NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #refreshtheCTGRefresh : Download the @AIHW National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results for 2017 showing improvements in 16 out of a possible 23 measures

Between June and December 2017, improvements were seen in 16 out of a possible 23 measures for which comparable data for both periods were available (see Table S1 for details). Results for a further indicator remained stable between reporting periods.

The improvements were seen in 12 of the 15 process-of-care measures with comparable data. Improvements were also seen in 4 of the 8 outcome measures, while 1 outcome measure remained stable. The largest improvements (4 or 5 percentage points) were seen in the recording practices for the measuring of:

  • influenza immunisations for clients with type 2 diabetes, which rose from 31% to 36%
  • influenza immunisations for clients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which rose from 32% to 37%
  • influenza immunisations for clients aged 50 and over, which rose from 32% to 36%. ” 

 Extract from good news from AIHW Report

 Download full 158 page report HERE

aihw-ihw-200 (1)

Summary

This is the fifth national report on the Indigenous primary health care national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs) data collection. It presents data on all 24 nKPI indicators for the first time.

Data for this collection are provided to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) by primary health care organisations that receive funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to provide services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Some primary health care organisations included in the collection receive additional funding from other sources, including state and territory health departments.

As of the June 2017 data collection, changes have been made to the data extraction method, with the Department of Health introducing a new direct load reporting process. This allowed Communicare, Medical Director, and Primary Care Information System (PCIS) clinical information systems (CISs) to generate nKPI data within their clinical system, and transmit directly to the OCHREStreams portal. Best Practice services were provided with an interim tool while MMEx has always had direct load capability.

61.9 % our ACCHO’s

The new process was introduced to provide a greater level of consistency between CISs, but the change in the extraction method means that data from June 2017 onwards are not comparable with earlier collections.

As the June 2017 collection represents a new baseline for the collection, this report only presents data for June and December 2017.

For 2 indicators (Kidney function tests recorded and Kidney function test results) only December 2017 results are presented due to unresolved data quality issues in June 2017.

See Chapter 2 for more information on the change in extraction method, data quality, and the impact  on the collection, and Appendix E for data improvement projects and the nKPI/Online Service Reporting (OSR) review under way.

Improvements were seen for most indicators between June and December 2017. Although data from these 2 reporting periods are not comparable with earlier reporting periods, an overall pattern of improvement is in keeping with the pattern of improvement previously reported for the period June 2012 to May 2015 (see AIHW 2017). This indicates that health organisations continue to show progress in service provision.

Things to work on

For the 3 process-of-care indicators that did not show improvements—glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) result recorded (6 months), cervical screening, and Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) health assessment for those aged 0–4—the changes were very small (0.5, 0.4, and 0.1 percentage points, respectively).

In the case of cervical screening, this might be due to changes to the cervical screening program, which took effect from 1 December 2017 (see Chapter 4 for details).

Three outcome measures that did not show improvements—HbA1c result of 7% or less, low birthweight, and smoking status of women who gave birth in the previous 12 months—saw changes of between 0.8 and 1.8 percentage points.

Contents

  • 1 Introduction
    • The nKPI collection
    • Structure of this report
  • 2 Data quality
    • Data quality issues
    • Additional considerations for interpreting nKPI data
  • 3 Maternal and child health indicators
    • Why are these indicators important?
    • 3.1 First antenatal visit
    • 3.2 Birthweight recorded
    • 3.3 MBS health assessment (item 715) for children aged 0-4
    • 3.4 Child immunisation
    • 3.5 Birthweight result
    • 3.6 Smoking status of females who gave birth within the previous 12 months
  • 4 Preventative health indicators
    • Why are these important?
    • 4.1 Smoking status recorded
    • 4.2 Alcohol consumption recorded
    • 4.3 MBS health assessment (item 715) for adults aged 25 and over
    • 4.4 Risk factors assessed to enable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment
    • 4.5 Cervical screening
    • 4.6 Immunised against influenza-Indigenous regular clients aged 50 and over
    • 4.7 Smoking status result
    • 4.8 Body mass index classified as overweight or obese
    • 4.9 AUDIT-C result
    • 4.10 Cardiovascular disease risk assessment result
  • 5 Chronic disease management indicators
    • Why are these important?
    • 5.1 General Practitioner Management Plan-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.2 Team Care Arrangement-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.3 Blood pressure result recorded-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.4 HbA1c result recorded-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.5 Kidney function test recorded-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.6 Kidney function test recorded-clients with cardiovascular disease
    • 5.7 Immunised against influenza-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.8 Immunised against influenza-clients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
    • 5.9 Blood pressure result-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.10 HbA1c result-clients with type 2 diabetes
    • 5.11 Kidney function test result-clients with type 2 diabetes-eGFR
    • 5.12 Kidney function test result-clients with type 2 diabetes-ACR
    • 5.13 Kidney function test result-clients with cardiovascular disease-eGFR
  • 6 Discussion
    • Data improvements
  • Appendix A: Background to the nKPI collection and indicator technical specifications
  • Appendix B: Data completeness
  • Appendix C: Comparison of nKPI results
  • Appendix D: State and territory and remoteness variation figures
  • Appendix E: Data improvement projects
  • Appendix F: Guide to the figures
  • Glossary
  • References

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories #AustPH2018 #UluruStatement : #SA @Nganampa_Health @DeadlyChoices @NunkuYunti #NT @CaaCongress @DanilaDilba #QLD #Goolburri ACCHO @Wuchopperen #NSW @AHMRC #VIC #Treaty #WA @TheAHCWA

1.1 : PM told by his Indigenous advisory council that a proposed “voice” to parliament should be established as a matter of priority

1.2 : NACCHO Executive team meets with Minister Ken Wyatt and AMA President Tony Bartone 

2.SA : Nganampa Health Council ACCHO Tackling Indigenous smoking  at APY Lands school sports day.

2.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO and the Tackling Tobacco Team at the CATSINaM conference at the Hilton Hotel Adelaide.

3.1 NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs : The NT is putting a minimum floor price on alcohol, because evidence shows this works to reduce harm

3.2 : NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin staff out at Palmerston Indigenous Village doing Men’s Health Screenings.

4 .1 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Cairns Supports Next Generation of Doctors

4.2 QLD : Ministers & Director General visit Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement

5 NSW : AHMRC Message Stick Newsletter launched 

6. VIC :  Keeping The Victorian Aboriginal Community At The Heart Of Treaty

7. WA : AHCWA For dialysis in remote communities, kidney disease patients can now be treated closer to Country.

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 : PM told by his Indigenous advisory council that a proposed “voice” to parliament should be established as a matter of priority

 “Scott Morrison has been told by his Indigenous advisory council that a proposed “voice” to parliament should be established as a matter of priority, that it must be free from the whims of the political cycle and should ­draw on existing governance structures such as land councils and the ­national ­Aboriginal health ­network (NACCHO) .” 

From the Australian 27 September

The council’s co-chairs, ­Andrea Mason and Roy Ah-See, have told the Prime Minister of “an urgent need to future-proof our place in this nation” — a reference to establishing the advisory body by referendum in the Con­stitution so that it cannot be ­summarily disbanded by the ­government of the day.

The submission to the parliamentary committee highlights the ­discredited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, which was ­disbanded by the ­Howard government in 2005.

The submission suggests that the ATSIC, along with the current National Congress for Australia’s First Peoples, could be used as the basis for structuring a new body.

It says while ATSIC “developed, supported and empowered the emergence of a critical mass of … public administrators, equipped to navigate the machinery of government”, its demise could “largely be attributed to personalities ­rather than principles or the intent of the organisation”.

It accuses politicians of having “generated confusion within the Australian public” on the role of a voice when it took centre place in last year’s Uluru Statement ­from the Heart as the only form of ­constitutional recognition that would satisfy indigenous ­Australians.

The submission cites Mark Leibler — who ­­co-chaired the Referendum Council — and constitutional law experts Anne Twomey and ­George Williams as having ­“rejected the suggestion that a voice would intrude on ­parliamentary sovereignty”.

Mr Morrison said on ABC radio yesterday morning that the voice would constitute a “third ­chamber” of parliament — a characterisation that has been dismissed by experts, ­including the lawyers cited in the submission.

The joint parliamentary ­committee is due to ­report in ­November.

1.2 NACCHO Executive team meets with Minister Ken Wyatt and AMA President Tony Bartone 

2.SA : Nganampa Health Council ACCHO Tackling Indigenous smoking  at APY Lands school sports day.

It was a great day and the display was visited by children from Pipalyatjatjara, Murputja, Amata, Pukatja, Fregon, Mimili, Indulkana and Yalata.

The kids loved the big cigarette and learning about all the poisons that are in cigarettes and went away with Tjikita Nyuntu Ngayuku Malpa Wiya wristbands and drink bottles.

We also did smokelysers to check carbon monoxide levels on some of the older kids and adults. We will be following up any high readings.

Zibeon organised a colour 3 km run at the end of the sports day and the kids ran with joy and enthusiasm despite the fact that it was the last event of the day.

The day was topped off by the dance competition at Pukatja school that night where there was some great dancing.

The Deadly Choices team were also out on the APY lands supporting partners the Port Power Aboriginal Program

The guys have been visiting communities all over delivering the WillPower Program and supporting this Ernabella Sports & Dance festival

2.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO and the Tackling Tobacco Team at the CATSINaM conference at the Hilton Hotel Adelaide.

3.1 NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs : The NT is putting a minimum floor price on alcohol, because evidence shows this works to reduce harm

From October 1, 2018, one standard drink in the Northern Territory will cost a minimum of A$1.30. This is known as floor price, which is used to calculate the minimum cost at which a product can be sold, depending on how many standard drinks the product contains.

People in the Northern Territory consume alcohol at much higher levels and have the highest rate of risky alcohol consumption in Australia. In 2014, around 44% of people in the NT were drinking alcohol at a level that put them at risk of injury or other harms at least once in the past month. This was compared to 26% of people nationally.

The implementation of the minimum floor price is the result of legislation, recently passed to minimise alcohol-related harms in the NT. From October, the NT will become one of the first places in the world to introduce a minimum price for alcohol.

Published in Croakey and The Conversation 

This article was co-authored by Donna Ah Chee, CEO of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and Mr Edward Tilton, Health Policy Consultant at the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress.The Conversation

John Boffa is Adjunct Associate Professor at Curtin University

A history of alcohol restrictions

The NT government introducted trial restrictions on the availability of alcohol in Alice Springs in 2002. This came after many years of campaigning for restrictions on alcohol sales by Aboriginal community organisations and the People’s Alcohol Action Coalition (an Alice Springs-based alcohol reform group).

The trial restrictions limited the hours during which take-away alcohol could be sold on weekdays to 2-9pm. They also attempted to address the sale of cheap 4L or 5L casks of wine by prohibiting the sale of take-away alcohol in containers larger than 2L. This super cheap alcohol was most implicated in the town’s social and health problems.

The trial had some positive effects but was substantially undermined by drinkers switching from cask-wine to other cheap forms of alcohol – in particular fortified wine sold in flagons and casks.

This led to renewed advocacy for more effective approaches to alcohol–related harm. In 2006, the NT government implemented the Alice Springs Liquor Supply Plan (LSP). This continued the earlier restrictions on the hours of sale for take-away alcohol. But it also extended the ban on the sale of cheap alcohol to include both wine in containers larger than two litres and fortified wine in containers larger than one litre.

What the liquor supply plan achieved

A 2011 government commissioned study found removing the two cheapest forms of alcohol (cask wine and fortified wine in casks and large bottles) from the market increased the price of alcohol in Central Australia. Before the introduction of the liquor supply plan, the average wholesale price per standard drink was around A$0.80. Under the plan, this increased to about A$1.10 per standard drink.

This increase was primarily achieved by the bans on cheap alcohol, effectively doubling the minimum unit price from about A$0.25 per standard drink to A$0.50 per standard drink. As the figure below shows, the introduction of the liquor supply plan in Alice Springs led to a significant decrease in alcohol consumption (estimated by using wholesale sales data) – from around 24 standard drinks per week for every person aged 15 years and over to around 20 standard drinks per week.


https://public.flourish.studio/visualisation/111877/embed

Made with Flourish

As expected, the ban on cheap cask and fortified wine led some drinkers to turn to other types of alcohol. But while there was a 70% increase in the consumption of more expensive full-strength beer, the decline in the consumption of cheap alcohol more than offset this. This led to the overall 20% decline in consumption.

The reductions in alcohol consumption were accompanied by a significant decrease in social harms and adverse health impacts. Treatments for alcohol-related harms at Alice Springs Hospital, which had been rising steeply, levelled off. Though they continued to rise, they did so at a much reduced rate.

This included reductions in those who were admitted to hospital because of assaults. In particular, the liquor supply plan led to around 120 fewer than projected Aboriginal women being hospitalised per year for assault. A similar pattern was seen for emergency department presentations, with a significant decrease in people presenting as a result of assault.

The LSP also saw significant reductions in the proportion of alcohol-related anti-social behaviour incidents recorded in Alice Springs.

A minimum floor price works

It’s clear restrictions on the sale of cheap alcohol are effective in reducing alcohol-related harm. And while the causes of family and community violence are complex, bans on cheap alcohol are especially effective in reducing the number of Aboriginal women subjected to assault.

Some have argued Aboriginal drinking is not affected by price as these drinkers will simply increase their expenditure on alcohol to maintain their consumption. But the liquor supply plan provides powerful evidence this assumption is incorrect. The reduction in assaults of Aboriginal women strongly suggests the increases in price were accompanied by a reduction in consumption.

The implementation of the minimum floor price shows the importance of local advocacy by Aboriginal organisations and community groups in moving policy and practice in alcohol control forward.

3.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin staff out at Palmerston Indigenous Village doing Men’s Health Screenings.

Picture above : Ray Chula and Maria Burrenjuck with Crystal Burrenjuck, Tidora Burrenjuck, Patrick Burrenjuck, Sebastian Burrenjuck, and Maggie Madigan

The team also put on a cooked breakfast and BBQ for the community. Thanks to everyone who came down and great to see men taking control of their health.

Left to right: Timothy Thomson, Brian Long, Lyle Braun, Ray Chula, Joseph Fitz and Darryl Tambling

4 .1 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Cairns Supports Next Generation of Doctors

Dr Ben Schussler, who is spending a year at Wuchopperen, has worked in a range of clinics including Chronic and Complex and Men and Male Youth since beginning his placement in February.

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited proudly supports the next generation of doctors through its medical student and registrar placement programs.

GP Registrars Dr Alex and Dr Schussler are on placement while third year medical student Josh Preece completed his in August.

Josh, a University of Sydney medical student, has a close personal connection with Wuchopperen.

‘My nanna, Louisa Preece, (who I stayed with while I was up in Cairns) worked at Wuchopperen from 1993 to 2005 as Registered Nurse,’ he explained.

‘My auntie Julie Boneham was a Registered Nurse at Wuchopperen and has previously served as the Chairperson of and is currently a director on Wuchopperen’s Board, my auntie Cilla Preece was a dental assistant at Wuchopperen and later served on Wuchopperen’s  Board, and my cousin, Dania Ahwang is currently the CEO.’

Josh, a third year medical student, chose Wuchopperen for his GP placement in order to gain a greater understanding of the community controlled health sector.

‘I have been lucky enough to sit in with Wuchopperen’s Chronic and Complex Health GPs and really get a feel for what the working life of a GP is like,’ he said.

‘I was able to get involved with patient’s healthcare, and hear their stories. I chose Wuchopperen for my placement because I really wanted to get some exposure to frontline Indigenous health at an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

‘A patient being able to have all their healthcare needs met in a culturally appropriate setting, and having “Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands” was really inspiring. It shows that self-determination, autonomy, and self-governance works!’

Josh said he learned that health is more than the problem presented at an appointment.

‘I learned that you have to think about the whole person in front of you, especially in Indigenous healthcare,’ he said.

‘You can’t just solve “high blood pressure”, you need to be thinking holistically about a person’s lifestyle and goals, the social context in which they live, and respect their autonomy. I was lucky enough to sit in with Wuchopperen’s diabetes educators, nursing team, physio, dietitian, and Aboriginal health workers, as well as spending some time at the Raintrees pharmacy. It was great to see the whole range of allied health services and how we can all work together to drive patient outcomes.’

Wuchopperen’s new GP Registrars, Dr Jerry Alex and Dr Ben Schussler have also been on learning curves.

Dr Jerry, who is spending six months doing an extended skills placement in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, said the ‘learning is constant.’

‘I wanted to do my placement here because I am interested in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.  The learning process is constant and I gaining a better understanding of the multiple impacts on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.’

‘I am planning to do a Fellowship in Indigenous health next year.’

Dr Ben Schussler, who is spending a year at Wuchopperen, has worked in a range of clinics including Chronic and Complex and Men and Male Youth since beginning his placement in February.

His decision to do his placement at Wuchopperen was inspired by a wish to find out more about Indigenous health, and to increase his skills in caring for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

‘I wanted to increase my knowledge of Indigenous health issues and culture as well as improve my skills in providing medical care to this population,’ Dr Ben explained.

Like Josh and Dr Jerry, Dr Ben said he has learned an enormous amount since starting his placement.

‘It has been, and is, such a great experience working here,’ he said.

‘I have learned about medical problems such as rheumatic heart disease that I likely never would have seen had I not worked with this group of patients.  I have learned more about the Indigenous culture and history in Australia and have a better understanding of the barriers to care for Indigenous Australians.’

‘I am very impressed with the services available at Wuchopperen. The resources available to optimise patient care are superb.  The opportunity to access allied health services for my patients far exceeds what is typically available in general practice.’

4.2 QLD : Ministers & Director General visit Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement

Ministers & Director General visit Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Company Limited to learn about there integrated model of health, human and social services in Toowoomba & South Western Queensland

5 NSW : AHMRC Message Stick Newsletter launched 

Read HERE 

6. VIC :  Keeping The Victorian Aboriginal Community At The Heart Of Treaty

IMAGE: MEMBERS OF THE ABORIGINAL TREATY WORKING GROUP AND VICTORIAN TREATY ADVANCEMENT COMMISSIONER IN PARLIAMENT DURING THE TABLING OF THE ADVANCING THE TREATY PROCESS WITH ABORIGINAL VICTORIANS BILL 2018 (L TO R): VICKI CLARK, PAUL BRIGGS, MICK HARDING (CHAIR), JILL GALLAGHER (COMMISSIONER), JANINE COOMBS, GERALDINE ATKINSON. (SUPPLIED)

The Andrews Labor Government is engaging even more Aboriginal Victorians in the state’s historic Treaty process with a second round of Treaty grants.

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Natalie Hutchins today announced almost $1.3 million for 19 Aboriginal organisations as part of the second round of the Treaty Community Engagement Program.

The successful organisations include the First Nations Legal and Research Services, Winda-Mara Aboriginal Corporation, Aldara Yanera, Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency, the Victorian Traditional Owner Land Justice Group, Yorta Yorta, Koorie Youth Council.

Wantanda Consulting, Mangrook Footy Show, Eastern Maar Aboriginal Corporation,  Gunaikurnai Land and Waters Aboriginal Corporation, the Willum Warrain Gathering Place, Yingadi Aboriginal Corportaion, Spark Health and Bunjilwarra were also successful.

The Program will support Traditional Owners groups and other organisations and businesses to engage with Victorian Aboriginal communities as well as non-Aboriginal Victorians on Treaty. This will provide further insight on how self-determination and treaty can strengthen Victorian Aboriginal communities.

The Program will also help ensure the treaty process continues to be guided by Aboriginal voices and prepare the Aboriginal community for the establishment of the Aboriginal Representative Body and eventual Treaty negotiations.

Insights obtained through the Program will be used by the Victorian Treaty Advancement Commission as it works to establish the Aboriginal Representative Body as part of the next phase of the treaty process.

The Program offers two kinds of grants: Treaty Circle Grants and Treaty Engagement Grants.

Treaty Circle Grant will support small, community-led consultations on key issues related to treaty.

Treaty Engagement Grants will support in-depth, ongoing engagement with Victorian Aboriginal communities, as well as research on key issues relating to treaty and self-determination.

Today’s funding builds on the $370,000 in grants provided to Aboriginal organisations in the first round of the Program. Further rounds of Treaty grant funding will be open soon.

The Labor Government has provided more than $37.5 million to support the treaty process and promote self-determination among Victorian Aboriginal communities.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Natalie Hutchins

“The voices of Aboriginal Victorians will always be at the centre of the Treaty process. This goes to the heart of self-determination.”

“These exceptional Aboriginal organisations know their community best and that’s why we’re supporting them to consult and engage on Victoria’s historic Treaty process.”

7. WA : AHCWA For dialysis in remote communities, kidney disease patients can now be treated closer to Country.

With Aboriginal communities receiving Medicare funding for dialysis in remote communities, kidney disease patients can now be treated closer to Country.

Instead of being stuck in a hospital 800km away, Barbara Reid can now receive her dialysis only an hour’s drive away from her family.

Read full story HERE 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Cancer Policies , Strategies and Future directions : Latest @HealthInfoNet review shows many cancers are preventable among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

‘The review shows that cultural safety in service provision, increased participation in breast, bowel and cervical screening and reduction in risk factors will improve outcomes for cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The good news is that many cancers are considered to be preventable. Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, followed by breast cancer, bowel cancer and prostate cancer.

Tobacco smoking is still seen as the greatest risk factor for cancer’.

HealthInfoNet Director, Professor Neil Drew

Read over 75 Aboriginal Health and Cancer articles published by NACCHO last 6 years

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Services

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Services are located in all jurisdictions and are funded by the federal,state and territory governments and other sources [91].

They are planned and governed by local Aboriginal and Torres Strait and Torres
Strait Islander communities and aim to deliver holistic and culturally appropriate health and health-related services.

Services vary in the primary health care activities they offer. Possible activities include: diagnosis and treatment of illness or disease; management of chronic illness; transportation to medical appointments; outreach clinic services; immunisations; dental services; and dialysis services.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer support groups have been identified as important for improving cancer awareness and increasing participation in cancer screening services [92].

Aboriginal women attending these support groups have reported an increased
understanding of screening and reported less fear and concern over cultural appropriateness, with increases in screening rates [19].

Support groups have also been found to help in follow up and ongoing care for cancer survivors [19, 93], particularly where they are shaped to meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [73, 94].”

See Page 12 of Review

Download Review+of+cancer+among+Aboriginal+and+Torres+Strait+Islander+people

The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (HealthInfoNet) at Edith Cowan University has published a new Review of cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The review, written by University of Western Australia staff (Margaret Haigh, Sandra Thompson and Emma Taylor), in conjunction with HealthInfoNet staff (Jane Burns, Christine Potter, Michelle Elwell, Mikayla Hollows, Juliette Mundy), provides general information on factors that contribute to cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

It provides detailed information on the extent of cancer including incidence, prevalence and survival, mortality, burden of disease and health service utilisation.

This review discusses the issues of prevention and management of cancer, and provides information on relevant programs, services, policies and strategies that address cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The review provides:

  • general information on factors (historical/protective/risk) that contribute to cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • detailed information on the extent of cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including: incidence, prevalence and survival data; mortality and burden of disease and health service utilisation
  • a discussion of the issues of prevention and management of cancer
  • information on relevant programs, services, policies and strategies that address cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • a conclusion on the possible future directions for combating cancer in Australia

Selected Extracts

Policies and strategies

There are very few national policies and strategies that focus specifically on cancer in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework is therefore significant as the first national approach to addressing the gap in cancer outcomes that currently exists between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the non-Indigenous population [132]. However, over the past 30 years, there have been a number of relevant strategies and frameworks developed addressing cancer in the general population, and broader aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. A selection of national policy developments relevant to addressing cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are described briefly below.

Selected national policy developments relevant to addressing cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

2018 Lung Cancer Framework: Principles for Best Practice Lung Cancer Care in Australia is released
2016 National Framework for Gynaecological Cancer Control is released
2015 First National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework is released
2015 Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan is released
2014 Second Cancer Australia Strategic Plan 2014–2019 is published
2013 First National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 is published
2011 First Cancer Australia Strategic Plan 2011–2014 is published
2008 National Cancer Data Strategy for Australia is released
2003 Report Optimising Cancer Care in Australia is published
1998 First National health priority areas cancer control report is published
1996 Cancer becomes one of four National health priority areas (NHPA)
1988 Health for all Australians report is released
1987 First National Cancer Prevention Policy for Australia is published

 

It was not until the late 1980s that national cancer control strategies and policies began to be developed [133]. In 1987, the first National Cancer Prevention Policy for Australia, was published by the Australian Cancer Society (ACS) (now the Cancer Council Australia) based on a series of expert workshops [134].

It outlined what prevention activities were currently being undertaken, what should be undertaken and suggested a number of goals, targets and strategies in the areas of cancer prevention and early detection and screening. This policy has been updated many times over the years [133] and is still in publication as the National cancer control policy [135].

The following year, in 1988, the Health for all Australians report, commissioned by the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory council (AHMAC), recognised that cancers could be influenced by primary or secondary prevention strategies [136]. The report recommended nine goals and 15 targets related to cancers, based on those put forward by the National Cancer Prevention Policy for Australia. Cancer prevention and strategies relating to breast, cervical and skin cancer and tobacco smoking were recommended as initial priorities under the National Program for Better Health. These were then endorsed at the Australian Health Ministers Conference and funding was provided.

In 1996, cancer control was identified as one of four National health priority areas (NHPA). This led, the following year, to the publication of the First report on national health priority areas 1996, which outlined 26 indicators spanning the continuum of cancer care, and included outcome indicators, indicators relating to patient satisfaction and the creation of hospital based cancer registries [137].

In 1998, the first NHPA cancer control report was produced [138]. It identified a number of opportunities for improvements in cancer control, including within ‘special populations such as Indigenous people’ [138].

In 2003, the report Optimising cancer care in Australia was jointly developed by The Cancer Council Australia, the Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) and the National Cancer Control Initiative (NCCI), with strong consumer input [139]. This report made 12 key recommendations, including that the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people be the focus of efforts to bridge gaps in access to and utilisation of culturally sensitive cancer services.

In 2008, the National Cancer Data Strategy for Australia aimed to provide direction for collaborative efforts to increase data availability, consistency and quality [140]. It reported that although Indigenous status is recorded by cancer registries, data quality is poor, and recommended that the quality of Indigenous markers in hospital and death statistics collections needs to improve if cancer registries are to have better data.

In 2011, Cancer Australia published the first Cancer Australia strategic plan 2011–2014, which aimed to identify future trends in national cancer control and to outline strategies for the organisation to improve outcomes for all Australians diagnosed with cancer [141]. It was followed in 2014, by the Cancer Australia Strategic Plan 2014–2019, which had an increased focus on improving quality of cancer care and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [142].

In 2013, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 (the Health plan) was developed to provide a long-term, evidence-based policy framework approach to closing the gap in disadvantage experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [143].

The Health plan emphasises the importance of culture in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the rights of individuals to a safe, healthy and empowered life. Its vision is for the Australian health system to be free of racism and inequity and all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to have access to health services that are effective, high quality, appropriate and affordable. This led to the publication of the Implementation plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 in 2015 [90], which outlines the strategies, actions and deliverables required for the Australian Government and other key stakeholders to implement the Health plan.

The first National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework (the Framework­) was released in 2015, to address disparities and improve cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [56]. It provides strategic direction by setting out seven priority areas for action and suggests enablers that may help in planning or reviewing strategies to address each of the priority areas. The Framework aims to improve cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by ensuring timely access to good quality and appropriate cancer related services across the cancer continuum.

In 2016, Cancer Australia released the National Framework for Gynaecological Cancer Control to guide future directions in national gynaecological cancer control to improve outcomes for women affected, as well as their families and carers [144]. It aims to ensure the provision of best practice and culturally appropriate care to women across Australia by offering strategies across six priority areas, of which one pertains specifically to improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

In 2018, Cancer Australia released the Lung Cancer Framework: Principles for Best Practice Lung Cancer Care in Australia [145]. It aims to improve the outcomes and experiences of people affected by lung cancer by supporting the uptake of five principles: patient-centred care; multidisciplinary care; timely access to evidence-based care; coordination, communication and continuity of care and data-driven improvements.

Future directions

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework (the Framework­) provides guidance for individuals, communities, organisations and governments [56]. The Framework was developed in partnership with Menzies School of Health Research, and was informed by a systematic review of the evidence and extensive national consultations. The parties involved in these consultations included Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by cancer, health professionals working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and experts in Indigenous cancer control. The Framework outlined seven evidence-based priority areas for action as follows:

  • improving knowledge and attitudes about cancer
  • focusing prevention activities
  • increasing participation in screening and immunisation
  • ensuring early diagnosis
  • delivering optimal and culturally appropriate treatment and care
  • involving, informing and supporting families and carers
  • strengthening the capacity of cancer-related services to meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Each of these priorities was accompanied by a number of enablers to assist in planning or reviewing strategies to address that priority. The enablers provide flexible approaches to meeting the priorities that allow for local context and needs.

The development of the Framework has been responsible for gathering national support and agreement on the priorities and for creating a high level of expectation around the ability to address the growing cancer disparity [146]. Cancer Australia has since commenced a number of projects and initiatives that focus on one or more of the priorities identified by the Framework. One project aims to identify critical success factors and effective approaches to increasing mammographic screening participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women [147]. A leadership group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer control tasked with driving a shared agenda to improve cancer outcomes has also been established [148]. In addition, the development of a monitoring and reporting plan for the Framework is underway.

Quality data are critical to understanding the variations in cancer care and outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and to inform policy, service provision and clinical practice initiatives to improve those outcomes. However, it has been repeatedly reported in the literature and by the Framework, that current data are inadequate or incomplete, and there is a significant need for improved local, jurisdictional and national data on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer [56149-151]. In particular, the need for primary healthcare services to address the under identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in data registries. A project currently underway in SA, which is likely to have relevance to other regions, aims to develop an integrated comprehensive, cancer monitoring and surveillance system for Aboriginal people, while also incorporating their experiences with cancer services [149].

Both the Framework and the literature have identified a need for a more supportive and culturally appropriate approach across the cancer care continuum for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [5677151152]. The Wellbeing Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Living with Chronic Disease, (Wellbeing framework), aims to assist healthcare services to improve the quality of life and quality of care, as well as health outcomes, for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with chronic disease [153]. This addresses the identified need for more supportive and culturally appropriate care as it attempts to incorporate the social, emotional, cultural and spiritual aspects of health and wellbeing, as well as the physical aspects.

The Wellbeing framework is underpinned by two core values, which are considered fundamental to the care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [153154]. These core values highlight that wellbeing is supported by:

  • upholding people’s identities in connection to culture, spirituality, families, communities and country and
  • having culturally safe primary healthcare services in place.

The Wellbeing framework consists of four essential elements for supporting the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with chronic disease [153154]. These show the importance of having:

  • locally defined, culturally safe primary health care services
  • appropriately skilled and culturally competent health care teams
  • holistic care throughout the lifespan
  • best practice care that addresses the particular needs of a community.

The Wellbeing framework suggests a number of practical and measurable applications for applying or achieving the underlying principles of each element. It has the capacity to be adapted by primary healthcare services, in consultation with the communities they serve, to more effectively meet the chronic and cancer care needs of their communities [153154].

 

The Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control was established in 2016-17 to:

  • provide strategic advice and specialist expertise in Indigenous cancer control
  • encourage cross-sector collaboration in addressing the priorities in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework
  • share knowledge across the sector to leverage opportunities.

Concluding comments

Despite considerable improvements in cancer detection and treatment over recent decades, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people diagnosed with cancer generally experience poorer outcomes than non-Indigenous people for an equivalent stage of disease [2797]. This is highlighted by statistics which showed that, despite lower rates of prevalence and hospitalisation for all cancers combined for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people compared with non-Indigenous people, between 1998 and 2015, the age-standardised mortality rate ranged from 195 to 246 per 100,000 while the rate for non-Indigenous people decreased from 194 to 164 per 100,000 [2].

Furthermore for 2007–2014, while 65% of non-Indigenous people had a chance of surviving five years after receiving a cancer diagnosis, only 50% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people did [2].

The disparities are particularly pronounced for some specific cancers – for lung cancer the age-standardised incidence rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was twice that for non-Indigenous people, while for cervical cancer the rate was 2.5 times the rate for non-Indigenous people for 2009–2013 [2].

The factors contributing to these poorer outcomes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are complex. They reflect a broad range of historical, social and cultural determinants and the contribution of lifestyle and other health risk factors [6], combined with lower participation in screening programs, later diagnosis, lower uptake and completion of cancer treatment, and the presence of other chronic diseases [2798155]. Addressing the various factors that contribute to the development of cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is important, but improvements in some of these areas, particularly in reducing lifestyle and behavioural risk factors, are likely to take some time to be reflected in better outcomes.

Current deficiencies in the prevention and management of cancer suggest there is considerable scope for better services that should lead to improvements in the short to medium term. Effective cancer prevention and management programs that are tailored to community needs and are culturally appropriate are vital for the current and future health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [5657]. Providing effective cancer prevention and management also requires improved access to both high quality primary health care services and tertiary specialist services. Effective and innovative programs for the prevention and management of cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people do exist on an individual basis and, in some cases, the efforts made to engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in screening programs, in particular, are impressive. However, a more coordinated, cohesive national approach is also required.

Reducing the impact of cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is a crucial aspect in ‘closing the gap’ in health outcomes. The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer framework [56] may be an important first step in addressing the current disparity in cancer outcomes and raises the probability of real progress being made. Cancer Australia has recently released the Optimal Care pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people which recommends new approaches to cancer care and with the aim of reducing disparities and improving outcomes and experiences for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer [156]. As encouraging as these developments are, substantial improvements will also depend upon the effective implementation of comprehensive strategies and policies that address the complexity of the factors underlying the disadvantages experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Action beyond the health service sector that addresses the broader historical, social and cultural determinants of health are also required if real progress is to be made [6].

NACCHO Aboriginal Health NEWS : @AIHW report : The consumption of #alcohol, #tobacco and other #drugs is a major cause of preventable disease and illness in our communities

The consumption of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs is a major cause of preventable disease and illness in our comminities

There are a wide range of data sources available that contribute to our understanding of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use.

This web report from AIHW is intended to be a general reference for contemporary data on alcohol, tobacco and other drugs in Australia.

SEE Full Report 

This report consolidates the most recently available information regarding the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, meth/amphetamines and other stimulants, the non-medical use of pharmaceutical drugs, illicit opioids (heroin) and new (and emerging) psychoactive substances (NPS).

Key trends in the availability, consumption, harms and treatment are identified and detailed data are presented for vulnerable populations.

These population groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, homeless people, older people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or queer (LGBTIQ), people in contact with the criminal justice system, people with mental health conditions, young people and people who inject drugs

Key findings Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 

  • There has been significant declines in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people smoking and consume alcohol that exceeds lifetime risk guidelines (consuming more than two standard drinks per day on average).
  • The prevalence of smoking by Indigenous people has declined from 55% in 1994 to 45% in 2014–15.
  • The proportion of Indigenous people that consume alcohol as levels that exceed lifetime risk guidelines has reduced from 19% in 2008 to 15% in 2014–15.
  • In 2011, tobacco use accounted for 12% of the burden of disease for Indigenous Australians. This accounts for 23.3% of the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.
  • In 2016, more than 1 in 4 (27%) Indigenous Australians used an illicit drug in the last 12 months. This was 1.8 times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians (15.3%).
  • The most commonly used illicit drug by Indigenous Australians is cannabis (16.7%), followed by the non-medical use of pharmaceutical drugs (11.0%).
  • Of clients of alcohol and other drug, treatment services, 15% were Indigenous Australians aged 10 and over, which is an overrepresentation relative to their population size.

Currently there are almost 800,000 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people (see Box ATSI1) living in Australia, accounting for 2.8% of the Australian population [1]. There are substantial differences in measures of health and welfare between Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians.

Box ATSI1: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The terms ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’ is preferred in Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) publications when referring to the separate Indigenous peoples of Australia. However, the term ‘Indigenous’ Australians is used interchangeably with ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander’ in order to assist readability.

The Australian Burden of Disease Study identified that Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people experience a burden of disease that is 2.3 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians [2]. The gap in the disease burden is due to a range of factors including disconnection to culture, traditions and country, social exclusion, discrimination and isolation, trauma, poverty, and lack of adequate access to services [3]. Tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs are key risk factors contributing to the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians [2].

Box ATSI2. Data sources examining tobacco, alcohol and other drug use by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

There are a number of data sources that provide information about tobacco, alcohol and other drug use by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey (NATSISS) [4] and the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (AATSIHS) [5] collected by the ABS are designed to obtain a representative sample of Indigenous Australians. In relation specifically to tobacco smoking, the ABS has consolidated data from six large, national, multistage random household surveys to identify trends between 1994 and 2014–15 [6].

The AIHW’s National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) uses a self-completion questionnaire to capture information about drug and alcohol use among the general Australian population; however it is not specifically designed to obtain reliable national estimates for Indigenous people. In 2016, 2.4% of the NDSHS (unweighted) sample aged 12 and over (or 568 respondents) identified as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin. The estimates produced by the NDSHS should be interpreted with caution due to the low sample size [7].

There are also other data sources that provide information relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

  • Australia’s Burden of Disease study analyses the impact of nearly 200 diseases and injuries in terms of living with illness (non-fatal burden) and premature death (fatal burden). In 2015, a report was released that provides estimates of burden of disease between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians [8].
  • The National Perinatal Data Collection covers each birth in Australia and includes information on Indigenous mothers and their babies [6].
  • The Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Dataset (AODTS-NMDS) contains information on treatment provided to clients by publicly funded alcohol and other drug services including Indigenous clients [9].
  • The Online Services Report (OSR) contains information on the majority of Australian Government-funded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander substance use services [6].

Tobacco smoking

While tobacco smoking is declining in Australia, it remains disproportionately high among Indigenous Australians. Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has shown:

  • In 1994, the Indigenous Australian survey data showed that 55% of Indigenous Australians aged 18 and over were smokers; 20 years later, in 2014–15, this had declined to 45% (Table S3.4).
  • Over a similar 20-year period, the National Health Survey (NHS) the proportion of non-Indigenous smokers aged 18 and over declined, from 24% in 1995 to 16% in 2014–15 (Table S3.5).
  • There appears to have been no change to the gap in smoking prevalence between the Indigenous Australian adult population and the non-Indigenous Australian adult population from 1994 to 2014–15. Even though the Indigenous Australian smoking rates are declining, the non-Indigenous rate is declining at a similar rate, therefore the gap remained constant [6] (Figure ATSI1).

Most of the decline in smoking occurred in non-remote areas. Over the 20-year period, the proportion of Indigenous Australians aged 18 and over in non-remote areas who were smokers declined from 55% to 42%, while the proportion in remote areas remained relatively stable at between 54% and 56% (Table S3.4).

In 2014–15, Indigenous males were more likely than Indigenous females to be smokers (47% compared with 42%) [1].

Geographic trends

The 2014–15 NATSISS provides estimates of tobacco smoking for Indigenous Australians by jurisdiction. According to the 2014–15 NATSISS, 39% of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over smoked daily. Those from the Northern Territory (45%) and Western Australia (42%) surpassed this national average, while Indigenous Australians from South Australia (35%) were the least likely to be a current daily smoker [4] (Table S3.3).

Tobacco smoking in pregnancy

Indigenous Australians are at an elevated risk of smoking during pregnancy compared with non-Indigenous Australians. The National Perinatal Data Collection showed that:

  • Indigenous mothers accounted for 19% of mothers who smoked tobacco at any time during pregnancy in 2015, despite accounting for only around 4% of mothers.
  • The age-standardised rate of Indigenous mothers smoking during pregnancy has decreased from 50% in 2009 to 45% in 2015.
  • Almost 1 in 2 (45%) Indigenous mothers reported smoking during pregnancy—compared with 12% of non-Indigenous mothers (age-standardised).
  • The age-standardised rate of Indigenous mothers quitting smoking during pregnancy (14%) is about half that of non-Indigenous mothers (25%) (based on mothers who reported smoking in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy and not smoking after 20 weeks of pregnancy) [10].

Alcohol consumption

Abstinence (non-drinkers)

  • The 2016 NDSHS found that Indigenous Australians aged 14 and over were more likely to abstain from drinking alcohol than non-Indigenous Australians (31% compared with 23%, respectively) and abstinence among Indigenous Australians has been increasing since 2010 when it was 25% [7] (Table S3.1).
  • This pattern is consistent with data from the 2012–13 AATSIHS, where 28% of Indigenous Australians reported abstaining from drinking compared with 18% of non-Indigenous Australians [5].

Lifetime risk

  • The 2014–15 NATSISS found that the proportion of Indigenous Australians aged 15 years and over who exceeded the NHMRC lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol consumption (consuming more than 2 standard drinks per day on average) decreased between 2008 and 2014–15 (19% compared with 15%; non age-standardised proportions). The overall change is largely due to a decline in non-remote areas (19% in 2008 to 14% in 2014–15) [4] (Table S3.6).
  • Comparisons between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are only available using age-standardised data from the 2012–13 AATSIHS and is not comparable to the 2014–15 NATSISS. The findings showed that lifetime risky drinking of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over was similar to that of non-Indigenous Australians (9.8% compared with 9.7%; age-standardised) [5] (Table S3.7).

Single occasion risk

  • According to the 2014–15 NATSISS, 30% of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over exceeded the single occasion risk guidelines for alcohol consumption (non age-standardised proportions), which is a decline since 2002 (35%).
  • Comparisons between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are only available using age-standardised data from the 2012–13 AATSIHS and is not comparable to the 2014–15 NATSISS. The 2012–13 AATSIHS reported that 1 in 2 (50%) Indigenous Australians exceed the single occasion risky drinking guidelines (more than 4 standard drinks on a single occasion in past year). This was 1.1 times the rate that non-Indigenous Australians (44%) that exceeded these guidelines [5] (Table S3.7).

Risky alcohol consumption

  • According to the 2016 NDSHS, almost 1 in 5 Indigenous Australians (18.8%) consumed 11 or more standard drinks at least once a month. This was 2.8 times the rate that non-Indigenous Australians (6.8%) consumed this amount of alcohol [7] (Table S3.1).

Geographic trends

Between 2002 and 2014–15 there was a decline in the proportion of Indigenous Australians that resided in New South Wales Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory that exceeded the lifetime and single occasion risk guidelines (Figure ATSI2). Indigenous Australians residing in Tasmania (36%), the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) (35%), Queensland (33%) and Western Australia (33%) had higher rates of exceeding the single occasion drinking guidelines than the national average [4] (Table S3.8).

Indigenous Australians residing in Western Australia (16%), New South Wales (16%) and Queensland (15%) surpassed the national average for exceeding lifetime risk guidelines [4] (Table S3.9).

Illicit drug use

In the 2014–15 NATSISS, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 and over were asked whether they had used illicit substances in the last 12 months, and the types of illicit substances they had used during that period [4]. The data showed that:

  • Almost one-third (30%) of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over reported having used illicit substances in the last 12 months, up from 22% in 2008.
  • Males were significantly more likely than females to have used illicit substances (34% compared with 27%), as were people in non-remote areas compared with those in remote areas (33% compared with 21%).
  • Cannabis was the most commonly reported illicit drug used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the last 12 months at 19% (25% of males compared with 14% of females).
  • The non-medical use of analgesics and sedatives (such as painkillers, sleeping pills and tranquilisers) was also relatively common (13%), with females (15%) being more likely than males (11%) to have used analgesics and sedatives.
  • One in twenty (5%) Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over reported having used amphetamines or speed in the last 12 months (6% of males compared with 3% of females) [4] (Figure ATSI3).

The 2016 NDSHS data showed that (other than ecstasy and cocaine), Indigenous Australians aged 14 and over recent used of illicit drugs was at a higher rate than non-Indigenous Australians (Table S3.1). Rates of illicit drug use in 2016 for Indigenous Australians aged 14 and older were:

  • Over one in four (27%) used any illicit drug in the last 12 months—1.8 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (15.3%)
  • One in five (19.4%) used cannabis in the last 12 months—1.9 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (10.2%)
  • Around one in 10 (10.6%) used a pharmaceutical for non-medical use—2.3 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (4.6%) [7] (Table S3.1)
  • 3.1% used meth/amphetamines in the last 12 months—2.2 times higher than non-Indigenous Australians (1.4%).

The differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians were still apparent even after adjusting for differences in age structure (Figure ATSI4). There were no significant changes in illicit use of drugs among Indigenous Australians between 2013 and 2016, however due to the small sample sizes for Indigenous Australians, the estimates of the NDSHS should be interpreted with caution.

Geographic trends

Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over residing in the Northern Territory (22%) were the least likely to report substance use, while those from the Australian Capital Territory (41%) and Victoria (40%) were the most likely to report using substances.

Indigenous Australians from the Northern Territory (22%) and Queensland (29%) were the only jurisdictions below the national average (30%) [4] (Table S3.3).

Health and harms

The health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are considerably lower than for non-Indigenous Australians. For instance:

  • 35.1% of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people compared with 58.3% of non-Indigenous Australia self-assessed their health as ‘excellent’ or ‘very good’ (age-standardised per cent).
  • 32.5% of Indigenous Australians compared with 12.3% of non-Indigenous Australians reported high/very high psychological distress (age-standardised per cent).
  • 71.0% of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people reported having a long-term health condition compared with 55.3% of non-Indigenous Australians (age-standardised per cent) [4] (Table S3.6).

Almost 1 in 2 Indigenous Australians with a mental health condition were a daily smoker (46%) and about 2 in 5 (39%) to have used substances in the last 12 months. This was higher than for Indigenous  Australians with other long-term health conditions (33% and 24%, respectively) or those with no long term health condition (39% and 29% respectively) [4] (Table S3.11).

The Australian Burden of Disease Study provides an indication of the risk factors that contribute to the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. In 2011, tobacco use accounted for 23.3% of the gap, and alcohol and drug use contributed to 8.1% and 4.1% of the gap, respectively [8] (Table S3.12).

Treatment

Indigenous Australians are also overrepresented in drug and alcohol treatment services. In 2016–17, the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Dataset (AODTS-NMDS) showed that 15% of clients were Indigenous Australians aged 10 and over (Table S3.13). Indigenous Australians (3,313 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely to receive AOD treatment services than non-Indigenous Australians (430 per 100,000 population) were. Specifically where:

  • Amphetamines was the principal drug of concern, Indigenous Australians (1,204 per 100,000 population) were 8 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (155 per 100,000 population).
  • Heroin was the principal drug of concern Indigenous Australians (911 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (123 per 100,000 population) were.
  • Cannabis was the principal drug of concern Indigenous Australians (867 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (126 per 100,000 population) were.
  • Alcohol was the principal drug of concern Indigenous Australians (136 per 100,000 population) were 7 times more likely than non-Indigenous Australians (26 per 100,000 population) [9] (Table S3.14).

Dependence on opioid drugs (including codeine, heroin and oxycodone) can be treated with pharmacotherapy therapy using substitute drugs such as methadone or buprenorphine. The National Opioid Pharmacotherapy Statistics Annual Data collection (NOPSAD) provides information on clients receiving opioid pharmacotherapy treatment on a snapshot day each year. For jurisdictions where data was provided, in 2017:

  • Around 1 in 10 clients (9%) were Indigenous, an overrepresentation relative to their population size.
  • Indigenous Australians were almost 3 times as likely (70 clients per 10,000 population) to receive pharmacotherapy treatment as non-Indigenous Australians (26 clients per 10,000 population) [11] (Table S3.15).

Data from the OSR shows that 2015–16, there were 80 organisations around Australia that provided alcohol and other drug treatment services to around 32,700 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients [6]. The OSR data also shows that:

  • All 80 organisations reported that alcohol was one of the top five common substance-use issue, followed by cannabis (94%) and amphetamines (70%)
  • Treatment episodes were more likely to be to occur in non-residential settings (87%)
  • One third of all treatment episodes were in Very remote areas (32%) and the highest proportion of clients were located in Major cities (35%).

Policy context

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 includes a suite of products that give the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according to a range of 68 performance measures across 3 tiers: Tier 1—health status and outcomes, Tier 2—determinants of health, and Tier 3—health system performance. The measures are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework and cover data that has been collected on the entire health system, including Indigenous-specific services and programs, and mainstream services [12].

National Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Peoples Drug Strategy 2014–2019

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Drug Strategy 2014–2019 was a sub-strategy of the National Drug Strategy 2010–2015 and remains a sub-strategy under the National Drug Strategy 2017–2025. The overarching goal of this sub-strategy is to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by preventing and reducing the harmful effects of alcohol and other drugs (AOD) on individuals, families and their communities [13].

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and the #UluruStatement promoted during #NRW18 and @TheLongWalkOz Thanks to @AMAPresident @EssendonFC @VAHS1972 @quitvic @DeadlyChoices

” What you (Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews ) said about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander advancement being led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is absolutely right,

The great Australian Chris Sarra said very wisely … governments have got to stop doing things to Aboriginal people and start doing things with them and that is my commitment.”

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has told a Reconciliation event The Long Walk he is committed to following the lead of Indigenous people, less than a year after rejecting their call for an enshrined voice in parliament.

After Premier Daniel Andrews spoke of his government’s efforts to create a state Treaty at the Long Walk event at Melbourne’s Federation Square, Mr Turnbull said the two leaders were “starting to agree on more things all the time”.

During a summit at Uluru in May 2017, Indigenous leaders rejected symbolic constitutional recognition in favour of an elected parliamentary advisory body and a treaty.

But in October, Mr Turnbull said a new representative body was not desirable or capable of winning acceptance at a referendum

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #treaty : #Uluru Summit calls for the establishment of a First Nations Voice enshrined in the Constitution

Australian Medical Association has thrown its support behind last year’s Uluru Statement from the Heart: It was a fairly clear-cut decision for us to make.

We recognise the issue regarding the will to want to have the right to self-determination. We recognise the health inequities, the social justice inequities, the wellness inequities that confront our Indigenous population.

And this Statement is just another way of trying to ensure that we can continue to work and get all governments, both State, Federal, and Territory, to work towards closing the gap, improving the social determinants of health, and recognising the need and the required improvements that are necessary to address the gap that currently exists.

The ACCHOs, or Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, are a very important part of the health delivery process. It recognises that the usual relationships, when it comes to health facilities in a different way, it’s a different connectivity. “

The recently elected Australian Medical Association’s President, Tony Bartone, who participated in the Long Walk spoke with ABC Radio reporter, Dan Conifer . See full interview and AMA press release Part 1 and 2 below

 

 ” Politicians, footballers and campaigners have joined thousands of Australians in the Long Walk event to support moves to improve Indigenous health and celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

It has been 14 years since AFL champion Michael Long’s momentous journey from his home in Melbourne to the Prime Minister to get the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people back on the national agenda.

Indigenous health is focal point of this year’s walk, with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service Australian Medical Association (AMA) and Quit Victoria both throwing their support behind the event.

Ill health forced Essendon great Michael Long to miss this year’s Long Walk.

Part 1 : Australian Medical Association has thrown its support behind last year’s Uluru Statement from the Heart

The AMA Federal Council has endorsed the Uluru Statement from the Heart, which calls for a First Nations’ voice in the Australian Constitution.

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said today that the AMA has for many years supported Indigenous recognition in the Australian Constitution, and that the Uluru Statement is another significant step in making that recognition a reality.

“The Uluru Statement expresses the aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in regard to self-determination and status in their own country,” Dr Bartone said.

“The AMA is committed to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

“Closing the gap in health services and outcomes requires a multi-faceted approach.

“Cooperation and unity of purpose from all Australian governments is needed if we are to achieve meaningful and lasting improvements.

“This will involve addressing the social determinants of health – the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age.

“Constitutional recognition can underpin all these endeavours, as we work to improve the physical and mental health of Indigenous Australians.”

Dr Bartone said the AMA was proud to announce its endorsement of the Uluru Statement during National Reconciliation Week.

Part 2 :The recently elected Australian Medical Association’s President, Tony Bartone, who participated in the Long Walk spoke with ABC Radio reporter, Dan Conifer

ELIZABETH JACKSON: Within the next couple of years, your local doctor’s surgery could be adorned with posters supporting Indigenous Constitutional change. The highly influential

Australian Medical Association has thrown its support behind last year’s Uluru Statement from the Heart. The peak body says including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the nation’s founding document could help make Indigenous patients healthier. The AMA’s President Tony Bartone has told our political reporter Dan Conifer the organisation is unequivocal in its support.

TONY BARTONE: It was a fairly clear-cut decision for us to make. We recognise the issue regarding the will to want to have the right to self-determination. We recognise the health inequities, the social justice inequities, the wellness inequities that confront our Indigenous population. And this Statement is just another way of trying to ensure that we can continue to work and get all governments, both State, Federal, and Territory, to work towards closing the gap, improving the social determinants of health, and recognising the need and the required improvements that are necessary to address the gap that currently exists.

DAN CONIFER: Can you just explain for us how something like the Uluru Statement from the Heart, and the changes that it calls for, would support health outcomes, would improve life expectancy and so on?

TONY BARTONE: They’re fairly fundamental aspirations that are part of the Uluru Statement, and those aspirations and recognitions really speak to a number of emotional, physical, and broader social, environmental issues that really will address, as we say, the social determinants of health. We can’t really seek to close the gap when it comes to health outcomes until we address the fundamental building blocks.

DAN CONIFER: Now, one of the key elements of the Uluru Statement is about involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in decision-making processes. In the medical profession, how has involving Indigenous Australians driven improvements?

TONY BARTONE: The ACCHOs, or Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, are a very important part of the health delivery process. It recognises that the usual relationships, when it comes to health facilities in a different way, it’s a different connectivity. Put another way, it recognises the inherent qualities and behavioural patterns of our Indigenous population, and that is different from a traditional Western-type setting which we’ve become experienced with.

DAN CONIFER: And if a referendum were to be held on any of the elements of the Uluru Statement, how would the AMA, individual doctors and specialists around the country, take part or be involved in that campaign?

TONY BARTONE: We would use all avenues open to us, both in terms of our advocacy and communication with our members, to ensure that the information and the sharing of that information, in terms of the wider community, patients who come to our surgery, the access points that we do have, are used to the fullest in terms of ensuring a proper address of the Statement’s initiatives.

DAN CONIFER: So we could see Vote Yes posters or pamphlets or badges in GP surgeries when this, or if this comes to a vote?

TONY BARTONE: What we’d see is the Association taking a front foot in our communication and advocacy on behalf of members. Of course, each individual member is free and would be wanting to participate to perhaps even a fuller extent, which would lead to putting up of posters and sharing that material in a surgery environment. But we would take a front foot more at an Association level to ensure that we communicate with our stakeholders, with our leaders in Parliament, and with the community in general through our media connectivity to communicate that wish and desire.

Part 3 The Long Walk ,VAHS and Quit Victoria promotes Indigenous health

Smoking rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost three times the national average of non-Indigenous people, although the prevalence in Indigenous communities is falling steadily.

In Victoria, 41 per cent of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population are smokers.

Quit Victoria’s Aboriginal Tobacco Control Program Coordinator Jethro Pumirri Calma-Holt told SBS News the health of Indigenous Australians should be kept at the top of the agenda.

“Indigenous health is something that needs to be invested in by everyone and that’s part of national reconciliation week.”

“What Michael Long did all those years ago has created a really big legacy for everyone to follow in his footsteps,” he said

Check it out the legend himself Anthony McDonald-Tipungwuti wearing the VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt out during the warm up for Dream Time at the G. The other players also wore the shirts as well… What a moment !

If you want your very own VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt just like Tippa the only way you can get one is to complete a health check at VAHS. So call us and book your health check on 03 9419 3000

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #IHMayDay18 #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #WorldNoTobaccoDay events from #NSW @ReadyMob @Galambila #QLD @Apunipima #VIC @VAHS1972 #SA #WA #NT @DanilaDilba

1.1 National :The Northern Territory Government, a serial offender, has again received the Dirty Ashtray Award, for putting in the least effort to reduce smoking over the past 12 months.

1.2 RACGP and NACCHO presents Smoking podcast

2 .NSW : Galambila ACCHO – READY MOB Tackling Smoking and Healthy Lifestyles team host #IHMayday18

3.1 VACCHO Quit the smokes today 

3.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team launch new Deadly Dan movie and education package on World No Tobacco Day

4.QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York launches 3 great videos on World No Tobacco Day

 

5.WA : Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya ACCHO , offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke.

6 .SA : Zena Wingfield is the Tackling Indigenous Smoking Project Officer at Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service

7.1 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin launches community campaign

7.2 NT Congress Alice Springs World No Tobacco Day Event  

8. ACT : Deadly Choices World No Tobacco Day

Video From Congress Alice Springs

 

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.National : The Northern Territory Government, a serial offender, has again received the Dirty Ashtray Award, for putting in the least effort to reduce smoking over the past 12 months.

“Smoking kills. Smoking robs people, including young people, of their health.

“Governments must do more to help people to stop smoking, or to not take up the deadly habit in the first place.

“Strong government actions, including making packaging unappealing, keeping tobacco products out of view, and keeping tobacco prices high, have helped to encourage people to quit, or young people not to start.

“The Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt, is to be commended for continuing funding of $183.7 million over four years for the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program.

Releasing the AMA/ACOSH National Tobacco Control Scoreboard 2018 on World No Tobacco Day, AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said it is the third year in a row that the NT has earned the dubious honour.

“The NT scored an E this year, and continues to fail miserably when it comes to protecting Territorians from the harms from smoking,” Dr Bartone said.

“This completes a ‘dirty dozen’ for the Territory – its 12th ‘win’ since the Award was first presented in 1994.

“The Queensland Government has won the Achievement Award for the second year in a row, but it still only scored a C – a C for complacency.”

Queensland was narrowly the best of the C-graders, scoring highest in the provision of smoke-free environments. It was just ahead of the Australian Government for its appropriate, evidence-based decisions about liquid nicotine and e-cigarettes.

Dr Bartone said that all Australian governments must urgently step up their efforts to combat smoking, including reintroducing education campaigns, and banning shop assistants and employees under the age of 18 from selling tobacco products.

“While Australia has made remarkable progress in tackling tobacco, we are in danger of losing momentum in the face of constant efforts by the tobacco industry to promote smoking,” Dr Bartone said.

“Tobacco is unique among consumer products in that it causes disease and premature death when it is used exactly as intended. Two out of three smokers will die from their habit.

“We know that public education and awareness campaigns can have a powerful effect on people’s decisions, yet there has been no national media campaign on tobacco since 2012.

“It is especially disappointing that, yet again, the latest Federal Budget provides no new funding, despite expecting to raise more than $11 billion a year from tobacco taxes.

“It is important that we stay vigilant against any attempts to normalise smoking, or make it appealing to young people.

Above : Katherine West Health Board NT

“This includes regulating e-cigarettes in exactly the same manner as tobacco cigarettes, and not allowing them to be marketed as quit smoking aids until such time as there is scientific evidence that they work as cessation aids, and do not cause further harm

“But no one government is excelling.

“Tobacco control is still a public health priority, here and around the world.

“Australia has to reclaim its reputation as the world leader in tobacco control.”

The AMA/ACOSH National Tobacco Control Scoreboard is compiled annually to mark World No Tobacco Day on 31 May.

Judges from the Australian Council on Smoking and Health (ACOSH) allocate points to the State, Territory, and Commonwealth Governments in various categories, including legislation, to track how effective each has been at combating smoking in the previous 12 months.

The judges called on all jurisdictions to allocate consistent funding for strong media campaigns, and to ban all remaining forms of tobacco marketing and promotion.

They also called on all States and Territories to strengthen controls on the sale of tobacco by banning employees under 18 from selling tobacco products.

1.2 RACGP and NACCHO presents Smoking podcast

‘Do you smoke?’ A simple preventive activity for clinicians to engage with every patient. Listen to Episode one:

Smoking & Smoking Cessation with Prof David Thomas on The National Guide Podcast

2 .NSW : READY MOB ACCHO’s Tackling Smoking and Healthy Lifestyles team host #IHMayday18

Kristy Pursch and David ReidStepping into a smoke free future

Pursch and Reid are members of the READY MOB Tackling Smoking and Healthy Lifestyles team, and are passionate about raising the awareness of the health impacts of tobacco smoking and chronic disease in Aboriginal communities and promoting positive lifestyle changes.

 

READY MOB is: Really Evaluate And Decide Yourself Make Ourselves Better.

We couldn’t do what we do without great relationships and collaboration. Working together for community

The name also signifies that the team is READY to work with the community to promote healthy lifestyles. They are based at the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service on the mid north coast of NSW.

Follow – @KristyPursch

 

2.2 NSW  : Tamworth says no to smokes

How young minds are getting blown away from  smokes

http://www.northerndailyleader.com.au/story/5440414/how-young-minds-are-getting-blown-away-from-smokes/?cs=159 via @The_NDL

3.1 VACCHO Quit the smokes today 

Quit the smokes today on to improve your health and reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke.

Contact your local ACCO or the Aboriginal Quitline today for support

 

3.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team launch new Deadly Dan movie and education package on World No Tobacco Day

 WATCH HERE

 

The VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team and Darebin City Council launched the Deadly Dan Education Suite to teachers within the Darebin area. The new resource will include the book, our new film and 2 lesson plans with heaps of resources!

Thank you to Darebin Mayor Kim Le Cerf for attending and supporting this resource!

We’re excited to continue spreading Deadly Dan’s healthy lifestyle messages to early years and primary schools across Darebin.

If you couldn’t make it to the education launch or want more info about Deadly Dan’s education suite pleas contact Lena at 9403 3300 or message

4.QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York launches 3 great videos on World No Tobacco Day

Today is #WNTD #WorldNoTobaccoDay is a day to raise awareness about the devastating health effects that tobacco use and exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke has on an individual, their family and the community

The Team in Coen

This we have launched 3 more of our campaign videos, we are showcasing some locals in Hope Vale’s real stories. Check out why Desmond stopped smoking

WATCH HERE

“My brother had emphysema, he would be still here if he didn’t smoke.” Lex from Hope Vale.

View Lex’s inspiring video here

Watch Here

Giving up is not as hard as what everyone predicted it to be” What’s your story Cape York?

Don’t make smokes your story!

5.WA : Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya ACCHO , offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke.

Are you aware of the dangers of passive smoking?

Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya, offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke.
If you need help quitting smoking, give us a call on 08 9172 0444#WMHSAC #BeAtYourBest #WirrakaMaya


VIEW HERE

6 .SA : Zena Wingfield is the Tackling Indigenous Smoking Project Officer at Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service

chatting on Community Soapbox today about , next Wednesday, 31st May.

Listen up: 

7.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin launches community campaign\

Thanks to Larrakia TV (Aboriginal TV) for sharing this video showing Danila Dilba’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking team out and about promoting World No Tobacco day all this week in the community.

Great work by our team in spreading the message about the dangers of smoking.

Watch Here

 

7.2 NT Congress Alice Springs World No Tobacco Day Event  

 

 

8. ACT : Deadly Choices World No Tobacco Day

Did you know that pack-a-day smoking can cost more than just your health? Give it up for a year, and you could save $10,000!

Contact our clinics to have a yarn about quitting the smokes

8. Tasmania Aboriginal Centre not available at publication date

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AFL @AlcoholDrugFdn #NRW2018 #WorldNoTobaccoDay : Senator Bridget McKenzie Minister for Sport and Rural Health supports Redtails Pinktails #SayNoMore Drugs, #Smoking and #FamilyViolence #SayYesTo #Education #Employment #Family #Community

 

 ” Over the weekend Senator Bridget McKenzie had a chat pregame to local Central Australia Redtails before they took on Darwin’s TopEnd Storm curtain raiser to AFL Sir Doug Nicholls Indigenous round , a 6 hour broadcast on Channel 7 nationally : The Redtails and PinkTails Right Tracks Program is funded by the Local Drug Action Teams Program ”

See Part 1 Below

Part 2 Say No more to Family Violence all players link up

Part 3 #WorldNoTobaccoDay May 31 launched in the Alice

 ” Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,”

Watch video launch in the

The Minister for Rural Health, Senator Bridget McKenzie was also is in Alice Springs to launch the next phase of the National Tobacco Campaign and said that smoking related illness devastates individuals, families and the wider community : see Part 3 below

PART 1

Arrernte Males AFL Opening Ceremony

Arrernte women AFL Opening Ceremony

Part 1 The Australian Government and the ADF are excited to welcome an additional 92 Local Drug Action Teams, in to the LDAT program

The Senator with Alcohol and Drug Foundation CEO Dr Erin Lalor and  General Manager of Congress’ Alice Springs Health Services, Tracey Brand in Alice Springs talking about the inspirational Central Australian Local Drug Action Team at Congress and announcing 92 Local Drug Action Teams across Australia building partnerships to prevent and minimise harm of ice alcohol & illicit drugs use by our youth with local action plans

WATCH VIDEO of Launch

The Local Drug Action Team Program supports community organisations to work in partnership to develop and deliver programs that prevent or minimise harm from alcohol and other drugs (AOD).

Local Drug Action Teams work together, and with the community, to identify the issue they want to tackle, and to develop and implement a plan for action.

The Alcohol and Drug Foundation provides practical resources to assist Local Drug Action Teams to deliver evidence-informed projects and activities. The community grants component of the Local Drug Action Team Program may provide funding to support this work.

Each team will receive an initial $10,000 to develop and finalise a Community Action Plan and then to implement approved projects in your community. Grant funding of up to a maximum of $30k in the first year and up to a maximum of $40k in subsequent years is also available to help deliver approved projects in Community Action Plans. LDAT funding is intended to complement existing funding and in kind support from local partners.

LDATs typically apply for grants of between $10k and $15k to support their projects

 

See ADF website for Interactive locations of all sites

The power of community action

Community-based action is powerful in preventing and minimising harm from alcohol and other drugs.

Alcohol and other drugs harms are mediated by a number of factors – those that protect against risk, and those that increase risk. For example, factors that protect against alcohol and other drug harms include social connection, education, safe and secure housing, and a sense of belonging to a community. Factors that increase risks of alcohol and other drug harms include high availability of drugs, low levels of social cohesion, unstable housing, and socioeconomic disadvantage. Most of these factors are found at the community level, and must be targeted at this level for change.

Alcohol and other drugs are a community issue, not just an individual issue.

Community action to prevent alcohol and other drug harms is effective because:

  • the solutions and barriers (protective/risk factors) for addressing alcohol and other drugs harm are community-based
  • it creates change that is responsive to local needs
  • it increases community ownership and leads to more sustainable change

Part 2 Say No more to Family Violence all players link up

Such a powerful message told here in Alice Springs today as the Redtails Football Club, Top End Storm football club, link arms with the Melbourne Football Club, Adelaide Football Club for the NO MORE Campaign AU before the AFL Indigenous Round started.

WEBSITE Link up and say ‘No More’

 

 Watch Channel 7 Coverage of this special statement from all players

Part 3 #WorldNoTobaccoDay May 31 launched in the Alice

Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,”

Watch the ABC TV Interview HERE

Watch video of launch in the Alice

Successful Tobacco Campaign Continues

Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

The Minister for Rural Health, Senator Bridget McKenzie was in Alice Springs to launch the next phase of the National Tobacco Campaign and said that smoking related illness devastates individuals, families and the wider community.

“In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,” Minister McKenzie said.

“The latest phase of Don’t Make Smokes Your Story continues to focus on Indigenous Australians aged 18–40 years who smoke and those who have recently quit. The campaign also concentrates on pregnant women and their partners with Quit for You, Quit for Two.

“An evaluation of the first two phases of the campaign revealed they had successfully helped to reduce smoking rates.

“More than half of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants who saw the campaign took some action towards quitting smoking — and 8 per cent actually quit.

“These are very promising stats, however, we must continue to support and encourage those Australians who want to quit, but need help.”

The launch of the next phase of the campaign aligns with World No Tobacco Day and this year’s theme is Tobacco and heart disease.

“Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in Australia, killing one person every 12 minutes,” Minister McKenzie said.

“There is a clear link between tobacco and heart and other cardiovascular diseases, including stroke — a staggering 45,392 deaths in Australia can be attributed to cardiovascular disease in 20151.

“Latest estimates show that tobacco use and exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke not only costs the lives of loved ones, but it costs the Australian community $31.5 billion in social — including health — and economic costs.”

“The Coalition Government, along with all states and territories, has made significant efforts to reduce tobacco consumption across the board.

“For example, we know that tobacco is the leading cause of preventable disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accounting for more than 12 per cent of the overall burden of illness.

“The Coalition Government has recently invested $183.7 million continuing to boost the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program to cut smoking and save lives.

“This comprehensive program has helped to cut the rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people smoking and we want to build on this success.

“The Government’s investment in this program highlights our long-term commitment to Closing the Gap in health inequality.”

The ABS report Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Smoking Trends, Australia, 1994 to 2014-15, reported a decrease in current (daily and non-daily) smoking rate in those aged 18 years and older from 55 per cent in 1994 to 45 per cent in 2014-15, which shows Indigenous tobacco control is working.

For help to quit smoking, phone the Quitline on 13 7848, visit the Department of Health’s Quitnow website or download the free My Quitbuddy app.

Your doctor or healthcare provider can also help with information and support you may need to quit.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Teenage #Pregnancy #maternalMHmatters : Download @AIHW Report : Indigenous teenage mothers almost twice as likely to smoke during pregnancy as non-Indigenous mothers. @sistaquit #Prevention2018

 

” Indigenous teenage mothers are over-represented One in 4 (24%) teenage mothers identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander in 2015.

This means that Indigenous women were over-represented amongst teenage mothers, given Indigenous women aged 15–19 account for only 5.3% of the overall population of Australian females of the same age.

The proportion of Indigenous mothers in Australia is higher in Remote and Very remote areas, and teenage Indigenous mothers also follow this pattern

Compared to non-Indigenous teenage mothers, Indigenous teenage mothers were 1.5 times as likely to smoke in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy (43% compared with 28%) “

Read Part 2 Below or Download :

NACCHO Download aihw-per-93.pdf

Babies of teenage mothers are more likely to be premature and experience health issues in the first month than babies born to women just a few years older, a new report has revealed.

Teenage mums are also more likely to live in Australia’s lowest socio-economic areas (42 per cent) compared to mums aged 20-24 years (34 per cent), according to the report by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, published today , showed the numbers of teenage mothers had dropped from 11800 in 2005 to 8200 in 2015, with nearly three-quarters of teenage mothers aged 18 or 19.

Compared to babies born to mothers aged 20-24 years, more babies born to teenage mothers were premature, had a low birth weight and needed admission to special care nursery.

Despite the negative outcomes for babies, the report showed positive trends for teenage mothers including more spontaneous labours, lower caesarean section rates and less diabetes for teenage mothers.

“The difference between teenage mothers and those in the slightly older age group is due in part to a large number of teenage mothers living in low socio-economic areas,” says AIHW report author Dr Fadwa Al-Yaman.

Dr Al-Yaman said the differences could also be due to the higher smoking rates in pregnancy, with a quarter of teenage mothers smoking after 20 weeks of pregnancy compared to 1 in six of those aged 20 to 24.

A quarter of teenage mothers identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, with Indigenous teenage mothers almost twice as likely to smoke during pregnancy as non-Indigenous mothers.

Dr Al-Yaman said risk factors were highly interlinked, with issues such a smoking, low levels of education and employment being concentrated in remote areas.

The teenage birth rate in metro areas is less than half that of regional areas, she said.

“There is a strong link between socio-economic disadvantage and living in remote areas,” she told AAP.

“You need to have access to transport, access to health services and if you have to pay for your transport, sometimes over an hour’s worth, it’s going to take more of your welfare money.”

SISTAQUIT Trial Recruiting Services Now

The SISTAQUIT™ trial aims to improve health providers’ skills and when offering smoking cessation care to pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Pregnancy is an important window of opportunity for GPs and health providers to help smokers quit, however they often lack the confidence and skills to address their patients’ smoking.

This intervention provides webinar-based training in evidence based and culturally competent smoking cessation care for providers working within Aboriginal Medical and Health Services.

The SISTAQUIT™ Team are currently recruiting Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS) and GP practices in NSW, WA, QLD, SA and NT for this study.

To find out more about your service being involved in the SISTAQUIT™ trial please contact Dr Gillian Gould or Joley Manton at the University of Newcastle.

Website

Download the trial brochure here

Download an information sheet here

Part 2 Indigenous Mothers

Indigenous teenage mothers are over-represented One in 4 (24%) teenage mothers identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander in 2015.

This means that Indigenous women were over-represented amongst teenage mothers, given Indigenous women aged 15–19 account for only 5.3% of the overall population of Australian females of the same age.

Indigenous mothers are younger than average

The average age of Indigenous teenage mothers (17.8 years) was lower than for non- Indigenous mothers (18.1 years). Indigenous teenage mothers were 4.5 times as likely to be aged under 15 (1.8%; 35) as non-Indigenous teenage mothers (0.4%; 27) and less likely to be aged 19 (37.4%; 744 compared with 49.1%; 3,048).

More likely to live in remote areas

The proportion of Indigenous mothers in Australia is higher in Remote and Very remote areas, and teenage Indigenous mothers also follow this pattern.

In 2015, the Indigenous population rate for 15–19 year old mothers living in Remote and Very remote areas was 84.9 per 1,000 females, which was 5.5 times the non-Indigenous rate (15.2 per 1,000).

The population rate for 15–19 year old Indigenous mothers was also higher for women living in Major cities at 40.7 per 1,000 for Indigenous women compared with 7.1 per 1,000 for non-Indigenous women.

Fewer and later antenatal visits

Indigenous teenage mothers generally attended fewer antenatal visits than non-Indigenous teenage mothers, with higher proportions of 1 visit (1.5% compared with 0.9%) and 2–4 visits (9.5% compared with 6.1%) and lower proportions of 5 or more visits (86% compared with 91%).

They were 1.1 times as likely to attend their first antenatal visit at 20 weeks gestation or more (25% compared with 23%).

More likely to smoke

Compared to non-Indigenous teenage mothers, Indigenous teenage mothers were:

• 1.5 times as likely to smoke in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy (43% compared with 28%)

• 1.7 times as likely to smoke after 20 weeks (36% compared with 21%).

Higher rates of diabetes

Indigenous teenage mothers were 1.2 times as likely as non-Indigenous teenage mothers to have diabetes (6.0% compared with 4.9%) and gestational diabetes (5.1% compared with 4.2%).

Onset of labour, method of birth and perineal status

In 2015, Indigenous teenage mothers were more likely than their non-Indigenous counterparts to have spontaneous labour (66% compared with 62%), and less likely to have induced labour (28% compared with 32%), but equally likely to have no labour (both 6.1%).

Compared to non-Indigenous teenage mothers, Indigenous teenage mothers were slightly more likely to:

• have a caesarean section (19% compared with 18%)

• have an intact perineum (27% compared with 26%).

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health @AIHW The health of Australia’s mums and bubs varies where they live

 ” In general across all indicators, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers and babies and those outside metropolitan areas recorded poorer results.

‘For example, metropolitan areas had a rate of almost 4 infant and young child deaths per 1,000 births. The rate was around 1.4 times higher in regional areas with about 5 deaths per 1,000 births,’

‘While about 1 in 10 Australian mothers smoked during pregnancy overall, the rate was much higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers, of whom almost half (46.5%) smoked at some point during their pregnancy.’

Download the full AIHW report HERE

AIHW_HC_Report_Child_and_maternal_health_April_2018

Read over 308 NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s health articles published over the past 6 years

The health of Australia’s pregnant women and their babies has improved across a range of health indicators, with infant death rates and the rate of women smoking during pregnancy on the decline, according to a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, Child and maternal health 2013–2015, presents findings on four indicators measuring the health of babies and their mothers:

  • infant and young child deaths,
  • the rate of newborn babies who are of a low birthweight,
  • mothers smoking during pregnancy, and
  • mothers attending antenatal care services during the first trimester of their pregnancy.

The report shows that despite generally positive results across these indicators nationally, these positive trends are not seen equally across Australia’s 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas.

‘For example, while nationally there has been a consistent decrease in the proportion of mothers smoking during pregnancy—falling from about 1 in 7 mothers in 2009 to 1 in 10 in 2015—rates in some PHN areas are nearly 18 times as high as in others,’ said AIHW spokesperson Anna O’Mahony.

‘The other indicators also varied, but to a lesser extent, with rates up to 3 times as high in some PHN areas’.

Northern Sydney PHN area (which includes the suburbs of Manly, Hornsby and Avalon) recorded the lowest rates for three of the four health indicators: low birthweight babies (4% of all births), mothers smoking during pregnancy (1% of mothers) and deaths among infant and young children (2 deaths per 1,000 live births).

In contrast, Northern Territory PHN area (which covers the whole of the Northern Territory) had the highest rates for two indicators low birthweight babies (8% of births) and infant and child deaths (8 deaths per 1,000 live births).

The Western NSW PHN area (which includes the Bathurst, Dubbo, Broken Hill and Orange) had the highest rate of mothers smoking during pregnancy, with almost one in four mothers smoking at any time during pregnancy (23%).

The AIHW reports on a range of topicsExternal link, opens in a new window.[https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports-statistics/population-groups/mothers-babies/overview]

relating to the health of mothers and their babies, but Ms O’Mahony noted that there is more to learn.

‘This includes improving data on mothers’ experiences with domestic violence, mental health issues, and alcohol consumption during pregnancy,’ she said.

The AIHW will next month be releasing its first report on the health and wellbeing of teenage mothers and their babies.

Minister @KenWyattMP launches NACCHO @RACGP National guide for healthcare professionals to improve health of #Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients

 

All of our 6000 staff in 145 member services in 305 health settings across Australia will have access to this new and update edition of the National Guide. It’s a comprehensive edition for our clinicians and support staff that updates them all with current medical practice.

“NACCHO is committed to quality healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, and will work with all levels of government to ensure accessibility for all.”

NACCHO Chair John Singer said the updated National Guide would help governments improve health policy and lead initiatives that support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can Download the Guide via this LINK

A/Prof Peter O’Mara, NACCHO Chair John Singer Minister Ken Wyatt & RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel launch the National guide at Parliament house this morning

“Prevention is always better than cure. Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

Minister Ken Wyatt highlights what is new to the 3rd Edition of the National Guide-including FASD, lung cancer, young people lifecycle, family abuse & violence and supporting families to optimise child safety & wellbeing : Pic Lisa Whop SEE Full Press Release Part 2 Below

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) have joined forces to produce a guide that aims to improve the level of healthcare currently being delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and close the gap.

Chair of RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Associate Professor Peter O’Mara said the third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (the National Guide) is an important resource for all health professionals to deliver best practice healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

“The National Guide will support all healthcare providers, not just GPs, across Australia to improve prevention and early detection of disease and illness,” A/Prof O’Mara said.

“The prevention and early detection of disease and illness can improve people’s lives and increase their lifespans.

“The National Guide will support healthcare providers to feel more confident that they are looking for health issues in the right way.”

RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel said the RACGP is committed to tackling the health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

“The National Guide plays a vital role in closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health disparity,” Dr Seidel said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should have equal access to quality healthcare across Australia and the National guide is an essential part of ensuring these services are provided.

“GPs and other healthcare providers who implement the recommendations within the National Guide will play an integral role in reducing health disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, and ensuring culturally responsive and appropriate healthcare is always available.”

The updated third edition of the National Guide can be found on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website.

 

Free to download on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website:

http://www.racgp.org.au/national-guide/

and NACCHO

Part 2 Prevention and Early Diagnosis Focus for a Healthier Future

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians.

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, today launched the updated third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Prevention is always better than cure,” said Minister Wyatt. “Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

“The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.

“It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

The guide, which was first published in 2005, is a joint project between the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners RACGP).

“To give you some idea of the high regard in which it is held, the last edition was downloaded 645,000 times since its release in 2012,” said Minister Wyatt.

“The latest edition highlights the importance of individual, patient-centred care and has been developed to reflect local and regional needs.

“Integrating resources like the national guide across the whole health system plays a pivotal role in helping us meet our Closing the Gap targets.

“The Turnbull Government is committed to accelerating positive change and is investing in targeted activities that have delivered significant reductions in the burden of disease.

“Rates of heart disease, smoking and binge drinking are down. We are on track to achieve the child mortality target for 2018 and deaths associated with kidney and respiratory diseases have also reduced.”

The National Guide is funded under the Indigenous Australian’s Health Programme as part of a record $3.6 billion investment across four financial years.

The RACGP received $429,000 to review, update, publish and distribute the third edition, in hard copy and electronic formats.

The National Guide is available on the RACGP website or by contacting RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health on 1800 000 251 or aboriginalhealth@racgp.org.au.