NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT

1.QLD :Deadly Kindies give Indigenous children a great start

2.WA : Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS) Women have Healthy futures and a yarn

3. SA : Newsletter from the Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

4. VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team solid workout

5. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs Speaking out

6. NSW  : Yerin Newsletter 2nd Edition July 2017

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.QLD :Deadly Kindies give Indigenous children a great start

“We know that getting kids prepared for and engaged in education directly impacts the health and wellbeing of themselves, their families and their communities long into the future,”

And while these Kindy Kits give kids all the items they need for a day at kindy, making sure they are kindy-ready also relies on providing them with access to the range of services available through the IUIH Model of Care.

Such services include speech therapy, audiology and eye health checks to make sure they can participate and develop the skills they will need when they go to school.

We are already experiencing huge demand for the Deadly Kindykits.

Thanks to the support of ambassadors Johnathan Thurston and Beryl Friday, we are looking forward to this campaign resulting in more kids being up to date with their health checks, more kids being able to access additional health services they need, and more kids enrolling in kindy.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson said Deadly Kindies recognised the importance of education as a key social determinant of health.

Education Minister Kate Jones and ambassador Johnathan Thurston today officially launched a new campaign to get more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander enrolments in kindergarten.

Ms Jones said ‘Deadly Kindies’ – launched at C&KKoobara Aboriginal and Islander Kindergarten in Zillmere – was about giving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children a better start to health and education.

“We want all Queensland children to get the best start to their education,” Ms Jones said.

“Deadly Kindies will encourage families to register their interest for kindy at their three and four-year-old’s health check.

“Families will be given an opportunity to register their young children for kindy and they will also receive a free Deadly Kindy Kit.

“The Kit includes kindy backpack, hat, blanket, sheet, lunchbox, library bag, water bottle and T-shirt.

“Families will also receive any necessary support and information they need to go ahead and enrol in a local kindergarten.

“The program ensures each child receives any health care required as a result of their eye, ear and other physical health assessment, which in turn ensures they can maximise their learning at kindy.“

Ms Jones said the Palaszczuk Government had invested $1.5 million to deliver the program through the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health.

“The campaign’s strength lies in its holistic approach to supporting Indigenous children, by linking better start to health with a better start to education,” she said.

“Deadly Kindies is part of our efforts to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kindergarten participation in Queensland to at least 95 per cent by 2018, up from 93.1 per cent in 2016.

“I thank football star Johnathan Thurston and netball star Beryl Friday for their invaluable support as official ambassadors for the Deadly Kindies campaign.”

More information: www.deadlykindies.com.au

2.WA : Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS) Women have Healthy futures and a yarn

Indigenous women from across Geraldton are converging at Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS) three times a week to enjoy craft, cuppas, and connection.

The women meet in the GRAMS ‘shed’ from 9.30am to 1.30pm on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays to make items ranging from wreaths and quilts to bunting and bags.

GRAMS CEO Deborah Woods welcomed all Indigenous women to join the craft sessions, regardless of their artistic ability.

“The craft group is a really lovely way for Indigenous women to come together, to not only be creative but also to enjoy the camaraderie of working together creatively,” Ms Woods said.

“There are real social and mental health benefits in bringing people together to enjoy each other’s company while working on something creative and productive.

“Aside from the satisfaction in producing craftworks, we also enjoy all sorts of conversations – from sometimes deep and profound topics to the outright hilarious.”

Ms Woods said women who were not into craft were also welcome to attend to help produce a hot daily soup.

Attending the craft group is free, and includes access to tea and coffee facilities.

Anyone who takes part must first have completed a full women’s health check, get their flu shots and also have a GRAMS care plan.

The group encourages donations of craft wares, including artificial flowers, material off cuts, broken tiles and any craft equipment.

For more information, or to donate goods please, contact Volunteer Felicity Mourambine on 0484 138 155.

3. SA Newsletter from the Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

Download the 10 Page

Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti Newsletter

newsletter-june2017v2-rs

4. VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team solid workout

Great job to everyone who came in at 7:30am and smashed out a solid workout! You all smashed it And especially good job to Raylene from Bendigo & District Aboriginal Co-Operative & Rudy from Mallee District Aboriginal Services who came all the way to have an awesome session!

#vahsHLT #BeBrave #BePositive #BeStrong #StaySmokeFree

Aboriginal Quitline : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service : Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc : National Best Practice Unit Tackling Indigenous Smoking

5. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs Speaking out

 ” The Australian Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion announced on 7 July that it was his intention from July 2018 only Aboriginal owned, managed and controlled organisations and businesses would be funded by the Commonwealth to deliver services under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

This decision by the Minister is one of the most profoundly important policy decisions to have been made for years in relation to the delivery of services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs 

Watch NACCHO TV Interview with Julie Tongs

Read download 20 page  Winnunga AHCS Newsletter July 2017

In making the announcement Minister Scullion said it was a decision taken on the back of incontrovertible evidence that the best outcomes being achieved under the IAS were those that were being delivered by local, community focused Indigenous managed and led organisations and businesses.

The Minister effectively asserted that the evidence was in, and that the practice of Governments in turning to mainstream and church based businesses, ahead of Aboriginal organisations, was producing sub-optimal outcomes for Aboriginal people and that the Commonwealth would from the beginning of the next financial year only make funding under the IAS available to Aboriginal businesses.

The next step in this process must be its extension to other programs and funding including of Indigenous specific programs managed by the States and Territories and of funding dispersed through the Public Health Network.

It was perhaps no coincidence that the Minister’s announcement coincided with the tenth anniversary of the disastrous and racist bi partisan ‘intervention’ in the Northern Territory.

Ms Pat Anderson, one of the authors of ‘Little Children are Sacred’ and currently chairperson of the Lowitja Institute has previously summarised the rationale of Minister Scullion’s decision to turn to Aboriginal organisations for the delivery of services as being that one of the most important determinants of health is ‘control’.

She said: ‘Practically this means any policy aimed at reducing the disadvantage of our communities must ask itself how it will increase the ability of Aboriginal people, families and communities to take control over their own lives.’

This is the point I have made repeatedly to ACT Government Ministers and officials, most particularly and forcefully in recent times in relation to the exclusion of any Aboriginal community involvement in programs such as Strengthening Families, A Step Up for Our Kids,

Through care, supported housing, care and protection, childcare, aged care or justice. The default practice in the ACT is for the Government to turn to precisely the organisations that Minister Scullion has said the evidence shows produce sub-optimal outcomes for Aboriginal people, namely non-Aboriginal mainstream businesses and church backed businesses. Organisations which the Minister has now said will, on the basis of all the evidence, no longer be funded by the Commonwealth.

6. NSW  : Yerin Newsletter 2nd Edition July 2017

VIEW ALL PAGES HERE

 

 

Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 Week : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #SA #NT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD #Act #Tas

 1.QLD : WuChopperen Health Service new Family Wellbeing Service for Cairns families

2. QLD  :Gold Coast Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service has launched its annual calendar  to encourage people to eat more fruit and vegetables.

3. NSW : Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service  additional case management services for First Australians in Batemans Bay, Bega and Narooma

      4.WA : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia and 22 Aboriginal Medical Services across WA. on the agenda during NAIDOC Week      

        5. VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) and Peter Mac, the Women’s, the Royal Melbourne and the Royal Children’s Hospital have come together for a NAIDOC Week

6. QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council has been recommended for ISO 9001:2008 recertification for three years to 2020.

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.QLD : WuChopperen Health Service new Family Wellbeing Service for Cairns families

A new Family Wellbeing Service now underway in the Cairns region will strengthen support for vulnerable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities.

Minister for Child Safety Fentiman visited the WuChopperen Health Service in Manoora today (11 July) while in Cairns for Governing for the Regions week.

“WuChopperen Health Services has already been supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the region through a range of health services and the addition of the Family Wellbeing Service further strengthens their support,” she said.

The Queensland Government will provide more than $2.6million this financial year to the health service to undertake the Family Wellbeing Service.

The new service will help local Indigenous families in the Cairns region stay safe and together and is part of an overall funding package across the state for new community-run services to better support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities.

“It’s about providing culturally-responsive, community-led support to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families safely care for their children at home,” she said.

“We are committed to reducing the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families in the child protection system, and we know we will achieve the best results if we work in partnership with Indigenous communities.”

Family Wellbeing Services are rolling out in 20 locations across Queensland, as part of up to $150 million investment over five years, to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families have access to the best possible family support.

Ms Fentiman said the services would give Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families access to targeted support to improve their social, emotional, and physical wellbeing and safety.

“By 2018, we are aiming to have these services offer more than 6000 families a coordinated approach to support them, address multiple needs and build family and community capacity,” she said.

Ms Fentiman also announced $124,000 in funding over the next two years for WuChopperen to provide an Early Childhood Development Coordinator (ECDC) within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Wellbeing Service to increase early childhood educational access for children in contact with the child protection system.

“These investments will delivering better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families and help to address their overrepresentation in the child protection system,” she said.

The Queensland Government has worked in partnership with key stakeholders, including the Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Protection Peak (QATSICPP), to capture the voices of community, children, families and Indigenous service providers in the establishment of the Family Wellbeing Services.

For more information go to http://www.communities.qld.gov.au/gateway/reform-renewal/child-family

2. QLD  :Gold Coast Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service has launched its annual calendar  to encourage people to eat more fruit and vegetables.

Bush tucker is being used to encourage people to eat more fruit and vegetables.

The Gold Coast Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service has launched its annual calendar featuring local bush tucker foods.

Watch video here

The 12-month calendar has recipes featuring native foods such as kangaroo, lemon myrtle, finger lime, lemon aspen, warrigal greens, wattle seed, lilli pilli, pig face and pippis.


Dietician Maxine Daley said the unit had worked alongside Indigenous elders to create the recipes.

“The calendar is based on fruit and vegetables, so we are using the cultural appeal of bush tucker foods to promote fruit and vegies to our clients,” she said.

“Everything in this calendar is from the Gold Coast. It suits our environment, it suits our climate.

“You can grow it in a pot or a backyard or polystyrene box on your balcony.

“The idea was born out of a focus group in which people expressed an interest in knowing more about bush tucker foods.

“There’s been such an impact on Aboriginal culture in general. Food culture has also changed,” Ms Daley said.

“When we did the focus groups people were really interested in learning more about bush tucker foods.”

3. NSW Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service  additional case management services for First Australians in Batemans Bay, Bega and Narooma

’Koori Health in Koori Hands’, is Katungul’s moto and we take the approach of ensuring that not only our clients physical health is being address but also their spiritual and social wellbeing, as without recognising that these go hand in hand we cannot offer true holistic care.

We are truly ecstatic that we have been recognised for our efforts to date and look forward to striving to meet the Governments priority of making a difference in the lives of Indigenous Australians,”

Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service CEO, Robert Skeen (pictured above )  said the injection of funds would go a long way to strengthen their frontline services to help the most vulnerable in their communities.

The Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service will be able to provide additional case management services in Batemans Bay, Bega and Narooma, with a focus on social and health support needs, thanks to a $749,092 grant from the Coalition Government.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said that Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service would receive funding to provide case management services through until 30 June 2019.

“The Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service program will deliver an early detection and intervention health and wellbeing initiative to around 200 preschool and primary school aged children,” Minister Scullion said.

“Improving the safety of Indigenous families and communities is one of the highest priorities for the Coalition Government – and this investment will enable the Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service to provide additional support to people who need it the most.”

Minister Scullion said that through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS), the Government was providing targeted investment to those working on the ground to make a difference in the lives of First Australians.

“This project is a great example of the Coalition working with Indigenous Australians to improve outcomes for First Australians living in Batemans Bay, Bega and Narooma,” Minister Scullion said.

Federal Member for Gilmore, Ann Sudmalis said: “Thousands of Indigenous Australians call Gilmore home and I thank Minister Scullion for this recognition and investment.”

“Supporting the needs of Indigenous Australians in our region by further resourcing Katungal Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service for another two years, provides certainty and continuity,” Mrs Sudmalis said.

The Katungul Aboriginal Corporation and Medical Service project is one of 43 recently funded under the IAS. Services have been funded to provide intensive support to Indigenous people most affected in the following areas: alcohol and drugs, domestic violence, mental health and wellbeing, and youth offending.

Existing service providers will share $18,697,510 million in Government funding through until 30 June 2019 to transition from the Indigenous Community Links programme to new place-based, intensive support services that address specific safety and wellbeing needs. A further $4,239,664 million will be provided until 30 June 2019 for new services in areas where a safety and wellbeing service gap has been identified.

The final year of funding is dependent on the projects providing strong outcomes for their clients.

Providers will be asked to collect service data to assess the impact of the service, to better understand what works to overcome Indigenous disadvantage and contribute to the evidence base.

4.WA : Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia and 22 Aboriginal Medical Services across WA. on the agenda during NAIDOC Week

• Implementation Guide for the WA Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing Framework launched

• Two-year $1 million pilot project to address social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people to help prevent self-harm and suicide

The McGowan Labor Government is committed to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people in Western Australia, including helping to prevent self-harm and suicide.

The Aboriginal Family Wellbeing project, a two-year pilot project, aims to address the risk factors to social and emotional wellbeing in Aboriginal people across WA.

The project includes an accredited six-month Certificate II training program, developed by Aboriginal people, for Aboriginal people, and will be delivered in collaboration with the Mental Health Commission, Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia and 22 Aboriginal Medical Services across WA.

Health and Mental Health Minister Roger Cook also launched the Implementation Guide for the WA Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing Framework 2015-2030 as part of NAIDOC Week celebrations.

NAIDOC Week celebrations are held across Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture, and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Comments attributed to Health and Mental Health Minister Roger Cook:

“The McGowan Government acknowledges poor social and emotional wellbeing is a significant contributor to the unacceptably high rate of illness and suicide among Aboriginal people in WA.

“The delivery of the Aboriginal Family Wellbeing project with the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia will ensure all Aboriginal Medical Services in WA will have at least one representative capable of delivering and administering the program to Aboriginal communities.

“Furthermore, the Implementation Guide for the WA Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing Framework 2015-2030 is a how-to manual to take meaningful, and measurable actions, towards improvements.

“The framework set the agenda for one of the most important challenges we face in this country, improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people, and is supported by WA Health’s Strategic Intent, which made Aboriginal health services, and addressing the health inequalities faced by Aboriginal people, a priority.”

5. VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) and Peter Mac, the Women’s, the Royal Melbourne and the Royal Children’s Hospital have come together for a NAIDOC Week

Jill Gallagher AO, Chief Executive Officer of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO)

Jill Gallagher AO, Chief Executive Officer of the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), spoke and called on health services to be bold, lead change from within and also support employment and training opportunities for Aboriginal people.

“I’d like to highlight an important aspect of the work that will ‘close the gap’, but isn’t as obvious to everyone – This is employment and training,” Ms Gallagher said.

“Aboriginal employment is a critical link in improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.”

Ms Gallagher said employing more Aboriginal people would improve the health sector’s “cultural competency” and “when we have a culturally safe place for Aboriginal people, we will improve access to services and improve health for individuals”.

The event included a Q&A session – led by Dr Steve Ellen, Peter Mac’s Director of Psychosocial Oncology – and a panel including Elder and Yorta Yorta woman Aunty Pam Pedersen, Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer Moira Rayner and Peter Mac’s Director of Wellbeing Geri McDonald.

The panel discussed practical measures to reflect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture in a healthcare setting, including the possum skin cloak recently unveiled at Peter Mac. This was made recently by Aboriginal breast cancer survivors and is now available for use by other Aboriginal cancer patients at Peter Mac.

Ms Gallagher described initiatives like this, which brought Aboriginal culture into the healthcare environment, was “medicine for the spirit” for Aboriginal people.

The event provided an opportunity for the precinct partners to renew their joint commitment to providing a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island patients, families and carers.

“NAIDOC week is a time to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture and achievements and is an opportunity to recognise the contributions that Indigenous Australians make to our country and our society,” Peter Mac Chief Executive Dale Fisher said on opening the event.

“It brings together our Parkville Precinct partners – the Royal Women’s Hospital, the Royal Children’s Hospital and the Royal Melbourne Hospital – to talk about the importance of a culturally responsive environment in our health services.”

The Parkville Precinct is committed to healing and closing the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-indigenous people, and providing health services and information in culturally safe, accessible and welcoming environments.

6. QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council has been recommended for ISO 9001:2008 recertification for three years to 2020.

ISO certification means Apunipima’s quality management systems (which underpin best practice business performance) meet the international standard.

The ISO audit took place from 8 – 12 May 2017.

Auditors Scott Walker and Peter Jensen visited Apunipima’s Cairns, Napranum, Mapoon, Aurukun offices and facilities and looked at management systems including roles and responsibilities, risk management processes, document control, internal audit outcomes, continuous improvement processes, resource management, policy and procedures, service planning and records management.

Acting Quality and Risk Manager Elizabeth Whitehead said recertification meant Apunipima was working to an internationally accepted standard.

‘Apunipima has received ISO certification for three year periods before – a reflection of how well we have worked, and how well we are working now. The auditors are able to issue 12 month certificates so ongoing three year certification is a definite achievement.’

‘The auditors recognised the complex environment, difficulties and challenges that we face in delivering services every day and commended Apunipima on the good work occurring in the communities they visited.’

‘The audit results, and the recommendation for a further three years recertification, reflects the passion, commitment and dedication of our staff.’

Image L-R: Primary Health Care Manager Mapoon Debra Jia, Program Support Officer – Baby One Program Daphne De Jersey, Region 1 Primary Healthcare Manager Aletia Twist, Quality and Risk Manager Roberta Newton, Auditor Peter Jensen, Health Worker – Project Officer Jennifer Sellick and Administration Officer Temaleti Matasia

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News : Indigenous Health Minister @KenWyattMP visits , promotes and engages with our ACCHO’s during #NAIDOC2017 week

 

 “ This week, celebrating and acknowledging the power of our languages, the importance of language, but even where we’ve think we’ve lost languages I’m often surprised with the older people within our communities who can still speak the language.

And in my own country there are people teaching Noongar language and reviving the veracity of the language. Now language often is an identifier of who we are and what country we’re associated with.

NAIDOC Week is about celebrating, enjoying ourselves within our community, having fun, but also reflecting. 

Alice Springs : Ken Wyatt being interviewed by Kyle Dowling from CAAMA radio about Congress ACCHO Alice Springs and  the 11 organisations partnering in the new Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre SEE PART 3 Below

Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 : New Aboriginal-led collaboration has world-class focus on boosting remote Aboriginal health

Victoria / VACCHO / VAHS

APY LANDS

Kowanyama /Cairns QLD  :

“I am closely involved with the Darwin and Kimberley suicide prevention trials, part of the Federal Government’s $192 million commitment to addressing regional mental health issues,

“What we learn from those sites, which have acute suicide rates, will be made available as appropriate for North Queensland, in close collaboration with local communities.”

Mr Wyatt, in was Cairns  speaking at the myPHN Conference (see Part 3 for PHN Press Release ) said close engagement with the community and respecting locally endorsed solutions to guard against suicide was the way forward

Part 1  : Minister rolls out mental health action plan for Kowanyama

FINDINGS from suicide prevention trials being carried out in Western Australia will be implemented in the Far North to help lower the rising suicide rate in indigenous communities.

From The Cairns Post

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt says he is “very concerned” about reports of the suicide rates in the region’s remote indigenous population growing to become one of the highest in the world.

The Weekend Post has reported concerns by community leaders at Kowanyama that the mental health crisis was sparked by the tragedy in the community in October, when a vehicle rammed into a house full of mourners, resulting in one death and 25 people being serious injured.

There had been more than 20 suicides or attempts at Kowanyama, which has a population of about 1200, since the ­October tragedy.

Mr Wyatt, was Cairns  speaking at the myPHN Conference, said close engagement with the community and respecting locally endorsed solutions to guard against suicide was the way forward.

“I am closely involved with the Darwin and Kimberley suicide prevention trials, part of the Federal Government’s $192 million commitment to addressing regional mental health issues,” he said.

“What we learn from those sites, which have acute suicide rates, will be made available as appropriate for North Queensland, in close collaboration with local communities.”

An experienced social work has been flown into Kowanyama to join a mental health clinical nurse consultant who travels to the remote Cape York community for four-day visits.

Mr Wyatt said further emergency action was underway with the federally-funded Northern Queensland Primary Health Network working with the Royal Flying Doctor Service to expand mental health services at Kowanyama.

“This additional commitment has already ensured an extra clinician for the community, to provide support and targeted suicide prevention activities with this full-time position starting on Tuesday, July 11,” he said.

If you or someone you know needs assistance please call Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14.

Cairns Apunipima

 Part 2  : Working with communities to deliver better health is our primary aim
The nation’s Primary Health Networks (PHNs) are being encouraged to work closely with communities to tackle health challenges and improve the wellbeing of all Australians.
Aged Care Minister and Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt said he hoped opening the 2nd annual myPHN Conference in Cairns today would help guide a new era in effective and efficient care.
 
This year’s conference theme of ‘Transforming Healthcare Together’ challenges current beliefs on the best ways to improve patient outcomes,” said Minister Wyatt.
“PHNs are leading the charge in this space. After undertaking detailed analysis of their regions’ specific health needs, they are now commissioning services to fill these gaps.
 
“These range from building the capacity of General Practitioners (GPs) and tackling mental health, chronic conditions and obesity, to engaging with consumers in disease prevention.
The Minister said the first stage of the national trial of Health Care Homes was another example of the fresh approach to the care of people with complex conditions.
“Participating GPs and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services will work closely with patients and specialists, pharmacists and allied health care to empower patients to take an active role in health improvements,” he said.
 
Minister Wyatt said primary health providers had a vital role in helping improve Indigenous health and that of older Australians.
“Despite the progress we’ve made to date, Indigenous people still have a shorter life expectancy and are more likely to develop chronic conditions such as diabetes  kidney and cardiovascular diseases than non-Indigenous Australians,” Minister Wyatt said.
 
We have to do better, and primary health professionals are well placed to develop innovative new programs that can make a real difference.”
A good example is the Northern Queensland PHN workforce investment, including funding more than 100 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to become qualified indigenous health workers. 
 
The conference also focuses on how social and cultural influences can effect  health outcomes, promising new hope for closing the life expectancy gap for Indigenous Peoples.
 
Innovation and new thinking will help deliver a stronger health and aged care system,” said Minister Wyatt.
 
“Learning from the experiences of other communities and nations will also keep older Australians healthier for longer, and give them more flexibility on when and how they access care as they age.
“Better health is a partnership between governments, the health sector, and the consumer. Greater collaboration and new models of care promise positive outcomes.”

Part 3 Transcript of Interview on CAAMA Radio with Kyle Dowling on 5 July 2017

Ken Wyatt:What I like about the centre is that it is an alliance of organisations that have been heavily involved in research around many of the health issues impacting on our people. But what’s more important significant is that Congress is the lead agency or the lead player in all of this and having that Aboriginal leadership working so closely with the expertise and knowledge and skills and capability of research is fantastic.

Kyle Dowling: Ken Wyatt, the Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care, recently congratulated the 11 organisations partnering in the new Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre.

Ken Wyatt: Any of us have the capability and capacity to take leading voices. It’s whether we have the confidence and courage to do it at times. And I think Congress has really set a framework for showing that they are leaders. That they are prepared to go and fight for the things they believe in, but equally they work very closely with people who’ve got a like-minded thinking who want to make a difference.

I think the other part that is important in this is their voices are also about translating research into real change on the ground in the community with families. And that’s an important translation of research into practice. And they’ve been around a long time so their knowledge of the health of people within the area, but not only the area, but nationally has been well-based on being involved with the community, listening to community, but treating community for the range of illnesses that they’ve seen over the years. So I want to complement them on their vision, but also being a leader to demonstrate that our voices do count. That they are important.

Kyle Dowling: : So Ken, can you just talk to us about the actual role of the Central Australia Academic Health Centre and the importance of the collaboration between Aboriginal community-controlled health services and leading medical researchers.

Ken Wyatt:What’s important about the centre is that it’s now recognised as a centre of excellence for research. That means it gives them access to Commonwealth funding out of the Futures Research Fund, but also NHMRC funding as well. They’re also recognised as being of a national standing in the quality of what they are capable of doing, but the team they have within that alliance. So you’re really saying that you- you’ve brought together this incredible group of skills, resources and thinking that will be used to tackle some of those complex issues on the ground.

Yesterday, Alan Cass talked about renal disease and the work that affected him into making the decision to look at the whole issue of progression to dialysis and what we still need to do. And he talked about some of the alarming figures here that- when you think about the number of Aboriginal people within the Territory- those figures are extremely high. So we’ve got to do something about it and that’s what he’s talking about when he is involved in this collaborative centre.

Kyle Dowling: Why Central Australia? Why was this area the right place for the centre?

Ken Wyatt: Look, I think it’s just natural to expect it to be here because you’ve got an incredible organisation like Congress. You have Aboriginal leadership here whose thinking and whose passion for making a difference for people here and across Australia. But you’ve also got these incredible alliances with Flinders Uni, Baker IDI, and there’s other collaborative members of that group who are also deliverers of services. And if we think of the history of the Territory, there have been some outstanding individuals that have been involved. So you only have to look at the Menzies Research Centre, the work that they have done. It’s a natural fix and it’s a good mix of bringing some incredible people together to work on these issues.

Kyle Dowling: Now the partners in the CAAHSC have identified research priorities. Can you touch on a little bit of those?

Ken Wyatt: The five areas that they have identified are good, but the one that excites me is the whole issue of workforce and development of capacity. But developing of capacity for Aboriginal research- there was a young woman I met yesterday who has become a researcher and her passion for that work now is growing. It’s- and she becomes an example for others that research is an important area and that I can do it, so can you. And that workforce capacity also means that they will be looking at, not only what’s needed today, but the type of skills we’ll need for tomorrow and the future. And aged care is in that mix.

I had a good meeting with Congress this morning about older people who live in this area that I need to have a look at the issues around their needs, but equally be made aware of the number of older people now living in community and what we have to do for them.

Kyle Dowling: Now, Central Research has been dubbed a hub of hope for Indigenous health. How would you describe Central Research as in fact being a hub of help for Indigenous hope.

Ken Wyatt: That whole hub of hope I see in an optimistic sense. I see it as a group of people believing what they do, but then wanting to turn that into having access to further work they have to do to find and identify reasons. And I use the term causes of the cause.

So what are the causes that cause an illness or what are the causes that cause renal failure. And then to look at how do we go upstream and prevent that from happening. So if it’s skin diseases, if it’s other factors that result in kidney failure, then how do we address and tackle those. But equally what they’ll be looking at is what treatment can we provide and what treatment can we also think about providing at the local community level because the problem with dialysis is that you really need to live with the chairs are that provide you with that life-saving support. But ultimately if we can find a cure for kidney failure then that makes it far more expecting of pushing out life, but also preventing kidney failure and giving people in any individual hope for a future, hope for a longer life because the point I want to make is that every person we lose out of our community is a history book.

We never write our histories, we never write our stories on paper. We only learn in transmission in conversation, art, the stories we tell dance. Now when we take one of those people out, that’s the end of that story. We can never go back and re-read it, and that’s why that the work that this centre does is critical in keeping people alive longer because young people like you will need the knowledge of the stories, but also the history and every aspect that gives us what is important spiritually, culturally, but as an identity as an individual within our community.

Kyle Dowling: Before I do let you go, I did just want to get a quick message from you. It is NAIDOC Week. Your message to everyone across the country on NAIDOC weekend, what NAIDOC means to you as an Aboriginal person?

Ken Wyatt: This week, celebrating and acknowledging the power of our languages, the importance of language, but even where we’ve think we’ve lost languages I’m often surprised with the older people within our communities who can still speak the language. And in my own country there are people teaching Noongar language and reviving the veracity of the language. Now language often is an identifier of who we are and what country we’re associated with.

NAIDOC Week is about celebrating, enjoying ourselves within our community, having fun, but also reflecting.

Kyle Dowling: Yes, well on that note, Ken thank you for taking out your time to have a chat with us here on CAAMA Radio and thank you for tuning in.

That’s going to be it for Strong Voices today. Thank you for tuning in. I hope you enjoyed the program. Make sure you check out our CAAMA webpage. It’s caama.com.au. Make sure you check out our social media as well -our Facebook and Twitter. And we’ll be back the same time tomorrow.

Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 Week : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #SA #NT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD #Act #Tas

Intro : History of NAIDOC Week

1.NSW :Coffs Harbour NAIDOC Our Languages Matter – Garla ngarraangiya ngiyambandiya ngawaawa – is the theme for this year

 2.VIC : Smoking ceremony and afternoon tea at VACCHO Celebrating NAIDOC Week.

3.1 QLD New ATSICHS clinic opens NAIDOC week at Loganlea reminds us of those champions in Indigenous health who blazed the trail

3.2 QLD : Carbal ACCHO  leads the way for Indigenous health NAIDOC WEEK

 3.3 Apunipima ACCHO at Laura Dance Festival Cape York Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4.1 W.A New program announced in NAIDOC Week to improve social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people in regional WA

4.2 WA : Sistagirls wearing  NAIDOC design hoodies in Warburton WA Tackling Indigenous Smoking

5. SA Sharon Bilney ACCHO Nurse celebrate and acknowledges NAIDOC Week

6.1 NT : ABC TV Q and A broadcasts from Alice Springs for NAIDOC week

6.2 Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt visits Congress Alice Springs for NAIDOC week

7. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service judges choice in NAIDOC damper bake off

8. Tas :  Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (TAC) praised by Premier in NAIDOC week for reviving palawa kani, the Tasmanian Aboriginal language                           

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

History of NAIDOC Week

Photo above national launch of NAIDOC week in Cairns

NAIDOC poster  photo in banner Janette Milera🖤🧡

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News : 10 Winners profiles National #NAIDOC2017 Awards

Download and print the NAIDOC History Timeline (PDF version)

1920 – 1930

Before the 1920s, Aboriginal rights groups boycotted Australia Day (26 January) in protest against the status and treatment of Indigenous Australians. By the 1920s, they were increasingly aware that the broader Australian public were largely ignorant of the boycotts. If the movement were to make progress, it would need to be active.

Several organisations emerged to fill this role, particularly the Australian Aborigines Progressive Association (AAPA) in 1924 and the Australian Aborigines League (AAL) in 1932. Their efforts were largely overlooked, and due to police harassment, the AAPA abandoned their work in 1927.

In 1935, William Cooper, founder of the AAL, drafted a petition to send to King George V, asking for special Aboriginal electorates in Federal Parliament. The Australian Government believed that the petition fell outside its constitutional responsibilities.

1938

On Australia Day, 1938, protestors marched through the streets of Sydney, followed by a congress attended by over a thousand people. One of the first major civil rights gatherings in the world, it was known as the Day of Mourning.

Following the congress, a deputation led by William Cooper presented Prime Minister Joseph Lyons with a proposed national policy for Aboriginal people. This was again rejected because the Government did not hold constitutional powers in relation to Aboriginal people.

After the Day of Mourning, there was a growing feeling that it should be a regular event. In 1939 William Cooper wrote to the National Missionary Council of Australia to seek their assistance in supporting and promoting an annual event.

1940 – 1955

From 1940 until 1955, the Day of Mourning was held annually on the Sunday before Australia Day and was known as Aborigines Day. In 1955 Aborigines Day was shifted to the first Sunday in July after it was decided the day should become not simply a protest day but also a celebration of Aboriginal culture.

1956 – 1990

Major Aboriginal organisations, state and federal governments, and a number of church groups all supported the formation of, the National Aborigines Day Observance Committee (NADOC). At the same time, the second Sunday in July became a day of remembrance for Aboriginal people and their heritage.

In 1972, the Department of Aboriginal Affairs was formed, as a major outcome of the 1967 referendum.

In 1974, the NADOC committee was composed entirely of Aboriginal members for the first time. The following year, it was decided that the event should cover a week, from the first to second Sunday in July.

In 1984, NADOC asked that National Aborigines Day be made a national public holiday, to help celebrate and recognise the rich cultural history that makes Australia unique. While this has not happened, other groups have echoed the call.

1991 – Present

With a growing awareness of the distinct cultural histories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, NADOC was expanded to recognise Torres Strait Islander people and culture. The committee then became known as the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC). This new name has become the title for the whole week, not just the day. Each year, a theme is chosen to reflect the important issues and events for NAIDOC Week.

During the mid-1990s, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) took over the management of NAIDOC until ATSIC was disbanded in 2004-05.

There were interim arrangements in 2005. Since then a National NAIDOC Committee, until recently chaired by former Senator Aden Ridgeway, has made key decisions on national celebrations each year. The National NAIDOC Committee has representatives from most Australian states and territories.

Since 2008, Anne Martin and Ben Mitchell have been serving as co-chairs of the National NAIDOC Committee.

NAIDOC Week posters from 1972 to the present see link here

National NAIDOC Posters are available for public use to help you celebrate NAIDOC Week

1.NSW :Coffs Harbour NAIDOC Our Languages Matter – Garla ngarraangiya ngiyambandiya ngawaawa – is the theme for this year

The NAIDOC Ready Mob Road Show Kempsey , Port Macquarie and Coffs Harbour

Aboriginal Health Services aim to be the peak providers of high quality, culturally appropriate holistic primary health and related care services throughout the Mid North Coast.

The services operate from Monday to Friday and provide access to General Practitioners, Aboriginal Health Workers, various medical specialists and allied health professionals.

The following Aboriginal Medical Services provide services to communities within the boundaries of the Mid North Coast Local Health District. Please contact them directly for further information:

02 6652 0800 Galambila Aboriginal Medical Service, Coffs Harbour

02 6560 2300 Durri Aboriginal Health Service Inc, Kempsey

02 6958 6800 Darrimba Maarra, Nambucca

02 6589 4000 Werin Aboriginal Corporation Medical Clinic, Port Macquarie

 2.VIC : Smoking ceremony and afternoon tea at VACCHO Celebrating NAIDOC Week.Photos Eddie Moore
 
Flag raising Federation Square
3.1 QLD New ATSICHS clinic opens NAIDOC week at Loganlea reminds us of those champions in Indigenous health who blazed the trail

 As NAIDOC Week is celebrated nationwide, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in Loganlea can also celebrate access to health treatment closer to home with the opening of a new primary healthcare clinic.

The new clinic, which Health and Ambulance Services Minister Cameron Dick opened today, received more than $900,000 in funding from the Palaszczuk Government.

Mr Dick said the facility was a step in the right direction in addressing the healthcare needs of the local community.

“The large and growing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in the Logan area has increased demand for culturally appropriate and accessible health services,” Mr Dick said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service (ATSICHS) Brisbane’s new Loganlea Clinic provides community based patient care, allowing for conditions, such as chronic disease, to be managed close to home and within a community setting.

“Spending less time in a hospital is always a better outcome for everyone, and eases the demand on resources for the hospitals in the area.”

Under the Making Tracks Investment Strategy 2015-2018, Queensland Health provided about $920,000 to ATSICHS Brisbane to establish the Loganlea clinic with the help of the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH).

Mr Dick said investing in evidence-based multidisciplinary services for Indigenous Queenslanders was a key aspect of the Palaszczuk Government’s strategy.

“In addition, ATSICHS Brisbane currently receives $1 million annually to deliver comprehensive and culturally appropriate primary healthcare services at their Woodridge clinic and $220,000 to employ two child health workers at their Northgate clinic,” he said.

Member for Waterford and Minister for Communities Shannon Fentiman said it was great that the clinic could be opened during NAIDOC Week.

“The Palaszczuk Government is investing more than $200 million over three years into services and programs targeted at closing the health gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous people in Queensland,” Ms Fentiman said.

“Our goal is to close the life expectancy gap by 2033 and halve the child mortality gap by 2018.

“Partnering with community-based organisations to provide accessible and efficient primary healthcare services will go a long way to achieving this.”

ATSICHS Brisbane is a not-for-profit community owned health and human services organisation, now with seven medical clinics across greater Brisbane and Logan.

“The Loganlea community will benefit greatly from this clinic, which will have a tangible impact on the health and wellbeing of our clients and the strength of our community,” ATSICHS Brisbane CEO Jody Currie said.

“This week as we celebrate NAIDOC, our hope is that our people and our community, not just in Logan but across the state can say: I make good choices and decisions about my health and wellbeing and get the treatment and care that is best for me and my life. This can happen through clinics such as these.

“Together with the IUIH we are determined to advance the Indigenous healthcare sector, delivering positive and practical responses to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing needs.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson said the clinic would meet the increased demand, with the release of the 2016 Census

3.2 Carbal ACCHO  leads the way for Indigenous health NAIDOC WEEK

AS NAIDOC Week 2017 swings into celebration, Carbal Medical Centre in Warwick is at the front-line, keeping our indigenous community fighting fit.

PHOTO : CHECK-UP: Carbal Medical Centre’s doctor Christine Tran checks out Ethan Appleby while Rebecca Appleby looks

Clinic manager Kerry Stewart said Carbal was a one-stop shop for indigenous health in Warwick.

“We look after it all here, all health concerns, be they physical, mental, emotional and social,” Mrs Stewart said

She said the main health concern among Warwick’s indigenous population was chronic disease.

“This is something we see a lot of – diabetes, cancer, respiratory problems and renal failure are the main issues,” she said.

“To help we have a large team of doctors, nurses, allied health and Aboriginal health workers, indigenous team care co-ordinators, who can assist with support, care and comfort.

“We also have a worker whose job is to tackle indigenous smoking.

“With funding we receive we’re able to pay for things like sleep apnoea machines, mobility aids, blood sugar monitors, nebulisers, items that help keep our patients healthy. We also provide transport and accommo- dation services for those who need them to assist patients to get to appoint- ments in Warwick and further afield.”

Carbal Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Services chief executive officer Brian Hewitt said under the Closing the Gap initiative the Federal Government decided in 2006 the best way to approach indigenous health was by starting community indigenous health centres.

“So various Aboriginal Medical Services were developed and Carbal has been hugely successful, so much so we became a company 12 months ago,” Mr Hewitt said.

“We run five clinics, employing 80 staff that encompass Toowoomba, Warwick, Stanthorpe and Goondiwindi. We look after about 6000 clients, 5000 who identify as indigenous.”

 3.3 Apunipima ACCHO at Laura Dance Festival Cape York Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4.1 W.A New program announced in NAIDOC Week to improve social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people in regional WA

New Aboriginal family wellbeing training will be prioritised across the Kimberley, Pilbara and Goldfields regions, in a West Australian first to address social and emotional health risks in indigenous communities.

The Aboriginal Health Council of WA welcomed today’s State Government announcement to contribute $1 million over two years towards the pilot Aboriginal Family Wellbeing project to help prevent self-harm and suicide in the regions by strengthening families.

The project includes an accredited six-month Certificate II training program, which will be delivered jointly by the WA Mental Health Commission, AHCWA and the 22 Aboriginal Medical Services across the state.

AHCWA Chairperson Michelle Nelson Cox said the initiative would ensure all Aboriginal Medical Services in WA had at least one key staff member skilled in delivering the program.

“This is about building the skills and confidence of our social and emotional wellbeing teams across all Aboriginal Medical Services so they can identify communities where there is real need to strengthen family wellbeing and, in turn, self-harm and suicide prevention strategies,” Ms Nelson Cox said.

“Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in Aboriginal communities.

“Statistics show that the suicide rate for indigenous Australians is almost twice the rate for non-indigenous Australians. And concerningly, the suicide rate of our young people aged 15 to 19 is five times as high as non-indigenous Australians.”

At least six trainers will be educated in the program in the first year, with a focus on the Kimberley, Pilbara and Goldfields regions. Other services and regions will be invited to participate in the second year.

“This is the first time that this training has been delivered in WA and we feel proud to have built a partnership with the Mental Health Commission to share this important initiative,” Ms Nelson Cox said.

“Until now, there has been a lack of specific Aboriginal family wellbeing training. We hope that by providing this new program it will lead to more and more trainers in the regions and real health benefits to our communities.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) currently engaged as members.

4.2 WA : Sistagirls wearing  NAIDOC design hoodies in Warburton WA Tackling Indigenous Smoking

5. SA Sharon Bilney ACCHO Nurse celebrate and acknowledges NAIDOC Week

“Deciding to become a nurse is a decision that I’ve never regretted,

It’s a career that you can have around children and I’ve loved the opportunities that have come with it as well – I loved that I’ve worked in a hospital setting but also been able to lecture and have the chance to mentor and support young Aboriginal students on their path into nursing.”

The mother of four, who is Manager of Client Services for Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service, began her early career working at Port Lincoln Hospital.

Going home with the feeling that she’d made a difference in someone’s life that day is what Sharon Bilney says is the best part of being a nurse.

“When I was working at the hospital, it was just so nice to feel as though I’d made a difference,whether it was to an Aboriginal patient that day or educating a non-Aboriginal person about Aboriginal culture,” Ms Bilney, who belongs to the Kokatha family group, said.She also had a two-year stint lecturing in nursing at TAFE South Australia’s Port Lincoln Campus.

Ms Bilney is speaking about her nursing career to help highlight NAIDOC Week, which runs from Sunday, July 2-9, and is urging young Indigenous people to explore nursing as a career option.

The theme for this year’s NAIDOC Week is Our Languages Matter.

“I highly recommend nursing. Even if you don’t want to work in a hospital, the possibilities and options are endless. Take every opportunity that comes your way,” Ms Bilney said.

“NAIDOC week is an important week to celebrate our history and culture. If not for anything else, it is just a wonderful opportunity to recognise our people for one week.”

Ms Bilney said the best thing she had ever done was switch from her previous career in office work to nursing.

“Once I knew that I would be able to study at home part-time while I still had my youngest little boy at home with me, I thought the opportunity was just amazing,” she said.

“Once I was enrolled, I just wanted to focus on getting through the next five years of study and really achieve that goal of becoming a nurse.”

In her final year of study, Ms Bilney received the Federal Government-funded Rural and Remote Undergraduate scholarship, through the Australian College of Nursing (ACN). ACN Chief Executive Officer, Adjunct Professor Kylie Ward FACN, said Ms Bilney was a perfect example of how diverse a career in nursing could be, and how it could be explored at different stages in life.

“Sharon was a mum at home caring for her young son when an opportunity came her way to be able to study nursing,” Adjunct Professor Ward said.

“On completing her studies, she has had the opportunity to work in a hospital and experience theatre work, accident and emergency, the surgical and medical wards and has also had the chance to work in palliative care and mental health.

“She has also lectured in nursing and been able to mentor young Indigenous students and is now leading the way in providing health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Port Lincoln.”

6.1 NT : ABC TV Q and A broadcasts from Alice Springs for NAIDOC week

Features William Tilmouth Chair of Congress ACCHO

 

6.2 Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt visits Congress Alice Springs for NAIDOC week

  Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 : New Aboriginal-led collaboration has world-class focus on boosting remote Aboriginal health

7. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service judges choice in NAIDOC damper bake off

It was made with love, hope and a bit of glitter.

A dozen teams battled it out in a damper cook-off at the Aboriginal Tent Embassy on Tuesday as part of National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee week celebrations.

The Glamper Damper Campers represented Reconciliation Australia and were the overall winners. The team created a unique damper, which they described as being made with love, hope and glitter. The three-cheese damper also featured pumpkin, spinach and buttermilk – which they said was the secret ingredient.

Damper, also known as bush bread or seedcake, was originally made from flour of ground seeds, grains, legumes, roots or nuts. But the introduction of pre-milled white flour and white sugar has mostly replaced the use of native ingredients to make the damper.

Competition judge and Ngunnawal man Richie Allan, of the Traditional Owners Aboriginal Corporation, said the competitors were judged on a number of criteria, including taste, flavour, texture and creativity.

“The boys went a bit fancy on all the criteria, looks like MKR or something,” Mr Allan said, laughing.

Next year’s competition might go back to the “old ways” of baking damper, where contestants have to grind seeds to make their own flour, he said.Joining Mr Allan on the judging panel were Reconciliation Australia deputy chief executive officer Karen Mundine and event organiser Derek Hardman.

There were winners in four categories:

  • Judge’s choice – Mozzarella, ham and chive, created by Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service.
  • Best flavour – Nutella centre, created by Indigenous Business Australia.
  • Encouragement award – Choc chip, created by Lynley, 5, and Kennedy, 8.
  • Reconciliation Australia NAIDOC overall winner – Pumpkin, three cheese and spinach created by the Glamper Damper Campers from Reconciliation Australia.

Reconciliation Australia organised the event and had two teams competing. The other teams were made up of people from various organisations and public service departments, including the ACT Health Directorate and the ACT Finance Directorate.

Reconciliation Australia chief executive officer Justin Mohamed said the aim of the event was to focus on “sharing culture, having relationships, talking [and] getting to know each other better”.

The event was a first for the organisation and Mohamed said he enjoyed being out of the boardroom and around the campfire.

Information on other NAIDOC events happening this week can be found here.

8. Tas :  Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (TAC) praised by Premier in NAIDOC week for reviving palawa kani, the Tasmanian Aboriginal language.

June Sculthorpe is passionate about palawa kani.

In the 1990s she was one of the first people to work on a program to revive the Tasmanian Aboriginal language, alongside linguist Terry Crowley at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies.

Palawa kani words to learn

  • ya — Hello
  • lakapawa nina — See you
  • mina — I, me
  • nina — You
  • ya pulingina — Welcome
  • nina nayri? — How are you going?
  • mina nayri — I’m well
  • lutruwita — Tasmania

They used as their base written documents from early explorers who had transcribed Aboriginal words.

Professor Crowley also had some recordings of the language being spoken, and it turned out those recordings had a connection to Ms Sculthorpe.

“As he played that [recording], I knew the lady who had spoken to it,” she said.

“Her name was Dot Heffernan who was Fanny Cochrane Smith’s grandchild.”

Ms Sculthorpe is also a descendant of Fanny Cochrane Smith, who famously recorded Aboriginal songs on wax cylinders in the 1800s.

“I had never known that the language had been passed down in our family,” she said.

Hearing a voice she knew say “tapilti ningina mumara prupari patrula” (go and get a log and put it on the fire) was a life-changing moment for Ms Sculthorpe.

“I’d never known that those words had been used in Tasmania in my family and it was very moving. That was the beginning of my involvement with palawa kani.”

Ms Sculthorpe has built up knowledge of palawa kani to the point where the community can now relearn and reclaim their words and culture.

“Because our culture had been so taken away from us, we want to learn the language, we want our community to learn the language,” she said.

WATCH VIDEO HERE

 

  

 

         

Introducing dual place names for landmarks such as kunanyi/Mount Wellington has slowly seen palawa kani introduced to the whole of Tasmania.

“As we learn it more, it’s good to hear people … to be using the place names and basic greetings,” Ms Sculthorpe said.

“We’re in Tasmania and these are Tasmanian places and it just sort of connects us more to the long history of people living in Tasmania.”

During this year’s NAIDOC Week, Ms Sculthorpe has read the weather forecast each morning in palawa kani on ABC Radio Hobart Breakfast.

“It was a good way to learn, by being forced to go down and read the weather,” she said.

“Because we have all those words for hot and cold, sunny and cloudy, icy and foggy, and the language program puts all those words around here on a poster to try to get people to read them.

“But unless you actually have to use them every day it is hard to remember them.”

Tasmanian Premier Will Hodgman said NAIDOC Week served as an “an important reminder of the need for continued, concerted efforts towards reconciliation”.

He acknowledged the work of the Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (TAC) for its efforts researching and reviving traditional languages, particularly palawa kani, the Tasmanian Aboriginal language.

“Using palawa kani, 13 geographical features and places have now been given traditional language names, including Hobart’s mountain kunanyi/Mount Wellington,” he said.

It is estimated about 250 distinct Indigenous language groups once existed in Australia and most would have had several dialects, so the total number of language varieties is likely to be far more.

Tasmanian school students have joined in song and movement as part of their 2017 NAIDOC week celebrations, recognising the history, culture and achievements of Indigenous peoples.

The week’s theme of Our Languages Matter is focused on the importance, richness and resilience of Indigenous language, highlighting the role language plays in cultural identity and linking people to their land and water.

It also explores the way in which Indigenous history, spirituality and rites are shared through both story and song.

Moonah Primary School students celebrate NAIDOC

Aboriginal students from Moonah Primary School formed a NAIDOC committee and hosted a whole school assembly to mark the week.

They asked the school community to wear red, yellow and black in tribute to the Aboriginal flag.

“Every colour on the flag has its own meaning and representation,” Grade 6 student Heidi Farnell explained.

“The yellow circle in the middle represents the sun [which] is our protector and giver of life,” Grade 5 student Matilda Hopper said.

They told the audience the flag was designed to bring the Aboriginal community together in a bid for land rights.

“But today it represents more than that,” Caleb said.

“It is a widely recognised symbol of the unity and identity of my Aboriginal people.”School principal Kathy Morgan said it was a valuable experience for all students but especially those in the NAIDOC committee.

“They’ve just loved it. To start off with they were in awe of having this responsibility,” she said.

“They felt really special.”According to the national NAIDOC committee, there are now only about 120 languages still spoken, with many “at risk of being lost as elders pass on”.

Aboriginal Health #NAIDOC2017 : New Aboriginal-led collaboration has world-class focus on boosting remote Aboriginal health

“One of the clear innovations that our Centre already offers is acknowledging that the principle of Aboriginal community control is fundamental to research, university and health care partnerships with regional and remote Aboriginal communities,”

Ms Donna Ah Chee Congress CEO said it was satisfying to achieve recognition for the strong health leadership and collaboration that already exists in Central Australia ( see editorial Part 3 below)

  ” The centre’s accreditation this week with the National Health and Medical Research Council proved the “landmark research” by consortium members had “huge potential” to address serious indigenous health issues.

The objective is to evaluate problems and find practical solutions fast, to prevent health problems and give speedy but lasting benefits to patients within community,”

Announcing $222,000 in seed funding, Federal Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt see full story PART 2 from the Australian below

Photo above : Traditional Arrernte owners welcome Ken Wyatt MP to Alice Springs to launch the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre

An academic health science centre in Central Australia is the first Aboriginal-led collaboration to achieve Federal Government recognition for leadership in health research and delivery of evidence-based health care.

The Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care, the Hon Ken Wyatt MP, today announced that the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre (CAAHSC) was one of only two consortia nationally to be recognised as a Centre for Innovation in Regional Health (CIRH) by Australia’s peak funding body for medical research, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).

To be successful in their bid, the 11-member consortium was required to demonstrate competitiveness at the highest international levels across all relevant areas of health research and translation of research findings into health care practice.

With NHMRC recognition, the CAAHSC joins an elite group of Australian academic health science centres that have so far all been based in metropolitan areas including Melbourne,

Sydney and Adelaide. The CAAHSC is also in good company internationally, with long established collaborations including Imperial College Healthcare in the UK and Johns Hopkins Medicine in the USA.

The CAAHSC, whose membership includes Aboriginal community controlled and government-run health services, universities and medical research institutes, was formally established in 2014 to improve collaboration across the sectors in support of health.

Such synergy is vital in order to make an impact in remote central Australia, considering the vast geographical area (over 1 million square kilometres) and the health challenges experienced particularly by Aboriginal residents.

The CAAHSC consortium reflects the importance of Aboriginal leadership in successful research and health improvement in Central Australia.

The Chairperson of CAAHSC is Mr John Paterson, CEO of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory, the peak body for the Aboriginal community controlled health services sector in the NT.

With the leadership of CEO Ms Donna Ah Chee, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress was the lead partner on the group’s bid to become a CIRH.

The CAAHSC is a community driven partnership, where Aboriginal people themselves have taken the lead in identifying and defining viable solutions for the health inequities experienced in the Central Australia region.

The CAAHSC partners have a long and successful track record of working together on innovative, evidence-based projects to improve health care policy and practice in the region.

Such projects include a study that examined high rates of self-discharge by Aboriginal patients at the Alice Springs Hospital, which in many cases can lead to poor health outcomes.

This research was used to develop a tool to assess self-discharge risk which is now routinely used in care, and to expand the role of Aboriginal Liaison Officers within the hospital.

Another collaborative project designed to address the rising rates of diabetes in pregnant women involves the establishment of a patient register and birth cohort in the

Northern Territory to improve antenatal care in the Aboriginal population.

CAAHSC Chair, Mr John Paterson agrees, saying the CIRH would serve as a model for other regional and remote areas both nationally and internationally, particularly in its governance, capacity building, and culturally appropriate approaches to translational research.

Mr Paterson said he hoped NHMRC recognition would attract greater numbers of highly skilled researchers and health professionals to work in Central Australia, and that local Aboriginal people would become more engaged in medical education, research and health care delivery.

He also hopes that achieving status as a CIRH will be instrumental in attracting further resources to the region, including government, corporate and philanthropic support.

Mr Paterson said the consortium is now focussed on building a plan across its five priority areas: workforce and capacity building; policy research and evaluation; health services research; health determinants and risk factors; and chronic and communicable disease.

This will include development of research support ‘apprenticeships’ for Aboriginal people and pursuit of long-term financial sustainability.

The partners of the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre include: Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT); Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute; Charles Darwin University; Centre for Remote Health (A joint centre of Flinders University and Charles Darwin University); Central Australian Aboriginal Congress; Menzies School of Health Research; Central Australia Health Service (Northern Territory Health); CRANAplus; Flinders University; Ngaanyatjarra Health Service and the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health and Wellbeing.

1.Chronic Conditions

Chronic diseases are the most important contributor to the life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Given their impact on premature mortality, disability and health care utilisation in Central Australia it is unsurprising that chronic disease has become the primary focus for addressing Indigenous Australian health disadvantage.

The Central Australia AHSC has considerable research and translation expertise with those chronic conditions that most impact the Aboriginal Australian population, including diabetes, heart disease, renal disease and depression.

Some of our focus areas are: understanding the developmental origins of adult chronic disease through targeted multi-disciplinary research focused on in-utero, maternal and early life determinants; understanding and preventing the early onset and rapid progression of heart, lung and kidney disease and diabetes within Aboriginal people, and developing and supporting capacity development of the chronic disease workforce within Aboriginal communities and health services.

2.Health Determinants and Risk Factors

In order to support the health of Central Australians, we recognise the importance of transcending boundaries between the biological, social and clinical sciences. The Central Australia AHSC takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding social gradients, their determinants, and pathways by which these determinants contribute to illness, and consequently to forwarding policy responses to reduce health inequalities.

The Central Australia AHSC is interested in exploring the role of stress, intergenerational trauma and other psychosocial factors, as well as uncovering the biological pathways by which social factors impact on cardiometabolic risk, mental illness and other conditions of relevance to Indigenous communities.

3.Health Services Research

As a regional hub servicing a high proportion of Aboriginal people spread across an extensive area, Central Australia serves as an exemplar environment through which to address critical issues of national importance – for instance, targeted and practical research focused on the National Health and Hospital Reform agenda, the ‘Close the Gap’ reforms and the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

Through health services research, the Central Australia AHSC is chiefly interested in developing and equipping primary care and hospital services with the skills, methods and tools by which to improve health care quality, appropriateness and accessibility.

Towards this goal, we are involved in developing, trialling, evaluating and establishing the cost-effectiveness of novel health system approaches to the identification, management and prevention of acute care, chronic disease and mental illness

4.Policy Research and Evaluation

The Central Australia AHSC brings together the expertise of leading clinician researchers, public health specialists and health service decision makers.

The Central Australia AHSC provides the capacity to evaluate the systems that underpin change management in health care through policy, protocol and evaluation research, and to support quality improvement processes through health provider training.

While being locally relevant, our works also informs jurisdictional and national health policy and practice in Aboriginal and remote health and implementation of national health reforms.

5.Workforce and Capacity Building

Central Australia’s health care workforce encompasses health care providers in hospitals, remote Aboriginal communities, and outreach services, including Aboriginal health practitioners, nurses, allied health providers, general practitioners and specialists.

Remoteness and the challenging work environment often translate to high levels of health provider staff turnover.

The Central Australia AHSC’s ongoing focus on professional development and capacity building facilitates health work force sustainability by providing relevant training and support and by attracting new health care providers who are also involved in research.

Workforce and capacity building undertaken by the AHSC partners includes the delivery of education programs (including tailored remote and Indigenous health postgraduate awards for doctors, nurses and allied health practitioners), growing research capacity (supervised formal academic qualifications and informal mentoring), and conducting research to inform workforce recruitment and retention.

Part 2 World-class focus on boosting remote health

Alice Springs mother Nellie Impu is part of a grim health statistic profoundly out of place in a first-world nation: one in five pregnant Aboriginal women in the Northern Territory has diabetes.

Photo : Nellie Impu, left, with Wayne, Wayne Jr and nurse Paula Van Dokkum in Alice Springs. Picture: Chloe Erlich

From the Australian July 5

For pre-existing type 2 diabetes, that’s at a rate 10 times higher than for non-indigenous women; more common gestational diabetes is 1.5 times the rate.

Mrs Impu became part of that statistic almost five years ago when she was pregnant with son Wayne. So the announcement of a new central Australian academic health science centre, led by the Aboriginal community-controlled health service sector and bringing together a consortium of 11 clinical and research groups, is a big deal for her and many women like her.

The diabetes treatment she underwent while carrying Wayne will continue for more than a decade as part of a longitudinal study.

“We know there is a link ­between mums with diabetes in pregnancy and outcomes for their babies as they grow, including ­future possibilities of type 2 diabetes, which work like this can help us track,” said research nurse Paula Van Dokkum, who works with consortium member Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute.

Wayne is meeting all his childhood development targets, and his mother said the ongoing association with the centre would help her in “trying to make sure he grows up healthy and strong”.

Announcing $222,000 in seed funding, federal Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt said the centre’s accreditation this week with the National Health and Medical Research Council proved the “landmark research” by consortium members had “huge potential” to address serious indigenous health issues.

“The objective is to evaluate problems and find practical solutions fast, to prevent health problems and give speedy but lasting benefits to patients within community,” Mr Wyatt said.

The academic health science centre model, well ­established internationally, brings together health services, universities and medical research institutes to better produce evidence-based care.

The Alice Springs-based enterprise will aim to tackle a ­cancer-causing virus endemic in indigenous central Australia, its only significant instance outside South America and central Africa.

The human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 causes a slow death over 20 years with leukaemia, chronic cough, respiratory problems and respiratory failure. It can be acquired through breast milk in early childhood as well as through blood or sexual contact.

A recent study found HTLV-1 infection rates in a central Australian indigenous community of more than 40 per cent. One result, the inflammatory disease bronch­iectasis, is a leading cause of death for young adults at the Alice Springs hospital.

The program will also address the soaring demand for dialysis in remote communities, with indigenous Australians five times as likely to have end-stage kidney disease than other Australians.

Alice Springs hospital is home to the largest single-standing ­dialysis service in the southern hemisphere, with 360 patients.

Part 3 Alice Springs: the Red Centre of medical innovation

London, Boston, Toronto, Melbourne … and Alice Springs.

Although there may be little in common between these major cities and the heart of Australia’s outback, an announcement this week brings the Red Centre into the company of international players in translational health research, including prestigious institutions such as Imperial College Healthcare in Britain and Johns Hopkins Medicine in the US.

This week, the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre was given the official seal of approval by the National Health and Medical Research Council.

The Central Australia consortium was one of only two centres recognised as a centre of innovation in regional health for its leadership in health research and delivery of evidence-based healthcare.

And now there’s opportunity in the Red Centre to do even more.

It may well be the most remote academic health science centre in the world, and perhaps the only academic health science centre in the world led by Aboriginal people. With such esteemed recognition for this remote, Aboriginal-led, evidence-based healthcare collaboration, it is hoped that public and private support will also follow.

As a model well established abroad and gaining momentum in Australia, academic health science centres are partnerships between health services, universities and medical research institutes whose collaborative work ensures that translational health research leads to evidence-based care and better health outcomes for patients.

For the 11 partners behind the Central Australia partnership, recognition as a centre for innovation in regional health acknowledges the outstanding collaboration that has existed in this region for several years, and particularly the leadership offered by the Aboriginal sector.

Working with the other partners in the consortium, Aboriginal community-controlled health services are taking the lead in identifying and defining viable solutions for the health inequities experienced in the region.

The work of the Central Australia partners is practical and responsive.

Interested in resolving what had become a troubling issue at Alice Springs Hospital, a resident physician researcher initiated a study that found nearly half of all admitted Aboriginal patients had self-discharged from the hospital in the past, with physician, hospital and patient factors contributing to this practice.

The research findings were used to develop a self-discharge risk assessment tool that is now routinely used in hospital care, and to expand the role of Aboriginal liaison officers within the hospital.

Considering the vast and remote geographical area — more than one million square kilometres — and the health challenges experienced particularly by Aboriginal residents who make up about 45 per cent of the region’s population of about 55,000 people, the Central Australia consortium faces unique and significant challenges. In this respect, Alice Springs may be more like Iqaluit in the Canadian Arctic than London or Baltimore.

But in other ways this relatively small academic health science centre may be at an advantage.

With its closely knit network of healthcare providers, medical researchers, medical education providers and public health experts working together, community-driven approaches to identifying issues and developing evidence-based solutions have become a standard approach in Central Australia.

In this setting of high need and limited resources, working collectively is sensible, practical and necessary.

Importantly, there is the possibility to do a lot more.

The consortium hopes such recognition will help to attract top healthcare providers and researchers, to increase educational offerings and to develop local talent, especially Aboriginal people.

The evidence is resounding. A research oasis in the desert, this centre for innovation is fertile ground for investment by government, corporations and philanthropists alike.

Donna Ah Chee is chief executive of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress. John Paterson is chief executive of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory.

Aboriginal Children’s Health : Targeted Early Childhood learning programs 6 months to 3 years key to #healthyfutures

By age four children in the most well off families had been exposed to 32 million more words than children in welfare dependent families,

In addition to this, children in the most well off families had been exposed to 560,000 more positive affirmations than negative, whereas in the welfare families children had 160,000 more negative affirmations than positive.

This is a staggering difference of 720,000 from a supportive environment towards a discouraging one.”

The next generation of young people, who are likely to be impulsive, have unhealthy brain development leading to poor school performance, develop alcohol and other drug addictions, be violent on the streets and incarcerated, are already there.

We must do better at preventing this from occurring and early childhood is key.”

Ms Donna Ah Chee is the CEO of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Alice Springs which, not surprisingly, has early childhood care as its top priority.

Pictured above : Ms Ah Chee , Doctor John Boffa and staff showing  NACCHO CEO Pat Turner through  ” Arrwekele akaltye—irretyeke ampere ”   A targeted Early Childhood learning program  Aboriginal children 6 months to 3 years

See NACCHO TV Interview with Donna Ah Chee

” Denying children stimulation – talking with them, reading to them, praising them – very early in their life is more serious than either sexual abuse or physical abuse in terms of impact on life long health and well being.

Donna Ah Chee quoted these findings by the Harvard Centre on the Developing Child at a keynote address to a recent  national health conference in Alice Springs.

Originally published in Alice Springs News Online

Congress has runs on the board. It is one of the oldest Aboriginal NGOs in town, founded in 1973.

“We [Aboriginal people] controlled it from the beginning, and still do,” she says.

“In some ways we had no choice. Our health status was very poor as you can see from the infant mortality rate and Life Expectancy figures in 1973 when Congress started.

“The mainstream health system had completely failed us.”

There was a heavy dose of politics to get the point across.

Congress was the key organiser of the first land rights rally here  “as the newly formed organisation was clear about the connections between health, control, land, culture, employment, shelter and so on long before we started to use the language of ‘Social Determinants of Health’.”

Congress has had a role in an improving health system that has had many big players, not least the NT and Federal governments: Infant mortality in the mid ’70s was 120 per 1000 live births. Now it is 10. Life expectancy for men was 52 – now 63; and 54 for women – now 70.

The organisation now looks after 12,000 people a year, including 2000 bush visitors.

“Give me the child until he is seven and I will give you the man,” Ms Ah Chee quotes the 17th century saint Francis Xavier.

“Children who start behind tend to fall further behind. Babies are born with 25% of their brains developed, and there is then a rapid period of development so that by the age of three their brains are 80% developed.”

Ms Ah Chee quotes epidemiologist Sir Michael Marmot, former chair of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health, producer of “Closing the Gap in a Generation” in 2008 and recently presenting the Boyer Lecture series on the ABC.

SEE NACCHO POST

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #SDoH #MarmotOz : ‘Aunty, with our prospects in life – what is the point of being healthy?

She says he published the results of a British study on 70,000 children all born in 1970.

“He showed that brain development by age four is highly dependent on being read to every day, conversational language in the home, going to bed at the same time every night, being part of a good playgroup and being physically active – that is responsive parenting,” says Ms Ah Chee.

“Such programs can help some children to “leapfrog” out of the intergenerational disadvantage that they are otherwise destined to.

“They can reverse the large social gradient seen in this graph. In the second Boyer lecture Professor Marmot describes one such program that has achieved this in the poorest part of London – in Hackney,” she says.

p2355-congress-brain-growth

 

“Yet in spite of all the evidence for the effectiveness of early years interventions this is how most OECD countries spend their funds – it is the inverse of what is needed,” flicking the graph  on the screen.

She says more than 70% of Aboriginal mothers who have accepted participating in the Congress early childhood program “are significantly educationally disadvantaged so it is reaching the right families.

“Corresponding with the educational disadvantage is the reality that 80% are not working and have incomes of less than $500 per week.

“The program is clearly accessing some of the most disadvantaged families in Alice Springs with whom it will have it greatest impact.”

She says there needs to be one carer for every four children “but the carers can be community people trained on the job. This is another advantage to this approach as it provides employment for local Aboriginal people who want to care for kids.”

The primary health care sector through “its antenatal care and healthy kids checks establishes supportive relationships with mothers, families and children in the critical period from conception to age three.

“The education sector should continue to take responsibility for pre-school from age three and primary education. This is how the two sectors should work together in partnership to ensure all children get the best possible start to life.”

When Congress started 40 years ago, infant mortality rates were around 170 deaths per 1,000 live births and now they are around 12 . Our babies are no longer dying from easily preventable causes and the challenge has moved to the promotion of healthier development.
More than 300 staff are able to provide more than 160,000 episodes of care each year to about 12,000 Aboriginal people living in Alice Springs and in six remote community clinics in Central Australia.”

The Congress’s Chief Executive Officer, Ms Donna Ah Chee, says there has been a 30% decrease in all cause mortality for Aboriginal people in the NT since 2001

Download the Report Here : CPHC Congress Final Report

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #SA #NT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD

1.QLD Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Sports Health Carnival attracts 600 kids

2. NSW Coffs Harbour Aunty Mary ” 94% of vision loss in Indigenous Australians is preventable or treatable

3. SA : Sharon Bilney ACCHO Nurse celebrate and acknowledges NAIDOC Week

 4.SA : Community Controlled Health Service works to close the life expectancy gap in Murray Bridge

5. WA : AHCWA In battle ” meth use problems rival alcohol abuse

6. NT  : The NT ‘Intervention’ led to some changes in Indigenous health, but the social cost may not have been worth it

7.VIC : VAHS Indigenous superhero empowering the next generation of ‘smoke-free ambassadors’                                  

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.QLD Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Sports Health Carnival attracts 600 kids

The University of Queensland has welcomed the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival to the St Lucia campus.

From 26-29 June, the carnival is showcasing the strong links between health, wellbeing, sport and education.

More than 600 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders aged 6 to 12 have nominated to participate in rugby league and netball games, in addition to a tour of the campus, demonstrations from Faculties, and meeting some of their sporting heroes, including the Brisbane Broncos and Queensland Firebirds.

UQ is supporting the IUIH event through the UQ Poche Centre for Indigenous Health and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit.

Director of the UQ Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit, Shane Drahm, said the carnival demonstrated strong links between UQ and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

“It’s a fantastic opportunity to highlight our partnerships and the fantastic work of IUIH and the Deadly Choices program in community,” Mr Drahm said.

Deadly Choices General Manager Keiron Lander said the event focused on promoting positive messages for the young participants and their families.

“A healthy choice is a deadly choice,” Mr Lander said.

“The carnival is a smoke-free, sugar-free and alcohol-free event. All the children here this week have been attending school and have undergone a health check through their local services.

“The event is about bringing little people together in a safe environment focused on health, education and physical activity.”

2. NSW Coffs Harbour Aunty Mary ” 94% of vision loss in Indigenous Australians is preventable or treatable

“I think it’s important for other Aboriginal people to hear my story and understand it is important to take your health seriously and listen to your doctor,

“Most cases of blindness in Aboriginal people are preventable and I want to prevent others losing their sight like me.”

Aunty Mary lost her sight to diabetes and will speak about the importance of maintaining a healthier lifestyle to prevent this illness.

INDIGENOUS elder Aunty Mary Hooker has a full dance card for her upcoming visit to the Coffs Coast for NAIDOC Week.

The Bundjalung woman will be at Coffs Harbour Showground on July 5 as a guest in the Guide Dogs NSW/ACT information stand at the Who Ya Gunna Call forum.

She will also visit family fun days in Nambucca Heads and Grafton during her stay.

A keen knitter and painter, she will be bringing along a giant 5.5 metre scarf she knitted in the colours of the Aboriginal flag as an example of how she keeps busy.

“Guide Dogs came to my home to teach me cane training, how to get to the shops, cross the road safely and move around my community on my own.

“I wouldn’t have gained my confidence without the free training and support.

“Now I have a cane in Aboriginal colours and it makes me feel proud.”

Guide Dogs orientation and mobility specialists will be on hand at the forum to speak to anyone who may be experiencing or know someone experiencing sight loss.

Regional manager Jeremy Hill said Aboriginal adults are six times more likely to be blind than other Australians.

“Yet 94% of vision loss in Indigenous Australians is preventable or treatable,’ he said.

“We’re hoping our information stand will help to reduce these worrying statistics by providing eye health advice and practical solutions if they are having trouble getting around due to vision loss.”

3. SA Sharon Bilney ACCHO Nurse celebrate and acknowledges NAIDOC Week

“Deciding to become a nurse is a decision that I’ve never regretted,

It’s a career that you can have around children and I’ve loved the opportunities that have come with it as well – I loved that I’ve worked in a hospital setting but also been able to lecture and have the chance to mentor and support young Aboriginal students on their path into nursing.”

The mother of four, who is Manager of Client Services for Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service, began her early career working at Port Lincoln Hospital.

Going home with the feeling that she’d made a difference in someone’s life that day is what Sharon Bilney says is the best part of being a nurse.

“When I was working at the hospital, it was just so nice to feel as though I’d made a difference,whether it was to an Aboriginal patient that day or educating a non-Aboriginal person about Aboriginal culture,” Ms Bilney, who belongs to the Kokatha family group, said.She also had a two-year stint lecturing in nursing at TAFE South Australia’s Port Lincoln Campus.

Ms Bilney is speaking about her nursing career to help highlight NAIDOC Week, which runs from Sunday, July 2-9, and is urging young Indigenous people to explore nursing as a career option.

The theme for this year’s NAIDOC Week is Our Languages Matter.

“I highly recommend nursing. Even if you don’t want to work in a hospital, the possibilities and options are endless. Take every opportunity that comes your way,” Ms Bilney said.

“NAIDOC week is an important week to celebrate our history and culture. If not for anything else, it is just a wonderful opportunity to recognise our people for one week.”

Ms Bilney said the best thing she had ever done was switch from her previous career in office work to nursing.

“Once I knew that I would be able to study at home part-time while I still had my youngest little boy at home with me, I thought the opportunity was just amazing,” she said.

“Once I was enrolled, I just wanted to focus on getting through the next five years of study and really achieve that goal of becoming a nurse.”

In her final year of study, Ms Bilney received the Federal Government-funded Rural and Remote Undergraduate scholarship, through the Australian College of Nursing (ACN). ACN Chief Executive Officer, Adjunct Professor Kylie Ward FACN, said Ms Bilney was a perfect example of how diverse a career in nursing could be, and how it could be explored at different stages in life.

“Sharon was a mum at home caring for her young son when an opportunity came her way to be able to study nursing,” Adjunct Professor Ward said.

“On completing her studies, she has had the opportunity to work in a hospital and experience theatre work, accident and emergency, the surgical and medical wards and has also had the chance to work in palliative care and mental health.

“She has also lectured in nursing and been able to mentor young Indigenous students and is now leading the way in providing health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Port Lincoln.”

4.SA : Community Controlled Health Service works to close the life expectancy gap in Murray Bridge

Imagine two newborn babies lying next to each other, one Aboriginal, one white.

Their whole lifetimes lie ahead of them.

But on average, one can expect to live about 10 years longer than the other.

That is the problem the Moorundi Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service hopes to solve in the Murraylands and Fleurieu areas of South Australia.

Photo above Clinton thanks  Moorundi Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service for donating $500 dollar’s to our go fund me page and also Murray bridge community for helping to by donating to our walk. Thank you Moorundi and Murray bridge community for helping us by donating to keep us going on our walk

The service held an open day, with a free lunch and health checks, on Wednesday at its Standen Street, Murray Bridge premises as part of wider Reconciliation Week celebrations.

But closing the life expectancy gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians would take a much wider effort, said Aboriginal health Director, Damian Rigney.

He hoped Moorundi staff could scan every person in the Murraylands’ Aboriginal community for the common conditions which tended to affect them more than the general population: diabetes, heart problems and chronic obstructive diseases of the lungs and airways.

‘A lot of what we’ve got to talk about is tobacco cessation, staying active, eating the right foods,’ he said.

‘We hit risk factors at quite a high level in the Aboriginal community.’

‘Regular testing played an important role in preventing chronic disease,’ he said.

‘Better to run a urine analysis and find out about kidney disease at an early stage, before a patient became tied to a dialysis machine for the rest of his or her life.’

But Mr Rigney said the service was still a long way away from connecting with every member of the Aboriginal community.

Many Aboriginal people still centred their health care on their everyday General Practitioner, he said, perhaps not realising that more holistic help was available.

‘Our goal would be that every Aboriginal person in our catchment has an annual health check, and if they have a chronic disease they have a care plan to help with that disease,’ he said.

Source: The Murray Valley Standard

5. WA : AHCWA In battle ” meth use problems rival alcohol abuse

“While there is evidence that alcohol use is still higher than methamphetamine use, from the Aboriginal community perspective, we are certainly seeing methamphetamine use becoming just as significant as alcohol use.”

AHCWA Chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox

Read more in this story from Page 6 in the North West Telegraph

6. NT  : The NT ‘Intervention’ led to some changes in Indigenous health, but the social cost may not have been worth it

The measurable health outcomes of the Northern Territory National Emergency Response (NTNER), better known as The Intervention, have scarcely been documented. Health-related assessments have focused on the process itself, perceptions of those affected and some limited data regarding eventual dental and hearing health.

From the Conversation

The Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association released a “health impact assessment” of The Intervention in 2010. But the report did not seek to evaluate health impacts and instead attempted to predict what these might be. At that stage, three years after the start of the NTNER, the message was:

the intervention could potentially lead to profound long-term damage, with any possible benefits to physical health largely outweighed by negative impacts on psychological health, social health and well-being, and cultural integrity.

Direct health care activities were a limited component of the NTNER, accounting for less than one-tenth of its A$1.4 billion budget from 2007-2012. Any enduring health benefits stemming from the policy were always likely to relate to the focus on housing and education – key social determinants of health.

Policies directed at the social determinants, as well as child health checks, certainly played a part in some health-related changes. But the overall implementation of the NT Intervention was so coercive that the negative feelings associated with it would likely outweigh any of the measurable health impacts.

Community-based child health checks

The major defined health care initiative of the NTNER were the community-based child health checks.

These were closely aligned with the government’s initial driver of The Intervention, which was to “protect Aboriginal children in the NT” – in part a response to the earlier “Little Children are Sacred” report. When initially implemented, the health checks were compulsory for all Aboriginal children aged 0–15 years. While these aimed to identify and treat health problems, their purpose was also to investigate for effects and evidence of sexual abuse.

Like much of the NT Intervention, the initially compulsory, intrusive and contentious nature of such assessments of children without carer consent ensured a difficult reception.

The policy also suffered from staffing issues. Although detailed numbers are difficult to ascertain, it was clear many of the 1,080 well-meaning clinicians who responded to the NTNER staffing hot line had little or no experience of Indigenous or remote health.

The child health checks failed to integrate with and support existing primary health care (such as GP clinics). A “fly-in, fly-out” workforce created the perception existing health providers were in some way inadequate, or complicit in the health issues the checks were detecting. Whether this undermined existing staff morale or contributed to already high turnover of remote primary health care staff is difficult to assess.

On the plus side, many Indigenous children had health screening in association with the NT Intervention. More than 10,000 children up to 15 years of age, representing more than 50% of the population, had health checks over the first 18 months. The fact that half did not is perhaps testament to the limited value local communities placed on such screening. Whether such screening would have occurred irrespective of the NTNER remains unclear.

There were other benefits too. Two-thirds of children were referred for follow-up review, including 39% to local primary health care, 35% to a dentist, 14% to audiology, 12% to paediatricians and 9% to ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists.

Reassuringly, by 2012, the majority (94%) of children identified as requiring referral had been seen, including 94% for dental, nearly 100% for audiology and 97% for ENT care. This appeared to have measurable health impacts. Oral health problems decreased by 12%, hearing loss by 10% (and 60% in those with documented hearing loss at initial review) and ear disease by 21%.

Whether this translates to sustained improvement remains to be seen. Without change in the underlying social determinants of health, this is unlikely.

Social determinants

While the NTNER did not include measures for new housing, it occurred in close association with the Strategic Investment Housing and Infrastructure Program, a partnership between the NT and federal governments. The emphasis this program placed on secure tenure of properties made the negotiation and provision of long-term leases to the government a core requirement for housing support.

In close parallel with the health care component of the NTNER, people and organisations had to cede autonomy and ownership to the government to access adequate accommodation.

Unlike many elements of the NTNER, this received some initial cautious support from the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association’s health impact assessment. Nonetheless there remains little evidence this government takeover of Indigenous Australian housing has improved the quality of housing or overcrowding. Indeed, measures of household overcrowding have barely changed over the time of the NTNER.

The NTNER had the initial plan of encouraging education attendance by linking income support and family assistance payments to school attendance for everyone on Aboriginal land and providing meals for children at school at parents’ cost. Unfortunately Indigenous school attendance rates for years one to ten remain stubbornly fixed at 80% nationally and 69% in the NT.

The right thing, the wrong way

While the NTNER may have brought about improvements in the ear and dental health of children, the process was associated with disenfranchisement of Indigenous Australian communities. Broader change in the underlying health determinants relating to education and housing have not been seen. The experience has also created further mistrust in the relationship between Indigenous Australians and governments.

The overall message is that investment and resourcing of initiatives to improve Indigenous Australian health can bring about measurable improvements. These must nonetheless occur in partnership with stakeholders and communities and empower services that already exist and, as in the case of primary health care, are functioning well.

The NTNER has both demonstrated how increased resourcing of health care for Indigenous Australians can lead to positive measurable change while, at the same time, showing how not to do it.


 7.VIC : VAHS Indigenous superhero empowering the next generation of ‘smoke-free ambassadors’                                  

“You smoke, you choke!” That’s the message to the youngest members of our Indigenous community.

And the messenger is a fictional anti-smoking superhero by the name of ‘Deadly Dan’.

Cloaked in possum fur – and using a boomerang, ‘Deadly Dan’ highlights the dangers of smoking, in a new book.

“I can smell cigarette smoke all over Wurundjeri country,” ‘Deadly Dan’ shouts from the pages.

“And if my people call me, I can fly as fast as Bunjil.”

For the three and four-year-olds at Yappera Children’s Services in Melbourne northern suburbs, the message seems to have had an impact.

“Smoking is bad,” little Maya told SBS World News.

Aliyah added” “It makes you sick.”

‘Two fruit, five veg’

A collaboration between the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service and Quit Victoria, ‘Deadly Dan at the League’ also aims to spread the word about healthy living.

During a visit to Yappera, the children sing along to the super hero’s song:

“Two fruit, five veg, they’re the bomb. They keep our bodies, healthy and strong.”

“Let’s tell our mob, let’s tell them quick – cigarettes, they make you sick!”

The book is set in Melbourne’s northern suburbs, using local landmarks the children are familiar with.

Laura Thompson, the regional coordinator at ‘Tackling Indigenous Smoking’, said the aim was for the children to then initiate a conversation with their families.

“We found that they’re our best smoke-free ambassadors, and that they’re able to go back into their homes and have a Quit conversations with their parents actually, and advocate for smoke-free environments.”

Quit Victoria Director, Dr Sarah White, said young people were the strongest advocates of anti-smoking campaigns.

“A lot of people are surrounded by adults and their role models smoking, around them.”

“If you look at the community, about 60 per cent, or a bit over 60 per cent, are 30 and under. So if we reach the children, we’re actually reaching a big proportion of Indigenous communities in Australia.”

Having an impact

The Aboriginal Health Service has seen an increase in the number of adults visiting its clinic, wanting to quit.

But there’s still a way to go.

While the smoking rate is declining among the Indigenous community, it’s still high, at 39 per cent.

That’s compared to 12.2 per cent, for the overall Australian community.

The ultimate aim of the ‘Deadly Dan’ book is to ensure the smoke-free message has a lasting legacy in these youngest of ambassadors.

“When they go to any environment, it’s a healthy, smoke-free environment, that they can enjoy,” Ms Thompson told SBS.

“And that our next generation of kids, choose not to smoke, and that their elders and parents, before them, are on their quitting journey.”

 

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NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #SA #NT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD

1.SA Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA awarded $500,000 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services grant

2. NSW : Awabakal Medical Services “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” health workshops for students

3.1 QLD New partnership between AFL Gold Coast Suns and Deadly Choices 715 Health Checks

3.2 QLD : 90th anniversary of 270km walk to be marked by ceremony and re-enactment

4.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team , Deadly Dan and Smoke Free Super Heroes

5.WA : First National first Aboriginal Affairs roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress .

6.NT  Additional $1.6m for Indigenous language interpreters

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.SA Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA awarded $500,000 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services grant

Local Aboriginal families with young children will benefit from new services after Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service was successful in gaining a $500,000 grant earlier this month.

FROM Whyalla News

The New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services program is an initiative of the Commonwealth Government’s Department of Health, and aims to deliver antenatal, postnatal and early childhood services targeting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with children under five yearsn old. Nunyara plans to use the funding to improve the health care of children from antenatal care right through until they attend primary school.

The health service currently have a part time Aboriginal Maternal Infant Care (AMIC) Practitioner and access to a Midwife one day per week.

The funding would increase the hours of these two positions as well as create four new jobs.  Nunyara will employ a Child Health Coordinator, Child Health Nurse, AMIC Trainee and Transport Officer to support the new program.

Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service chief executive officer Cindy Zbierksi said the team anticipates they can “more than double” Nunyara’s service delivery outputs relating to improved access and outcomes for under five-year-olds.

“We can increase the child health checks by at least doubling them in the first six months and increase childhood immunisation by 20 percent,” she said.

The provision of a Transport Officer in the new program will also assist clients to attend specialist appointments in Port Augusta, who have more Paediatric and Obstetric services than Whyalla.

Mrs Zbierski said this has been an issue in the past, as travelling to Port Augusta is less than 100 kilometres away so clients do not qualify for the Patient Assistance Transport Scheme.

Nunyara is working on converting one of its buildings into a space for this service and plans to have the team fully operational by the end of 2017. Nunyara is located at 17/27 Tully St, Whyalla

2. NSW : Awabakal Medical Services “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” health workshops for students

IRRAWANG High School Indigenous students were treated to some famous faces this week, with some Indigenous stars visiting the school to run a health workshop with the students

From News of the Area

The workshop was all about “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” and has been generously funded by the Awabakal Medical Services and facilitated by No Limit Management.Students were treated to three special guests who spoke to the crowd.

Cody Walker, a professional footballer in the NRL with the Sydney Rabbitohs is a proud man of Bundjalung and Yuin Heritage.

George Rose, a former NRL player, played for Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles, with whom he won the 2011 NRL premiership, and also Melbourne Storm and Sydney Roosters.

He played for the Walgett Aboriginal Connection in several Koori knockouts and is a proud Kamilaroi man.

International Indigenous model Samantha Harris, a respected Dunghutti woman, joined the football stars to run the workshop group for the morning.

Each of the guests spoke of their life journeys and reinforced to the students the dangers of smoking, encouraging them to maintain a fit and healthy lifestyle and stand up to peer pressure.
The students took part in fun, but physical team and confidence building activities, working together to reach outcomes.

The guest stars gave the students an opportunity at the end of the workshop for photos and autographs.

Matt Chaffey, Year 10 student from Medowie said “I really appreciated the mentors coming to our school.”

“From what they told us, it makes me more determined to never smoke.”

Well done to the staff and students for another unique and creatively managed experience for the students at Irrawang High School.

3.1 QLD New partnership between AFL Gold Coast Suns and Deadly Choices 715 Health Checks

The Deadly Choices  Gold Coast SUNS jersey will be free for community members when they have a full 715 Health Check Kalwun on the Gold Coast

The Deadly Choices  Gold Coast SUNS jersey will be free for community members when they have a full 715 Health Check Kalwun on the Gold Coast

3.2 QLD : 90th anniversary of 270km walk to be marked by ceremony and re-enactment

On Wednesday 28 June more than 100 people, including a support crew of cooks, a nurse, counsellor, community workers and volunteers, will set out to walk from Taroom, 290km west of Maryborough, to Woorabinda – more than 270km to the north – over eight days.

The Trek will be kicked off by a Healing Ceremony on Bundulla Station, the site of the former Taroom Aboriginal Settlement, which was closed down in 1927 because of the threat of flooding from a nearby irrigation scheme.

See full history HERE

The Taroom Aboriginal Settlement, also known as Taroom Aboriginal Reserve, was established as a government-operated reserve on a site on the Dawson River, east of the township of Taroom in 1911. The settlement was established under the Aboriginals Protection and Restriction of the Sale of Opium Act 1897, which enabled direct government control over the lives of Aboriginal people in Queensland, including forced removals to designated reserves. Under the direction of a superintendent, the settlement housed Aboriginal people from different language groups and regions of Queensland, who lived within a highly regulated and tightly controlled institutional environment until its closure in 1927.[1]

Inhabitants at the time were forced to move to what is now Woorabinda Aboriginal Shire, 170km south west of Rockhampton.

Most of them walked.

The purpose of the Healing Ceremony is to pay respect to those hundreds of Elders, men, women and children and to lay wreaths at a memorial at the site.

Trek walkers are expected to travel from Woorabinda, Yarrabah, Palm Island, Cherbourg and other central Queensland communities, and will include non-Indigenous participants.

This year marks the 90th anniversary of the walk and the third year of re-enacting the walk.

Media is welcome to attend. For more information or to arrange interviews, please contact Christine Howes on 0419 656 277.

4.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team , Deadly Dan and Smoke Free Super Heroes

This week the VAHSHLT were hanging out at Yappera Children’s Service Co-Operative reading Deadly Dan at the League and talking about the importance of staying smoke free!

At our Coach program we are educating the kids about healthy lifestyles and are creating a next generation of smoke free super heroes!!

#youSmokeYouChoke #StaySmokeFree Aboriginal Quitline Quit Victoria Department of Health & Human Services, Victoria

 

 5.WA : First National first Aboriginal Affairs roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress .

State and territory Aboriginal affairs leaders say it is inevitable the federal government will need to have treaty negotiations with indigenous people.

Representatives from Western Australia, the ACT, the Northern Territory, South Australia and Victoria met on Friday for the first roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress on Aboriginal affairs.

WA Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt, who is indigenous, said each state faced similar issues including housing, treaties, Aboriginal representation and land tenure.

“It’s an opportunity now for states and territories to have a much better understanding of what we’re all doing, and co-operate a lot more to create more opportunities for Aboriginal people,” he told reporters on Friday.

“We’re seeing a lot more happening in the space of Native title, constitutional recognition and closing the gap.”

Mr Wyatt met with SA Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Minister Kyam Maher, ACT MLA Rachel Stephen-Smith, NT MLA Chansey Paech and Member for Geelong Christine Couzens.

Roundtable meetings are expected to continue once or twice a year, with discussions towards the end of 2017 to focus on how states and territories will use land vested in Aboriginal communities to better create economic development.

Mr Wyatt said treaty conversations were occurring with Nyoongar people from WA’s South West region, and acknowledged this was happening across Australia.

“What Uluru has shown is that Aboriginal Australia is very keen to have this conversation about treaties elevated,” he said.

“It has created a new pressure on the commonwealth government to engage in an area that perhaps, may be new to them.” Mr Maher said a state treaty could be announced by the end of the year and that bilateral agreement would have a federal impact.

“When states and territories talk with one voice it helps solve problems,” he said.

 

6.NT  Additional $1.6m for Indigenous language interpreters

The Coalition Government is providing the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) with an additional $1.6 million to expand its successful Indigenous Interpreting Project.

See Background  Health NT Research TeleinterpretingServices

Indigenous language interpreters play an essential role in ensuring First Australians have access to a fair legal system, as well as government and community services. Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said 11 per cent of First Australians spoke an Indigenous language as their main language at home.

“In some parts of Australia, English is the third or fourth language spoken, clearly demonstrating the need for widely available interpreting services,” Minister Scullion said.

“This $1.6 million investment will ensure the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters is able to meet the growing need for accredited Indigenous language interpreters in regional and remote Australia, particularly in the health and justice sectors.

“The authority’s Indigenous Interpreting Project has already enjoyed considerable success.

Since 2012, it has led to 96 accreditations being awarded to Indigenous interpreters across 25 languages.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News : $20 million Streamlined Support for Aboriginal Community Health Services

This is fundamental to the Turnbull Government’s policy of partnership, our commitment to doing things with, not to, the Indigenous community

Under the agreement, NACCHO will receive the funding and will form a collaborative network with its State and Territory counterpart organisations to finance and support local health services.

The agreement provides the network with funding certainty, allowing organisations to plan for the future and improve their effectiveness.”

Federal Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt

Download

NACCHO Ken Wyatt Press Release June 20 2017

Minister Wyatt says a new Network Funding Agreement will streamline the provision of $20 million a year in health service support through the National Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Organisation (NACCHO).

The unified funding arrangements, signed on Friday, will allow the Commonwealth to work better with Australia’s peak indigenous community health organisation.

Minister Wyatt said the agreement was focussed on outcomes, allowing service funding to be administered through an Aboriginal-controlled agency.

“I have been hearing from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about the kind of care they want, and this agreement will help deliver it,” he said.

“We know that strong, Aboriginal-administered care plays a pivotal role in improving health outcomes, but it can face challenges supplying services on the ground.

“‘This new approach will allow service providers to access the assistance they need to enable them to deliver crucial, quality care to their clients.”

Minister Wyatt said the new network would also ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices were heard clearly at all levels of health administration.

“The aim is to streamline funding and communication, to continue our shared commitment to Closing The Gap,” he said.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories from #ACT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD #NT #TAS @KenWyattMP

1.Winnunga ACCHO elders garden has healthy future for community

2. SA : Nathan Krakouer  no more bad choices now Deadly Choices

3.1 The new Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Council will bring together six different ACCHO’s  across North East Victoria

3.2 VAHS hosts Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima 

4.AHCWA calls for “ICE “ intervention and prevention ACTION

5.1 NSW 60 Students graduate AHMRC Aboriginal Health College

 5. 2 NSW Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking program hits the road.

 6.QLD ‘No Smokes’ one-day training 

7. NT Uncle Jimmy and NT ACCHO’S helps to stop Trachoma

8.Tasmania Culture Centre employment assistance service

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media     Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.Winnunga ACCHO elders garden has healthy future for community

When you think of a garden and gardening, most of us wouldn’t think of it as a gift of life. But for 74 year old Uncle Brian Demery this is exactly what it did for him. ‘I went to Winnunga coz I was sick but when I went to Winnunga a new chapter of my life was opened. Winnunga just cares, not only about me but about lots of our Elders’ Uncle Brian said.

Twelve years ago Uncle Brian and his late wife, who passed away 11 years ago, operated a community garden but when the funding stopped, the couple found themselves struggling to keep it going due to the ongoing costs.

‘I was speaking to Julie Tongs at Winnunga. I told her, what had happened and how I was paying for it out of my own pocket. Julie said ‘how can we help you’, Uncle Brian explained. ‘I couldn’t do it without Winnunga. It’s expensive with the seeds and punnets’ he added.

From humble beginnings in its current Queanbeyan location, the Winnunga Elders Garden became what it is today – a thriving community garden with a variety of seasonal vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, peas, beans, capsicum, lettuce, corn, turnips, chilli’s and some grapes.

The Ngemba Elder from Bourke said although it’s a lot of hard work taking care of 10 large garden beds, a green house, a number of sleepers and five trellises, he said it gives him a purpose, a reason to get up each morning. ‘I just love it, it’s satisfying. You just feel good within yourself. If you don’t do anything, you get bored, you drink, you do bad stuff but this keeps you on track. It’s also good exercise’ Uncle Brian explained.

Uncle Brian who works in the garden two hours a day and for four to five hours on a Saturday and Sunday was keen to describe the feeling he gets from seeing the plants grow. ‘You put the seeds in and wait to see it grow, see it sprout. Every day, it’s exciting. You then get to pick it and taste it’ he said.

Those who know the keen golfer, father of two, a grand-father and great-grandfather, can’t speak highly enough of his character. One of these people is Ian Bateman, Manager of Winnunga’s Social Health Team. ‘Uncle Brian is not only a great role model but also an interesting character with a great sense of humour. He brings a lot of knowledge and passion and we couldn’t think of a better person for the garden. It’s also good to see someone his age still being so active. He gives back to the community’ Mr Bateman said.

The Elders Garden has had a significant impact on the community.

‘I do up vegetable packages for families and Elders. There are about 15 families with kids, we give to. I like helping these families and Elders as they are battling to make ends meet, it saves them money’ Uncle Brian said. Mr Bateman also echoed Uncle Brian’s thoughts on the important role of the garden. ‘It’s a big benefit to the community. There are people struggling especially our Elders and pensioners. A lot of the pensioners are supporting extended families with serious social issues. So the garden and its produce are of a great benefit to the community’ Mr Bateman explained.

Uncle Brian also added ‘People are so grateful. For me, it’s mainly for the kids. Everything I grow isn’t sprayed, no pesticides, it’s all organic. This way, they get fresh vegetables, it encourages the kids to eat vegetables’ he said. Uncle Brian said although he is getting on in age, he still plans to keep working the garden for a little longer but welcomes any volunteers to help him out.

‘I reckon I’ve got two years left in me to keep doing this. It’s getting hard but I’ll still do it. I’d love to hear from any Koori fellas who’d like to help out. They could start out with one garden bed, I’ll help. I’ll give them the seeds’ he said.

If you would like to assist with the Winnunga AHS Elders Garden, please contact the Social Health Team at Winnunga on 02 6284 6222.

2. SA : Nathan Krakouer  no more bad choices now Deadly Choices

Port Adelaide Power journeyman Nathan Krakouer opens up on bad choices that almost ended his life READ Story Here

Nathan Krakouer speaks out about his past choices and how he turned his life around. Now Nathan wants to help others by using his lessons from binge drinking and drugs to advise indigenous youth to not go down the path he did.

Power signs on to boost health care

PORT Adelaide will have its indigenous players — such as Nathan Krakouer — become powerful role models in Aboriginal communities to promote better health.

And Power chief executive Keith Thomas explains the bold move from “the core business of football” as part of the Port Adelaide Football Club taking on greater responsibility with indigenous issues.

“We have a role to play in Aboriginal health care,” said Thomas, who this week challenged the AFL and its clubs to broaden the indigenous agenda beyond a celebration of Aboriginal culture with the Sir Doug Nicholls Round.

Port Adelaide yesterday signed an agreement with the Aboriginal Health Council of SA to be part of the “Deadly Choices” program that will encourage indigenous communities to have health checks.

The Deadly Choices program aims to advise indigenous youth the impact of poor lifestyle decisions by empowering them to make healthy decisions for themselves and their families.

The Deadly Choices team from Queensland were in Adelaide last week to bump heads with us before the big launch day on July 1st.

(L-R) Thomas Gilles, Ian Lacey, Wade Thompson, Trent Wingard, Nathan Appo, Marlon Motlop

Deadly Choices is a school-led, 8-week health and lifestyle program will encourage young people make the right choices to look after their own health.

And if they complete the health check at one of our member clinics, they will be able to win the Deadly Choices Guernsey.

Our member clinics are at Pipalyatjara, Amata, Umuwa, Fregon, Ernabella, Mimili, Indulkana.

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3.1 The new Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Council will bring together six different ACCHO’s  across North East Victoria

Six Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations will collaborate with Murray PHN to help improve access to health services and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our area.

They will form the newly-established Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Council, committed to improving indigenous health outcomes in the region, in line with the operational principles of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

Matt Jones, CEO of Murray PHN, said the organisation was the first Primary Health Network in Australia to establish an Indigenous Health Advisory Council.

“Our goal is to ensure that primary health services and the health service system across the Murray PHN catchment area are responsive to the needs of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities,” Mr Jones said.

“This is part of wider efforts to close the gap in life expectancy and health outcomes in the Indigenous population.

“As a representative voice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our region, the Indigenous Health Advisory Council will allow for the authentic participation of indigenous people in designing and developing models of care,” he said.

The Murray PHN Advisory Council membership will consist of:

  • Albury Wodonga Aboriginal Health Service (AWAHS)
  •  Bendigo and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BDAC)
  •  Mallee District Aboriginal Service (MDAS)
  •  Mungabereena Aboriginal Corporation
  •  Murray Valley Aboriginal Cooperative (MVAC)
  •  Njernda Aboriginal Corporation
  •  Murray PHN

Improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is one of the key health priorities for the region. Murray PHN has more than 14,800 people who identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (14,800+), and whose health status continues to be considerably lower than the wider population.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience a burden of disease two-and-a-half times that of other Australians, with 70 per cent of the health gap due to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, chronic respiratory disease, chronic kidney disease and mental health issues.

The Murray PHN Indigenous Health Advisory Committee will meet quarterly.

3. VAHS hosts Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima 

 

“What inspires me and what I’m taking away is the love, I always have faith In community. Its powerful and has touched my heart and I’m taking that away with me.

I felt the love of community in this building and in this work, faith/belief in community, past present and future, I felt that within myself powerful. 

Oxfam fights alongside Indigenous communities. The power is in the love of community.”

After hearing Gary Foley’s  powerful recount of the rich and proud history of VAHS , Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima made this statement to the VAHS board, staff and community.

Thank you to Uncle Bill Nicholson, Aunty Janice Austin, Gary Foley, Jimmy Peters and the Board, Uncle Phil Ah Wanh, and Ngarra, Justin and the Oxfam team for making today happen.

4.AHCWA calls for “ICE “ intervention and prevention ACTION

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia has called for better access to early intervention and prevention programs to help address increasing methamphetamine (ice) use in regional WA. AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson Cox said “beggared belief” that there had not been any significant investment into grassroots community intervention programs despite ice use continuing to increase over the past decade.

“It is frustrating that despite several state and federal strategies highlighting the need to increase investment in community-led and culturally appropriate early intervention prevention, treatment and support services, we are yet to see any significant amounts of funding directed to our sector and other Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, “she said.

Ms Nelson Cox said there had been a concerning shift with ice use overtaking excessive alcohol use in some communities, resulting in services being unprepared and lacking the appropriate programs and services to provide care to those using the illicit drug.

“There is a growing presence of illicit drugs in the regions,” she said.

“While there is evidence that alcohol use is still higher than methamphetamine use, from the Aboriginal community perspective we are certainly seeing methamphetamine use becoming just as significant as alcohol use.

“Our people are crying out for help. They want community-led solutions and want to work with government departments but all they are getting is lip service.”

Ms Nelson Cox said there was no conclusive evidence that cashless welfare cards had made any impact in minimising drug use.

“Our Elders are gravely concerned about the impact of the cashless welfare card. There is no significant evidence to suggest that cashless welfare cards lead to any reduction in drug use in our regional communities”, she said.

“What we have seen in certain towns is an increase around elder abuse, black market trades of the cards for cash, reports of prostitution and a rapid rise in crime.

“Regional communities are trying to take practical approaches and strategies to deal with this problem.

“Penalising people through their Centrelink payments is not the solution. This approach will not deal with the crux of the problem. It will not empower our people and we are also yet to see investment into additional support services as was promised with its introduction.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal health services currently members.

5.1 NSW 60 Students graduate AHMRC Aboriginal Health College

 

A big day for 60 Students graduating today from courses at the AHNMRC Aboriginal Health College. Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands

Congratulations Aboriginal Health College 2017 graduates. Equals more Aboriginal health workers & culturally appropriate care

5.2 NSW Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking program hits the road.

Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking program hit the road last week with the help of some familiar faces.

We ran a workshop with the students to educate them about smoking and the effects the habit can have.

We would like to say a big thank you to our special guests for the day who were on hand to share some important messaging – George Rose, Samantha Harris, Latrell Mitchell, Connor Watson and Will Smith.

 6.QLD ‘No Smokes’ one-day training 
 

Please see the attached invitation to ‘No Smokes’ one-day training which will be delivered at Apunipima Cairns office on Thursday 15 June 2017 from 9.00am to 3.30pm.

The training provides an introduction to the ‘No Smokes’ resources, which include a variety of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific tools, as well as resources to inform people of the dangers of smoking and to assist them to quit.

The main resource used with the training will be a flipchart, which can be viewed here: http://nosmokes.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/TobaccoFlipchart_Sept2012_A4.pdf

The training is FREE and lunch and morning tea will be provided.

Please RSVP to Nina Nichols nina.nichols@apunipima.org.au or Kelly Franklin kelly.franklin@nintione.com.au.

7. NT Uncle Jimmy and NT ACCHO’S helps to stop Trachoma

 

Day one of the Barkly Desert Culture tour in Tennant Creek…For the past three years local artists the E town Boyz, Hill Boyz and The Sand Hill Women have been making inspirational music under the mentorship of Monkey Marc, Beatrice Lewis and Sean Spencer with support of the Barkly Shire Council.

The artists have collaborated to write and perform a great song to make their community aware of Trachoma and how to stop it.

Here is a sneak preview of the song and video that we will share with you all very soon.

OR WATCH VIDEO HERE

The tour goes to Elliott tomorrow, then Alpurrulam, Ampilatawatja, Ali Curung, Alparra and a big finale concert in Alice Springs on June 16th. Clean Faces, Strong Eyes Indigenous Eyehealth Caama Alice Springs CAAMA Music See Desert Hip Hop for all tour dates…..

8.Tasmania Culture Centre employment assistance service

“Interested in these jobs at IBIS Styles Hobart, or other jobs coming up?

Not sure how to apply?

Come along to the Aboriginal Health Service this Friday June 9 from 10.30 am to get some tips and help with updating your resume, writing your application and get some interview tips.

Let Sally know if you are interested in attending.. hobart@tacinc.com.au or ring 62340700”