NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : New @NACCHOChair Elected #QLD @DeadlyChoices @IUIH_ #VIC Njernda ACCHO #NSW Orange and Tharawal #SA @DeadlyChoices #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #WA Kimberley AMS

1.1 National : Donnella Mills Becomes Chairperson of the  National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Plus NACCHO Board changes 

1.2 National NACCHO AGM 2019 acknowledges years of ACCHO Service

1.3 National : Download NACCHO Annual Report 2017-2018

2.1 NSW : Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation nurse named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year.

2.2 NSW : Orange ACCHO Health Service continues efforts to improve Aboriginal health

3.Vic : Njernda ACCHO chronic care coordinator, Garry Giles is empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country to improve their health

4.1 QLD : IUIH and University of Queensland awarded Outstanding Collaboration in Higher Education and Training through Business Higher Education Round Table (BHERT).

4.2 QLD : Deadly Choices help celebrate 20th Anniversary of Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health and the 150th Anniversary of the town itself.

5. NT : Katherine West Health Board’s  Healthy Harold yarned with the Kids at Timber Creek about how to stay safe and healthy

6. SA : Deadly Choices SA mob exercise and eating health promotion

7. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Canberra download their October 2018 Newsletter

8. WA : NACCHO and Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Syphilis Test and Treat kits now available in the Kimberley region in Western Australia

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Donnella Mills Becomes Chairperson of the  National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Plus NACCHO Board changes 

I am very honoured and excited to be taking up the role of Chairperson for NACCHO. I would like to acknowledge the excellent leaders NACCHO has had in the past, I am following in the footsteps of some amazing people to continue the essential national conversation on community led health initiatives.

I believe Community Control is the key model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care and will see us achieving greater autonomy and self-determination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,

Donnella Mills pictured at NACCHO AGM this month in Brisbane thanking Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen) Chairperson, Donnella Mills has been recognised for her contribution to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, through her appointment as Chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO).

Donnella has served as the Deputy Chairperson of the NACCHO Board for the past 12 months and takes on the role of Chairperson following the 1 November resignation of John Singer.

When the new Board met for the first time after the AGM on 2 November, it fully endorsed the Deputy Chair, Donnella Mills to act in the role of Chairperson as set out in the NACCHO constitution.

NACCHO is the peak body for the Aboriginal Community Controlled health sector and represents 145 services, and 302 health centres across the country.

Donnella will work with the NACCHO Board to drive the national health debate in Australia, particular in regards to self-determination and community led solutions for closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Ms Mills is a Torres Strait Islander woman with ancestral and family links to Masig and Nagir in the Torres Strait. She is a Cairns-based lawyer with LawRight, a Community Legal Centre which coordinates the provision of pro bono civil legal services to vulnerable members of our community, as well as the Chairperson for Wuchopperen. She will use her previous experience in the legal and health care systems to address the issues facing our community in both Cairns, and on a national level.

“Health and legal issues are intrinsically linked. It is no coincidence Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – among the most incarcerated people in the world – also have some of the poorest health outcomes in the world. The provision of Community Controlled, holistic and culturally appropriate health care services really is a way to ensure a healthy future for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,” says Donnella.

CEO Pat Turner and the Board of NACCHO welcome her to the role of Chairperson and look forward to working with her over the next 12 months.

At the AGM, four new members were appointed to the new NACCHO Board. From Queensland, we are joined by Gail Wason, CEO of Mulungu Primary Health Care Service in Mareeba and Gary White, Chairman of Goondir Health Service in Dalby. From Victoria, we welcome Michael Graham, CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service and Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative.

The retiring members are: Adrian Carson and Kieran Chilcott from Queensland; and John Mitchell and Rod Jackson from Victoria. The Board thanks them all for their contribution to NACCHO over the years.

1.2 National NACCHO AGM 2019 acknowledges years of ACCHO Service

Congratulations on up to 40 years of service and the outstanding contribution by ACCHO Members .

On behalf of the NACCHO Board and 145 Members we also honour the community members and staff who were all seriously concerned about the availability of health care service to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living there regions many years ago

1.Presented to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service Mackay for 40 years of service WEBSITE 

2.Presented to Broome Regional Aboriginal Medical Service 40 years of service WEBSITE 

3.Presented to Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services 30 years of service WEBSITE 

4. Presented to Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Regional Health and Community Services 25 years of service WEBSITE 

Download a copy of all certificates

 J3291 – Member Services Anniversary certificates_v1

1.3 National : Download NACCHO Annual Report 2017-2018

Download from the NACCHO website 

2.1 NSW : Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation nurse named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year.

Matthew James knows all too well about the challenges that mental health can bring.

Mr James has assisted Macarthur’s Indigenous population as a mental health practisioner at the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation for the past year.

The nurse leads Tharawal’s Byala team, which supports people struggling with mental health issues, or drug and alcohol-related problems.

Originally published Here 

Byala means “Let’s talk” in the local Dharawal Aboriginal language.

Mr James was rewarded for his dedication to the cause when he was named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year award late last month.

The Orangeville resident said he was nominated for the award by a Thawaral colleague.

“I’m stoked, it was really nice to get recognition at a national level,” he said.

Matthew always makes people feel comfortable… he is amazing.

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation team manager Tina Taylor

He received the honour at an Australian College of Mental Health Nurses seminar in Cairns.

Mr James, who has more than 20 years of industry experience, joined the Tharawal team in October 2017.

He said his role included providing counselling, diagnosis reviews and medication for Indigenous people

“There is a huge amount of disadvantage here in Macarthur and there are challenges, such as helping people with trauma issues,” he said.

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation was formed in 1983 to provide medical and community health services to Indigenous people.

Mr James said Tharawal did a great job supporting Macarthur’s Indigenous community.

“Tharawal offers the leading Aboriginal health service in Australia,” he said.

“I am very proud of our work.”

Tharawal’s social and emotional well-being team manager Tina Taylor said Mr James was a great leader and compassionate with his clients.

“Matthew has brought a whole new dynamic to the team,” Ms Taylor said.

“He always makes people feel comfortable… he is amazing.”

For more information about these services, visit the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation Airds Facebook page.

2.2 NSW : Orange ACCHO Health Service continues efforts to improve Aboriginal health

IMPROVING the health of one of the region’s most vulnerable populations has been the focus for Orange Health Service during NAIDOC Week.

The hospital held its ceremony on Thursday, including a flag raising, acknowledgement of country, dancing and a barbecue lunch complete with cake, with more than 60 people in attendance.

Originally Published HERE

But general manager Catherine Nowlan said the full appreciation of the theme, ‘Because of her, we can’, came via a sustained effort for the entire week.

Health professionals shared stories about their own Aboriginal heritage and how the strong women in their lives inspired them to succeed in their adult careers, as well as about the Aboriginal patients they treated.

“One of our health leaders said she had the opportunity to meet the most wonderful Aboriginal lady and her family embraced her because she was part of the care team,” Ms Nowlan said.

“She said it was the simple things we do every day that make the difference.

“It’s all about creating a world worth living in and a responsibility to understand each other’s cultures.”

Orange Health Service has an Aboriginal component in its staff inductions on the need to involve the whole family in a patient’s treatment, as well as social conventions.

 “If you haven’t asked the question, how do you know? So it’s about giving the right and appropriate care.”

Orange Health Service general manager Catherine Nowlan

However, Ms Nowlan said there had also been extra training in July to help 370 staff members be more comfortable in asking patients when they arrived at the hospital as to whether they identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

“By asking the question, it helps us improve the identification of patients,” she said.

3.Vic : Njernda ACCHO chronic care coordinator, Garry Giles is empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country to improve their health

AS A Yorta Yorta man, Garry Giles knows family comes first.

Followed by housing, food, safety.

And finally, lingering right at the bottom, health.

It’s an unspoken yet age-old hierarchy not just for his mob, but Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) people across the country.

Originally Published HERE 

And while it’s seen him raised in a tight-knit community where aunties, uncles, cousins and siblings (blood-related or not) always had his back, it’s also a hierarchy that has caused endless heartache.

Because, as Njernda chronic care coordinator, Garry has seen how neglected health can lead to tragic outcomes, with clients, friends and family members taken too soon.

Currently, indigenous Australians are two to three times more likely to develop a chronic disease than non-indigenous people.

These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease.

And not only are Indigenous Australians more likely to have each of these conditions individually.

They are also more likely to have all three, and die from them.

But Garry is dreaming of a (hopefully not too distant) day when this gap is closed.

‘‘There is a huge need, our community is very sick,’’ he said.

‘‘And so many of our people seem to put their health on the backburner and don’t realise these diseases can be managed, they can be controlled.’’

Garry started working in his community when he was just 15 as a farmhand on an Indigenous farm.

He then cleaned for Berrimba Childcare Centre for five years before moving into home and community care for another five years.

From there he moved into health, completing a certificate III in ATSI health, and two years later he was an Aboriginal health worker with Njernda.

At that point, it wasn’t really a dream come true — a career in health had never been on Garry’s radar previously.

‘‘One of my aunties encouraged me to do it,’’ he said.

‘‘She said I had the compassion and the heart for it. If it weren’t for her, I probably wouldn’t have gone down this path.’’

Garry has now been chronic care coordinator for 12 months — but even in this specialised role, he still needs to keep a range of talents up to scratch.

‘‘I can be a counsellor one day, a driver or support worker the next,’’ he said.

‘‘But my main focus is chronic care. I book clients in and liaise with all allied health services.

‘‘This is a one-stop shop as a lot of our mob don’t tend to go through mainstream health services for their care — they prefer to come here.’’

Allied health staff connected to Njernda include podiatrists, dentists, endocrinologists, optometrists and child and maternal health practitioners.

As well as mental health, diabetes and drug and alcohol services.

It can sometimes feel like a 24-hour job for Garry.

‘‘Everyone is linked in some way, we’re all like family,’’ he said.

‘‘So you might run into someone in the supermarket and have a consultation there, because they just need that reassurance.

‘‘A lot of people don’t have any family, so we become that family. And while we try not to work outside our opening hours, if people have no one and are a bit scared, we’re more than happy to help.’’

Garry said education was key to better health for ATSI people.

And through his role at Njernda, he’s seen how proper support and guidance can lead to life-changing outcomes.

‘‘One of the best things is seeing people take more control of their lives,’’ he said.

‘‘A lot of our mob have low self esteem after facing so many barriers in life and a chronic illness is just another burden.

‘‘But we want to empower them to take steps to improve their health.

‘‘Because if they’re not well, they can’t help anybody — they won’t be there for their grandchildren. They won’t be there for their family.’’

4.1 QLD : IUIH and University of Queensland awarded Outstanding Collaboration in Higher Education and Training through Business Higher Education Round Table (BHERT).

Congratulations to IUIH and University of Queensland for receiving an Award last night for Outstanding Collaboration in Higher Education and Training through Business Higher Education Round Table (BHERT).

Receiving the award here is IUIH CEO Adrian Carson, Chair of the IUIH Board Aunty Lyn Shipway, UQ representative Leanne Coombe, and IUIH Director of Workforce Development Alison Nelson.

IUIH is the largest Aboriginal community-controlled, health organisation in Australia, and the largest employer of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in South East Queensland.

The partnership with UQ was designed to address indigenous health disadvantage by developing a generation of health professionals familiar with the special challenges within Indigenous health offering placements within a community controlled clinical setting.

The program has grown from providing placements to 30 students across 3 disciplines in 2010 to more than 350 students across 20 disciplines in 2017.

Congratulations to the team involved and thanks to all the students and team who have completed placements and contributed to this partnership.

4.2 QLD : Deadly Choices help celebrate 20th Anniversary of Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health and the 150th Anniversary of the town itself.

The DC team were on the road last week, in Cunnamulla for the 20th Anniversary of Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health and the 150th Anniversary of the town itself. They also launched Deadly Choices at Cunnamulla.

While in the region, they visited Charleville and Western Areas Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Community Health Limited and helped launch the Charleville Men’s Group, and joined them for a morning tea.

DC Ambassador Petero Civoniceva was a big hit with the locals and he can’t wait to get back out there again!

Too deadly everyone!

5. NT : Katherine West Health Board’s  Healthy Harold yarned with the Kids at Timber Creek about how to stay safe and healthy

Healthy Harold yarned with the Kids at Timber Creek about how to stay safe and healthy. One of the best ways to stay safe is to say no to drink driving.

The kids tried a driving game with beer goggles on to feel what it is like when a drunk person drives a car and everyone crashed 😱

It is dangerous to be driving a car, or be in the car with someone who is drunk.
If you are drinking give a sober person the keys to the car and always have a sober person to drive.

Keep your family and community safe
Drink Safe, Be Safe, Have a Deadly Time

#oneshieldforall
Life Education NT

6. SA : Deadly Choices SA mob exercise and eating health promotion

Having a workout buddy is a great advantage. Your workout partner could inspire and motivate you to reach your goal. Make that connection today!

#DeadlyChoicesSA #workout #friendship
📷 Power .aboriginal.programs

If you eat with other people you are more likely to eat regularly and healthy than those who eat alone or in front of the TV or computer.

#DeadlyChoicesSA #Eatinghealthyfact #healthytip

📷 Power .aboriginal.programs

7. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Canberra download their October 2018 Newsletter

 Download the Newsletter

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter October 2018 (3)

8. WA : NACCHO and Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Syphilis Test and Treat kits now available in the Kimberley region in Western Australia

 
NACCHO and the Australian Government Department of Health are working together to coordinate an $8.8 million response to address the syphilis outbreak in Northern Australia. 

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services is the latest ACCHS to participate in training conducted by Flinders University and the roll out of the Test and Treat kits.  

Results from traditional blood tests can take up to two weeks to be processed, which cause issues with people moving on before receiving treatment and potentially spreading the disease.  The Test and Treat kits allow instant diagnosis and if needed, immediate treatment.
Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services staff completing accredited training
Left to right
Tori Jamieson, KAMSC Sexual Health and Wellbeing Officer
Jarlyn Spinks, KAMSC Peer Education Support Officer
 
Tracey Kitaura, DAHS Aboriginal Health Worker (EN) Chronic Disease/STI/RHD
For further information please visit the NACCHO website https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/esr/
 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : #NACCHOAgm2018 Program launched #NSW @ahmrc #ahmrcAGM18 #WA Mawarnkarra Health Service #VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @DeadlyChoices @Apunipima

1.1 : First Nations people will play a fundamental role in developing guidelines to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kidney patient outcomes

1.2 :NACCHO CEO Pat Turner keynote speaker at

2. WA : Mawarnkarra Health Service Roebourne new $1.8 million renal facility brings care closer to home

3.Armajun Aboriginal Health Service  Inverell reminds he community about the dangers of lung disease

4.VIC : The Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) is pleased to announce the appointment of a the new Chair and Deputy Chair

5 .NT : Roderick Brown’s three young sons all have the potentially fatal rheumatic heart disease, with his eldest son undergoing open heart surgery at the age of seven.

6.SA : Not good news ‘ Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service (CKAHS) staff were in for a shock when they came into work on Monday last week as parts of the ceiling had collapsed overnight.

7. QLD : Deadly Choices health promotion on Cape York

Download the 60 page Program released October 

NACCHO National Conference Program 2018 (1)

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 : First Nations people will play a fundamental role in developing guidelines to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kidney patient outcomes

First Nations people will play a fundamental role in developing guidelines to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kidney patient outcomes, with more than $300,000 in Government funding to Kidney Health Australia to support national consultations.

Kidney Health Australia will hold 20 community consultations across the country with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to inform the Caring for Australasians with Renal Impairment Indigenous Guidelines.

Renal failure disproportionately affects First Australians and we need to work together to improve and maintain the health of those who contract kidney disease.

Recent research shows almost one in five Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged over 18 have indicators of chronic kidney disease.

Our people face unique challenges in the management of this condition, including access to services and leaving country to receive treatment.

The guidelines are being developed to address these and other challenges and to work towards delivering better treatment options and a healthier future.

They will also help support chronic kidney disease education, prevention, early detection, management and workforce education.

Grassroots consultation will allow Kidney Health Australia to ensure the guidelines are relevant and reflect what communities want and need.

In addition, a panel of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health clinicians, including community-based practitioners, will advise on the consultative process and the content of the guidelines.

The guidelines will complement the national renal roadmap currently under development and the priority placed on First Nations kidney health by the Council of Australian Governments.

The guidelines will also be a resource for Māori people, with Kidney Health Australia securing separate funding to hold community consultations in New Zealand.

Completion of the community consultations is expected in late 2019.

1.2 NACCHO CEO Pat Turner keynote speaker at 

“Our model of comprehensive primary health care is best practice – we must continue to lead”

Pat Turner NACCHO CEO

2. WA : Mawarnkarra Health Service Roebourne new $1.8 million renal facility brings care closer to home

More renal patients in Roebourne and surrounding areas can now be treated closer to home thanks to a new community supported home dialysis facility.

Health Minister Roger Cook today officially opened the new four-chair, purpose-built facility, which has been constructed on the grounds of Mawarnkarra Health Service.

Managed by Mawarnkarra Health Service, the Warawarni-Gu Maya Community Supported Home Dialysis facility will make it easier for local people who are suitable for home dialysis and have end stage kidney disease, to undertake their treatment closer to home.

Home dialysis is for people who are capable and confident of supervising their treatment either alone or with a carer – usually a family member. Each of the four dialysis bays have individual television sets to make patients more comfortable and their time spent at treatment more pleasant.

The new centre includes a dedicated consultation room with telehealth facilities – this means specialists can see and speak to their patients in a virtual setting, and patients are spared the cost and stress of travel to a tertiary hospital.

Between 2015 and 2017, telehealth activity has increased 113 per cent in the Pilbara region. So far this year, more than 1,700 outpatient appointments in the region have been conducted using telehealth.

The $1.8 million Warawarni-Gu Maya Community Supported Home Dialysis facility was constructed by the WA Country Health Service as part of the Australian Government’s Health and Hospitals Fund, which is investing $45.7 million to its Bringing Renal Dialysis and Support Services Closer to Home program.

Comments attributed to Health Minister Roger Cook:

“Having renal dialysis is tough and time consuming, and can be exacerbated by time away from family and friends during treatment.

“This new purpose-built, community supported home dialysis unit offers eligible patients, including a large proportion of Aboriginal people, a comfortable local setting to undertake their self-dialysis.

“It is fantastic to see that telehealth, which enables people to stay closer to their communities, is becoming ‘business as usual’ for our health system. It is important that patients can stay close to family and friends as much as possible when receiving health care.”

Comments attributed to Pilbara MLA Kevin Michel:

“It is fitting that the name Warawarni-Gu Maya translates to ‘Healing House’ as being with our loved ones and support networks when we are sick is crucial, and treatment closer to home can have a huge impact on a patient’s wellbeing.

“This new facility will help many vulnerable residents in Roebourne and the surrounding communities, including a large proportion of Aboriginal people, for whom treatment on country is very important.

3. Armajun Aboriginal Health Service  Inverell reminds he community about the dangers of lung disease

“Maintaining or improving lung health is really important and there is a lot that people with chronic lung disease can do to stay well,”

“Our goal is to encourage people with chronic lung disease to attend the BE WELL program. The program enables people with chronic lung disease to learn how to manage their lung problem, how to exercise and get moving one step at a time towards better health,” 

Armajun program manager James Sheather

Originally Published Here

Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, Inverell held an Aboriginal community awareness day about chronic lung disease on Thursday, October 18.

The community were welcomed to with a free barbeque and information session that include education, screening and a tour of the new Aboriginal healthy lung program called, Breathe Easy, Walk Easy, Lungs for Life (BE WELL).

“Armajun is taking active steps to support the better management of lung disease,” Armajun chief executive Deb McCowen said.

Chronic lung disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a relatively common disease that mainly affects older people, and includes conditions such as  emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

This year the Australian Institute of Health Welfare reported that 1 in 20 Australians aged 45 and over had COPD. The prevalence of COPD among Indigenous Australians is 2.5 times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians.

COPD limits airflow in the lungs, which can lead to shortness of breath. The main causes include smoking or exposure to cigarette smoke, outdoor air pollution, fumes and dust in the workplace, childhood lung infections and chronic asthma.

BE WELL is a joint project between Armajun, the University of Sydney and the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health. Armajun is the first of four NSW Aboriginal Medical Services to join BE WELL, which is a National Health & Medical Research Council funded Aboriginal Pulmonary rehabilitation project.

4. VIC : The Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) is pleased to announce the appointment of a the new Chair and Deputy Chair

Karen Heap, new VACCHO Chair is CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative as well as Chair of the Victorian Children, Young People and Families Alliance

The Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) is pleased to announce the appointment of a the new Chair and Deputy Chair following our AGM on Monday 22 October.

The Board governing VACCHO, peak body for Aboriginal health and wellbeing in Victoria held its AGM yesterday and the following Members make up the VACCHO Board going forward:

  • Karen Heap, Chair (Former Deputy Chair)
  • Raylene Harradine, Deputy Chair (newly elected)
  • Suzie Squires, Treasurer
  • John Gorton, Director
  • Mick Graham, Director
  • Jason Saunders, Director

VACCHO’s Acting CEO, Trevor Pearce congratulated Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative as well as Chair of the Victorian Children, Young People and Families Alliance on taking up the role of VACCHO Chair. “Karen is a proud Yorta Yorta woman and a well-respected leader within the Victorian Aboriginal community and supporter of VACCHO for many years. I have no doubt she will continue to uphold the core values of VACCHO that advocates for a vibrant, healthy and self-determining Aboriginal community.

Mr Trevor Pearce, also welcomed Ms Harradine to the role as a new Board member of VACCHO. “Raylene is a proud Wotjobaluk and Latjl Latjl woman. Raylene is the CEO of Bendigo and District Aboriginal Cooperative and brings a wealth of experience to VACCHO’s Board” Mr Pearce said.

“I’d also like to take the opportunity to thank John Mitchell, our outgoing Chair, and Rod Jackson, outgoing Treasurer, for all their work over the previous two years both as leaders of our organisation, and as the two Board members representing NACCHO’s Victorian members on the NACCHO Board.”

Karen Heap and Michael Graham will now represent Victorian NACCHO members on the NACCHO Board.

VACCHO’s Finance Sub-committee will be led by Suzie Squires as Treasurer, with Karen Heap, Raylene Harradine, and Michael Graham making up the rest of the sub-committee.

Ms Heap said she was honoured to take on the role of VACCHO’s Board Chair. “VACCHO is an integral part of health and wellbeing for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples living in Victoria,” Ms Heap said.

“There is a lot happening both in Victoria and at the Federal level and we are proud to represent our Members to Government and other key stakeholders in shaping policy and delivering programs as we work toward Closing the Gap for our people.”

5 .NT : Roderick Brown’s three young sons all have the potentially fatal rheumatic heart disease, with his eldest son undergoing open heart surgery at the age of seven.

 

Key points:

  • Rheumatic heart disease is caused by repeated exposure to an infection on the skin and throat
  • It is entirely preventable, but is believed to kill up to 100 Indigenous children and young people a year
  • Maningrida children have the highest known rates of rheumatic heart disease in the world

His story reflects the dire situation facing many Indigenous communities not only in the Northern Territory, but all around Australia.

Picture above : PHOTO: Roderick Brown and his sons Trey and Curtis. (ABC News)

Article originally published HERE 

Read NACCHO RHD report HERE

The father of three and his partner, Danielle Turner, travelled more than 4,000 kilometres from Maningrida with their sons to have their voices heard in Canberra.

“It’s important because [we’re] sending a message across Arnhem Land and of course, around Australia,” he said.

“It’s very important that [people know] rheumatic heart disease is very preventable, and can cause death and is very painful for the family.”

The family joined doctors, researchers and community representatives calling on the Federal Government to take urgent action to stem the soaring number of cases in Australia.

RHD is a preventable illness affecting about 6,000 Australians, with Indigenous children 55 times more likely to die from the disease than their non-Indigenous peers.

The causes can be as common as repeated throat and skin infections but the consequences can be devastating, leading to permanent heart damage and even death.

Maningrida has world’s highest recorded rate of RHD

Mr Brown, an Indigenous ranger in Maningrida, said all three of his boys — aged three, seven and nine — get monthly penicillin injections to stop the progression of the disease.

“Just to keep their heart going and active,” he said.

His eldest son Curtis underwent life-saving open heart surgery at Royal Melbourne Children’s Hospital two years ago.

“My heart was melting when I saw my kid going through the surgery, and after the surgery when he came back it was very sad,” Mr Brown said.

“I couldn’t stop thinking of that day… Seeing him lying there on a trolley.”

Unfortunately, the Brown family’s story is not unique.

“My brothers, my niece and nephew, they’re going through the same problem,” Mr Brown said.

‘Politicians can no longer turn a blind eye’

“We don’t want to see children suffering and dying unnecessarily in a rich country like Australia,” Dr Bo Remenyi said.

The NT Australian of the Year said the event in Canberra was a “landmark” occasion, and a step towards raising awareness in Federal Parliament.

“I think the message was heard very clearly, to the point where politicians can no longer turn a blind eye to rheumatic heart disease,” Dr Remenyi said.

The Australian Government is committed to being a global leader in ending RHD, in accordance with a resolution passed by the World Health Assembly in April, Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt said.

But Dr Remenyi disputed that.

“We’re yet to see full a commitment to address the United Nations resolution on rheumatic heart disease,” she said.

Earlier this month, the Federal Government committed $3.7 million over three years to five Aboriginal medical services across Australia.

“It’s a good initiative to get things off the ground,” Dr Remenyi said.

“It’s insufficient funding to solve rheumatic heart disease, and of course, there’s many communities who missed out on funding all together.”

Mr Wyatt said the development of a “road map” would allow the funding to be reviewed in the future, and states and territories would also commit money.

For any such initiative to be successful, it had to be community-driven, said Matthew Ryan, mayor of the West Arnhem Regional Council.

“We need to address the issue at the parliament and the politicians need to understand how serious it is,” Mr Ryan said.

“It needs to be community-driven, and the Government working with us in terms of funding — direct funding — and the NT Government working with us instead of talk, talk.”

For Mr Brown, more help for his family and the community can’t come soon enough.

“I’d like to ask Territory Housing, it would be better if myself, my partner and my kids had our own house,” he said.

“Better education for the whole community” was required, he said, as well as more doctors in the community.

6.SA : Not good news ‘ Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service (CKAHS) staff were in for a shock when they came into work on Monday last week as parts of the ceiling had collapsed overnight.

Strong winds and rain on Sunday evening created a water blockage in the system which caused roof tiles to collapse in two places.

This included a portion of ceiling over a workstation where at least three workers are based.

CKAHS chief executive officer Zell Dodd said staff had no choice but to evacuate that day while the damaged was assessed, with some consulting services relocated to Ceduna District Health Services (CDHS).

Orginally Published HERE

Country Health SA executive director of corporate services Brett Paradine said the building was immediately repaired and deemed safe.

“The community controlled Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service (CKAHS) GP consulting services and visiting eye health team were relocated to the Ceduna District Health Services on Monday due to storm damage,” he said.

“Country Health SA (CHSA) immediately called in a builder and electrician to ensure the CKAHS building was deemed safe for use.

“The building is now considered electrically safe and the roof is stable. Damaged ceiling tiles have been replaced, while an additional down pipe was installed to assist with roof run-off.”

CKAHS chairperson Leeroy Bilney said the service was now dealing with mould caused by the rainfall.

He said the mould had already affected staff with respiratory problems.

“Due to this risk, we have had to close the administration section of our building while we await mould testing to determine if treatment to affected areas has resolved the issue,” he said.

“In the short term we have approximately 22 staff displaced for at least one week while this occurs.

“I am concerned for our community members, employees, patients and visitors – if we can’t provide a safe environment, despite the determinations in attempting to get a new building, we fail to deliver optimal service and this is not fair to out Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

It continues a difficult period for CKAHS, with a portion of the building condemned and not in use which has put strain on the remaining office space.

Member for Flinders Peter Treloar expressed concern over the state of the building last year and said CKAHS had been actively lobbying at a state and federal level for some time over the condition of the building.

Since 2012 Country Health SA has provided $150,000 for repair and maintenance work.

“Country Health is working with CKAHS to develop future plans for the service and the premises,” he said.

“CKAHS provides vital health services to the Ceduna area, and we will continue to work in partnership with the federal government to ensure this continues.”

Ms Dodd said the health service had been working for a long time to get the building upgraded and the condemned section repaired.

“We now live in fear knowing that another downpour of rain or another storm will do the same, despite Country Health doing the best they can,” she said.

“What I am deeply concerned about is when, and not if, we get rain, in what part of the building will it hit next.

“I have already met with key state government officers where we are working solidly in a bid to find a solution to the immediate and longer term future – it’s pretty clear and as a matter of public interest we cannot operate, expand and provide the much-needed services, including bringing in fly-in fly-out specialists and Allied Health professionals, for the people we serve, if we don’t get a new building soon.”

She said if the doors were to close for a long period then CDHS would not be able to take on the additional load.

Mr Paradine said an alternative location may need to be sourced.

“Since 2012 we have funded around $150,000 towards maintenance and repair of the CKAHS building,” he said.

“CHSA is in discussions with CKAHS and will support them to identify alternative properties in the Ceduna region.”

7. QLD : Deadly Choices health promotion on Cape York 

Queensland Govt funding has delivered a state-of-the-art new oval for Coen’s Cape York  future sports stars! Facility includes lights 2 play @ night & will encourage healthy lifestyles. Gr8 opening celebration this week

was very happy after seeing his blood pressure results thanks to Kirstin from

Deadly Choices Team and Minister Cameron Dick flying high

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : #NACCHOAgm2018 Program launched #NSW Bourke AMS @awabakalltd #VIC #Wathaurong #NT @MiwatjHealth #QLD @Apunipima @Wuchopperen #ACT @WinnungaACCHO

1.1 NSW : Bourke Aboriginal Health Service utilises My Health Record to improve the health outcomes in the community

1.2 NSW : Awabakal Ltd Preschool Wickham was awarded ‘Most Outstanding Childcare Service in the Newcastle and Hunter Region 

2.NT :  Malabam Health Board and Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation will each receive $742,000 over three years to lead local pilot programs to target Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD).

3.ACT : Australian first as major steps taken in realising Winnunga ACCHO  Model of Care at AMC

4.VIC : The Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Op and Barwon Health co-fund Koorie Birth Suite inclusive space for Geelong’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community

5.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO hosted a youth camp for the community of Hopevale on Cape York 

5.2 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Dentist receives highest accolade for dental surgeons 

6. WA : AHCWA Congratulations to the participants that completed our 2 day, Birds & the BBV’s training course

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

Download the 60 page Program released October 

NACCHO National Conference Program 2018 (1)

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 NSW : Bourke Aboriginal Health Service utilises My Health Record to improve the health outcomes of the community

The Bourke Aboriginal Health Service was established 30 years ago to address early mortality rates in the community. But if you ask Barbara Flick – or Ungi as she’s also known – not enough has changed since.

Ungi is part of the Pademoen Clan of the Yuwallaraay nation. She’s also CEO of the Bourke Aboriginal Health Centre.

Watch Video

Her impressive career in healthcare spans almost half a century. She was the first nurse at the Aboriginal Medical Service Redfern in 1972, ran the biggest GP practice in Darwin and served as National Indigenous Health Advisor to the Australian Medical Association.

With a resume like that, it’s little wonder that Ungi was invited into the Bourke community to work on improving the Aboriginal Health Service six years after her retirement.

“I work in healthcare because I want my grandchildren to grow up to be strong and healthy, to make decisions about what they want to do in life and to maintain their culture and identity,” Ungi says. “When I heard about the situation in Bourke, my heart ached for the families here. I wanted to keep doing something useful, so I accepted their invitation.”

Bourke has a small population of just under 3,000 people and more than 30 per cent are Indigenous. It’s remote, which makes it difficult to attract medical staff. It also has high rates of chronic disease.

“We have a lot of sick people in the community, but exact rates of chronic disease aren’t well known,” Ungi says. “A lot of people don’t get health checks so we can’t identify chronic disease and help treat it.”

Improving outcomes

The Bourke Aboriginal Health Service offers two main programs – clinical services to treat people who are sick and a chronic disease program to help mitigate community issues. Ungi believes My Health Record will help improve both.

“It will have an enormous positive impact on our population,” Ungi says. “It’s difficult to get a GP in rural and remote areas so we have to staff our clinic with locums. They come for two or three weeks at a time and then go away. During that time with us, they’re more concerned with dealing with the people who turn up at the clinic sick everyday than managing chronic disease.

“With My Health Record, people won’t have to tell the same story to every locum they come across. But practitioners will still be able to see what their conditions and medications are.”

Many of the people in the Indigenous communities also move across the region regularly to visit family. Ungi says My Health Record will ensure continuity of care: “It will make us comfortable in knowing that when people go away, they’ll be taken care of properly.”

Addressing community challenges

On a broader level, My Health Record can improve the health outcomes of the wider Bourke community.

As an example, Bourke Aboriginal Health Service is currently running a ‘Too Deadly for Diabetes’ program to help address management of the disease in the community. It’s been a huge success – after seven weeks, one diabetic even went into remission.

“My Health Record will help us keep track of what’s happening. It will help locums review medications and reduce them when necessary,” Ungi says. “It’s not just about knowing what’s wrong with people. By using My Health Record, we can see changes in their illnesses or medications. This is most important for the management and treatment of chronic disease.”

Ungi wants the Bourke community to have better control over their personal health and their lives. Anything that encourages honest conversations with treatment providers is an important part of the solution.

“Our biggest concerns are about people going down that road to the cemetery,” Ungi says. “My Health Record will benefit our community by giving us the information we need to treat people in the most appropriate way, to stem the flow of disease and give people a healthier life.”

1.2 NSW : Awabakal Ltd Preschool Wickham was awarded ‘Most Outstanding Childcare Service in the Newcastle and Hunter Region’ 

This tops off a fantastic 12 months with the Excellence Accreditation result, placing the preschool in the top 48 services in Australia, so it was fitting to get validation from the Local Business Awards by being the leading centre in Newcastle.

The staff attended a night at the Belmont 16 Footers where the announcement was made. The journey has been an exciting time for Wickham, and the girls would like to honour the many, many staff and pioneers from the community that set the foundation for our preschools. Without the foresight, passion and vision from those pioneers, these opportunities would not be available for us today.

2.NT :  Malabam Health Board and Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation will each receive $742,000 over three years to lead local pilot programs to target Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD).

The Government has funded nearly $4.5 million to eliminate the RHD, with more than 6,000 Indigenous people living with the painful and prolonged disease.

Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion, said the expansion of the Rheumatic Fever Strategy would include practical environmental health hygiene activities and intensive health promotion measures to help combat both acute rheumatic fever and the associated RHD.

Originally published here

Picture above : LIFE THREATENING: Liddywoo Mardi, 15, after open-heart surgery at Royal Children’s Melbourne. Picture: CDU.

“RHD and acute rheumatic fever take scores of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander lives each year, including young people who never get a chance to reach their full potential,” Minister Scullion said.

Malabam Health Board and Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation will each receive $742,000 over three years to lead local pilot programs to combat RHD.

​“Malabam Health Board will cover Maningrida and Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation will focus on the Yirrkala and Millingimbi communities in East Arnhem Land,” Minister Scullion said.

“Our Government recognises the vital role local Aboriginal Medical Services play in their community and we believe these organisations are vital to averting new cases of this preventable disease.” he said.

Minister Scullion said the new programs will help support the Roadmap to Eliminate Rheumatic Heart Disease, which is currently being developed.

“Through this roadmap and the guidance of key stakeholders and experts, we will eliminate this disease and improve the health and living conditions of thousands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now and into the future,” Minister Scullion said.

“The Government is making a significant investment in RHD prevention, allocating $23.6 million to the Rheumatic Fever Strategy over the next four years.

“The strategy supports state and territory-based programs to register, manage and control acute rheumatic fever and RHD.”

RHD is caused by repeated bouts of acute rheumatic fever, damaging the heart valves, which is an auto-immune reaction to untreated throat and skin infections.

Poor living conditions contribute to these infections making rheumatic fever more likely.

3.ACT : Australian first as major steps taken in realising Winnunga ACCHO  Model of Care at AMC

I want to congratulate the Minister for his courage and confidence in supporting Winnunga to be autonomous in the AMC.

This is ground-breaking for an Aboriginal Community Controlled health service to be afforded an opportunity to deliver our holistic model of care in a corrections facility. I hope Health Ministers in other States and the NT are watching this space, and that they engage with the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector to give Aboriginal detainees a choice of service provider in correctional facilities, and follow Minister Rattenbury’s lead.

I want to thank Dr Nadeem Siddiqui ED Clinical Services for the care and support that he and the Winnunga team provided to Narelle King and her family in difficult circumstances.

We should never forget that the Moss Review was commissioned by the Minister to review the care and treatment of Steven Freeman who was severely assaulted in AMC in 2015. I know that Narelle King (Steven’s mother) doesn’t want any other mother to ever go through the heartache and pain that her and her family have suffered since the assault ” 

Ms Julie Tongs OAM, Chief Executive Officer Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS)

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) was joined today by ACT Corrective Services and Canberra Health Services, coming together to mark to another major milestone towards a second 24 hour health service for detainees.

In an Australian first, a holistic Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health provider is being integrated into a correctional environment. Holistic health care refers to the physical, emotional, social and cultural wellbeing of an individual.

Under the Model of Care, holistic 24 hour 7 day a week Winnunga Health Services will be made available to all detainees in the Alexander Maconochie Centre (AMC).

Since ACT Health and WNAHCS signed a contract on 22 June 2018 for service delivery, a senior governance forum has been established to oversee the implementation of the Model. Recruitment and transition planning is progressing between ACT Health and Winnunga.

The Model of Care is the ACT Government’s response to Recommendation 5 of the Moss Review, that “Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service be integrated into the provision of health care at the AMC in order to introduce its holistic model of care to Indigenous detainees.”

Planning for a new AMC Hume Health Centre is also underway, which would house both Justice Health and WNAHCS. This building is due to be completed in the 2020 financial year.

Comments attributable to Minister for Justice and Corrections Shane Rattenbury:

“The ACT Government is committed to working in partnership with the community to ensure that we have the right services and support in place to provide holistic health support to detainees at the AMC.

“I thank Julie Tongs for her leadership in progressing the Model of Care, as well as acknowledge the work of Winnunga staff in providing holistic health services.

“I would also like acknowledge staff from ACT Corrective Services and Canberra Health Services, in realising this next major step in the Model of Care at the AMC.

“Reducing the overrepresentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the correctional system requires adopting best-practice models, and I look forward to seeing the successes of the Winnunga Model of Care over time.”

4.VIC : The Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Op and Barwon Health co-fund Koorie Birth Suite inclusive space for Geelong’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community

WHEN new mum Simone Lucas gave birth to Ryleah-Jayne recently she felt relaxed and at home.

Being surrounded by indigenous paintings helped Ms Lucas connect with her Wathaurong heritage.

Ms Lucas was the first Aboriginal woman to give birth at Geelong hospital’s culturally inclusive Koorie Birth Suite.

Orginally published HERE 

Picture above : Simone Lucas, centre, with one week old Ryleah-Jane in the new birthing suite with artist Ammie Howell, left and elder Aunty Naomi Surtees. Picture: Alison Wyn

The suite, named Darrabarruk Pupup, meaning new baby, is part of an initiative to improve Barwon Health’s maternity experience for Geelong’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

Barwon Health chief operating officer Amanda Cameron said 53 indigenous babies were born at the hospital last financial year with higher numbers expected in the future.

“The Aboriginal community’s input and decision making has assured the development is the most culturally appropriate and safe environment for our maternity patients and their families,” she said.

Ms Lucas said the suite was excellent and welcoming.

“They didn’t have this suite the first time I gave birth,” Ms Lucas said.

“Just noting that it was culturally appropriate made it relaxing.”

Aunty Naomi Surtees said the opening of the suite was an important moment that would hopefully promote better health among the wider community and assist in closing the gap between indigenous and non-indigenous health.

“It’s a very big moment. My children were born here, and my grandchildren … it’s a very empowering moment,” Ms Surtees said.

“We needed to have a room of our own, a place where women felt comfortable … with spirits around them and on the walls protecting them.”

Ms Surtees said for women who are on their own, the room is their protection.

“It is very breathtaking, a safe area they can birth their children,” she said.

5.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO hosted a youth camp for the community of Hopevale on Cape York 

Twenty-five teenagers between the ages of twelve and seventeen, participated in the five day event school holiday event

Activities at the camp included, kup murri and collecting fresh water mussels, sing alongs and motivational games and activities.

Across the week there were visits from other agencies and services to explain what they do and how they can support the kids.

The aim of the camp was to help build relationships and trust with the group and let them know that Apunipima is here to support them.

5.2 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Dentist receives highest accolade for dental surgeons 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited Dental Officer, Dr Manjunath Rajashekhar has been recognised by the highest dental body in Australia, Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons at a ceremony in Adelaide.

The Cairns based Wuchopperen Dentist says being recognised by his peers is deeply heartening and provides a platform for continuous professional development.

“It was a great honour to be accepted as a member into the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons. Being a part of such a prestigious organisation is a great opportunity to continue to improve our dental services, and ensure we are offering best-practice dental healthcare in line with the international industry,” says Dr Manjunath.

Dr Manjunath has a great passion for dentistry and believes prevention is the key to achieving positive outcomes for clients.

“We have been able to develop a great dentistry practice here at Wuchopperen, as we have integrated dental health into general health checks. It is a lot easier to work with a client to establish healthy dental practices than treat a client when it is too late,” says Dr Manjunath.

Dania Ahwang, Wuchopperen CEO says the recognition of Dr Manjunath is well deserved and highlights the key impact Dr Manjunath has had on the provision of dental healthcare to the Cairns and surrounding districts’ Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

“We are very lucky to have Dr Manjunath here at Wuchopperen working with and for our community.  His passion and commitment to improving the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is exactly what we need in the community controlled health sector.

Prior to Dr Manjunath joining our team we were unable to integrate dental health into our holistic health care model as seamlessly as we do now. He, and our entire dental team have worked tirelessly with our clients to create positive change in their lives,” says Dania.

Wuchopperen provides a wide variety of dental services to our current clients including information sessions on preventative practices to keep teeth healthy.

6. WA : AHCWA Congratulations to the participants that completed our 2 day, Birds & the BBV’s training course 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health ACCHO NEWS : @KenWyattMP announces 25 Aboriginal health services to undertake facility upgrades and repairs worth $2.7 million with funding from the Service Maintenance Program

 ” Twenty-five Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services across the nation are undertaking facility upgrades and repairs, thanks to more than $2.7 million in funding from the Service Maintenance Program.

The funds have been allocated to improve the safety and accessibility of services in the Northern Territory, Western Australia, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania.

This includes vital support for clinics, accommodation and associated facilities, so staff can continue delivering comprehensive primary health care to First Nations people that is culturally appropriate and best practice.”

Minister Ken Wyatt Press Release

Download full list of projects funded 

2017-18 SMP – Full ACCHO list

Our Government has given priority to services seeking urgent repairs and maintenance, especially facilities based in remote and very remote areas.

Significant projects include:

    • Urgent security and safety upgrades to the Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation’s Men’s Health Clinic in Tennant Creek to include duress alarms and swipe cards
    • Improving cultural appropriateness, safety and access at the Dhauwurd-Wurrung Portland and District Aboriginal Elderly Citizens Inc. clinic
    • Extending phlebotomy clean rooms at the Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation and the Maari Ma Health Aboriginal Corporation to allow immediate testing of children’s lead and iron levels

The Service Maintenance Program – part of the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program (IAHP) – supports the improvement of health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through better access to health services.

Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation
Broome Regional Aboriginal Medical Service
Condobolin Aboriginal Health Service Inc.
Coonamble Aboriginal Health Service Limited
Derby Aboriginal Health Service Council Aboriginal Corporation
Dhauwurd-Wurrung Portland and District Aboriginal Elderly Citizens Inc
Goondir Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Corporation for Health Services
Griffith Aboriginal Medical Service Inc
Gundutjmara Aboriginal Cooperative Ltd
Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation
Indigenous Wellbeing Centre Ltd
Laynhapuy Homelands Aboriginal Corporation
Maari Ma Health Aboriginal Corporation
Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation
Nganampa Health Council Inc
Orange Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (OAMS)
Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Service (OVAHS)
Paupiyala Tjuratja Aboriginal Corporation
Pintupi Homelands Health Service Aboriginal Corporation
Pius X Aboriginal Corporation
Ramahyuck District Aboriginal Corporation
South East Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation
Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation
Tobwabba Aboriginal Medical Service
Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service Ltd

Under the IAHP, we are committed to providing First Nations people with access to quality, comprehensive and culturally appropriate primary health care.

In the recent Budget, our Government announced $3.9 billion over four years to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, an increase of approximately four per cent per year.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories :#NACCHOAgm2018 Program launched #VIC @VACCHO_org @VAHS1972 @DeadlyChoices #NSW #Armidale ACCHO #QLD #GidgeeHealing #NT @AMSANTaus #WA @TheAHCWA #SA @AHCSA

1.1 National Resources : News ASIC MoneySmart video series designed to help our mob with money worries

1.2 National  Survey : Indigenous researchers and strengthening health research capabilities

2.1 VIC : Self-determination key to Close the Gap in VAAF says VACCHO

2.2 VIC : VAHS ACCHO Deadly Choices was at the 2018 Victorian Aboriginal State-wide Junior Football/Netball Carnival in Echuca promoting healthy messages 

3.QLD : Gidgee Healing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service enters agreement to overcome barriers to better health in Queensland’s Lower Gulf

4.NSW : Armidale Aboriginal Health Service encourages Indigenous artwork / cultural  “ graffiti “ from kids

5.NT  : Safer Communities: Boosting Youth Programs Grants of up to $20,000 each are available for community projects or initiatives aimed at preventing substance misuse by our Territory youth.

6 . WA : AHCWA Federal Member for Perth, the Hon Patrick Gorman visits the Aboriginal Health Council of WA

7. SA :  AHCSA’s ‘Shedding the Smokes’ program up at Kingoonya, SA. Great mob from Yalata, Coober Pedy, Ceduna & Adelaide spending time together

 

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

Download the Interim Draft Program released 1 October 

NACCHO 7 Page Conference Program 2018_v3

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.1 National : News ASIC MoneySmart video series designed to help our mob with money worries

Watch No 1

Watch No 2

The Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) has produced two new MoneySmart videos for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people that explain how to:

  • Sort out money problems – Follow the journey of Lisa, who is struggling to stay on top of her bills and seeks help from a financial counsellor. Lisa shows there’s no shame in asking for help if you’re struggling to pay your bills.
  • Deal with family pressure about money – Uncle Charlie gets a big payment and is pressured by family to help them out with this money. Charlie helps his family realise he needs to make his money last so he has money for them when they really need it.

Why ASIC created these videos

ASIC has a dedicated Indigenous Outreach Program (IOP) which aims to increase Indigenous Australians’ financial knowledge, and improve the financial services provided to them.

These videos were created after the IOP spoke to people in Indigenous communities who said they felt shame about facing their debt problems and did not know where to go for help.

They also said they were struggling to deal with pressure from family and friends when it came to managing and sharing money.

How can you help?

Share these videos with as many people as possible, in urban, regional and remote communities. The videos can be played in medical centres, local community or resource centres, and community stores.

Please also share this email with your network.

If you have any questions about the videos, please callASIC’s Indigenous Helpline on 1300 365 957 or email feedback@moneysmart.gov.au.

1.2 National  Survey : Indigenous researchers and strengthening health research capabilities

Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders conducting health research and/or are completing a course/degree on health research are invited to take part in a research study reviewing progress of the research workforce.

Participation involves a survey on experiences of research training, work transitions and views on strategies for strengthening research capabilities.

The project is led by Aboriginal academics at the Melbourne Poche Centre for Indigenous Health and funded by The Lowitja Institute. Findings will inform further expanding and strengthening of the Indigenous health researcher workforce, a critical avenue to better health outcomes for communities.

Participants will receive a $30 book gift voucher. For more information and to access the survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VZMFYJP

2.1 VIC : Self-determination key to Close the Gap in VAAF says VACCHO

The principles of self-determination are a welcome and integral part of the Victorian Government’s new Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework 2018-2023 (VAAF), according to the peak body for Aboriginal health and wellbeing in Victoria.

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) Acting CEO Trevor Pearce said the new VAAF was more progressive than previous Aboriginal affairs policies.

Picture above Acting CEO Trevor Pearce Thanks Njernda ACCHO for hosting the VACCHO Members Meeting in Echuca this week, and for this beautiful Message Stick.

“Self-determination is proven to be a fundamental part of Closing the Gap for Aboriginal people, with its strong link to improved health and wellbeing outcomes,” Mr Pearce said. “So we are really pleased to see it recognised for its importance and threaded throughout the new VAAF.

“We’re also really pleased to see the elimination of systemic racism and structural barriers highlighted in this VAAF.

“We look forward to VACCHO being a part of the implementation of this VAAF through the promised   Aboriginal-led evaluation and review mechanism.”

Mr Pearce said it was pleasing to see a holistic approach to Aboriginal health and wellbeing taken in the VAAF. However, he said it was disappointing that the importance of Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations (ACCOs) was not highlighted in the Health and Wellbeing domain of the document.

“ACCOs being community-controlled organisations is a key part of self-determination, and we wanted to see that emphasised in the VAAF’s Health and Wellbeing domain,” Mr Pearce said.

“Community-controlled health organisations have been running successfully since the1970s and they deserve respect and recognition of what they have achieved and will continue to do so.

“We did raise this during the VAAF consultation process, and we hope not including the importance of ACCOs in the Health and Wellbeing domain was an oversight that will be addressed.”

Mr Pearce said he hoped future plans such as VAAFs would have ten-year lifespans to map further into the future and achieve more beyond political cycles.

“There’s a lot happening in Victoria right now with Treaty and this VAAF and other plans and priorities, which is great,” he said.

“And then we have the Uluru Statement from the Heart and the Redfern Statement on a national level, so we need to get beyond talking and start working on making these things happen.

“Here at VACCHO we want to do everything we can to make change and improve the health and social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of our mobs. We can Close the Gap if we work together.”

2.2 VIC : VAHS ACCHO Deadly Choices was at the 2018 Victorian Aboriginal State-wide Junior Football/Netball Carnival in Echuca promoting healthy messages 

VAHS was there supporting the event to be Smoke-Free and promoting the message & benefits that our “Boorais & Smoke Don’t Mix!”

Thanks to everyone who didnt smoke at the event.

3.QLD : Gidgee Healing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service enters agreement to overcome barriers to better health in Queensland’s Lower Gulf

An agreement between Queensland Health’s North West Hospital and Health Service, Gidgee Healing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service and Western Queensland Primary Health Network aims to better meet the health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the Lower Gulf.

Picture above : Dallas Leon, CEO of Gidgee Healing, Paul Woodhouse, Chair of NWHHS, Stuart Gordon, Chief Executive of WQPHN, Lisa Davies Jones, Chief Executive of NWHHS, Shaun Solomon, Chair of Gidgee Healing, Sheilagh Cronin, Chair of WQPHN, and Jacqui Thomson from Queensland Health visited the three Lower Gulf communities earlier this year

The Lower Gulf Strategy will integrate the health system at every level. It will allow Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to participate in decision making affecting their health, and ensure health services are structured around the needs of the individual, family and community. There will be a strong focus on preventive health care and encouraging healthy lifestyles.

The Lower Gulf Strategy will provide comprehensive primary care to the three Lower Gulf communities of Mornington Island, Doomadgee and Normanton, as well as seamless referral pathways for specialist care.

Gidgee Healing, as a regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, will lead change through a greater community-controlled model of care, and will provide greater cultural integrity within programs and services.

Implemented late last year, the Lower Gulf Strategy aims to: reduce chronic disease among the Mornington Island, Doomadgee and Normanton communities and prevent young people getting chronic disease; transition Community Health Services to community control (Gidgee Healing); improve access to child and maternal health services; improve access to mental health and substance abuse services, particularly for children and youth; and increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff employed in the health services in these three communities.

The North West Hospital and Health Service has been working with the Western Queensland Primary Health Network and Gidgee Healing to provide comprehensive primary care. On Mornington Island, Gidgee Healing is co-located with the Hospital and Health Service at Mornington Island Hospital.

In Doomadgee, the two services are also co-located. In both locations they are squeezed for space. In Normanton, Gidgee is located at its own health hub in town, but the two teams work closely together. With a greater emphasis on primary care and disease prevention in the three communities, the teams have developed new ways of working.

Key features of the model are partnerships across the health continuum with patients, family/carers and care teams; customised care around patient goals; and working with local providers to best care for patients’ needs. It promotes flexible team based care supported by a shared workforce, central care coordination, access to health literacy and self-management, and sharing of information.

Challenges are real but surmountable. More clinical services space is needed in Doomadgee and Mornington Island. The main entrance to health services needs to be in primary care, as our focus is on prevention and primary care. There is very limited staff accommodation in Doomadgee and Mornington Island. The two services are working together to source capital funding to improve the infrastructure.

Early indicators of success in all three locations are the increasing numbers attending Gidgee Healing for primary health care and a subsequent drop in presentations to the hospital. This signals that the focus on primary and preventive health care is resonating with the communities. People are seeking health services earlier and more regularly, rather than waiting until their conditions are chronic or acute before seeking help.

Staff in the three organisations are working together to overcome the barriers to better health outcomes for the people they serve.

4.NSW : Armidale Aboriginal Health Service encourages Indigenous artwork / cultural  “ graffiti “ from kids

Everything that they do here is based on Aboriginal culture and about mixing in with other kids in town to learn a little bit more. It’s an opportunity for kids to come together and have a bit of fun with Aboriginal culture.”

The cultural activity was teaching the children about being positive, and was also a great confidence builder.

“The program we manage is all about that. It’s like an early intervention and prevention approach about doing positive things and respecting their elders and their parents,” she said.

“We want them to know that this place is theirs, so we decided to do the two murals. You know? They can come in and show mum and dad, nan and pop and uncle and aunt. These are so much more than just paintings on the walls.

Program co-ordinator Cynthia Briggs

FROM HERE 

A group of children participating in an Aboriginal Youth Program managed through the Armidale Aboriginal Health Service painted two external, bare, cement walls at the Pat Dixon Centre with murals of traditional artwork on Wednesday morning.

Work was supervised by Glen Innes artist Lloyd Hornsby, who said the mixture of colours the children decided to use was not an easy mix to apply, and they had done some really good work to bring them all together.

Program co-ordinator Cynthia Briggs said Wednesday was the second day of organised cultural activities for Aboriginal youth in Armidale that is run by the service every school holidays.

“We got an Aboriginal artist Lloyd Hornsby to direct the children in the designs that are on the murals,” Cynthia said.

“They were really plain walls and we’ve turned then into something that the kids can call their own, and that was the idea.

5.NT  : Safer Communities: Boosting Youth Programs Grants of up to $20,000 each are available for community projects or initiatives aimed at preventing substance misuse by our Territory youth.

 

The Territory Labor Government is investing in our youth and creating safer communities by providing grants through the 2019 Alcohol and Other Drugs Youth Grants Program.

Grants of up to $20,000 each are available for community projects or initiatives aimed at preventing substance misuse by our Territory youth.

Applications must demonstrate how the proposed project relates to the National Drug Strategy 2017-2023 and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Drug Strategy 2014-2019

Northern Territory based incorporated organisations or community groups are eligible to apply.

Grants will be provided by the Northern Territory Government through the Department of Health’s Mental Health, Alcohol and Other Drugs Branch.

A total of $280,000 is available to be awarded this round.

Visit www.health.nt.gov.au for further information, eligibility criteria, and to submit applications, or phone 8999 2691.

Applications for the grants close 5 November 2018.

Comments attributable to Minister for Health, Natasha Fyles:

The Territory Labor Government is putting children first and creating safer communities through a range of grants available, designed to prevent substance abuse.

The CLP cut a range of youth programs when they were in government, leading to the issues which we are now dealing with.

The Alcohol and Other Drugs Youth Grants Program delivers on the Territory Labor Government’s promise to reinstate funding for activities aimed at reducing the impact of youth substance misuse.

These include

  • Awareness raising and education projects for young people that promote healthy choices and activities,
  • Sporting, cultural and community events that enhance young people’s level of connectedness that builds resilience,
  • Activities which support young people to develop skills and learn, and;
  • Projects that work with young people to reduce alcohol consumption during pregnancy and raise awareness about Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

The Territory Labor Government will continue to invest in our youth and promote a better lifestyle to ensure they are engaged and are given every opportunity to become law abiding adults.

6 . WA : AHCWA Federal Member for Perth, the Hon Patrick Gorman visits the Aboriginal Health Council of WA

As the newly elected Federal Member for Perth, the Hon Patrick Gorman visited the Aboriginal Health Council of WA yesterday to meet the staff, tour the facilities and learn about the valuable work we do to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people across WA.

7. SA :  AHCSA’s ‘Shedding the Smokes’ program up at Kingoonya, SA. Great mob from Yalata, Coober Pedy, Ceduna & Adelaide spending time together

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : #NSW @Galambila ACCHO Keynote at #NATSIHWAsym18 #QLD @Apunipima #NT @MiwatjHealth #VIC Wathaurong ACCHO

1.National : Australian Digital Health Agency has produced a My Health Record animation for ACCHOs that has been translated into 13 different languages

2. NSW : Keynote at #NATSIHWAsym2018 Creating Value at Galambila ACCHO Aboriginal Health Service

3. QLD : The Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Social Emotional Wellbeing Team Walk to Raise Awareness of Mental Health

4.NT : Miwatj ACCHO Tackling Indigenous Smoking  Team were invited by Yalu to join a camp out at Ŋayawili Outstation

5. VIC : Aboriginal Community Health and Fitness Challenge comes to Wathaurong ACCHO

6.WA : Not good news : As PM Scott Morrison abandons WA’s remote communities

 

Download the Interim Draft Program released 1 October 

NACCHO 7 Page Conference Program 2018_v3

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.National : Australian Digital Health Agency has produced a My Health Record animation for ACCHOs that has been translated into 13 different languages:

Watch Translation 

  • Yolngu matha (NT – Arnhem Land)
  • Pitjanytjatjarra  (NT, SA and WA – APY Lands)
  • Arrernte (NT – Central desert)
  • Warlpiri (NT – Central desert)
  • Gurindji Kriol (NT – North/central west region)
  • Roper River Kriol (NT – North/central east region)
  • Tiwi (NT – Tiwi Islands)
  • Murrinh Patha  (NT – Port Keats region)
  • Kunwinjku (NT – Arnhem Land)
  • Alyawarr (NT – Central desert)
  • Anindilyakwa (NT – Groote Eylandt)
  • Pintupi Luritja (NT, WA – APY Lands)
  • Burarra (NT – Arnhem Land)

You can check them out here 

2. NSW : Keynote at #NATSIHWAsym2018 Creating Value at Galambila ACCHO Aboriginal Health Service

 ” No matter where I worked, there were cultural clashes that caused division in workplaces especially in Aboriginal Affairs because of the risk factor politically and socially”

Kristine Garrett CEO Galambila ACCHO is from Central Queensland with ancestral ties to the Wulli Wulli and the Darumbal people of the region and was a keynote speaker for NATSIHWA Professional Development Symposium 2018, ‘Engaging our Workforce’, the focus was on upskilling  Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops

Originally Published Indigenous X

For most of my career I have travelled up and down the east coast of Australia doing different jobs. At the age of 27 I was living and working on the Block in Redfern. I was there when the Eora Centre (back then it was the Visual and Performing College) was just being built. They were radical times – one Radio Redfern Tagline ‘The Station that make your Black Hearts Burn’. Nostalgic I know but, them were the days.

In 2013 I was fortunate to be offered the CEO Position at Galambila in Coffs Harbour New South Wales. As someone from off-country, and a Murrie to boot, you have to work hard on community and kinship protocols.

No matter what age you have to walk the culture path, be humble, pay respect to elders, ask where you can or cannot go and ask what community want to see at their organisation. Sometimes it is something very simple like offering a cup of tea.

Building rapport is sometimes based on unwritten codes – we are still oral people and so much is dependant on what we say and do; or we do what we say. Some family groups already knew me from the Redfern days or had ways of finding out about me. So my transition was slow and I really wanted to gain an insight into the community and the organisation.

No matter where I worked, there were cultural clashes that caused division in workplaces especially in Aboriginal Affairs because of the risk factor politically and socially. Sometimes subtle organisational norms, other times quite blatant practices bordering on racism, and sometimes we as Aboriginal people are too accepting of the racial overtones.

My observations at Galambila that initially bio-medical constructs dominated the culture of our organisation and it caused tension across into other areas. Our Aboriginal workforce are from the community so they faced the same social disadvantage, sometimes they are the only income of the extended family, at times they cannot pay bills, they face violence and as a CEO I too carry a cultural load..

What occurs when tensions are driven from multiple identities; bio-medical, political, social and individualised, it becomes unclear what we stand for as an organisation.

We face those tensions today especially relating to Traditional Medicine. Even today I continue with my debate about traditional medicine; we can place a bowl of Apples on the reception table and say ‘this is good for you’ and yet we can’t say the same for Wattle Tree Tea, Sarsprilla Vine or even my go to herb native Gumbi Gumbi.

Is it that they haven’t been studied? Or is it because they haven’t been grafted and commercialised? I am yet to find the answer so I continue to stimulate the conversation.

The World Health Organisation has established guidelines for alternative approaches, acupuncture etc and we are sometimes too slow to capitalise on our opportunities. It becomes a resourcing issue always doing the urgent rather than the important things.

Major changes were introduced in 2014 at Galambila. The Aboriginal Workforce moved to front-line services, it didn’t matter whether the workers were drivers, facility maintenance workers, receptionist, admin, doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Board members, community members or other key stakeholders everybody could have a say.

The challenge was we were no closer to knowing what we stood for as an organisation. We needed a framework to bind all the differencing of opinions to identify our true essence of what we say and do.

Through a quality framework ‘Yiidagay Darundaygu’ (Gumbaynggir Language ‘Always becoming good for a Purpose’). The Cultural Integrity was formed and we are still working on it today.

Giinagay is hello in Gumbaynggir Language – our Board were the real drivers to the introduction of Gumbaynggir Language across the organisation as it provides a connection, automatically when you engage with Galambila you are part of something wonderful.

Galambila’s Image is paramount we are no longer known as Gamin-billa, our business is to care and sometimes that is as simple as a smile when you walk into the Clinic, offering a cup of tea.  Laughter is the sweet sound of success not forgetting Galambila is also a place where we can cry. Giinagay is hello in Gumbaynggir Language – our Board were the real drivers to the introduction of Gumbaynggir Language across the organisation as it provides a connection, automatically when you engage with Galambila you are part of something wonderful.

What has been an unexpected benefit to our approach, has been Galambila serving an active Aboriginal Clients demographic representing 87% of the Aboriginal population on the Coffs Coast.  Our medicare income has tripled over 4 years. To lead collectively is a willingness to dream for the same things. With a stable Board of Directors, fantastic management, solid staff and loyalty to our community anything is possible – but be warned it is a lot of hard bloody work.

Awesome address by Tyson Morris who started at Galambila Health Service with no qualifications. He now has a Cert 4 in Fitness and completed his clinical training. Galambila is all about up skilling and providing training and study for all their Health Workers.

 

3. QLD : The Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Social Emotional Wellbeing Team Walk to Raise Awareness of Mental Health

Conquer the Corrugations – Cape York Mental Health Awareness Walk, has just completed its fourth annual walk from Coen to Archer River in Cape York and Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima) were proud sponsors and participants in this year’s event.

Completed over two days, walkers and horse riders, complete the 42 kilometres from Coen to Archer River Roadhouse, camping overnight, just beyond the halfway point on a cattle station.

The 2018 event marks the third year that Maureen Liddy, Apunipima’s Social Emotional Wellbeing Team Leader in Coen has completed the challenge. This year she led a team of Apunipima staff from Coen and Cairns in their first Conquer the Corrugations walk.

“The walk is a good way to demonstrate that with determination we can overcome and achieve anything.” Maureen said.

“It’s important to raise the awareness of mental health in the Cape and this event does a great job getting the message out.” Said Maureen.

Maureen said that even though the event was both a physical and mental challenge, there was support each step of the way from fellow walkers and the organisers.

“People really come together to cheer each other on, give a hug if it’s needed or simply listen to your story while you walk. Often that is all you need to do to help someone whose mental health is suffering.” Maureen added.

Emma Jackson one of the organisers of Conquer the Corrugations, said that the walk was a way to demonstrate that life is a series of ups and downs, just like the corrugations in a dirt road.

“There may be down times, but there will also be up times and if we save one life, if we help one person get the help they need, the event is a success.” Emma said.

“The reason that I am so passionate about this event, is because I want my children to know that it is OK to not be OK all of the time, and to know that there is always someone you can talk to about how you are feeling.” Emma added.

Rachel McIvor and Randall Fyfe, from Apunipima Social Emotional Wellbeing (SEWB) Centre in Coen were the backbone of the team ensuring that the Apunipima walkers did not need to worry about a chair, or bed at the end of the long days over the long weekend. Rachel also participated on the second day by walking hand in hand with each member of the team across the line in true team spirit.

Maureen’s passion for the event and her determination to walk the entire distance this year, won her the people’s choice award “Spirit of the Walk.” The final 19 kilometres of the walk Maureen completed in socks and thongs, because of the large blisters she developed on day one. That is the spirit of the walk!

“I may be a bit stiff and sore, but I’ll be back next year.”

We have no doubt that Maureen will be one of the first to register for the 2019 Conquer the Corrugations and her infectious enthusiasm will ensure that Apunipima is well represented at next year’s event.

4.NT : Miwatj ACCHO Tackling Indigenous Smoking  Team were invited by Yalu to join a camp out at Ŋayawili Outstation.

Last week, Glen, Oscar and Tarlissa from the Miwatj TIS Team were invited by Yalu to join a camp out at Ŋayawili Outstation.

Our TIS team provided a lot of education on the harmful effects of smoking and the long-term consequences. #StartTheJourney #MiwatjHealth

 

5. VIC : Aboriginal Community Health and Fitness Challenge comes to Wathaurong ACCHO 

 Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative is proud to be launching I Dare Ya!, a free Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing program for the Geelong Community.

With six weeks, six ‘Deadly Dares’ and six fun workouts to challenge yourself and one grouse piece of merchandise up for grabs, I Dare Ya is the most fun you’ll ever have shaking up your health and wellbeing!

Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative invites the Geelong Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community to join in I Dare Ya. Learn from Health Professionals about how to create sustainable change, be inspired by motivational speakers who have turned their health around and meet new people on the journey to living their most deadly and healthy lives.

I Dare Ya is a localized and culturally based health promotion program that addresses the growing rates of physical inactivity, obesity and chronic disease in the Aboriginal Community but is the one behavior change program they can’t wait to be apart of!

“With over 50 registrations already, it is the whole of Community and after hours approach that is driving the successful uptake of I Dare Ya” says Laura Thompson, a Gunditjmara woman and managing director of Spark Health.

Each week we will take on a different topic to help us reach our goals before getting moving. We have something for every fitness level. It doesn’t matter if you’re just starting out or running marathons – we’ve got you covered!

Registrations are open for I Dare Ya and more information can be found at

https://sparkhealth.com.au/pages/i-dare-ya

Week One of I Dare Ya kicks off on Thursday 11th October at Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative (62 Morgan Street, North Geelong VIC 3215).

The Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Op are excited to be partnering with Spark Health to launch I Dare Ya in Geelong. “We are proud to offer innovative opportunities for our Community to come together to be healthy, strong and deadly role models. We can’t wait to see everyone there!

  • Free Six Week Health and Wellbeing Program at Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative (62 Morgan Street, Geelong North)
  • Dates: Thursday 11th October to Thursday 15th November 2018.
  • Six Weeks, Six Deadly Dares, Six Fun Workouts, One piece of grouse merch!
  • Registrations now open: www.surveymonkey.com/r/iDareYa
  • Kids welcome, families encouraged to come together.

About Spark Health:

Spark Health is an Aboriginal-led health promotion, Aboriginal Community engagement and communications social enterprise who are experts in designing engaging and innovative Community based programs that add years to peoples’ lives.

At Spark, we are excited about health and believe in the change and ripple effect of a healthy lifestyle in closing the gap.

www.sparkhealth.com.au

About Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative:

The Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-operative Ltd was formed by the community in 1978 to support the social, economic, and cultural development of Aboriginal people, particularly within the Geelong and surrounding areas.

The Co-operative provides a range of services including; family and community services, support to young people, justice support services; cultural heritage services, and health services.  The Co-operative expanded to include a Community Controlled Health Service, which contributes toward addressing the inequality in health status of Aboriginal people. The Wathaurong Health Service supports the general well-being of Aboriginal people by providing holistic health care with clinical and primary care services as well as health promoting activities. Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-operative Ltd is the largest employer of Aboriginal people within the Geelong region.

www.wathaurong.org.au

6.WA : Not good news : As PM Scott Morrison abandons WA’s remote communities

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s obstinate defence of the Commonwealth Government’s axing of funding to support about 165 remote communities in Western Australia, illustrates his indifference for some of Australia’s most vulnerable people.

Housing Minister Peter Tinley was responding to the Prime Minister’s assertion today that support for remote housing is purely a State responsibility, following the expiration of a $1.2 billion, 10-year joint funding agreement between the Commonwealth and WA on June 30.

The Commonwealth has a 50-year history of supporting remote communities – many of which were established in WA as a result of Federal Government policy.

Under the terms of the former agreement, the Commonwealth contributed about $100 million annually to support the approximately 12,000 people living in 165 remote communities in WA.

The State Government’s annual contribution totals almost $90 million to support and maintain the nation’s most distributed population.

The WA Government has been trying to negotiate a new long-term funding agreement but the Commonwealth has consistently indicated it wants to walk away from any further involvement in funding WA’s remote communities.

Comments attributed to Housing Minister Peter Tinley:

“Premier Mark McGowan wrote to then PM Malcolm Turnbull in May this year to try to gain an agreed outcome to negotiations for a new long-term deal to support remote communities.

“He never got a reply. So last month he wrote to the new PM, Mr Morrison, reiterating the State’s position and asking for his personal intervention to resolve the issue. He is still to receive a reply to that letter.

“Yet today, we see the PM waltzing around Perth declaring that support for vulnerable Western Australians is no longer in the interests of the Commonwealth and that remote housing funding is purely a State responsibility.

“Walking away from a long-term funding agreement for remote communities will leave a $400 million hole in WA’s forward estimates and abandon thousands of Western Australians to further distress.”

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories #AustPH2018 #UluruStatement : #SA @Nganampa_Health @DeadlyChoices @NunkuYunti #NT @CaaCongress @DanilaDilba #QLD #Goolburri ACCHO @Wuchopperen #NSW @AHMRC #VIC #Treaty #WA @TheAHCWA

1.1 : PM told by his Indigenous advisory council that a proposed “voice” to parliament should be established as a matter of priority

1.2 : NACCHO Executive team meets with Minister Ken Wyatt and AMA President Tony Bartone 

2.SA : Nganampa Health Council ACCHO Tackling Indigenous smoking  at APY Lands school sports day.

2.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO and the Tackling Tobacco Team at the CATSINaM conference at the Hilton Hotel Adelaide.

3.1 NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs : The NT is putting a minimum floor price on alcohol, because evidence shows this works to reduce harm

3.2 : NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin staff out at Palmerston Indigenous Village doing Men’s Health Screenings.

4 .1 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Cairns Supports Next Generation of Doctors

4.2 QLD : Ministers & Director General visit Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement

5 NSW : AHMRC Message Stick Newsletter launched 

6. VIC :  Keeping The Victorian Aboriginal Community At The Heart Of Treaty

7. WA : AHCWA For dialysis in remote communities, kidney disease patients can now be treated closer to Country.

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 : PM told by his Indigenous advisory council that a proposed “voice” to parliament should be established as a matter of priority

 “Scott Morrison has been told by his Indigenous advisory council that a proposed “voice” to parliament should be established as a matter of priority, that it must be free from the whims of the political cycle and should ­draw on existing governance structures such as land councils and the ­national ­Aboriginal health ­network (NACCHO) .” 

From the Australian 27 September

The council’s co-chairs, ­Andrea Mason and Roy Ah-See, have told the Prime Minister of “an urgent need to future-proof our place in this nation” — a reference to establishing the advisory body by referendum in the Con­stitution so that it cannot be ­summarily disbanded by the ­government of the day.

The submission to the parliamentary committee highlights the ­discredited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, which was ­disbanded by the ­Howard government in 2005.

The submission suggests that the ATSIC, along with the current National Congress for Australia’s First Peoples, could be used as the basis for structuring a new body.

It says while ATSIC “developed, supported and empowered the emergence of a critical mass of … public administrators, equipped to navigate the machinery of government”, its demise could “largely be attributed to personalities ­rather than principles or the intent of the organisation”.

It accuses politicians of having “generated confusion within the Australian public” on the role of a voice when it took centre place in last year’s Uluru Statement ­from the Heart as the only form of ­constitutional recognition that would satisfy indigenous ­Australians.

The submission cites Mark Leibler — who ­­co-chaired the Referendum Council — and constitutional law experts Anne Twomey and ­George Williams as having ­“rejected the suggestion that a voice would intrude on ­parliamentary sovereignty”.

Mr Morrison said on ABC radio yesterday morning that the voice would constitute a “third ­chamber” of parliament — a characterisation that has been dismissed by experts, ­including the lawyers cited in the submission.

The joint parliamentary ­committee is due to ­report in ­November.

1.2 NACCHO Executive team meets with Minister Ken Wyatt and AMA President Tony Bartone 

2.SA : Nganampa Health Council ACCHO Tackling Indigenous smoking  at APY Lands school sports day.

It was a great day and the display was visited by children from Pipalyatjatjara, Murputja, Amata, Pukatja, Fregon, Mimili, Indulkana and Yalata.

The kids loved the big cigarette and learning about all the poisons that are in cigarettes and went away with Tjikita Nyuntu Ngayuku Malpa Wiya wristbands and drink bottles.

We also did smokelysers to check carbon monoxide levels on some of the older kids and adults. We will be following up any high readings.

Zibeon organised a colour 3 km run at the end of the sports day and the kids ran with joy and enthusiasm despite the fact that it was the last event of the day.

The day was topped off by the dance competition at Pukatja school that night where there was some great dancing.

The Deadly Choices team were also out on the APY lands supporting partners the Port Power Aboriginal Program

The guys have been visiting communities all over delivering the WillPower Program and supporting this Ernabella Sports & Dance festival

2.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO and the Tackling Tobacco Team at the CATSINaM conference at the Hilton Hotel Adelaide.

3.1 NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs : The NT is putting a minimum floor price on alcohol, because evidence shows this works to reduce harm

From October 1, 2018, one standard drink in the Northern Territory will cost a minimum of A$1.30. This is known as floor price, which is used to calculate the minimum cost at which a product can be sold, depending on how many standard drinks the product contains.

People in the Northern Territory consume alcohol at much higher levels and have the highest rate of risky alcohol consumption in Australia. In 2014, around 44% of people in the NT were drinking alcohol at a level that put them at risk of injury or other harms at least once in the past month. This was compared to 26% of people nationally.

The implementation of the minimum floor price is the result of legislation, recently passed to minimise alcohol-related harms in the NT. From October, the NT will become one of the first places in the world to introduce a minimum price for alcohol.

Published in Croakey and The Conversation 

This article was co-authored by Donna Ah Chee, CEO of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and Mr Edward Tilton, Health Policy Consultant at the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress.The Conversation

John Boffa is Adjunct Associate Professor at Curtin University

A history of alcohol restrictions

The NT government introducted trial restrictions on the availability of alcohol in Alice Springs in 2002. This came after many years of campaigning for restrictions on alcohol sales by Aboriginal community organisations and the People’s Alcohol Action Coalition (an Alice Springs-based alcohol reform group).

The trial restrictions limited the hours during which take-away alcohol could be sold on weekdays to 2-9pm. They also attempted to address the sale of cheap 4L or 5L casks of wine by prohibiting the sale of take-away alcohol in containers larger than 2L. This super cheap alcohol was most implicated in the town’s social and health problems.

The trial had some positive effects but was substantially undermined by drinkers switching from cask-wine to other cheap forms of alcohol – in particular fortified wine sold in flagons and casks.

This led to renewed advocacy for more effective approaches to alcohol–related harm. In 2006, the NT government implemented the Alice Springs Liquor Supply Plan (LSP). This continued the earlier restrictions on the hours of sale for take-away alcohol. But it also extended the ban on the sale of cheap alcohol to include both wine in containers larger than two litres and fortified wine in containers larger than one litre.

What the liquor supply plan achieved

A 2011 government commissioned study found removing the two cheapest forms of alcohol (cask wine and fortified wine in casks and large bottles) from the market increased the price of alcohol in Central Australia. Before the introduction of the liquor supply plan, the average wholesale price per standard drink was around A$0.80. Under the plan, this increased to about A$1.10 per standard drink.

This increase was primarily achieved by the bans on cheap alcohol, effectively doubling the minimum unit price from about A$0.25 per standard drink to A$0.50 per standard drink. As the figure below shows, the introduction of the liquor supply plan in Alice Springs led to a significant decrease in alcohol consumption (estimated by using wholesale sales data) – from around 24 standard drinks per week for every person aged 15 years and over to around 20 standard drinks per week.


https://public.flourish.studio/visualisation/111877/embed

Made with Flourish

As expected, the ban on cheap cask and fortified wine led some drinkers to turn to other types of alcohol. But while there was a 70% increase in the consumption of more expensive full-strength beer, the decline in the consumption of cheap alcohol more than offset this. This led to the overall 20% decline in consumption.

The reductions in alcohol consumption were accompanied by a significant decrease in social harms and adverse health impacts. Treatments for alcohol-related harms at Alice Springs Hospital, which had been rising steeply, levelled off. Though they continued to rise, they did so at a much reduced rate.

This included reductions in those who were admitted to hospital because of assaults. In particular, the liquor supply plan led to around 120 fewer than projected Aboriginal women being hospitalised per year for assault. A similar pattern was seen for emergency department presentations, with a significant decrease in people presenting as a result of assault.

The LSP also saw significant reductions in the proportion of alcohol-related anti-social behaviour incidents recorded in Alice Springs.

A minimum floor price works

It’s clear restrictions on the sale of cheap alcohol are effective in reducing alcohol-related harm. And while the causes of family and community violence are complex, bans on cheap alcohol are especially effective in reducing the number of Aboriginal women subjected to assault.

Some have argued Aboriginal drinking is not affected by price as these drinkers will simply increase their expenditure on alcohol to maintain their consumption. But the liquor supply plan provides powerful evidence this assumption is incorrect. The reduction in assaults of Aboriginal women strongly suggests the increases in price were accompanied by a reduction in consumption.

The implementation of the minimum floor price shows the importance of local advocacy by Aboriginal organisations and community groups in moving policy and practice in alcohol control forward.

3.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin staff out at Palmerston Indigenous Village doing Men’s Health Screenings.

Picture above : Ray Chula and Maria Burrenjuck with Crystal Burrenjuck, Tidora Burrenjuck, Patrick Burrenjuck, Sebastian Burrenjuck, and Maggie Madigan

The team also put on a cooked breakfast and BBQ for the community. Thanks to everyone who came down and great to see men taking control of their health.

Left to right: Timothy Thomson, Brian Long, Lyle Braun, Ray Chula, Joseph Fitz and Darryl Tambling

4 .1 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Cairns Supports Next Generation of Doctors

Dr Ben Schussler, who is spending a year at Wuchopperen, has worked in a range of clinics including Chronic and Complex and Men and Male Youth since beginning his placement in February.

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited proudly supports the next generation of doctors through its medical student and registrar placement programs.

GP Registrars Dr Alex and Dr Schussler are on placement while third year medical student Josh Preece completed his in August.

Josh, a University of Sydney medical student, has a close personal connection with Wuchopperen.

‘My nanna, Louisa Preece, (who I stayed with while I was up in Cairns) worked at Wuchopperen from 1993 to 2005 as Registered Nurse,’ he explained.

‘My auntie Julie Boneham was a Registered Nurse at Wuchopperen and has previously served as the Chairperson of and is currently a director on Wuchopperen’s Board, my auntie Cilla Preece was a dental assistant at Wuchopperen and later served on Wuchopperen’s  Board, and my cousin, Dania Ahwang is currently the CEO.’

Josh, a third year medical student, chose Wuchopperen for his GP placement in order to gain a greater understanding of the community controlled health sector.

‘I have been lucky enough to sit in with Wuchopperen’s Chronic and Complex Health GPs and really get a feel for what the working life of a GP is like,’ he said.

‘I was able to get involved with patient’s healthcare, and hear their stories. I chose Wuchopperen for my placement because I really wanted to get some exposure to frontline Indigenous health at an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

‘A patient being able to have all their healthcare needs met in a culturally appropriate setting, and having “Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands” was really inspiring. It shows that self-determination, autonomy, and self-governance works!’

Josh said he learned that health is more than the problem presented at an appointment.

‘I learned that you have to think about the whole person in front of you, especially in Indigenous healthcare,’ he said.

‘You can’t just solve “high blood pressure”, you need to be thinking holistically about a person’s lifestyle and goals, the social context in which they live, and respect their autonomy. I was lucky enough to sit in with Wuchopperen’s diabetes educators, nursing team, physio, dietitian, and Aboriginal health workers, as well as spending some time at the Raintrees pharmacy. It was great to see the whole range of allied health services and how we can all work together to drive patient outcomes.’

Wuchopperen’s new GP Registrars, Dr Jerry Alex and Dr Ben Schussler have also been on learning curves.

Dr Jerry, who is spending six months doing an extended skills placement in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, said the ‘learning is constant.’

‘I wanted to do my placement here because I am interested in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.  The learning process is constant and I gaining a better understanding of the multiple impacts on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.’

‘I am planning to do a Fellowship in Indigenous health next year.’

Dr Ben Schussler, who is spending a year at Wuchopperen, has worked in a range of clinics including Chronic and Complex and Men and Male Youth since beginning his placement in February.

His decision to do his placement at Wuchopperen was inspired by a wish to find out more about Indigenous health, and to increase his skills in caring for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

‘I wanted to increase my knowledge of Indigenous health issues and culture as well as improve my skills in providing medical care to this population,’ Dr Ben explained.

Like Josh and Dr Jerry, Dr Ben said he has learned an enormous amount since starting his placement.

‘It has been, and is, such a great experience working here,’ he said.

‘I have learned about medical problems such as rheumatic heart disease that I likely never would have seen had I not worked with this group of patients.  I have learned more about the Indigenous culture and history in Australia and have a better understanding of the barriers to care for Indigenous Australians.’

‘I am very impressed with the services available at Wuchopperen. The resources available to optimise patient care are superb.  The opportunity to access allied health services for my patients far exceeds what is typically available in general practice.’

4.2 QLD : Ministers & Director General visit Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement

Ministers & Director General visit Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Company Limited to learn about there integrated model of health, human and social services in Toowoomba & South Western Queensland

5 NSW : AHMRC Message Stick Newsletter launched 

Read HERE 

6. VIC :  Keeping The Victorian Aboriginal Community At The Heart Of Treaty

IMAGE: MEMBERS OF THE ABORIGINAL TREATY WORKING GROUP AND VICTORIAN TREATY ADVANCEMENT COMMISSIONER IN PARLIAMENT DURING THE TABLING OF THE ADVANCING THE TREATY PROCESS WITH ABORIGINAL VICTORIANS BILL 2018 (L TO R): VICKI CLARK, PAUL BRIGGS, MICK HARDING (CHAIR), JILL GALLAGHER (COMMISSIONER), JANINE COOMBS, GERALDINE ATKINSON. (SUPPLIED)

The Andrews Labor Government is engaging even more Aboriginal Victorians in the state’s historic Treaty process with a second round of Treaty grants.

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Natalie Hutchins today announced almost $1.3 million for 19 Aboriginal organisations as part of the second round of the Treaty Community Engagement Program.

The successful organisations include the First Nations Legal and Research Services, Winda-Mara Aboriginal Corporation, Aldara Yanera, Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency, the Victorian Traditional Owner Land Justice Group, Yorta Yorta, Koorie Youth Council.

Wantanda Consulting, Mangrook Footy Show, Eastern Maar Aboriginal Corporation,  Gunaikurnai Land and Waters Aboriginal Corporation, the Willum Warrain Gathering Place, Yingadi Aboriginal Corportaion, Spark Health and Bunjilwarra were also successful.

The Program will support Traditional Owners groups and other organisations and businesses to engage with Victorian Aboriginal communities as well as non-Aboriginal Victorians on Treaty. This will provide further insight on how self-determination and treaty can strengthen Victorian Aboriginal communities.

The Program will also help ensure the treaty process continues to be guided by Aboriginal voices and prepare the Aboriginal community for the establishment of the Aboriginal Representative Body and eventual Treaty negotiations.

Insights obtained through the Program will be used by the Victorian Treaty Advancement Commission as it works to establish the Aboriginal Representative Body as part of the next phase of the treaty process.

The Program offers two kinds of grants: Treaty Circle Grants and Treaty Engagement Grants.

Treaty Circle Grant will support small, community-led consultations on key issues related to treaty.

Treaty Engagement Grants will support in-depth, ongoing engagement with Victorian Aboriginal communities, as well as research on key issues relating to treaty and self-determination.

Today’s funding builds on the $370,000 in grants provided to Aboriginal organisations in the first round of the Program. Further rounds of Treaty grant funding will be open soon.

The Labor Government has provided more than $37.5 million to support the treaty process and promote self-determination among Victorian Aboriginal communities.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Natalie Hutchins

“The voices of Aboriginal Victorians will always be at the centre of the Treaty process. This goes to the heart of self-determination.”

“These exceptional Aboriginal organisations know their community best and that’s why we’re supporting them to consult and engage on Victoria’s historic Treaty process.”

7. WA : AHCWA For dialysis in remote communities, kidney disease patients can now be treated closer to Country.

With Aboriginal communities receiving Medicare funding for dialysis in remote communities, kidney disease patients can now be treated closer to Country.

Instead of being stuck in a hospital 800km away, Barbara Reid can now receive her dialysis only an hour’s drive away from her family.

Read full story HERE 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : #NSW @DeadlyChoices Katungul ACCHO @awabakalltd #Yerin ACCHO #NT @CaaCongress @DanilaDilba #SA @DeadlyChoicesSA @NunkuYunti #VIC @VACCHO_org #WA

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner joined an amazing line up of experience in all endorsing community controlled for all Australians at our discussions at PHMOZ

2.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Batemans Bay making Deadly Choices by opening gym for clients

2.2 NSW : Yerin ACCHO on central coast is leading the way in Aboriginal health promotion by holding an ACCHO Commmunity Health Expo 

2.3 NSW : The Awabakal Ltd Quit Crew visited Nikinpa Aboriginal Child & Family Centre last week to do a presentation about TIS (Tackling Indigenous Smoking).

3.1 NT : Congress Alice springs : Skills boost “the best medicine” for Aboriginal health as ten Aboriginal Health Practitioner Trainees graduate

3.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin Deadly Choices team visits the Garaworra Supported housing program

4. VIC : VACCHO staff get a run down on the 2018 Victorian election campaign

5.1 SA : The Deadly Choices team are out on the APY lands supporting one of our partners the PAFC Power Aboriginal Program

5.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO Newsletter January-July edition 2018.

6. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Aurukun was a hive of healthy activity last weekend with the annual River to Ramp Fun Run and Walk. 

7 WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Matters – Men’s Health Marmun Pit stop flyer.

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner joined an amazing line up of experience in all endorsing community controlled for all Australians at our discussions at PHMOZ : With Donna Ah Chee CEO and Doctor John Boffa Congress Alice Springs and Doctor Tim Senior 

 

2.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Batemans Bay making Deadly Choices by opening gym for clients

The Batemans Bay Katungul Gym has now been officially opened.

Big thanks to Preston Campbell for attending and speaking on behalf of IUIH & Deadly Choices.

Preston talked to the community about his story & why spaces like these are so important for our Physical & Mental health

What a great turn out to the Katungul Batemans Bay Gym opening.

WATCH VIDEO 

Always important to have the community support. Once you complete a 715 Health Check and receive your Deadly Choices shirt you’ll have access to the gym. #DeadlyChoices

2.2 NSW : Yerin ACCHO on central coast is leading the way in Aboriginal health promotion by holding an ACCHO Commmunity Health Expo 

Will you be joining us for our Community Health Expo next month?

Come along and learn about what health care services Yerin Incorporating Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Centre offers to the Central Coast Aboriginal community.

REGISTER FOR FREE: https://yerin-community-health-expo.eventbrite.com.au

This event offers the Central Coast Aboriginal community an opportunity to actively engage with their health and wellbeing and learn more about the culturally appropriate health care services that are available to them.

2.3 NSW : The Awabakal Ltd Quit Crew visited Nikinpa Aboriginal Child & Family Centre last week to do a presentation about TIS (Tackling Indigenous Smoking).

The presentation included a Smokerlyzer demonstration to show the CO (carbon monoxide) reading in the bloodstream.

Thank you to everyone who attended the presentation!

If your organisation is interested in educating your workforce about the damages of smoking, give the Quit Crew a call on (02) 4918 6400.

We can provide the tools to support smokers to cut back or quit smoking.

3 NT : Congress Alice springs : Skills boost “the best medicine” for Aboriginal health as ten Aboriginal Health Practitioner Trainees graduate

A record number of Aboriginal Health Practitioners [AHPs] will today graduate from the Congress AHP Traineeship program; a partnership with Batchelor College.” Congress’ General Manager – Health Services, Tracey Brand said today.

“Ten Aboriginal Health Practitioners from our AHP Traineeship program – including three from our bush clinics – will graduate with their Certificate IV Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) and two senior AHPs will graduate with a Diploma in Aboriginal Primary Health Care.

“Aboriginal Health Practitioners are a strategic priority for our workforce. AHPs are critical to the work of Congress in delivering culturally safe and responsive comprehensive primary health care to our people” said Ms Brand.

Aboriginal Health Practitioners are recognised nationally as a fundamental component of Aboriginal comprehensive primary health care. As well as providing primary health care, AHPs provide cultural security and safety, disease prevention and health promotion, and local community knowledge.

They work within multidisciplinary health care teams to achieve better health outcomes for Aboriginal people and play a key role in facilitating relationships between other health professionals to provide care that meets the client’s physical, social, emotional and cultural needs.

Tallira Anderson is one of the ten graduates. “As a young mum, I was inspired to become an Aboriginal Health Practitioner to be a role model for my daughter.”

“Growing up seeing too many of my family with preventable chronic illnesses, I want to make a difference. I am now a graduate AHP and proud to be working in the new Congress Northside clinic.” said Ms Anderson.

“Following a challenging period in recruiting AHPs in 2016, Congress embarked on a mission to develop our own and launched the Congress AHP traineeship program. The graduations this week are evidence of the program’s success.” continued Ms Brand.

“AHP graduates are to be congratulated on their achievement in attaining their qualification.

“Congress now employs 21 AHPs across our town and remote clinics and will continue to invest in the AHP workforce by employing a minimum of three AHP trainees each year.”

 

3.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin Deadly Choices team visits the Garaworra Supported housing program
Tracey from our Deadly Choices team visits the Garaworra Supported housing program run by Anglicare NT every fortnight on Mondays and helps prepare some Good Quick Tukka.
Yesterday Corn, Zucchini & Carrot fritters were on the menu.
Thanks to Alberto Dhamarrandji and his little sister Anneka Dhamarrandji, Jackson Mills and Serena Morgan pictured here for helping out #deadlychoices #AnglicareNT

4. VIC : VACCHO staff get a run down on the 2018 Victorian election campaign
Victoria has been a leader for Aboriginal Affairs across Australia. The state has embraced the concept of selfdetermination for Aboriginal people, recognising it is the only policy to produce real and sustainable outcomes for Community.
Download a PDF copy VACCHO-STATE-ELECTION-2018-WEB
Since 2006 there have been a number of strategies and frameworks that have been co-designed with Aboriginal leaders and their communities. They prioritise areas including education, health, human services, economic participation, child protection and leadership.
These community-led reforms across Victoria are improving Aboriginal People’s lives. We are seeing healthier babies and mums, more young people completing year 12, and a large increase in immunisation rates for Aboriginal children across the state.

Our communities have the solutions, and we will continue to ensure our voice is heard in achieving better health outcomes for all Victorians. It is vital that the partnerships between Community and government continues. Keep walking with us.

We ask for:
• Multi-partisan commitment to continue legitimate engagement with Aboriginal communities, and reforms
based upon self-determination.
• To honour existing plans, fund their implementation and ensure future policies are based on the principles
of self-determination.
• Continued support of Aboriginal involvement in strategic decision-making at all levels of government.

5.1 SA : The Deadly Choices team are out on the APY lands supporting one of our partners the PAFC Power Aboriginal Program

WillPower Program community visits 2 Amata  Ernabella Mimili Indulkana
 Massive thx to all students & teachers 4 hosting us, it’s been an amazing few days with more to come

5.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO Newsletter January-July edition 2018.

Download copy here Newsletter_Jan-July 2018

6. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Aurukun was a hive of healthy activity last weekend with the annual River to Ramp Fun Run and Walk. 

Almost 100 entrants ran, jogged or walked the seven kilometre course from Obon to the finish line at the picturesque Aurukun Landing.

Deputy Mayor Edgar Kerindun oversaw the race formalities and was on hand to congratulate the participants and winners at the finish line. The overall winner was Gabriel waterman, who set an impressive pace given the hot conditions.

The overall winner was Gabriel waterman, who set an impressive pace given the hot conditions.

The biggest smile of the day went to eight year old Althea Koomeeta, who won a push bike for winning her age group.

The success of events like this are the result of a large group of coommitted stakeholders working together. The River to Ramp Fun Run and Walk was supported by the following organisations: Skytrans, Rio Tinto, Glencore, ALPA, Island and Cape Stores, Kang Kang Café, Ercson, Preston Law, Apunipima, Cape York Employment, Koolkan School, PCYC Indigenous Programs, G&R Wills, Kondo Korp, Pikkuws Restaurant and Builders North.

7 WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Matters – Men’s Health Marmun Pit stop flyer.

 

With; Stan Masters – Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Derbarl Yerrigan Below is the Derbarl Yerrigans Marmun Pit stop flyer. They help men promote better health For more information about Marmun Pit Stop go to or 9421 3888

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : National @CPMC_Aust #ACT @WinnungaACCHO celebrates 30 years #NSW @Galambila #QLD @IUIH_ @DeadlyChoices @Apunipima #RUOKDay #NT @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.1 National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

Winnunga last night celebrated its 30th anniversary , as it continues to go from strength to strength – providing responsive, appropriate services, tailored to the needs of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in Canberra

Picture above : Wally Bell welcome to country at dinner celebrating 30 years of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health : Pictures below Geoff Bagnall

  

The Ngunnawal people are the Traditional Owners of the lands that the ACT is located on. However, there are many Aboriginal people from other parts of the country living in and visiting Canberra.

This is mainly due to the mobility of people generally, connecting with family, the histories of displacement, and employment opportunities particularly in the Commonwealth public service.

Winnunga was established in 1988 by local Aboriginal people inspired by the national mobilisation of people around the opening of the new Parliament House in May and the visit by the Queen.

The late Olive Brown, a particularly inspirational figure who worked tirelessly for the health of Aboriginal people, saw the need to set up a temporary medical service at the Tent Embassy site in Canberra and this proved to be the beginning of Winnunga.

Mrs Brown enlisted the support of Dr Sally Creasey, Carolyn Patterson (registered nurse/midwife), Margaret McCleod and others to assist. Soon after ACT Health offered Mrs Brown a room in the office behind the Griffin Centre to run a clinic twice a week (Tuesday and Thursday mornings) and on Saturday mornings. Winnunga operated out of this office from 1988 to 1990. The then Winnunga Medical Director, Dr Peter Sharp, began work at Winnunga in 1989.

Other staff worked as volunteers. In January 1990 the t ACT Minister for Health at the time, Wayne Berry, provided a small amount of funding. By 1991 the clinic was operating out of the Griffin Centre as a full time medical practice. In that same year the ACT attained self-government.

In 2004 Winnunga moved to its current premises at Boolimba Cres in Narrabundah, and employs over 60 staff. Winnunga has grown into a major health service resource for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the ACT and surrounding region, and delivers a wide range of wholistic health care services.

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

Today I visited Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and it was beaut to get a tour of the new clinic with manager Catherine Hampton.

The clinic at North Side Shopping Complex will provide comprehensive primary health care services for all Aboriginal people living in the North Side area

Warren Snowdon is the local Federal member for Lingiari

People living in the north of Alice Springs will now have access to a new clinic as primary health care service Central Australian Aboriginal Congress expands its network.

The new Congress Northside Clinic in the Northside Shopping Centre held an open day on Saturday September 8 and begin providing services from Wednesday September 12.

It will cater for nearly 2000 clients living in the town’s north, including Trucking Yards, Charles Creek and Warlpiri Camp.

Congress chief executive officer Donna Ah Chee said the clinic would have doctors, Aboriginal health practitioners, nurses, podiatry services, a dietician, a diabetes educator and also offer care coordination and social and emotional well-being help.

Ms Ah Chee said it would also provide advocacy and other support to families in the northside area.

“Providing a smaller clinic closer to our clients is an exciting development and builds on the success of our Larapinta and Sadadeen clinics that opened in 2016,” she said.

The new clinic has nine consultation rooms, a double treatment room and two allied health treatment rooms.

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress said it had found that smaller, multidisciplinary teams delivered better continuity of care, access and chronic disease outcomes.

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

Our Quit Support Team had a great weekend at Freedom Day Festival
KWHB were a proud sponsor to make the festival smoke free 🚭to protect everyone from harmful cigarette smoke.

Check out the AFL and Basketball teams next to our deadly archway!

What’s your smoke free story?


National Best Practice Unit Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

SHPA caught up with Chris Braithwaite, a pharmacist with the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Northern NSW.

Chris spoke to us about:

  • his journey to working with indigenous communities
  • what an average day looks like
  • the challenges posed by existing funding models for home medicines reviews
  • cultural competence and institutional racism

Listen to the Podcast HERE 

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

The number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months since the introduction of a new online birth registration system by the NSW Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages (BDM).

Attorney General Mark Speakman announced the success of the online registration form as a result of the Our Kids Count campaign which aims to increase Aboriginal birth registrations through better access to information about the birth registration process.

“The number of unregistered Aboriginal births has traditionally been too high, but we’re closing the gap by highlighting the importance of registration and making the process faster and easier to complete,” said Mr Speakman.

“A birth certificate allows people to fully participate in society and without one, many of the basic opportunities we take for granted such as enrolling in school, sport or getting a driver licence, become unnecessarily complicated and out of reach.”

New figures show the average number of children registered to Aboriginal mothers since March 2018 has increased 82 per cent since the last quarter of 2017, and a 101 per cent increase since 2016.

NSW Registrar for Births Deaths & Marriages, Amanda Ianna said the new online birth registration has been popular among all sections of the community since it was introduced in April 2018.

“The take up rate for the online form has exceeded all our expectations with over 90 per cent of all NSW birth registrations now being made through the online system. The form is intuitive and people can complete it at a time and place that suits them,” Ms Ianna said.

BDM has spread the message about the benefits of birth registration during visits to Aboriginal communities and through brochures and online material, including an educational video.

For more information about Our Kids Count, visit: www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/Aboriginal

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

This partnership will bring life-changing benefits for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples right across Australia,

The Sharks players will assist in educating youth about the importance of taking a preventative approach to their health, and living healthy lifestyles. This includes reducing the negative impacts of smoking and drinking alcohol, and advocating consistent attendance at school.

It provides the kids a chance to make positive decisions around being a deadly student. It’s about our young ones looking at the opportunities available, with education being the passport towards achieving their dreams.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson.

Club stalwart and 2001 Dally M Player of the Year, Preston Campbell returned to his former NRL club recently, as the Cronulla Sharks announced a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

As a Deadly Choices Ambassador, Campbell has been instrumental in assisting to bring about better health and educational outcomes among Indigenous communities in Australia; a formula which the Sharks will now implement to boost existing and future community programs within its Sharks Have Heart portfolio.

A huge thank you to Deadly Choices and local elder Aunty Deanna Schreiber for designing and creating our farewells gifts to JT

“The Deadly Choices – Cronulla Sharks partnership will help reinforce those positive mental and physical health outcomes among communities, through the promotion of healthy eating, active participation in sport, and emphasising the importance of a good education,” said Campbell.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices.

“When you have kids at such an impressionable age it’s important to direct plenty of positive messaging and ensuring they create good habits for themselves.

“I’ve had a chance to speak with the boys today about the Deadly Choices programs and they’re excited about the impact they’ll have on our young kids”

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back.”

As explained by Sharks Have Heart General Manager George Nour, empowering youth within communities is exactly what the Sharks intend to achieve through the Deadly Choices partnership.

“Sharks Have Heart are extremely proud to launch our partnership with Deadly Choices,” Nour said. “To be associated with such a strong and respected brand within the Indigenous community is only going to strengthen our programmes within our diversity pillar.”

At the launch, the Sharks were provided a snapshot of what it means to make Deadly Choices and be role models for community, with Campbell joined by fellow long-term Deadly Choices Ambassador and former league international Steve Renouf in discussing their roles.

Sharks Co-Captain Wade Graham, a member of the Australian World Cup squad last year and twice an Indigenous All Star in 2016 and 2017, was joined by Indigenous teammates Andrew Fifita, Jesse Ramien and Edrick Lee at the program launch.

Graham was excited by the Sharks new partnership and to be teaming up with Deadly Choices.

“I think staying fit is extremely important in this day and age, particularly for the youth and if the Sharks and Deadly Choices can encourage as many people as possible to get the body moving, to eat healthy and to have an active lifestyle, it is going to be extremely beneficial to the Indigenous community,” Graham said.

“I am looking forward to working with Deadly Choices who do outstanding work in the Indigenous community and to be helping to spread their important messages,” he added.

In 2016-17 in South East Queensland alone, the Deadly Choices team delivered 145 education programs to more than 1860 participants. The team also held 10 community and sporting events, with almost 1500 attendees and participants.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

WATCH HERE

Today and every day is RU OK Day? Start a conversation and support your friends, colleagues, family and community.

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch


This innovative project began with Kalyakool Moort research. The highly collaborative project has embodied passion and commitment to improve perinatal wellbeing and engagement for women and men at this significant time.

The ‘Baby Coming-You Ready?” Rubric has been developed, digitised and designed by Aboriginal women, men and researchers.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Governor-General visits @WinnungaACCHO Plus #NSW #StrokeWeek2018 Events @Galambila @ReadyMob @awabakalltd #Tamworth #VIC #BDAC #BADAC #QLD @Apunipima #NT @AMSANTaus @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

2.QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service was honoured and pleased by a visit on September 3 from his Excellency the Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove and Lady Cosgrove.

Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs briefed their Excellency’s on the range of services which are provided to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Canberra and the region.

Sir Peter was particularly interested in the range and breadth of services which are provided to the community and learn that of the almost 7000 clients which Winnunga sees each year that almost 20% are non- Indigenous.

Sir Peter was also very interested to explore with Julie Tongs the rationale for the decision that has been taken in the ACT by the ACT Governmnet and Winnunga Nimmityjah to establish an autonomous Aboriginal managed and staffed health clinic within the Alexander Maconochie Centre to minister to the health needs of Aboriginal prisoners.

Following the briefing Sir Peter and Lady Cosgrove joined all staff for afternoon tea.

It was Chris Saddler an Aboriginal Health Practitioner at Winnunga and Lieutenant Nam’s birthday so the visitors sang happy birthday to both . Sir Peter  gave Chris and Julie a medal with the inscription Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia with the Crown and a wattle tree.

2.1 QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

The current guidelines recommend that a stroke risk screening be provided for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people over 35 years of age. However there is an argument to introduce that screening at a younger age.

Education is required to assist all Australians to understand what a stroke is, how to reduce the risk of stroke and the importance be fast acting at the first sign of stroke.”

Dr Mark Wenitong, Public Health Medical Advisor at Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima), says that strokes can be prevented through a healthy lifestyle and Health screening, and just as importantly, a healthy pregnancy and early childhood can reduce risk for the child in later life.

Naomi Wenitong  pictured above with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media and celebrate Stroke Week in your community.

Listen to the new rap song HERE  or Hear

The song, written by Cairns speech pathologist Rukmani Rusch and performed by leading Indigenous artist Naomi Wenitong, was created to boost low levels of stroke awareness in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said the rap packed a punch, delivering an important message, in a fun and accessible way.

“The Stroke Rap has a powerful message we all need to hear,’’ Ms McGowan said.

“Too many Australians continue to lose their lives to stroke each year when most strokes can be prevented.

“Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song, remember and act on its stroke awareness and prevention message – it could save their life.”

Ms McGowan said the song’s message was particularly important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities who were over represented in stroke statistics.

Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islanders are twice as likely to be hospitalised for stroke and are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians. These alarming figures were revealed in a recent study conducted by the Australian National University.

There is one stroke every nine minutes in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are overrepresented in stroke statistics. Strokes are the third leading cause of death in Australia.

Apunipima delivers primary health care services, health screening, health promotion and education to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people across 11 Cape York communities. These health screens will help to make sure you aren’t at risk  .

We encourage you to speak to an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health Practitioner or visit one of Apunipima’s Health Centres to talk to them about getting a health screen.

What is a stroke?

A stroke occurs when the blood flow to the brain is interrupted, depriving an area of the brain of oxygen. This is usually caused by a clot (ischaemic stroke) or a bleed in the brain (haemorrhagic stroke).

Brief stroke-like episodes that resolve by themselves are called transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs). They are often a sign of an impending stroke, and need to be treated seriously.

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

What to do in case of stroke?

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

The Australian National Stroke Foundation promotes the FAST tool as a quick way for anyone to identify a possible stroke. FAST consists of the following simple steps:

Face – has their mouth has dropped on one side?

Arm – can they lift both arms?

Speech – Is their speech slurred? Do they understand you?

Time – is critical. Call an ambulance.

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

The @Galambila ACCHO and @ReadyMob staff  hosting #strokeweek2018 on Gumbaynggirr country ( Coffs Harbour ) : Special thanks to Carroll Towney, Leon Williams and Katrina Widders from the Health Promotion team #ourMob#ourHealth #ourGoal #fightstoke @strokefdn

Recently released Australian National University research, found around one-third to a half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their 40s, 50s and 60s were at high risk of future heart attack or stroke. It also found risk increased substantially with age and starts earlier than previously thought, with high levels of risk were occurring in people younger than 35.

The good news is more than 80 percent of strokes can be prevented,’’ said Colin Cowell NACCHO Social Media editor and himself a stroke survivor.

“This National Stroke Week, we are urging all Australians to take steps to reduce their stroke risk.

“As a first step, I encourage all the mob to visit to visit one of our 302 ACCHO clinics , their local GP or community health centre for a health check, or take advantage of a free digital health check at your local pharmacy to learn more about your stroke risk factors.

“Then make small changes and stay motivated to reduce your stroke risk. Every step counts towards a healthy life,” he said.

Top tips for National Stroke Week:

  • Stay active – Too much body fat can contribute to high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Get moving and aim exercise at least 2.5 to 5 hours a week.
    •Eat well – Fuel your body with a balanced diet. Drop the salt and check the sodium content on packaged foods. Steer clear of sugary drinks and drink plenty of water.
    • Drink alcohol in moderation – Drinking large amounts of alcohol increases your risk of stroke through increased blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, obesity and irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation). Stick to no more than two standard alcoholic drinks a day for men and one standard drink per day for women.
    • Quit smoking – Smokers have twice the risk of having a stroke than non-smokers. There are immediate health benefits from quitting.
    • Make time to see your doctor for a health check.  Ask for a blood pressure check because high blood pressure is the key risk factor for stroke. Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and atrial fibrillation are also stroke risks which can be managed with the help of a GP.National Stroke Week is the Stroke Foundation’s annual stroke awareness campaign.

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

WHEN Aboriginal elder Aunty Pam Smith first had a stroke she had no idea what was happening to her body.

On her way back to town from a traditional smoking ceremony, she became confused, her jaw slack and dribbling.

FROM HERE

Picture above : CARE: Coral and Bill Toomey at National Stroke Awareness Week.

“I started feeling headachey, when they opened up the car and the cool air hit me I didn’t know where I was – I was in LaLa Land,” she said.

A guest speaker at the Stroke Foundation National Stroke Awareness Week event in Tamworth, Ms Smith has created a cultural awareness book about strokes for other Aboriginal people.

Watch Aunty Pams Story

She hopes it will teach others what to expect and how to look out for signs of a stroke, Aboriginal people are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-Indigenous people.

But, most still don’t go to hospital for help.

“Every time we went to a hospital we were treated for one thing, alcoholism – a bad heart or kidneys because of alcohol,” Ms Smith said.

“We were past that years ago, we’re up to what we call white fella’s things now.”

Elders encouraged people to make small changes in their daily lives, to quit smoking, eat a balanced diet and drink less alcohol.

For Bill Toomey it was a chance to speak with people who understood what it was like to have a stroke. A trip to Sydney in 2010 ended in the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital when he was found unconscious.

Now in a wheelchair, Mr Toomey was once a football referee and an Aboriginal Health Education Officer.

“I wouldn’t wish a stroke on anyone,” Mr Toomey said.

“I didn’t have the signs, the face didn’t drop or speech.”

His wife Coral Toomey cares for him, she was in Narrabri when he was rushed to hospital.

“Sometimes you want to hide, sit down and cry because there’s nothing you can do to help them,” she said.

“You’re doing what you can but you feel inside that it’s not enough to help them.”

Stroke survivor Pam Smith had a message for her community.

“Please go and have a second opinion, it doesn’t matter where or who it is – go to the hospital,” she said.

“If you’re not satisfied with your doctor go to another one.”

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

Did you know that Aboriginal people are up to three times more likely to suffer a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians, and twice as likely to die from a stroke?

This week is National Stroke Week, so make sure you know the signs of a stroke and call 000 if you suspect someone is experiencing a stroke.

Common risk factors for stroke include:
– High blood pressure
– Increasing age
– High cholesterol
– Diabetes
– Smoking

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

Veronica and Meagan had the opportunity to work closely with a group of the women in town. The ladies got to work on their paintings whilst participating in the Family Wellbeing training which focused on dealing with conflict and recognising personal strengths.


The week ended with a delicious lunch out bush and lots of smiles!

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

Chair of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance [AMSANT], Donna Ah Chee, said it wasn’t just the arrival of spring in the deserts of Central Australia to be welcomed today as the Aboriginal community-controlled health sector celebrated the graduation of 10 future leaders in receiving Diplomas in Leadership and Management.

“This is of course a wonderful achievement for each of the graduates who have put in a lot of hard work while still holding on to their full-time jobs,” said Ms Ah Chee.

“But just as important is what it means for the entire Aboriginal community controlled health sector—these women and men are the future, they are our future leaders in what are difficult, complex roles, they are role models for younger people, they are role models for their families and communities.

“Already organisations are moving graduates into managerial and team leader roles, and we are looking towards future intakes of students across a range of training opportunities in the sector— in management, administration, cultural leadership, community engagement and research.”

John Paterson, CEO of AMSANT reflected at the graduation ceremony in Alice Springs that while the work in the sector was very challenging, it was extraordinarily fulfilling.

“It really is the best sector to work in, no two ways about it.

“These new graduates are at the heart of what Aboriginal community control in comprehensive primary health care is about, it’s about people with lived experience in their own communities and families and having the strength and tenacity to take on the challenges we face in Aboriginal primary health care here in the Northern Territory.”

The graduates were drawn from the Katherine West Health Board, Anyinginyi Health, Miwatj Health and the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress).

Anyinginyi graduate, Nova Pomare, said that it hadn’t always been easy to get through the course.

“It was pretty hard working full time, studying and having to leave home away from family to attend the face-to-face course work in Darwin,” she said.

“But we were supported by our work places who have shown faith in our abilities and committed to our futures.”

Graduates of Diploma in Leadership and Management:

Anita Maynard Congress Velda Winunguj Miwatj Health

Carlissa Broome Congress Stan Stokes Anyinginyi Health

Glenn Clarke Congress Mahalia Hippi Anyinginyi Health

Samarra Schwarz Congress Nova Pomare Anyinginyi Health

John Liddle Congress Lorraine Johns Katherine West Health Board

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

 

 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

National Child Protection week began for VACCHO and the Victorian Aboriginal Children and Young People’s Alliance (Alliance) at the 2018 Victorian Protecting Children Awards on Monday 3 September 2018.

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) annual awards recognise dedicated teams and individuals working within government and community services who make protecting children their business.

We are pleased to announce that two of the 13 award winners were Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations and Members of VACCHO and the Alliance.

Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

This award was established by DHHS in partnership with the Victorian Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People, in memory of Aunty Walda Blow – a proud Yorta

Yorta and Wemba Wemba Elder who lived her life in the pursuit of equality.

Aunty Walda was an early founder of the Dandenong and District Aboriginal Cooperative and worked for over 40 years improving the lives of the Aboriginal community. This award recognises contributions of an Aboriginal person in Victoria to the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people.

Karen ensures the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people are always front and centre.

Karen has personally committed her support to the Ballarat Community through establishing and continuously advocating for innovative prevention, intervention and reunification programs.

As the inaugural Chairperson of the Alliance, Karen contributions to establishing the identity and achieving multiple outcomes in the Alliance Strategic Plan is celebrated by her peers and recognised by the community service sector and DHHS.

Karen’s leadership in community but particularly for BADAC, has seen new ways of delivering cultural models of care to Aboriginal children, carers and their families, ensuring a holistic service is provided to best meet the needs of each individual and in turn benefit the community.

The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

This award is for a team within the child and family services sector who has made an exceptional contribution to directly improve the lives of children, young people and families,

BDAC have lead the way, showing the Alliance member organisations what it takes to run the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18) program. BDAC have adapted a child protection model to incorporate holistic assessment and an Aboriginal cultural lens to support the children and families.

They have evidence that empowered decision making improves outcomes, particularly family reunification. The BDAC CEO, Raylene Harradine and Section 18 Pilot team have shown dedication, empathy and long term commitment in getting the program right for their organisation and clients, so that they can share their learning and program model with other ACCOs.

Their leadership in community has created waves of innovation in delivering cultural models of care to vulnerable Aboriginal children, carers and their families, achieving shared outcomes for all.

VACCHO and the Alliance walk away feeling inspired by all to do the best we can for our Koori children and young people, congratul