NACCHO Aboriginal Children’s Health @KenwyattMP Part 2 of 2 #ACCHO Providers who will be delivering the Primary Health Care and New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services are:

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” The $27 million would be invested over the next 18 months in Primary Health Care services and New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program.

These services include: comprehensive primary health care; antenatal and postnatal care; information about baby care; assistance with breastfeeding, nutrition and parenting; monitoring developmental milestones, immunisation status and infections; and health checks and referrals for treatment for Indigenous children before starting school.”

The Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, MP

See list below that includes many of our ACCHO member

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NACCHO welcomes $27 million for early childhood health

The peak body for Aboriginal controlled community health organisations today welcomed an extra $27 million over the next 18 months for programs to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Strait Islander children and mothers.

The funding announced by Indigenous Health Minister, Ken Wyatt, will be provided to 18 medical services in NSW, Queensland, Tasmania and Western Australia.

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chair, Matthew Cooke, welcomed the Minister’s announcement that Aboriginal medical services would receive most of the additional funding.

Mr Cooke said funding indigenous led solutions was critical to making significant gains in closing the indigenous health gap, including reversing the slide in infant mortality rates highlighted in last week’s Closing the Gap report.

“Maternal and early childhood health programs that are culturally appropriate, co-ordinated and delivered by Aboriginal health professionals working on the ground in local communities are essential to giving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children the best possible start in life,” Mr Cooke said.

“This announcement will fund services such as antenatal and postnatal care, information about baby care, support for breastfeeding, nutrition and parenting, monitoring milestones, immunisation and health checks to make sure children are healthy and ready to learn when they start school.

“This funding is an encouraging and welcome sign that the government has listened to Aboriginal people over the last week and recognises that we must be equal partners in addressing issues that affect our communities.”

The new funding will be invested under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program.

Aboriginal controlled community health organisations that will receive the new funding include:

  • Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Coprporation (NSW
  • Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation (NSW)
  • Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service Ltd (NSW)
  • Mt Isa Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Ltd (QLD)
  • Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Service (QLD)
  • Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre (QLD)
  • South East Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (TAS)
  • Tasmania Aboriginal Centre (TAS)
  • Moorditj Koort Aboriginal Corporation (WA)
  • GP Down South Ltd (WA)

Minister’s Press Release

New funding of $27m for child and maternal health programs and primary health care will help keep Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children healthy and ready to learn when they start school and ensure they are properly immunized.

“These targeted grants will help improve the health and life expectancy, as well as early childhood health and development, of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through better access to effective and high-quality health services,” Mr Wyatt said.

“The health providers will be delivering services in culturally-appropriate ways.

“This is in addition to our 2014-15 Budget announcement of $54 million over three years to 2018 for an additional 51 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services sites to improve child and maternal health.

“Together, this represents a significant investment in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.”

PDF printable version of $27 million for better Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes – PDF 254 KB

The providers who will be delivering the Primary Health Care and New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services are:

State Region Successful applicant/s
NSW North Coast Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation – Primary Health Care and New Directions: Mothers and Babies Service
Hunter New England and Central Coast Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation – Primary Health Care

New England North West Health Ltd (HealthWISE New England North West) – Primary Health Care

Hunter New England Local Health District (Tamworth Nundle Community Health Service) – New Directions: Mothers and Babies Service

Western NSW Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service Limited (Brewarrina AHS) – Primary Health Care
South Eastern NSW Grand Pacific Health Limited (Grand Pacific Health NSW) – Primary Health Care
Qld Western Queensland Mount Isa Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Limited (Gidgee Healing) – Primary Health Care and New Directions: Mothers and Babies Service
Northern Queensland Queensland Health Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service (Community Health Mossman) – Primary Health Care

Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Service – New Directions: Mothers and Babies Service

Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre – Primary Health Care

Tas North Western Tasmania Rural Health Tasmania Inc. – Primary Health Care and New Directions: Mothers and Babies Service
Southern Tasmania South East Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation – New Directions: Mothers and Babies Service

Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre – Primary Health Care

WA Perth South Moorditj Koort Aboriginal Corporation – Primary Health Care

GP Down South Ltd (Down South and Nidjalla Waangan Mia) – Primary Health Care

Arche Health Limited (Perth South WA) –
Primary Health Care

Country WA WA Country Health Service (Great Southern Aboriginal Health Service and
Wheatbelt Aboriginal Health Service) – Primary Health CareBoab Health Services Pty Ltd – Primary Health Care

 

NACCHO Member and Stakeholders support #closingthegap #RedfernStatement : Our community voices are key to Closing the Gap

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Yesterday ninth Closing the Gap Report highlighted the health challenges facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.Included in this NACCHO post are support press releases from a wide range of NACCHO members and stakeholders : 

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 ” The report identifies small gains that are being made by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations such as Apunipima, however with the targets looking increasingly out of reach we urge government to work more closely with communities and look at serious reforms to give us a chance to close the health gap between mainstream and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

We urge the government to listen and work with the community who know what is needed for themselves and their families.

We know that mainstream services do not deliver the outcomes we are all looking for and this report is further evidence that community led and community driven services are the way forward for better health outcomes in community.

Community is central to any debate about the future of our health services “

Apunipima Cape York Health Council CEO Cleveland Fagan pictured above with Dr Mark Wenitong

Read Download full press release Apunipima

ama

Read recent AMA Report card Indigenous Health

Read NACCHO Press Release referred to by Dr Michael Gannon AMA President

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 “ The Redfern Statement was developed on 9 June 2016 and the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) are one of the 18 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak organisations leading this statement and calling for Government action. Members of AIDA were proud to be in the Great Hall at Parliament House for this significant occasion.

AIDA looks forward to working with other Redfern Statement signatory peaks and senior State and Territory Government representatives between March and July at the Redfern Statement Workshops and participating in the National First People Summit in August/September later this year.

Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA)

Read Download full press release aida

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“It is a continuing tragedy that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people still suffer from poorer health outcomes and a shorter life expectancy than non Indigenous Australians.

While the reasons for this are complex and include a range of socioeconomic and other factors, it is certainly the case in the healthcare system that much more can be done.

For example, we have a continuing lack of access in many locations to culturally appropriate health services. Understandably, the availability of culturally appropriate healthcare often makes the difference between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients going to see a doctor or other health professional, or not going at all.

And while there are increased opportunities for cultural competency training within our medical and other health courses, more consistent access for medical and health students (particularly non Indigenous students) to this critical training is needed for them to have the skills and knowledge required to communicate effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

RDAA President, Dr Ewen McPhee

Read Download full press release 2-rural-doctors

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“While we have seen positive signs for health, including improvements in numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers not smoking during pregnancy and babies born with a low birthweight, we are still falling behind when it comes to achieving the target of halving the gap in child mortality by 2018,

One of the key priorities for our organisation is improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, which is demonstrated to worsen with increasing remoteness.

Mr Butt also stressed that while many of these issues are not new, they are even more pressing in isolated areas given approximately 65% of Aboriginal people live outside Australia’s major cities.

We need greater focus on improving child health, education, and wellbeing and to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families to give them the best start in life. It should involve a holistic early childhood strategy which informs high quality, locally responsive and culturally appropriate programs supported by stable, long term funding.”

The NRHA continues to work closely with our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander member bodies to achieve these outcomes,” .

NRHA CEO, David Butt, while progress has been seen in some areas, the rates of infant mortality were no longer on target and this was of concern.

Read Download full press release national-rural-health

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 ” Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians pay a heavy price for this collective national failure.

The first peoples live with worse health and education outcomes, fewer employment opportunities, inadequate housing options and the lasting effects of intergenerational trauma.

The flawed design and delivery of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy reminds us that paternalism does not work. We cannot ignore the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, or impose solutions instead of working with communities.

We need a new approach – an approach that listens to first Australians, gives them a stronger voice that they control, and recognises that they have the solutions.

We need a new approach that fosters hope that builds on a sense of belonging. An approach built on respect, recognition and resources.

Labor calls on the Government to heed local voices, to empower communities, and to prioritise what works.

The $500 million in cuts to programs and frontline services has had a very real and damaging impact. Despite a promise that there would be no jobs or services lost, the opposite is true. Cutting funding from local providers doesn’t foster independence, it undermines hope. “

The Hon Bill Shorten Shadow Minister for Indigenous affairs together we signed the malarndirri McCarthy Senator Dodson & Jenny Macklin

Read Download full press release labor

greens

The Close the Gap report now showing that child mortality rates are not on track is a dismal reflection on the Government’s half-hearted and under-funded attempts to end Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander disadvantage.

One of the targets is on track to Close the Gap for our First Peoples. Just one. How has the Government let it get to this stage?

“I have witnessed many Closing the Gap reports in my time as a Senator but this year’s report is particularly devastating. Unfortunately it is not surprising.

“When they ripped half a billion dollars out of the sector, leaders, Aboriginal organisations and service deliverers knew the impacts would be real. This is now reflected in this report. This highlights why the Government needs to adopt the Redfern Statement’s Engagement Approach.

“Falling behind on child mortality rates means that the Government’s failure to act in this space is costing lives.

Senator Rachel Siewert – Australian Greens spokesperson on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues  . President met with & today to discuss priorities in health for 2017

Read Download full press release greens

Please note at time of publications no other political parties had issued Closing the Gap Press releases

NACCHO CEO Press Release #ClosingtheGap : Aboriginal led solutions the key to closing the health gap #Redfernstatement

the-guardian

The Prime Minister committed to working with our people this morning and from this date on we expect nothing less,

For NACCHO the acceptance that our Aboriginal controlled health services deliver the best model of integrated primary health care in Australia is a clear demonstration that every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person should have ready access to these services, no matter where they live.

We can more than double the current 140 Aboriginal medical services that will improve health outcomes.”

NACCHO  CEO  Pat Turner Press Release : 

Malcolm Turnbull and Bill Shorten receive the Redfern statement, a blueprint for improvement in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs, before the release of the Closing the Gap report. Photograph: Mike Bowers for the Guardian

Download :  naccho-1702-mr-naccho-response-to-closing-the-gap

ICYMI Todays other NACCHO posts below

NACCHO Aboriginal Health download the #ClosingtheGap report #Redfernstatement Post 4 of 5

Today’s Closing the Gap Report demonstrates the need to more than double the network and reach of Aboriginal controlled medical services to Close the Gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

National Aboriginal and Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), CEO, Pat Turner, said despite some improvement in education outcomes, only one out of seven Closing the Gap targets is on track ( see ABC link below )

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The 9th Closing the Gap Report shows there have been small improvements over time in some areas of health but we are not on track to Close the Gap in average life expectancy and the gap in deaths from cancer is widening.

“Governments at all levels need to make a massive long term investment to redress the social and cultural determinants of health, which are responsible for more than 30 per cent of ill health in our communities.

“Early childhood education delivered in a culturally respectful manner by our own people, trained to work locally in their communities must be a priority.”

Ms Turner said current Commonwealth Government policies remain disconnected and siloed.

“In 2017 we need to see greater connectivity across all government portfolios at the Ministerial and departmental levels and more accountability from state and territory governments for the funding they receive to improve the lives of Aboriginal people.

“In every jurisdiction we see inconsistent data collection.  In 2017, with such innovative information technology available, all governments should implement open, transparent, consistent data collection and reporting to ensure their accountability to the Australian people at large.

“NACHHO stands ready, willing and able to work with everyone to negotiate better solutions to public policy and program investments that affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people”

redfern-statement-logo-2017

 

ICYMI todays posts

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Redfernstatement 1 of 5 posts : PM to release #closingthegap report today

NACCHO #closingtheGap Aboriginal Health and the #Redfernstatement Its time for this new approach

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Redfernstatement #closingtheGap Post 3 of 5 : New relationship with government is desperately needed

NACCHO Aboriginal Health download the #ClosingtheGap report #Redfernstatement Post 4 of 5

NACCHO SNAPSHOT progress Against Health Targets:

We are not on track to close the gap in life expectancy by 2031.

Over the longer term, Indigenous mortality rates have declined significantly by 15 per cent since 1998.

There have been significant improvements in the Indigenous mortality rate from chronic diseases, particularly from circulatory diseases (the leading cause of death) since 1998.

However, Indigenous mortality rates from cancer (second leading cause of death) are rising and the gap is widening.

There have been improvements in health care access and reductions in smoking which should contribute to long-term improvements in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Working collaboratively across governments, the health sector and with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities on local and regional responses is central to the Government’s approach to improve life expectancy.

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See ABC Website for all Targets

Indigenous Australians don’t live as long as other Australians. Their children are more likely to die as infants. And their health, education and employment outcomes are worse than non-Indigenous people.

Australia has promised to close this gap on health, education and employment. But a new report card finds we are failing on six out of seven key measures.

Target: To close the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a generation (by 2031).

  • Progress: Indigenous Australians die about 10 years younger than non Indigenous Australians, and that hasn’t changed significantly.
  • With increasing life expectancy in the non-Indigenous population, to close the gap “Indigenous life expectancy would need to increase by 16 years and 21 years for females and males respectively”.
  • That means gains of at least 0.6 years per annum, but in the five years to 2012 there was only a gain of 0.8 years for men and 0.1 for women — a fraction of what is needed.
  • The mortality rate (the number of deaths per 100,000 people in a year) for Aboriginal people is 1.7 times that of the Australian population, and that hasn’t changed since 1998.

Target: To halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade (by 2018).

  • Progress: There has been no significant decline in child mortality rates since 2008, and child mortality rates actually increased slightly from 2014 to 2015.
  • In 2015, there were 124 Indigenous child deaths. This was four deaths outside the range of the target and an increase of six deaths since 2014.
  • Between 2011 and 2014 Indigenous children aged 0-4 were more than twice as likely to die than non-Indigenous children.

Advertising and editorial wanted for the April 5  #Closingthegap  #Redfernstatement edition ?

nhn

NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

km-kw

While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Member News : Funding boost for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in NSW #Yerin #Armajan

yerin

“The aim of the funding is to provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with access to primary health care services that are culturally appropriate and safe.

Our services designed in collaboration with our local community so they are sensitive to specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at the local level.”

Belinda Field, Yerin CEO -NACCHO Member : Yerin Aboriginal Health Services Inc. is a community controlled integrated primary health care service located at Wyong on the NSW Central Coast, Darkinyung country. 

Pictured above L-R Kamira Farm (Natalie), The Glen (Joe Coyte), Yerin (Belinda Field), HNECCPHN (Richard Nankervis)

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“It’s a special meeting place that should be respected and cherished by the local Aboriginal community.

Its a place of learning , wellbeing and healing. And it belongs to you, the mob. It’s worth protecting,”

Armajan practice manager Dr Gleeson described an Aboriginal controlled health service as a contemporary sacred site. Armajun Aboriginal Health Service will be Walcha’s primary health care provider for Aboriginal people in the 2017-2018 year, after receiving almost $2.6 million of federal funding : see Article 2 below

Article 1 Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Centre

Funding for Aboriginal health services on the NSW Coast are to receive a large boost thanks to significant new funding from the Primary Health Network (PHN).

Speaking this morning at the Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Centre Richard Nankervis, CEO for the PHN said” The Primary Health Network is pleased to be providing more than $2.7M in funding to three of the leading primary health care providers on the Coast, namely Ngaimpe Aboriginal Corporation (operating The Glenn), Kamira and Yerin Aboriginal Health Services”.

“We look forward to working with these organisations to improve access to culturally appropriate primary health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and help close the gap in Aboriginal health disadvantage.”

The programs being funded cover a wide variety of primary health care services including care coordination, drug & alcohol rehabilitation and mental health programs such as peer navigation, counselling and suicide prevention.

Joe Coyte CEO of the Glen said, “We’re delighted that the PHN has recognised the fantastic outcomes we have been achieving at the Glen and they are supporting us to deliver these vital services. The funding will allow us to empower more Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal men take control of their lives and to become active members back in their families and the community as a whole.”

Kamira CEO, Catherine Hewett said, “This new funding is providing us with necessary funds to extend the reach of our services and help us provide more opportunities for Aboriginal women to access quality treatment.

We are looking forward to working with more women and helping them build strong relationships with their family and significant others so they have the necessary foundations for a long and lasting recovery”.

Funding for all of these programs and services have been allocated through the PHN’s commissioning process. The commissioning of health services is undertaken following a transparent tendering process that is informed by the PHN’s baseline needs assessment and associated market analysis. Commissioning is a holistic process that enables the PHN to plan and contract health care services that are appropriate and relevant to the needs of local communities

Article 2  : Armajun to take over local Aboriginal health services

A meeting was held in the offices of Amaroo  recently between the Walcha Aboriginal community and two representatives from Armajun Aboriginal Health Service.

Armajun chief executive officer Debbie McCowen and practice manager GP Keith Gleeson addressed the group to explain what services Armajun offered and find out what was needed in Walcha.

“We don’t believe in telling communities what they need,” said Ms McCowen.

“Our purpose today is to ask you what you think you need and outline what services we have and then investigate what we can do to provide anything else you might need.”

Armajun Aboriginal Health Service will be Walcha’s primary health care provider for Aboriginal people in the 2017-2018 year, after receiving almost $2.6 million of federal funding.

The Inverell-based company provides medical services out of the old Medicare Local building in Rusden Street, Armidale.

Mrs McCowen said the new funding secured Armajun’s services to Armidale and the region.

“This means we’re here to stay,” she said.

Armajun recently formed a regional advisory committee to inform the Inverell-based board on important local issues.

Amaroo chief executive Mark Davies and Kerry Griffin will represent Walcha.

The federal government cut more than $2 million from Aboriginal health provider, HealthWISE’s budget.

HealthWISE New England North West had been servicing more than 7500 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the region with about $2.6 million of Commonwealth funding.

But late last year the government announced HealthWISE would only receive $477,053 for the 2017-2018 year. “The level of funding received is insufficient [for us] to continue the same level of services across the region,” chairwoman Lia Mahoney told Fairfax Media at the time.

Meeting attendees raised concerns regarding the inadequate transport service between Walcha and  Armidale.

While Mr Davies queried whether a doctor who only treated Aboriginal patients would become an issue in the community, the mayor, Eric Noakes, and other attendees said it would not.

Dr Gleeson said they would not do anything without the agreement of other medical services in Walcha.

Dr Gleeson described an Aboriginal controlled health service as a contemporary sacred site.

“It’s a special meeting place that should be respected and cherished by the local Aboriginal community.

Its a place of learning , wellbeing and healing. And it belongs to you, the mob. It’s worth protecting,” he said.

Have you got a similar good news story about one of our ACCHO members ?

nhn

NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

km-kw

While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO #ACCHO Member News : Western Sydney returns to culturally appropriate Aboriginal Community Controlled Health

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“The scope of the arrangement includes operations of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Health Services provided from the Mt Druitt premises as well as Aboriginal health services to Penrith and the Healthy4Life services to Nepean Blue Mountain areas,

WACHS will work closely with WentWest to transition their current operational  arrangement to WACHS for the 1 April deadline “

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service  CEO Darren Ah See said the organisation is extremely pleased to have formally signed off on the funding agreement following negotiations with the Commonwealth and State Governments

See background to original closure

 July 2015 SMH report Aboriginal Health Service closes over unpaid tax bill

Photo above : WACHS CEO, Darren Ah See, Uncle Greg Simms, Blacktown-Mt Druitt Hospital General Manager, Sue-Anne Redmond and WentWest Primary Health Netowrk CEO, Walter Kmet. Photo: As reported in Wellington Times

The Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) has announced its tender for the provision of culturally appropriate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services to Western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains has been successful.

The joint tender process was led by the Commonwealth government in partnership with the NSW Ministry of Health.

The Commonwealth funding has been awarded to WACHS under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme for Western Sydney and Nepean Blue Mountains regions for 2016-17 and 2017-18.

The NSW Ministry of Health is also providing funding for the provision of culturally safe services for Aboriginal people including population health, chronic care, mental health and drug and alcohol.

Under this arrangement, WACHS will formally take on these services from the 1 April 2017.

Currently the Western Sydney Primary Health Network (WentWest) over sees the operations of the Sydney West Aboriginal Health Service (SWAHS), which is supported by funding from both the NSW Ministry of Health and the Commonwealth Government.

WentWest CEO, Walter Kmet welcomed the funding announcement.

“WACHS has a long-standing reputation for a strong business model which delivers culturally appropriate services. WentWest will work closely with WACHS during the transition of these services in line with the new arrangement.”

Western Sydney Local Health District CEO, Danny O’Connor also confirmed a commitment to working closely with WACHS and the PHN to strengthen Aboriginal health services in the city’s west.”

“WSLHD has already developed a relationship with WACHS and is looking forward to the opportunities that this new arrangement will bring to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Western Sydney.”

CEO of Nepean Blue Mountains PHN, Lizz Reay said she was looking forward to the continuation Healthy4Life program in the Blue Mountains region.

Have you got a similar good news story about one of our ACCHO members ?

nhn

NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

km-kw

While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health “Ministerial Champions ” visit our remote #ACCHOS #CapeYork and #DerbyWA

 

derby

 ” Ministerial champion ”  for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt toured the Derby Aboriginal Health Service  with NACCHO CEO  Pat Turner : See background story 2 below

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Story 1

 ” Ministerial Champion for Wujal Wujal ” Leeanne Enoch MP, Minister for Innovation, Science and Digital Economy and Minister for Small Business recently visited the Apunipima Cape York Health Council.

Image (L-R) Director-General Jamie Merrick, Minister Enoch, Apunipima CEO Cleveland Fagan

The Minister, accompanied by the Government Champion for Wujal Wujal, Jamie Merrick, Director-General, Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation met with Apunipima’s senior managers to discuss the services and activities Apunipima provides to Wujal Wujal – a remote Aboriginal community which lies 70 km south of Cooktown.

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The Champions program is based around supporting Mayors and communities to achieve the social and economic outcomes which they identify as important.

Apunipima CEO Cleveland Fagan said he welcomed the visit with the Minister and Director-General.

‘We were pleased to meet with Minister Enoch and Mr. Merrick to discuss our role in supporting the community and leadership in Wujal Wujal to achieve the goals that matter to the community.’

‘Apunipima provides culturally appropriate primary health care to the people of Wujal Wujal including a GP, Maternal and Child Health Nurse and Midwife, Podiatrist, Dietitian and Diabetes Educator.’

‘There are some real success stories when it comes to the health of the people of Wujal Wujal – 100 percent of children aged 12, 24 and 60 months are fully immunised, 75 percent of newborn bubs are within the normal weight range and nearly 90 percent of clients with type 2 diabetes have a GP Management Plan in place.’

‘There are some challenges, particularly around smoking rates and obesity and we will be working with community to address these health issues.’

‘We look forward to continuing to work closely with Minister Enoch and the Queensland Government to continue to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Cape York.’

Story 2 Derby Aboriginal Health Service

derby_aboriginal_health_service_council_logo

Mission

To deliver holistic primary health care services which;

  • ŸAre based on the social justice principles of equity and access
  • ŸAddress the needs of Aboriginal people, and
  • ŸRespect and reflect the cultural values of the communities we serve.

The Derby Aboriginal Health Service has been established by Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people, with the purpose of;

  • Empowering Aboriginal people in the prevention and management of ill-health, and in the promotion of well-being for individuals, families and communities, as well as;
  • Empowering Aboriginal people in the processes of decision-making, planning and service delivery

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History

In early 1995 Winun Ngari Aboriginal Corporation received funding from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) to carry out a comprehensive health planning exercise for Aboriginal people and communities in the Jayida Buru Ward of the Malarabah ATSIC Regional Council of the West Kimberley.

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This region includes Aboriginal Communities in and around Derby town, south of Derby along the Fitzroy Valley, north east of Derby and along the Gibb River Road and Outstations north along the coast and up into the Mitchell Plateau.  The Jayida Buru Health Strategy was the result of this process, and was the first health strategy for Aboriginal people in the Derby region which was developed from the Aboriginal perspective.

Amongst its findings was recognition that:

“…there appears to be little acknowledgement of the diverse needs of these population groups in the structure and operation of most mainstream services in the Derby region.  These services often operate under constraints imposed by a Perth based policy and practise…and an organisational culture that excludes Aboriginal people from information and decision making”.

The Strategy outlined five key objectives;

  • Aboriginal community and self-management of health related issues
  • ŸService and program planning based on identical local health need
  • ŸA comprehensive, integrated and coordinated range of programs and services
  • ŸEquitable access to services
  • ŸAppropriate levels of resource allocation

and determined that;

“There are compelling reasons for the establishment of an Aboriginal Health Service in the Jayida Buru region; the health needs of the Aboriginal people in the region greatly exceed the capacity of the mainstream provider; the scope and models of mainstream service provision are not currently culturally appropriate or readily accessible; and there is no choice of health provider available to us.”

In April 1997 the Winun Ngari Aboriginal Corporation Committee established a Derby Aboriginal Medical Service (DAMS) Committee.  This committee, with the support of the Winun Ngari Committee and Administration, began its struggle to establish a culturally appropriate health service to address the concerns raised through the Jayida Buru Health Strategy.

Funding from the Office of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (OATSIH) was received in early 1997.   On September 17, the first committee of the Derby Aboriginal Health Service Council was elected.

NACCHO Promotion

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NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

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While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Redfernstatement Parliamentary Event @Congressmob Invite 14 February

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Background to the Redfern Statement

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55 leaders met today  9th of June 2016, in Redfern where in 1992 Prime Minister Paul Keating spoke truth about this nation – that the disadvantage faced by First Peoples affects and is the responsibility of all Australians.

Photo above NACCHO CEO Pat Turner addressing the national media

An urgent call for a more just approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs

“Social justice is what faces you in the morning. It is awakening in a house with adequate water supply, cooking facilities and sanitation. It is the ability to nourish your children and send them to school where their education not only equips them for employment but reinforces their knowledge and understanding of their cultural inheritance. It is the prospect of genuine employment and good health: a life of choices and opportunity, free from discrimination.”

Mick Dodson, Annual Report of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, 1993.

The Redfern Statement

Download the 18 Page document here

Redfern Statement June 2016 Elections 18 Pages

Redfern Statement

A call for urgent Government action

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Members News : Katungul #AMS sets ambitious new direction and focus

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Katungul Aboriginal Medical Service has a new chief executive officer based in Narooma NSW and an ambitious new direction and focus.

Rob Skeen took over late last year after an extensive search for the most qualified and experienced CEO and already has big plans ahead for the service that currently has facilities in Batemans Bay, Narooma and Bega.

From the Narooma News

“We aim to be a one-stop shop for our people both on the clinical and non-clinical side of health,” Mr Skeen said. “We need to lift the profile of the service and we need to talk about the successes that have been happening since the dark days.”

The corporation’s footprint actually extends all the way from Ulladulla down to the Victorian border and out west to Cooma and past the ACT.

Mr Skeen said serving the Eden Aboriginal population was an immediate need and the next priority would be to open an outreach service at the location before spreading west and north.

Katungul board member Wally Stewart said he was excited about the new direction for the medical service and one challenge was to overcome any biases and prejudices in the community after a rough few years, including the organisation going into administration.

But there was a new focus on the board, which was taking advice from external experts including former Eurobodalla mayor Lindsay Brown and the former CEO of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, Graham Peachey, who also lives in Narooma.

“It’s all about breaking down and shattering the barriers,” Mr Stewart said. “People still have ideas about what we were in the past and they don’t know a lot has changed.”

Mr Stewart said Katungul was the largest employer of Aboriginal people on the Far South Coast with around 80 per cent of its 52 workers being indigenous, and he said it was great to have an “honorary Koori” and indigenous person as the CEO, referring to the fact he was a Murray but had moved to Koori country on the South Coast.

“Our logo is Koori health in Koori hands and that is what it’s all about,” he said.

A Murri man originally from Queensland, Mr Skeen was headhunted by the board and comes from a background of working in Aboriginal health for Queensland Health, as well as the Northern Territory and NSW.

He also worked for the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council, where he was involved in sector reform and Aboriginal health service regionalisation.

The Katungul service has just been audited by Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations and passed with flying colours, Mr Skeen said.

Each Katungul health centre has a GP, registered nurse and Aboriginal health practitioners, qualified with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency (AHPRA).

The mobile dental clinic will begin operating in February and the service was also about to start a series of health campaigns starting with a Healthy Heart Week.

Katungul will also begin hosting a series of community consultations throughout the year to give the community the opportunity to be involved in the planning and evaluation of their health services, Mr Skeen said.

NACCHO Advertisement

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NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

km-kw

While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders #FASD : Community participation is a key principle in effective health promotion

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 ” Community participation is a key principle in effective health promotion. Gurriny have used a whole-of-community approach by involving the five above mentioned target groups when designing their FASD prevention activities.

Gurriny consulted with women of childbearing age to learn about their views and attitudes towards alcohol, and assed their current knowledge about the harms associated with drinking in pregnancy. It was also important for health professionals to understand what types of alcoholic drinks women of child bearing age were consuming and how much.

For further information about the FASD Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Project please contact Bridie Kenna on 0401 815 228 or bridie.kenna@naccho.org.au

Read 17 Articles about FASD

Menzies School of Health Research have partnered with the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Telethon Kids Institute (TKI) to develop a package of resources to reduce the impacts of FASD on the Aboriginal population.

FASD is a diagnostic term used for a spectrum of conditions caused by fetal alcohol exposure. Each condition and its diagnosis is based on the presentation of characteristic features which are unique to the individual and may be physical, developmental and/or neurobehavioural.

The package of resources is based on the model developed by the Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Service (OVAHS). OVAHS is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service located in the far north east region of the Kimberly in Western Australia. OVAHS services Aboriginal people in the remote town of Kununurra and surrounding regions.

The package incorporates FASD education modules targeting five key groups:

  • Pregnant women using New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services (NDMBS) antenatal services, and their partners and families;
  •  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women of childbearing age;
  •  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander grandmothers;
  •  NDMBS staff who provide antenatal care
  •  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men.

To complement the package of resources, two day capacity building workshops for the 85 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services (NDMBS) were held in Darwin, Cairns, Melbourne (TAS, VIC and SA sites combined), Perth and Sydney. The aim of the training workshops was to enable NDMBS sites to develop, implement and evaluate community-driven strategies and solutions by:

i. Increasing awareness and understanding of alcohol use during pregnancy, and FASD;

ii. Increasing awareness and understanding of existing FASD health promotion resources;

iii. Increase understanding, skills and capacity to use existing FASD health promotion resources within NDMBS, in line with their capacity, readiness and community circumstances and needs.

Staff from Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service (Gurriny) participated in the Queensland FASD training workshop in April. Since then, Gurriny have thrived in the area of FASD prevention by implementing multiple strategies within their community.

A key component of the FASD training workshop was highlighting the importance of routine screening of women about alcohol use during pregnancy. Assessment of alcohol consumption, combined with education in a supportive environment can assist women to stop or significantly reduce their alcohol use during pregnancy. A number of screening tools were introduced at the workshop including AUDIT-C (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test – Consumption), which Gurriny have now incorporated into their own data recording system. This tool has three short questions that estimate alcohol consumption in a standard, meaningful and non-judgemental manner.

Gurriny now places great emphasis on providing routine screening of women about their alcohol use during all stages of pregnancy and recording results in clinical records at each visit. Health professionals at Gurriny often use brief intervention and motivational interviewing techniques to guide conversations about alcohol and pregnancy.

This is of particular significance when working with pregnant women, as there are multiple opportunities through routine antenatal care to provide support through the stages of change. There is sound evidence that motivational interviewing and brief interventions can decrease alcohol and other drug use in adults. Both practices are listed in the Royal Australian College of General Practice (RACGP) guidelines as an effective strategy for positive behaviour change.

It is estimated that over half of all pregnancies in Australia are unplanned and many Australian women are unknowingly consuming alcohol during pregnancy. Providing women of childbearing age with reliable information about the risks of alcohol consumption during pregnancy and the importance of contraception use if they are not planning a pregnancy are essential strategies in preventing FASD. Staff at Gurriny have pre-conception discussions about healthy pregnancies and FASD prevention with women who cease contraception use and may be planning a pregnancy. Women are provided with reliable information in a supportive environment to help them make informed decisions.

Knowledge transfer strategies are a key component to ensure new information is shared and retained within the service and community. Members from Gurriny’s Child and Maternal Health team have shared the package of resources and new skills gained at the workshop with a number of their colleagues, both clinical and administrative. They have also shared the new information with relevant health professionals from external organisations, including the local hospital. This assists in developing a more consistent approach to FASD prevention and maximises available resources in the community. Gurriny have made links with other health and community services within the Yarrabah community to develop a coordinated, strategic approach to FASD prevention.

Community participation is a key principle in effective health promotion. Gurriny have used a whole-of-community approach by involving the five abovementioned target groups when designing their FASD prevention activities.

Gurriny consulted with women of childbearing age to learn about their views and attitudes towards alcohol, and assed their current knowledge about the harms associated with drinking in pregnancy. It was also important for health professionals to understand what types of alcoholic drinks women of child bearing age were consuming and how much.

Based on the findings, laminated cards were developed which show the number of standard drinks in each serving according to the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) alcohol guidelines. These cards are used in both one-on-one and group based education sessions. There is no safe level of alcohol consumption at any stage of pregnancy; this message is emphasised at all opportunities with women of childbearing age.

Raising community awareness is a key strategy in successful health promotion. Gurriny have a strong presence in the Yarrabah community and often attend health and community events to raise awareness of the harms associated with drinking in pregnancy and FASD.

Health staff make use of any opportunity to raise awareness, share information and prompt people to think about making positive changes to their own drinking behaviour, or support others to do so.

Additional awareness raising strategies include showing FASD prevention DVD’s on iPad’s in clinic waiting rooms, demonstrating the concept of the invisible nature of FASD disability by using demonstration FASD dolls in education sessions, and having posters about healthy pregnancies and FASD prevention in clear view throughout the clinic.

Health promotion is most effective when multiple strategies are used which target not only the individual, but the community at large. It is evident Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service is using this approach in order to reach the best possible health outcomes for women, children and families.

For further information about the FASD Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Project please contact Bridie Kenna on 0401 815 228 or bridie.kenna@naccho.org.au

 

Aboriginal Mental Health : NACCHO welcomes funding model for Mental Health and Suicide Prevention from the PHN

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Congratulations Galambila Coffs Harbour  on the successful tender to address Mental Health and Suicide Prevention in your region.

NACCHO applauds the Galambila Aboriginal Community Controlled efforts to ensure our people have ready access to these vital services at the local level.

We believe Galambila will be best placed to ensure these services are not only high quality and professional but most certainly are culturally relevant, appropriate and safe for our people who need to use them”.

“NACCHO welcomes the funding for Mental Health and Suicide Prevention from the PHN and looks forward to this outcome being replicated with all our Member ACCHs throughout the country.

Well done in leading the way in this important initiative“.

Pat Turner CEO NACCHO

Pictured above with PHN representatives are Local Federal Member Hon Luke Hartsuyker MP with Galambila Chair Reuben Robinson, Board members Christian Lugnan , Kerrie Burnet and CEO Kristine Garrett

North Coast Primary Health Network (NCPHN) is excited to announce funding of $300,000 for Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Coffs Harbour to deliver the Aboriginal Mental Health Capacity Building Project in partnership with Werin Aboriginal Medical Service in Port Macquarie.

The project will:

  • Put in place integrated social and emotional wellbeing plans for Aboriginal people in Port Macquarie with complex needs, focussing on improving wellbeing and recovery
  • Develop a tailored care model for Aboriginal mental health in Coffs Harbour and Hastings Macleay
  • Improve cultural competence for health professionals working with the Aboriginal community
  • Improve awareness among the Aboriginal community of mental health and suicide prevention services

NCPHN’s Chief Executive Dr Vahid Saberi said the project would be an innovative and much needed addition to mental health services available for Aboriginal people.

“The latest figures available show that Aboriginal people on the Mid North Coast and Hastings Macleay are experiencing nearly twice the yearly hospitalisation rate (2857) of non-Indigenous people (1654) for mental health related issues.

“We are pleased with the scope of the Galambila project which includes the development of a special care model for Aboriginal mental health,” he added.

Galambila’s CEO Kristine Garrett welcomed the project funding.

“The Aboriginal Mental Health Capacity Building Project will improve mental health outcomes for local Aboriginal people,” Ms Garrett said.

Galambila Aboriginal Medical Service was awarded the funding as a result of a tender process. Organisations were invited to establish novel mental health services, as well as implement projects to increase the capacity of the mental health system to respond to the needs of Aboriginal people and support their access to services.

Through North Coast Primary Health Network, the Australian Government has provided funding of $3.8 million for mental health, suicide prevention, drug and alcohol services and projects to improve the health system. Over coming months, NCPHN will use this funding to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of mental health and drug and alcohol services across the region.

 

ABOUT NORTH COAST PRIMARY HEALTH NETWORK (NCPHN)

We work alongside community members and health professionals to improve access to well-coordinated quality health care. Our aim is to work together to transform the healthcare system and reduce health inequities.

Our work begins by gaining an understanding of health care needs of the North Coast.

This needs assessment involves our community, clinicians and service providers and is available for all to use. We use this information to work with health professionals and community members to find gaps and facilitate local solutions.

We do this by commissioning services – this is a new way of all of us working together to design services that best meet our community’s needs.  Our priorities are

  1. Better mental health and emotional well-being
  2. Closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
  3. Improving our population’s health and wellbeing
  4. Building a highly skilled and capable health workforce
  5. Improving the integration of health services through electronic and digital health platforms
  6. Improving the health and wellbeing of older people

For more information, go to: http://www.ncphn.org.au