Aboriginal Health and #Respectourelders @KenWyattMP Launching education for aged care facilities cultural considerations caring for elders

 

Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People is an important program which will help address the fundamental need for culturally appropriate care for Aboriginal people, some who may need to use aged care services at an earlier stage of their lives

Programs like this are a vital part of ensuring the care of senior Indigenous people is as culturally continuous as possible”

Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt has welcomed the new course, which coincides with his announcement of a new North West Ageing and Aged Care Strategy which aims to create age-friendly communities across the Pilbara and the Kimberley, while encouraging more seniors support services and greater local employment in aged care.

Photos above Ken Wyatt meeting with the elders from the Yindjibarndi Aboriginal Corporation in Roebourne WA\.

The launch of Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People will be streamed live via the Aged Care Channel at 10.45am AEDT on 22 November with Aboriginal Elder Mr Elliot taking part in answering live questions from members.

Developed by the Aged Care Channel (ACC) in partnership with the Department of Health, the Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People course aims to help inform aged care facilities across Australia of the cultural considerations of caring for Indigenous Australians.

ACC Group Manager Content and Production, Steve Iliffe says the program took six months to put together with the help of research, lots of resources, government input and guidance of Indigenous people as well as visits to different aged care facilities in Pilbara and northern Adelaide.

“We thought it was an important program to do because Indigenous Australians do have a series of complex needs different to the rest of the population due to their history and access to health in areas,” he explains.

“They have a connection to the land, a connection to their family and want to still have access to bush tucker and do things that they traditionally do.

“We went out to a number of different aged care facilities to talk to the people there about what they do to provide tailored care.”

ACC Learning and Development Manager Nicola Burton says providing culturally-appropriate care is a crucial part of the person-centred approach.

“The goal of this program is to recognise how to respond to the cultural needs of Indigenous Australians receiving care,” she says.

“There are significant regional differences between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups, each with complex and diverse ways of life.

“Language, music and art vary in each area, but a connection with culture, community and the land seems to be common to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

While working of the course and program, the ACC team spoke to and sought the advice of subject matter expert Ngarrindjeri elder and Chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group Mark Elliott.

“It was important for us to work with an indigenous leader – he guided us through the process and the research,” Mr Iliffe says.

“With this new course, we hope that we can increase understanding between cultures because at the end of the day, it’s about creating a home for people in aged care and providing them with a life they are still living.”

The new Strategy announced by the Minister includes short, medium and long-term goals, from the engagement and inclusion of seniors in local communities, through to tailored home and residential care support.

“[Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People] is an important program which will help address the fundamental need for culturally appropriate care for Aboriginal people, some who may need to use aged care services at an earlier stage of their lives,” Minister Wyatt says.

“Programs like this are a vital part of ensuring the care of senior Indigenous people is as culturally continuous as possible.

“It will contribute to this goal by helping staff understand the impact of historical events and past government policies, along with broadening their appreciation of Indigenous culture and the health challenges faced by some people.

“Giving staff these insights can contribute to better care, and I encourage everyone involved in indigenous aged care to take the course.”

He adds that the aim of the North West Ageing and Aged Care Strategy is to foster quality and culturally relevant residential aged care facilities that allow people to stay connected to community and age safely with dignity.

“Hopefully the new course will contribute to achieving this outcome,” he says.

“The program showcases the Pilbara’s Yaandina residential aged care facility, whose staff are experienced in providing residents with culturally sensitive care.”

Mr Iliffe says the result of the research and creation of the program is close to the hearts of all involved.

“The people involved had the most amazing time and it is something they will cherish forever,” he says.

“These experiences help us more closer to closing the gap.”

The launch of Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People will be streamed live via the Aged Care Channel at 10.45am AEDT on 22 November with Aboriginal Elder Mr Elliot taking part in answering live questions from members.

Aboriginal Health and #Disability #NDIS : $3 million plan to address the cultural barriers and disadvantage

7

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 1.8 times more likely to have a disability than other Australians

“We are announcing today up to $3 million in funding over three years for two targeted projects that will support the Plan; a research project to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners and ex-prisoners with disability as well as a trial on integrated health and education approaches to support students with disability in remote communities.”

Federal Government Press Release 17 October 2017

Read 23 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Disability Articles

Read 18 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and NDIS Articles

A $3 million plan has been unveiled to address the cultural barriers and disadvantage faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability.

Minister for Social Services, Christian Porter, Assistant Minister for Disability Services, Jane Prentice and Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said the Australian Government Plan to Improve Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People with Disability (the Plan) will drive better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their families and carers.

Download PDF Copy

dss0001_atsi_disability_plan_accessible_v1

Or for persons requiring Listen or Easy to Read

“We are announcing today up to $3 million in funding over three years for two targeted projects that will support the Plan; a research project to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners and ex-prisoners with disability as well as a trial on integrated health and education approaches to support students with disability in remote communities.”

Assistant Minister Prentice said consultations over the last three years show that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability face unique challenges.

“The Plan recognises the importance of supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, particularly in remote locations.

“We need to ensure services are delivered within a cultural framework that is appropriate for the community’s customs and practices.”

The plan identifies five key priority areas for action:

  • Housing – access to appropriately designed shelter and accessible, well-designed communities that are fully inclusive of all residents.
  • Justice System – the right to be free from racism and discrimination and a disability-inclusive justice system
  • Education – an inclusive high quality education system that is responsive to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability
  • Economic security – including employment and business ownership opportunities
  • Health Services – that meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability to ensure the highest possible health and wellbeing outcomes.

See Detail Below or in the Plan

“By addressing these issues head on, this Plan aims to achieve improved outcomes and overall social, emotional, cultural, and economic wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability and their families and carers,” Minister Porter said.

Extract- Executive Summary

The Australian Government is committed to building an environment that enables Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability to achieve improved life outcomes and overall social, emotional, cultural and economic wellbeing.

The development of a dedicated Australian Government plan to improve outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability seeks to build the capacity of service systems, including disability services and Indigenous programs, to better meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability in a culturally safe and appropriate way. The Plan also aims to support workers and carers in their continuing efforts in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The Plan acknowledges that disability is everyone’s responsibility:

• Australian Government

• state/territory government

• local government

• business and industry sectors

• not–for–profit and community organisations

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, communities and organisations.

The Plan is the first of its kind and will be built on over time. The Plan will build on significant work currently being undertaken by the Australian Government to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability. Consultations on the Plan have been undertaken over the last three years across government agencies together with community stakeholders, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their representative organisations, researchers and community organisations.

The Plan highlights five key areas that stakeholders view as priorities for future consideration by the Australian Government, highlighting work that is already underway in these areas, along with potential strategies to address each of the areas:

1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability have access to appropriately designed shelter and live in accessible, well designed communities that are fully inclusive of all their residents.

2. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability have the right to:

• be free from racism and discrimination

• have their rights promoted

• a disability inclusive justice system.

3. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability achieve their full potential through participation in an inclusive, high quality education system that is responsive to their needs. People with disability have opportunities for lifelong learning.

4. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their families and carers have opportunities to gain economic security through employment and business ownership, enabling them to plan for the future and exercise choice and control over their lives.

5. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability attain the highest possible health and wellbeing outcomes throughout their lives, enabled by all health services capabilities to meet the needs of people with disability.

6 .To ensure that the Plan leads to substantive and meaningful change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, any actions or strategies under the Plan must be:

Measurable The priorities and actions outlined in the Plan must be measurable to track progress and outcomes.

Replicable While Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities are diverse, there needs to be some consistency in approach and general principles for success that can be applied across different communities.

Sustainable The Plan represents a starting point in the development of a new approach for improving the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability. The Plan seeks to outline reform and action that will be sustainable over the long-term.

Flexible The Plan recognises that different people and different communities have different needs. While adhering to principles of sustainability and best practice in the delivery of services, implementation needs to be responsive to the unique requirements of individuals and communities.

Cultural The Plan recognises that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability will have similar physical and structural requirements as non–Indigenous people, but that service delivery needs to be undertaken in a cultural context to achieve success.

Area 5: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability attain the highest possible health and wellbeing outcomes throughout their lives, enabled by all health and disability services having the capability to meet their needs.

Why is it important?

Holistic health care and coordination between health and disability services are paramount for those with disabilities. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, those with a disability and those without, access Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled health services as they deliver holistic, comprehensive and culturally appropriate health care, and have an understanding of the cultural needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

While these services meet general health needs through comprehensive primary health care, there is still a need for health workers to receive appropriate training on disability issues. Workers aware of disability needs are able to facilitate appropriate referral pathways for clients to receive any required additional disability services and supports.

Access to disability services is limited by cultural considerations as well as by geographical location, environmental factors, capacity and level of need. Cultural safety can be at risk where the only service within geographic reach is designed for the general population without achieving cultural competency for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander care.

Summary of press release

The Australian Government is committed to working in a spirit of collaboration with states and territories, local government, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and communities and organisations to deliver real outcomes and foster greater opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their families and carers.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #CarersGateway : Free online resources to support #Aboriginal #carers

It’s rewarding work, but without help Dolly finds herself emotionally and physically drained. Dolly reached out and found that she could get services to help her.

Like Dolly, millions of people in Australia care for others who need help with their everyday lives.

A carer may be someone who looks after their husband or wife, partner, grandparent, uncle, aunty, cousin, child, grandchild or any other family member, a neighbour, a friend or someone in their community who needs help.

Everyone’s situation is different. Some carers look after someone who is an older person or who is unwell or has difficulties getting around. Some carers may look after someone who has a disability, a mental illness or dementia, a chronic condition or a long-term illness or drug and alcohol problems.

Many people looking after someone else don’t think of themselves as carers. They just see caring as what they do to help their families or friends or people in their communities.

Carers need help too – someone they can talk to and find out about services that can help. Carer Gateway is a free, Australian Government funded service that provides information for carers and helps people get in touch with their local services. People can ring up and have a private chat or go online and find out about support in their area, free financial and legal help and what to do in emergencies.  They can also get tips on how to look after themselves so they don’t get burnt out while caring for someone else.

Carer Gateway has short videos about real-life carers in the community – showing how they cope and deal with problems – and how they make the most of the time they spend caring for someone in need.

The videos include Dolly’s story. Dolly is a mother and full-time carer for her two adult daughters, who both need support with their everyday needs.

“It’s pretty much 24/7 around the clock. Four years ago, I realised I was doing a care role and I was also a working mum so quite busy. I thought you know what, it’s time for me to step back and start looking after my own,” she said.

There are free online resources to support Aboriginal carers, including a guided relaxation audio recording and information brochures and posters for use by health and community groups  which can also be ordered from the Carer Gateway ordering form and a Carer Gateway Facebook page to keep up to date on services and supports for carers.

To find out more, Carer Gateway can be contacted on 1800 422 737, Monday to Friday between 8am and 6pm,

or by visiting carergateway.gov.au

You can join the Carer Gateway Facebook community by visiting https://www.facebook.com/carergateway/

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #NRW2017 Elder Care : Audit report Aged Care services were delivered to 35 083 Indigenous elders

 

 ” Health conditions associated with ageing often affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people earlier than other Australians.3

This is reflected in the Australian Government policy to provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people access to aged care services from 50 years old, in comparison to 65 years old for the broader population.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are also designated as a special needs group under the Aged Care Act 1997 and all aged care service providers must have regard to the particular physical, physiological, social, spiritual, environmental and other health related care needs of individual recipients.4″

From ANAO Audit report Download here

Dep of Health Audit report Indigenous Aged Care

Image above from here

Background

1. The Australian Government provided $15.2 billion in funding to the aged care sector in 2014–15 and $16.2 billion in 2015–16.

Aged Care services were delivered to 35 083 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2014–15 at an estimated cost of $216 million1 (approximately 1.4 per cent of the total aged care budget).2

2. See above intro 4

3. The Australian Government funds aged care services to assist frail older people, and the carers of frail older people, to remain living at home as well as residential aged care services. The programs funded include:

  • the Commonwealth Home Support Program, which provides entry-level home support for older people who need assistance to keep living independently;
  • the Home Care Packages Program, which provides services tailored to meet individuals’ specific care needs including care services, support services, clinical services and other services to support older people to remain living at home and connected to their communities; and
  • residential aged care, which provides supported accommodation services for older people who are unable to continue living independently in their own homes.

4. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people also have access to aged care services funded through the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program (Flexible Program). In 2015–16 funding for the Flexible Program was approximately $37 million, based on agreed funded places rather than occupancy. The Flexible Program aims to provide aged care services that meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally appropriate setting, close to home and community. The majority of Flexible Program services are delivered in regional, remote and very remote locations.5

5. The Department of Health is responsible for leading the development of evidence based policy, determining the allocation of funding, and regulation of the Commonwealth aged care system to improve the wellbeing of older Australians as well as the implementation of the aged care reforms. The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency is responsible for assessing the quality of care of Australian Government funded aged care service providers. This is done through:

  • the accreditation of residential aged care service providers;
  • quality reviews of aged care provided to people living in their own homes or in the community; and
  • education and training on quality aged care to the aged care sector.

Audit objective and criteria

6. The objective of the audit was to assess the effectiveness of Australian Government-funded aged care services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. To form a conclusion against the audit objective, the ANAO adopted the following high level criteria:

  • Is there an effective framework in place to support access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to quality aged care services?
  • Do the Department of Health and the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency have effective frameworks to oversee the delivery of aged care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?
  • Does the Department of Health have appropriate arrangements in place for monitoring and reporting on the achievement of program objectives and supporting the cost effectiveness and service continuity of aged care delivery to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?

Conclusion

7. Australian Government-funded aged care services are largely delivered effectively to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

8. The ageing of Australia’s population and growing diversity among older people, in terms of their care needs, preferences and socioeconomic status, are placing pressure on the depth and agility of Australia’s aged care system. There are additional challenges in ensuring access to culturally appropriate care and service continuity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly for those living in remote and very remote communities. Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may also have language or cultural preferences that influence their specific requirements.

9. The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program has been effective in increasing the access to culturally appropriate aged care services for elderly Indigenous Australians. The direct selection and recurrent funding approach of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program provides few opportunities for new service providers to enter the market. There would be benefit in the Department of Health extending the application process to new service providers and better aligning the funded places with service capacity.

10. The Department of Health has developed sufficient guidance materials and provides supplementary funding to support Indigenous-focused services that operate under the Commonwealth Home Support, Home Care Packages and residential programs. However, not all Indigenous-focused services are aware of the Department of Health’s sector support programs.6

11. The Department of Health and the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency have been largely effective in their administration of Australian Government-funded aged care services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Each entity has developed sound administrative arrangements to manage the delivery of aged care services and to review the quality of care delivered through aged care programs. The Department of Health can strengthen its administration by implementing a coordinated approach that ensures the timely sharing of relevant information to facilitate risk assessments across the Ageing and Aged Care Group.

12. Consistent with its policy intent, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program is a more cost effective and viable model for specialised aged care delivery to Indigenous Australians when services are located in remote and very remote communities. A 25.8 per cent share of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program funding is allocated to services located in major cities and inner regional areas. To optimise recurrent funding decisions, it is important the Department of Health ensures that the existing service providers, their location and number of places, remain the most appropriate.

13. Given that the majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people access aged care through Commonwealth Home Support Program, Home Care Packages Program and residential aged care programs, further work is required by the Department of Health to maintain the service continuity of Indigenous-focused service providers in areas where there are no culturally secure alternatives. The Department of Health has an opportunity to leverage its datasets to improve the targeting of sector support initiatives to Indigenous-focused services and to monitor the ongoing impacts of aged care policies and programs on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Supporting findings

Access and use of aged care services by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

14. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were most likely to access aged care services through the Commonwealth Home Support Program or the Home Care Packages Program, at rates consistent with their share of the aged care population. Fewer than one per cent of residential aged care places were taken up by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

15. The Department of Health has created clear and consistent pathways for individuals to access and progress through the aged care system. The My Aged Care Contact Centre and website are the main entry points to the aged care system. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to connect with the My Aged Care Contact Centre, and can call directly or use a trusted representative to speak on their behalf. Following an initial screening undertaken by Contact Centre staff, the Regional Assessment Service assesses older people’s needs for lower intensity services available under the Commonwealth Home Support Program. Aged Care Assessment Teams assess the more complex needs of people requiring access to higher intensity care available under Home Care Packages, Transition Care, and within residential aged care.

16. A key challenge in targeting aged care services is assessing the eligibility of individuals seeking to access them as well as the scope of services. This can be particularly challenging in the context of facilitating access for individuals in remote or very remote areas, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

17. The Department of Health advised the ANAO that it is working with the aged care sector to identify opportunities to improve client pathways for diverse groups, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, to address the specific difficulties they may experience.

18. The Department of Health manages the planning and allocation of aged care residential places and Home Care packages for service providers based on the national planning benchmark, population projections and the current level of service provision. The Commonwealth Home Support Program and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program are funded through a grants process.

19. Between 2012–13 and 2015–16 the number of Home Care Level 1‒2 packages allocated to Indigenous-focused service providers has not grown at the same rate as those allocated to mainstream service providers. However, the growth in Home Care Level 3‒4 package and residential place allocations to Indigenous-focused service providers have both been higher than for mainstream counterparts.

20. The distribution of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program funding has remained largely unchanged since its inception. This is largely due to the continuation of grant agreements to existing services that have been in place over the life of the program. These arrangements limit the potential for new providers to access the program.

21. The Department of Health has developed operational manuals and/or guidelines to support providers in the delivery and management of aged care services for the programs reviewed as part of the audit. The Department of Health also funds two peak bodies to develop additional resources to assist with managing the change introduced by aged care reforms (including resources targeted towards remote and very remote Indigenous-focused service providers).

22. The Department of Health funds a Remote and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Service Development Assistance Panel (SDAP) to support aged care providers. ANAO consultations with Indigenous-focussed service providers indicated that awareness of SDAP funding varied across states and territories. There would be benefit in the Department of Health raising the awareness of this assistance in a consistent manner across jurisdictions, and measuring the financial management and governance capacity that has been built and maintained among service providers as a result of having received the funding.

Administration and regulation of aged care services

23. The Department of Health has internal governance committees, templates and guidance to coordinate program administration. Health’s state and territory offices have also adopted various local strategies for engaging with Indigenous-focused service providers. The department has commenced work to strengthen relationships between its National Office and its state and territory offices, to improve links between policy development and program implementation, while still allowing for specific approaches within each jurisdiction.

24. The Department of Health has developed an Enterprise Risk Management Plan that is updated annually as part of the department’s business planning processes. Each of the programs reviewed as part of the audit included risk management (identification, analysis and evaluation) in its business processes. Risk is considered against the type of activity being funded and may result in different risk ratings being given to the same organisation across each activity or program being funded. For service providers that are funded under multiple programs, there is an opportunity for Health to implement a more coordinated approach that facilitates the timely sharing of relevant information across program areas.

25. The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency has developed policies, procedures and guidance materials to support the accreditation of residential aged care service providers, and specific policies for the quality review of Home Care Packages, Commonwealth Home Support Program and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program service providers. Documents reviewed by the ANAO demonstrate that the relevant accreditation and quality review procedures were followed internally.

26. The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency has collected information on assessments of all residential service providers against the accreditation standards. This information shows that between 2000-01 and 2015-16, 95 per cent of residential Indigenous-focused service providers had at least one episode of non-compliance, in comparison with 53 per cent of non-Indigenous-focused Residential service providers. Reported instances of non-compliance mostly related to governance, including regulatory compliance, risk management and human resources as opposed to issues relating to quality of care.

27. In 2014–15 the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency delivered 716 courses, seminars and compliance assistance training events to 10 638 participants from residential and Home Care service providers. Flexible service providers receive compliance assistance training as determined through a case management process. There would be benefit in the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency expanding the proposed cost recovery model to include the indirect and direct costs recovered from courses and workshops to be consistent with the Australian Government’s stated policy intention, as well as the Australian Government Cost Recovery Guidelines.