NACCHO Aboriginal #Mentalhealth #SuicidePrevention and #RUOKday : If you ask #RUOK ? What do you do if someone says ‘no’? Plus Sponsorships for 10 #Indigenous young people to take participate #chatsafe campaign

R U OK Day today encouraging all of us to check in with others to see if they’re OK.

But what if someone says “no”? What should you say or do? Should you tell someone else?

What resources can you point to, and what help is available?

Read NACCHO Aboriginal Health articles over the past 6 Years

Mental Health 189 posts 

Suicide Prevention 124 Posts

Here is a guide 

Stop and listen, with curiosity and compassion

We underestimate the power of simply listening to someone else when they’re going through a rough time. You don’t need to be an expert with ten years of study in psychology to be a good listener. Here are some tips:

Listen actively. Pay attention, be present and allow the person time to speak.

Be curious. Ask about the person’s experience using open questions such as

what’s been going on lately?

you don’t seem your usual self, how are you doing/feeling?

Validate their concerns. See the situation from the person’s perspective and try not to dismiss their problems or feelings as unimportant or stupid. You can say things like

I can see you’re going through a tough time

it’s understandable to feel that way given everything you’ve been going through.

There are more examples of good phrases to use here.

Don’t try to fix the problem right now

Often our first instinct is wanting to fix the person’s problems. It hurts to see others in pain, and we can feel awkward or helpless not knowing how to help. But you don’t have to have all of the answers.

Instead of jumping into “fix it” mode right away, accept the conversation may be uncomfortable and allow the person to speak about their difficulties and experiences.

Sometimes it’s not the actual suggestion or practical help that’s most useful but giving the person a chance to talk openly about their struggles. Also, the more we understand the person’s experience, the more likely we are to be able to offer the right type of help.

Encourage them to seek help.

Ask:

how can I help?

is there something I can do for you right now?

Sometimes it’s about keeping them company (making plans to do a pleasant activity together), providing practical support (help minding their kids to give them time out), or linking them in with other health professionals.

Check whether they need urgent help

It’s possible this person is suffering more than you realise: they may be contemplating suicide or self-harm. Asking about suicidal thoughts does not worsen those thoughts, but instead can help ease distress.

It’s OK to ask them if they’re thinking about suicide, but try not to be judgemental (“you’re not thinking of doing anything stupid, are you?”). Listen to their responses without judgement, and let them know you care and you’d like to help.

Read more: How to ask someone you’re worried about if they’re thinking of suicide

There are resources and programs to help you learn how to support suicidal loved ones, and crisis support lines to call:

  • Contact the Social and Emotional team at your nearest ACCHO
  • Lifeline (24-hour crisis telephone counselling) 13 11 14
  • Suicide Callback Service 1300 659 467
  • Mental health crisis lines

If it is an emergency, or the person is at immediate risk of harm to themselves or others, call 000.

Encourage them to seek professional help

We’re fortunate to be living in Australia, with access to high quality mental health care, resources and support services. But it can be overwhelming to know what and where to seek help. You can help by pointing the person in the right direction.

The first place to seek help is the general practitioner (GP). The GP can discuss treatment options (psychological support and/or medication), provide referrals to a mental health professional or arrange access to local support groups. You can help by encouraging your friend to make an appointment with their GP.

There are great evidence-based online courses and self-help programseducational resources and free self-help workbooks that can be accessed at any time.

There are also online tools to check emotional health. These tools help indicate if a person’s stress, anxiety and depression levels are healthy or elevated.

What if they don’t want help?

People with mental health difficulties sometimes take years between first noticing the problem and seeking professional help. Research shows approximately one in three people experiencing mental health problems accesses treatment.

So even if they don’t want help now, your conversation may have started them thinking about getting help. You can try understanding what’s stopping them from seeking help and see if there’s anything you can do to help connect them to a professional. You don’t need to push this, but simply inviting the person to keep the options in mind and offering your ongoing support can be useful in the long run.

Follow up. If appropriate, organise a time to check in with the person again to see how they’re doing after your conversation. You can also let the person know you’re around and they are always welcome to have a chat with you. Knowing someone is there for you can itself be a great source of emotional support.

Read more: Five types of food to increase your psychological well-being

The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences bursary

Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence is seeking expressions of interest (EOI) from all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people who would like to share their expertise, advice, and ideas and contribute to the development of a suicide prevention social media campaign!

About the #chatsafe campaign

We would like to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to co-design a suicide prevention social media campaign specifically for the Aboriginal community. The campaign will focus on educating and empowering young people to support themselves and other young people within their online social networks. Rather than speaking on behalf of Aboriginal communities, we wish to draw on the expertise, cultural identities, and strengths of the community to inform campaign materials.

The co-design workshop will involve a yarning circle, where young people will be given the opportunity to share their experiences and express their needs. The yarning circle will be facilitated by an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person. The workshop will also involve working together, in groups, to generate ideas for a social media campaign (e.g., digital storytelling, drawing, etc.).

The workshop will be hosted in Perth, as a part of the The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences. The workshop will be conducted in the morning and breakfast will be provided. Young people will be reimbursed $30.00 per hour for their time.

Opportunity for financial support

Oyrgen would like to sponsor 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to take part in our co-design workshop and The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences, hosted from 20 to 23 November, in Perth, by providing a bursary.

SEE CONFERENCE WEBSITE

Eligibility

To be eligible for Orygen’s bursary funding, the applicant must be an Aboriginal and Torres Islander young person, aged between 18 and 25 years. We encourage young people from all geographic regions, across Australia, to apply.

Submitting your application

If you would like to be a part of the co-design workshop, please email your application to Jo at

The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences bursary

Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence is seeking expressions of interest (EOI) from all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people who would like to share their expertise, advice, and ideas and contribute to the development of a suicide prevention social media campaign!

About the #chatsafe campaign

We would like to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to co-design a suicide prevention social media campaign specifically for the Aboriginal community. The campaign will focus on educating and empowering young people to support themselves and other young people within their online social networks. Rather than speaking on behalf of Aboriginal communities, we wish to draw on the expertise, cultural identities, and strengths of the community to inform campaign materials.

The co-design workshop will involve a yarning circle, where young people will be given the opportunity to share their experiences and express their needs. The yarning circle will be facilitated by an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person. The workshop will also involve working together, in groups, to generate ideas for a social media campaign (e.g., digital storytelling, drawing, etc.). The workshop will be hosted in Perth, as a part of the The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences. The workshop will be conducted in the morning and breakfast will be provided. Young people will be reimbursed $30.00 per hour for their time.

Opportunity for financial support

Oyrgen would like to sponsor 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to take part in our co-design workshop and The 2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conferences, hosted from 20 to 23 November, in Perth, by providing a bursary.

Eligibility

To be eligible for Orygen’s bursary funding, the applicant must be an Aboriginal and Torres Islander young person, aged between 18 and 25 years. We encourage young people from all geographic regions, across Australia, to apply.

Submitting your application

If you would like to be a part of the co-design workshop, please email your application to Jo at jo.robinson@orygen.org.au. Submissions can be made on, or before Sunday, 30 September, 2018.

Selection process

In the first week of October, a panel consisting of Oyrgen staff, a Culture is Life representative, Professor Pat Dudgeon from the conference organising committee, Summer May Finlay (a Yorta Yorta woman), and young people will review all written applications and select 10 successful applicants. The selection panel will endeavour to select a diverse range of young people. The 10 successful applicants will be notified by email by mid-October. The success applicants will have until 31 October, 2018 to accept the bursary offered.

Requirements

The successful recipients of the bursaries are required to attend a half-day co-design workshop. Recipients will also be asked to complete and submit a ‘Wellness Plan’, ‘Bank Details Form’, and ‘Consent Form’ prior to participation in the w

. Submissions can be made on, or before Sunday, 30 September, 2018.

Selection process

In the first week of October, a panel consisting of Oyrgen staff, a Culture is Life representative, Professor Pat Dudgeon from the conference organising committee, Summer May Finlay (a Yorta Yorta woman), and young people will review all written applications and select 10 successful applicants. The selection panel will endeavour to select a diverse range of young people. The 10 successful applicants will be notified by email by mid-October. The success applicants will have until 31 October, 2018 to accept the bursary offered.

Requirements

The successful recipients of the bursaries are required to attend a half-day co-design workshop. Recipients will also be asked to complete and submit a ‘Wellness Plan’, ‘Bank Details Form’, and ‘Consent Form’ prior to participation in the w

Anyone seeking support and information about mental health can contact beyondblue on 1300 22 46 36. For information about suicide and crisis support, contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or the Suicide Callback Service on 1300 659 467

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #ElderCare : @KenWyattMP launches @genrontologyau #ATSIAAG Report : Assuring equity of access and quality outcomes for older Aboriginal peoples: What needs to be done

“This report details valuable recommendations to improve aged care access for our First Peoples and I commend the Australian Association of Gerontology and its special Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group.

It highlights the importance of respect for culture, to instill confidence in older First Nations people, and I look forward to its findings helping guide the development of effective pathways to quality aged care.”

The report was launched by Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt at Parliament House on Wednesday.

A new report is calling for an expansion of specialist targeted services for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and more work to embed cultural safety in mainstream care to improve the aged care system for Indigenous Australians.

Photo above : From left: Graham Aitken, Ken Wyatt, Ros Malay and James Beckford Saunders at the launch of a report focused on improving aged care access and quality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Download here

ASSURING EQUITY OF ACCESS FOR OLDER Aboriginal people

Elder Facts

In the 2016 Census, 649,171 people identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, representing 2.8% of the population – up from 2.5% in the 2011 Census, and 2.3% in 2006.

Although the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population has a much younger age profile and structure than the non-Indigenous population, the median age of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is gradually rising.

The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 65 years and over is only 4.8%, much smaller than for non-Indigenous people at 16%.

However, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 55 years and over is increasing, and is projected to more than double from 59,400 in 2011 to up to 130,800 in 2026.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders need access to culturally appropriate services, and they generally want to be cared for in their communities where they are close to family, and where they can die on their land.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face ongoing challenges finding services that are appropriate to their needs and circumstances, and often have problems accessing services where they exist.

Press Release

The Australian Association of Gerontology report also recommends strategies to improve the ability of the aged care workforce to provide more appropriate care, an expansion of advocacy services and a more appropriate needs assessment process.

The report was developed by the AAG’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group (ATSIAAG) with findings from its national workshop in Perth in November 2017 that explored barriers to equity in access and outcomes in aged care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

A lack of service connectivity, the challenges vulnerable groups experience with consumer directed care and My Aged Care, high costs and gaps in policy, education and advocacy are among roadblocks to access and equity outlined in the report.

The report was launched by Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt at Parliament House on Wednesday.

“This report details valuable recommendations to improve aged care access for our First Peoples and I commend the Australian Association of Gerontology and its special Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group,” Minister Wyatt said.

“It highlights the importance of respect for culture, to instil confidence in older First Nations people, and I look forward to its findings helping guide the development of effective pathways to quality aged care.”

ATSIAAG co-chair Graham Aitken said he was delighted Minister Wyatt gave the report the prominence it deserved.

“We are looking forward to seeing a response from government to the suggestions put forward in the report,” he said.

 

Fellow ATSIAAG co-chair Ros Malay said the report was timely given the work underway to develop an action plan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people under the Aged Care Diversity Framework, which was launched in December.

“The report has some great ideas that could be picked up in the action plan,” Ms Malay said.

The report was launched during a ATSIAAG roundtable of key stakeholders from government agencies, academia, aged care, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations who discussed how better data would drive improved aged care for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

A greater uptake of evidence from research and data to ensure greater understanding of the aged care service and support needs of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and how they can best be met is another strategy proposed in the report.

Mr Wyatt said understanding how better data could build a better aged care system for the nation’s First Peoples was a priority for the Turnbull Government.

“Following last year’s Australian National Audit Office report into Indigenous aged care, we have taken steps to improve data,” he said.

AAG CEO James Beckford Saunders said a report from this week’s roundtable would be published within the next few months.

Access the report, Assuring equity of access and quality outcomes for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: What needs to be done, here

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Palliative Care Week @Pall_Care_Aus @RuralDoctorsAus @KenWyattMP #NPCW18 NEWS ; 1. Updated culturally appropriate version of the Dying to Talk Discussion Starter. 2. My Health Record improving outcomes for people in palliative care

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“Death is hard. It brings us grief. But I think the other side of grief is when we know that we’ve met the wishes of a loved one.

I’m impressed with the quality of thought underpinning the Dying to Talk resources, which would ease people gently into the discussions that we need to have . The resource is helpful, constructive and compassionate”.

Such was the wisdom offered by Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt, when he launched in 2017 resources designed to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people discuss end-of-life care wishes with their families or health care teams. See Part 1 Below

Read all NACCHO Articles about Aboriginal Health and Palliative Care

Picture above : The Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt with Palliative Care Australia CEO Liz Callaghan (left) and Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives CEO Janine Mohamed. Originally published 2017

 

 ” Australians are being encouraged to include My Health Record in the discussion of ‘What Matters Most?’ during National Palliative Care Week for 20 -26 May 2018

What matters most for a lot of people is being able to take control of their own health and their digital health information.

My Health Record is an online summary of your key health information, which is controlled by the individual, allowing health care providers involved in a person’s care to securely share health information. For people who require palliative care, this takes a lot of the pressure off. ”

See Part 2 Below

“Many rural and remote patients want to be able to spend the last months and weeks of their life in their own community, and ideally on their own farm or in their own home, rather than at a major hospital in a distant city” he said.

While improving access to palliative care remains a critical need in rural and remote communities, rural doctors and other rural health professionals do a great job in providing quality end-of-life care in a patient’s own community, wherever that is possible.

This whole team approach can include palliative care nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, community nurses and others, with support from the Royal Flying Doctor Service.

Rural doctors are frequently on the front-line of palliative care provision in rural and remote communities”

Rural Doctors Assoc. of Aust. See Part 4 below

The resources include a set of cards, each printed with a statement, which healthcare workers can use to facilitate discussion with individuals or groups.

Also launched was a culturally appropriate version of the Dying to Talk Discussion Starter.

Among questions about family, possessions and health care, it asks about the importance of visiting country if you were sick and not going to get better, or being on country when you die.

Download Aboriginal-and-Torres-Strait-Islander-Discussion-Starter

Mr Wyatt congratulated the organisations that collaborated to develop the “invaluable” resources: Palliative Care Australia, the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives, The Indigenous Allied Health Australia and the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association.

“Your step-by-step guide will make those difficult discussions about death a little bit easier. It is structured, it’s succinct and it’s clear.”

During the launch, Dr Wyatt reflected on what he had learned while working as an undertaker and talking with relatives of people who had died. Often they said they had never discussed death and so didn’t know what their loved one had wanted. They wished they had had this important discussion, or taken the time to listen when their loved one had asked to talk about death.

“It was a salient experience and taught me to live life fully on a day-by-day basis, but to also have a long term plan as to where I wanted to go to. And that is why talking about death is important. Because you can signal your intentions but at the same time prepare your family for the event whenever it does occur, because we are all mortal.”

PCA CEO Liz Callaghan said the original Dying to Talk Discussion Starter was launched in 2016. The new culturally appropriate resources were developed after consultations with Indigenous health organisations that identified the need for a specific resource for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific resources have been developed to support advance care planning and end-of-life discussions,” Ms Callaghan said.

“Focus groups were held with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to understand what barriers they had in discussing their end-of-life care wishes and planning for death. Those focus groups informed the design and content of the Discussion Starter and the Dying to Talk Cards to ensure they were culturally safe and useful.”

Development of the new resources was funded by the Australian Government. They will be distributed across Australia, to Aboriginal Health Services and Aboriginal Medical Services.

The Discussion Starter can be downloaded from http://dyingtotalk.org.au/aboriginal-torres-strait-islander-discussion-starter/.

The resources feature artwork by Indigenous artist, Allan Sumner. The artwork conveys the journey of palliative care patients over the course of their lives, reflecting memories, loved ones, what is important, and what they have done and achieved.

 Part 2 My Health Record improving outcomes for people in palliative care

Australians are being encouraged to include My Health Record in the discussion of ‘What Matters Most?’ during National Palliative Care Week for 20 -26 May.

What matters most for a lot of people is being able to take control of their own health and their digital health information. My Health Record is an online summary of your key health information, which is controlled by the individual, allowing health care providers involved in a person’s care to securely share health information. For people who require palliative care, this takes a lot of the pressure off.

While most people think palliative care to be just for those in their last days of their illness, Palliative Care Australia CEO Liz Callaghan said that palliative care is not just care provided in the final stages of life, but helps those affected to live well with a terminal illness.

“People accessing palliative care services often have complex needs and their care team includes many health professionals including pharmacists, doctors, nurses, and allied health professionals. My Health Record makes it easier for those professionals to share information about medications, test results, and care plans.

“Australians can also share their advance care planning documents through their My Health record, ensuring all health professionals know what their wishes for their future care are,” Ms Callaghan said.

Agency Chief Clinical Information Officer and Executive General Manager Dr Monica Trujillo said palliative care is for people of any age who have been told that they have a serious illness that cannot be cured; it’s about assisting in managing symptoms and improving quality of life.

“For some people, palliative care may be beneficial from the time of diagnosis with a serious life-limiting illness. Palliative care can be given alongside treatments given by doctors and members of the treating team. Having a My Health Record means all medical practitioners and treating team can be kept up to date.

My Health Record can enable important health information including allergies, medical conditions, medicines, pathology and imaging reports to be accessed through one system. The benefits could include reduced hospital admissions, reduced duplication of tests, better coordination of care for people with chronic and complex conditions, and better informed treatment decisions,” Dr Trujillo said.

Carers Australia CEO Ara Cresswell said My Health Record can also assist with carers or loved ones who want to assist the patient going through palliative care.

“My Health Record can lessen the stress of having to remember details of the diagnoses and treatments of others, and help prevent adverse medication events. The ability to upload the patient’s end-of-life preferences can also lessen the distress of those forced into making very difficult decisions on behalf of a family member not able to communicate their own wishes.”

A My Health Record will be created for every Australian, unless they choose not to have one. The opt out period will run from 16 July to 15 October 2018. Records will then be created for interested Australians by the end of the year.

For further information visit http://www.myhealthrecord.gov.au or call 1800 723 471

Part 3 Dying on Country

 Part 4 Rural Aussies urged to talk end-of-life care
with their doctor and families
National Palliative Care Week – 20-26 May 2018

 

While it may seem like a confronting conversation to have, the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) is urging rural and remote Australians to take the time to discuss with their local doctor and family how they want to be looked after towards the end of their life.

Speaking during National Palliative Care Week 2018, RDAA President, Dr Adam Coltzau, said talking about end-of-life care now can help ensure patients are better able to have the palliative care journey they choose, rather than have it decided by others.

“Many rural and remote patients want to be able to spend the last months and weeks of their life in their own community, and ideally on their own farm or in their own home, rather than at a major hospital in a distant city” he said.

“While improving access to palliative care remains a critical need in rural and remote communities, rural doctors and other rural health professionals do a great job in providing quality end-of-life care in a patient’s own community, wherever that is possible.

“This whole team approach can include palliative care nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, community nurses and others, with support from the Royal Flying Doctor Service.

“Rural doctors are frequently on the front-line of palliative care provision in rural and remote communities. They provide care for patients throughout the trajectory of their disease and then, as the doctor at the local hospital, aged care facility or hospice, they often also provide care right through to the end of life.

“A number of welcome new initiatives will make it even easier for rural patients to stay in their community towards the end of their life.

“The increased use of telehealth – where a rural patient and their GP can consult via videolink with relevant specialists, who may be in a distant city location – can greatly reduce the need for seriously ill rural patients to travel from their community for medical care.

“For patients with life-limiting conditions, often the last thing they want to be doing is commuting back and forth to a distant city for medical appointments, which can affect both their physical and mental well-being.

“The other important step forward is the development of the National Rural Generalist Pathway, which will deliver more of the next generation of rural doctors with advanced skills training in a wide range of areas including palliative care.

“Dealing with death and dying is difficult, but it is an important conversation to have with your family and your doctor if you are suffering from a life-limiting condition.

“Palliative care patients deserve to have a high level of care available to them within their local community, and planning for this can reduce stress on both the patient and their loved ones as their condition progresses.

“Talk to your doctor about the options available to you, and put a plan in place early to ensure your needs will be met.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #CloseTheGap #Elders #Agedcare #Diversity framework : Online Survey to assist developing an Action Plan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders #Agedcare @IUIH_ @VACCHO_org

 ” There are more than 100,000 older people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, communities in Australia, who often have health care and support needs that differ from those of other older Australians.”

Australia ‘s aged care system is changing.

To have your say on the aged care needs of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, go to

www.surveymonkey.com/r/IUHAgedcare.

  • Making informed choices
  • Adopting systemic approaches to planning and implementation
  • Accessible care and support
  • Supporting a proactive and flexible system
  • Respectful and inclusive services
  • Meeting the needs of the most vulnerable

Priority outcomes specified in the Aged Care Framework, launched in Canberra by The Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

Before this study people were aware of the impact of social disadvantage and poverty on poorer mental health in older Aboriginal people, but we didn’t really appreciate the important role that living with chronic illness and physical disability has in driving these mental health problems,”

The Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute’s Dr Sandra Eades said the results should influence the Federal Government’s redesign of its Close the Gap targets. See Article in full Part 2

Read previous NACCHO Aged Elder Care articles HERE

Part 1 Survey Developing an Action Plan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders aged care

Australia is a diverse nation, and older people display the same diversity of characteristics and life experiences as the broader population.

Our aged care systems is evolving to offer increased choice and control for consumers, and this transition to person centred care requires care to be tailored to meet an individual’s diverse needs.

To help ensure these needs are appropriately met, the Australian Government have announced an Aged Care Diversity Strategy Framework, which will include implementation Action Plans for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse communities, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans and /or Intersex and Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander Australians.

The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (UIH) has been funded to lead the Action Plan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, in collaboration with the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), and we need your help!

Have your say

To ensure appropriate input from all stakeholders, an online survey has been developed and interviews will be held throughout the country.

We want to hear from you, if you are:

  • a consumer of aged care services, or the family member, carer or representative of one;
  • an aged care provider;
  • a peak organisation or representative group

What do we want to achieve?

It is expected that the project will deliver three significant outcomes:

  • a proposed Action Plan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care that will be an integral part of the national Aged Care Diversity Framework
  • a detailed consultation report that will inform local issues as well as national priorities and the development of the action plan
  • identified evidence based best practice for aged care service delivery to Indigenous communities based on a comprehensive literature review.

To have your say on the aged care needs of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, go to

www.surveymonkey.com/r/IUHAgedcare.

The online survey will be open until 26 February, 2018

Part 2

Resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The Australian Government’s My Aged Care phone line and website can help you access aged care services to support you.

Download HERE

Part 3 Older Indigenous Australians with illness or disability at high risk of depression, study finds

By national Indigenous affairs correspondent Bridget Brennan and Specialist Reporting Team’s Naomi Selvaratnam

For the first time there’s evidence that disability, renal failure and diabetes are causing high levels of psychological distress in older Indigenous Australians.

Key points:

  • Half of all Aboriginal people with chronic illness or a disability have mental health problems, study finds
  • Expert says policy changes are needed to improve the health and life expectancy of Indigenous community
  • There’s also calls for an overhaul of the NDIS to better accommodate Indigenous people

The Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute’s Dr Sandra Eades said the results should influence the Federal Government’s redesign of its Close the Gap targets.

“Before this study people were aware of the impact of social disadvantage and poverty on poorer mental health in older Aboriginal people, but we didn’t really appreciate the important role that living with chronic illness and physical disability has in driving these mental health problems,”

Dr Eades said.In the month before completing an interview for the study, a fifth of Indigenous patients aged 45 or over had experienced anxiety and depression requiring professional help, as well as feelings of restlessness and hopelessness.

“We would say it would be exceptional for an Aboriginal person with disability not to have experienced anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder.

Physical health impacts mental health

“Physical health impacts on mental health. It really highlights the need for the importance of the refresh of the Closing the Gap targets,” Dr Eades said.

“The Aboriginal share of the NDIS is between $1.6 billion and $2 billion, so that’s indicative of how much unmet need there is out there,” he said.

He added that many rural Indigenous communities require greater funding to care for those people living with disabilities.”So this requires a greater investment in communities so that people can support themselves, like it was always done in the past.”

“There are Aboriginal people that provide very good, high-quality care for their community members with disabilities, but what’s lacking often is the resources for them to be able to do that in a more substantive way,” Mr Griffis said.

“But there’s really no money being spent of any great note in this area, despite the urgent need.”

Mr Griffis has called for an overhaul of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) to better accommodate Indigenous people.

Dr Eades urged the federal and state governments to put a “stronger focus on [Indigenous] mental health in the next 10 years”.

“If you don’t have an opportunity to participate both in your community, and in the wider community, then naturally that can lead you to feel very depressed and very down.”

“They feel marginalised and they feel at the edges and periphery of society,” said Damian Griffis, the chief executive of First Peoples Disability Network Australia.

Australians with severe physical limitations are more prone to being highly distressed, but that is especially a risk for Aboriginal people, the study said.

The policy to improve the life expectancy of the Indigenous community is being reviewed, because it has seen little success so far.

New research by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute shows this is the case for half of all Aboriginal people suffering from significant health problems.

Aboriginal Health and #Respectourelders @KenWyattMP Launching education for aged care facilities cultural considerations caring for elders

 

Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People is an important program which will help address the fundamental need for culturally appropriate care for Aboriginal people, some who may need to use aged care services at an earlier stage of their lives

Programs like this are a vital part of ensuring the care of senior Indigenous people is as culturally continuous as possible”

Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt has welcomed the new course, which coincides with his announcement of a new North West Ageing and Aged Care Strategy which aims to create age-friendly communities across the Pilbara and the Kimberley, while encouraging more seniors support services and greater local employment in aged care.

Photos above Ken Wyatt meeting with the elders from the Yindjibarndi Aboriginal Corporation in Roebourne WA\.

The launch of Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People will be streamed live via the Aged Care Channel at 10.45am AEDT on 22 November with Aboriginal Elder Mr Elliot taking part in answering live questions from members.

Developed by the Aged Care Channel (ACC) in partnership with the Department of Health, the Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People course aims to help inform aged care facilities across Australia of the cultural considerations of caring for Indigenous Australians.

ACC Group Manager Content and Production, Steve Iliffe says the program took six months to put together with the help of research, lots of resources, government input and guidance of Indigenous people as well as visits to different aged care facilities in Pilbara and northern Adelaide.

“We thought it was an important program to do because Indigenous Australians do have a series of complex needs different to the rest of the population due to their history and access to health in areas,” he explains.

“They have a connection to the land, a connection to their family and want to still have access to bush tucker and do things that they traditionally do.

“We went out to a number of different aged care facilities to talk to the people there about what they do to provide tailored care.”

ACC Learning and Development Manager Nicola Burton says providing culturally-appropriate care is a crucial part of the person-centred approach.

“The goal of this program is to recognise how to respond to the cultural needs of Indigenous Australians receiving care,” she says.

“There are significant regional differences between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups, each with complex and diverse ways of life.

“Language, music and art vary in each area, but a connection with culture, community and the land seems to be common to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

While working of the course and program, the ACC team spoke to and sought the advice of subject matter expert Ngarrindjeri elder and Chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group Mark Elliott.

“It was important for us to work with an indigenous leader – he guided us through the process and the research,” Mr Iliffe says.

“With this new course, we hope that we can increase understanding between cultures because at the end of the day, it’s about creating a home for people in aged care and providing them with a life they are still living.”

The new Strategy announced by the Minister includes short, medium and long-term goals, from the engagement and inclusion of seniors in local communities, through to tailored home and residential care support.

“[Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People] is an important program which will help address the fundamental need for culturally appropriate care for Aboriginal people, some who may need to use aged care services at an earlier stage of their lives,” Minister Wyatt says.

“Programs like this are a vital part of ensuring the care of senior Indigenous people is as culturally continuous as possible.

“It will contribute to this goal by helping staff understand the impact of historical events and past government policies, along with broadening their appreciation of Indigenous culture and the health challenges faced by some people.

“Giving staff these insights can contribute to better care, and I encourage everyone involved in indigenous aged care to take the course.”

He adds that the aim of the North West Ageing and Aged Care Strategy is to foster quality and culturally relevant residential aged care facilities that allow people to stay connected to community and age safely with dignity.

“Hopefully the new course will contribute to achieving this outcome,” he says.

“The program showcases the Pilbara’s Yaandina residential aged care facility, whose staff are experienced in providing residents with culturally sensitive care.”

Mr Iliffe says the result of the research and creation of the program is close to the hearts of all involved.

“The people involved had the most amazing time and it is something they will cherish forever,” he says.

“These experiences help us more closer to closing the gap.”

The launch of Caring for Indigenous Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People will be streamed live via the Aged Care Channel at 10.45am AEDT on 22 November with Aboriginal Elder Mr Elliot taking part in answering live questions from members.

Aboriginal Health and #Disability #NDIS : $3 million plan to address the cultural barriers and disadvantage

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 1.8 times more likely to have a disability than other Australians

“We are announcing today up to $3 million in funding over three years for two targeted projects that will support the Plan; a research project to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners and ex-prisoners with disability as well as a trial on integrated health and education approaches to support students with disability in remote communities.”

Federal Government Press Release 17 October 2017

Read 23 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Disability Articles

Read 18 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and NDIS Articles

A $3 million plan has been unveiled to address the cultural barriers and disadvantage faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability.

Minister for Social Services, Christian Porter, Assistant Minister for Disability Services, Jane Prentice and Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said the Australian Government Plan to Improve Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People with Disability (the Plan) will drive better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their families and carers.

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“We are announcing today up to $3 million in funding over three years for two targeted projects that will support the Plan; a research project to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners and ex-prisoners with disability as well as a trial on integrated health and education approaches to support students with disability in remote communities.”

Assistant Minister Prentice said consultations over the last three years show that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability face unique challenges.

“The Plan recognises the importance of supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, particularly in remote locations.

“We need to ensure services are delivered within a cultural framework that is appropriate for the community’s customs and practices.”

The plan identifies five key priority areas for action:

  • Housing – access to appropriately designed shelter and accessible, well-designed communities that are fully inclusive of all residents.
  • Justice System – the right to be free from racism and discrimination and a disability-inclusive justice system
  • Education – an inclusive high quality education system that is responsive to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability
  • Economic security – including employment and business ownership opportunities
  • Health Services – that meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability to ensure the highest possible health and wellbeing outcomes.

See Detail Below or in the Plan

“By addressing these issues head on, this Plan aims to achieve improved outcomes and overall social, emotional, cultural, and economic wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability and their families and carers,” Minister Porter said.

Extract- Executive Summary

The Australian Government is committed to building an environment that enables Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability to achieve improved life outcomes and overall social, emotional, cultural and economic wellbeing.

The development of a dedicated Australian Government plan to improve outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability seeks to build the capacity of service systems, including disability services and Indigenous programs, to better meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability in a culturally safe and appropriate way. The Plan also aims to support workers and carers in their continuing efforts in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The Plan acknowledges that disability is everyone’s responsibility:

• Australian Government

• state/territory government

• local government

• business and industry sectors

• not–for–profit and community organisations

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, communities and organisations.

The Plan is the first of its kind and will be built on over time. The Plan will build on significant work currently being undertaken by the Australian Government to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability. Consultations on the Plan have been undertaken over the last three years across government agencies together with community stakeholders, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their representative organisations, researchers and community organisations.

The Plan highlights five key areas that stakeholders view as priorities for future consideration by the Australian Government, highlighting work that is already underway in these areas, along with potential strategies to address each of the areas:

1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability have access to appropriately designed shelter and live in accessible, well designed communities that are fully inclusive of all their residents.

2. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability have the right to:

• be free from racism and discrimination

• have their rights promoted

• a disability inclusive justice system.

3. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability achieve their full potential through participation in an inclusive, high quality education system that is responsive to their needs. People with disability have opportunities for lifelong learning.

4. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their families and carers have opportunities to gain economic security through employment and business ownership, enabling them to plan for the future and exercise choice and control over their lives.

5. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability attain the highest possible health and wellbeing outcomes throughout their lives, enabled by all health services capabilities to meet the needs of people with disability.

6 .To ensure that the Plan leads to substantive and meaningful change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, any actions or strategies under the Plan must be:

Measurable The priorities and actions outlined in the Plan must be measurable to track progress and outcomes.

Replicable While Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities are diverse, there needs to be some consistency in approach and general principles for success that can be applied across different communities.

Sustainable The Plan represents a starting point in the development of a new approach for improving the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability. The Plan seeks to outline reform and action that will be sustainable over the long-term.

Flexible The Plan recognises that different people and different communities have different needs. While adhering to principles of sustainability and best practice in the delivery of services, implementation needs to be responsive to the unique requirements of individuals and communities.

Cultural The Plan recognises that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability will have similar physical and structural requirements as non–Indigenous people, but that service delivery needs to be undertaken in a cultural context to achieve success.

Area 5: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability attain the highest possible health and wellbeing outcomes throughout their lives, enabled by all health and disability services having the capability to meet their needs.

Why is it important?

Holistic health care and coordination between health and disability services are paramount for those with disabilities. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, those with a disability and those without, access Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled health services as they deliver holistic, comprehensive and culturally appropriate health care, and have an understanding of the cultural needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

While these services meet general health needs through comprehensive primary health care, there is still a need for health workers to receive appropriate training on disability issues. Workers aware of disability needs are able to facilitate appropriate referral pathways for clients to receive any required additional disability services and supports.

Access to disability services is limited by cultural considerations as well as by geographical location, environmental factors, capacity and level of need. Cultural safety can be at risk where the only service within geographic reach is designed for the general population without achieving cultural competency for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander care.

Summary of press release

The Australian Government is committed to working in a spirit of collaboration with states and territories, local government, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and communities and organisations to deliver real outcomes and foster greater opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability, their families and carers.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #CarersGateway : Free online resources to support #Aboriginal #carers

It’s rewarding work, but without help Dolly finds herself emotionally and physically drained. Dolly reached out and found that she could get services to help her.

Like Dolly, millions of people in Australia care for others who need help with their everyday lives.

A carer may be someone who looks after their husband or wife, partner, grandparent, uncle, aunty, cousin, child, grandchild or any other family member, a neighbour, a friend or someone in their community who needs help.

Everyone’s situation is different. Some carers look after someone who is an older person or who is unwell or has difficulties getting around. Some carers may look after someone who has a disability, a mental illness or dementia, a chronic condition or a long-term illness or drug and alcohol problems.

Many people looking after someone else don’t think of themselves as carers. They just see caring as what they do to help their families or friends or people in their communities.

Carers need help too – someone they can talk to and find out about services that can help. Carer Gateway is a free, Australian Government funded service that provides information for carers and helps people get in touch with their local services. People can ring up and have a private chat or go online and find out about support in their area, free financial and legal help and what to do in emergencies.  They can also get tips on how to look after themselves so they don’t get burnt out while caring for someone else.

Carer Gateway has short videos about real-life carers in the community – showing how they cope and deal with problems – and how they make the most of the time they spend caring for someone in need.

The videos include Dolly’s story. Dolly is a mother and full-time carer for her two adult daughters, who both need support with their everyday needs.

“It’s pretty much 24/7 around the clock. Four years ago, I realised I was doing a care role and I was also a working mum so quite busy. I thought you know what, it’s time for me to step back and start looking after my own,” she said.

There are free online resources to support Aboriginal carers, including a guided relaxation audio recording and information brochures and posters for use by health and community groups  which can also be ordered from the Carer Gateway ordering form and a Carer Gateway Facebook page to keep up to date on services and supports for carers.

To find out more, Carer Gateway can be contacted on 1800 422 737, Monday to Friday between 8am and 6pm,

or by visiting carergateway.gov.au

You can join the Carer Gateway Facebook community by visiting https://www.facebook.com/carergateway/

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #NRW2017 Elder Care : Audit report Aged Care services were delivered to 35 083 Indigenous elders

 

 ” Health conditions associated with ageing often affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people earlier than other Australians.3

This is reflected in the Australian Government policy to provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people access to aged care services from 50 years old, in comparison to 65 years old for the broader population.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are also designated as a special needs group under the Aged Care Act 1997 and all aged care service providers must have regard to the particular physical, physiological, social, spiritual, environmental and other health related care needs of individual recipients.4″

From ANAO Audit report Download here

Dep of Health Audit report Indigenous Aged Care

Image above from here

Background

1. The Australian Government provided $15.2 billion in funding to the aged care sector in 2014–15 and $16.2 billion in 2015–16.

Aged Care services were delivered to 35 083 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2014–15 at an estimated cost of $216 million1 (approximately 1.4 per cent of the total aged care budget).2

2. See above intro 4

3. The Australian Government funds aged care services to assist frail older people, and the carers of frail older people, to remain living at home as well as residential aged care services. The programs funded include:

  • the Commonwealth Home Support Program, which provides entry-level home support for older people who need assistance to keep living independently;
  • the Home Care Packages Program, which provides services tailored to meet individuals’ specific care needs including care services, support services, clinical services and other services to support older people to remain living at home and connected to their communities; and
  • residential aged care, which provides supported accommodation services for older people who are unable to continue living independently in their own homes.

4. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people also have access to aged care services funded through the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program (Flexible Program). In 2015–16 funding for the Flexible Program was approximately $37 million, based on agreed funded places rather than occupancy. The Flexible Program aims to provide aged care services that meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally appropriate setting, close to home and community. The majority of Flexible Program services are delivered in regional, remote and very remote locations.5

5. The Department of Health is responsible for leading the development of evidence based policy, determining the allocation of funding, and regulation of the Commonwealth aged care system to improve the wellbeing of older Australians as well as the implementation of the aged care reforms. The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency is responsible for assessing the quality of care of Australian Government funded aged care service providers. This is done through:

  • the accreditation of residential aged care service providers;
  • quality reviews of aged care provided to people living in their own homes or in the community; and
  • education and training on quality aged care to the aged care sector.

Audit objective and criteria

6. The objective of the audit was to assess the effectiveness of Australian Government-funded aged care services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. To form a conclusion against the audit objective, the ANAO adopted the following high level criteria:

  • Is there an effective framework in place to support access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to quality aged care services?
  • Do the Department of Health and the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency have effective frameworks to oversee the delivery of aged care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?
  • Does the Department of Health have appropriate arrangements in place for monitoring and reporting on the achievement of program objectives and supporting the cost effectiveness and service continuity of aged care delivery to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?

Conclusion

7. Australian Government-funded aged care services are largely delivered effectively to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

8. The ageing of Australia’s population and growing diversity among older people, in terms of their care needs, preferences and socioeconomic status, are placing pressure on the depth and agility of Australia’s aged care system. There are additional challenges in ensuring access to culturally appropriate care and service continuity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly for those living in remote and very remote communities. Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may also have language or cultural preferences that influence their specific requirements.

9. The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program has been effective in increasing the access to culturally appropriate aged care services for elderly Indigenous Australians. The direct selection and recurrent funding approach of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program provides few opportunities for new service providers to enter the market. There would be benefit in the Department of Health extending the application process to new service providers and better aligning the funded places with service capacity.

10. The Department of Health has developed sufficient guidance materials and provides supplementary funding to support Indigenous-focused services that operate under the Commonwealth Home Support, Home Care Packages and residential programs. However, not all Indigenous-focused services are aware of the Department of Health’s sector support programs.6

11. The Department of Health and the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency have been largely effective in their administration of Australian Government-funded aged care services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Each entity has developed sound administrative arrangements to manage the delivery of aged care services and to review the quality of care delivered through aged care programs. The Department of Health can strengthen its administration by implementing a coordinated approach that ensures the timely sharing of relevant information to facilitate risk assessments across the Ageing and Aged Care Group.

12. Consistent with its policy intent, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program is a more cost effective and viable model for specialised aged care delivery to Indigenous Australians when services are located in remote and very remote communities. A 25.8 per cent share of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program funding is allocated to services located in major cities and inner regional areas. To optimise recurrent funding decisions, it is important the Department of Health ensures that the existing service providers, their location and number of places, remain the most appropriate.

13. Given that the majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people access aged care through Commonwealth Home Support Program, Home Care Packages Program and residential aged care programs, further work is required by the Department of Health to maintain the service continuity of Indigenous-focused service providers in areas where there are no culturally secure alternatives. The Department of Health has an opportunity to leverage its datasets to improve the targeting of sector support initiatives to Indigenous-focused services and to monitor the ongoing impacts of aged care policies and programs on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Supporting findings

Access and use of aged care services by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

14. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were most likely to access aged care services through the Commonwealth Home Support Program or the Home Care Packages Program, at rates consistent with their share of the aged care population. Fewer than one per cent of residential aged care places were taken up by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

15. The Department of Health has created clear and consistent pathways for individuals to access and progress through the aged care system. The My Aged Care Contact Centre and website are the main entry points to the aged care system. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to connect with the My Aged Care Contact Centre, and can call directly or use a trusted representative to speak on their behalf. Following an initial screening undertaken by Contact Centre staff, the Regional Assessment Service assesses older people’s needs for lower intensity services available under the Commonwealth Home Support Program. Aged Care Assessment Teams assess the more complex needs of people requiring access to higher intensity care available under Home Care Packages, Transition Care, and within residential aged care.

16. A key challenge in targeting aged care services is assessing the eligibility of individuals seeking to access them as well as the scope of services. This can be particularly challenging in the context of facilitating access for individuals in remote or very remote areas, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

17. The Department of Health advised the ANAO that it is working with the aged care sector to identify opportunities to improve client pathways for diverse groups, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, to address the specific difficulties they may experience.

18. The Department of Health manages the planning and allocation of aged care residential places and Home Care packages for service providers based on the national planning benchmark, population projections and the current level of service provision. The Commonwealth Home Support Program and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program are funded through a grants process.

19. Between 2012–13 and 2015–16 the number of Home Care Level 1‒2 packages allocated to Indigenous-focused service providers has not grown at the same rate as those allocated to mainstream service providers. However, the growth in Home Care Level 3‒4 package and residential place allocations to Indigenous-focused service providers have both been higher than for mainstream counterparts.

20. The distribution of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program funding has remained largely unchanged since its inception. This is largely due to the continuation of grant agreements to existing services that have been in place over the life of the program. These arrangements limit the potential for new providers to access the program.

21. The Department of Health has developed operational manuals and/or guidelines to support providers in the delivery and management of aged care services for the programs reviewed as part of the audit. The Department of Health also funds two peak bodies to develop additional resources to assist with managing the change introduced by aged care reforms (including resources targeted towards remote and very remote Indigenous-focused service providers).

22. The Department of Health funds a Remote and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Service Development Assistance Panel (SDAP) to support aged care providers. ANAO consultations with Indigenous-focussed service providers indicated that awareness of SDAP funding varied across states and territories. There would be benefit in the Department of Health raising the awareness of this assistance in a consistent manner across jurisdictions, and measuring the financial management and governance capacity that has been built and maintained among service providers as a result of having received the funding.

Administration and regulation of aged care services

23. The Department of Health has internal governance committees, templates and guidance to coordinate program administration. Health’s state and territory offices have also adopted various local strategies for engaging with Indigenous-focused service providers. The department has commenced work to strengthen relationships between its National Office and its state and territory offices, to improve links between policy development and program implementation, while still allowing for specific approaches within each jurisdiction.

24. The Department of Health has developed an Enterprise Risk Management Plan that is updated annually as part of the department’s business planning processes. Each of the programs reviewed as part of the audit included risk management (identification, analysis and evaluation) in its business processes. Risk is considered against the type of activity being funded and may result in different risk ratings being given to the same organisation across each activity or program being funded. For service providers that are funded under multiple programs, there is an opportunity for Health to implement a more coordinated approach that facilitates the timely sharing of relevant information across program areas.

25. The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency has developed policies, procedures and guidance materials to support the accreditation of residential aged care service providers, and specific policies for the quality review of Home Care Packages, Commonwealth Home Support Program and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program service providers. Documents reviewed by the ANAO demonstrate that the relevant accreditation and quality review procedures were followed internally.

26. The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency has collected information on assessments of all residential service providers against the accreditation standards. This information shows that between 2000-01 and 2015-16, 95 per cent of residential Indigenous-focused service providers had at least one episode of non-compliance, in comparison with 53 per cent of non-Indigenous-focused Residential service providers. Reported instances of non-compliance mostly related to governance, including regulatory compliance, risk management and human resources as opposed to issues relating to quality of care.

27. In 2014–15 the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency delivered 716 courses, seminars and compliance assistance training events to 10 638 participants from residential and Home Care service providers. Flexible service providers receive compliance assistance training as determined through a case management process. There would be benefit in the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency expanding the proposed cost recovery model to include the indirect and direct costs recovered from courses and workshops to be consistent with the Australian Government’s stated policy intention, as well as the Australian Government Cost Recovery Guidelines.