the PHN [Primary Health Network] level, which at that time was the Medicare Local, which we encouraged to form a care partnership with the local ACCHO.

‘So once we got the toolkit, the workshop and the cultural mentor in place, we implemented it as best as we could, and collected the data at baseline and compared it at 12 months.’

Professor Liaw and his team found the trial practices were extremely receptive to and engaged with the program, and that patients also had a positive experience of it.

‘We collected qualitative information from the practices and Aboriginal patients nominated by them, and the output was really positive from their perspective. Most of [the practices] wanted to continue with it,’ he said.

‘After we finished the trial, we also ran the workshops with the control practices, and they were all very keen as well.’

But despite these encouraging results, analysis revealed that quantitative outcomes – which were measured by the number of Aboriginal health checks carried out and recording of clinical risk factors such as cardiovascular, weight and blood sugar – did not differ significantly between participating and control practices.

While Professor Liaw was disappointed with these results, he also acknowledges the issues the researchers are trying to tackle may simply require more time to show significant change.

‘This is a complex intervention and to translate the toolkit, workshops and the cultural mentor suggestions into an organisational thing will probably require more than 12 months, because it might take a while to come to grips with it, and then work out a protocol to do it,’ he said.

However, another positive development has resulted from the research: buy-in from a participating PHN, which also means the research team can continue to monitor results on a much larger scale.

‘One of the PHNs involved in the study in Sydney is happy to roll it out,’ Professor Liaw said.

‘So we’re going to roll it out in one of the local government areas, and we will follow through what happened to the ones that participated in the trial, and also with this one, in the longer term. And then if they get more funding, we’ll roll it out to other local government areas, as well.’

Dr Senior is pleased with this news and is hopeful it is a signal of further engagement from PHNs with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

‘The cultural respect program in this research may be a useful framework for PHNs, but the most crucial step will be for them to work on developing and enhancing true partnerships with their local Aboriginal communities, and local ACCHOs,’ he said.

‘It’s this local community engagement that will be crucial, and if the cultural respect program can be used in this context, then they may have some successes.’

Meanwhile, Professor Liaw and his team have been happy with the study’s results in terms of increasing cultural knowledge and respect within practices, and are hoping for improved quantitative results, as well, with a view to the long game.

‘We plan to do some interviews in about 12 months and see whether there’s any longer term changes,’ he said.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Events and Conferences : This week features #ClosetheGap Day March 21 How to get involved in #NationalCloseTheGapDay #NCTGD#OurHealthOurChoiceOurVoice

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

21 March National Close the Gap Day

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane

22 March : The experts priorities for the 2019 Federal Election 

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured Save date

21 March National Close the Gap Day

For the last 10 years many thousands of Australians from every corner of the country, in schools, businesses and community groups, have shown their support for Close the Gap by marking National Close the Gap Day each March.

See RACGP CTG Video here 

This National Close the Gap Day, we have an opportunity to send our governments a clear message that Australians value health equality as a fundamental right for all.

On National Close the Gap Day we encourage you to host an activity in your workplace, home, community or school.

Our aim is to bring people together to share information, and most importantly, to take meaningful action in support of achieving Indigenous health equality by 2030.

How to get involved in National Close the Gap Day

  • Register your activity. You can download some online resources to support your event
  • Invite your friends, workmates and family to join you
  • Take action by signing the Close the Gap pledge and asking your friends and colleagues to do the same
  • Call, tweet or write to your local Member of Parliament and tell them that you want them to Close the Gap
  • Listen to and share the stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on Facebook – visit our Close the Gap Facebook page.
  • Share your photos and stories on social media. Use the hashtag #ClosetheGap
  • Donate to help our work on Close the Gap

With events ranging from workplace morning teas, sports days, school events and public events in hospitals and offices around the country — tens of thousands of people take part each year to make a difference.

Too many health gaps exist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

We must work to create equal access to healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Make a difference at: https://antar.org.au/campaigns/national-close-gap-day

#ClosetheGap #NationalCloseTheGapDay #NCTGD

#OurHealthOurChoiceOurVoice

Your actions can create lasting change. Be part of the generation that closes the gap.

National Close the Gap Day is a time for all Australians to come together and commit to achieving health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Close the Gap Campaign will partner with Tharawal Aboriginal Aboriginal Medical Services, South Western Sydney, to host an exciting community event and launch our Annual Report.

Register for event HERE 

Visit the website of our friends at ANTaR for more information and to register your support. https://antar.org.au/campaigns/national-close-gap-day

EVENT REGISTER

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane 

The Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery is hosting a workshop on Indigenous Ear Health in Brisbane on Thursday, 21 March 2019.

This meeting is the 7th to be organised by ASOHNS and is designed to facilitate discussion about the crucial health issue and impact of ear disease amongst Indigenous people.

The meeting is aimed at bringing together all stakeholders involved in managing Indigenous health and specifically ear disease, such as:  ENT surgeons, GPs, Paediatricians, Nurses, Audiologists, Speech Therapists, Allied Health Workers and other health administrators (both State and Federal).

Download Program and Contact 

Indigenous Ear Health 2019 Program

22 March : The experts priorities for the 2019 Federal Election 

Listen to 3 of Australia’s leading health advocates outline their top priorities for change

– Book Here

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

Interested in the health and wellbeing of rural or remote Australia?

This is the conference for you.

In March 2019 the rural health sector will gather in Hobart for the 15th National Rural Conference.  Every two years we meet to learn, listen and share ideas about how to improve health outcomes in rural and remote Australia.

Proudly managed by the National Rural Health Alliance, the Conference has a well-earned reputation as Australia’s premier rural health event.  Not just for health professionals, the Conference recognises the critical roles that education, regional development and infrastructure play in determining health outcomes, and we welcome people working across a wide variety of industries.

Join us as we celebrate our 15th Conference and help achieve equitable health for the 7 million Australians living in rural and remote areas.

Hobart and its surrounds was home to the Muwinina people who the Alliance acknowledges as the traditional and original owners of this land.  We pay respect to those that have passed before us and acknowledge today’s Tasmanian Aboriginal community as the custodians of the land on which we will meet.

More info 

28 March

28 March Close : DSS are drafting the Terms of Reference for the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation of People with Disability. @FPDNAus

https://engage.dss.gov.au/royal-commission-into-violence-abuse-neglect-and-exploitation-of-people-with-disability/

They have set up an on-line survey that is only open for the next 10 days. closes 28 March

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LSXH77X8

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

Thank you for your interest in the 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference will bring together Indigenous leaders, government, industry and academia representing Housing, health, and education from around the world including:

  • National and International Indigenous Organisation leadership
  • Senior housing, health, and education government officials Industry CEOs, executives and senior managers from public and private sectors
  • Housing, Healthcare, and Education professionals and regulators
  • Consumer associations
  • Academics in Housing, Healthcare, and Education.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference #2019WIHC is the principal conference to provide a platform for leaders in housing, health, education and related services from around the world to come together. Up to 2000 delegates will share experiences, explore opportunities and innovative solutions, work to improve access to adequate housing and related services for the world’s Indigenous people.

Event Information:

Key event details as follows:
Venue: Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre
Address: 2684-2690 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD 4218
Dates: Monday 20th – Thursday 23rd May, 2019 (24th May)

Registration Costs

  • EARLY BIRD – FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION: $1950 AUD plus booking fees
  • After 1 February FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION $2245 AUD plus booking fees

PLEASE NOTE: The Trade Exhibition is open Tuesday 21st May – Thursday 23rd May 2019

Please visit www.2019wihc.com for further information on transport and accommodation options, conference, exhibition and speaker updates.

Methods of Payment:

2019WIHC online registrations accept all major credit cards, by Invoice and direct debit.
PLEASE NOTE: Invoices must be paid in full and monies received by COB Monday 20 May 2019.

Please note: The 2019 WIHC organisers reserve the right of admission. Speakers, programs and topics are subject to change. Please visit http://www.2019wihc.comfor up to date information.

Conference Cancellation Policy

If a registrant is unable to attend 2019 WIHC for any reason they may substitute, by arrangement with the registrar, someone else to attend in their place and must attend any session that has been previously selected by the original registrant.

Where the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her place to another person, or to another event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

    • Registrations cancelled less than 60 days, but more than 30 days before the event are eligible for a 50% refund of the registration fees paid.
    • Registrations cancelled less than 30 days before the event are no longer eligible for a refund.

Refunds will be made in the following ways:

  1. For payments received by credit or debit cards, the same credit/debit card will be refunded.
  2. For all other payments, a bank transfer will be made to the payee’s nominated account.

Important: For payments received from outside Australia by bank transfer, the refund will be made by bank transfer and all bank charges will be for the registrant’s account. The Cancellation Policy as stated on this page is valid from 1 October 2018.

Terms & Conditions

please visit www.2019wihc.com

Privacy Policy

please visit www.2019wihc.com

 

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens 

The opening of the 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round has been moved forward! The National NAIDOC Grants will now officially open on Thursday 24 January 2019.

Head to www.naidoc.org.au to join the National NAIDOC Mailing List and keep up with all things grants or check out the below links for more information now!

https://www.finance.gov.au/resource-management/grants/grantconnect/

https://www.pmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/grants-and-funding/naidoc-week-funding

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

 

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO Members #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #National @IndigMaraProjct @Mayi_Kuwayu #NT Katherine West #Wurli-Wurlinjang #Sunrise ACCHO’s @HOTNORTH #QLD @Apunipima @Wuchopperen #TAS #VIC #NSWVotes2019 Both major party policies #WA @TheAHCWA #ACT

1.1 National : Indigenous Marathon Project a community focussed health initiative that uses the simple act of running as a vehicle to promote the benefits of healthy and active lifestyles. #RunSweatInspire

1.2  Mayi Kuwayu TV ads going live today March 14 in a number of ACCHO health clinics around Australia

2.1 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Cairns celebrated 10 years of Mums and Bubs program

2.2 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO team continues to roll out Mental Health First Aid training and Midwife workshop on Cape York

3. NT : Katherine West, Wurli-Wurlinjang and Sunrise Health Services ACCHO’s meet with 100 health professionals to enhance communication between hospitals, primary health and public health services

4.1 NSW : NSW Labor Leader, Michael Daley and Shadow Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, David Harris, have today announced Labor’s policies to better support Aboriginal communities across NSW. Press Release

4.2 NSW : ACCHO’s in Northern NSW partner with TAFE NSW to support and service qualifications that upskill the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care workforce

5. Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO opens new tulaminakali Health clinic in Devenport 

6. ACT : Beds at the troubled Ngunnawal Bush Healing Farm are likely to lay empty for longer after the government back tracked on plans to look for a provider for a residential program by early this year.

7. WA : AHCWA  headed to Bunbury last week to deliver the Certificate II in Family Wellbeing to a group of 10 students. 

8. VIC : MDAS ACCHO : Mallee Mums find support and strength in each other

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Indigenous Marathon Project a community focussed health initiative that uses the simple act of running as a vehicle to promote the benefits of healthy and active lifestyles. #RunSweatInspire

“ Running a marathon is one of life’s ultimate challenges. To run a marathon from some of Australia’s most remote and harshest places is truly an amazing accomplishment.

When our runners cross the finish line of the world’s biggest marathon, in the world’s biggest city, after overcoming unimaginable challenges, they know they can achieve anything.

The lessons learnt and the pride felt are taken home and used to educate and inspire others about the importance of personal pride, healthy lifestyles, good nutrition and regular physical activity,”

Rob De Castella Indigenous Marathon Project

Picture Above EMOTIONAL: Jessica Bartholomew, Cyrus Morseu and Debra Hegarty after the New York Marathon 2018

The Indigenous Marathon Project (IMP) was founded in 2010 by former World Champion marathon runner Rob de Castella. IMP is not a sports program, but a community focussed health initiative that uses the simple act of running as a vehicle to promote the benefits of healthy and active lifestyles.

IMP annually selects, educates, trains and takes a group of inspirational young Indigenous men and women aged 18-30 to compete in the world’s biggest marathon – the New York Marathon.

Through this, IMP promotes the importance of healthy and active lifestyles throughout Indigenous communities, and creates Indigenous role models.

 ” Mr Fielding was running to raise money for The Purple House, an organisation that provides dialysis to some of Australia’s most remote communities.

Aside from the more than $40,000 raised so far, he wants to promote a healthy lifestyle to other Indigenous Australians.”

From ABC TV COVERAGE

From NACCHO May 2018

Starting at 4am in the APY Lands town of Indulkana, Zibeon Fielding has just finished a 62-kilometre ultramarathon.

The feat, which is about the same as running one and a half full marathons, comes just five weeks after Mr Fielding completed the Boston Marathon.

Port Macquarie March 2018

Port Macquarie last weekend welcomed three former Olympians Australian Olympians Nova Peris, Rob de Castella, Steve Moneghetti to support a new program for improving the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“It’s so good to see because everyone knows there is an abundance of talent in communities but minimal opportunities.

Running can change people’s lives and the IMP graduates have themselves become inspirations.

It’s a beautiful thing to see with Port Macquarie getting behind it.”

Olympian Nova Peris pictured below with Charlie Maher said the Bush to Beach Project was awesome : 

WATCH VIDEO \

Additional Text and Photo Port Macquarie News

“The project enables participants to visit the partner community in recognition of their commitment, Providing the opportunity to learn and share culture, experiences and stories with one and another while working towards creating change.

This is the first year of the program and we are proud to have the young Ntaria participants visiting Port Macquarie in March for the 2019 Port Macquarie Running Festival.

“In order to make sure the program is sustainable and can make lasting change for many years ahead we are holding a fundraiser in conjunction with the Port Macquarie Running Festival. ”

Charlie Maher Ambassador

NACCHO’s Social Media editor Colin Cowell promoted the project nationally and attended the lunch on Saturday, March 9 fundraising to support the Bush to Beach Project.

The founder of Bush to Beach Charlie Maher said around $6000 was raised from the event.

Mr Maher was emotional in his speech at the fundraiser saying he was blown away by the support.

He said it had been a “real experience” having kids from his hometown of Hermannsburg visit.

Mr Maher said friendships were formed between the participants of the program from Port Macquarie and Hermannsburg.

“Our kids realised how much they had,” he said.

“We are trying to teach them to always be grateful, humble and appreciate what you have.”

The is the first of two visits of by the Northern Territory participants to Port Macquarie.

They will return in September.

The Port Macquarie participants of Bush to Beach will visit Hemmannsburg next month (April).

1.2  Mayi Kuwayu TV ads going live today March 14 in a number of ACCHO health clinics around Australia

Mayi Kuwayu is a major new study that will provide a far greater understanding of the value of culture for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Mayi Kuwayu Study looks at how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander wellbeing is linked to things like connection to country, cultural practices, spirituality and language use.

Our research team will follow a large number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and ask about their culture and wellbeing. As a longitudinal study, we will survey people and then ask them to take the same survey every few years, so that we can understand what influences changes over time.

This is the first time a national study of this type has been done and will provide an evidence base to allow for the creation of better policies and programs.

This study has been created by and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander controlled research resource.

The Mayi Kuwayu team are experienced at working closely with communities across Australia, and the study has majority Aboriginal staffing and study governance (decision making) structure.

The Mayi Kuwayu launch video can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/297654156

In exactly one month, MK Study leader Ray Lovett will be running the Boston Marathon as part of his ongoing commitment to The Indigenous Marathon Foundation, a charity led by world champion and former Olympian Rob de Castella which uses running to promote health and resilience and celebrate achievement in young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and women.

We’ll keep you posted on what you can do to be part of Ray’s marathon effort! #ourculturescount #RunSweatInspire

By sharing your story, you can help create a better understanding of how culture affects health and wellbeing over time.

TAKE THE SURVEY 

2.1 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Cairns celebrated 10 years of Mums and Bubs program

The Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program, First Time Mums, has been running for ten years this year at Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen).

The First Time Mums Program is a client-centred, home visiting program providing care and support to mums pregnant with their first Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander baby until bub turns two.

The Program aims to assist first time pregnant mums and their families to develop knowledge and skills to improve the long-term health, social and economic future of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.

The dedicated team of Nurse Home Visitors and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Partnership Workers have completed over 5,000 home visits to clients in the past ten years, providing a culturally safe service to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. The Family Partnership Workers help to promote trust and respect between the clients and their families, the broader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community and local health providers.

Nurse Supervisor of the First Time Mums Program at Wuchopperen, Helen Moss, says the program has made a huge difference to the lives of over 350 families since its inception in Cairns.

“Over the past ten years we have seen the program grow dramatically and help hundreds of mums and bubs, with fantastic results. While the clinical results speak for themselves, the relationships we see our team form with the clients, the mums with their babies, and the mums with each other is the most incredible part of the program.

It is such a rewarding program to be a part of, the whole team really get to know the mums and bubs on a very personal level and seeing the mothers creative positive change for themselves and their families is deeply heart-warming. Ultimately we feel their success is our success!” says Helen.

The First Time Mums program has shown the importance of ongoing support and community in the direct health outcomes of mothers and their babies.

“100% of the babies who have come through the program were fully immunised by the time they turned two, which has had a significant impact on the long-term health of the babies, and 97% of our babies were within a healthy birth weight range. This is a huge achievement and sets up a really solid base for the rest of the child’s life,” says Helen.

Birth weight is a crucial aspect of new born health, with data from Queensland Health showing in 2015‐2016, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies were 1.8 times as likely to be low birth weight compared with non‐Indigenous babies.

2.2 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO team continues to roll out Mental Health First Aid training and Midwife workshop on Cape York

Apunipima’s Social Emotional Wellbeing Community Implementation Manager, Bernard David, was in Hope Vale last week.

Bernard was delivering Mental Health First Aid Training to staff from Apunipima and Hope Vale Council.

Mental Health First Aid Training is a three day training course that teaches you how to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis.

The training helps participants to identify, understand, and respond to signs of addictions and mental illnesses.

Earlier this month a group of expectant mums in Aurukun got together to celebrate their pregnancies.

The group were invited by Apunipima’s Midwife in conjunction with the PHaMs team to share their pregnancy stories, complications and individual family challenges. It also gave the women an opportunity to discuss ways they could support each other at this exciting time.

The women hope to have another yarning session closer to the time for the women to fly out of community to deliver their babies in Cairns.

This will give them a chance to discuss ways to manage the challenges associated with being away from home for extended periods of time, their options for support services in Cairns, labour, birth and early breastfeeding and parenting.

3. NT : Katherine West, Wurli-Wurlinjang and Sunrise Health Services ACCHO’s meet with 100 health professionals to enhance communication between hospitals, primary health and public health services

 

 “We need to be mindful of how we approach research in Aboriginal communities. Research must be done in partnership and not done to Aboriginal people

Sinon Cooney from Katherine West Health Board says of research

Health experts gathered in Katherine this week 14-15 March for Hot North, a four-year National Health and Medical Research Council funded research program led by Menzies School of Health Research.

The event will bring more than 100 health professionals together from local health services, such as Katherine Hospital, Katherine West, Wurli-Wurlinjang and Sunrise Health Services to enhance communication between hospitals, primary health and public health services and to share the latest research and findings on regionally specific health concerns

This time last year a group of health experts gathered in Katherine and called for more emergency housing to help fix chronic health problems here.

A year later, the same problems remain.

Those same health experts will gather in Katherine on Thursday and Friday this week for Hot North, a four-year National Health and Medical Research Council funded research program led by Menzies School of Health Research.

This time workshop will hear about regionally important health concerns such as antimicrobial resistance, disability and ageing, diabetes in pregnancy and youth, rheumatic heart disease, and new initiatives in skin health.

The event will bring more than 100 health professionals together from local health services, such as Katherine Hospital, Katherine West, Wurli-Wurlinjang and Sunrise Health Services to enhance communication between hospitals, primary health and public health services and to share the latest research and findings on regionally specific health concerns.

Hot North director, Professor Bart Currie said a major focus of the workshops is to give researchers, clinicians and other health professionals an opportunity to network, collaborate and share research.

“It gives researchers and Katherine health professionals the opportunity to strengthen relationships and facilitate learning experiences that develop and transform health practices across northern Australia.

“By developing a community of medical researchers and clinicians, HOT NORTH is connecting a wide range of experts to address the current and future challenges facing the tropical north”, said HOT NORTH Director, Professor Bart Currie.

With 65 activities funded to date, HOT NORTH-supported research and translation is investigating a wide range of health issues facing the Indigenous people living in northern Australia.

As one of the top Aboriginal health providers in the country, Katherine Hospital plays an important role in helping to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health outcomes.

Katherine Hospital’s head physician Dr Simon Quilty said, “The Katherine region is huge, and the challenges in providing health care in this remote and tropical region, that’s bigger than Victoria and Tasmania combined, are immense.

“Not only do we have the logistic issues of servicing over 13,000 people who live in remote communities, but these people come from over 20 different tribal nations with different beliefs and expectations of health.

“HOT NORTH provides a fantastic forum for health care professionals from across the north of Australia to mix with academics engaged in remote, tropical and Indigenous health to come up with ideas of how to do things better.”

Katherine Hospital and the health clinics servicing Katherine have made significant progress over the past number of years.

It now ranks as one the top hospitals in Australia for its relationship with its Indigenous patients.

“It’s the transfer of research and practical experience into better service delivery that will help us close the gap across the north and protect the north from tropical and emerging diseases,” added Professor Currie.

Based at Menzies, HOT NORTH utilises a strong collaborative approach between researchers and community, drawing on the expertise of research professionals from eight of Australia’s leading research organisations:

  • Menzies School of Health Research
  • James Cook University
  • Telethon Kids Institute
  • Marie Bashir Institute & The University of Sydney
  • Doherty Institute & The University of Melbourne
  • South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute
  • QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute
  • Burnet Institute

4.1 NSW : Ten Aboriginal communities across NSW will receive significant infrastructure and service upgrades, thanks to a $55 million investment by the NSW Liberals & Nationals Government. 

 

Minister for Planning and Housing Anthony Roberts and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Sarah Mitchell today announced the funding, which is part of the new Roads to Home program, aimed at improving the quality of life and economic opportunities in discrete Aboriginal communities.

Pictured with Roy Ah See Chair NSW ALC yesterday at Bowraville launch 

“This is about connecting with some of our isolated communities in NSW and providing them with the facilities and services that they deserve,” Mr Roberts said.

“Some of these communities are facing challenges such as emergency vehicles having difficulty locating patients due to lack of street signs, waste not being collected due to unpassable roads, and school buses being unable to reach children because of road and drainage issues.”

The investment will deliver essential road upgrades to improve the connectivity of these communities, including road surfacing, stormwater and drainage, kerbs and footpaths, street and public space lighting, and power and telecommunication upgrades.

The Government will also update land tenure rules in these communities, which have been a primary barrier to home ownership and land development.

Ms Mitchell said the upgrades will have more than just a physical effect on the local communities.

“As a Government, it is crucial we do what we can to ensure these communities have access to the same standards and ongoing maintenance as their neighbours,” Ms Mitchell said.

“These upgrades will make it easier for people to get to and from work and school, improve road safety, and allow communities to grow and start new businesses and ensure these communities have access to the same standards and ongoing maintenance as their neighbours.”

NSW Aboriginal Land Council (NSWALC) Chairman Roy Ah See welcomed today’s announcement.

“This announcement will change the lives of First Australians in discrete communities for the better. This has been a priority for NSWALC, and I appreciate that the Liberals & Nationals Government has listened to and acted on our concerns,” Mr Ah See said.

“This announcement will help build up Aboriginal communities, unlock opportunities and provide the ability for many to move toward home ownership and greater economic independence. This is another example of what can be achieved when government works with Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people.”

The first 10 communities to benefit from the NSW Government’s initial $55 million investment are:

  • Bellwood Reserve, Nambucca (Nambucca Shire LGA)
  • Bowraville, Nambucca (Nambucca Shire LGA)
  • Cabarita, Forster (Mid-Coast LGA)
  • Gingie Mission, Walgett (Walgett Shire LGA)
  • Gulargambone Top, Weilan (Coonamble LGA)
  • La Perouse Mission, La Perouse (Randwick LGA)
  • Namoi Reserve, Walgett (Walgett Shire LGA)
  • Narwan Village, Armidale (Armidale Dumaresq LGA)
  • Three Ways, Griffith (Griffith LGA)
  • Wallaga Lake Koori Village, Merrimans (Eurobodalla LGA)

Work will start in these communities this year.

4.1 NSW : NSW Labor Leader, Michael Daley and Shadow Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, David Harris, have today announced Labor’s policies to better support Aboriginal communities across NSW. Press Release

 

This builds on Labor’s previous significant announcements including a pathway to negotiate a Treaty or Treaties with the First Peoples of the State.

Mr Daley said: “Labor has always acknowledged the unique cultural heritage of the First Peoples as a priority.

“The Liberals and Nationals have spent eight years paying lip service to policies in Aboriginal Affairs but they haven’t made any substantive policy or legislative changes.”

Mr Harris said: “It’s important that a NSW Labor Government continues to build on the existing relationship with the NSW Aboriginal community to achieve lasting generational change.”

Under further measures announced today, Labor will:

  • Appoint an Aboriginal Affairs Advocate for Children and Young People – The Advocate will be a voice for Aboriginal children in government policy and legislation and will work side by side with the Advocate for Children and Young People. Labor will work with Aboriginal communities to develop the role, determine its focus and make sure that it is Aboriginal-led to empower Aboriginal communities.
  • Allocate $5 million over four years to reinstate traditional burning practices – Expanding traditional burning practices will open up country for the local Aboriginal community and restore the traditional forest structure. These programs will create employment and training opportunities for Aboriginal communities.
  • Adopt the principles of Justice Reinvestment – A strategy that aims to reduce incarceration rates and improve social outcomes by directing resources into communities with high rates of imprisonment. Labor will deliver $4.5 million over four years to fund three pilot programs, which will be delivered through NGOs, and deliver a coordinating authority.
  • Make a formal apology to victims of state-sanctioned massacres in NSW – Recent research identified at least 68 massacres in NSW between 1788 and 1872, resulting in the deaths of approximately 1,653 Aboriginal people.
  • Move the Department of Aboriginal Affairs to Premier and Cabinet – This demonstrates NSW Labor’s commitment to a future Treaty Process which will need cross portfolio co-ordination at the highest level.
  • Fund the NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group (AECG) – The AECG is a not for profit Aboriginal organisation that provides advice on all matters relevant to education and training. Labor will deliver $4 million of additional money over four years which will enable the organisation to increase its participation in developing and supporting Aboriginal education across NSW.
  • Secure the future of the Girls Academy – Provide $3.9 million in funding over four years to secure the future of the Girls Academy, a program focused on increasing school attendance and retention rates. Currently, the Clontarf Foundation, an organisation which provides education and life skills programs to Aboriginal boys and young men, is receiving government funding. The Liberals and Nationals have failed to provide funding for a similar program for girls and women.

Labor also recommitted to:

  • Returning Me-Mel (Goat Island) to its traditional owners as a priority – Me-Mel has enormous significance to Indigenous communities and was home to the Wangal people when Captain Arthur Phillip and the First Fleet arrived in Sydney Cove in 1788. The Liberals and Nationals promised to return Me-Mel in October 2016, but the transfer has still not taken place.
  • Establishing Walama Court – A court for indigenous offenders in the District Court jurisdiction, at a time when Aboriginal incarceration rates are worse in NSW than either at the time of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody or in 2011.
  • Delivering dedicated Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage Act – NSW is the only state in Australia without standalone legislation to protect Aboriginal cultural heritage.
  • Establishing a Myall Creek massacre education and cultural centre – Providing up to $3 million to help establish an education and cultural centre at the historic Myall Creek massacre site in northern NSW, supporting one of the state’s most well-known reconciliation projects.
  • Flying the Aboriginal Flag on the Harbour Bridge – For 40 years, the Aboriginal flag has flown as a proud symbol for Indigenous Australians. A Daley Labor Government will fly the Aboriginal flag with the flags of Australia and New South Wales on the Harbour Bridge.
  • Funding up to six scholarships for Indigenous medical doctors – The scholarship will be delivered through the highly successful Shalom Gamarada Indigenous Residential Scholarship Program. This program is sponsored by Sydney’s Jewish community and Shalom College at the UNSW. It has been successful in its goal to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians through higher education and by increasing the number of Indigenous professionals, especially in the critical area of Indigenous health.

4.2 NSW : ACCHO’s in Northern NSW partner with TAFE NSW to support and service qualifications that upskill the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care workforce

THE first Indigenous cohort of health practitioners is set to graduate from TAFE.

Sixteen health care practitioners travelled from across the north coast to TAFE NSW Port Macquarie to celebrate the milestone and the finalisation of their Certificate IV in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Care Practice.

Originally Published HERE

Once they complete the remaining 300 workplace clinical hours of the 18-month course, they will be the first-ever student cohort in the NSW North Coast to graduate with the nationally-recognised qualification.

The students – all of whom already work as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) health practitioners and identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander – completed their sixth and final block of the course’s theory component last week. The big milestone was celebrated with a dinner at The Mercure restaurant.

TAFE NSW manager service delivery Aboriginal health, Daniel Morrison, said everyone was delighted to finish the face-to-face training blocks, each of which they travelled to TAFE NSW Port Macquarie to undertake.

“I am really proud of my students for achieving such a momentous milestone. I know they will be valuable community members with the skills and knowledge they’ve gained over the past 12 months,” he said.

“The TAFE NSW Certificate IV in Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander Health Care Practice empowers practitioners to offer streamlined care to patients, upskilling them to provide professional practice work in a clinical setting. The overarching goal is to improve health outcomes for our communities and families.”

TAFE NSW partners with the Aboriginal Medical Service and several Local Area Health Districts to support and service qualifications that upskill the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care workforce.

5. Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO opens new tulaminakali Health clinic in Devenport 

6. ACT : Beds at the troubled Ngunnawal Bush Healing Farm are likely to lay empty for longer after the government back tracked on plans to look for a provider for a residential program by early this year.

The $12 million custom-built facility in Canberra’s Tidbinbilla Valley – opened in late 2017 – was originally designed as an eight-bed residential facility for Indigenous people.

The government controversially abandoned the Indigenous community’s proposal for a residential drug and alcohol centre after it was revealed the area was not zoned for clinical services.

However it maintained plans for a residential program on the site to facilitate a “reconnection with the land and culture”.

But more than a year after it opened, clients are still bussed to and from daily activities at the farm. Just 34 participants have taken part since it opened.

A briefing for estimates hearings prepared by ACT Health in October revealed the government planned to put a tender out for a residential program at the farm by early 2019. But the government has since confirmed those plans are on hold.

It will not decide the future of the farm until the delayed “healing framework” – which was due for completion in January 2019 – is completed and a wide ranging review is handed down in October.

The government says there are separate plans to open a residential drug and alcohol facility for the Indigenous community.

“ACT Health will consider all findings and recommendations of the review as it rolls out to determine the most appropriate next steps for the [bush healing farm],” an ACT Health spokeswoman said.

She said the work was being done in close collaboration with members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body, United Ngunnawal Elders Council as well as other stakeholders.

The government has denied the purpose of the farm was ever to include clinical services, but stakeholders have disputed that.

Winnunga Aboriginal Health Service and Gugan Gulwan Youth Aboriginal Corporation walked away from the program in 2017 after it emerged no clinical services would actually be offered on-site.

The spokeswoman said, “The primary purpose of the [bush healing farm] is to provide an additional service to support a person’s reconnection with the land and culture and empower them to make new and more positive choices.

“The current operational model of the [bush healing farm] was not intended as a clinical model of alcohol and other drug withdrawal.

“However, the government recognises the need for Aboriginal specific services for withdrawal and rehabilitation and is at the same time progressing this work.”

The spokeswoman said that at the time of writing the estimates brief, the government anticipated the healing framework would be finalised by early 2019.

When that did not happen, the plans to put out a tender were scrapped.

“In addition, ACT Health initiated the review of the [bush healing farm] in September 2018, which will review the services, program design and delivery and governance of the facility,” she said.

“The review will build upon success and learnings to date and talk to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community about the best way forward for this service.

“The review is well underway and key stakeholders are contributing their views and aspirations for the [bush healing farm], which will inform next steps.

“During this review, further assessment will take place to determine the best way forward to provide a residential program, and the government will consider any changes as recommended by the review throughout the year.”

7. WA : AHCWA  headed to Bunbury last week to deliver the Certificate II in Family Wellbeing to a group of 10 students. 

 

Well done to everyone on the successful completion of their training

8. VIC : MDAS ACCHO : Mallee Mums find support and strength in each other


A new mum’s group at Mallee District Aboriginal Services is working with new and first-time parents to access better services – and build their mutual support networks at the same time.

The group was set up in response to suggestions from new mums last year, and organiser Maternal and Child Health Koori Maternity Services Assistant Nikita Morganson says it’s gone from strength-to-strength.

“It’s been fantastic for the mums involved to find a place and a network where they feel safe and supported,” Nikita said.

“This is a safe place where they have found they can come and yarn and be open with each other.
“We have special guests come to have conversations with the mums regarding anything to do with babies.

“We had the librarian come along to discuss the benefits of reading to baby, we also had the chemist come in to discuss myths and facts about products for babies and breastfeeding mums.”

Nikita said the group mixed formal and cultural activities, participating in sessions such as parents’ First Aid and other events within the community, with the support of one another.

“We’re also planning for Aunty Marilyne Nicholls to come along and do some cultural yarning with the mums and we’re hoping that might bring in some new faces as well,” she said.

Nikita said the mothers involved with the group were finding more confidence by supporting each other, even outside the group activities, bringing closeness and strength.

The new mums’ group is open to mums with new babies (whether first-time or not) and meets on Fridays (during school terms).

More information about what is available from the program contact Nikita Morganson at MDAS on (03) 5032 8600.