NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Driving licences: Why they are key to many Aboriginal health, justice and job issues

 ” More than 70 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote locations have no public transport, and more than one in 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults report not being able to or having difficulty getting to where they need to be.

Not only would this lack of access be frustrating but it also impacts on health and social inclusion or lack thereof.”

ArticleAddressing the barriers to driver licensing for Aboriginal people in New South Wales and South Australia by Kathleen Clapham, Kate Hunter, Patricia Cullen.

In the Northern Territory, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people make up 84 per cent of the prison population and programs such as these can help reduce incidences of gaol time by preventing people from driving without a licence.

“You get picked up a few times, and very quickly that’s a very serious offence. It’s a really important thing that needs to be addressed.”

While it’s difficult to measure the direct correlation between driver’s licence access and incarceration rates, it’s certainly something that’s likely to have a big impact.”

A key driver behind the program’s success is community participation. “It’s got to be delivered in a way the community wants. The program seems to be very flexible and culturally responsive. The team go out and engage very well with the community, And that does make a big difference that they’ve got the support of the community.”

Lead researcher Professor Rebecca Ivers believes equipping a person with something as simple as a driver’s licence can help address social inequality

Drivers’ licences a road to opportunity for remote Indigenous communities Picture above of Learners                                

 ” One of the stories within this first book talked about the high percentage of clients in the Broome Regional Prison who were there due to a driver-related offence including driving under the influence, driving unlicensed or driving under a ban.”

Article below by  Dr Melissa Stoneham from the Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia

First Published in Croakey SUBCRIBE HERE

In November 2011, the Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA (PHAIWA) released our first West Australian Indigenous Storybook, which was the start of a journey to showcase the many positive stories that occur in Aboriginal communities.

One of the stories within this first book talked about the high percentage of clients in the Broome Regional Prison who were there due to a driver-related offence including driving under the influence, driving unlicensed or driving under a ban.

One of the issues associated with this was that, upon release, many offenders did not have a means of transport. The purpose of the story was to talk about the ‘Life Cycle’ project that targeted pre-release offenders and provided them with skills on how to recondition an abandoned bicycle. The idea included presenting each prisoner, once released, with a bike to ensure they had access to much needed transport.

Now, not all community roads are suitable for bicycles and sometimes the wet season makes it almost impossible to ride a bike, but the general principle is a good one.

Having access to transport, whether this be a private vehicle, a bike or public transport is something many of us take for granted. But for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in some parts of Australia, accessing public transport and getting and retaining a driver’s licence can be a major challenge.

In this month’s JournalWatch, I am reviewing an article which was published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health called “Addressing the barriers to driver licensing for Aboriginal people in New South Wales and South Australia.”

Led by Kathleen Clapham from the Australian Health Services Research Institute at the University of Wollongong, the article used qualitative data collected over a four-month period in 2013 from interviews with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal stakeholders (n=31) and 11 focus groups with Aboriginal participants (n=46).

The research reported on how barriers to obtaining a driver licence were being addressed in four urban and regional Aboriginal communities: Redfern and Griffith in New South Wales, and Ceduna and Port Lincoln in South Australia.

The stakeholders were classified into a range of agencies including licensing specific agencies, job service agencies, employment agencies, community development agencies, community brokerage agencies, justice systems – police and courts, and state government licensing authorities.

The purpose of these interviews was to ascertain what programs were operating in each site to identify strengths and gaps in programs, funding and responsiveness to community need. All data were coded by themes and allowed for comparison between community member and stakeholder perspectives.

Another reason this research is important is that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are over-represented in transport-related morbidity and mortality, and have a transport injury mortality rate almost three times higher than the non-Aboriginal population.

More than 70 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote locations have no public transport, and more than one in 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults report not being able to or having difficulty getting to where they need to be.

Not only would this lack of access be frustrating but it also impacts on health and social inclusion or lack thereof. Separate to this study, a researcher in the Pilbara region of Western Australia identified how access to culture is impacted by being unable to access transport, including the need to travel for lore business, funerals, hunting and to visit family. Transport is essential for employment, schooling, accessing food, health, cultural and other services and is often a means of escape.

This is particularly so in more remote areas. Let’s take one example. If you lived in the small and remote community of Warakurna, you would need to drive 331 kilometres on unsealed roads to get to Yulara (Uluru) or 781 kilometres to reach Alice Springs.

That is a long way to get to a licensing centre, a hospital or to do a decent shop. In our vast nation, a larger proportion of Indigenous people than others live in the more remote areas of Australia and research indicates that Indigenous people have higher injury rates the more remotely they live.

Barriers to gaining a licence

So what does prevent Aboriginal people from gaining a driving licence and how does not having a driver licence affect the Aboriginal community?

A range of structural issues are involved. These include a lack of sufficient identification such as a birth certificate to prove identity. Lower literacy and the fact that English is often not a first language is a further constricting factor.  The protracted, bureaucratic licensing process, the introduction of graduated licensing and the need to access technology which is not available to all Indigenous people are additional barriers.

The cost of obtaining a licence was also seen as a barrier with one community member stating that “I have a job but because I don’t really get that much so $67 is a lot for me.”

Some of the impacts of under-licensing for Aboriginal people include unsafe transport choices such as overcrowding of vehicles, riding in utility trays and driving unlicensed.

Intersections with the justice system were also raised in the research, with having a state debt due to non-payment of fines frequently cited as a reason for why Aboriginal people were unable to obtain or had lost a licence.

Options to address licensing issues

The authors were able to identify some future options to address the barriers to driver licensing, particularly through the stakeholder data.

All stakeholders were able to cite numerous examples of successful licensing support and driver education courses targeting Aboriginal people, but many of these services had been closed due to lack of funding.

The re-initiation of these types of culturally sensitive courses was seen as a priority action, as was the establishment of government licensing services in remote communities. Some legal stakeholders suggested that providing driver training while people are in custody for disqualification is a potential solution as people in custody have limited access to alcohol and other drugs.

The research found the most frequent suggestions from stakeholders about how to address local Aboriginal licensing issues were:

  • job service networks playing a more active role
  • better use of work and development orders
  • inclusion of driver training in high school education
  • funding licensing programs and community educations courses that included basic literacy skills
  • better provision of services in regional and remote areas
  • legal solutions, such as court diversionary programs.

A quick scan of existing driver licence initiatives for Aboriginal people identified a couple of options including the New South Wales Government offering 1,000 free places on the Safer Drivers Course each year to help young learner drivers from disadvantaged backgrounds and Aboriginal communities. The course helps young drivers on their L-plates prepare for driving solo when they graduate to provisional licences, and teaches them how to reduce road risks and develop safe driving behaviour.

In the Ngarliyarndu Bindirri Aboriginal Corporation (NBAC) located in Roebourne, the Red Dirt Driving Academy employs local mentors to teach local people how to drive safely and retain their licences, with support from Elders. Since 2011 the Academy has been overwhelmed by demand, and has recently welcomed the nearby regional prison authority into the program. The town also has a new road safety mural (featured, right).

Whatever the answer, it is pretty clear we need greater investment in end-to-end licensing support programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, allowing them to more readily gain and retain their driver licence in their local communities and, where possible, with local mentors.

The broad array of structural and community barriers have been identified in articles such as the one reviewed here, and it is now time to use research findings such as these to make it easier and safer for Aboriginal people to get their drivers license.

ArticleAddressing the barriers to driver licensing for Aboriginal people in New South Wales and South Australia by Kathleen Clapham, Kate Hunter, Patricia Cullen., et al. ANZJPH; 41 (3):280-286.

 

 

NACCHO This weeks Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts : #Aboriginal Health Workers #Chronic Disease #TacklingSmoking

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1.Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation : Chronic Disease Coordinator Close 4 August

2.1-2.4  Western Australia : AHCWA members

3.Tackling Indigenous Smoking Support Officer (OVAHS) close 16 August

4.Generalist HR role Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

5. Registered Nurses Brewarrina Aboriginal Health Service Ltd (BAHSL)

6 -7 Jullums Lismore AMS Registered Nurse / Child and Family Nurse and Aboriginal Health Worker/ Practitioner

8. Rekindling The Spirit  : Positions Vacant – Counsellors

9. Nganampa Health Council  :Personal Care Attendant (Remote Area Aged Care Facility)
 
10.Chronic Kidney Disease Educator – Derby (KRS)
 

11.Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd  : Deputy Medical Director (KAMS) – Close 31 July

12.Flinders Island Aboriginal Association Inc.Tobacco Action Worker 

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation   :  Chronic Disease Coordinator (Registered Nurse / Aboriginal Health Practitioner) Close August 4

About the Organisation

Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation (CMSAC) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service established in 1986. CMSAC aims to provide primary, secondary and specialist health care services to Carnarvon and the surrounding region.

For more information please visit http://www.cmsac.com.au

About the Opportunity CMSAC is currently seeking an experienced Registered Nurse or Aboriginal Health Practitioner to join their multidisciplinary team as a Chronic Disease Coordinator.

As the Chronic Disease Coordinator you will be supported by a diverse team of Doctors, Aboriginal Health Practitioners, Nurses, Medical Receptionists and a Clinical Practice Coordinator providing a range of culturally appropriate and comprehensive primary health care services to the local Aboriginal communities.

Your responsibilities will include (but not be limited to) the following:

  • Providing day to day health services to the community in a professional, confidential and culturally safe manner
  • Utilising a holistic approach to assessing clients and their families by supporting and developing patient understanding of their condition, treatment and prevention strategies
  • Conducting opportunistic screening and follow-up of patients
  • Developing and implementing strategies that promote health education to clients, their families and the community with a focus on chronic disease management and health prevention
  • Providing Support and Advice on appropriate levels of follow-up to clients requiring short and long-term pharmaceutical support including instructing client/care givers how to take medication, the correct dosage, storage and security
  • Maintaining accurate documentation and record of all client encounters on the patient information & recall system
  • Maximising Medicare billings through effective patient records processes

To be successful, you will be a Registered Nurse or Aboriginal Health Practitioner, have experience working in a similar role within an AMS or primary health setting. You will have a sound knowledge of general practice, primary health care and the social and emotional wellbeing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Your strong interpersonal, communication and organisational skills will enable you to strengthen existing community partnership, establish and sustain stakeholder relationships, determine priorities and manage workloads in order to meet agreed timelines and achieve results.

Most importantly, you must be able to effectively communicate, promote and uphold CMSAC initiatives and values, acting as a role model in the community.

Before applying please visit http://www.ahcwa.org.au/employment to view the full Position Description.

About the BenefitsA generous remuneration package including salary sacrificing options is on offer.

In addition:

  • CMSAC will negotiate relocation assistance with the right candidate
  • You’ll enjoy a fantastic work/life balance, with Monday – Friday hours, 8:30am – 5pm, with no on-call requirements
  • 5 weeks annual leave

**The successful candidate must be willing to undergo a Drug Screen, provide a current Police Clearance and Working with Children Check and possess a C Class Drivers License.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Applications close 5pm, Friday 4 August 2017

 2. Western Australia : AHCWA members

Current Vacancies

If you are passionate about improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Western Australia then the below opportunities may interest you.

 2.1 Aboriginal Health Worker (50d)

Type: Full Time

Location: SWAMS, Bunbury

Closing Date: 5pm Friday, 4th August 2017

Here at SWAMS we have an exciting position available for someone looking to make a difference. As an Aboriginal Health Worker, you will be involved in clinical assessment and treatment, care coordination, client support and advocacy and community development activities.

2. 2 Administration Assistant

Type: Full Time
Location: PAMS, Newman
Closing Date: Wednesday 2nd August 2017, 5pm

PAMS currently has an opportunity for an Administration Assistant and to join their team on a full-time basis.

2.3 Remote Area Registered Nurse

Type: Full Time 6:2 roster

Location: PAMS, Newman

Closing Date: Wednesday 2nd August 2017, 5pm

PAMS has an opportunity for a Remote Area Registered Nurse to join their team on a 6 weeks on, 2 weeks off, fly in, fly out roster

 2.4 Clinical Operations Manager

Type: Full Time
Location: DYHS, Perth WA
Closing Date: 5.00pm, Monday 31 July 2017

DYHS is now looking for an experienced Clinical Operations Manager to join their team in Perth, on a full-time basis.

4.Generalist HR role Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

In the 40 years since it was established, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has become the largest Aboriginal medical service in the Northern Territory.  Congress is one of the most experienced in Aboriginal health in the country, is a national leader in comprehensive primary health care, and is a strong political advocate for the health of Aboriginal people.

Based in Alice Springs and reporting to the General Manager Human Resources, a newly created role has emerged.  The Organisational Capability Manager is a generalist HR role responsible for developing and leading workforce initiatives, strategic projects, building HR capability and workforce training and development.  Specific areas of focus in the first instance include :-

  • leading a refresh of the people performance and management framework;
  • leading the review of the WHS management system;
  • leading talent planning and implementation activities for organisational change projects and workforce development;
  • strengthening a reporting framework that captures meaningful data to promote organisational performance, assist decision making, minimise risk and enable achievement of the broader organisational objectives and priorities.

Applications are invited from experienced HR practitioners with appropriate tertiary qualifications and superior communication, negotiation and strategic thinking skills.  Experience in developing organisational capability for a large, geographically dispersed and multi-disciplinary entity will be highly regarded.  Pragmatism, intuition, commercial acumen, sound judgement, drive, energy, credibility and authenticity are also important qualities sought.

Offered initially on a contract basis for a period of 2-3 years, there is a genuine opportunity for the scope to extend well beyond this timeframe and expand in breadth of responsibility.  An attractive remuneration package commensurate with skills and experience, together with relocation assistance will be offered in order to attract the right candidate.

For a job and person specification, please visit hender.com.au and for further information on our client, please visit caac.org.au

Applications in Word format only should be addressed to Justin Hinora.

Telephone enquiries are welcome on (08) 8100 8849.

APPLY HERE

5.Registered Nurses Brewarrina Aboriginal Health Service Ltd (BAHSL)

About the Organisation

Brewarrina Aboriginal Health Service Ltd (BAHSL) is a non-profit organisation dedicated to improving not only the health but the youth, culture, education and housing of the organisation’s clients and the Brewarrina community in general. Operating with close ties to the accredited Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service, BAHSL services are available to the surrounding communities and small towns in the area, and provide a resource centre for:

  • Health related issues
  • Medical advice and treatment
  • Individual and family counselling
  • Information and advice about issues relating to substance abuse
  • Sexual health services
  • Family violence
  • Children’s health/issues
  • Adolescent health
  • Women’s and men’s health
  • Healthy lifestyle (including healthy eating)
  • Eye Health

About the Opportunity

Brewarrina Aboriginal Health Service Ltd (BAHSL) has an exciting opportunity for a Registered Nurse to join their multidisciplinary team of dedicated health professionals working throughout in Brewarrina, NSW.

In this role, your primary focus will be on planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating Enhanced Primary Health Care plans for the program’s clients, in collaboration with BAHSL Aboriginal Health Workers.

To be successful in this position, you will be a Registered Nurse (List A) with experience providing Primary Health Care to those suffering from chronic disease and across a range of other settings. You will require experience in working with Aboriginal communities and have an understanding of health issues in rural/remote areas and the impact of socio-economic factors on Aboriginal communities.

Candidates with previous experience in wounds management, community care, and adult immunisation will be highly regarded.

Please note: Candidates are required to hold registration with AHPRA, a working with children check, and a criminal history check.

BAHSL will reward your commitment with an excellent base salary (dependent upon skills and experience) and access to salary sacrificing arrangements!

Applicants currently located outside the Brewarrina region will be considered – and you’ll enjoy assistance with relocation costs (reimbursed after probation period) and help in finding suitable rental accommodation!

Advance your career in Aboriginal health in this varied role – APPLY NOW!

Please note, due to the nature of this position, Aboriginal people are encouraged to apply.

APPLY HERE

6 -7 Lismore AMS Registered Nurse / Child and Family Nurse and Aboriginal Health Worker/ Practitioner

Jullums Lismore AMS is currently looking for the following positions to join the team:

Registered Nurse / Child and Family Nurse

This is an identified position open to Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people

However, Registered Nurses who are not indigenous but able to meet the Selection Criteria are encouraged to apply

Aboriginal Health Worker/ Practitioner

This is an identified position, open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Minimum qualifications, Certificate IV

About Us:

Jullums Lismore Aboriginal Medical Service is a not-for-profit Aboriginal Community Controlled Health service under the management of Rekindling the Spirit, providing primary health care services to Aboriginal people throughout the Lismore area. Jullums is committed to promoting health, wellbeing and disease prevention, involving a holistic approach to diagnosis, and the management of illness.

About the Role:

Reporting to the Practice Manager, both these positions are responsible for a high standard of primary health services that focuses on the prevention, early detection and management of health problems for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. As a member of a multi-disciplinary team these roles ensure effective screening, service delivery and administration practices are delivered in accordance with our patient centred Model of Care.

The ideal candidates will have proven experience in providing health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

To request a copy of the Position Description and Selection Criteria, or if you wish to apply for the position by sending a covering letter with your CV, please contact

amanda@rubirockservices.com

8 Rekindling The Spirit  : Positions Vacant – Counsellors

Rekindling The Spirit is a Lismore based, community organisation run by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, who offer a holistic approach to working with those families and communities to support the achievement of positive and lasting changes in their lives.

Rekindling the Spirit supports Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and women to find their own path of empowerment through spiritual and emotional healing, by offering services that can help relieve poverty, distress, sickness, destitution, trans-generational trauma and other misfortunes. Our counselling, assistance, education and supplementary services focus on reducing the occurrence of domestic and family violence plus child abuse through the promotion of healing and wellbeing within families and the community.

Rekindling The Spirit is looking for a number of Full Time Male and Female Counsellors to provide front line, face to face services to support the implementation and ongoing management of a new program for our clients and community.

Ideal candidates will be Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people with proven experience in providing counselling services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. All counsellors with experience providing counseling services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply to ensure Rekindling The Spirit is able to recruit the highest quality candidates to support our community.

As the successful applicant, you will be responsible for a number of aspects of the programs, including:  Conducting client intake and assessments for the RTS DV Perpetrator Program

  •  Provide face to face counseling
  •  Facilitate Rekindling The Spirit group based activities
  • Conduct exit interviews and evaluation of participants
  • Develop and maintain effective referral pathways
  • Arrange and participate in meetings, team activities, community network presentations, special ceremonies and approved events and field work activities as required
  • Participate in program and service planning, review and evaluation, including data collection and documentation of new initiatives

To be successful, you will:

  • hold a minimum of a Diploma or relevant qualifications in Counselling, Substance Misuse, Mental Health, Aboriginal Health Worker, Community Services or another related field or be willing to undertake further study.
  • have proven experience in providing counselling and/or group facilitation experience in, drug and alcohol, domestic violence, health, social and emotional wellbeing counselling to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
  • have a demonstrated ability to work appropriately and effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
  •  possess high level communication skills and well developed computer skills.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to apply.

Criminal history screening and working with children/vulnerable persons checks will be carried out prior to commencement of employment.

If you have a strong interest in this role and wish to apply for the position, please send a covering letter with your CV to amanda@rubirockservices.com

9.Nganampa Health Council  :Personal Care Attendant (Remote Area Aged Care Facility)

Nganampa Health Council is an Aboriginal owned and controlled health organisation operating on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands in the far north west of South Australia. Across this area, we operate seven clinics, an aged care facility and assorted health related programs including aged care, sexual health, environmental health, health worker training, dental, women’s health, male health, children’s health and mental health.

When you join Nganampa Health, you are joining a community of primary health care professionals, united by our desire to make a difference. We learn and experience something new every day, and we are supported by the professionalism and spirit of our colleagues and our organisation.

A fantastic opportunity now exists for a full-time Personal Care Attendant to join our dedicated aged care team, based in Pukatja (Ernabella), in remote North West, South Australia.

Working under the direction of the Residential Care Manager, you will be responsible for planning and delivering person centred care to residentsof theTjilpiku Pampaku Ngura aged care facility.

To be successful, you will have demonstrated experience in Australia as a Personal Care Worker, working with frail, aged and disabled people in an aged care setting. You’ll hold a Certificate III or IV in Aged Care, or an equivalent EN qualification. This could also be a great opportunity for an existing EN looking for a change in role or to move away from a traditional hospital environment.

We are seeking an adaptable and flexible individual who can display the initiative, discretion and cultural sensitivity needed to support and drive the organisation’s objectives and values. You must be able to both communicate and participate effectively within a cross-cultural, multi-disciplinary health team.

Why join the Nganampa Health team

As a Personal Care Attendant at Nganampa Health, you will receive an excellent remuneration up to $58,880 (with Certificate IV qualifications), plus super. You will also receive a range of benefits including:

  • Annual district allowance;
  • Furnished rent-free housing including some meals;
  • Penalty & leave loadings and overtime entitlements;
  • Free electricity and subsidised internet and telephone access;
  • Relocation assistance (negotiable);
  • Generous leave provisions: 6 weeks annual leave, 3 weeks recreation leave, 3 weeks sick leave and 2 weeks study leave!
  • Annual airfares; and
  • Salary sacrificing options to greatly increase your take home pay by up to $16,000!

These incredible rewards bring your salary package up to an approximate $133,000 per annum!

APPLY HERE

10. Chronic Kidney Disease Educator – Derby (KRS)
 
About Kimberley Renal Services
Kimberley Renal Services (KRS) includes 4 Renal Health Centres based in Fitzroy Crossing, Broome, Kununurra, and Derby and a mobile prevention unit.The incidence of Kidney Disease in the Kimberley is one of the highest in Australia. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) and End-Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD) incidence within the Aboriginal population of the Kimberley greatly exceeds the national burden of disease. Dialysis prevalence for this region has more than tripled in the last decade and is increasing at a much faster rate than in the rest of Western Australia (WA).KRS and the regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) have developed a renal strategic plan to help combat this health crisis. This has enabled many patients to return to the Kimberley from Perth, which is 2,500kms away, to receive their treatment.

About the Opportunity The Kimberley Renal Service has an opportunity for a Chronic Kidney Disease Educator to join their multidisciplinary team based in Derby WA. This role will be offered on a full-time basis.Reporting to the Renal Health Centre Manager, you will be responsible for raising awareness and understanding of the factors which lead to development of chronic kidney disease.

To be successful in this role, you will be an experienced Registered Nurse – eligible for registration with the national nurses board of Australia – and advanced renal clinical skills. You will also have a commitment to the philosophy and practice of Aboriginal Community Control and knowledge of Equal Opportunity and OSH legislation.

KRS is looking for candidates with strong communication, decision-making and problem-solving skills, along with the ability to work both autonomously and as part of a multidisciplinary team. A high level of integrity and a dedication to maintaining patient confidentiality will ensure you flourish in this position.

About the Benefits

KRS is an organisation that truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. In addition, staff development programs are not only encouraged but are often paid for by KRS. These are highly attractive opportunities for someone with a desire to develop their professional knowledge and experience in the area of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health!

There are also a wide range of fantastic additional benefits for the role, including:

  • Attractive base salary of $84,960 PLUS Super;
  • Accommodation Allowance of $13,000;
  • Electricity Allowance of $1,440; and
  • After 12 months of service, you will receive annual airfares of $1,285.

APPLY HERE

11.Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd  : Deputy Medical Director (KAMS) – Identified Position

Job No: 90703
Location: Broome, WA
Employment Status: Full-time
Closing Date: 31 Jul 2017
  • Do you want to really make a difference in your career?
  • Take on this rewarding management role with the region’s leading provider of Aboriginal health services!
  • Attractive remuneration circa $230,000 base, PLUS district allowance AND accommodation allowances!

About the Organisation

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services LTD (KAMS) is a well-established regional Aboriginal community controlled health service, founded in 1986, which provides centralised advocacy and resource support for 6 independent member services, as well as providing direct clinical services in a further 6 remote Aboriginal communities across the region.

KAMS has successfully delivered high-quality, accessible comprehensive primary health care services over its 30 years of operation and has provided innovation and national leadership in areas such as health information management and evidence-based best practice in primary health care.

About Broome

Broome is located 2,240km north of Perth and has a permanent population of 14,436. Broome promotes a relaxed and easy-going lifestyle, with nearby shopping centres, Sunday markets as well as a broad range of restaurants and entertainment options. It is founded on the traditional lands of the Yaruwu people and is rich in history, culture and beautiful surrounds.

Broome has a deep history in the pearling industry, spanning back to the 1800’s, with memorials throughout the town to commemorate those lost in the early years of pearling. Cable Beach is also a must-see, being named in honour of the Java-to-Australia undersea telegraph cable that reaches shore there. You can explore its beautiful scenery with a bit of 4WDing at low tide, or you can even take a camel ride every day at sunset!

Roebuck Bay is known as one of the most beautiful beaches that surround Broome, with its “Staircase to the moon” phenomenon drawing food and craft markets each time it occurs. The combination of a receding tide and rising moon create a natural phenomenon that can only be described as breath-taking.

About the Opportunity

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd (KAMS) now has a rewarding opportunity for a full-time Deputy Medical Director to join their team in Broome, WA.

Please note: Due to the nature of this role, applicants are required to be of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent. This is a genuine occupational requirement for this position, which is exempt under Section 14 of the Anti-discrimination Act.

Reporting to the Medical Director, you’ll be responsible for providing comprehensive primary health care in line with accepted best practice standards.

Some of your key duties will include (but will not be limited to):

  • Assisting in the development and maintenance of high quality health services, ensuring continuous monitoring, quality improvement and innovation in the delivery of comprehensive primary health services;
  • Supporting the education, training and on-site up-skilling of the KAMS primary health care workforce;
  • Acting as a cultural champion for health services in the Kimberley;
  • Leading and participating in clinical audit activities in KAMS and member services
  • Assisting the Kimberley Renal Service with medical cover; and
  • Assisting the Medical Director when required.

To be successful you will need:

  • FRACGP, FACRRM or equivalent, with eligibility for medical registration in WA;
  • Significant experience in the delivery of general practice / primary heath care;
  • The ability to act as an effective member of a multidisciplinary health team;
  • Experience in working effectively with Aboriginal people;
  • The competency required to manage emergencies in a remote setting; and
  • A commitment to the philosophy and practice of Aboriginal Community Control.

KAMS are looking for candidates with well-developed interpersonal and communication skills, along with the ability to maintain client confidentially at all times within and outside the workplace. You will have experience working within an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation or an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Community Organisation and a strong interest in developing the skills required to lead an Aboriginal Health Organisation.

A ‘C’ Class Driver’s License, Federal Police Clearance, Working with Children Clearance, and willingness to travel often by 4WD vehicles and light aircrafts will be required.

To download a full position description, please click here.

About the Benefits

If you are looking for a change of routine, a change of lifestyle or a new adventure, this is the role for you. You will see and experience more of Australia’s real outback than most people ever will – and get paid to do it!

KAMS is an organisation that truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. In addition, staff development programs are not only encouraged but are often paid for by KAMS. This is a highly attractive opportunity for someone with a desire to develop their professional knowledge and experience in the area of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health!

While you will face diverse new challenges in this role, you will also enjoy an attractive remuneration circa $230,000 + super. 

There is also a wide range of additional benefits for the role including:

  • On call allowance – 10% of base salary;
  • District allowances – $2,920 single $5,840 double p.a;
  • Electricity allowance $1,440
  • Accommodation allowance $13,000;
  • Mobile phone allowance $100 per month;
  • 6 weeks’ annual leave & 2 weeks’ study leave;
  • Annual Airfares to the value of $1,285 pa (after 12 months of employment).

Don’t miss this exciting and rewarding opportunity to have a positive impact on the health outcomes of Indigenous communities in the spectacular Kimberley region – Apply Now!

Please note: Candidates must respond to the questions below and attach a current resume to be considered.

Apply HERE

12.Flinders Island Aboriginal Association Inc.Tobacco Action Worker 

Flinders Island Aboriginal Association Inc. (FIAAI) currently have a vacancy for a Tobacco Action Worker within FIAAI’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking Program. Contracted until June 2018 (with the possibility of extension beyond this date), this position presents an opportunity to be part of a small Launceston-based team dedicated to reducing the level of Aboriginal smoking throughout Tasmania.

DOWNLOAD pdf tis_job_ad

Reporting to the local Team Leader, this role is available full time or part time by negotiation.

As the Tackling Indigenous Smoking Program involves collaboration with Aboriginal (and other) organisations, schools and Communities around the state, a willingness to undertake some travel in the role is essential.

A driver’s licence is also essential, and significant connection to Tasmanian Aboriginal Communities is highly desirable.

If you’re interested in making a difference to Tasmanian Aboriginal health outcomes and can demonstrate the above we’d love to hear from you.

For more information about this position and a job description which includes process for applying contact Lee Seymour at the FIAAI

Tackling Smoking office on 6334 5721 or via

email at:

lee.seymour@fiaai.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal News Alerts : Download Referendum Council’s Final Report on constitutional recognition

 

 ” We are pleased to release the Final Report of the Referendum Council, a body established in 2015 to provide guidance on constitutional change to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

This is an issue of importance to all Australians, and one that deserves careful and thorough consideration.”

Malcolm Turnbull  and Bill Shorten Joint Press Release (see separate comments below part 2 and 3 )

Download Here  Referendum_Council_Final_Report

Today is another important step on the path to constitutional recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

The Council undertook a significant consultation process, seeking the views of all Australians through hosting a digital engagement platform and conducting regional dialogues with First Australians across the nation.

This historic Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consultation process culminated in the landmark First Nations National Constitutional Convention held in Uluru in May, and the adoption of the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

Today we met with the Referendum Council to discuss the recommendations presented in the final report in greater detail. We will now take the time to consider the recommendations and the best way forward.

We wish to thank the Referendum Council, led by Co-Chairs Ms Pat Anderson AO and Mr Mark Leibler AC, for their dedication and commitment.

Image Buzzfeed

 

Part 2 Remarks to the Indigenous Referendum Council

PRIME MINISTER:

Thank you very much.

Can I just add to Linda’s remarks before we get on to the business of the meeting, that we are here on Gadigal country as Linda said – and we thank you for that beautiful Acknowledgement of Country.

And of course we have just a few kilometres from us what is now called La Perouse. Continuous

Aboriginal settlement. Extraordinary. The Aboriginal community of La Perouse, resilient in the middle of the biggest city in Australia. Their ancestors saw the ships come, saw Captain Cook, Captain Phillip, and through all of those, the oppression and the injustice, have maintained that extraordinary spirit.

It is I think emblematic of the extraordinary resilience of the First Australians so that is I think a positive note of resilience and optimism that we should bear in mind here, as you acknowledged Linda, on Gadigal country.

Thank you Pat and Mark and all of the Council for the report. We are very pleased to receive it after 18 months of your work.

We’re not here of course to make a decision. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss with you the recommendation that you’ve made.

As you know, it follows a proposal, many proposals – but in particular the most recent lineage, it follows a proposal of Prime Minister Howard in 2007 that we should recognise our first Australians in the Constitution.

This report that you’ve presented us with is the fourth major report on the issue.

There was the 2012 expert panel report that was commissioned by Prime Minister Gillard, the 2014 Act of Recognition Review Panel and of course the 2015 Joint Select Committee Report provided to Prime Minister Abbott.

Of course many of you were on one or more of those panels.

The fact that Bill and I are here today demonstrates the bipartisan spirit with which the Parliament, each Parliament has approached this issue and which I hope will continue as we examine the recommendations.

It is wonderful that we are here together with First Australians who are Members of the Parliament,

Malarndirri and Pat and Ken and Linda of course, who gave the acknowledgement right at the beginning.

You four are of course are indeed powerful voices in the Parliament of Australia and I thank you for the guidance you’ve offered us.

This also shows that the discussion about recognition has been going on for some time and that’s not just because we like talking about these big issues, but because it’s very complex.

We started the process with five options and we note that your advice has not provided a shortlist and it has, in fact, while it has considered the work of the Expert Panel and the Select Committee, very thorough work, it has essentially rejected the recommendations that those two groups and other groups has made.

Its simply recommended one constitutional change which on any view is a relatively new concept in the Australian debate about recognition.

It is a latecomer in that respect.

So what we’re being presented with in your report, and indeed all Australians will be presented with, if this was to go to a referendum, would be one option which is a constitutionally entrenched advisory body – a Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voice to the Australian Parliament.

It is clearly, as we know, its Parliament’s duty and Parliament’s duty alone to propose changes to the Constitution but the Constitution cannot be changed by Parliament. Only the Australian people can do that.

There’s no political deal, no cross-party compromise, no leader’s handshake, even between leaders as amicable as Bill and myself, can deliver constitutional change.

To do that a constitutionally conservative nation has to be persuaded that the amendments respect the fundamental values of the Constitution and will deliver precise changes clearly understood that would benefit all Australians.

And we do not want to embark – I’m sure none of us do – in some sort of exercise in heroic failure. I have some considerable experience in trying to change the Constitution and know better than most how hard it is.

We need to ensure that any changes that are proposed are ones that meet both the expectations of First Australians but also will bring together all Australians because this is a vote of all Australians.

We are looking forward to having a frank discussion about that now, and to understand how you’ve reached your conclusions.

In particular, to understand why the recommendations of the previous panels and committees that you were asked to consider where set to one side in favour of the new proposal.

And also I’ll just add finally that we acknowledge the recommendation related to a Declaration of Recognition, which would be enacted by legislation as a symbolic statement bringing together historic recognition of our First Australians, our British institutions on which modem Australia was founded and of course our, today, 21st century multicultural nation.

We look forward to discussing all of that as well.

Thank you very much for your work.

It is very short on detail, couldn’t be shorter on detail in fact, but it is a very big idea. It is a very big new idea, so it’s worthy of considerable discussion here today.

Part 3 Bill Shorten remarks

Thank you, Malcolm and thank you, Linda for welcoming us.

I think that the delegates at Uluru in May said ‘in ’67 we were counted and in 2017, we seek to be heard’.

And that informs the approach that the Labor Party is taking in terms of today’s meeting. I want to thank the Referendum Council members, in particular the Chair but all the members, from Mark Liebler and Pat Anderson and all members of the Council.

It’s been hard work and we appreciate your wise counsel.

Hundreds of people, indeed thousands of people have participated in the Referendum Council’s dialogue and made submissions about what recognition and reconciliation means to them.

It builds upon previous work which has been done, including the work of the expert panel and the Parliamentary Committee.

We took that work seriously and obviously, we take the work of the Referendum Council

very seriously too.

Labor acknowledges the objectives of this report, including a stronger voice to the Parliament for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and a process for treaty and agreement making.

These are legitimate aspirations – it is the key recommendation of this report and we can’t shy away from that fact.

They are big changes, as the Prime Minister has said.

I do not believe they are beyond us.

My party is ready to work with all of the political parties, Indigenous leaders and the broader community in terms of final proposals for constitutional change.

As I said at the start, the delegates at Uluru said ‘in ’67 we were counted and now in 2017, we seek to be heard’.

It is a fact that for constitutional change to be successful, there can be no doubt that a bipartisan approach is the best path forward.

Without that, it is a much steeper climb.

Our task is now to hear your message.

Our task is to take the collective wisdom of the Council, turn it into awareness and support for change across the country.

I’ll be meeting this week and subsequent weeks with my Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Caucus, and with the broader Caucus, to talk about our next steps.

But I can assure all of you who have worked so hard on this, we are taking this very seriously and we understand the clear, unequivocal message of the Referendum Council that a voice is the option which the Referendum Council has come down with.

There is a lot more work to do.

We want to have a good discussion today.

This is an important milestone; it is not the last stop but it is certainly the next stage towards true reconciliation and recognition.

Thank you very much for the work you have done.

 

 

Aboriginal Health Please support the @MaiWiruSCF #Sugar Challenge Palyaringkunytjaku – Towards Wellbeing

“ The rates of obesity and insulin resistance syndrome in our communities are now so high that the majority of the adult population over 35 will be affected.

This provides a situation in which we are not aiming to target a subset or at risk group of the population with a nutrition strategy but our whole population is both at risk and suffering disease.”

Professor Paul Torzillo, Medical Director of Nganampa Health Council said in Fighting for “Good Food” (Mai Wiru), submitted by Lorenzo Piemonte, International Diabetes Foundation (2015)

 ” Congratulations, Mai Wiru. They are excited to be taking 10 influential Anangu senior women on a nutrition education retreat so they can experience first hand how a healthy diet feels, and can consequently extend lives in the APY Lands – to do this though, they need your help

Friends,please share this and support it. I met so many wonderful people when I spent two day in the APY Lands last week – they deserve our help.”

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt

Amata was an alcohol-free community, but some years earlier its population of just under 400 people had been consuming 40,000 litres of soft drink annually.

The thing that I say in community meetings all the time is that, the reason we’re doing this is so that the young children now do not end up going down the same track of diabetes, kidney failure, dialysis machines and early death, which is the track that many, many people out here are on now,”

Mai Wiru, meaning good health, and managed by long-time community consultant John Tregenza.

See Previous NACCHO Post Aboriginal Health and Sugar TV Doco: APY community and the Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation

Palyaringkunytjaku – Towards Wellbeing is the brain child of Inawantji (Ina) Scales, a young Pitjantjatjara woman from the APY Lands.

Ina has seen too many family and friends, too many Anangu (people from the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands) die from diet related illnesses.

Watch video

Ina wants to give Anangu the same opportunity Hope For Health has given Yolngu in the top end

See fundraising website

In 2016 Ina met with Damon Gameau, the founding director of the Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation.

She told him of her sadness from watching so many people become ill and pass away, she also told of her personal experience from visiting Living Valley Springs and the happiness she felt at now understanding the solutions.

Ina asked Damon for his help, and the Foundation’s help, to share her experiences with other people on the APY Lands.

Here we are today, raising funds to send 10 senior and influential women to an intensive health and nutrition retreat where they will learn and be able to personally experience firsthand, the benefits of healthy eating and living.

By providing a culturally appropriate setting with language interpretation, we will free participants to focus, distraction free, on learning the extensive information that will be provided.

These strong community leaders will then be able to return to community to share their experiences and become healthy living champions.

This is a 2 week trip with an interpreter and staff member to support the women through their learning and experiences, and further to be able to support the women on their return to community.

This will also ensure longer lasting results and help participants maximise their learnings and minimise any stumbling blocks they come across.

Our aim is to have an intensive and immediate impact for these women, enabling them to experience the benefits of healthy eating and living, and to expand their understanding of the impacts of foods on their bodies, to understand the how and why foods have such influence over us.

In their roles in community they can then spread the word about their positive experience and help others make healthier choices.

The participants are being selected based on their location and their capacity to influence on their return.

As a result, these women will become healthy living champions, sharing their knowledge and experience in their regions.

We can’t do it without you.

Help Ina make a good impact on the health of her people, of the Anangu nation.

  • The rate of kidney failure in Aboriginal communities is 15 x the rest of Australia; Type 2 diabetes is 3 x the national average.
  • For too long now high Aboriginal death rates have been attributed to alcohol consumption. The communities and region of the APY lands have now been alcohol free for 40 years yet average life span on the lands is just 55; 20 years lower than the rest of Australia. This is because of poor diet.
  • Professor Paul Torzillo, Medical Director of Nganampa Health Council said in Fighting for “Good Food” (Mai Wiru), submitted by Lorenzo Piemonte, International Diabetes Foundation (2015) “The rates of obesity and insulin resistance syndrome in our communities are now so high that the majority of the adult population over 35 will be affected. This provides a situation in which we are not aiming to target a subset or at risk group of the population with a nutrition strategy but our whole population is both at risk and suffering disease.”
  • Dr Amanda Lee et al in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Nutrition in remote Aboriginal communities: Lessons from Mai Wiru and the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands, (2015), state that more than 75% of Indigenous deaths result from potentially avoidable causes. This includes type 2 diabetes, a preventable, non-communicable chronic disease. About 70% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults, and 38% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were considered overweight or obese in 2015, with an additional 8% of children who are underweight, another major contributor to the avoidable deaths.
  • Communities on the APY Lands have a long history of being proactive, for example, communities took back management of their stores to ensure food security (the availability and affordability of healthy food and essential items on a daily basis through their local store).
  • There are programs in place that address nutrition and health, but the scale of the problem necessitates a spot fire approach and they are struggling to extend and achieve the progressive results needed to combat chronic health and nutrition issues in the Aboriginal population.
  • The success of service delivery in remote communities depends on the level of community involvement and buy-in. By providing an intensive experience with ongoing support community members will be empowered to create and manage change in their communities.

To make this program fly we need your wonderful support to get there!

We know you’re all very busy people and this is why we appreciate your help more than you can know! Here is a list of 10 things that you could do to help us make Ina’s dream of Palyaringkunytjaku – Towards Wellbeing a reality.

  1. Share our emails – when you receive our emails – share them with your friends and networks.
  2. Share our Social Media posts – Follow us on Facebook and invite your friends to do the same.
  3. Talk to your friends, family, colleagues – tell them what we are doing and how they can support us.
  4. Give us a call. We are looking for more support and are ready to answer calls. We can talk in more detail about the project and who knows where a conversation may lead. Email info@maiwirufoundation.org
  5. Hold a fundraising event. Be creative – a donation box at your work for a month, hold a concert, a dinner party with tickets, a raffle, a physical challenge among your friends, a percentage of your office mates salaries for a month. Design your own style of fundraising.
  6. Create your own campaign under this ‘Palyaringkunytjaku’ umbrella – simply click the button at the bottom of the screen that says ‘Fundraisers – Create Your Own’. You can select one of the impact levels and let your friends and family know what the funds raise will enable. You might like to do ‘6 Spoons in June (and July)’ for the length of this campaign and ask for sponsorship, as an incentive
  7. Keep a close eye on our campaign-we need to hit the target, so if we get close and time is short consider donating again to get us over the top
  8. Have you got something special to give? Relevant health products or services? Donate towards our perks or retreat or help with distributing perks to donors.
  9. Send a message through your networks. Do you have a voice in your community? Do you have a big social media following? Perhaps a lot of professional networks? One or two emails during the campaign from you could result in thousands of dollars towards our very important work. We have email templates for you to use and technical support available if you require. Email: info@maiwirufoundation.org
  10. Did we mention sharing our social media, emails and talking to people you know about what we are doing? When people hear and understand your passion, they can be inspired to jump on board.

All donations are tax deductible.

What happens if we get more or less than $63,500?

By hitting $63,500 we can make Ina’s dream a reality and take 10 participants from the APY Lands on this program, means Palyaringkunytjaku can go ahead as Ina hoped.

There are always many people from the APY Lands who would benefit from this experience,, therefore the amount we raise will directly impact on the number of people Ina and the Mai Wiru Foundation are able to support.

The Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation is an indigenous community-led initiative, implementing nutrition programs in central Australia’s remote APY Lands. After two years of consultation, and multiple visits from nutritionists to indigenous communities, the team are working on three key projects: opening healthy living cafes, funding permanent nutritionists on the ground, and intensive nutrition workshops.

Melbourne filmmaker Damon Gameau embarked on a unique experiment to document the effects of a high sugar diet on a healthy body, consuming only foods that are commonly perceived, or promoted to be ‘healthy’. Damon’s now acclaimed documentary The Sugar Film raises awareness of the hazards of any diet containing too much sugar. In making the film Damon included a segment about an innovative health program initiated by Indigenous communities in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara(APY) Lands, where stores were stocking healthy foods and nutritionists were advising customers on the best food choices. Damon determined to give back to the APY communities who featured in That Sugar Film by supporting them in their mission to take control of their own nutrition and improve the health status of Aboriginal families on the APY Lands.

Damon founded the Mai Wiru (Good Food) Sugar Challenge Foundation, a not-for-profit enterprise working with APY communities in an indigenous-led initiative to improve their health.

The health challenges of Aboriginal people are well documented, with current research identifying a 10 year gap between the life expectancy of indigenous and non-indigenous males and indigenous and non-indigenous females. The report published by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare : Indigenous Health (2014) found that ‘The largest gap in death rates between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians was in circulatory disease deaths (22% of the gap) followed by endocrine, metabolic and nutritional disorders (particularly diabetes) (14% of the gap)’.

You can start your own campaign to raise money for Palyaringkunytjaku – with a goal for one of the impact levels below:

  • For the flights – 1 participant (12 in total) = $767
  • For the 2 week health workshop – per participant (10 participants) = $5,990
  • Meals during transit per person – 4 days (12 people) = $300
  • Vehicle expenses – hire, mileage, fuel, maintenance. Pickup and return to community – 3 vehicles for all participants = $11,169
  • Accommodation Alice Springs – per person 2 nights (each direction) twin share = $150

What happens if we get more or less than $63,500?

By hitting $63,500 we can make Ina’s dream a reality and take 10 participants from the APY Lands on this program, it means Palyaringkunytjaku can go ahead as Ina hoped. There are always many people from the APY Lands who would benefit from this experience, therefore the amount we raise will directly impact on the number of people Ina and the Mai Wiru Foundation are able to support

If you would prefer to make a donation by bank transfer/direct deposit, please see our bank account details below. Please advise by email – info@maiwirufoundation.org – when donation is made so we can issue a tax receipt. Thank you.

Account Name: Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation
Bank: Suncorp
BSB: 484 799
Acct No: 507433042
Description: Please enter your email address

Aboriginal Eye Health #NDW2017 : Fact check: Has trachoma among Indigenous kids fallen from 20pc to 4pc ?

” On the final day of the Uluru convention on a referendum for Indigenous constitutional recognition, former prime minister Kevin Rudd spoke to the ABC about Indigenous disadvantage since his National Apology to the Stolen Generations in 2008.

Mr Rudd told Radio National on May 26: “One of the programs that we established back then was to eliminate trachoma amongst Indigenous young people. Twenty thousand kids were suffering from trachoma back then at about a 20, 25 per cent rate. We’re now down to about four per cent.”

Is Mr Rudd correct about the incidence and decline of trachoma among Indigenous young people? RMIT ABC Fact Check investigates

Originally Published HERE

NACCHO Declaration

Read over 40 NACCHO Eye Health articles we have published over 5 years

 ” The Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision has played a part in prompting actions that contribute to this improvement. The Roadmap outlines a whole of system approach to improving Indigenous eye health, and achieving equity between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal eye health outcomes.

There is however still work to be done on Closing the Gap for Vision. For example, half of Indigenous participants with diabetes had not had the recommended retinal examination.

NACCHO has been involved with the Roadmap from its inception, and had a long relationship with Indigenous Eye Health at the University of Melbourne, and with RANZCO. We’re pleased with the great work and good progress being made.”

 Ms Patricia Turner, Chief Executive Officer, of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) launching  The 2016 Annual Update on the Implementation of the Roadmap to Close the Gap for Vision November 2016

 

The verdict

Mr Rudd’s claim is overstated.

In saying that 20,000 kids were suffering from trachoma, Mr Rudd appears to have used data for the number of children living in communities judged to be at risk of having endemic trachoma. The number of children estimated to have trachoma in 2009 was about 3,000.

His rate of 20 to 25 per cent “back then” is supported by a prevalence figure of 21 per cent contained in a 2008 report. However, the rates for 2007 and 2009 were each 14 per cent, and the report for 2009 cautions about the reliability of the 2008 data.

Rates of trachoma among Indigenous children in at-risk communities have declined steadily since 2009. The claim that rates have fallen to about four per cent is supported by recent reliable data.

What is trachoma?

Trachoma is a contagious infection of the eye that, with repeated long-term infections, can result in the eyelashes turning inwards and scratching the cornea, leading to blindness.

Trachoma affects children and preschool-aged children in particular. It is commonly spread through nose and eye secretions, occurs in areas with poor community and personal hygiene, and is associated with overcrowding and reduced access to water.

Australia is the only developed country where trachoma is still endemic, and it occurs primarily in remote Aboriginal communities in Central Australia.

What program did the Rudd government establish?

Professor Hugh Taylor is the Harold Mitchell Professor of Indigenous Eye Health at Melbourne University and when Mr Rudd announced the policy in 2009 he was head of the National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit, which receives funding from the Federal Department of Health.

Professor Taylor told Fact Check that “after years of either inaction or ineffective action, in 2009 Kevin Rudd committed to eliminate trachoma in Australia by the year 2020”.

Australia adopted a trachoma eradication strategy in line with the World Health Organisation’s 1998 global strategy and based on its SAFE guidelines. SAFE stands for [S]urgery to repair inward eye lashes, [A]ntibiotics, promotion of [F]acial cleanliness, and [E]nvironmental improvements in hygiene and water access.

Mr Rudd’s office told Fact Check the policy he was referring to was a $58 million commitment made in February 2009 to “help tackle eye and ear diseases in Indigenous communities”, with a major focus on trachoma eradication.

The funding was to be allocated over four years, and according to a press release at the time, included “a major increase in services to address trachoma, which will enable at least 10 regional teams to treat and help prevent the disease in NT, WA, SA and other states where trachoma is identified”.

The 2009-10 federal budget papers spell out $58.4 million in funding over four years for “improving eye and ear health services for Indigenous Australians”.

According to the National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit, in 2009 the Government committed $16 million over four years towards eliminating trachoma in Australia, and in 2013 committed a further $16.5 million.

The source of the claim

When contacted by Fact Check, Mr Rudd’s spokeswoman said reports for 2008 and 2015 by the National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit were the source of his claim.

Fact Check was unable to find another consistent, national source of data on the prevalence of trachoma in Indigenous communities. Experts confirmed that there was not any other reliable source.

In the unit’s data collection process, communities are classified as being at risk or not at risk of trachoma and screening of the disease focuses on the at-risk communities.

Screening is administered by local health officials who report the data back to the surveillance and reporting unit for collation and analysis.

Coverage of trachoma screening of at-risk communities has increased over time, due to the increasing level of resourcing of the trachoma eradication program.

20,000 kids with trachoma?

Mr Rudd’s February 2009 media release contains the sentence: “Approximately 20,000 Indigenous children suffer from trachoma in Australia.”

Mr Rudd’s office told Fact Check that “in 2009, it would appear the material provided by the Health Department to the Government referred to 20,000 kids suffering from trachoma”.

His spokeswoman pointed to a May 2009 media release from the then Indigenous affairs minister Jenny Macklin which contained the same sentence and a July 2009 speech by the then parliamentary secretary for social inclusion Ursula Stephens who said: “Trachoma affects approximately 20,000 Indigenous children — a stunning statistic and one that is confronting to government.”

However, a spokeswoman for the Department of Health told Fact Check that “the number of children screened and found to have active trachoma was 997 in 2008 and 575 in 2009”, and “we can confirm that the figure of 20,000 children relates to the number of children resident in potentially at-risk communities (population data), not those screened and found to have trachoma”.

The National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit’s report for 2009 says there were “20,155 children aged one to nine years resident in the 232 at-risk communities”.

Of these children, 4,116, or 20 per cent, were screened and 575 children had trachoma.

“If those 4,116 children screened were a representative sample of all 20,155 children resident in all at-risk communities, the additional number of children estimated to have trachoma across the three jurisdictions lies between 2,045 and 2,448,” the report said.

It appears that all three ministers were referring to statistics available at the time about the number of children at risk of contracting trachoma, not the number who were suffering from trachoma.

Professor Taylor told Fact Check that “the estimate in 2008 was that there were 20,000 kids in remote communities considered to be at risk of trachoma”.

“This is a rubbery figure because not all the communities had been examined,” he added.

The prevalence of trachoma in 2008

The executive summary of the National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit’s 2008 report says that “the prevalence of active trachoma in those communities from which data were reported was 21 per cent”.

Of 287 remote Aboriginal communities, 235 were identified as at risk of trachoma in 2008, and 121 were screened and reported data.

The 2008 report focused on the prevalence of trachoma in Indigenous children aged one to nine years old.

Fact Check notes that both the 2007 and 2009 reports show the trachoma prevalence in Aboriginal children aged one to nine years old in communities that reported data in those years to be 14 per cent.

The discussion section of the 2009 report says that “in 2008, there was an abrupt two-fold increase in trachoma prevalence in NT, and an equally abrupt seven-fold decrease in trachoma prevalence in SA, compared with past years. Both of these sudden changes were reversed in 2009”.

The report says the variation in the numbers “suggests that the data from 2008 might be problematic”.

Professor Taylor told Fact Check that “there is an inconsistency in the data and it’s appropriate to acknowledge it, but those are the data that we have, and those are the data that we must use”.

Carleigh Cowling, senior surveillance officer with the National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit, said the Northern Territory intervention had an impact on the collection of the data in 2008.

“During the intervention, the trachoma screening program was taken over by unusual bodies, whose training was questionable,” she said, adding that “data collected by those teams were not presented in the 2008 report, which does make the data presented problematic”.

The prevalence of trachoma today

The most recent report from the National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit, published in June 2016 and containing data for 2015, shows that 139 communities were identified as being at risk of trachoma, a decrease of 96 communities since 2008.

Of these 139 communities, 67 were screened and reported data.

The 2015 report focused on children aged five to nine, though reports prior to 2010 focused on children aged one to nine. “It’s an assumption that one to four-year-olds are similar,” Professor John Kaldor, the current head of the National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting unit, now part of the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales, said.

Professor Taylor and Ms Cowling both told Fact Check that though the 2008 report focuses on children aged one to nine and the 2015 report on children aged five to nine, this will have little impact on the comparability of the data from those years.

The results, for children aged five to nine as against one to nine reported in 2008, reveal that the prevalence of trachoma in the communities that screened was 3.7 per cent. The prevalence “using the most recent data carried forward in all at-risk communities” was 4.6 per cent.

The 3.7 per cent is for at-risk communities that screened in 2015, and the 4.6 per cent is for all at-risk communities, meaning those that screened and those that didn’t screen that year but are considered at risk based on previous data.

Professor Kaldor said policy guidelines changed in 2014 so that if a community had high rates of trachoma several years in a row, resources were shifted towards treatment rather than screening.

He and Professor Taylor both agreed that the current prevalence of trachoma among children in affected communities was about 4 per cent.

Professor Kaldor said of hotspots that still exist in Central Australia: “While the drug azithromycin is a big part of combating the disease, there’s the whole issue of fulfilling the other parts of the SAFE strategy to sustainably improve facilities and living conditions.”

“If these are not addressed, the impact of treatment may be short-lived.”

Professor Taylor told Fact Check that “since 2008 we’ve made considerable progress”.

“If you look at closing the gap, it’s actually one area where you can say we’ve made considerable progress,” he said.

Sources

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @DiabetesAus #NDW2017 #ItsAboutTime for National #Diabetes Week

 

 “It is National Diabetes Week from 9-15 July and Diabetes Australia’s “It’s About Time” campaign aims to raise awareness about the importance of early detection and early treatment for all types of diabetes.

Too many Australians are being diagnosed with diabetes too late. The is true for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The delay in diagnosis is putting many people at risk of major life threatening health problems.

It’s About Time  we detected all types of diabetes earlier and save lives.

 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost four times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to have diabetes or pre-diabetes.

Improving the lives of people affected by all types of diabetes and those at risk among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a priority for Diabetes Australia.”

See full Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander diabetes info below Part 1

Read over 120 NACCHO published articles about Diabetes  in past 5 years

 ” New research has found that only 5% of Australians aged over 40 have had a type 2 diabetes risk check in the past two years.

Also, more than half of people surveyed were unable name any diabetes related complication despite type 2 diabetes being a leading cause of vision loss, kidney damage, heart attacks, stroke and limb amputation.

The release of the research comes at the start of National Diabetes Week as Diabetes Australia launches a new campaign, It’s About Time, to raise awareness of the seriousness of the type 2 diabetes, and urge 500,000 Australians who could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes to get checked  ”

IT’S ABOUT TIME WE DETECTED  SILENT UNDIAGNOSED TYPE 2 DIABETES see Part 2 below

Part 1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander diabetes info

Watch the short video below for a quick guide to the benefits of the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) ”

You can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a more healthy diet and being physically active which will help maintain a healthy weight to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal and your body strong.

If you have any worries about diabetes, check the symptoms below and find out more from your Aboriginal Health Worker, Health Clinic/Community Centre, Aboriginal Medical Service or doctor.

The following information is from the ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ flipcharts for Indigenous Australians.

It is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

The ‘Keep Culture Life & Family Strong; Know Early About Diabetes’ resource was originally developed by Healthy Living NT with funding provided by the Department of Health and Ageing through Diabetes Australia. The reprinting and distribution of the most recent addition has been made possible with funding by the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) – an initiative of the Australian Government administered by Diabetes Australia.

How do you feel? (Symptoms)

If you have any of the following symptoms you should talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.

  • Feeling tired or weak
  • Go to the toilet a lot
  • Feeling thirsty
  • Leg cramps
  • Feeling itchy
  • Sores and boils that won’t heal
  • Blurry vision
  • Pins and needles
  • Feeling grumpy or angry.

Through a simple test, a doctor can find out if they’re the result of diabetes.

What is it? (About diabetes)

Sugar (glucose) gives your body energy. The sugar (glucose) moves from your blood into your muscles with something called insulin. With diabetes your insulin isn’t working properly, so the sugar (glucose) doesn’t get into your muscles and body easily and there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood.

Everyone has a little bit of sugar (glucose) in their blood. The optimum sugar (glucose) level is between 4 to 6 mmol/L (after fasting).

Sugar (glucose) is fuel that comes from some of the food you eat and drink. It gives your body energy to do all sorts of things:

  • Walk
  • Think
  • Play sports
  • Hunt
  • Work
  • Rake
  • Gardening
  • Resting.

To help the sugar (glucose) move into your muscles and body cells your body needs something called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas – a body part which is near your stomach.

Insulin helps keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

With diabetes, the insulin isn’t helping the sugar (glucose) move from your body into your muscles and body cells. So it stays and builds in your body, making your blood sugar (glucose) level high.

Type 2 Diabetes

There are different types of diabetes. A lot of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is when your body stops the insulin working properly.

Fat bellies, not being active enough, eating a big mob of fatty food can stop the insulin working properly in your body.

Being active, eating healthy and being a healthy weight can help your insulin work better to keep your sugar (glucose) normal. Sometimes people might need to take tablets and insulin everyday to keep their sugar (glucose) levels normal.

Gestational Diabetes

Another type of diabetes is gestational diabetes. This happens when you are pregnant, but not all women get it. It goes away after pregnancy but you and your baby can get type 2 diabetes later in life.

Pre Diabetes

There is also Pre Diabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT). This happens when your sugar (glucose) level is high, but not high enough to be called diabetes. It doesn’t mean you have diabetes now, but it does mean you might get it later. Being active and eating healthy you can slow down the start of type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes

Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have type 1 diabetes. This usually happens in kids and teenagers. Type 1 diabetes is when your body kills the insulin making part in the pancreas and no insulin is made in your body. To give the body the insulin it needs, insulin injections are needed every day for the rest of their life.

What do I do? (Management of diabetes)

When there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood it damages your heart, kidneys, feet, eyes and nerves.

You can keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal by:

Eating healthy

  • Have plenty of bush tucker and have shop foods and home cooked meals that are low in fat, sugar and salt.
  • Have something from each of the core food groups every day. They give you energy, fight sickness and help care for your body to keep it strong.
  • Drink plenty of water.

Avoiding and eat less fat, sugar and salt

  • Eat less fat as it makes you put on weight and gives you problems with your heart.
  • Pick meat with no fat or only small bits of fat on it. Cut the fat off the meat and take the skin off chicken.
  • Drain the juices (fat) after cooking meat and scoop out the fat from the top of stews.
  • Avoid cooking with or having fats like butter, oil, margarine or dripping.
  • It is better to boil, steam, stew, grill, microwave or stir-fry food.

Being a healthy weight (not too fat and not too skinny)

  • Do this by eating less, eating healthy and being more active.

Keeping active

  • It helps you lose weight and keep it off and it keeps you healthy.
  • It helps your insulin to work properly.
  • Walk, job, play sport, hunt, garden, work around the place.
  • Be active for 30 minutes or more every day OR do 10 minutes 3 times a day.

Taking your medicine

  • Take your medicine at the times the doctor tells you.
  • Take them with or after eating in the morning, afternoon and supper time every day.
  • Refill your medicine box in the morning (get some more medicine before it gets low and so you don’t run out).
  • Take your medicine with you when you go to see family, walkabout or away from home.
  • Put your medicines somewhere cool, dry and safe so they won’t go bad.
  • Keep your medicines out of reach of kids.

Remember to:

  • Have your check-ups with your doctor, health worker or nurse. Have regular check-ups for your eyes, feet, kidneys, blood pressure, skin and teeth. If you notice anything different about your body talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse.
  • Check your sugar (glucose) levels at the times your doctor, health worker or nurse tells you.
  • See your doctor, health worker or nurse straight away if you feel sick.
  • Check your feet and skin for sores and/or cracks every day.

Why take medicine for? (Medications for diabetes)

Indigenous  

Diabetes medicine helps to keep your body strong and well and it helps to keep your sugar (glucose) levels normal.

When eating healthy, being active and being a healthy weight isn’t working at keeping your sugar (glucose) levels normal, you might need to take tablets and/or insulin.

The doctor might put you on tablets called Metformin to help your insulin work better and to lower the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood.

After a while the pancreas gets tired from working too hard and can’t make enough insulin, so your doctor might put you on tablets called Sulphonylurea. This medicine helps your body make more insulin.

Or, after awhile, the doctor might need to add another lot of tablets called Glitazone or Acarbose.

Remember to have your medicine with or after eating, in the morning, afternoon or supper time. Take them at the time the doctor tells you to.

All tablets work differently and some can have side effects.

If the following problems don’t go away or if you are still worried about them, then talk to your doctor.

  • Feel sick like you want to vomit (nausea)
  • A sore belly
  • Diarrhoea
  • Sugar (glucose) levels going too low
  • Have fluid build-up (retention)

When your sugar (glucose) levels get too high and stays high the doctor might put you on tablets and give you insulin.

  • Having insulin doesn’t mean you have type 1 diabetes.
  • Insulin isn’t like tablets so it shouldn’t be swallowed.
  • You inject the insulin under your skin in different places on your belly.

Talk to your doctor, health worker or nurse about insulin and what is right for you.

Having too much insulin or taking too many Sulphonylurea tablets can make your sugar (glucose) levels go too low (under 3) and make you hypo (hypoglycaemia).

You can also go hypo (hypoglycaemia) if you are:

  • Not eating, not eating enough or eating too late
  • Being extra active
  • Drinking grog (alcohol).

You might not feel anything when you have a hypo (hypoglycaemia), but sometimes you might feel:

  • Shaky
  • Hungry
  • Get headaches
  • Weak
  • Confused
  • Angry
  • Talk like you’re drunk when you’re not
  • Sweaty.

When you have these feelings or think you are having a hypo (hypoglycaemia), get your sugar (glucose) level up fast by drinking or eating something sweet.

Keep your sugar (glucose) level normal and stop having another hypo (hypoglycaemia) by eating a sandwich or meal after you have something sweet.

Remember, after taking your tablets or insulin:

  • Keep them somewhere cool, dry and safe (maybe in the fridge at home or at the clinic) so that they won’t go bad
  • Keep them out of reach of children
  • Get rid of your syringes/needles and finger pricking needles by putting them in a “sharps container” or “hard plastic” empty container with a lid (see if the clinic has one).

Remember when you go see family, walkabout or are away for home take your tablets and/or insulin with you.

Why me? (Risk factors)

Nobody knows how or why some people get diabetes but there are some things we know that can add to your chances of getting it. You have more chance of getting it when you are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, but not all Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islande people have diabetes.

Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people live different to how they used to live. Changes that add to your chances of getting diabetes are:

  • Not as active
  • More overweight
  • Eating fatty salty, sugary foods.

People living the old way were:

  • Active
  • Leaner and fit
  • Eating healthy food (bush tucker).

Other chances of getting diabetes include:

  • It is in your family tree or when someone in your family has diabetes
  • You had diabetes when pregnant
  • You get older
  • You eat too much and you eat too many fatty and sugary foods
  • You are overweight
  • You are not active enough
  • You have pancreatitis (a sickness of the pancreas).

There are things you can’t change or stop you from getting diabetes:

  • It’s in your family
  • You are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
  • You are pregnant with diabetes
  • You are getting older.

The things you can do to slow down the start of diabetes:

  • Eat healthy and be a healthy weight
  • Be active
  • Don’t drink too much grog.

Nobody knows why or how people get diabetes. After a while it can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves making you really sick.

Talk to your doctor, clinic, nurse or health worker about having a test to find out if you have diabetes.

You can’t always feel it or see it happening, so you might not know you have it.

Part 2 :IT’S ABOUT TIME WE DETECTED  SILENT UNDIAGNOSED TYPE 2 DIABETES

New research has found that only 5% of Australians aged over 40 have had a type 2 diabetes risk check in the past two years.

Also, more than half of people surveyed were unable name any diabetes related complication despite type 2 diabetes being a leading cause of vision loss, kidney damage, heart attacks, stroke and limb amputation.

The release of the research comes at the start of National Diabetes Week as Diabetes Australia launches a new campaign, It’s About Time, to raise awareness of the seriousness of the type 2 diabetes, and urge 500,000 Australians who could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes to get checked.

Diabetes Australia CEO Professor Greg Johnson said there was great concern about the length of time many people have silent, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes without it being diagnosed.

“It’s about time we detected silent undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Many people have type 2 diabetes for up to seven years before being diagnosed and during that time up to half begin to develop a diabetes-related complication,” Professor Johnson said.

“The tragedy is that much of the damage to the body that causes diabetes-related complications like vision loss, kidney damage, heart attack, stroke and limb amputation is preventable.

“AUSDRISK is a free, online risk assessment you can take to determine your risk of type 2 diabetes. Despite over 60% of Australians having risk factors for type 2 diabetes, the research shows only 5% of Australians over the age of 40 have done the type 2 diabetes risk assessment in past two years” he said.

The survey found:

  •  Only 21% of Australians over the age of 40 had heard of the Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk (AUSDRISK) Assessment;
  •  Only 5% of Australians over the age of 40 had completed the AUSDRISK assessment in the past two years; and
  •  More than 51% of people over the age of 18 were unable to name any serious diabetes-related complication despite type 2 diabetes being a leading cause of vision loss and blindness, limb amputation, kidney damage, heart attacks and stroke.

Diabetes NSW & ACT CEO Sturt Eastwood urged people take the free type 2 diabetes risk assessment today.

“Type 2 diabetes is the single biggest challenge confronting Australia’s health system and it’s time we did a better job of detecting type 2 diabetes earlier,” Mr Eastwood said.

“The earlier a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes occurs, the sooner a management plan can be put in place delivering better outcomes for the individual and the community.

“The AUSDRISK check only takes about five minutes. If you take the check and get a high score, see your doctor so they can determine if you have type 2 diabetes.

“If you are diagnosed there is a lot of support and advice, and many effective treatments available to help you manage type 2 diabetes and reduce the risk of developing diabetes-related complications.”

Professor Lesley Campbell from St. Vincent’s Hospital said front line health professionals were spending more and more time treating patients who present with type 2 diabetes complications. Diabetes was often still undiagnosed until admission for heart attack, stroke or lung or heart transplantation.

“Unfortunately we are seeing people with type 2 diabetes diagnosed too late and the impact of late diagnosis and lack of treatment is filling our hospital beds,” Professor Campbell said.

“Diabetes is ranked in the top ten causes of death in Australia and is the leading cause of preventable blindness, limb amputation and end stage kidney disease.

“Much of this can be avoided with early diagnosis and optimal treatment.”

For Sydney woman Belinda Nakauta, having her toe amputated because of type 2 diabetes was a major wake up call.

“I went to the doctor about a urinary tract infection and he suggested I get checked for type 2 diabetes. I was shocked when it came back positive and the scary thing is I have no idea about how long I was living with type 2 diabetes before I was assessed,” Ms Nakauta said.

“Having a toe amputated a couple of years ago was a wakeup call. Having a part of your body cut off, no matter how small, is a scary experience. With the help of a dietitian and regular gym visits, I’ve lost more than 20 kilograms and dramatically cut back on the medication I need to manage my type 2 diabetes.

“I wish I had done something five or ten years ago. I don’t want to be that person in the ICU on dialysis. I don’t want to have foot complications or lose my eye sight. I don’t want to be that person.

“It was about time I started taking my diabetes seriously and I hope my story helps convince all Australians that it is about time we do something about diabetes.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #FASD Workshop dates : Development of the National #FASD Strategy 2018 – 2028

The Australian Government Department of Health is undertaking consultations to inform the development of the National FASD Strategy 2018– 2028.

The Strategy will provide a national approach for all levels of government, organisations and individuals on strategies that target the reduction of alcohol related harms relating to FASD, reducing the prevalence of FASD in Australia and provide advice and linkages on the support which is available for those affected by the disorder.

The objectives of the National FASD Strategy 2018 – 2028 are:

  • strengthen efforts and address the whole-of-life impacts of FASD;
  • address the whole-of-population issues;
  • support collaborative cross sectoral approaches required to prevent FASD in Australia; and
  • provide information and support those living with and affected by the disorder.

The Department has engaged Siggins Miller Consultants Pty Ltd (Siggins Miller) to undertake the development of the National FASD Strategywhich includes consultation with stakeholders and the development of a national strategy which provides a national holistic approach to reducing the prevalence of FASD; support Australians living with the disorder; guide the activities of individuals and communities as well as all levels of government, the public and research sectors, Not-For-Profit organisations which can adapted and implemented across Australia.

Siggins Miller is an experienced Australian consultancy company providing services for over 20 years in policy and program research, evaluation and management consultancy. The Siggins Miller project team is led by Professor Mel Miller (Director) and Mr James Miller (Senior Consultant).

As part of the consultation process, Siggins Miller will be conducting face-to-face strategy development workshops. There will also be other opportunities to provide feedback including through supplementary telephone interviews and written submissions.

The consultation period will run from 1st July, 2017 and conclude on the 1st September, 2017.

The workshops will be attended by with individuals and organisations working on FASD, individuals and organisations working with people affected by FASD, public health organisations and representatives of State and Territory Departments including: Health, Corrections and Juvenile Justice and Education and National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Affiliates.

The workshops will be catered and run from 9:30am – 3:30pm. Face-to-face strategy development workshops will be held in and on:

Sydney: Tuesday, August 1, 2017.

Canberra: Thursday August 3, 2017.

Melbourne: Tuesday,August 8, 2017.

Hobart: Thursday, August 10, 2017.

Brisbane: Tuesday,August 15, 2017.

Cairns: Thursday, August 17, 2017.

Perth: Tuesday,August 22, 2017.

Broome: Thursday, August 24, 2017.

Darwin: Tuesday,August 29, 2017.

Alice Springs: Thursday, August 31, 2017.

Adelaide: Monday, September 4, 2017.

Exact addresses of venues are in the process of being finalised and will be communicated to all stakeholder by Siggins Miller in the coming weeks.

It should be noted that due to capacity of venues, spaces to attend the face-to-face strategy development workshops are limited in each location. Invited participants will also be responsible for any costs associated with attending the face-to-face workshop in each location.

Siggins Miller will be in contact with you by email in the coming weeks with an invitation for you to attend one of the face-to face strategy development workshops.

In the meantime, should you have any questionsabout the consultation and written submission process, please contact Siggins Millerby email on fasdstrategy@sigginsmiller.com.au or by phone on: 1800 055 070.

Please note that the 1800 number provided is a message bank service in which you can leave your inquiry, a senior Siggins Miller staff member will endeavour to return your call within 72 hours.

 

 

NACCHO TOP 10 Aboriginal health #JobAlerts #Kimberleys #Brisbane #Adelaide #Grafton #Casino this week : #Aboriginal Health Workers / #Nurses

This weeks #Jobalerts 28 June

Please note  : Before completing a job application check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Tackling Tobacco Care Coordinator

2.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Nurse Supervisor (Registered Nurse / Midwife)

3. Broome Project Coordinator – Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial

4-7 Kimberley AMS Four Nurse positions

8. Grafton and Casino Registered Nurse (RN) & Early Childhood Nurse (ECN)

9-10 Brisbane :North Stradbroke Island part of the Yulu-Burri-Ba team?

 

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholder

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Tackling Tobacco Care Coordinator

Join Us to Further Reduce Smoking in the Aboriginal Community

  • Become part of a successful team improving health outcomes for Aboriginal communities in Adelaide
  • Provide culturally smoking cessation support making a positive difference to people’s lives
  • Competitive remuneration HSL 4 plus salary sacrifice options

About the Organisation

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the foremost Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Adelaide, South Australia, providing a range of health care and community support services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

First incorporated in 1971, Nunkuwarrin Yunti has grown from a welfare agency with three employees to a multi-faceted organisation with over 100 staff who deliver a diverse range of health care and community support services.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti aims to promote and improve the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and to advance their social, cultural, and economic status. The Organisation places a strong focus on a client-centered approach to the delivery of services, and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for clients.

About the Opportunity

Nunkuwarrin Yunti has an exciting opportunity for a Tobacco Care Coordinator to join their team in Adelaide on a full-time basis, as part of our Tackling Tobacco program. The initial position is up to December 2017, as the role is subject to ongoing funding. The program has been undertaken since 2010.

With the support of the Tackling Tobacco team this position will utilise approaches to provide effective and evidence based tobacco screening, assessment, quit support and referral programs to clients, staff, and community members who use tobacco. The position will be responsible for supporting health services to talk with clients about smoking and readiness to quit, develop/review clinical guidelines, organise/deliver training to staff, coordinating/ responding to referrals received and ensuring follow up with clients is conducted as per the program plan.

Under direction the primary role of the Tackling Tobacco Care Coordinator is to:

  •  Participate in the planning, development, implementation and promotion of services through the establishment of appropriate plans to ensure services are delivered in a culturally safe manner
  • Utilise tailored approaches to provide expert advice and support to individuals and groups that promotes the harms of smoking, tobacco cessation techniques and Nicotine replacement therapies.
  • Initiate relationships with other service providers to support referrals and referral pathways
  • Coordinate and ensure scheduled follow up is provided to referrals received into the program
  • Coordinate, deliver and undertake community education programs and activities
  • Contribute to policy and procedure development related to tobacco interventions
  • Provide support to lower level staff within the tobacco program as required, particularly in the delegation and scheduling of client follow ups.
  • Work collaboratively with other community support and health teams on a daily basis to ensure quality services are delivered to clients

Please include your CV and a cover letter (no more than 2 pages) addressing the following 3 questions:

  1. What skills, strengths and experience would you bring to the role? Please also comment on your knowledge and understanding relating to Tobacco use within the Adelaide Metropolitan Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community.
  2. Please outline your experience in working with Aboriginal clients regarding their smoking behaviour and how you would work with individuals to encourage them to stop smoking?
  3. This position is responsible for ensuring a high number of referrals are made to the Tobacco program. Please outline what strategies you would implement for both internal and external stakeholders to ensure that this is achieved?

For a Copy of the Job Description Click Here

Further information:  Contact Andrew Schultz, Team Manager – Population Health (Tobacco) – 8406 1600

 Written Application and Current CV to be lodged to Human Resource Administration Officer – Ms Jynaya Smith (jynayam@nunku.org.au) by 5:00pm Friday 14th July 2017.

2.Nunkuwarrin Yunti Nurse Supervisor (Registered Nurse / Midwife)

Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program

  • Ongoing, full time position
  • Attractive remuneration package
  • Starting Salary $95,693.98 + Super + access to Salary Sacrifice
  • Significant career and training development opportunities

Nunkuwarrin Yunti works to promote and deliver improvement in the health and well-being of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the greater metropolitan area of Adelaide and to advance their social, cultural and economic status. The Organisation places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best

The Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) is a program of sustained and scheduled home visiting for Aboriginal families that begins during the antenatal period and continues until the child is 2 years old. Based on the model developed by Professor David Olds in the USA, the AFNPP involves nurses and/or midwives and Aboriginal Family Partnership Workers working in partnership with women who are pregnant with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander baby, through an intensive home visiting program of evidence based interventions.

The position of Nurse Supervisor contributes by leading, modelling, coordinating and working with a team of 3 Nurse Home Visitors and 3 Aboriginal Family Partnership Workers. The position is located in Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Women Children and Family Health Unit and will be based at Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Mile End site. The position manages the team who will provide support to women and families who live within the catchment areas of Playford, Port Adelaide and Enfield (Adelaide Metro) including the two maternity hospitals (Women’s and Children’s Hospital and Lyell McEwin Hospital).

Key Duties

  • Coordinate the development and implementation of the ANFPP and model a strength-based, culturally safe and client-centred program to achieve operational outcomes.
  • Provide leadership to the team for practice governance and day to day operations of the ANFPP program in line with the national ANFPP program guidelines and relevant Nunkuwarrin Yunti Clinical and Practice Governance systems.
  • Develop and maintain a positive learning environment, taking a reflective approach to service, team and individual performance development inclusive of formal training, clinical supervision and regular team meetings.

 Key Requirements

  • Current AHPRA registration as a Registered Nurse and/or Midwife
  • Demonstrated high level of nursing practice in maternal and/or child and family health within a comprehensive primary health care context
  • Experience in the provision of mentoring and leadership to a team of health professionals, preferably including clinical supervision and reflective practice
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander co-workers, clients and communities

Click here to download the Job Description

Click her to download the Application Form

Enquiries about the role can be addressed to Virginia Healy at virginiah@nunku.org.au or on (08) 84061600.

Applications to include completed Application Form, Resume and Covering Letter including a brief overview against the key requirements above.

Applications to be forwarded to Ms Jynaya Smith, Human Resource Administration Officer C/o Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc, PO Box 7202, Hutt Street, Adelaide, SA 5000 or Email: jynayam@nunku.org.au

Note – current driver’s license and National Police Check required prior to employment

ABORIGINAL PEOPLE ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY

APPLICATIONS CLOSE DATE – FRIDAY 7th JULY 2017

3. Broome Project Coordinator – Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial

Job No: 90286
Location: Broome, WA
Employment Status: Full-time
Closing Date: 10 Jul 2017
  • Rewarding and varied role with the region’s leading provider of Aboriginal health services!
  • Attractive remuneration circa $81,682 – $96,948 base, PLUS district allowance AND accommodation allowances!
  • Do you want to really make a difference in your career? This is a unique opportunity to work with Indigenous communities in the spectacular Kimberley region!

About the Organisation

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services LTD (KAMS) is a well-established regional Aboriginal community controlled health service, founded in 1986, which provides centralised advocacy and resource support for 6 independent member services, as well as providing direct clinical services in a further 6 remote Aboriginal communities across the region.

KAMS has successfully delivered high-quality, accessible comprehensive primary health care services over its 30 years of operation and has provided innovation and national leadership in areas such as health information management and evidence-based best practice in primary health care.

About Broome

Broome is located 2,240km north of Perth and has a permanent population of 14,436. Broome promotes a relaxed and easy-going lifestyle, with nearby shopping centres, Sunday markets as well as a broad range of restaurants and entertainment options. It is founded on the traditional lands of the Yaruwu people and is rich in history, culture and beautiful surrounds.

Broome has a deep history in the pearling industry, spanning back to the 1800’s, with memorials throughout the town to commemorate those lost in the early years of pearling. Cable Beach is also a must-see, being named in honour of the Java-to-Australia undersea telegraph cable that reaches shore there. You can explore its beautiful scenery with a bit of 4WDing at low tide, or you can even take a camel ride every day at sunset!

Roebuck Bay is known as one of the most beautiful beaches that surround Broome, with its “Staircase to the moon” phenomenon drawing food and craft markets each time it occurs. The combination of a receding tide and rising moon create a natural phenomenon that can only be described as breath-taking.

About the Opportunity

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd (KAMS) has a truly rewarding opportunity for a Project Coordinator – Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial to join their team in Broome, WA. This is a full-time, fixed term role to 30 June, 2018.

This position has an indirect report to the Executive Steering Group of the Kimberley Suicide Prevention Working Group. The Working Group is charged to set strategy and oversee the Kimberley Suicide Prevention Trial in accordance with the parameters described in the National Suicide Prevention Trial Background and Overview, April 2017.

Reporting to the Deputy CEO, you will be responsible for delivering project deliverables and progress reports in accordance with the agreed project timeline set by the Steering Group. This will involve a range of project coordination and community development tasks.

Some of these tasks will include (but will not be limited to):

  • Identifying needs and service gaps, and community strengths and assets, and support for service mapping activities;
  • Facilitating stakeholder engagement;
  • Collecting and analysing local and regional data;
  • Developing detailed planning, schedules and resource requirements for identified projects;
  • Providing high-level reports, strategic policy, and advice;
  • Ensuring the Program works within the identified KAMS values and is culturally safe; and
  • Delivering the position’s work plan within the approved budget and financial delegations.

To be successful you will need:

  • A qualification in Community Development, Health or related discipline;
  • Demonstrated skill and experience in managing diverse and high level stakeholders at a regional level;
  • Demonstrated ability in project management and monitoring and evaluating a regional program using both qualitative and quantitative techniques, including participatory action research methodologies;
  • Self-motivation and the ability to organise own workload with minimal direction;
  • Excellent problem-solving skills including a high level of conceptual and analytical ability; and
  • Demonstrated commitment to the principles of Aboriginal Community Control and demonstrated knowledge of cultural safety principles and practices.

KAMS are looking for candidates with well-developed interpersonal and cross-cultural communication skills and the ability to maintain client confidentially at all times within and outside the workplace. Ideally, you will have experience working within an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation or an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Community Organisation and experience working in a mental health or social and emotional wellbeing role, however, this is not mandatory.

A ‘C’ Class Driver’s License, Federal Police Clearance and willingness to travel often by 4WD vehicle and light aircraft will be required.

To download a full position description, please click here. 

Please note: Candidates must address the selection criteria outlined in the position description. Please attach answers in a word document and upload with your application. 

About the Benefits

If you are looking for a change of routine, a change of lifestyle or a new adventure, this is the role for you. You will see and experience more of Australia’s real outback than most people ever will – and get paid to do it!

KAMS is an organisation that truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. In addition, staff development programs are not only encouraged but are often paid for by KAMS. This is a highly attractive opportunity for someone with a desire to develop their professional knowledge and experience in the area of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health!

While you will face diverse new challenges in this role, you will also enjoy an attractive remuneration package circa $81,682 – $96,948 + super. 

There is also a wide range of additional benefits for the role including:

  • District allowances – $2,920 single $5,840 double p.a;
  • Electricity allowance $1,440
  • Accommodation allowance $13,000;
  • Annual Airfares to the value of $1,285 pa (after 12 months of employment).   

Don’t miss this exciting and rewarding opportunity to have a positive impact on the mental health outcomes of Indigenous communities in the spectacular Kimberley region – Apply Now!

Please note: Candidates must respond to the questions below and attach a current resume to be considered.

4-7 Kimberley AMS Four Nurse positions

4. Registered nurse child health and midwife

http://kamsc-dahs.applynow.net.au/jobs/90282-registered-nurse-child-health-and-midwife

5.Registered nurse town clinic

http://kamsc-dahs.applynow.net.au/jobs/89298-registered-nurse-town-clinic

6.Remote schools registered nurse

http://kamsc-dahs.applynow.net.au/jobs/90281-remote-school-registered-nurse

7.Child health nurse

http://applynow.net.au/jobs/90283-child-health-nurse

About the Organisation

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services LTD (KAMS) is a well-established regional Aboriginal community controlled health service, founded in 1986, which provides centralised advocacy and resource support for 6 independent member services, as well as providing direct clinical services in a further 6 remote Aboriginal communities across the region.

KAMS has successfully delivered high-quality, accessible comprehensive primary health care services over its 30 years of operation and has provided innovation and national leadership in areas such as health information management and evidence-based best practice in primary health care.

8. Grafton and Casino Registered Nurse (RN) & Early Childhood Nurse (ECN)

Job No: 89222
Location: Grafton, NSW & Casino, NSW
Closing Date: 12 Jul 2017
  • Take on one of these uniquely rewarding roles and expand your career in Aboriginal Health!
  • Enjoy above award remuneration plus super & salary sacrificing options!
  • Enjoy great work/life balance with Monday to Friday, 35 hour week & family oriented work environment!

About Bulgarr Ngaru

Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (BNMAC) is a not-for-profit Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, providing primary health care services to Aboriginal people throughout the Clarence and Richmond Valleys through its’ network of clinics in Grafton, Casino and Maclean.

With a commitment to promoting health, wellbeing and disease prevention, involving a holistic approach to diagnosis, and the management of illness, Bulgarr Ngaru is a central part of the economic and social fabric of the region

Bulgarr Ngaru employs more than 50 people from local communities across the region including health professionals, clerical, and managerial staff. They are the leading employer of Aboriginal people and workers in the primary health sector in the region and more than 60% of staff members are Aboriginal people.

Building on their current regional network of health facilities and a significant client base, Bulgarr Ngaru looks forward to the next two decades of service development and innovation.

About the Opportunities

Registered Nurse – General Primary Health Care

Bulgarr Ngaru is looking for full-time Registered Nurses to join their teams in Grafton and Casino.

As a Registered Nurse, you will be responsible for assisting clients to address health issues in an holistic way. You’ll work collaboratively with Doctors and Health Workers to develop educational and intervention programs that address the contributory factors to wellness and empower clients to put in place a strategy that will improve their overall health and sense of wellbeing.

More specifically, some of your key duties will include:

  • Working within the treatment room and on outreach clinics taking and recording clinical data;
  • Performing patient recalls;
  • Undertaking Health Assessments and Care Plans;
  • Working alongside the Medical Officers to ensure efficient and effective primary health care to clients of the organisation, outreach clinics and in clients’ homes as required;
  • Implementing treatment room protocols to ensure optimum infection control, quality primary health care and patient monitoring and immunisations; and
  • Ensuring compliance with Accreditation procedures regarding cold chain monitoring, drug cabinet and doctor’s bag ordering and monitoring.

The successful RN candidates will be Registered Nurses with AHPRA Registration and relevant post-graduate experience in either an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation or General Practice. Knowledge of clinical accreditation is required, and experience with organisational accreditation processes will be highly regarded.

Importantly, you’ll have a comprehensive understanding of the primary health needs, early intervention, psychosocial and cultural issues impacting on Aboriginal families, and a genuine desire to further your experience in the area of Aboriginal Health. The ability to work closely with Aboriginal Health Workers as an integral part of the team will be well regarded.

Your highly developed interpersonal and liaison skills will ensure your ability to build strong working relationships with service providers, clients and other key stakeholders.

The ideal applicants will radiate patience and adaptability, and will be the type of person who thrives in busy, varied and often unpredictable work environment. Team players who are willing to jump into any task at hand will fit well within Bulgarr Ngaru‘s dynamic team.

Although not essential, knowledge of / experience with Practice Incentive and Service Incentive Payments (Diabetes and Asthma Cycles of Care) would be well regarded.

Early Childhood Nurse

Bulgarr Ngaru is also looking for a full-time Early Childhood Nurse to join their team in Casino.

Due to the nature of this role, applicants are required to be female. In this position, an applicant’s gender is a genuine occupational qualification and is authorised by section 31 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1997.

This position will be responsible for working within the New Directions Mothers and Babies Services – a service that provides Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with young children access to a range of child and maternal care.

You’ll be responsible for providing a coordinated assessment, identifying goals, planning strategies, and implementing and evaluating nursing care of children and families by:

  • Monitoring the growth, development and health status of the child (0 to 5 years of age) within the context of the family;
  • Providing pre and post-natal support, advice, health information, first line counselling (where appropriate) and referral of mothers and families to relevant service providers; and
  • Actively promoting and providing a holistic approach to care.

The successful ECN will be a Registered Nurse with AHPRA Registration, and will hold recognised qualifications in Child and Family Health Nursing. A background in working with families and young children, particularly within a community setting, will be essential for your success.

It is essential that you have the ability to effectively and sensitively communicate with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and have a comprehensive understanding of the primary health needs, early intervention, psychosocial and cultural issues impacting on Aboriginal families. Due to the nature of the role, you must also have demonstrated experience working specifically with Aboriginal children and their families.

Additionally, it’s important you have the ability to plan and coordinate client care, while operating effectively within a multidisciplinary team. Effective communication skills and competency in the use of computer programs will ensure your success.

Please note: Candidates for both roles must be willing to provide outreach services on a rotating roster, and a current driver’s license is required. Accreditation as a Registered Nurse Immuniser (or the willingness to obtain this qualification within six months of employment) is also a requirement for both positions.

About the Benefits

If you are looking for a new challenge, a change of lifestyle or a new adventure, this is the role for you. You’ll love being surrounded by stunning beaches on one side and glorious mountains and rivers on the other, with the Gold Coast, Brisbane and Sydney all a quick hop, skip and a jump away!

Bulgarr Ngaru truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. You will have access to genuine ongoing training opportunities and professional development.

In return for your hard work and dedication, you’ll be rewarded with an above award, attractive remuneration plus super, salary sacrificing and access to an employee assistance program.

Bulgarr Ngaru offers a family friendly, supportive workplace with strong community ties, and a 35-hour Monday to Friday week, ensuring you achieve a healthy work/life balance.

This is an excellent opportunity to enhance your cultural knowledge in a stunning location. Make a positive difference – Apply Now!

Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islanders are strongly encouraged to apply.

9-11 Brisbane :North Stradbroke Island part of the Yulu-Burri-Ba team?

Yulu-Burri-Ba, in collaboration with ATSICHS Brisbane will be providing Family Wellbeing Services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community within the North Stradbroke Island and Bayside catchment area.

The aim of this new service is to provide family wellbeing targeted interventions to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in our community who are experiencing family wellbeing challenges.

To deliver these new services, Yulu-Burri-Ba has created three new positions:

Click the position title to download the corresponding Position Description

  1. Family Wellbeing Care Coordinator / Lead Case Worker – Identified position*
  2. In-home Family Mentor – Identified position*
  3. Family Counsellor – Indigenous person preferred

Why work for Yulu-Burri-Ba?

We can offer you:

  • An opportunity to make a difference to the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families
  • Ability to salary sacrifice
  • A positive, supportive and learning work environment
  • Challenging and rewarding employment

 

How to apply

Please send us your resume and a covering letter addressing why you would be the best person for the job.

Applications close

Wednesday, 5 July 2017 – 9AM

Need more information?

Email us at mailto:HR@ybb.com.auor call the Human Resource Team on (07) 3409 9596

*This position is identified to be filled by an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : New #census release : Number of @IndigenousX has jumped by 18 per cent since 2011 to 649,171

The first results of the 2016 Census of Population and Housing, released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) today, show that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples represented 2.8 per cent of the population counted in the 2016 Census – up from 2.5 per cent in 2011, and 2.3 per cent in 2006.

Download this press release 2016 Census Press Release

Graphics below SBS TV and NITV

Of the 649,200 people who reported being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin in 2016, 91 per cent were of Aboriginal origin, 5 per cent were of Torres Strait Islander origin, and 4.1 per cent reported being of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin.

While the Northern Territory has Australia’s highest proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (25.5 per cent of the NT population), New South Wales is home to the highest number, with more than 216,000 people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin.

The Census also revealed the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is younger than Australia’s overall population, with a median age 23 years in 2016. This is substantially younger than the median age for non-Indigenous Australians, who had a median age of 38 years in 2016.

There have been increases in income levels within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population since the 2011 Census, with median weekly household income increasing from $991 to $1,203.

One in ten Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported speaking an Australian Indigenous language at home in the 2016 Census. A total of 150 Australian Indigenous languages were spoken in homes in 2016, reflecting the linguistic diversity of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

Australian Statistician David W. Kalisch said Census data is high quality, thanks to the participation of Australians.

“The Independent Assurance Panel I established to provide extra assurance and transparency of Census data quality concluded that the 2016 Census data can be used with confidence,” Mr Kalisch said.

“The 2016 Census had a response rate of 95.1 per cent and a net undercount of 1.0 per cent. This is a quality result, comparable to both previous Australian Censuses and Censuses in other countries, such as New Zealand, Canada, and the United Kingdom. 2

“Furthermore, 63 per cent of people completed the Census online, embracing the digital-first approach and contributing to faster data processing and data quality improvements.

“2016 Census data provides a detailed, accurate and fascinating picture of Australia, which will be used to inform critical policy, planning and service delivery decisions for our communities over the coming years,” he said.

Census data is available free online. Use one of our easy tools such as QuickStats and Community Profiles to access the latest data for your area or topic of interest.

For more information on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, please see a data summary here.

You can also attend one of our free Seminars. To find out more about Census Data Seminar series, or to register, go to the ABS website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

2016

 

2011

Total Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population 649,200 548,400
% of total Australian Population 2.8% 2.5%
Median age 23 21
Sex
Male 322,171 (49.6%) 270,333 (49.3%)
Female 326,996 (50.4%) 278,039 (50.7%)
State of residence
NSW 216,176 172,625
QLD 186,482 155,826
WA 75,978 69,664
NT 58,248 56,779
VIC 47,788 37,992
SA 34,184 30,432
TAS 23,572 19,625
ACT 6,508 5,184
Languages spoken at home (other than English) %
1. Arnhem Land and Daly River Region Languages 16.1% 18.2%
2. Torres Strait Island Languages 11.7% 11.0%
3. Western Desert Languages 11.1% 14.0%
4. Yolngu Matha 10.6% 11.2%
Median household income (weekly) $1,203 $991

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News : $20 million Streamlined Support for Aboriginal Community Health Services

This is fundamental to the Turnbull Government’s policy of partnership, our commitment to doing things with, not to, the Indigenous community

Under the agreement, NACCHO will receive the funding and will form a collaborative network with its State and Territory counterpart organisations to finance and support local health services.

The agreement provides the network with funding certainty, allowing organisations to plan for the future and improve their effectiveness.”

Federal Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt

Download

NACCHO Ken Wyatt Press Release June 20 2017

Minister Wyatt says a new Network Funding Agreement will streamline the provision of $20 million a year in health service support through the National Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Organisation (NACCHO).

The unified funding arrangements, signed on Friday, will allow the Commonwealth to work better with Australia’s peak indigenous community health organisation.

Minister Wyatt said the agreement was focussed on outcomes, allowing service funding to be administered through an Aboriginal-controlled agency.

“I have been hearing from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about the kind of care they want, and this agreement will help deliver it,” he said.

“We know that strong, Aboriginal-administered care plays a pivotal role in improving health outcomes, but it can face challenges supplying services on the ground.

“‘This new approach will allow service providers to access the assistance they need to enable them to deliver crucial, quality care to their clients.”

Minister Wyatt said the new network would also ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices were heard clearly at all levels of health administration.

“The aim is to streamline funding and communication, to continue our shared commitment to Closing The Gap,” he said.