NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Uluru #Voice #Treaty @RecAustralia Reconciliation Australia’s Vision of National Reconciliation is based on five critical dimensions: race relations, equality and equity, institutional integrity, unity and historical acceptance.

‘‘Here in Australia we’re fortunate enough to have one of the richest and oldest continuing cultures in the world,

This is something we should all be proud of and celebrate.’’

As we begin a new year 2019 , it is an appropriate time to pause and reflect on our progress towards a just, equitable and reconciled Australia. Reconciliation Australia co-chair Tom Calma AO highlighted the uniqueness of the history of Australia.

Part 1 : Reconciliation Australia’s Vision of National Reconciliation is based on five critical dimensions: race relations, equality and equity, institutional integrity, unity and historical acceptance.

Originally published here Shepparton Region Reconciliation Group convenor Dierdre Robertson

These five dimensions do not exist in isolation; they are inter-related and Australia can only achieve full reconciliation if there is progress in all five.

Race relations: All Australians understand and value Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous cultures’, rights and experiences, which results in stronger relationships based on trust and respect and that are free of racism.

Equality and equity: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples participate equally in a range of life opportunities and the unique rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are recognised and upheld.

Unity: An Australian society that values and recognises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage as a proud part of a shared identity.

Institutional integrity: The active support of reconciliation by the nation’s political, business and community structures.

Historical acceptance: All Australians understand and accept the wrongs of the past and the impact of these wrongs. Australia makes amends for the wrongs of the past and ensures these wrongs are never repeated.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have been calling for treaty/ies for many decades.

Negotiation of treaties and agreements by all governments and parliaments were recommendations of the final report of the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation in 2000.

Given that Australia is the only Commonwealth country that does not have a treaty with its First National Peoples, the progress towards treaty/treaties in Victoria is an important first step towards true reconciliation.

History was made with the passage through the Victorian Parliament of Australia’s first ever treaty legislation in June 2018.

A number of other jurisdictions are progressing their own treaty and agreement-making processes, and are looking to Victoria with interest.

The South Australian Government had started treaty negotiations with Traditional Owners before a change of government paused negotiations.

Discussions are also under way in the Northern Territory and Queensland.

The First Nations National Constitutional Convention at Uluru in 2017 brought together 250 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and led to the Statement from the Heart, which included the following: ‘‘We seek constitutional reforms to empower our people and take a rightful place in our own country. When we have power over our destiny our children will flourish. They will walk in two worlds and their culture will be a gift to their country.’’

The constitutional convention called for a Voice to Parliament — a national indigenous representative body enshrined in the constitution.

The convention also called for a Makarrata Commission to supervise agreement-making between governments and First Nations and truth-telling about our history.

The Final Report of the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples was handed down in November 2018.

The key point of this report is that the voice should become a reality and that it will be co-designed with government by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples right across the nation.

After the design process is complete the legal form of the voice can then be worked out.

It will be easier to work out the legal form the voice should take once there is clarity on what the voice looks like.

The commitment to a voice, and the commitment to co-design of that voice are significant steps for the parliament to discuss and consider.

They are significant steps towards a bipartisan and agreed approach to advancing the cause of constitutional recognition.

The Joint Select Committee Final Report also stated ‘‘We believe there is a strong desire among all Australians to know more about the history, traditions and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their contact with other Australians both good and bad. A fuller understanding of our history including the relationship between black and white Australia will lead to a more reconciled nation.’’

With the backdrop of this progress, what can you do to work towards a reconciled Australia?

Become informed about the treaty progress in Victoria and get on board to lobby and advocate for justice and self-determination for Victoria’s First Nations Peoples.

Visit http:www.vic.gov.au/aboriginalvictoria.html

https://treaty.org.au

Find out more about the Uluru Statement from the Heart and add your voice to those of other Australians who have supported the reforms in the Uluru Statement, visit https://www.1voiceuluru.org/

Read the Final Report of the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples by going to https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary—Business/Committees/Joint/Constitutional—Recognition—2018/ConstRecognition/Final—Report

Part 2 From the Australian Monday 14 January 2019

Bill Shorten’s proposal for a ­republican plebiscite faces an assault from prominent Indigenous figures who are calling on Labor to dump the policy and focus on establishing an indigenous voice to parliament.

Leading Indigenous academics Megan Davis, Marcia Langton and Eddie Synot say the campaign for an indigenous voice should be given clear air.

The Greens are also urging Labor to dump a first-term plebiscite on the republic, along with Maritime Union of Australia Northern Territory branch secretary Thomas Mayor.

At its national conference last month, Labor committed to making the voice a priority for constitutional change but did not commit to a timeline on a referendum.

Professor Davis said Labor should junk its plans for a first-term plebiscite on the republic. “The referendum for a constitutionally enshrined voice is the civic question that has actively occupied the minds of Australians for eight years,” she said. “This referendum requires clear air. We want a just republic, not just a republic.’’

Professor Langton said she had not spoken to a single Indigenous Australian who supported a republican plebiscite being held before a referendum on the voice.

“It kills off the chance of our issues getting clear air,” she said. “It is pretty clear that republicans, while they think they have a handle on our issues, clearly don’t.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Election2019 : A Labor Government will become the first political party to put in place a #RAP #ReconciliationActionPlan – and commits to us having a #voice in the party, in our parliament, and in our society.

 ” A Shorten Labor Government will become the first political party to put in place a Reconciliation Action Plan – committing our party to practical measures to give First Australians a voice in our party, in our parliament, and in our society.

For Labor, reconciliation and recognition is about ensuring that First Nations people have the same rights, opportunities and outcomes as every other Australian. Labor’s Reconciliation Action Plan includes strategies to work to better understand how to improve the current involvement of, and relationships with, First Nations People.”

From Labor Party Press Release in full below : More information on Labor’s Reconciliation Action Plan can be found here DOWNLOAD 

Labor Party reconciliation-action-plan

Bill Shorten Speech 

Download a full copy HERE Bill Shorten Speech

Labor recognizes its role in building a more equitable relationship – one in which the rights and obligations flow both ways. This includes a commitment to establishing a Voice and enshrining it in the Constitution. It is our first priority for Constitutional change.

Labor’s Reconciliation Action Plan is a practical plan with measurable timeframes – ensuring that at every level of our party we are constantly building our understanding of the issues that affect First Nations People’s equality and aspirations, and developing practical ideas for achieving sustainable change.

These goals have eluded us as a nation for more than two centuries. It is time for that to change – and Labor wants to lead this change.

Reconciliation and recognition is about acknowledging – and celebrating – the unique place of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders as the first people and custodians of

Australia and recognising the need for change through real partnerships.

In doing this Labor can continue to lead the way on our nation’s path to Recognition, Reconciliation and Justice.

A fair go for Australia also means a fair go for First Nations People.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @IndigenousPHAA #Prevention : Download @_PHAA_ Report : Saving lives a million at a time: Australia’s #top10publichealth successes over the last 20 years

As we edge closer to the federal election, it’s critical our parties consider what public health successes we must achieve next, and how they can lead on issues such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, obesity, nutrition, environmental and ecological issues such as climate change, and advancing health equity.”

PHAA CEO Terry Slevin

Today the Public Health Association Australia (PHAA) launched its new report, the Top 10 Public Health Successes Over the Last 20 Years at Australian Parliament House.

PHAA CEO Terry Slevin stated, “Public health initiatives have prevented an extraordinary amount of ill health and death in our communities – there is a saying in our field that nurses and doctors save lives, and public health professionals also save lives – they just do so a million at a time.”

The report has been compiled by Australia’s leading public health experts, and the top ten achievements are presented in no particular order as they are all considered to have been of equal importance to Australian public health.

The top ten public health successes include:

  • Folate: reduced neural tube defects
  • Immunisation and eliminating infectious disease
  • Containing the spread of HPV and its related cancers
  • Oral health: reduced dental decay
  • Reduced incidence of skin cancer
  • Tobacco control: reduced deaths caused by smoking
  • Reduced the road death and injury toll
  • Gun control: reduced gun deaths in Australia
  • Contained the spread of HIV
  • Prevented deaths from bowel and breast cancer

Download the PHAA report HERE 

PHAA Top 10 Public Health Successes_FINAL

“This report paints a clear picture of exactly which programs and initiatives have had the greatest impact – from cancer screening to vaccines, from road safety to tobacco control. These have all saved thousands of lives and protected the health of millions of Australians.”

“Public health is about preventing or minimising harm – it is always better than cure. We aim to intervene before illness, death or injury occurs, creating safe and healthy environments for all Australians. This is why in public health, we’re for birthdays,” Mr Slevin said.

“We aspire to give Australians more birthdays (five more for each person is our starting goal) and other important celebrations – weddings, births, graduations – all of the significant milestones we value in life. Perhaps most importantly, we want Australians to be healthy enough to really enjoy these extra years and milestones,” Mr Slevin said.

“So the next question we ask is, who will be the policy leaders and decision makers to help us achieve this aspiration? The report acknowledges key decision makers at the federal, state and territory government levels who were instrumental in making the top ten public health successes happen.”

“As we edge closer to the federal election, it’s critical our parties consider what public health successes we must achieve next, and how they can lead on issues such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, obesity, nutrition, environmental and ecological issues such as climate change, and advancing health equity.”

The UK has just released a new preventive health vision statement proving that western conservative governments can prioritise prevention. This is key not just because it is the most effective form of public health practice, but also the most economically sound.

“Preventive public health measures are often cheap to implement and more than pay for themselves through reduced health care costs and increased productivity through keeping people out of hospitals.”

“Public health investment in Australia currently amounts to less than 2% of the national health budget, and has been generally declining since at least 2001. It is essential we allocate adequate resources to public health programs and initiatives to build a healthier population, stem the tide of chronic disease that is enveloping the nation, and reduce future health expenditure,” Mr Slevin said.

“We owe it to ourselves and to our children to look back in twenty years’ time and say we did all we could.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and events : This week #WorldMentalHealthDay #WMHD2018 #MentalHealthPromise #10OCT This Month : Register and Download #NACCHOagm2018 Oct 30 – Nov 2 Program @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay @June_Oscar #WomensVoices #IndigBizMth

 

This week 

World Mental Health Day Oct 10

World Mental Health Week Oct 7- 13 

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week (ATSIHAW) 28th November to 5th December : Expression of Interest open but close 26 October

This Month

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open : Download the Program 

Future events /conferences

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October
National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project. 

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference 20-21 November Perth

2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
This week 

This World Mental Health Day – on Wednesday 10 October – will be the biggest yet in Australia, with more than 700 organisations, companies, community groups and charities taking part, as well an official Guinness World Record Attempt in Wagga Wagga to raise awareness and reduce stigma.

The ‘Do You See What I See?’ campaign encourages people to make a #MentalHealthPromise and shed a more positive light on mental health in a bid to reduce stigma for the one in five Australians who are affected by mental illness annually.

More than 700 organisations have engaged with the campaign already this year, which has also seen more than 20,000 mental health promises made by individuals at http://www.1010.org.au .

Five days out from World Mental Health Day itself, on Wednesday 10 October, Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan says this year’s response has been the biggest ever.

“Year-on-year the interest in World Mental Health Day continues to grow and to me that’s a clear sign that we are reducing stigma, and more and more people are prepared to talk and hopefully seek help,” said Mr. Quinlan.

“We’ve seen a huge increase in the participation of workplaces over the last two years, and have tailored our messaging accordingly to encourage people to shed a more positive light on mental health at work.”

“We know from our recent Investing to Save Report with KPMG that investment in workplace initiatives could save the nation more than $4.5 billion, and to see some of the biggest employers in the country engage with this year’s campaign, is a clear sign that people are becoming more and more aware of just how important it is to look after mental health and wellbeing in the workplace.”

To help celebrate this year’s World Mental Health Day, and to add to the success of the campaign, Mental Health Australia has also linked up with the Wagga Wagga City Council and Bunnings Warehouse to attempt a Guinness World Record for the most number of people wearing high visibility vests in one location.

Aimed to again shed a positive light, and raise the visibility and awareness of mental health in a community, particularly amongst young men, tradies, farmers and their families, the high-viz world record attempt in Wagga on World Mental Health Day has already seen the people of the Riverina come together.

“We often speak about mentally healthy communities and this fun Guinness World Record Attempt has been a great opportunity to engage with, and unite the people of Wagga Wagga for a common goal,” said Mr. Quinlan.

“Thanks to the fantastic support of Bunnings and the Wagga Wagga City Council, as well as 3M and Triple M Riverina, we can’t wait to see a sea of high visibility vests in the Bunnings carpark next Wednesday morning, and who knows we might even break the current record of 2,136.”

To find out more or to register for the Guinness World Record Attempt go to www.1010.org.au/wagga (link is external)

Mental Health Australia would like to thank all the organisations who have shown their support this year and will be helping to raise awareness and reduce stigma next Wednesday 10 October on World Mental Health Day.

To find our more go to www.1010.org.au

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week (ATSIHAW) 28th November to 5th December : Expression of Interest open but close 26 October

In 2017 we supported more than 60 ACCHS to run community events during ATSIHAW.

We are now seeking final EOIs to host 2018 ATSIHAW Events

EOI’s will remain open until 26th October 2018

ATSIHAW coincides each year with World AIDS Day- our aim is to promote conversation and action around HIV in our communities. Our long lasting theme of ATSIHAW is U AND ME CAN STOP HIV”.

If you would like to host an ATSIHAW event in 2018, please complete the EOI form here Expression of Interest 2018 and then send back to us to at  atsihaw@sahmri.com

Once registered we will send merchandise to your service to help with your event.

For more information about ATSIHAW please visit http://www.atsihiv.org.au/hiv-awareness-week/merchandise/

ATSIHAW on Facebook     https://www.facebook.com/ATSIHAW/

ATSIHAW on Twitter          https://twitter.com/atsihaw

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations still open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Download Draft Program as at 2 October

NACCHO 7 Page Conference Program 2018_v3

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

Dr Puggy Hunter was the NACCHO Chair 1991-2001

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 144 + Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996. He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council. He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

The scheme provides scholarships for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people studying an entry level health course.

Applications for PHMSS 2019 scholarship round are now open.

Click the button below to start your online application.

Applications must be completed and submitted before midnight AEDT (Sydney/Canberra time) Sunday 14 October 2018. After this time the system will shut down and any incomplete applications will be lost.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not available for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

A significant number of applications are received each year; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The scholarships are funded by the Australian Government, Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing. The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

The RACGP and NACCHO invite you to a workshop to be held prior to GP18, that
will support your practice team to maximise the opportunity for the prevention of
disease at each health service visit.

A National Guide contributor and a cultural educator will discuss how best to utilise
the third edition of the National Guide when providing care for Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people.

The workshop will also include a focus group exploring implementation of the
National Guide in both mainstream and Aboriginal Community Controlled Primary
Health Care Services (ACCHSs), as well as the characteristics of a culturally
responsive general practice.

Program

• Background and purpose of the National Guide
• Features of the National Guide, including:
• Recommendation tables
• Good practice points
• Evidence base
• Lifecycle wall chart
• Putting the National Guide

Date
Wednesday 10 October 2018

Time
Registration and lunch 12.00 pm
Workshop 12.30–4.00 pm

Venue
Jellurgal Aboriginal Cultural Centre
1711 Gold Coast Highway, Burleigh Heads

Cost
Free of charge

RSVP
Friday 5 October 2018

Registration essential

Registration
Email daniela.doblanovic@racgp.org.au
or call Daniela Doblanovic on 03 8699 0528.

We will then contact you to confirm

 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

This grant opportunity is designed to assist existing approved residential and home care providers in regional, rural and remote areas to invest in infrastructure. Commonwealth Home Support Programme services will also be considered, where there is exceptional need. Funding will be prioritised to aged care services most in need and where geographical constraints and significantly higher costs impede services’ ability to invest in infrastructure works.

Up to $500,000 (GST exclusive) will be available per service via a competitive application process.

Eligibility:

To be eligible you must be:

  • an approved residential or home care provider (as defined under the Aged Care Act 1997) or an approved Commonwealth Home Support Program (CHSP) provider in exceptional circumstances (refer Frequently asked Questions) ; and
  • currently operating an aged care service located in Modified Monash Model Classification 3-7 or if a CHSP provider, the service is located in MMM 6-7. (MMM Locator).

More Info Apply 

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

Throughout October, twenty national Indigenous Business Month events will take place showcasing the talents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs from a variety of business sectors. These events aim to ignite conversations about Indigenous business development and innovation, focusing on women’s roles and leadership.

Indigenous Business Month is an initiative driven by the alumni of Melbourne Business School’s MURRA Indigenous Business Master Class, who see business as a way of providing positive role models for young Indigenous Australians and improving quality of life in Indigenous communities.

Since the launch of Indigenous Business Month in 2015, [1] the Indigenous business sector is one of the fastest growing sectors in Australia delivering over $1 billion in goods and services for the Australian economy.

Jason Eades, Director, Consulting at Social Ventures Australia and Indigenous Business Month 2018 host said:

It is a privilege to be involved in Indigenous Business Month, to be able to take the time to celebrate and acknowledge the great achievements of our Indigenous entrepreneurs and their respective businesses. Indigenous entrepreneurs are showing the rest of the world that we can do business and do it well, whilst maintaining our strong cultural values.”

The latest ABS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2014-15 shows that only 51.5 percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women participate in the workforce compared to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men at 65 percent.

The Australian Government has invested in a range of initiatives to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs in the work-placeincluding: [2) Continued funding for girls’ academies in high schools, so that young women can realise their leadership potential, greater access to finance and business support suited to the needs of Indigenous businesses with a focus on Indigenous entrepreneurs and start-ups, and expanding the ParentsNextprogram and Fund pre-employment projects via the new Launch into Work program providing flexibility to meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Michelle Evans, MURRA Program Director AND Associate Professor of Leadership at the University of Melbourne said:

The Indigenous Business Month’s aim is to inspire, showcase and engage the Indigenous business community. This year it is more significant than ever to support the female Indigenous business community and provide a platform for them to network and encourage young Indigenous women to consider developing a business as a career option.”

Indigenous Business Month runs from October 1 to October 31. Check out the website for an event near you (spaces are limited).

The initiative is supported by 33 Creative, Asia Pacific Social Impact Centre at the University of Melbourne, Iscariot Media, and PwC.

For more information on Indigenous Business Month visit

·         The Websitewww.indigenousbusinessmonth.com.au

·         Facebook

·         Twitter

·         LinkedIn

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

 

Download HERE

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018.

This Forum will bring together Indigenous and First Nation presenters and panellists from across the world to discuss shared experiences and practices in building, supporting and retaining an Indigenous allied health workforce.

This full-day event will provide a platform to share information and build an integrated approach to improving culturally safe and responsive health care and improve health and wellbeing outcomes for Indigenous peoples and communities.

Delegates will include Indigenous and First Nation allied health professionals and students from Australia, Canada, the USA and New Zealand. There will also be delegates from a range of sectors including, health, wellbeing, education, disability, academia and community.

MORE INFO 

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference 20-21 November Perth

” The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference Committee invite and welcome you to Perth for the second National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference, and the second World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference.

Our Indigenous communities, both nationally and internationally, share common histories and are confronted with similar issues stemming from colonisation. Strengthening our communities so that we can address high rates of suicide is one of these shared issues. The Conferences will provide more opportunities to network and collaborate between Indigenous people and communities, policy makers, and researchers. The Conferences are unique opportunities to share what we have learned and to collaborate on solutions that work in suicide prevention.

This also enables us to highlight our shared priorities with political leaders in our respective countries and communities.

Conference Website 

2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
Indigenous Eye Health and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) are pleased to announce the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019 which will be held in Alice Springs, Northern Territory on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 at the Alice Springs Convention Centre.
The 2019 conference will run over two days with the aim of bringing people together and connecting people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, ACCOs, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.
More information available at: go.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities #Nurses National demand #CATSINaM18 #NSW CEO @awabakalltd @AHMRC #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD @QAIHC @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ @Apunipima Plus @LowitjaInstitut @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 ACCHO Job/s of the week 

1.2 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland

2.Queensland 

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Lowitja Institute :  Research Project Officer

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

1. 1 ACCHO Job/s of the week

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council

Project Officer – AOD Our Way Program

We are seeking two experienced AOD project officers to undertake program support in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

* Indigenous Health Organisation

* Salary: $84,150 + superannuation

* Attractive health promotion charity salary packaging

* Cairns location

* Temporary position till 30th June 2020

QAIHC is a non-partisan peak organisation representing 29 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ATSICCHOs) across Queensland at both state and national level. Our members deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate, world class primary health care services to their communities.

Role Overview

The AOD Our Way program is designed to increase capacity in communities, families and individuals to better respond locally to problematic Ice and other drug use. The Project Officer position is based in Cairns but will have a state-wide focus to support this program. Reporting directly to the Manager, AOD, you will be responsible for ensuring that QAIHC meets its AOD Our Way program obligations and commitments under its Agreement with Queensland Health. The role includes ensuring services are engaged, supported and provided with the opportunity to participate in the AOD Our Way program.

Pre-requisite skills & experience

* Well-developed knowledge, skills and experience in Alcohol and Other Drugs program delivery.

* Ability to build relationships and engage with a broad range of stakeholders.

* High level communication, collaboration and interpersonal skills.

* Understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations and the issues facing them.

* Ability to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their leaders, respecting traditional culture, values and ways of doing business.

* A current drivers licence

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People are strongly encouraged to apply for this position

To apply, obtain an application pack or any query, please email – applications@qaihc.com.au.

Please apply only via this method.

Applications are required by midnight on Sunday 7th October 2018

General Practitioner _ Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative

Organisational Profile

GEGAC is an Aboriginal Community organization based in Bairnsdale Victoria. Consisting of about 160 staff, GEGAC is a Not for Profit organization that delivers holistic services in the areas of Primary Health, Social Services, Elders & Disability and Early Childhood Education.

Position Purpose

The General Practitioner position will provide medical services to the population served by GEGAC Primary Health Care. This will include the management of acute and chronic conditions and assistance with the delivery and promotion of primary health care. The role will be part of a multidisciplinary team; including Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Koori Maternity Services, Dental and visiting allied health/Specialists.

Qualifications and Registrations Requirement (Essential or Desirable).

Relevant and Australian recognised medical degree Essential 

Registration with AHPRA; Fellowship of the College of General Practitioners or similar or be eligible of such Essential

Training in CPR, undertaken with the past three years Essential

A person of Aboriginal / Torres Strait Islander background Desirable

How to apply for this job

A copy of the position description and the application form can be obtained below, at GEGAC reception 0351 500 700 or by contacting HR@gegac.org.au.

Or by following the below links –

Position Description – https://goo.gl/iTiSGg

Application Form – https://goo.gl/xVbf3w

Applicants must complete the application form as it contains the selection criteria for shortlisting. Any applications not submitted on the Application form will not be considered.

Application forms should be emailed to HR@gegac.org.au, using the subject line:  General Practitioner

Or posted to:

Human Resources

Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-operative
PO Box 634
Bairnsdale Vic 3875

Applications close 29th September 5.00pm.

No late applications will be considered.

A valid Working with Children Check and Police check is mandatory to work in this organisation.

“this advertisement is pursuant to the ‘special measures’ provision at section 8 of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth)”.

CEO Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle 

Located in the popular NSW hub of Newcastle, the role of CEO for Awabakal is a unique opportunity to advance the needs of the local Aboriginal community it serves in the delivery of integrated primary healthcare, aged care, children and family services.

The CEO is responsible for collaborating with the Board of Directors to set and execute strategic direction which ensures organisational growth, effectiveness and sustainability. The successful candidate will be visionary in their approach to predicting and preparing for future challenges and opportunities as they relate to Aboriginal affairs. Significant senior experience operating at this strata level is critical.

Only those with the ability to make tough decisions and see them through will succeed, therefore exceptional change management skills and the ability to cultivate a strong, functional workplace culture to drive accountability in an organisation in which transparent decision-making and ethics is essential.
The successful candidate will need to demonstrate significant experience in managing the complex and sometimes competing needs of multiple stakeholders ranging from community, organisational members, service delivery professionals and government funding agencies.

The successful CEO candidate will need to deeply connect and understand the culturally sensitive health and support issues and challenges required to address current and future needs of the local Aboriginal community.

Based on this knowledge the CEO will be accountable for developing and delivering a fully integrated program service delivery and strategic partnership model, utilising the necessary fiduciary and financial capabilities to successfully execute.

You will possess:
• Extensive knowledge and genuine appreciation of Aboriginal culture as it relates to the role.
• Significant experience in successfully operating in the complex political, social and economic environment that affect Aboriginal communities.
• Beyond reproach ethical, transparent standards in a highly regulated organisation with complex accreditation and reporting requirements.
• A community-centric, global perspective on a community organisation delivering access programs.
• High-order communication skills (written, verbal, negotiating, influencing, funding application and report-writing).
• A degree in business, finance, project management or related field.
• A no nonsense ‘say what you mean and mean what you say’ approach to addressing legacy challenges and opportunities!
THE OFFER
A competitive salary and benefits package is on offer for the successful candidate.
Aboriginality is a genuine occupational requirement of this position; an exemption is claimed under Section 14D of the Anti-Discrimination Act NSW 1977.

HOW TO APPLY

Request for position description and confidential enquiries can be made to Ali Kimmorley or Sally Bartley of peoplefusion on 02 4929 1666. Your information and application is kept strictly confidential.

To register your interest please visit our website https://www.peoplefusion.com.au/and attach your resume and a covering letter outlining your relevant experience and motivation for applying for this role.

Applications close 24th September 2018.

Aboriginal Health Practitioner Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO 

  • Are you an Aboriginal Health Practitioner or Worker wanting to contribute to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal people?
  • Join a well-respected Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
  • Identified position for Aboriginal candidates

The Clinic

Primary Care Services (PCS) provides comprehensive primary health care to the Aboriginal community. The multi-disciplinary team consists of Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, a Clinical Services Officer, Enrolled and Registered Nurses, and General Practitioners and Registrars. Services are augmented by a range of visiting medical specialists and allied health professionals. The PCS team liaises and works closely with the Women, Children and Family Health program, the Social and Emotional Wellbeing program and the Community Health Promotion and Education program to ensure a high standard of integrated and coordinated client care.

The Opportunity

As an Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) or Aboriginal Health Worker (AHW) you will be required to work collaboratively with PCS staff and other members of Health Services teams to provide best practice client care. As a vital team member your role will contribute to the high quality and culturally appropriate client care that Nunkuwarrin Yunti is known to provide.

In order to deliver this, some of your key responsibilities will include:

  • Undertake client assessments and follow -up care, care plans and referrals from other members of the multi-disciplinary team
  • Provide health education and brief intervention counselling to improve health outcomes for individual clients
  • Promote the importance and benefits of general preventative health assessments and immunisations and ensure access to these services for clients

About you

  • Both AHP and AHW are required to have a Cert IV in Aboriginal Primary Health Care (Practice) or equivalent.
  • As an AHP you will be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Registration Authority (AHPRA); and bring a minimum of three (3) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a Primary Health Care setting.
  • As an AHW you will bring a minimum of two (2) years of demonstrated vocational experience in a relevant health field, preferably Primary Health Care.

As a suitably qualified AHP or AHW you will have well developed clinical skills and a sound knowledge of best practice approaches to comprehensive primary health care with broad knowledge of existing health and social issues within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. You will have the ability to resolve conflict, solve problems and negotiate outcomes. Organisational skills, self-confidence and the ability to work independently and autonomously, assess priorities, organise workloads and meet deadlines is critical to success.

Click here to download the AHP Job Description

Click here to download the AHW Job Description

Click here to download the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Application Form

Please note: It is a requirement of all roles that successful candidates have a current driver’s licence and are willing to undergo a National Police Check prior to commencing employment. 

Both roles are identified Aboriginal positions; exemption is claimed under Section 8 (1) of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975.

The Benefits

Classified under the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Enterprise Agreement of 2017 you will be entitled to the following dependent on qualifications and experience:

  • AHP – Health Services Level 4 with a starting salary of $69,255.98, plus super
  • AHW – Health Services Level 3 with a starting salary of $61,430.62, plus super

You will have access to salary sacrificing options which allow you to significantly increase your take home pay.

In addition, you will have access to generous leave allowances, including additional paid leave over the Christmas period, on top of your annual leave benefits!

Our organisation has a strong focus on professional development so you will have access to both internal and external training and development opportunities to enhance your career and self-care.

To apply

Please forward your CV, a Cover Letter and Application Form addressing the assessment questions to hr@nunku.org.au

Candidates who do not complete and submit the Application Form, Cover Letter and CV will not be considered further for this position.

We encourage and thank all applicants for their time, however only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

Should you have any queries or for further information please contact HR via hr@nunku.org.au

Applications close Monday 1st October 2018 at 10am Adelaide time

Child Health and Maternal Program Coordinator and Child Health Nurse Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation 

About the Organisation

The name Derbarl Yerrigan is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River. Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC), has a proud history of providing Aboriginal health services within the Perth metropolitan area and in 1974 was the first Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service to be established in Australia.

DYHSAC has now grown to have four successful, busy clinics across the Perth metro area, delivering comprehensive healthcare and specialised programs along with an accommodation centre for clients requiring medical treatment away from home or Country. Our mission is to provide high quality, holistic and culturally secure health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities in the Perth metropolitan region.

For more information about DYHSAC, please visit http://www.dyhs.org.au.

About the Opportunity

DYHSAC is currently seeking for an experienced Child Health and Maternal Program Coordinator based at East Perth site however with an expectation to cover the catchment of DYSHAC. The primary objective of this position is to provide holistic and culturally appropriate care to Aboriginal families to ensure young children are as healthy as possible and also to ensure Aboriginal women are connected to appropriate care during pregnancy and perinatal period.

The position will be required to plan, develop and evaluate comprehensive programs which address the health needs of pregnant women and children aged zero to five years.  These programs will include partnerships with specialist maternity services, delivery of scheduled child health screening, care coordination of children requiring child development and/or specialist paediatric services, coordination of child immunisation programs, health promotion programs addressing priority health issues, and supporting skill development in the area of child health for the DYHSAC clinic staff.

Essential Requirement for the position

  1. Current registration with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Authority as a Registered Nurse.
  2. Significant experience and/or qualifications in Child Health, community nursing and/or paediatrics in the primary health setting.
  3. Substantial demonstrated experience in project management, including planning, implementation and evaluation.
  4. Demonstrated understanding of the health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with a particular focus on children 0-5 years, pregnant women, and families with children.
  5. Very well-developed written and verbal communication skills, including the ability to liaise with external agencies and solve complex problems.
  6. Demonstrated ability to manage a multi-disciplinary team.
  7. Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively and communicate effectively with Aboriginal families.
  8. A current Working With Children Check.

About the Benefits

Employment wages and conditions will be commensurate with qualifications and experience, and will be negotiated with the successful applicant.  At Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation, you will be joining an organisation which offers a flexible and family-friendly work environment and is led by a passionate and committed CEO.

It is an essential requirement for this position to undertake a National Police Check.

How to Apply:

Please apply through SEEK including a resume and a cover letter addressing the selection criteria. For any further information about the position, please contact HR Department on (08) 9421 3888.

Applications close: Wednesday 26 September 2018 at 5pm

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Please note that the Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is an equal opportunity institution, providing educational and employment opportunities without regard to race, colour, gender, age, or disability.

The Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation reserves the right to contact the current or most recent employer and evaluate past employment records of applicants selected for interview. The organisation reserves the right to re-advertise the position or to delay indefinitely final selection if it is deemed that applicants for the position do not constitute an adequate applicant pool.

APPLY HERE 

Child Health Nurse

About the Organisation

The name Derbarl Yerrigan is the Wadjuk Noongar name for the Swan River. Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (DYHSAC), has a proud history of providing Aboriginal health services within the Perth metropolitan area and in 1974 was the first Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service to be established in Australia. DYHSAC has now grown to have four successful, busy clinics across the Perth metro area, delivering comprehensive healthcare and specialised programs along with an accommodation centre for clients requiring medical treatment away from home or Country. Our mission is to provide high quality, holistic and culturally secure health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities in the Perth metropolitan region.

For more information about DYHSAC, please visit http://www.dyhs.org.au.

About the Opportunity

DYHSAC is currently seeking for experienced part time and/or full time Child Health Nurses based at East Perth site however with an expectation to cover the catchment of DYSHAC.The primary objective of this position is to provide holistic and culturally appropriate care to Aboriginal families to ensure young children are as healthy as possible.

The position will be required to provide specialist child health services to children and their families who are clients of Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service.  This will include scheduled child health screening, care coordination of children requiring child development and/or specialist paediatric services, implementation of child immunisation programs, health promotion programs addressing priority health issues, and supporting skill development in the area of child health for the DYHSAC clinic staff.

Essential Requirement for the position

  1. Current Registration with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency as a Registered Nurse and/or Midwife.
  2. Post graduate qualification in Child Health plus minimum 12 months experience working in the clinical area.
  3. Understanding of scope of practice in line with relevant state board.
  4. Good understanding and demonstrated participation in continuous quality improvement activities.
  5. Well-developed written and verbal communication and interpersonal skills.
  6. Ability to work as a member of a multi-disciplinary, multi-cultural team.
  7. Experience in keeping detailed and accurate records by hard copy and electronic means.
  8. Demonstrated ability to maintain confidentiality and security of records and information.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge and Understanding of Primary Health Care principles and social determinants of health.
  10. Willingness to undergo Drug and Alcohol testing as required by the employer.
  11. A current WA Immunisation Certificate.
  12. Current Working With Children Check

About the Benefits

Employment wages and conditions will be commensurate with qualifications and experience, and will be negotiated with the successful applicant.  At Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation, you will be joining an organisation which offers a flexible and family-friendly work environment and is led by a passionate and committed CEO.

It is an essential requirement for this position to undertake a National Police Check.

How to Apply:

Please apply through SEEK including a resume and a cover letter addressing the selection criteria. For any further information about the position, please contact HR Department on (08) 9421 3888.

Applications close: Wednesday 26 September 2018 at 5pm

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Please note that the Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is an equal opportunity institution, providing educational and employment opportunities without regard to race, colour, gender, age, or disability.

The Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Aboriginal Corporation reserves the right to contact the current or most recent employer and evaluate past employment records of applicants selected for interview. The organisation reserves the right to re-advertise the position or to delay indefinitely final selection if it is deemed that applicants for the position do not constitute an adequate applicant pool.

APPLY HERE

Miwajt Health ACCHO : Coordinator Regional Renal Program

Are you passionate about improving health care to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in remote Northern Territory?

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is a regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Our Values

  • Compassion care and respect for our clients and staff and pride in the results of our work.
  • Cultural integrity and safety, while recognising cultural and individual differences.
  • Driven by evidence-based practice.
  • Accountability and transparency.
  • Continual capacity building of our organisation and community.

We have an exciting opportunity for a self-motivated hard working individual who will coordinate Miwatj Health’s Regional Renal Program across East Arnhem Land. Renal services are contracted to a partner organisation and the Regional Renal Program Coordinator will provide a central point of contact between services, foster and strengthen links between PHC programs and renal services, develop and implement an Aboriginal workforce model for the program, and coordinate and drive the aims of the community reference groups.

Key responsibilities:

  • Implement and coordinate renal program plan as per renal program statement and principles.
  • Manage program budgets and investigate funding opportunities.
  • Establish, support and engage regularly with the regional community reference groups and patient groups in Darwin.
  • Drive action on identified priorities of community reference groups.
  • Coordinate with WDNWPT regarding patient preceptor work plans.

To be successful in this role you should have current registration with AHPRA as Registered Nurse / Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner / other relevant qualified health professional.

More info APPLY

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland


 

 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

2.1 There are 10 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 There are 8 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

 

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 24 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3 There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

 

Current Vacancies
  • Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Clinical)

  • Intake Officer / Support Worker

  • Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner (Senior)

  • Counsellor (Specialised) / Social Worker – Various Roles

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

 

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

General Practitioner (Swan Hill)Mental Health Nurse (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Mildura)Alcohol and Other Drugs Support WorkerCaseworker, Kinship ReunificationPractice Nurse – Chronic Care CoordinatorAboriginal Family-Led Decision-making Caseworker (Swan Hill)First Supports Caseworker (Swan Hill)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Mildura)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Health Worker (1)Team Leader, Early Years (Swan Hill)General Practitioner (Mildura)

MDAS Jobs website 

 

 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

Trainee Dental Assistant  Illawarra NSW
Comprehensive Care Practice Manager  Surry Hills, NSW 2010

AHMRC Job WEBSITE

8. Tasmania

Are you interested in Chronic Disease Management?

Do you have a qualification as an Aboriginal Health Worker, Enrolled Nurse, or Registered Nurse?

We have a part time position at the

Aboriginal Health Service in Hobart,

for immediate start, to 30th June 2019.

 

Please provide a covering letter outlining your desire to work in this area and a current resume to payroll@tacinc.com.au

or email raylene.f@tacinc.com.au for further information.

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Lowitja Institute :  Research Project Officer

  • Become part of a leading national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation
  • Melbourne based
  • Full time fixed term to June 2019 (maternity leave replacement), competitive salary with generous salary sacrifice options

The Lowitja Institute is Australia’s national institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, named in honour of its Patron, Dr Lowitja O’Donoghue AC CBE DSG.

Our purpose is to value the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Our vision is that the Lowitja Institute will be an authoritative and collective voice for the benefit of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ health and wellbeing

In joining the Lowitja Institute, our valued staff commit to working respectfully and effectively, within an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation, to make a direct and significant contribution to the health and wellbeing of our peoples.

The Institute is currently seeking a Research Project Officer to be a member of the Research and Knowledge Translation team, which is responsible for the creation and management of the research-related activities and products required to meet the strategic and operational objectives of the Institute. The Research Officer will work within one of the Lowitja Institute’s broader activities, Insight, which converts key elements of research findings into approaches for evidence-based decision making by policymakers, communities and service practitioners.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply for the position.

Applications, addressing the selection criteria and submitted through the Lowitja Institute website, must be received by midnight AEST on Monday 24 September 2018.

The Lime Network : EVENT AND PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR (INDIGENOUS APPLICANTS ONLY)

The LIME Network – Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Only Indigenous Australians are eligible to apply as this position is exempt under the Special Measure Provision, Section 12 (1) of the Equal Opportunity Act 2011 (Vic).

Salary: $88,171 – $95,444 p.a. (pro rata) plus 9.5% superannuation

The Event and Project Coordinator will take a lead in the coordination, planning and implementation of key projects and events of the LIME Network.  These include the LIME Connection international conference, stakeholder meetings, seminars and other events.

Close date: 14 Oct 2018

Position Description and Selection Criteria

0046502.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to: https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/selection-criteria

Advertised: AUS Eastern Standard Time
Applications close: AUS Eastern Daylight Time

Website 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Download @CSIROnews #FutureofHealth Report that provides a new path for national healthcare delivery, setting a way forward to shift the system from illness treatment, to #prevention.

Australians rank amongst the healthiest in the world with our health system one of the most efficient and equitable. However, the nation’s strong health outcomes hide a few alarming facts: 

  • There is a 10-year life expectancy gap between the health of non-Indigenous Australians and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Australians spend on average 11 years in ill health – the highest among OECD countries
  • 63% (over 11 million) of adult Australians are considered overweight or obese
  • 60% of the adult population have low levels of literacy 
  • The majority of Australians do not consume the recommended number of serves from any of the five food groups.

From CSIRO Future of Health report

Download HERE full 60 Page Report NACCHO INFO FutureofHealthReport_WEB_180910

The CSIRO Future of Health report provides a list of recommendations for improving the health of Australians over the next 15 years, focussed around five central themes: empowering people, addressing health inequity, unlocking the value of digitised data, supporting integrated and precision health solutions, and integrating with the global sector.

CSIRO Chief Executive Dr Larry Marshall said collaboration and coordination were key to securing the health of current and future generations in Australia, and across the globe.

“It’s hard to find an Australian who hasn’t personally benefitted from something we created, including some world’s first health innovations like atomic absorption spectroscopy for diagnostics; greyscale imaging for ultrasound, the flu vaccine (Relenza); the Hendra vaccine protecting both people and animals; even the world’s first extended-wear contact lenses,” Dr Marshall said.

“As the world is changing faster than ever before, we’re looking to get ahead of these changes by bringing together Team Australia’s world-class expertise, from all sectors, and the life experiences of all Australians to set a bold direction towards a brighter future.”

The report highlighted that despite ranking among the healthiest people in the world, Australians spent on average of 11 years in ill health – the highest among OECD countries.

Clinical care was reported to influence only 20 per cent of a person’s life expectancy and quality of life, with the remaining 80 per cent relying on external factors such as behaviour, social and economic support, and the physical environment.

“As pressure on our healthcare system increases, costs escalate, and healthy choices compete with busier lives, a new approach is needed to ensure the health and wellbeing of Australians,” CSIRO Director of Health & Biosecurity Dr Rob Grenfell said.

The report stated that the cost of managing mental health related illness to be $60 billion annually, with a further $5 billion being spent on managing costs associated with obesity.

Health inequities across a range of social, economic, and cultural measures were found to cost Australia almost $230 billion a year.

“Unless we shift our approach to healthcare, a rising population and increases in chronic illnesses such as obesity and mental illness, will add further strain to the system,” Dr Grenfell said.

“By shifting to a system focussed on proactive health management and prevention, we have an exciting opportunity to provide quality healthcare that leaves no-one behind.

“How Australia navigates this shift over the next 15 years will significantly impact the health of the population and the success of Australian healthcare organisations both domestically and abroad.”

CSIRO has been continuing to grow its expertise within the health domain and is focussed on research that will help Australians live healthier, longer lives.

The Future of Health report was developed by CSIRO Futures, the strategic advisory arm of CSIRO.

More than 30 organisations across the health sector were engaged in its development, including government, health insurers, educators, researchers, and professional bodies.

Australia’s health challenges:

  • Australians spend on average 11 years in ill health – the highest among OECD countries.
  • 63 per cent (over 11 million) of adult Australians are considered overweight or obese.
  • There is a 10-year life expectancy gap between the health of non-Indigenous Australians and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • 60 per cent of the adult population have low levels of health literacy.
  • The majority of Australians do not consume the recommended number of serves from any of the five food groups.

The benefits of shifting the system from treatment to prevention:

  • Improved health outcomes and equity for all Australians.
  • Greater system efficiencies that flatten the cost curve of health financing.
  • More impactful and profitable business models.
  • Creation of new industries based on precision and preventative health.
  • More sustainable and environmentally friendly healthcare practices.
  • More productive workers leading to increased job satisfaction and improved work-life balance.

More info : www.csiro.au/futureofhealth

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Job Opportunities #NSW CEO @awabakalltd Doctor @Walgett_AMS Plus #NT @MiwatjHealth @CAACongress #QLD 6 @DeadlyChoices Officers @ATSICHSBris @IUIH_ #QLD @Apunipima Plus @NATSIHWA #Aboriginal Health Workers @IAHA_National Allied Health @CATSINaM #Nursing

This weeks #ACCHO #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

1.1 ACCHO Job/s of the week 

1.2 National Aboriginal Health Scholarships 

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland

2.Queensland 

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 Rumbalara ACCHO  PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2  South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

University of Melbourne in Indigenous Eye Health.

Project Officer UNSW

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

1. 1 ACCHO Job/s of the week

CEO Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle 

Located in the popular NSW hub of Newcastle, the role of CEO for Awabakal is a unique opportunity to advance the needs of the local Aboriginal community it serves in the delivery of integrated primary healthcare, aged care, children and family services.

The CEO is responsible for collaborating with the Board of Directors to set and execute strategic direction which ensures organisational growth, effectiveness and sustainability. The successful candidate will be visionary in their approach to predicting and preparing for future challenges and opportunities as they relate to Aboriginal affairs. Significant senior experience operating at this strata level is critical.

Only those with the ability to make tough decisions and see them through will succeed, therefore exceptional change management skills and the ability to cultivate a strong, functional workplace culture to drive accountability in an organisation in which transparent decision-making and ethics is essential.
The successful candidate will need to demonstrate significant experience in managing the complex and sometimes competing needs of multiple stakeholders ranging from community, organisational members, service delivery professionals and government funding agencies.

The successful CEO candidate will need to deeply connect and understand the culturally sensitive health and support issues and challenges required to address current and future needs of the local Aboriginal community.

Based on this knowledge the CEO will be accountable for developing and delivering a fully integrated program service delivery and strategic partnership model, utilising the necessary fiduciary and financial capabilities to successfully execute.

You will possess:
• Extensive knowledge and genuine appreciation of Aboriginal culture as it relates to the role.
• Significant experience in successfully operating in the complex political, social and economic environment that affect Aboriginal communities.
• Beyond reproach ethical, transparent standards in a highly regulated organisation with complex accreditation and reporting requirements.
• A community-centric, global perspective on a community organisation delivering access programs.
• High-order communication skills (written, verbal, negotiating, influencing, funding application and report-writing).
• A degree in business, finance, project management or related field.
• A no nonsense ‘say what you mean and mean what you say’ approach to addressing legacy challenges and opportunities!
THE OFFER
A competitive salary and benefits package is on offer for the successful candidate.
Aboriginality is a genuine occupational requirement of this position; an exemption is claimed under Section 14D of the Anti-Discrimination Act NSW 1977.

HOW TO APPLY

Request for position description and confidential enquiries can be made to Ali Kimmorley or Sally Bartley of peoplefusion on 02 4929 1666. Your information and application is kept strictly confidential.

To register your interest please visit our website https://www.peoplefusion.com.au/ and attach your resume and a covering letter outlining your relevant experience and motivation for applying for this role.

Applications close 24th September 2018.

Deadly Choices Officers ( 6 positions ) ATSICHS Brisbane

ATSICHS Brisbane is a not-for-profit community owned health and human services organisation delivering on the unique health and wellbeing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in greater Brisbane and Logan. We are the largest, most comprehensive Aboriginal Medical Health Service in Queensland.

Our services include medical and dental clinics, mums and bubs programs, an aged care facility, family and child safety services, foster and kinship care, social and emotional wellbeing services, kindergarten programs and a youth service.

We have five core values which shape the way that we work:

  • Community
  • Respect
  • Collaboration
  • Quality
  • Accountability

“Our vision for the future is that we are world leaders in Indigenous health and social support services provided in an urban setting.”

To do this we are focussing on four strategic priorities:

  1. Work smarter, work together
  2. Ensure easy to access services for every stage of life
  3. Champion healthy individuals and thriving families
  4. Build a strong and sustainable organisation.

About the Role

As a key member of the ATSICHS Brisbane team, the Deadly Choices Program Officer is expected to personally contribute to the shaping and achievement of ATSICHS vision and goals within their own scope. The Deadly Choices Program Officer will provide three (3) Key Functions

Role Functions

The Deadly Choices Program Officer is responsible, as part of a small team, for the delivery of school and community based health education, promotion and prevention activities; in line with the Regional Action Plan and the Deadly Choices and Smoking Cessation Procedures Manuals.

Organisational Contributions

Conduct a range of workshops and support activities for ATSICHS staff, to improve tobacco cessation screening and intervention practices and processes.

Contribute to the Development of a Flourishing Team

Support fellow staff in a team environment to build collegiality and a sense of belongingness within the team and ATSICHS family. Staff will actively participate in team activities and contribute to a flourishing workplace culture that promotes the ethos and values of ATSICHS Brisbane as a long standing Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation.

About You

Essential:

  • Certificate IV or above in Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care – Community Care or equivalent
  • Current C Class Drivers Licence (Qld) and an ability to travel across the designated region as required
  • Working with Children’s Card (Blue Card) or be eligible to apply
  • Interpersonal skills that demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate negotiate and liaise with clients and members of the community, general and technical staff in the provision of professional quality client service
  • The ability to work with other health professionals and organisations
  • Demonstrated ability to deliver health promotion programs, with experience in community engagement activities.
  • Demonstrated understanding of the health social and emotional wellbeing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Demonstrated commitment to maintain a healthy lifestyle and engage and encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to commit to lifestyle change
  • Please note that it is a genuine occupational requirement that this position be filled by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person in accordance with s25 of the Anti-discrimination Act 1991 (Qld).

Desirable, but not mandatory:

  • Experience working in Healthy Lifestyle or similar Health or Community engagement/development programs.
  • Previous experience of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients.
  • Bachelor degree in Public Health/Nutrition/Exercise Science/Health Promotion or related discipline.

How can you apply?

Applications can only be submitted through Seek.

Applications must be submitted before 14th September 2018

For any further enquiries please get in touch with our People & Culture Team through (07) 3240 8900

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) GENERAL MANAGER BUSINESS SERVICES

  • Base salary: $152,256.00 – $187,239.00
  • Total effective package: $181,168 – $224,943 (p.a)*
  • Full Time 4 Year Maximum Term Contract

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 40 years’ experience providing comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal people living in Central Australia. Congress is seeking a General Manager Business Services who is interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

The General Manager Business Services is an experienced executive within a dynamic community controlled comprehensive primary health care service that is making a real difference in Aboriginal health. The role is accountable to the CEO for the leadership, planning, development and performance of Congress’s internal business services (finance, quality and risk, information and communications technology, records management, and asset management) to ensure that the division supports the effective delivery of contemporary evidence based services that meet the current and emerging needs of Congress.

More Info APPLY 

Miwajt Health ACCHO : Coordinator Regional Renal Program

Are you passionate about improving health care to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in remote Northern Territory?

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is a regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Our Values

  • Compassion care and respect for our clients and staff and pride in the results of our work.
  • Cultural integrity and safety, while recognising cultural and individual differences.
  • Driven by evidence-based practice.
  • Accountability and transparency.
  • Continual capacity building of our organisation and community.

We have an exciting opportunity for a self-motivated hard working individual who will coordinate Miwatj Health’s Regional Renal Program across East Arnhem Land. Renal services are contracted to a partner organisation and the Regional Renal Program Coordinator will provide a central point of contact between services, foster and strengthen links between PHC programs and renal services, develop and implement an Aboriginal workforce model for the program, and coordinate and drive the aims of the community reference groups.

Key responsibilities:

  • Implement and coordinate renal program plan as per renal program statement and principles.
  • Manage program budgets and investigate funding opportunities.
  • Establish, support and engage regularly with the regional community reference groups and patient groups in Darwin.
  • Drive action on identified priorities of community reference groups.
  • Coordinate with WDNWPT regarding patient preceptor work plans.

To be successful in this role you should have current registration with AHPRA as Registered Nurse / Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner / other relevant qualified health professional.

More info APPLY

Practice Manager Gippsland & East Gippsland Aboriginal Co-Operative

Organisational Profile

GEGAC is an Aboriginal Community organization based in Bairnsdale Victoria. Consisting of about 160 staff, GEGAC is a Not for Profit organization that delivers holistic services in the areas of Primary Health, Social Services, Elders & Disability and Early Childhood Education.

Position Purpose

The Practice Manager is responsible for the day to day delivery of the Primary Health Service & Dental Clinic, overseeing programs and supervision of staff to ensure all patients receive a quality and culturally appropriate service regarding their health care needs. The role also involves development of action plans, reports and review of data to maximise revenue and to manage quality improvement activities and prepare for accreditation.

Qualifications and Registrations Requirement (Essential or Desirable).

Drivers Licence Essential

At least 3 years of management experience  Essential       

Experience in either an Aboriginal health service or a community health service/GP practice  Essential  

A person of Aboriginal / Torres Strait Islander background Desirable    

Previous budgeting experience or managing a divisional budget including grant funding Desirable                             

How to apply for this job

A copy of the position description and the application form can be obtained below, at GEGAC reception 0351 500 700 or by contacting HR@gegac.org.au.

Or by following the below links –

Position Description – https://goo.gl/XzK2G5

Application Form – https://goo.gl/TEwMwV

Applicants must complete the application form as it contains the selection criteria for shortlisting. Any applications not submitted on the Application form will not be considered.

Medical Practitioner / GP VMO / Doctor – Walgett

Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service Limited (WAMS) is an innovative, dynamic, fully managed GP practice, providing high quality healthcare to the Walgett community. The first AMS in NSW to be accredited with the QIC, WAMS is committed to providing an innovative model of healthcare that incorporates practice nursing, allied health and preventative healthcare.

Professional Benefits

  • Varied presentations will challenge your skills and ensure that your continued professional development is maintained.
  • Innovative models of care
  • Working in Walgett may fast-track your 10 Year Moratorium by as much as 7 years.
  • VMO subject to LHD credentialing
  • Outreach clinics in Brewarrina, Goodooga and Pilliga
  • Be supported by Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers and Allied Health staff

Highly attractive remuneration and conditions

  • Attractive remuneration structure to suit your experience – potential to earn more than $300k+ annually
  • Immediate patient base
  • Flexible work hours and arrangements
  • Practice is open Monday to Friday
  • Access to the GP Rural Incentive Program for eligible doctors
  • Access to NSW RDN’s Transition Grant for eligible doctors
  • Quality accommodation and car included in package
  • State of the art purpose-built service with an Administration Building, General Practice and Dental Practice
  • Services including –  Men’s Health, Ear Health, Eye Health, Drug & Alcohol, Family Health, Chronic Disease, Speech Pathology, Aboriginal Maternal and Infant Health Strategy and Early Childhood Family Health Nurse

Selection Criteria:

  • Must have current specialist medical registration with AHPRA or be eligible for Category 1 pathway with RACGP or ACRRM
  • Demonstrated experience working in the field of Aboriginal health
  • Full Medical Indemnity
  • WWCC / NCRC Clearances
  • Full Australian drivers licence
  • Demonstrated interest in training junior doctors
  • Willingness to contribute positively within a team environment

Helping communities in remote NSW

  • RDN is a not-for-profit organisation. Neither you nor the practice is charged a fee to use our services.

If you have vocational registration or hold FRACGP/FACRRM we’d love to hear from you.

To discuss possibilities please contact:

Mark Muchiri, Medical Workforce Consultant

NSW Rural Doctors Network:

Tel: +61 2 4924 8076
Email: mmuchiri@nswrdn.com.au

Christine Corby OAM, Chief Executive Officer

Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service Limited

Email: ChristineC@walgettams.com.au

 

Rural GP – Aboriginal Health Service – Coastal South Australia

The RDWA is working with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service (CKAHS) to recruit a full time GP. This is a highly rewarding role and would suit a GP who thrives on a broad scope of practice and is committed to improving the health outcomes of the community. An excellent package is on offer and includes housing, generous remuneration between $240,000 – $260,000, relocation assistance, and top tier Commonwealth Government funded financial incentives.

The Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service is located on South Australia’s spectacular Eyre Peninsula. The practice provides a culturally appropriate service to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the township of Ceduna and surrounding outreach services.

Ceduna is a busy regional hub with a population of over 3,500. Boasting beautiful beaches and excellent fishing waters, it is a popular tourist spot and a hub for aquaculture including oyster farming. The town is well serviced with schools, government agencies and retail shops. There are daily flights to Adelaide.

The team at CKAHS consists of Aboriginal Health Workers, a Practice Manager, Practice Nurse and Clinical Coordinator and is well supported by regular visiting Specialist and Allied Health workers. The Ceduna District Health Service (Hospital) and GP Plus Health Care Centre are co-located with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service. Inpatient care and emergency on-call is managed by the town GPs as part of a shared roster. Doctors are well supported by excellent retrieval services and support networks for immediate specialist advice via phone or video link.

Criteria

  • 4 years of general practice experience
  • Emergency medicine experience

For more detailed information or to apply, contact the RDWA Recruitment Team on 08 8234 8277 or via email: recruitment@ruraldoc.com.au

(CKAHS) to recruit a full time GP. This is a highly rewarding role and would suit a GP who thrives on a broad scope of practice and is committed to improving the health outcomes of the community. An excellent package is on offer and includes housing, generous remuneration between $240,000 – $260,000, relocation assistance, and top tier Commonwealth Government funded financial incentives.

The Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service is located on South Australia’s spectacular Eyre Peninsula. The practice provides a culturally appropriate service to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the township of Ceduna and surrounding outreach services.

Ceduna is a busy regional hub with a population of over 3,500. Boasting beautiful beaches and excellent fishing waters, it is a popular tourist spot and a hub for aquaculture including oyster farming. The town is well serviced with schools, government agencies and retail shops. There are daily flights to Adelaide.

The team at CKAHS consists of Aboriginal Health Workers, a Practice Manager, Practice Nurse and Clinical Coordinator and is well supported by regular visiting Specialist and Allied Health workers. The Ceduna District Health Service (Hospital) and GP Plus Health Care Centre are co-located with the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service. Inpatient care and emergency on-call is managed by the town GPs as part of a shared roster. Doctors are well supported by excellent retrieval services and support networks for immediate specialist advice via phone or video link.

Criteria

  • 4 years of general practice experience
  • Emergency medicine experience

For more detailed information or to apply, contact the RDWA Recruitment Team on 08 8234 8277 or via email: recruitment@ruraldoc.com.au

Australian Hearing / University of Queensland


 

 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

2.1 There are 5 JOBS AT Apunipima Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 There are 8 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

 

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 24 JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3 There are 5 JOBS at Wurli Katherine

 

Current Vacancies
  • Administration Support Officer – SIF

  • Counsellor (Specialised) / Social Worker – Various Roles

  • Support Worker (Community Services)
  • Clinic Receptionist

  • Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

 

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

General Practitioner (Swan Hill)Mental Health Nurse (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Mildura)Case Worker, Integrated Family Services (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Stronger Families Caseworker (Mildura)Alcohol and Other Drugs Support WorkerCaseworker, Kinship ReunificationPractice Nurse – Chronic Care CoordinatorAboriginal Family-Led Decision-making Caseworker (Swan Hill)First Supports Caseworker (Swan Hill)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Mildura)Men’s Case Management Caseworker (Swan Hill)Aboriginal Health Worker (1)Team Leader, Early Years (Swan Hill)General Practitioner (Mildura)

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 Rumbalara ACCHO  PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

PRACTICE MANAGER – Re-advertised

New Position – Full time – 38 Hours per week 

The position exists to ensure that the management of the general practice:

  • Fully supports the delivery of quality clinical care by all clinicians working in the practice

  • Provides for the self-sustained operation of the practice (break-even at minimum)

Key Selection Criteria:

  • Understanding of, and commitment to, Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander culture

  • Understanding of general practice

  • Management experience in a small business, ideally general practice management

  • Demonstrated leadership capabilities

  • Development, implementation, and monitoring of policies and processes that ensure effective and efficient operation of a healthcare service

  • Experience in leading healthcare service accreditation

  • Quality management experience

  • Commitment to continuing professional education

  • Valid driver’s license

For further information on this role contact Mr. Soenke Tremper or Ms Cindy McGee on 03- 58200 – 035

Salary Packaging is available

You will be required to hold a valid Victorian Employee Working with Children Check and a current police check completed within the last 2 weeks prior to commencement.

For consideration for an interview, you must obtain a Position Description from Marieta on (03) 5820 6405 or email: marieta.martin@raclimited.com.au and address the Key Selection Criteria, include a current resume, copies of qualifications and a cover letter.

Applications close at 4pm on Tuesday, 28th August 2018 and are to be addressed to:

Human Resources Dept. Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative
PO Box 614
Mooroopna Vic 3629

Koorie Supported Playgroups Facilitator

New Position – 0.5 FTE – 2.5 days (19 hours) per week

Develop and deliver two culturally safe supported playgroups for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families & children (aged from birth to starting primary school) with the aim of improving parent/child interactions, parental skill development & capacity, child development & school readiness, supporting cultural knowledge & connectedness and providing information and facilitating links to other relevant services.

Key Selection Criteria:

* Demonstrated knowledge and/or understanding of early years developmental milestones for children.

* A sound knowledge of and understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, values, family networks, parenting practices and issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.

* Proven planning and organisational skills.

* Proven employment history/experience in related field.

* Current Drivers licence.

* Minimum Diploma in Early Childhood, Social Work, Community Services or related field.

Salary Packaging is a benefit available for Part or Full Time Employees

You will be required to hold a valid Victorian Employee Working with Children Check and a current police check obtained within the last 2 months.

For consideration for an interview, you must obtain a Position Description from Marieta on (03) 5820 6405 or email: marieta.martin@raclimited.com.au and address the Key Selection Criteria, include a current resume, copies of qualifications and a cover letter.

Applications close at 4pm on Friday, 14th September 2018 and are to be addressed to:

Human Resources Dept.

Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative PO Box 614 Mooroopna Vic 3629

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community are encouraged to apply

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

 

AHMRC Job WEBSITE

7.2  South Coast Medical Service Aboriginal

 

The Community Support Officer will be responsible for supervising and reporting on family contact, transport of children, young people and their families to supervised contacts, respite and other scheduled activities. The Community Support Officer may also be required to engage in mentoring activities.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Qualifications, Knowledge and Experience

Essential

* A tertiary qualification in Social Work / Welfare / Community Services / Disability Services or related fields or equivalent experience in a relevant sector

* Demonstrated ability in working with Aboriginal people, their communities and organisations

* The ability to develop and maintain effective working relationships with stakeholders, other agencies and service providers

* Proficiency in report writing and demonstrated ability to develop, organise and maintain records and reports in a timely manner

* Demonstrated computers skills, including the use of all Microsoft Office applications

* Ability to work autonomously under limited supervision, exercising sound professional judgement and seeking advice and consultation when appropriate as well as working as part of a wider team

* Personal organisation skills including time management and ability to prioritise competing demands

* Understanding of the importance of handling sensitive and confidential client or service information

* Clear Working with Children Check and National Police History Check

* Current, valid Driver’s Licence and willingness to transport clients, and travel overnight in regional and interstate areas if required

Desirable

* Aboriginality*

PERSONAL QUALITIES AND ATTRIBUTES

* Effective conflict resolution skills, negotiation, mediation and decision making skills

* Demonstrates initiative and an ability to problem solve

* Good literacy skills

* Effective communication skills including written and verbal communication with the ability to exercise these skills with people at all levels

For a full Position Description and an Application form, please email hr@southcoastams.org.au

 

 

8. Tasmania

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Closingthegap : Reconciling a policy mess : But research shows ACCHO’s significantly more effective at improving Indigenous health outcomes than the mainstream system.

 ” The present National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO )network provides a different working model for governments devolving decision-making power to the people directly affected. Research shows the network is significantly more effective at improving indigenous health outcomes than the mainstream system.

In its submission to a parliamentary committee considering options for indigenous constitutional recognition, the peak health body says: “We know that governments, of all persuasions and at all levels, struggle to … ensure full participation from ­Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander peoples to have a genuine say over matters that impact on us. This can be seen now in the poorly conceived and led consultations on the Closing the Gap Refresh.”

From The Australian 5 September Stephen Fitzpatrick Indigenous affairs editor 

To get to the bottom of why the decade-old Closing the Gap program designed to reduce Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander disadvantage has been such an underwhelming enterprise, it helps to trawl through the confused muddle of a half-century of indigenous affairs policy in Australia.

The Council of Australian Governments scheme, with its range of targets tracking outcomes across health, education and employment based on rigorous data sets, emerged in Kevin Rudd’s hands from the formal reconciliation era to become an annual showpiece addressing the state of the First Nations within the broader nation.

That this concept was even possible dates to 1967, when a referendum gave the commonwealth powers to join with state and territory governments to create a national system of indigenous affairs. For the first time, indigenous Australians could be treated — in theory — the same as everyone.

But theory and practice often don’t align. The fact Closing the Gap now is undergoing a root-and-branch review, labelled a “refresh”, shows this. So does the Turnbull government’s malign rejection last year of the Uluru Statement from the Heart’s proposal for indigenous constitutional recognition, which would have put indigenous Australians at the heart of policy made about them.

Now the latest top-down spasm in indigenous affairs policy, the appointment of Tony Abbott to an ill-defined role as “special envoy” in the field, is being seen in many quarters as yet another abrogation of repeated government promises to do things “with, not to” Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders.

Academic Marcia Langton has called the appointment a “punch in the guts to indigenous Australia”, and it has been described by others as being more about solving Scott Morrison’s political problems than black Australia’s lived ones. The Prime Minister’s indigenous advisory council was not even consulted, co-chairman Roy Ah See revealed to The Australian.

There are just three Closing the Gap targets still formally being considered, only two of them on track: halving the gap on Year 12 attainment and getting 95 per cent of four-year-olds enrolled in early childhood education. The third, closing the gap on life expectancy by 2031, remains derailed.

Four more targets expired recently. Just one — halving the child mortality rate — is trending to be met, although data experts query whether the underlying figures used to demonstrate this are accurate. The other three still off course when their timelines ran out were on reading, writing and numeracy; school attendance; and employment.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare charts a life expectancy gap of 10 years and says that between one-third and one-half of the health gaps between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians are associated with differences in socio-economic position such as education, employment and income.

Linked to this, it recently released a report documenting the ongoing impact of trauma suffered by the Stolen Generations, of whom it calculates there are 17,150 survivors.

Many of the detailed written submissions to the official government “refresh” point out that structural reform is the only thing capable of overcoming the inequity born of more than two centuries of dispossession and trauma. Not a blind adherence to meeting targets — or, as expressed in ­Abbott’s acceptance of his new role, the rather hollow platitude that improved school attendance rates “is the absolute key to a better future for indigenous kids and this is the key to reconciliation”.

The overwhelming conclusion is that long-term failure has been the result of a lack of consistent indigenous voices in policymaking — and although peak groups and individuals are being consulted on the “refresh”, there is not much expectation of ongoing co-design.

After a series of workshops involving peak groups and individuals, there are 23 revised targets on the table. Several continue on the original themes, ­although the reliance on a mix of state and territory data and policies, as well as those at the commonwealth level, is a reminder that the 1967 referendum’s unanticipated result was an overall indigenous affairs policy incoherence.

Measures on health, education and employment take up the first nine proposed targets, with existing data on each of these assessed to be largely adequate for integrating into a revised scheme.

A new category of entrepreneurship acknowledges that getting out of poverty is crucial to escaping disadvantage, but analyst Charles Jacobs, from the Centre for Independent Studies, warns that its reliance wholly on government procurement spending increases could mask the need for also boosting indigenous business participation in the private sector.

“Small enterprises, for instance tourism businesses, are part of this, so the measure should perhaps be achieving a certain percentage of self-employment in the whole sector,” Jacobs says. “You’ve got to include businesses in the free market because the government procurement approach is limited.”

Areas such as housing, child protection, justice and family violence also are categorised as having sufficient data streams to create realistic targets, but the worry is that measuring inequitable rates of out-of-home care and imprisonment could be meaningless at the commonwealth level if the state and territory jurisdictions that determine them do not also introduce actual policy change.

Among the Uluru Statement’s most powerful lines is a direct reference to this dilemma: “Proportionally, we are the most incar­cerated people on the planet. We are not an innately criminal people. Our children are alienated from their families at unprecedented rates. This cannot be because we have no love for them. And our youth languish in detention in obscene numbers. They should be our hope for the future.”

The remaining areas being considered in the current blueprint cover targets that may address some of the root causes of this, but for which the review’s briefing notes admit there is no useful data being collected.

This raises the question of whether measurability on these should even be the key goal or whether the voice to parliament proposed at Uluru might be a better lever because it could have a direct influence on policymaking. They include disability and social inclusion, culture and language, racism and systemic discrimination, healing and trauma: issues that inquiry after inquiry has acknowledged are influencers of overall poor indigenous outcomes.

The First Peoples Disability Network submission to the review describes the flaws as being built in to the system.

“Once a year the Prime Minister delivers his report on outcomes to parliament, but after the report is delivered there is no systematic process that involves Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander expertise on how to respond to the outcomes and issues,” it says. “The process needs to be transformed from a retrospective, static and non-participatory process into a dynamic and responsive process.”

There is even speculation that the 11th report, due in February, simply will be an announcement of a new measurement regime for the revised series of targets, thereby avoiding the dismal recitation in recent years of failure.

There is a further fly in the ointment, though: an Australian National Audit Office inquiry also is under way, investigating whether appropriate data governance arrange­ments are in place for estab­lishing progress in the official program and whether there is effec­tive evaluation of what impact indigenous programs are having. That audit is due in February, right when the annual Prime Minister’s report lobs. The outcome could be a jarring crossover, as the Auditor-General, a statutory official, is under no pressure to make the government look good.

Richard Weston, chief executive of the Healing Foundation, which came into being after the 1997 Bringing Them Home report identified unresolved trauma as a key driver of continuing indigenous family and community dysfunction, says the “huge economic cost to the Australian taxpayer of only addressing symptoms of trauma” is just one of the issues at stake in whether Closing the Gap works.

“There’s no simple fix; it’s complex,” Weston tells The Australian. “We don’t have a vision for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policy or people. We’re trying to fix a complex problem with simple solutions, which become like a flavour-of-the-month approach, just throwing a bit of money first at one thing and then another.”

His foundation’s submission to the government review is damning. “Empirical evaluation designs that seek to prove a statistically significant impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander wellbeing are failing to shed light on what elements of the program failed, why they failed or how they could have succeeded, and have not given recognition to those considered effective in the eyes of the people who deliver or engage with the services,” it reads.

“While there is a place for quantitative evaluation of programs, evaluation needs to go beyond the finding of ‘nothing works’ to consider whether the program has actually failed, whether the evaluation methodology has failed, or if both the program and evaluation have disregarded key underlying factors associated with poor outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

Which is where going back to the 1967 referendum outcome is helpful. A Productivity Commission report last year said 44 per cent of the $33.4 billion allocated to indigenous spending annually came via the commonwealth, a direct result of that vote.

Of this total, $27.4bn (or 88 per cent) was channelled through mainstream services available to all Australians, such as health, ­policing and education.

The remaining $6bn came through indigenous-specific programs and, of this, the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet administered almost $2bn, but the whole often is delivered via a spaghetti bowl of overlapping service and program providers, with ­inade­quate evaluation of effici­ency or results and frequent shifts in policy.

One example of this was the implementation in 2014 of an overarching Indigenous Advancement Strategy federal funding model, an approach broadly canned by a later Senate inquiry for its poor design and implementation and that stripped $500 million from the field.

This all raises the question of whether the commonwealth should be providing programs at all or, as University of Queensland professor Mark Moran puts it, deciding to “fix a failing public ­administration system”.

“This could include innovations in new funding methods, with collaboration and accountability measures that wrap and build around the discrete place or dispersed urban population, instead of targeting individual recipients with more grants,” Moran says. “Mainstream services — such as education, school, health, police and child protection — are essential and must remain.

“But if the funds for all of the ‘additional’ programs were pooled and channelled into a small number of ­locally based organisations, or into all-encompassing community development program(s), it could create a more effective and enabling environment for innovation and locally led reform to occur.”

It’s what the Uluru Statement’s framers say the voice to parliament is designed to address, with very likely a regional, traditional owner-based network feeding up to a national body but directing it towards locally determined needs.

So, too, is the Empowered Communities model, being trialled in nine discrete indigenous communities nationwide including in Sydney’s Redfern and La Perouse, or Cape York’s Pama Futures approach, a collaboration between local people and governments that its advocates describe as “the best chance we have to close the gap on indigenous disparity in our region”.

There has not been a national approach to inviting representative indigenous input to policy since the Howard government dissolved the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission in 2004, and even Amanda Vanstone, the minister at the time, said recently that “in hindsight (it) might have been a mistake” to abolish that body in its entirety.

Law professor Megan Davis, pro vice-chancellor indigenous at the University of NSW (and one of the authors, with Cape York lawyer Noel Pearson, of the Uluru Statement), says a key feature of ATSIC was its impact on regional policymaking, in particular the provision of remote infrastructure and the importance of this to closing the gap on indigenous disadvantage.

Before ATSIC, bodies such as the National Aboriginal Conference, established by the Fraser government in 1977, exploited what then minister Fred Chaney has recently described as a “loud and often critical voice” that was nonetheless “useful and effective” in determining the needs of indigenous Australia.

Post-ATSIC, the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples was an attempt at providing a representative voice but it lost all funding with the introduction of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

But perhaps Gumatj clan leader Djawa Yunupingu put it best when he asked in a fiery and, as it turns out, prescient speech recently at the annual Garma festival in Arnhem Land, the same forum Abbott used in 2013 to declare he would be a “prime minister for indigenous affairs” should he win office.

“How long do we have to wait to get this right?” Yunupingu said. “Another committee? Another meeting? Another prime minister?

NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health #Nutrition #Obesity : @IndigenousPHAA The #AFL ladder of sponsorships such as soft drinks @CocaColaAU and junk food @McDonalds_AU endangers the health of our children

 “Aboriginal and Non- Aboriginal kids are being inundated with the advertising of alcohol, junk food and gambling through AFL sponsorship deals according to a new study.

With obesity and excessive drinking remaining a significant problem in our communities, it’s time for the AFL ladder of unhealthy sponsorship (see below) to end,

Children under the age of eight are particularly vulnerable to advertising because they lack the maturity and mental skills to evaluate the messages. Therefore, in the case of the AFL, they begin to associate unhealthy products with their favourite sport and players

We need to ask ourselves why Australia’s most popular winter sport is serving as a major advertising platform for soft drink, beer, wine, burgers and meat pies. It’s sending the wrong message to Australians that somehow these unhealthy foods and drinks are linked to the healthy activity of sport,”

Says the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA).

Read all NACCHO Aboriginal Health Nutrition / Obestity articles over 6 years HERE 

In the study published this week in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Australian researchers looked at the prevalence of sponsorship by alcohol, junk food and gambling companies on AFL club websites and on AFL player uniforms.

The findings were used to make an ‘AFL Sponsorship Ladder’, a ranking of AFL clubs in terms of their level of unhealthy sponsorships, with those at the top of the ladder having the highest level of unhealthy sponsors.

The study clearly demonstrated that Australia’s most popular spectator sport is saturated with unhealthy advertising.

Download PDF Copy of report NACCHO Unhealthy sponsors of sport

Ainslie Sartori, one of the authors involved in the research confirmed, “After reviewing the sponsorship deals of AFL clubs, we found that 88% of clubs are sponsored by unhealthy food and beverage companies. A third of AFL clubs are also involved in business partnerships with gambling companies.”

Recommendation 

Sponsorship offers companies an avenue to expose children and young people to their brand, encouraging a connection with that brand.

The AFL could reinforce healthy lifestyle choices by shifting the focus away from the visual presence of unhealthy sponsorship, while taking steps to ensure that clubs remain commercially viable.

Policy makers are encouraged to consider innovative health promotion strategies and work
with sporting clubs and codes to ensure healthy messages are prominent

 

The study noted that children are often the targets of AFL advertising. This is despite World Health Organization recommendations that children’s settings should be free of unhealthy food promotions and branding (including through sport) due to the known risk it poses to their diet and chances of developing obesity.

PHAA CEO Terry Slevin commented, “When Australian kids see their sports heroes wearing a uniform plastered with certain brands, they inevitably start to associate these brands with the player they look up to and with the positive and healthy experience of the sport.”

He added, “The AFL is in a unique position to positively influence the health of Australian kids through banning sponsorship by alcohol, junk food and gambling companies. It could instead reinforce the importance of a healthy lifestyle for them.”

“Australian health policy makers need to consider innovative health promotion strategies and work together with sport clubs and codes to ensure that unhealthy advertising is not a feature. We successfully removed tobacco advertising from sport and we can do it with junk food and gambling too,” Mr Slevin said.

The recently released Sport 2030 plan rightly identifies sport as a positive vehicle to promote good health. But elite “corporate sport” plays a role of bypassing restrictions aimed at reducing exposure of children to unhealthy product marketing.

“The evidence is clear – it’s time for Australia to phase out all unhealthy sponsorship of sport,” Mr Slevin conclude

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Coniston NT massacre 1928 descendants reunite to push for national truth-telling process , a theme of the #UluruStatement from the Heart.

We expect up to 400 people to join us for a chance to share the truth about our colonial past with the families of the victims and the murderers.

We want everyone to know that these massacres didn’t happen during some distant past but 10 years after the end of the First World War.

We remember those who lost their lives in that war every year, in every town around Australia. We have a special public holiday for it and lots of memorials everywhere.

What about our fallen loved ones?

Truth telling, along with agreement making and an Aboriginal voice to parliament, is a theme of the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

Central Land Council chair Francis Kelly.

Download the 12 Page PDF 

Coniston-Brochure-2018

Families affected by the Coniston Massacre from around Australia have gathered at a meeting of the Central Land Council outside Yuendumu, getting ready to remember the innocent men, women and children killed during a series of massacres in 1928.

Today they will travel to the remote outstation of Yurrkuru (Brooks Soak), approximately three hours north west of Alice Springs, to commemorate with songs, dances, speeches and prayers the 90th anniversary of the killings.

Yurrkuru is the site of the murder of the dingo trapper Fred Brooks which triggered the revenge parties led by Police Constable George Murray between August and October 1928 that have become known as the Coniston Massacre.

The families of an estimated 100 murder victims are planning to speak at the event, alongside members of Constable Murray’s family and political leaders such as Senator Patrick Dodson and NT Chief Minister Michael Gunner.

Their families unveiled a plaque at Yurrkuru in 2003 and plan to call for annual events commemorating the massacres and for interpretive signs at the many massacre locations.

They also want all school children to be taught about the frontier wars.

Mr Kelly, one of the creators of the documentary Coniston which will be shown at the CLC meeting tonight, said he is particularly pleased to welcome students from surrounding Aboriginal communities to the commemoration.

“Until all Australians know about the crimes committed against our families we can’t move forward as one mob, one country,” he said.

“Other countries with murderous pasts have managed to come together by speaking the truth. If they can do it, why can’t we?”

The Aboriginal man on the 2 dollar coin.His name was Gwoya Jungarai and he was one of the only survivors of one of the last recognised massacres of Aboriginal people, the 1928 Coniston Massacre in Central Australia.

Almost every Australian has seen his face, held his likeness in their hands but how many know his story?

Today Friday the 24th of August 2018 will mark the 90th anniversary of that atrocity. We will remember him as well as those others who did not survive.Lest we forget the Frontier Wars.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion Press Release

The anniversary was a solemn commemoration from or the families and descendants of the victims as well as for the entire Central Australian community.

Today community members from Central Australia gathered at Yurrkuru to commemorate 90 years since the Coniston massacre.

The Coniston massacre was a series of killings between August and October 1928, with large numbers of Aboriginal people from the Warlpiri, Anmatyerre and Kaytetye nations killed.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion said that the anniversary was a solemn commemoration for the families and descendants of the victims as well as for the entire Central Australian community.

“It is important that we remember the Aboriginal men, women and children who were killed during this dark chapter of Australian history and acknowledge the impact on families and communities that these crimes have on First Nations peoples,” said Minister Scullion.

“Today we also reflect on the resilience of the local Traditional Owners in more recent history. In 2014 I was honoured to join Traditional Owners and deliver a deed of grant to the Yurrkuru Aboriginal Land Trust – handing back land which was central to the Coniston massacre.

The Central Land Council hosted an event to commemorate the massacre at Yurrkuru (Brooks Soak), approximately 60 kilometres from Yuendumu.  The event brought together Aboriginal families from across Central Australia, as well as descendants of those responsible.

“I commend the Central Land Council for this work to ensure that the Coniston massacre is never forgotten.”