NACCHO Aboriginal Health Training News: Congress #ACCHO Alice Springs wins major Training Large Employer of the Year Award

“Receiving this award is great recognition of what can be achieved through the combination of a Workforce Engagement and Development Plan, a dedicated Leadership team and an Aboriginal Staff Advisory Committee.

With a workforce of 399 staff and over 50% Aboriginal employment, training is critical to achieving Congress’ strategic objectives through building a skilled workforce that has appropriate clinical and non-clinical skills to deliver culturally‑safe and responsive health care to Aboriginal people .

Accredited and non-accredited training remains a commitment across our entire workforce, establishing an Aboriginal workforce is critical to closing the gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal people and Congress strategic plan. “

Chief Executive Officer, Donna Ah Chee. ( See NACCHO TV Interview HERE )

Photo above  : Tracey Donnellan Brand : General Manager Health Services Division CACC accepting the award in Darwin

Congress is thrilled to be named 2017 Large Employer of the Year at the NT Training Awards.

The Large Employer of the Year Award recognises organisations with a workforce of  200+ employees that has achieved excellence in the provision of nationally recognised training to its employees.

Congress has a proud 43 year history of providing comprehensive Aboriginal community controlled health care to over 15,000 Aboriginal people in Alice Springs and across six remote Aboriginal communities in Central Australia.

For more info about CAAC download cphc-congress-final-report

The Congress Workforce Engagement and Development Plan was precipitated by the Congress Board of Directors establishing a benchmark of 60% Aboriginal employment.  The Plan builds on a number of innovative strategies to support Aboriginal people to gain employment and qualifications and to build on our existing workforce including:

  • A cadetship program that supports Aboriginal people to attain undergraduate tertiary qualifications in a health, early childhood or commerce field.
  • A traineeship program employing trainees across a number of health, early childhood and administrative positions, providing on the job and accredited Certificate IV training and career in Congress.
  • An Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) focused traineeship program with 13 AHP trainees progressing towards Certificate IV in Aboriginal Primary Health Care with a pathway to an AHP career in Congress.
  • A Diploma of Leadership and Management program focused on supporting Aboriginal staff into management positions.
  • Provision of nationally accredited mentoring set skill set for Managers and mentors.
  • 63 staff currently actively engaged in training from Certificate III to post graduate qualifications, with the predominate focus on investing in our Aboriginal workforce.
  • Strategic focus on Professional Development, training and study across our entire workforce with generous paid leave available to staff.

Accredited and non-accredited training remains a commitment across our entire workforce, establishing an Aboriginal workforce is critical to closing the gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal people and Congress strategic plan” said Chief Executive Officer, Donna Ah Chee.

Congress acknowledges our training partners, Central Australian Remote Health Development Service and Batchelor Institute.

Congress delivers comprehensive health care across 13 Health Services in Alice Springs and six remote Aboriginal communities in Central Australia

Part 2 Congress Education & Training Service

What do we do?

Our Education and Training Service provides a range of education and training opportunities to Aboriginal people interested in pursuing a rewarding and meaningful career in Aboriginal health.

  • Traineeships
  • Cadetships
  • HLT40213 Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice

Traineeships

Congress traineeships are offered to Aboriginal school leavers seeking work experience and/or Aboriginal people looking to return to work and or a career change, who are interested in building career in the field of Aboriginal health or related administrative and corporate service.

Congress traineeships provide full-time employment for 12-18 months (role dependant) leading to a nationally accredited qualification (Certificate III or IV) on completion.

Cadetships

Congress offers cadetships to Aboriginal people who are undertaking full-time study at university in a health, social services or business administrative field and who are seeking on the job training in their field.

Cadetships are offered on a fixed-term basis for the duration of the university course length.

Cadetships include:

  • full-time study on campus;
  • 12 weeks full-time per year paid Congress placement;
  • mentoring and coaching with Congress professional;
  • allowance for text books/equipment;
  • weekly allowance paid for study periods; and
  • allowance for accommodation and travel costs.

Course fees and HELP fees are the responsibility of the cadet.

AHPs

Congress works in partnership with Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education (BIITE) to provide accredited training to Congress students and trainees, specifically the HLT40213 Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice course.

The training component is delivered by BITE through its workshop program based at the Desert Peoples Centre (DPC) in Alice Springs.

Congress supports this training through students undertaking clinical practice within their own services. Congress will also accept other BIITE students on clinical placement and will share with BIITE resources to provide access to the Communicare system.

For more information regarding the HLT40213 Certificate IV visit the BIITE website here.

How to apply:

For more information on available positions, eligibility and how to apply visit the Jobs page or email vacancy@caac.org.au.

Opening hours

Mon – Fri  8.30am – 5pm

Contact Details

Human Resources
(08) 8959 4771

Traineeships and Cadetships – Training & Development Coordinator
(08) 8959 4771

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Members NEWS : Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service could become Australia’s best #ACCHO

Western Sydney AMS [Aboriginal medical service] has had its challenges,

“The statistics show there’s more than 13,000 Indigenous people in our catchment area. So it’s important that they have a culturally appropriate health service to meet their needs.”

 Chief Executive, Darren Ah See Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

Originally published here

An overhauled Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service could become Australia’s best Indigenous health provider – and it needs to be.

The service, which has been taken over by Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service, has the country’s largest Indigenous population in its catchment area.

Its new chief executive, Darren Ah See said the first challenge was to engage those who have been “pushed away” from the service in the past.

“I think generally across Australia, we’ve seen in the Closing the Gap report that there hasn’t been a lot of gains,” he said.

“It’s a battle but I can say that without the Aboriginal medical services…it would be a lot worse. We’ve just got to work together.”

The service has secured funding to start three new programs at its Mount Druitt headquarters.

That includes programs for maternal and child health, chronic disease care and additional mental health support.

 Picture above relaunch Smoking ceremony

Mr Ah See relaunched the service’s headquarters on Thursday.

 

He said it was an “honour” to take on the challenge of turning around Aboriginal health statistics in western Sydney and the Blue Mountains.

Mr Ah See that plans were in place to open a second hub in Penrith next year, and set up a GP clinic in the Blue Mountains.

“We’ve had six months now and we’re starting to get some traction and people through the doors,” he said. “But there’s still a lot of people not accessing the service.”

Western Sydney Local Health District chief executive Danny O’Connor said the service had a “long and proud tradition” of serving the local Aboriginal community.

“Anything that occurs from this point on is building on a really solid foundation,” he said.

Aboriginal Health #AIDAConf2017 : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #TAS #QLD #WA #SA #VIC

1.1 : NACCHO CEO attends AMA’s Indigenous Health Taskforce 

1.2 : National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

1.3 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

2 .1 NSW: Awabakal ACCHO Leading Indigenous doctors visit to inspire the students to pursue their dreams

2. 2 NSW Awabakal is Tackling Indigenous Smoking

3. VIC : VACCHO supports a YES vote for Equality

4. WA: AHCWA : Football benefits Indigenous communities long after the siren

5. QLD : Deadly Choices 2017 STATE QUEENSLAND MURRI CARNIVAL IN REDCLIFFE has kicked off

6. NT : $6 Million Health Centre for Umbakumba,Groote Eylandt

7. TAS : FIAAI ‘No Smokes No Limits’ Public Health Campaign Launched

8.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 NACCHO CEO attends AMA’s Indigenous Health Taskforce 

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner and Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt, attended the AMA’s Indigenous Health Taskforce meeting last weekend to discuss the Government’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health priorities and actions.

The Taskforce identifies, develops, and recommends Indigenous health policy and strategies for the AMA, and includes Federal Councillors, AMA members, and Indigenous health organisations.

Issues discussed included the growing incidence of type 2 diabetes among young Indigenous people, renal disease, preventable hospital admissions and deaths, mortality rates, and the use of the Medicare Benefits Scheme (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

The Taskforce also discussed racism within the health system in Australia, and recognised the need for more programs and strategies to eradicate racism from the entire health workforce

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations : Only 45 days to go

 Last Monday 18 September there was only 45 days to go and we are nearly booked out

This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.3 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

Register HERE

Download the 2 day Ochre Day Program

final 2017-Ochre-Day-Program

2 .1 NSW: Awabakal ACCHO Leading Indigenous doctors visit to inspire the students to pursue their dreams

A group of leading Indigenous doctors visited Maitland High School on Tuesday to inspire the students to pursue their dreams.

Eight doctors from the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association told the students their experiences and ran medical workshops, including plastering and handwashing with the use of a UV light to detect germs.

The program was part of AIDA’s visit to the Hunter, which included a stop in at Awabakal in Newcastle.

Maitland High was chosen due to its high Aboriginal population (12 per cent).

AIDA president Kali Hayward said they wanted to show the students the opportunities available and leave a lasting impression. “You can’t underestimate the value of a role model,” she said

2. 2 NSW Awabakal is Tackling Indigenous Smoking

Awabakal is facing the issue of increased smoking rates in the community head on with the launch of their I’m Quitting campaign which took place in September  at Awabakal Medical Service.

The campaign is part of the national Tackling Indigenous Smoking program and aims to reduce smoking rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with Awabakal highlighting the problem on a local level.

 The launch event saw 25 ‘quit kits’ issued to existing smokers who are looking to cut down or completely quit the habit. The kits include a branded shirt to raise awareness, a 30 day progress chart with health information on the first month of quitting, pledge magnets to remind people why they were quitting, Nicotine Replacement Therapy voucher and more.

When discussing the campaign, Chief Executive Officer Raylene Gordon said that smoking rates within the Aboriginal community were continuing to increase and Awabakal was committed to supporting the community in their efforts to quit.

“The I’m Quitting campaign has been introduced to help support members of our community who are wanting to reduce or completely stop smoking all together and it is a program of which I am incredibly proud,” said Raylene.

“Smoking is a real issue for the Aboriginal community it is the most preventable cause of early death, with smoking accounting for one in every five deaths.

“This is an unacceptable figure. The I’m Quitting campaign is designed to assist community members on their quitting journey by providing useful information and quit tips, along with supporting them through our Medical Service to ensure they stay on track,” said Raylene.

Awabakal Project Officer and I’m Quitting participant, Ray Kelly, said he has decided to quit smoking for not only his own health but also for his daughters.

“I have been smoking for about 15 years and I can feel the damage it has caused. I’m mainly quitting for my three daughters, I need to be there for them as they grow and I need to be a healthy role model,” said Ray.

“My goal is to quit completely and while I have attempted to do so in the past, I’m really focussed on making this time stick.

“Even in the last week or so since cutting back I have noticed a difference, I feel healthier while I train and my tastebuds have changed,” concluded Ray.

Awabakal are encouraging anyone that is thinking of quitting smoking to contact Awabakal Medical Service on 02 4907 8555.

3. VIC : VACCHO supports a YES vote for Equality

VACCHO supports the right of every Australian to get married regardless of their gender or sexuality.

We oppose this non-binding postal survey that asks ‘anyone’ to determine the human rights of our LGBTI families and friends, however believe the most powerful act to effect positive change, is to vote yes.

VACCHO will be unequivocally supporting the Equality Campaign, and encouraging our Member organisations to vote yes, as well as ours and the wider community to do the same.

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who identify as LGBTI often experience multiple levels of marginalisation and discrimination. VACCHO is significantly concerned about the implications this campaign will have on the social and emotional wellbeing of the Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander LGBTI community, their families and mainstream brothers and sisters. Already we have witnessed deplorable content generated from the No Campaign.

We know LGBTI people suffer uniquely high rates of suicidality, same-sex attracted people are up to 14 times more likely to attempt suicide. This statistic will be compounded in our LGBTI community, especially for our young brotherboys and sistergirls.

It saddens us that in 2017 the Federal Government can stand silent and allow this level of vilification and discrimination to occur.

Discriminatory legislation is an impediment to the LGBTI Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander community achieving the highest attainable standard of health, instead this process is widening the health inequalities of First Australians.

We hope that the Parliament will respect the outcome of the Equality campaign, work swiftly to deliver marriage equality, and heal the harm.

4. WA: AHCWA : Football benefits Indigenous communities long after the siren

Football has the ability to build a strong heart and mind, and it is making our kids more disciplined and coordinated with their body skills as well as their mentality.

Indigenous sporting personalities needed to be particularly mindful that they were role models for their communities.

They have kids that look up to them and their competitiveness in the sporting industry, and [players need to recognise their] connection to culture and must not forget that they come from a grass roots level “

Michelle Nelson-Cox is speaking about the positive impact footy has on Indigenous communities in Western Australia

Ms Nelson-Cox, a Whadjuk Noongar woman, is the chairperson of the Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

Originally Published HERE

“[Football] is very important to have around, not only for aspiring young kids who fantasise about being an elite sportsperson, but also because of our elite sportspeople who are creating a positive profile [in the community],” she said

A recent report by the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre – After the Siren: The community benefits of Indigenous participation in Australian Rules Football – has highlighted the physical health, mental well being and community connectedness benefits that flow from playing football.

AFL is the second-most popular team sport among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, with almost 45,000 Indigenous players, and in WA, one in four Indigenous men play the sport.

Indigenous boys living in remote areas and playing football had 20 percent lower rates of truancy from school than those that did not play, according to the report.

In the past year adult Indigenous players reported higher life satisfaction than those who did not participate, and they were twice as likely to rate their health as excellent.

Fifty-six percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who played football were assessed as being in excellent health, compared to 48 percent of children that had not engaged with the sport

Report co-author and Senior Research Fellow, Dr Sean Gorman from Curtin University’s School of Media, Culture and Creative Arts, said the report also found that AFL is an inclusive sport that offers wide accessibility irrespective of socio-economic background.

“Whether it is urban or regional areas, the role of football plays is massive, not just in terms of getting communities engaged, it is massive in terms of the way it presents a positive aspect to people’s lives that are, if we look at social and economic indicators, not great,” he said.

“Football is a really important social mechanism for Aboriginal people to engage their agency, but also to participate in something that all Australians love.”

Dr Gorman also highlighted the important role elite-level Indigenous players held in the community.

“They are seen as significant contributors to the way Aboriginal people feel great pride and great resonance that enables them to see something other than the horrible statistics that we see time and time again,” he said.

“The role they play is completely vital to the way Aboriginal people can feel proud and safe and valued, whether that is in urban, regional or remote Australia.”

Ms Nelson-Cox said Indigenous sporting personalities needed to be particularly mindful that they were role models for their communities.

“They have kids that look up to them and their competitiveness in the sporting industry, and [players need to recognise their] connection to culture and must not forget that they come from a grass roots level,” she said.

Dr Gorman said that for many professional Indigenous players, there was a deeper narrative associated with their participation in AFL.

“When you talk to Aboriginals about why they play they say ‘I am not playing for myself, I am representing my family and my community’,” he said.

“It becomes a deeper narrative, a stronger narrative, which as a broader community we need to appreciate and understand.

“This is where the report becomes so salient because it is how we connect all these disparate narratives up, and we can start to appreciate on a greater level the contribution these men and women have made over time.”

One such role model is the Fremantle Dockers’ woman’s team Vice Captain and Noongar woman Kirby Bentley, who spoke at the launch of the After the Siren report on Thursday.

“I am still one of the most elite Indigenous female footballers in the country and for me that is not so much about saying how good I think I am. It’s more about what I can do with the position I am in,” she said.

The number of women’s football teams has doubled since AFL Women’s League was introduced this year, according to the report.

AFL is also making its mark on remote communities in the far-north of WA.

“It is an integral part of the Western Desert communities,” Michael McMonigal said.

McMonigal is the program manager of Ngurra Kujungka [Inc], an non-for-profit organisation leading the development of the Western Desert’s first community driven, regional sport and recreation program.

“It has a very positive influence on the community, in terms of their overall physical, mental and emotional wellbeing,” he said.

“We are hoping to develop programs and pathways for these young footballers to follow in the future.”

In 2003, Newcrest Mining Ltd began sponsoring the annual Western Desert League, a football competition created to benefit and engage the Martu people, the traditional owners of a large part of central WA.

 

5. QLD : Deadly Choices 2017 STATE QUEENSLAND MURRI CARNIVAL IN REDCLIFFE has kicked off

Arthur Beetson Foundation has announced that 2017 Deadly Choices Arthur Beetson Foundation Murri Rugby League Carnival will take place at Dolphin Oval Redcliffe from 20th to 23rd September.

The Carnival involves teams from across Queensland and is a real show piece of Indigenous Rugby League Talent.

Three Competitions take place over four days include Under 15’s Boys, Open Women’s and Open Men’s. Some exciting additional events and activities will be announced very soon.

The Carnival is much more than Rugby League as it also has a major focus on Health and Education. All players have to complete a “Health Check” as a requirement to participate and all Under 15’s Boy participants must have attended school 90% of time

.
Peter Betros Chairman of QRL stated the “ this Carnival highlights the great reach the game of Rugby League has across Queensland and the Arthur Beetson Foundation should be congratulated in providing this opportunity for so many to get involved”

Brad Beetson, son of the late Arthur Beetson and Board Member of the Arthur Beetson Foundation stated “ Dad through his life had a passion on improving the lives of young indigenous it’s great that the foundation can continue this by using his other great passion of Rugby League the vehicle to do so”.

Murri Rugby League is an annual four day rugby league carnival for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queensland rugby league teams. Queensland Rugby League (QRL) has awarded the Arthur Beetson Foundation with the tender for the next three years. The Foundation has employed MRL (Qld Pty Ltd) to event manage the Murri Rugby League carnival.

Giving Back

A significant portion of Arthur Beetson Foundation generated revenue will be invested back into Indigenous Rugby League programs and structures endorsed by the QRL to establish sports focused sustainable community activities.

Murri Rugby League aims to:

  • Raise the representation of Indigenous players from the current 11% in the National Rugby League to 15%, an overall 4% growth in participation over a 3-5 year time frame.
  • Provide structure in a drug and alcohol free environment for players to have the opportunity to develop a direction into representation at a national level.
  • Work with the network of Indigenous communities in Queensland to promote and develop the carnival as a state event.
  • Develop a sponsorship alliance which will support the participation of all Communities and contribute to the staging of the carnival as an annual event.

About The Murri Rugby League Carnival

The Murri Carnival is a very important date on the Indigenous calendar and is much more than a rugby league event. The Carnival has certain basic rules. An adult person cannot play in the Carnival unless they:
. undergo a health check; and
. enrol to vote or, if enrolled, make sure that their enrolment details are current.

An under 15 player cannot play in the Carnival unless they;
. undergo a health check; and
. have a 90% school attendance record.

Each year a number of people are identified as possible suffers of diabetes a disease that shortens the life span of too many Indigenous Australians.

In 2014 the under 15 side travelled to New Zealand and a Men’s team travelled to Fiji to play and take part in a cultural exchange. The QRL Indigenous under 15 team also played the curtain raiser to the NRL Indigenous All Star Game at Suncorp Stadium last February 2015 against a New South Wales Koori team

6. NT : $6 Million Health Centre for Umbakumba,Groote Eylandt 

The community of Umbakumba on the Territory’s Groote Eylandt is celebrating the opening of a new $6 million health centre.

The Member for Arnhem Selena Uibo said the jointly funded facility was sorely needed in the remote island community, 600 kilometres southeast of Darwin.

The community is located approximately 50 km east of Angurugu situated inside Little Lagoon, Point Langton on the northeast coast of Groote Eylandt. Umbakumba is approximately 50 km east of Angurugu on Groote Eylandt, which is 650 km east of Darwin and 50 km off the Arnhem Land coast in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Apart from the fortnightly freight barge service from Darwin, Umbakumba is generally accessed by air.

Groote Eylandt airport, located 1 km from Angurugu, is the main air access point for the island. Owned and maintained by Gemco, the airstrip is sealed and there are flights to and from Nhulunbuy/Darwin most days.

Travel time to Nhulunbuy: 30-50 minutes, to Darwin: 1.5-2 hours. A 50 km dirt road links Angurugu to Umbakumba. Charter flights can also be arranged direct to Umbakumba which has a dirt airstrip that can accommodate twin engine light aircraft.

There is a reasonable dirt road from the airport to Umbakumba. However, a 4-wheel drive is essential and given the number of rivers and streams, travel throughout the island during the wet season can be difficult.

“Groote Eylandt residents want and deserve to access high quality health services,” Ms Uibo said.

“We know that improving the health of Groote Eylandt people, boosts the community and makes the Territory a healthier and stronger place.”

The $6 million build has been funded through a tripartite Regional Partnership Agreement including:

$3 million from Groote Eylandt Bickerton Island Enterprises

$2 million from the Northern Territory Government

$1 million from the Australian Government

Ms Uibo said it was a great example of local decision making with the Groote Eylandt Bickerton Island Enterprises group working with the Territory and Federal Governments to improve health.

“The original clinic was so run down that the costs of repairs was prohibitive,” Ms Uibo said.

“Local contractor GCC was awarded the contract to build a new facility in January last year and after significant challenges including weather and distance they have delivered a state of the art facility for community.

The new Yinumarra health Centre facilities include:

  • new emergency services with an ambulance bay and a single bed emergency rooms
  • five consulting rooms including men’s, women’s and children’s consulting areas
  • dental room
  • drug storage room
  • multi-purpose room
  • enhanced security and privacy for staff and clients
  • reception and internal and external waiting area

The centre is one of three to be opened, with Ngukurr Health Centre opened last week and Numbulwar Health Centre opening tomorrow

7. TAS : FIAAI ‘No Smokes No Limits’ Public Health Campaign Launched

Flinders Island Aboriginal Association’s Tackling Smoking Program has recently launched their latest ‘No Smokes No Limits’ public health campaign with billboards being revealed across Tasmania. These billboards feature motocross imagery and Aboriginal ambassadors Jay and Josh Woolley from WSM Freestyle.

As part of this campaign, smokers are encouraged to contact their local health service, general practice or the Quitline for assistance in giving up the habit. This campaign seeks to denormalise smoking, and is in stark contrast to some of the messaging typically associated with extreme sports that are often sponsored by energy drinks or other consumables associated with poor health outcomes.

FIAAI CEO Maxine Roughley said “This program especially targets young people who are our future and we are proud to be supporting such an important health issue.”

FIAAI will be looking to expand this campaign to buses and other mediums in the future, with billboards currently being found in several parts of the state including Hobart, Launceston, East Devonport, Burnie and others. FIAAI will also be presenting at the upcoming Oceania Tobacco Control Conference (October 17-19) regarding this campaign.

The FIAAI Tackling Smoking Team can be contacted on 6334 5721 for more information.

 

8.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

The South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium (the Consortium) was launched on 18 May 2017, as a collaborative partnership formed between the South Australian Aboriginal Health Partnership (comprising of SA Health, Aboriginal Health Council of SA and Department of Health – Commonwealth) and the South Australian Academic Health Science and Translation Centre.

The Translation Centre represents a partnership between SA Health, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), University of Adelaide, Flinders University, University of South Australia, Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Health Consumers Alliance of South Australia, Adelaide Primary Health Network, Country SA Primary Health Network and Cancer Council SA. The Translation Centre has 9 priority areas of which one is Aboriginal Health.

Consortium Vision

The Consortium’s vision is to reduce the impact of chronic disease experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in South Australia through the successful implementation of the priorities identified within 3 plans: The South Australian Aboriginal Cancer Control Plan 2016-2021, the South Australian Aboriginal Heart and Stroke Plan 2017-2021 and the South Australian Aboriginal Diabetes Strategy 2017-2021.

How will the Consortium Work

The responsibility to oversee the implementation activity of the SA Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium rests within its governance structures. The Consortium has 5 active working groups including an Executive Group, an Aboriginal Community Reference Group and three condition-specific leadership groups representing Diabetes, Cancer and Heart and Stroke. We refer to the people and organisations on these groups as our members.

Who is working in the Consortium Coordinating Centre?

The team comprises of two full time staff. Wendy Keech is the Senior Research Translation Manager and Executive Officer. Wendy is supported by Douglas VJ Clinch, in a Project Officer role overseeing and supporting the various governance groups of the Consortium. Strategic policy and cultural advice and support is being provided by Kim Morey and Neville Fazulla both on a part-time basis to the team, and have particular focus on supporting the community reference group. Andrea McKivett, has been providing her clinical, technical and cultural support to the team since the inception of the Consortium, with Katharine McBride recently joining the team to provide technical support one day a week. The team come from various backgrounds and disciplines required to support the work of the Consortium, and all are passionate people with a strong commitment to making a difference to the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people in South Australia.

If you would like any further information please don’t hesitate to contact Wendy Keech, on (08) 81284228, email: wendy.keech@sahmri.com or Doug VJ Clinch, on (08) 81284893 or email: douglas.clinch@sahmri.com.

Aboriginal Health #RUOKday: Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #TAS #QLD #WA #VIC

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

1.2 National ANSANT Danila Dilba : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

2.NT : Ngukurr remote community and Sunrise ACCHO opens new $5.93 million culturally appropriate delivery of health services

3.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal centre’s new Rrala milaythina-ti (strong in Country Project)improving health and wellbeing 

4. NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service #RUOKDay backs several mental health programs

5. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Hopevale and Mossman Gorge Celebrate R U OK

6. WA : AHCWA embarks on leading strategy for Aboriginal youth health

7. VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle mob up for any challenge

 8.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

 This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

DOWNLOAD the Full 2 Day Program released this week

2017-Ochre-Day-Program

Register HERE

2.1 NT : Ngukurr remote community and Sunrise ACCHO opens new $5.93 million culturally appropriate delivery of health services

” An absolute privilege and pleasure today to officially open the new Ngukurr health clinic run by Sunrise Health. Great to have the Numbulwar Red Flag dancers help to open the clinic with the Hon. Warren Snowden MP and finishing the opening ceremony was Ngukurr school students who sang a few songs!”

Member Arnhem Selena Uibo

The community of Ngukurr in the Territory’s southern Arnhem Land is celebrating the opening of its new federally funded Health centre .

The Member Arnhem Selena Uibo says the $5.93 million dollar building will improve health services in the region.

“All Territorians are entitled to control over their lives and access to high quality services,” she said.

“Building strong and healthy remote communities is key to developing a stronger Northern Territory.

“Here on the edge of the Roper River the community of Ngukurr will help to lead the way.”

The new build was completed as part of the Commonwealth funded $50.29 million Health and Hospitals Fund Regional Priority program to upgrade 11 remote health centres across the NT.

Northern Territory business Probuild built the new health centre at Ngukurr which features:

  • Culturally appropriate design with separate male and female entrances
  • A drive-through ambulance bay
  • State-of-the-art emergency facilities
  • Dental room
  • Hearing room
  • 8 consulting rooms
  • Secure administration area for improved staff safety and security for drug storage
  • Enhanced security for staff and patients

Ms Uibo said Sunrise Aboriginal Health Service will operate the health centre.

“Separate male and female entry areas and treatment rooms allow for a culturally appropriate delivery of health services,” she said.

“That will encourage more community members to access the health services they need earlier.

“The new improved facilities will also help to attract to staff, offering facilities to deliver primary health as well as acute and emergency care to the Ngukurr community.”

Newly constructed health centres are expected to be opened in Umbakumba and Numbulwar next week.

3.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal centre’s new Rrala milaythina-ti (strong in Country Project)improving health and wellbeing 

 ” The Tasmanian Aboriginal centre’s new Rrala milaythina-ti (strong in Country Project) is getting Aboriginal people from all over Tasmania out on country and improving health and wellbeing as well as strengthening connections to country, people, language and culture.”

Check out Strong in Country Facebook Page

Twenty-one participants have just completed the project’s biggest trip yet- a four-day, at times challenging, trek on the 46 km three Capes Walk, which winds through eucalypt forests, button grass plains and rainforest, over mountains and along the edge of the huge dolerite cliffs of the Tasman Peninsula in Southern Tasmania.

Albeit a fair few stiff pairs of legs, the participants aged from 15 to 65 returned last week inspired to get out more, to keep fitter, to challenge themselves and continue building connections with their people and country.

Participants reported great benefits to their physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wellbeing and spoke of belonging and spiritual connections.

Some were experienced bush walkers, while for others it was a first- and now they are hooked.

Lily Castle, from Hobart, was one of them. “It was a challenge I really enjoyed”, the 18-year old said.

“I found I had to push myself harder than I had before. It was a blessing to meet new people and hear some old stories and be part of a great group.

“It was absolutely spectacular to be standing on the top of cape Pillar and Cape Hauy. It’s an experience I will never forget or take for granted.

“I feel like now I have done this, I know whatever I put my mind to or whatever I want to achieve, whatever challenge, it’s just determination and willpower.

There were many times I thought “I can’t keep going”, even the first day.

“I feel more powerful, just with small things that I want to change that I can do it; I believe in myself more.

“I feel more connected to the community. I got to meet people who taught me a lot about my ancestors and about Tasmanian Aboriginal history. I feel more connected to my culture now”.

Ms Castle said the trip was also an opportunity to get away from smokes and grog, and she now feels more equipped to tackle these addictions.

Like other participants, Ms Castle is keen to join in upcoming trips, including some to remote places with significant Aboriginal heritage.

There have also been day trips and smaller overnight adventures to cater for people with different fitness levels, ages, availability and family situations.

Aboriginal heritage worker Sharnie Read, one of the project organisers, said some trips have been tied into Aboriginal heritage consultations and NAIDOC celebrations.

“A lot of the trips are about taking community members out and giving them a strong connection to country and teaching them about the history and cultural landscape and heritage, and also bonding as a group, she said.

Ms Read said the participation of older people had been invaluable, with their generosity in sharing community and family history and knowledge, which provided generational links, and inspired lifelong fitness.

Funded by Primary Health Tasmania under the Federal Government’s Primary Health Networks Program, Rrala milaythina-ti is a ‘Participation Action Research project aiming to show that Aboriginal people ‘s wellbeing increases through contact with country.

“Jilian Mundy was a participant on the three Capes trip.

4. NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service #RUOKDay backs several mental health programs

“I think it needs to be promoted more, because there’s a lot of issues out there that don’t get addressed, there is a great need in the Indigenous community, and that grief, loss and intergenerational trauma added to the struggle.

As a project manager at Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, James Sheather has backed several mental health programs in the region

Originally Published HERE

Take a minute, change a life – that was the call from mental health advocates in the lead up to World Suicide Prevention Day

It is a message that resonates with many locals, who are painting the town yellow in anticipation of RUOK Day today – an event that encourages us to ask friends and family if they’re feeling low.

“If something tells you in your gut that something’s not quite right – that is the time to have the conversation,” director of the Hunter Institute of Mental Health Jaelea Skehan said.

“As difficult as it might be to start a conversation and to reach out and ask ‘Are you ok?’, it is actually much harder for someone who is currently in distress and despair to put their hand up and ask for help. There’s great power in us as a community learning how to and being brave enough to actually offer help.”

Part of the conversation thinktank for RUOK Day, Ms Skehan encouraged locals to trust their gut instincts. If you notice someone acting withdrawn or ‘not themselves’, she said, it is time to reach out.

Ross Hill senior psychologist education Karina Hutching, who has been championing a series of mental health information sessions for local public schools this month, said the RUOK Day message was for every day.

“It’s an ongoing message that we promote connectedness to others and that we promote our wellbeing and the health of those around us,” she said.

She said the sessions aimed to teach children about the supports available to them in the school environment, and their own ability to improve their mental state.

Sleep, water and exercise was the focus at Inverell Public School on Wednesday, as students learnt about the power they have to improve their mental health. The combined wellbeing and fitness workshop is running in every local school before RUOK Day.

Good SPACE (Suicide Prevention through Awareness, Courage and Empathy) project co-ordinator Fiona Livingstone, who runs Aboriginal suicide prevention workshops with rugby league star Nathan Blacklock agreed. She said unresolved grief due to the consequences of colonisation was one reason Aboriginal people are more likely to suffer from mental illness.

“Our research tells us, and certainly Aboriginal participants in our workshops are in agreement that this all stems from colonisation when the lives and the world of Aboriginal people changed dramatically,” she said.

She said other factors included racism, discrimination, inequality and a shorter lifespan.

Good SPACE runs a number of mental health workshops in Inverell and the region, including two free suicide prevention workshops. If anyone is interested in educating themselves on suicide prevention, contact Ms Livingstone on 0427 072 105 or fiona.livingstone@newcastle.edu.au.

Local RUOK Day activities will be held at Victoria Park today Thursday, September 14.

If you need help, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 for free, 24 hour crisis support.

5. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Hopevale and Mossman Gorge Celebrate R U OK?

The communities of Hopevale and Mossman Gorge will celebrate R U OK? this month.

R U OK? is a national suicide prevention charity inspiring people to check in, listen, encourage action, and check in again.

Hopevale

Hopevale will celebrate national R U OK? Day on 14 September with a community event in the park featuring a suicide prevention talk and community barbeque.

Apunipima’s Social and Emotional Wellbeing Centre team, with support from My Pathway, are coordinating the event.

Social and Emotional Wellbeing Counsellor Dorothy Deshong, who will deliver the talk, said the main message of R U OK? Day was importance of checking in with people and encouraging them to take action.

‘People who are feeling socially or emotionally unwell can often be helped simply by having someone care enough to listen to their problems and direct them on the right path to receiving help,’ she said.

‘The message is also that the best way to know if someone is feeling bad is to take time out, and ask them directly, R U OK?.’

‘We want to encourage people to check in with others as it increases the chances of a person accessing help. This is especially important when someone is experiencing depression and grief. It is also hoped that people will use this day as the perfect opportunity to reach out for help if they need it.’

Mossman Gorge

Mossman Gorge will focus on the R U OK? message throughout September.

Apunipima Social and Emotional Wellbeing Team Leader Donna Henning said she and the team wanted to spread the R U OK? message to community in a variety of ways.

‘We have an R U OK? banner between the Mossman Gorge Wellbeing Centre and Primary Health Care Centre and it will stay up for the month of September,’ she said.

‘Our Youth Worker Ben and Adult Worker Bacho will play touch footy with community with an R U OK? football and be there to have conversations social and emotional wellbeing.’

‘We also have R U OK? information cards to give out to community and even R U OK? serviettes to use in our regular women’s and men’s activities.’

Donna said she hoped R U OK? message would spark conversations about the importance of checking in with friends, family and colleagues.

‘It’s so important to check in, and keep checking in,’ she said.

‘Sometimes people find it hard to share their real feelings but even if it takes a while, keep asking. The person knows you are there and that’s a good thing in itself. Asking, taking the time to listen, encouraging action and checking in are the keys to helping people move through challenging times.’

 

6. WA : AHCWA embarks on leading strategy for Aboriginal youth health

Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia youth workers will travel to the Kimberley this week as part of a national first project exploring the most significant health issues facing young Aboriginal people in regional WA.

AHCWA staff will host a series of age appropriate workshops with young indigenous people and health workers across the state, including in the Kimberley, Mid-West, Pilbara, Goldfields and South-West before the end of the year.

Results of the workshops will form part of AHCWA’s Aboriginal Youth Health Strategy – a new blueprint that will document the most important health concerns of young people and the availability of local health services.

“We are excited to undertake the first ever WA Aboriginal Youth Health Strategy in Australia and hear directly from young people in WA about the health issues they are most concerned about,” AHCWA Aboriginal youth coordinator Hayley Thompson said.

“Over the years there have been general strategies conducted about youth health in Australia but this is the first time a strategy has been undertaken exclusively for young Aboriginal people in WA.

“We know that mental health, drugs and alcohol are among the most pressing issues facing young indigenous youth today, along with boredom, which can lead to young people engaging in criminal activity and violent behaviours.

“This plan will help us to navigate the most significant health issues facing young Aboriginal people in remote WA, determine how accessible health services are and the best way forward to provide the support they need.”

On Wednesday, the team will host a workshop with children aged between five and 10 at the Broome Youth and Families Hub before travelling to Derby on Thursday for a workshop with young people at Derby Aboriginal Health Service.

On Friday, they will speak with staff at Headspace and Aarnja in Broome.

Youth workers will gauge health-related information as part of the workshop, asking young people between the ages of five and 24 about health issues in their communities, where they would go for help and what the word “healthy” means to them.

“This is about working with children and young people on an age appropriate level to determine the health issues of most concern and ensure they know where to seek help should they need it,” Ms Thompson said.

“Workshops will be presented in a fun, engaging way and be tailored to a variety of literacy levels, locations and interests of the group.

“Through this project, AHCWA hopes to achieve a better sense of the health issues affecting young people in each region and any potential gaps that may need attention.

“We hope that by chatting face-to-face with young people and service providers in each region it will provide richer data and more comprehensive information.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) currently engaged as members.

7. VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle mob up for any challenge

Our Kirrip Challenge Champs in Melton have been going great guns in The Six Week Challenge!

Last night we took on Week 4’s Boxing session at Melton Waves Gym…what a turn out > Welove seeing the young ones bringing their families along and encouraging each other to find that extra burst of energy.

Bring on Challenge night!!

8.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

The South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium (the Consortium) was launched on 18 May 2017, as a collaborative partnership formed between the South Australian Aboriginal Health Partnership (comprising of SA Health, Aboriginal Health Council of SA and Department of Health – Commonwealth) and the South Australian Academic Health Science and Translation Centre.

The Translation Centre represents a partnership between SA Health, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), University of Adelaide, Flinders University, University of South Australia, Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Health Consumers Alliance of South Australia, Adelaide Primary Health Network, Country SA Primary Health Network and Cancer Council SA. The Translation Centre has 9 priority areas of which one is Aboriginal Health.

Consortium Vision

The Consortium’s vision is to reduce the impact of chronic disease experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in South Australia through the successful implementation of the priorities identified within 3 plans: The South Australian Aboriginal Cancer Control Plan 2016-2021, the South Australian Aboriginal Heart and Stroke Plan 2017-2021 and the South Australian Aboriginal Diabetes Strategy 2017-2021.

How will the Consortium Work

The responsibility to oversee the implementation activity of the SA Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium rests within its governance structures. The Consortium has 5 active working groups including an Executive Group, an Aboriginal Community Reference Group and three condition-specific leadership groups representing Diabetes, Cancer and Heart and Stroke. We refer to the people and organisations on these groups as our members.

Who is working in the Consortium Coordinating Centre?

The team comprises of two full time staff. Wendy Keech is the Senior Research Translation Manager and Executive Officer. Wendy is supported by Douglas VJ Clinch, in a Project Officer role overseeing and supporting the various governance groups of the Consortium. Strategic policy and cultural advice and support is being provided by Kim Morey and Neville Fazulla both on a part-time basis to the team, and have particular focus on supporting the community reference group. Andrea McKivett, has been providing her clinical, technical and cultural support to the team since the inception of the Consortium, with Katharine McBride recently joining the team to provide technical support one day a week. The team come from various backgrounds and disciplines required to support the work of the Consortium, and all are passionate people with a strong commitment to making a difference to the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people in South Australia.

If you would like any further information please don’t hesitate to contact Wendy Keech, on (08) 81284228, email: wendy.keech@sahmri.com or Doug VJ Clinch, on (08) 81284893 or email: douglas.clinch@sahmri.com.

 

 

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health TOP #jobalerts @IUIH_ @AMSANT @CAACongress @MiwatjHealth

This weeks #Jobalerts

Please note  : Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO or stakeholder that job is still available

1. Miwatj Health NT Senior Social and Emotional Well Being Therapeutic Clinician

2. AMSANT Alice Springs : Indigenous Health Project Officer ( IHPO )

3. Congress Alice Springs Chief Operating Officer at the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre (CAAHSC)

4. Congress Alice Springs : WOMENS HEALTH NURSE

5 -7 Yerin Aboriginal Health Services Inc. 3 positions 1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Mental Health : Team Leader – Chronic Disease Program Team Leader – Mental Health and AODS (Wellbeing Program)

8-13 : Wurli-Wurlinjang Health NT 6 positions

8.Wurli-Wurlinjang Family Partnership Program (WWFPP) – Various Positions

9.Program Coordinator _ Strong Indigenous Families (FDV)

10.Strong Indigenous Families. Positions include: Counsellors/ Therapists, Case Managers & Community Engagement Support Officers (FDV)

11 .Mental Health Professionals

12.Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner

13.General Practitioner

14.Mawarnkarra Health Service WA program Manager

15. National Health and Medical Research Council 2017 – 2018 Indigenous Internship program

 16 – 22 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

VIEW Hundreds of Jobs on the NACCHO Jobalerts

 

  Register or more INFO

How to submit a Indigenous Health #jobalert ? 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

1. Miwatj Health NT Senior Social and Emotional Well Being Therapeutic Clinician 

Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation is the regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in East Arnhem Land, providing comprehensive primary health care services for over 6,000 Indigenous residents of North East Arnhem and public health services for close to 10,000 people across the region.

Miwatj Health aims to improve access to integrated, culturally responsive and safe mental health and drug and alcohol services that holistically meet the social and emotional well being and mental health needs of the population in the East Arnhem region.  We  are seeking enthusiastic, dedicated and an appropriately qualified senior therapeutic clinician to fill a role within our organisation.

Our Values

  • Compassion care and respect for our clients and staff and pride in the results of our work.
  • Cultural integrity and safety, while recognising cultural and individual differences.
  • Driven by evidence-based practice.
  • Accountability and transparency.
  • Continual capacity building of our organisation and community.

In this role you will be responsible for working collaboratively with members of the Social and Emotional Well Being (SEWB) team, and the Manager, Mental Health to contribute to the development and delivery of the Miwatj SEWB model.

Key Responsibilities include;

  • Demonstrated experience in working in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations or environments and fully embrace the concept of Aboriginal Community Control
  • Experience in delivering (culturally adapted) Focused Psychological Strategies to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Deliver culturally adapted evidence based therapeutic interventions that value and build upon traditional indigenous knowledge
  • Contribute to a coordinated approach for the prevention, assessment, early intervention, referral and shared care arrangements for common mental and behavioral disorders, including alcohol and drug use disorders
  • Develop and articulate a Miwatj SEWB Model that includes the promotion of strong SEWB, screening, self-referral and early intervention for common mental health disorders (including alcohol and drug use disorders) as part of comprehensive primary health care. This includes the development of mental health care plans, clinical pathways, case management, and clear referral pathways and processes
  • Develop clinical governance structures and processes to support the delivery of culturally-adapted evidence-based therapeutic interventions to address common mental health disorders, including alcohol and drug use disorders, as part of comprehensive primary health care
  • Ensure Therapeutic Work complements and works in an integrated way with the existing medical and social/cultural support streams of care
  • Effectively manage a team of two clinicians to deliver, articulate and promote the SEWB Miwatj Model

To apply for this role you must be either a registered Clinical Psychologist, Registered Psychologist, Mental Health experienced Social Worker, or Mental Health experienced Occupational Therapist and be eligible to work in Australia.

For further details please refer to the Job Description.

This is a full time position with benefits and an attractive salary commensurate with experience. The position is Darwin based and will involve regular travel throughout the Miwatj region (locally based and subsidised accommodation may be negotiated).

Applications close 11 October 2017.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are encouraged to apply.

2. AMSANT Alice Springs : Indigenous Health Project Officer ( IHPO )

About the Position

AMSANT is seeking a motivated individual with high level knowledge and awareness of the Health and Community Services Sector (Government and non-government) in the NT and on a national scale. The successful candidate will possess effective oral, written and interpersonal skills with the ability to communicate effectively with Indigenous people while also maintaining sound cross cultural skills, strong analytical and problem solving skills and have a passion for contributing to improvements in Aboriginal health in the NT. Qualifications in Health/ Human Services or equivalent experience is essential with sound understanding of chronic disease and clinical background being highly desirable. Qualifications in Public Health, Health Promotion or Health Education is also desirable.

Contract Type & Salary

This is a full time role to 30 June 2018 with salary between $99,995 and $106,084 based on the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications. Generous salary packaging is also available.

Location
Alice Springs

How to apply
Download a copy of the position description and selection criteria from www.amsant.org.au

Your application should address the selection criteria and include a cover letter and two referee’s details. Email applications to hr@amsant.org.au

Application closing date
15th September 2017

For further information

Contact Human Resources on 08 8944 6666

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

 

3. Congress Alice Springs Chief Operating Officer at the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre (CAAHSC)

  • Base salary: $158,554 – $183,085 (p.a)
  • Total effective package: $188, 192 – $220,310 (p.a)
  • Full-Time Maximum Term 3 year contract

The Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre (CAAHSC) is a partnership of 12 organisations from across the Territory including the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress), to establish a health research centre. The CAAHSC is a construct around innovation in regional health that brings together Aboriginal health services, the Alice Springs hospital and leading research and education institutions under a virtual centre of excellence. The centre has a focus on Aboriginal health, remote health and primary health care in a regional context, with another key focus to translate research into outcomes on the ground. The CAAHSC is an exciting collaborative, and it will be at the forefront of some incredible research and Congress is the leading partner.

The Centre is one of only two consortia nationally to be recognised as a Centre for Innovation in Regional Health (CIRH) by Australia’s peak funding body for medical research, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).

The Centre is seeking a Chief Operating Officer who is interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

The Chief Operating Officer provides direct strategic and governance support to the Executive Committee of the Central Australia Academic Health Science Centre (CAAHSC) and manages the day to day operations of the CAAHSC.

Alice Springs offers a unique lifestyle in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere in the heart of Australia. It is within easy reach of Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Watarrka (Kings Canyon) and a host of other world heritage sites.

As well as a wonderful lifestyle and rewarding work, Congress offers the following:

  • Competitive salaries
  • Six (6) weeks annual leave
  • 9.5% superannuation
  • Generous salary packaging
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Family friendly conditions
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)
  • District allowance

For more information on the position please contact Chief Medical Officer – Public Health, Dr John Boffa (08) 8951 4401 or 0418 812 141 or email john.boffa@caac.org.au.

Application close: MONDAY 2 OCTOBER 2017.

*Total effective package includes: base salary, district allowance, superannuation, leave loading, and estimated tax saving from salary packaging options.

Contact Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or vacancy@caac.org.au for more information

To apply for this job go to: http://www.caac.org.au/hr& enter ref code: 3748736.

4. Congress Alice Springs : WOMENS HEALTH NURSE

Full-time, Fixed Term 2 Year Contract based in SANTA TERESA

  • Base Salary: $98,982 – $106,314 (p.a)
  • Total Effective Package: $121,757 – $129,934 (p.a)*
  • Female Identified Position

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) has over 40 years’ experience providing comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal people living in Central Australia. Congress is seeking a Women’s Health Nurse who is interested in making a genuine contribution to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people.

The Women’s Health Nurse works within a multi discipline team to provide culturally appropriate women’s health services and health promotions to Aboriginal women and children 0 – 8 weeks of age living in Santa Teresa.

This position participates in the after hour on call roster for medical emergencies. All after hour call outs are accompanied.

Central Australia offers a unique lifestyle in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere in the heart of Australia. It is within easy reach of Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Watarrka (Kings Canyon) and a host of other world heritage sites.

As well as a wonderful lifestyle and rewarding work, Congress offers the following:

  • Competitive salaries
  • Six (6) weeks annual leave
  • 9.5% superannuation
  • Generous salary packaging
  • A strong commitment to Professional Development
  • Family friendly conditions
  • Relocation assistance (where applicable)
  • District allowance and Remote Benefits

For more information on the position contact Clinic Manager Jason King on (08) 8956 0911 and Jason.King@caac.org.au

Applications close: SUNDAY 1 OCTOBER 2017

*Total effective package includes: base salary, district allowance, superannuation, leave loading, and estimated tax saving from salary packaging options.

Contact Human Resources on (08) 8959 4774 or mailto:vacancy@caac.org.aufor more information. Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

For more information about jobs at Congress visit www.caac.org.au

To apply for this job go to: http://www.caac.org.au/hr & enter ref code: 3736373.

5 -7 Yerin Aboriginal Health Services Inc. 3 positions 1.Aboriginal Health Worker – Mental Health : Team Leader – Chronic Disease Program Team Leader – Mental Health and AODS (Wellbeing Program)

 

                 

Overview of Positions

Yerin Aboriginal Health Services Inc. is providing services to individuals and families living with Chronic Disease, Mental Health or requiring support for Drug and Alcohol issues.     With the early onset of chronic diseases in our community and the need for early intervention, we encourage you to utilise your experience and community insights to make a difference by applying for one of the following positions.

Aboriginal Positions – Identified (Full Time)

  • Aboriginal Health Worker – Mental Health

Targeted Positions (Full Time)

  • Team Leader – Chronic Disease Program
  • Team Leader – Mental Health and AODS (Wellbeing Program)

Competitive Salary Package is available including salary sacrifice.

To obtain an application pack – please email recruitment@yerin.org.au or contact Alison Trindall on 02 43511040; or visit our website www.yerin.org.au

If you would like to discuss the position requirements, please contact Paul Hussein, Operations Manager at Yerin on 43 511040, or email paul@yerin.org.au

Identified Position is under Section 9A of the NSW Anti-Discrimination Act 1977.

Job Applications close 20 September 2017

Download the Yerin Info

Yerin MULTIPLE ROLES_EMPLOYMENT_PACKAGE_ SEPTEMBER 2017

8-13 : Wurli-Wurlinjang Health NT 6 positions

If you are considering applying for a position with us, we encourage you in the first instance to review the position profile of the vacancy you are interested in. This will assist you in understanding the role you are interested in and will provide details in relation to the position responsibilities and other criteria applicants should consider addressing in their application.

All applications must contain the following as a minimum:

  • completed employment application form
  • current resume or curriculum vitae (CV)
  • a cover letter which provides a clear and concise overview of your ability to meet the requirements of the role.
  • a minimum of two referees (names, positions and telephone contact number) preferably one current and one past supervisor

Note: Applications who are successful must have the ability to satisfactorily complete a Criminal History Check and obtain a Working with Children Card.

Applications may be forwarded using our online Employment Application Form OR by emailing the Human Resources team at hr@nullwurli.org.au

View all details of these Wurli current vacancies HERE

8.Wurli-Wurlinjang Family Partnership Program (WWFPP) – Various Positions

9.Program Coordinator _ Strong Indigenous Families (FDV)

10.Strong Indigenous Families. Positions include: Counsellors/ Therapists, Case Managers & Community Engagement Support Officers (FDV)

11 .Mental Health Professionals

12.Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner

13.General Practitioner

14.Mawarnkarra Health Service WA program Manager

 Mawarnkarra Health Service is a community controlled Aboriginal health service providing access to and delivering quality medical services to improve the physical, spiritual, cultural, social and emotional wellbeing of the families of the Roebourne area.

We are seeking a Programs Manager to lead a team who provide programs focused on the physical, spiritual, cultural, social and emotional wellbeing of our clients. The successful applicant must have demonstrated relevant experience in program/project management, strong team management skills and the ability to successfully lead a team to achieve required outcomes and objectives.

The remuneration package for this position will be negotiated commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Interested applicants must address specific Selection Criteria in order to be considered for the interview stage.

This position offers an attractive base salary together with a range of other benefits including rental assistance and a work vehicle.

A copy of the Position Description and Selection Criteria for the above advertised position can be requested from Shenae Murphy, MHS Human Resource Officer on 9182 0800 or email hrofficer@mhs.org.au

Applications are to be received no later than 4.00pm, Friday 15th September 2017. Applications can be emailed to hrofficer@mhs.org.au or sent via post to PO BOX 59 Roebourne WA 6718.

15. National Health and Medical Research Council 2017 – 2018 Indigenous Internship program

 
 
National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) is pleased to invite eligible applicants to apply to the Indigenous Internship program.
The Indigenous Internship program provides a wide range of opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to gain insight into the work of the NHMRC, as well as to enhance their educational experience through practical work experience.
An internship with the NHMRC provides:
·         exposure to government processes and requirements in relation to funding health and medical research
·         experience in developing guidelines, identifying and promoting resolution of ethical issues
·         exposure to mechanisms and challenges of disseminating and increasing uptake of knowledge
·         better understanding of the rationale for, and demands of, public administration and accountability
A limited number of paid placements for internships are available in our Canberra and Melbourne offices.
 
Eligibility
To be eligible you must be:  enrolled in an Undergraduate or Postgraduate degree in a health or medical research related field; able to work independently and as part of a team; and can provide evidence to confirm that you are of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent.
 
Applications for the 2017-18 Indigenous Internship Program close on Friday 29 September 2017.
To find out more please see our Indigenous Internship Information, which details eligibility and selection, as well as the terms and conditions of the program.
If you have any questions, please contact the Indigenous Employment Coordinator TJ Oberleuter on 02 6217 9530.

16 – 22 JOBS AT IUIH Brisbane

IUIH and its members are constantly looking for healthcare workers, GP’s, allied health professionals, medical and health related students to fill short or long term vacancies within their growing operations.Current job opportunities are listed below:

Website HERE

+ Team Leader – Home Support (Hervey Bay) Full Time On going + Manager, Family Wellbeing Services + Business Intelligence Analyst / Developer + Regional Optometrist + Registered Nurse – Full Time Ongoing + Exercise Physiologist, Full Time On going Based at Windsor + Exercise Physiologist – Hervey Bay / Cherbourg – Full time, Fixed Term + Indigenous Outreach Worker (CTG) Bundaberg Full Time Fixed Term

Aboriginal Health Lifestyle Campaigns : Minister @KenWyattMP investing in #DeadlyRoos partnership, a Community Controlled initiative. #DeadlyChoices

“Deadly Choices is what I like to call a ‘jewel in the crown’ of Indigenous health, achieving some stunning results since it kicked off in South East Queensland four years ago.

The Deadly Kangaroos is an expansion of this program, using the star power of the ambassadors and the excitement of this year’s World Cup to reach more even communities.

Our national rugby league stars need to be in peak physical condition to play at the top of their game and we appreciate the players’ support to start discussions with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about ways to improve their health “

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said legendary Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga and other Indigenous and non-Indigenous players would become ambassadors for the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s Deadly Choices program, to extend its reach across Australia.

The launch in Canberra was attended by the NACCHO Chair Matthew Cooke (pictured on right )

Members of the elite Australian Kangaroos Rugby League 2017 World Cup squad will headline the expansion of a successful grassroots campaign to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Deadly Choices is a community-based health lifestyle campaign launched in 2013.

There is particular focus on young people and the importance of exercise, education, school attendance, quitting smoking and regular preventive health checks.

Through media campaigns, sports carnivals and community events it has prompted:

    • Almost 19,000 annual health checkups in South East Queensland
    • Active patient numbers to triple to over 330,000
    • 1,155 smoke-free household pledges
    • More than 3,300 smoker interventions

“Experience shows that sport and sporting legends can help communities kick major goals in health awareness and foster real change,” the Minister said.

“I encourage everyone to support Australia in the World Cup in October, just as the Kangaroos are supporting better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and all Australians.”

The ambassadors will make appearances at game day events as the Australian team travels through the ACT, New South Wales, the Northern Territory and regional Queensland for the World Cup.

“Key ambassadors for the Deadly Kangaroos are Johnathan Thurston and Greg Inglis,” the Minister said. “Also, the best three players from the national men’s and women’s teams at the Arthur Beetson Deadly Choices Murri Rugby League carnival will also be chosen as community ambassadors to promote positive health messages.

“Merchandise, including a special Deadly Kangaroos World Cup jersey, has been produced as an incentive for people to have a health check.

“The messages will also be promoted through television, radio, social media and at coaching clinics and Aboriginal community controlled health services.”

The Australian Government is contributing $235,000 to help support the Deadly Kangaroos campaign

The Rugby League World Cup runs from 26 October – 2 December 2017.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NACCHOagm2017 #NSW #TAS #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

 

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

2. Katungul Aboriginal Medical Service going strong after recent awards

3. QLD : B.strong training program to help close the gap

 4.WA : South West Aboriginal Medical Service receives funding to establish a dental clinic

5. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yuntiat Flinders Uni

6. NT : Menzies HealthLAB hits the road for Science Week

7.VIC : Mallee District Aboriginal Services aims to reach out

8. Tas : Tasmania Aboriginal community and family events

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

 This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

Register HERE

2. Katungul Aboriginal Medical Service going strong after recent awards

Katungul Aboriginal Medical Service says it is going from strength to strength, getting more and more healthy outcomes for the Koori community.

Morale was boosted even further by recent Eurobodalla business and NAIDOC awards, and now the service is being recognised as a shining light in the arena of Aboriginal community health and closing the gap.

Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services was awarded the prestigious Excellence in Business Award at this month’s Eurobodalla Business Awards night, where the service also picked up the People’s Choice Award for the Narooma area.

And then only one month ago, Katungul received the Excellence Award at the Eurobodalla NAIDOC Awards night held in Narooma.

Katungul chief executive officer Rob Skeen said the awards had definitely been a huge boost for staff, particularly receiving the peer-to-peer recognition of both the people’s choice and NAIDOC awards.

“It’s important to all our staff, because even though we work for the organisation, we are still community members and part of the wider family,” Mr Skeen said.

“All our staff have a strong investment in not only seeing Katungul succeed but because of our long community and family history, we also have those ties with the community, so its not only about what’s happening now but also building a strong base for future generations.”

“Those historical family and cultural ties reflects our “Koori health in Koori hands” philosophy.”

Since taking over as CEO last year, Mr Skeen has seen the number of employees grow from 30 to 56 and the health service was getting recognition for its accomplishments from a range of other services and government entities.

Katungul Aboriginal Medical Service now services the entire Far South Coast from Eden to Ulladulla with offices in Bega, Narooma and Batemans Bay, as well as recent moves to service areas west of the ACT.

Only last week, representatives from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet had a lengthy meeting at the service’s Narooma office to find out why the service’s reporting system was so good, and Katungul has been recognised one of the four most accountable Aboriginal organisations in Australia.

“They were impressed and had plenty of questions to ask about how we were meeting our key performance indicators,” Mr Skeen said. “It was a good opportunity for us to reinforce that it’s not just about the numbers but also the narrative and story behind our accomplishments that are equally as important.”

So for example, the work being done by the young outreach workers Sean Kinchela and Dean Heycox in the eyes and ear screening program, who in recent months had screened more than 450 primary school and kindergarten students from Bermagui to Batemans bay, checking for conditions such as otitis media.

Their work had been so successful , the pair was next week scheduled to give a presentation to the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council as a best practice model on health screening for other Aboriginal medical services in

Other Katungal success stories include the mobile dental van that now was visiting schools and communities all along the Far South Coast thanks to the support of the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health in the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Sydney.

The dental hygienist supplied by the Poche Centre now had a dental assistant and local Koori trainee working with her for all the school visits in the Bega and Eurobodalla shires.

Mr Skeen said Katungul was also implementing a new holistic approach to medical care that took into account both physical and mental health.

“Because you can’t make healthy decisions about your body without having a healthy mind,” he said.

A new strategic plan for the health service was also being finalised and would begin to be implemented across all its offices and programs in October, he said.

Katungul was working on building partnerships with the three other Aboriginal medical services in Nowra and the Illawarra, and also the Oolong House residential alcohol and drug treatment facility.

“One of the proudest accomplishments for me so far was getting word that the number of emergency room admissions for our Aboriginal people had dropped significantly, which to me means we are making a difference when it comes to preventative medicine and keeping Kouri health in Kouri hands, “Mr Skeen said.

 3. QLD : B.strong training program to help close the gap

Health professionals will receive training on how to provide culturally-appropriate healthy-lifestyle advice to their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients with the launch of the B.strong training program.

Photo above : (left to right) Professor Noel Hayman, Clinical Director, Inala Indigenous Health Service; Aunty Evelyn Waria, Torres Strait Islander Elder; Aunty Kerry Charlton, Aboriginal Elder; Cameron Dick MP, Minister for Health and Minister for Ambulance Services.  (Photo: Qld Health Hospital and Health Service)

Minister for Health and Ambulance Services Cameron Dick today launched the Palaszczuk Government’s $2.24 million three-year Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Brief Intervention Training Program (the B.strong training program) which will be delivered by Menzies School of Health Research over 2017-2019.

“The B.strong training program will build the capacity, skills and confidence of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and other health and community professionals,” Mr Dick said.

The program is of particular importance to the Member for Inala, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, after campaigning for further Indigenous health services in the area.

“The program will enable health professionals to deliver appropriate nutrition and physical activity interventions to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients and to help them stop smoking,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

Photo above : Training delivery photo (Apunipima Cape Capers e-newsletter):

Royden Fagan (bottom left hand photo pointing at paper).

Menzies School of Health Research Brief Intervention Trainer Royden Fagan delivered B.strong Brief Intervention training program to Apunipima health workers earlier this month. Participants who complete the one day session, six two-hour online modules and take part in peer support groups will gain a Statement of Attainment.

“I am excited that the Menzies School of Health Research has been working collaboratively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stakeholders and Queensland Health to develop the B.strong training program.

“The Townsville Aboriginal and Islander Health Service and Inala Indigenous Health Service worked in partnership with Menzies to test and pilot the face-to-face and online training program.”

Inala Indigenous Health Service Clinical Director Professor Noel Hayman said working in partnership with Menzies for the B.strong training program was crucial for its success.

“We worked together to develop, design and test the B.strong training program and online materials,” Prof Hayman said.

“The shared goal was to produce a best-practice training program in smoking cessation, nutrition and physical activity for health professionals to work more effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“The face-to-face B.strong training program will be delivered flexibly to fit the operational needs of health services to ensure all staff receive training.”

Menzies School of Health Research Director Prof Alan Cass said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders have a high prevalence of known risk factors for chronic disease.

“Smoking rates amongst Indigenous Queenslanders are high, including maternal smoking rates, and Indigenous Queenslanders are also more likely to be obese,” Prof Cass said.

“The B.strong training program aims to address the risk factors that significantly contribute to the burden of disease and injury for Indigenous Queenslanders.”

To find out more about the B.strong program see www.bstrong.org.au (external site) ( http://www.bstrong.org.au/ ) or to organise a training workshop contact the B.strong team at: b.strong@menzies.edu.au ( mailto:b.strong@menzies.edu.au ) or Ph: 07 3169 4208.

 4.WA : South West Aboriginal Medical Service receives funding to establish a dental clinic

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service is set to add to its already impressive array of services thanks to the state government’s Local Projects, Local Jobs funding.

Member for Bunbury Don Punch said the funding will help to create a dental clinic at the centre which will help improve the health outcomes for the Noongar community.

“Dental health is such an important part of overall healthcare so I think it is really appropriate SWAMS expand their services in this area,” he said.

“I recently toured the Bunbury SWAMS clinic and was very impressed by the holistic approach they take to health care.

Mr Punch said the $25,000 in funding would go a long way towards turning SWAMS’ long held ambition for a dental clinic into a reality.

“The dental clinic initiative will enhance their services in a very positive way.”

“SWAMS has partnered with WA Dental Health Services and with the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health at the Sydney Medical School to establish the clinic” he said.

5. SA : Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti at Flinders Uni

 
Our team were at Flinders Uni NAIDOC  – if you’re young and deadly (or even if you’re older and deadly) learn how we can support you to live a smoke-free life! #BeHealthyBeSmokefree #notupinsmokes

6. NT : Menzies HealthLAB hits the road for Science Week

Territorians from Wurrumiyanga on the Tiwi Islands to Gunbalanya in Arnhem Land recently received a snapshot of their overall physical health from one of the NT’s most interesting mobile laboratories.

HealthLAB, an initiative of the Menzies School of Health Research, promoted healthy lifestyle choices to more than 350 Territorians during National Science Week.

As people moved through the various stations, which measured blood pressure, carbon monoxide in their lungs and showed internal organs on ultrasound, they gained a better understanding of their bodies and received information about how to improve their health.

Other stations included a vertical jump that indicated lower body strength, while a grip strength test measured upper body strength.

HealthLAB director Associate Professor Heidi Smith-Vaughan said the mobile lab was a great way for people to have a hands-on experience with the medical technology, and improve their awareness of how current lifestyle choices – such as smoking or healthy eating – can impact their health in the future.

“We received great feedback from schools and the general public during this tour, which saw NT lawmakers and the captain of NT Thunder Shannon Rioli take part,” she said.

HealthLAB manager Nicole Boyd said that since its inception in 2014, more than 5000 Territorians had experienced HealthLAB and learned how they could make healthier choices to help reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases like diabetes or hypertension.

To help people keep track of their scores and measurements, the HealthLAB team launched an app for Apple devices – visit W: https://itunes.apple.com/app/id1226929609 – earlier this year, which also provides messages of encouragement and healthy lifestyle tips.

For more information about Menzies’ HealthLAB, visit W: menzies.edu.au/healthlab

 7.VIC : Mallee District Aboriginal Services aims to reach out

MALLEE District Aboriginal Services took the unusual step of closing its Mildura offices and staff instead offered its services direct to the community from Nowingi Place, on the Mildura riverfront, for the day

The first Mildura organisation-wide Community Engagement Day aims to reach out to people who might otherwise not use MDAS health, community and family ­services.

The focus of the day is on health services, with free health checks, assessments and information, but will have the full range of MDAS services on-site.

“Our health services are really hitting the mark with the community, because we’ve had a 100 per cent increase in the number of health checks at our clinics in the past four years,” MDAS project officer Shanice Kuchel said.

 8. Tas : Tasmania Aboriginal community and family events
 Members of the Aboriginal community and our family’s, we are hosting one of three up-coming gatherings next – Friday, 6:00pm, 1 September 2017 at piyura kitina (Risdon Cove).We are looking for Aboriginal community volunteers to help out for the community dinner. If your able to volunteer  Friday, please contact Kira or Rose at the TAC on – 03 62340700, 1800 132 260.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and @MHPNOnline free webinar : Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration

NACCHO Member Alert speaker update August 30

 ” Our CEO Pat Turner and NACCHO staff would like to invite all health workers to be a part of this free webinar: Reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services.
 
Developed by NACCHO and produced by Mental Health Professionals’ Network (MHPN) the webinar features Q&A with a panel of experts and will explore the key issues and the impact that incarceration has on individuals, families and communities.”

Download FLYER HERE and share /promote this free webinar

No need to travel to benefit from this free PD opportunity.
Simply register and log in to participate from your home, work or anywhere you have a computer or tablet with a high speed internet connection.
 
Register now to attend this free webinar for health practitioners on
Wednesday 13 September 2017, from 4:30pm – 5:45pm AEST.
 
NACCHO also invites all Member services to ask staff to register now to access a free Mental Health Professionals’ Network webinar for their own professional development.
 
The Indigenous interdisciplinary panel will explore and discuss ways of reducing the mental health impact of Indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services.
 
This professional development opportunity is free and the previous webinar conducted by the MHPN had 680 participants across Australia.
 
The webinar features a Q&A with a panel of experts and will explore the key issues and the impact that incarceration has on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
The panel will discuss strategies to enhance cultural awareness and develop responsive services for Indigenous communities affected by incarceration.

WHO’S ON THE PANEL?
 
Julie Tongs OAM : CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service ACT
Dr Louis Peachy : QLD-based rural medical advisor
Dr Marshall Watson : SA-based psychiatrist
Dr Jeff Nelson : QLD-based psychologist
 
Facilitator: Dr Mary Emeleus (QLD-based general practitioner and psychotherapist).
 
Simply register and log in to participate from your home, work or anywhere you have a computer or tablet with a high speed internet connection.
Registrations close at midnight on Tuesday 12th September, 2017.
 
Please find attached a flyer about the updated webinar and it would be appreciate if you could distribute this to your local network.
 
 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NACCHOagm2017 #NSW #TAS #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

 

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

2.QLD : APUNIPIMA Cape York Health Council’s Baby One Program highlighted at Growing Deadly families Forum

3. WA / AHCWA : Shot in the arm for vaccinations at Bega Garnbirringy Health Service 

4.1 VIC : VAHS Healthy Life Style Team Kirrip Six Week Challenge – Week Two has officially kicked off!

4.2 VIC : Mallee District Aboriginal Services Study will help target gambling

5.1 NSW Awabakal kicks off thier Healthy Lifestyle Challenge!

5.2 NSW : Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s Youth Vaccine Hip Hop video project

6. NT NATSIWA AMSANT 2017 Darwin Forum

7. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

8. Tas : Tasmania Aboriginal community and family events

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

 This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

Register HERE

 

2.QLD : APUNIPIMA Cape York Health Council’s Baby One Program highlighted at Growing Deadly families Forum.

APUNIPIMA Cape York Health Council’s Baby One Program has been highlighted at this month’s Queensland Clinical senate’s Growing Deadly families Forum.

The Forum focused on improving the health of Queensland’s indigenous women and families through a healthier start to life.

Apunipima’s johanna Neville and Florida Getawan told delegates about the council’s award-winning Indigenous-led Baby One Program, which is an integral part of antenatal care in Cape York. It runs from pregnancy until the baby is 1000 days old.

“Baby Baskets (full of useful and essential items) are integral feature of the Baby One Program, are provided to families at key times during pregnancy and the postnatal period,” Ms Neville told delegates.

“The baskets act as both an incentive to encourage families to engage with health care providers, as a catalyst to health education and as a means to provide essential items to families in Cape York.”

Ms Getawan, who helps deliver the Baby One Program in cairns and Kowanyama, said home visits make a difference when it comes to mothers receiving care.

“As a maternal and child-health worker I spend time educating pregnant women about healthy eating, what’s good and what’s not good for them during pregnancy such as the dangers of smoking, and safe sleeping for bubba”, she said.

“ I love doing home visits and yarning with mothers about healthy parenting, and being a support person for them in their own space.

“I love being there for families who are too shy to come to the clinic so, if I can, I engage with them in their own environment.

“I love watching mothers grow because I have had seven pregnancies myself and can relate to what they are going through, and I am able to develop a healthy relationship with them.”


3. WA / AHCWA : Shot in the arm for vaccinations at Bega Garnbirringy Health Service 

An Aboriginal health worker from Kalgoorlie is the latest to complete a program that teaches how to administer vaccinations to children.

The Bega Garnbirringy Health Service health worker graduated after taking part in the two-week course at the Nindila training Centre in Kalgoorlie.

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) launched the training program for Aboriginal health workers in partnership with the Communicable Disease Control Directorate at the Department of health in March 2015.

Since then, 34 Aboriginal health workers from across WA have been trained to administer vaccinations and promote immunisation.

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the program had been initiated to improve immunisation rates amongst Aboriginal children in WA, which are the lowest in the country.

“Until this program was launched, only nurses and doctors were authorised to carry out immunisations,“ she said.

“By expanding the number of Aboriginal health workers trained to administer vaccinations to children, we hope to decrease the risk of our young people contracting preventable diseases.

“TRUST”

‘In addition, the added benefit of having Aboriginal health workers trained to conduct vaccinations means they can relate to Aboriginal children and gain the trust of their parents to help spread the message about the importance of immunisation.”

A WA Auditor General’s report published last December cited immunisation rates amongst Aboriginal children, infants and toddlers as lower than the national target. It suggested the training program had helped contribute to improvements in low immunisation rates among Aboriginal children, with rates for Aboriginal infants in several regions increasing by an average of 8,5% in the year from June 2015.

“We are thrilled that it appears this training program has already contributed to immunisation rates among Aboriginal children increasing significantly in some areas, “Ms Nelson-Cox said.

“We hope that as more Aboriginal Health Workers are trained, the rates will go up even further.

“We have received an overwhelming response from our Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations, who see the value in their AHW’s being trained to administer immunisations,” she said.

Courses are planned for Broom and Carnarvon later this year.

4.1 VIC : VAHS Healthy Life Style Team Kirrip Six Week Challenge – Week Two has officially kicked off!

Huge effort from all of our Challenge Champs who came to hear Luke give us some great information about eating well to live longer and stronger lives.

Everyone gave 110% in the workout and we can’t wait for next week! Keep smashing those goals and working towards building healthy habits every day.

Jandalee and Coz were our FitBit winners this week for their consistency and determination! Thanks to Medibank for donating the FitBits, we can’t wait to give one away every week.

Go for it Kirrip Challenge! You’ve got this!

#StaySmokeFree#hltChallenge#vahsHLT#BeDeadly

4.2 VIC : Mallee District Aboriginal Services Study will help target gambling

A study commissioned by Mallee District Aboriginal Services is helping to highlight the extent of problem gambling in the Mallee’s Aboriginal community – and identifying possible strategies and solutions.

The study, published by La Trobe University, was compiled from interviews conducted with 26 community members across the Mildura, Swan Hill and Kerang region earlier this year.
Pictured MDAS Gambler’s Help Counsellor Tiffany Griffin with Social and Emotional Wellbeing Manager Raelene Stephens

You can download the report here.

The report found that although gambling was identified as “a popular and pleasurable activity”, participants also noted it was a “respite from depression, loneliness, stress and sadness”, with some acknowledging it to be a cause of significant harm.

Although the study noted that tighter regulation by government would aid in reducing harm, other recommendations were more community-focussed.

The report found that there was a strong sense that for interventions to work, more open discussion about gambling was needed, in part to address shame, one of the biggest barriers identified to addressing harm.

MDAS chief executive officer Rudolph Kirby said the report would be used as a springboard to open community discussion on the issue of problem gambling.

“One of the main findings of the study, and one of the challenges we face, is that a lot of people don’t identify gambling itself as a problem in the first place,” Mr Kirby said.

“They might acknowledge they have money problems or health problems or family problems, but most people don’t see gambling as a problem in itself,” he said.

“Even when they do they’re often too embarrassed to say something or seek help because of the stigma around the issue.”

Mr Kirby said the report’s findings would be a catalyst for strengthening the delivery of support services, with the assistance of funding announced by the Victorian Government last month.

The project known as “It’s not all about the money” will be funded by the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation to allow MDAS and La Trobe University to work with other Elders and community members in Mildura, Swan Hill and Kerang to co-design and implement interventions.

MDAS Gambler’s Help Officer Tiffany Griffin said the work would focus on looking at how to increase the open conversations about gambling in the community.

“This is a great opportunity to first acknowledge the problem that we have, then get the community on-board to address the problem and preventing it being such a problem in future, as well,” Ms Griffin said.

“We want the community to be part of designing our education and support services so they are not only more aware of them, but feel comfortable in coming forward and asking for support for a problem they or a family member might have,” she said.

“The report also identified that one of the things that drew people to gambling venues, particularly bingo, was the opportunity to socialise and catch up with others, so opportunities for replacement activities is also an important factor that we can look at.”

The project will complement the support services already provided by Gambler’s Help MDAS.

The MDAS Social and Emotional wellbeing team can be contacted on (03) 5018 4100. Gambler’s Help services can also be access by calling 1800 858 858.

5.1 NSW Awabakal kicks off thier Healthy Lifestyle Challenge!

This week we kicked off our Healthy Lifestyle Challenge!

We had a good little bunch of starters at both our 7am and 10:30am sessions. It was so encouraging to see many of our local community members taking that sometimes scary 1st step towards improving their health.

It was awesome seeing some of our Dads team up with their sons, as Timana said ‘that’s leadership right there’.

Today was packed with fun, sweat and giggles.

It’s not too late to join us, please contact us for a rego form and make an appointment at medical to get your measurements done. Challenge yourself……

5.2 NSW : Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s Youth Vaccine Hip Hop video project

Recently the Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s Youth Vaccine Hip Hop video project was launched on YouTube.

The ‘Whatchya Gunna Do?’ video can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nW54z1cIYv8.

Through the combined efforts of locally talented youths and nationally recognised artists the project included the writing and recording of the song as well as filming the video clip with young people from throughout the Murrumbidgee Local Health District area.

The Murrumbidgee Local Health District has been eagerly awaiting the launch of ‘Whatchya Gunna Do?’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait people who visit a GP located in an AMS in the Murrumbidgee region (Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation, Griffith Aboriginal Medical Service or Viney Morgan) will be managed by the team at the relevant AMS.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait who visit a mainstream ‘non AMS’ General Practice, can be referred into the program to Marathon Health.

“We have been fortunate to be able to combine local youth talent with nationally recognised artists including Nooky and Nina Las Vegas,” Murrumbidgee Local Health District director of public health Tracey Oakman said.

“The youth wrote the lyrics, sang the song and participated in the video, all with the support of producer  Rahj Conkas, lyric writer Nooky and radio host, DJ and producer Nina Las Vegas,” Mrs Oakman said.

The inspiration behind the project was the Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s desire to see young people educated on the importance of vaccination.

The Murrumidgee Local Health District recently announced that the local area has the highest rate of Human Papillomavirus vaccinations across the nation and would like to see the region take the top spots when it comes to other vaccinations too.

In Australia free vaccinations from the National Immunisation Program are provided to children (at 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 months and 4 years), adolescents (Year 7 at school) and older people (Aboriginal people over 50 and others over 65 years).  Additionally free vaccines are available to people with specific medical conditions.

LAUNCH: A hip hop video has been released to promote vaccination.

LAUNCH: A hip hop video has been released to promote vaccination.

“The aim of the video is to engage with high school age youth to get them thinking about the importance of immunisation,” Mrs Oakman said.

The launch last Saturday was held as part of Wagga Wagga City Council’s Youth Week celebrations.

Mrs Oakman said the project originally came about thanks to an idea from a local health worker.

“The project is the brainchild of Leanne Sanders, Aboriginal Immunisation Health Worker,” Mrs Oakman said.

“Leanne realised many youth do not recognise the importance of being vaccinated and proposed the Hip Hop video as a way of reaching them.”

For more information on vaccinations visit the Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s website at http://www.mlhd.health.nsw.gov.au, the Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s Facebook page or by speaking to your local health professional.

The ‘Whatchya Gunna Do?’ video can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nW54z1cIYv8.

6. NT NATSIWA AMSANT 2017 Darwin Forum

Our busy schedule had the NATSIHWA professional development team land in Darwin this week to facilitate a forum to a group of Aboriginal Health Practitioners who work in a variety of roles from education to management.

A passionate and dedicated group of health professionals shared their experiences working in the Top End and engaged with our Guest Presenters, who delivered some current education to assist them in their practice.

Our members  provided valuable historical insights into the Aboriginal Health Worker role and how they continue to work diligently to advance this valuable profession across the NT.

The AMSANT Leadership and Workforce Development Team presented an outstanding informative session and received positive feedback from all attendees.

Many thanks to Jeaneen for your warm welcome to Larrakia Country, and our guest presenters for your time and commitment in assisting us to facilitate our forums.

Thanks to the Darwin mob for coming along and providing your feedback for us to take back to Canberra.  It is so rewarding to journey with you, to hear your voices and witness such strong representation in the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health & education sector. Kudos to you all !

Photo Above L-R: Darwin forum presenters Vanessa McAndrew IBA, Marea Fittock RHD and Stehen Thompson ASD.
AMSANT Present at Darwin Forum
Photo Above L-R: Karrina DeMasi, Patrick Johnson and Sharon Wallace.
AMSANT presenters Patrick Johnson, Sharon Wallace and Karrina DeMasi provided particiapnts at NATSIHWA Darwin Forum with a powerful presentation on AMSANT services, leadership, workforce and policy.

All were impressed by their dedication and achievments, especially the NATSIHWA  team. We would like to give a huge shout out to the AMSANT Team and also thank you for allowing us to share your information with our all our readers.

 

7. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

 
Doug Milera, CEO of Tauondi College proudly demonstrates the college as a newly minted smoke-free environment. This means a healthier space for students and staff alike! Too deadly Tauondi. #BeHealthyBeSmokefree
8. Tas : Tasmania Aboriginal community and family events
Members of the Aboriginal community and our family’s, we are hosting one of three up-coming gatherings next – Friday, 6:00pm, 1 September 2017 at piyura kitina (Risdon Cove).
We are looking for Aboriginal community volunteers to help out for the community dinner. If your able to volunteer next Friday, please contact Kira or Rose at the TAC on – 03 62340700, 1800 132 260.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

1.National : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations pharmacist Special Interest Group ( SIG )  launched

2.NT : Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service $2.4 million for culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services

3. WA : AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox speaks about cashless welfare cards

 4. WA  : Wrongful conviction shines light on lack of translators

 
 5. QLD Deadly Choices calls  for volunteers for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival

6. SA :  Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO promotes World Hepatitis Day.

7.VIC :  VAHS mob promotes Healthy Lifestyle message  at World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

8. QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council  Growing Deadly Families

9. NSW Redfern National Children’s Day Celebration

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

National : Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations pharmacist Special Interest Group ( SIG )  launched

“For too long Aboriginal people have suffered shorter lifespans, been sicker and poorer than the average non-Indigenous Australian, however, highly trained pharmacists have a proven track record in delivering improved health outcomes when integrated into multidisciplinary practices,

“Strong international evidence supports pharmacists’ ability to improve a number of critical health outcomes, including significant reductions in blood pressure and cholesterol and improved diabetes control. A number of studies have also supported pharmacists’ cost-effectiveness.

Some ACCHOs have already shown leadership in the early adoption of pharmacists outside of any national programs or support structures. NACCHO and PSA are committed to supporting ACCHOs across Australia to meet the medicines needs in their communities by enhancing support for those wishing to embed a pharmacist into their service.”

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner said disparities in the health between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are confronting SEE Previous NACCHO post

Pictured above Mike Stephens Director of Medicines Programs and Policy in Cover Photo

See previous NACCHO Pharmacy posts

See previous NACCHO QUMAX posts

In recognition of the growing number of pharmacists working in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs), the peak national body for pharmacists, the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) has launched the ACCHO Special Interest Group (SIG).

The ACCHO SIG was launched on 30 July at PSA17 in Sydney during theAboriginal Health Service Pharmacist forum.

PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson said pharmacists working in ACCHOs have specific needs and skills and having a Special Interest Group with the primary role of supporting them will assist PSA to drive the growth of this career path.

“In many cases pharmacists working in these positions are providing innovative and diverse services that have the potential to be informative and relevant to the evolution of pharmacy services and inter-professional care.

“Consultation with these pharmacists and services about their needs is vital to ensure PSA and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) deliver relevant and meaningful benefits to PSA members and the wider pharmacy and health sectors,” Dr Jackson said.

A key role of the National ACCHO SIG Committee will be to provide up-to-date information to NACCHO and PSA on relevant issues that relate to both organisations.

This will include input on improvements to PSA’s professional development and practice support programs that benefit ACCHO pharmacists. The SIG will also provide NACCHO with input on pharmacy-related trends and practices that affect ACCHOs.

It is a joint committee to be run by PSA and NACCHO to foster collaboration, inform relevant policy and strengthen the relationships between these organisations with a shared commitment to embedding pharmacists in ACCHOs nationally.

PSA also welcomed the announcement of a trial to support Aboriginal health organisations to integrate pharmacists into their services.

The ACCHO SIG will support pharmacists participating in this trial.

Dr Jackson said having a culturally responsive pharmacist integrated within anAboriginal health service builds better relationships between patients and staff, leading to improved results in chronic disease management and Quality Use of Medicines.

 NT : Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service $2.4 million for culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services.

The Federal Government will provide up to $2.4 million for a tailored project to address family violence experienced by Indigenous women and children in Katherine.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said the funding formed part of the $25 million Indigenous-focused package under the Third Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

“I am pleased to announce this support for Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service, a local community service with specialist experience in supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families,” Minister Scullion said.

“The funding will deliver culturally safe and trauma-informed intensive family-focused case management services.”

Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service CEO, Suzi Berto, said the project would provide intensive family-focused case management delivered within a trauma-informed framework to address behaviour often associated with domestic violence. It would also aim to break the cycle of domestic and family violence and child removals from families.

“Wurli welcomes this new program and would like to thank the Federal Government for selecting Wurli to take on this particular project,” Ms Berto said.

Minister Scullion said community-based, culturally-appropriate solutions were required to reduce the rate of family violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children.

“In total, $18.9 million will be invested in eight Indigenous community organisations across Australia to deliver a range of services, including trauma-informed therapeutic services for children, services for perpetrators to prevent future offending and intensive family-focused cased management.

“We have actively sought the views of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on how best to address family violence.

“Wurli-Wurlinjang Aboriginal Health Service has been identified based on its expertise, as well as local needs in the community.

3. WA : AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox speaks about cashless welfare cards

” Targeting welfare is not, by itself, a panacea but it just might give Roebourne the circuit-breaker it needs to allow the state government to build a safe and resilient community.

There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse.

Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the group did not support the “ill-conceived idea” that cashless welfare cards could turn the tide on child abuse.

FROM NEWS LTD

Paedophiles in Western Australia’s Pilbara region are allegedly using welfare payments to bribe children for sex, prompting the police commissioner to call for an expansion of the cashless welfare program.

But the Aboriginal Health Council of WA says the commissioner should be more concerned about policing in remote communities rather than advocating further disempowerment of indigenous people.

Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan said in an opinion piece in The West Australian newspaper on Tuesday that welfare cash was also being used for drugs, alcohol and gambling at Roebourne and surrounding Aboriginal communities.

He said in an area of about 1500 people, there were 184 known child sex abuse victims, with police charging 36 people with more than 300 offences since the operation began late last year, plus another 124 suspects.

Mr O’Callaghan, who will retire this month after 13 years as police commissioner, said that in 2014 the previous government noted 63 government and non-government providers delivering more than 200 services to Roebourne.

“Despite all of this effort, we have failed to protect the most vulnerable members of that community and have witnessed sufferers of abuse grow up and become offenders, and so the cycle continues,” he said.

“We often find children sexually abusing children.”

The commissioner said the problem was so widespread that some families had normalised it and he described the hopelessness as a “cancer quickly spreading throughout the community”.

“Given the longstanding issues in Roebourne, we ought now to be looking at more fundamental structural reform around welfare and income to reduce the opportunity for offending,” he said.

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the group did not support the “ill-conceived idea” that cashless welfare cards could turn the tide on child abuse.

“There has been no conclusive evidence to date that cashless welfare cards play any role in reducing the impact of issues such as illicit drug use or child sexual abuse,” she said.

“Ultimately, we need to see an increase in community programs and comprehensive support services to help address these complex social issues in Aboriginal communities.”

Ms Nelson-Cox also said the commissioner’s admission that officers could not protect children in remote communities was gravely concerning.

Imagine if you were taken into custody to be questioned over a crime you did not commit in a language you could not even read and write in — and were then charged with murder.

4. WA  : Wrongful conviction shines light on lack of translators

It sounds like a third world travel nightmare.

But this actually happened in Australia to Gene Gibson, a shy young man from the tiny Gibson Desert community of Kiwirrkurra.

As reported ABC

While there were many complex factors which led Mr Gibson to being jailed for the manslaughter of Josh Warneke in 2014, after a conviction which was quashed earlier this year, it might never have ended up that way if he had a skilled interpreter to steer him through crucial meetings with police.

Mr Gibson’s first language is Pintupi, with Kukutja his second.

He has a limited understanding of English and his cognitive impairment makes it difficult for him to comprehend complex information.

Today the Court of Appeal outlined its reasons for quashing his conviction, explaining that Mr Gibson’s problems with language were one reason why “the plea was not attributable to a genuine consciousness of guilt”.

It gives many examples of how Mr Gibson often did not understand his own lawyer, who in turn could not understand what the interpreter was telling Mr Gibson about important matters like how to plead.

He was originally charged with murder but pleaded guilty to manslaughter after police interviews were deemed inadmissible for several reasons, including the lack of a qualified interpreter.

Stranger in your own land

Mr Gibson, like many Indigenous Australians who do not speak English as a first language, is somewhat like a foreigner in his own justice system.

It is something which concerns WA’s chief justice Wayne Martin.

Earlier this month, he told a conference of criminal lawyers in Bali that language was causing “significant disadvantage” for Indigenous people in the justice system, with WA’s translation services not reaching everyone who needed them.

“If we do not have properly resourced and effective interpreter services for Aboriginal people, then they will continue to fare badly in the criminal justice system,” he wrote in a submission to a Senate committee inquiry last year.

The interpretation and translation of Indigenous languages for the WA justice system is undoubtedly a niche industry.

There are about 45 Indigenous languages in the Kimberley, many of them considered highly endangered. Fewer than 600 people speak Pintupi, according to the Australian Indigenous Languages Database.

So not only do you have to find an interpreter who speaks Pintupi, but you also need someone who is trained to understand police and court proceedings, and relay them to a defendant.

It is a massive problem, according to Faith Baisden, the coordinator of First Languages, which helps Indigenous communities maintain their languages.

“Particularly in those small community groups we’re talking about, we’re not necessarily going to find someone who’s got the skill and the confidence to be trained. It takes really specialised training,” she said.

Another problem is that WA’s only Indigenous language interpreting service is struggling for funding.

The Kimberley Interpreting Service (KIS) is dependent on federal money after being stripped of funding by the WA Government in recent years.

But its chief executive Dee Lightfoot said she was hopeful of securing money from the new WA Government in September’s budget, with Treasurer Ben Wyatt writing to inform her he was reviewing her request.

She said Mr Gibson needed an interpreter to help him navigate the justice system from the very start

5. QLD Deadly Choices calls  for volunteers for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival

 

Volunteers aged 16+ years are needed for the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival! More details are below! To register your interest please email admin@murrirugbyleague.com.au.

6. SA :  Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO promotes World Hepatitis Day. 

World Hepatitis Day. Nunkuwarrin Yunti provides treatment, Specialists, prevention, advocacy and information support for people with Hepatitis. Here is Jorge from our Harm Minimisation Team #showyourface

OR VIEW HERE

7.VIC :  VAHS mob promotes Healthy Lifestyle message  at World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

Check out our newest healthy lifestyle local sport champions!

These deadly women make up the Maal-Ya Indigenous Basketball team. They are off to Vancouver, Canada on Sunday to play in the World Indigenous Basketball Challenge!

So proud to see these women represent their mobs and proudly display our Healthy Lifestyle Values: staying smoke free, healthy eating, active living, drinking water and being deadly role models!

With Georgia Bamblett, Courtney Alice, Thamar Atkinson, Montanna Hudson, Sophie Atkinson, Klarindah Hudson-Proctor, Edward Bryant, Tyler Atkinson and June Bamblett.

Good luck Maal-Ya! Can’t wait to hear how you go! Stay tuned to this page and Sports Carnival for updates throughout the week!

#StaySmokeFree #Gofor2and5 #DrinkWaterUMob

Sportcarnival VicHealth Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc

8. Apunipima Cape York Health Council  Growing Deadly Families

Apunipima Cape York Health Council Region Two Manager Johanna Neville and Maternal and Child Health Worker Florida Getawan will head to Brisbane today to deliver a presentation on the Baby One Program to the Queensland Clinical Senate’s Growing Deadly Families Forum.

Johanna and Florida will focus on the Baby One Program, an integral part of antenatal care in Cape York

‘Apunipima’s award winning, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander – led home visiting Baby One Program runs from pregnancy until the baby is 1000 days old,’ Florida said.

‘Baby Baskets – an integral feature of the Baby One Program – are provided to Families at key times during pregnancy and the postnatal period. The Baskets act as both an incentive to encourage families to engage with health care providers, as a catalyst for health education and as a means to provide essential items to families in Cape York.’

‘It’s well known that best practice care during pregnancy and baby’s early years has been proven to provide positive health outcomes. There is a still a gap in the maternal and child health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders compared to other Australians. It’s this gap we are trying to bridge with the Baby One Program which sees Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers visit families in their homes to deliver health care and health education.’

Florida Getawan helps deliver the Baby One Program in Cairns and Kowanyama and said home visiting makes the difference when it comes to mums getting care.

‘As a Maternal and Child Health Worker I spend time in Cairns and Kowanyama, educating pregnant women about healthy eating, what’s good and what’s not good for them during pregnancy such as the dangers of smoking, and safe sleeping for bubba,’ she explained. ‘I love doing home visits and yarning with mothers about healthy parenting and being a support person for them in their own space.

I love being there for families who are too shy to come to the clinic so if I can engage with them in their own environment, families feel safe to access health information I love watching mothers grow because I’ve had seven pregnancies myself and can relate to what they are going through and I’m able to develop a healthy relationship with them.’
Johanna and Florida will deliver their presentation at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre 10:50 am on Thursday 3 August 2017.

About the Growing Deadly Families Forum

The Queensland Clinical Senate – which provides clinical leadership by developing strategies to safeguard and promote the delivery of high quality, safe and sustainable patient care – is holding the Growing Deadly Families Forum which will focus on improving the health of Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and families, through a healthier start to life.

The Forum runs from 3 – 4 August.

 

9. NSW Redfern National Children’s Day Celebration

AMS Redfern will be celebrating ‘National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day’ come along and share stories about the importance of staying connected to culture and having strong positive family relationships
Friday 4th August from 2:30 pm-4:30 pm
#BBQ will be provided
#Value our rights, Respect our Culture, Bring us home.
#Limited Giveaways

 

 

 

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