NACCHO Aboriginal Health Mob : Our first 2018 #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories @KenWyattMP #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS

1.WA : AHCWA team helps with a Meningococcal vaccination campaign to protect the people living in Central WA Desert Communities

2. QLD: Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service : Hearing loss surgery sounds great for 16 children from Yarrabah FNQ

3.ACT : Winnunga AHCS Healthy Weight Program Epitomises Holistic Health Philosophy

4 .NSW : Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation call for more Indigenous health care professionals to help close the gap

5.VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service VALE GARRY (“GILLA”) JOHN McGUINNESS

6.SA : What is the “Nganampa Health Council Difference”?

7. NT : Katherine West Health , Congress Alice Springs , Anyinginyi Health and Miwatj ACH More Indigenous Health Leaders for Remote Australia

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Kipli Kani Open nutrition sessions

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Our next Deadly News Post is January 25

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.WA : AHCWA team helps with a Meningococcal vaccination campaign to protect the people living in Central WA Desert Communities

AHCWA staff members, Stacee and Veronica recently visited the Central Communities including, Warburton, Warakurna, Blackstone, Jameson, Tjirrkarli, Tjukurla, Wanarn, Wingellina, Cosmo Newberry, Punmu, Jigalong, Parnngurr, Kunawarritji, and Kiwirrkurra to help with a vaccination campaign planned to protect the people living in Central Communities from the recent outbreak of Meningococcal W and to help prevent further spread of the disease.

Under this program, the Meningococcal A, C,W,Y vaccine was offered to all people aged 2 months and older living in these communities.

The team involved were truly amazed at the way the Communities got behind the campaign and encouraged all people, young and old, to have their Meningococcal needles.

The children were incredibly brave and if upset, the families would speak in language to the children.

It was obvious to the team that the children were really listening and took in what the family was saying about how important the needle was.

AHCWA would like to thank all the people from Communities in the NG Lands and Pilbara for the wonderful support that was shown in response to the Meningococcal vaccination campaign.

Also a big thank you to the WACHS teams who invited AHCWA
to participate in this campaign.

2. QLD: Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service : Hearing loss surgery sounds great for 16 children from Yarrabah FNQ

 Up to 16 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids from Yarrabah will have life-changing hearing health surgery this week at Cairns Day Surgery. Registered Nurse Karen Leeman prepares 7 year old Dallas Sands for surgery on a perforated eardrum. Cairns Post Story and PICTURE: STEWART McLEAN

THE sounds of their tropical home will become much more clearer for 16 children from Yarrabah who have gone under the knife to improve their hearing.

Several health organisations united yesterday to assist the indigenous children with day surgery in Cairns under the federally funded Eye and Ear Surgical Support Services program.

Children ranging from 2-15 years of age were treated for a series of hearing impairments, including perforated eardrums and middle-ear infections.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children experience some of the highest levels of ear disease and hearing loss in the world. Rates are up to 10 times more than those for non-indigenous Australians.

Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service Aboriginal Corporation nurse Dannielle Gillespie said, due to Yarrabah’s relatively remote location, it was difficult for parents to get their children to doctors.

She said an initial list of 200 children needing hearing loss surgery had to be whittled down to the list treated at Cairns Day Surgery yesterday.

“Hearing loss in Yarrabah is right across all kids,” she said.

“Basically, if the perforations in the ear are not fixed, then that has a future roll-on effect with their speech, their education, their learning abilities – even their social skills, it starts affecting that, too.”

Yarrabah mum Zoe-Ann Sands’ daughter Dallas, 7, had surgery yesterday.

Ms Sands said she was thankful her daughter would finally have better hearing.

Funding for the surgery was provided to health advocacy group CheckUP by the Commonwealth Government

3.ACT : Winnunga AHCS Healthy Weight Program Epitomises Holistic Health Philosophy

Long serving CEO Julie Tongs couldn’t help reminiscing that Winnunga AHCS ACT Government funded Healthy Weight Program replicated the sector’s bedrock philosophy of truly Aboriginal community controlled holistic health services.

‘It means that you can work with a person individually, get to know their real needs, monitor and refer them for support in various ways through the holistic approach to health care that underpins how Winnunga AHCS works,’ Ms Tongs said.

‘This has been a major initiative,’ Ms Tongs said ‘with funding of $640,000 provided over a three year period.’

‘We are confident getting closer to the end of this Program, we will prove decisively that the program has worked and worked brilliantly. It is a preventative health program.’

Ms Tongs said the program which has been operating for over two years now, has achieved a number of significant outcomes, such as:

– Significant participation in the program with over 100 people being monitored on a regular basis

– The employment of a full-time Aboriginal person, Leeton-born, but Cowra raised Christine Saddler as program co-ordinator

– The creation of regular full-time gym training program with a regular clientele

– The training of numerous Winnunga AHCS staff members with the skills to identify at risk clients and to then ensure that once identified they are contacted regularly

‘There is absolutely no doubt this Program works well, within the confines of our sector’s holistic and culturally safe health and wellbeing environment,’ said Christine Saddler. ‘It’s about trust and the ability to work with clients,’ she added.

Christine noted that Winnunga AHCS pushed for the introduction of a Healthy Weight Program with the knowledge that many clients struggled with their weight.

‘There are many reasons why this happens and almost in each case the circumstances are never quite the same’, said Chris, who has worked in the Aboriginal community controlled health sector for many years including at Newcastle’s Awabakal Health Service before joining Winnunga AHCS five years ago.

Chris also explained that once a person joined the program a range of resources were provided, including regular sessions at a local gymnasium. ‘We are running these gym sessions three times a week with each session lasting for one hour. We have tried various formats and tailor the sessions to each person’s needs and capabilities.

‘We have employed personal trainers to assist some of our clients. This has worked. Many of our Program participants have lost a significant amount of weight as well as improved other health factors’ Christine said.

 

Mother and daughter Lorna and Tammy Cotter, participants of the program from day one, were quick to explain what it has meant for them. Said Mum Lorna ‘Once I heard of this program I joined because I believed it would help me to control my diabetes and to prevent chronic sickness.’

‘I enjoy the program but more importantly it has worked. I have lost 10.5 kilograms and 8 centimetres from my waist and my Hb1Ac diabetes reading has fallen from 10.3 to 8.2.

I have also met many people in our community whom I hadn’t met before. The thing I like most is that I do the program with my daughter and now my granddaughter’.

For daughter Tammy the weight loss figures are also dramatic. ‘I have lost 10.5kg and 16cm from my waist while by BMI (body mass index) has fallen by 3.4kg/m2’.

Tammy said because of the guidance on eating habits the program provided she was eating healthier and her overall health and lifestyle had also improved. ‘It’s something I now will be passing on to my children,’ she said.

Both Tammy and mum Lorna said neither would have been able to afford to access any other health programs and very specifically would definitely not have been able to afford a gym membership or the usually very high cost of personal trainers.

Julie Tongs noted the community feedback on the program had been very positive, adding she had a letter from one male client congratulating Winnunga AHCS on the program while also saying it had made a huge difference to his level of health.

The weight loss factor and its associated many health benefits was also highlighted by Winnunga AHCS’s Executive Director of Clinical Services, Dr Nadeem Siddiqui.

‘Diabetes is a huge health problem within Indigenous communities. We know the Program has helped clients lower the risks of diabetes,’ Dr Siddiqui said. ‘Because we have a dedicated and experienced Aboriginal health worker co-ordinating the program we can make sure participants are not only monitored but directly referred to other Winnunga services as required, be they from our GP’s, nurses, dieticians, psychologists or even our tobacco control workers.’

‘It is by working holistically and just as importantly within a culturally safe Aboriginal health service that this program is succeeding.’ And both he and Christine emphasised that they firmly believed it would not work in other environments.

Dr Siddiqui said strong links had also been established with external mainstream services, for example with The Canberra Hospitals’ Chronic Disease Management Unit, to provide in-reach services to support program clients.

Both emphasised that as many Indigenous people within the ACT suffered from social isolation the fact that they could meet regularly and openly discuss and share issues that impacted on their daily lives, that in itself was a major factor in play to reflect the Program’s overall acceptance and take up within the local Aboriginal community.

And another very simple initiative that had assisted enormously in breaking down barriers was the simple introduction of a post-gym cup of coffee. ‘The Healthy Weight Program is one that works. Not only does it encourage empowerment it also provides support, feedback and guidance that has seen numbers attending gym classes remain high’.

‘We will continue to be innovative’ stated Julie Tongs ‘and have demonstrated this by introducing hypnotherapy sessions and trauma informed yoga, as intergenerational trauma remains a significant factor for many of our people’.

Dr Nadeem noted ‘As a non-Indigenous person and a doctor it opens your eyes as to how holistic medicine in a truly supportive and sensitive environment can work where purely clinical responses don’t.’

4 NSW : Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation call for more Indigenous health care professionals to help close the gap

The key to improving health in Indigenous communities may be to train more Indigenous doctors and health professionals.

CEO of the Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation Darren Carr said Indigenous communities have a mistrust of medical professionals stemming from the Stolen Generations.

“When you look at the Stolen Generations, a lot of removals of kids happened in a health care setting – so if a child had gone to hospital for some reason, that’s where the child would be taken from their parents,” Mr Carr said.

“There is an understandable historical suspicion and mistrust of health services, and that’s why you need Aboriginal health professionals and services – people know they will feel safe going to them, so they’re more likely access those health services.”

Tina Pollard is one of the only Indigenous nurses in Wagga; she said increasing the number of Indigenous health care professionals is vital if we want to close the gap in life expectancy.

“It’s because we come from the same backgrounds and we have more of an understanding of what the issues are for our people, so we can relate to them a lot better and make our clients feel safe,” Ms Pollard said.

“I see it pretty well every day, especially during hospital visits – they feel very uncomfortable when they go to the hospital, so I will go with them to make sure they’re okay, because they’re more likely to come back for followups if they have a good experience.”

Tina hopes she can be a role model for other Indigenous students.

“If we have more people out there showing that this is what aboriginal people can do, then they’ll know they can do it too.”

5.VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service VALE GARRY (“GILLA”) JOHN McGUINNESS

The Victorian Aboriginal Health Service is sad to learn of the passing of Garry (Gilla) John McGUINNESS on the evening of Tuesday 9 January 2018.

Gilla (as he is better known in the community) died peacefully at St Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne after several days. He is a member of a large family and he leaves behind him a son, John (JBL) and a granddaughter, sisters and brothers and many nieces and nephews.

Gilla graduated from Koori Kollij in the mid-1980s as an Aboriginal Health Worker. He has been associated with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service for many years as a patient, a member and for several years as a Director on the VAHS Board. Many will remember and talk about Gilla and his family and their close association with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service. Even as a young person frequenting Fitzroy where VAHS first commenced, Gilla was closely linked in some way.

Gilla always talked about the 3CR Radio Station based in Smith Street, Fitzroy and how he brought Radio participation through the airways for prisoners. He spoke of his long association with 3CR (over 30 or more years) and about being a member of the local ATSIC Melbourne Aboriginal Regional Council where he was part of an elective representation of Aboriginal people in Melbourne.

In his latter years Gilla used the VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Gym and the services of VAHS until he became too sick to come to continue.

Board of Directors and staff pay their condolences to the family of Gilla

6.SA : What is the “Nganampa Health Council Difference”?

A: The Nganampa Health Difference is a term we use to describe the experience that is on offer when you’re working at NHC. We strive to empower people to make a difference on the frontline of primary healthcare for Indigenous Australians. Working and living remotely can be challenging but our people tell us that this is where their sense of fulfilment comes from! They also value the learning culture at NHC, our professional practice and processes, and the support that they feel we provide, to give them what they and their patients need. You will feel a part of our close, collaborative community and have the opportunity to make a direct impact on our communities! The work we do really improves the lives of the communities we work for. Read more about our accomplishments in the regions here

Q: What are some of the benefits of working for NHC?

A: In return for your professionalism, commitment and care, Nganampa Health brings you a truly unique and satisfying career opportunity. We offer excellent financial rewards and the chance to develop a remarkable skill set and experience a different side to Australia. Working remotely can be challenging, so we’re pleased to be able to provide great financial benefits. For example, people working for us on the APY lands tend to earn a higher salary than they would in more mainstream contexts, and they live in rent-free, fully furnished housing with paid electricity, internet and phone line. Please note though – the real benefit is making a difference in the community so if money is your only motivation, you won’t last long!

Q: What if I am not looking for a permanent role?

A: A Locum role could be for you! With highly competitive remuneration and the flexibility of a fly-in-fly-out locum role you can have the opportunity to make a positive impact and also spend time with your family back home. The level of flexibility and diversity offered by these positions means that there is still autonomy in the services you can provide and you’re not limited to supporting only one particular patient type. In all our roles at NHC, you can work with everyone from newborns to the elderly and see all kinds of medical conditions including emergencies, elderly issues, chronic disease as well as the opportunity to provide health advice and disease prevention.

Q: What qualifications or skills do I need to have?

A: NHC employs people in roles from nurses, doctors and aboriginal health workers to personal carer’s at our aged care facility and corporate staff in environmental health, logistics and finance. All of our people come to NHC with a diverse range of skills and we are always in support for people who want to further their education even more! If you have the relevant qualifications listed in our job ads and a particular interest or passion within the areas NHC covers, then please get in touch with us.

Our people all share the desire to make a real difference on the frontline of primary health, whether working directly with clients or in the office. Our people are professional, committed and really care.

Q:  What positions are currently available?

A: Please see our current opportunities page for positions that are currently advertised.  If you don’t see a suitable position right now, you can also express your interest by contacting us here. If you want to find out more about the different career opportunities at NHC, read some of our staff stories and hear about their journey so far!

7. NT : Katherine West Health , Congress Alice Springs , Anyinginyi Health and Miwatj ACH More Indigenous Health Leaders for Remote Australia

 The Turnbull Government will support a further 14 Northern Territory Aboriginal health services staff members to undertake specialised leadership and management training, as it continues moves to bolster the indigenous health workforce.
The Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said the new participants would bring the total number of people supported by the Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Traineeship program to 66.
 
Customised training will help equip these outstanding nominees to become future leaders in the Aboriginal community controlled health sector,” Minister Wyatt said. 
 
Building a strong indigenous health workforce is a key factor in closing the gap.
“Increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people representation at all levels of the health system, including administration, service delivery, policy, planning and research is crucial.”
The Turnbull Government’s $715,535 commitment brings the total Commonwealth investment in the Northern Territory traineeship program to more than $5 million since 2012.
 
“Strong local leaders will help ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote communities in the NT have access to high-quality, culturally appropriate and comprehensive primary health care,” said Minister Wyatt.
The successful trainees will receive a nationally accredited Diploma of Leadership and Management. The new funding will be shared between four health services:
  • Katherine West Health Board Aboriginal Corporation
  • Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Aboriginal Corporation
  • Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation
  • Miwatj Aboriginal Health Corporation

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Kipli Kani Open nutrition sessions

 

 

 

Aboriginal Health News : Our final 2017 #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS @IndigenousWFPHA

1.International : Our Indigenous public health takes a leap forward on the international stage

2. National : NACCHO Sol Bellear AM tribute and Bellear family thank you 

3.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Our thanks to CEO Robert Skeen providing this years ”  Secret Santa “

3.2 NSW : Wellington ACCHO to feature in ‘Break it Down’ Mental Health Series

3.3 NSW : Tharawal ACCHO Dr Josie Guyer is the inaugural winner of the RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Growing Strong Award

4. Nganampa Health Council operates a Smoking Cessation and Healthy Lifestyles program encouraging Anangu to lead healthy lifestyles

5.VIC : @VACCHO_CEO Jill Gallagher AO named Treaty Advancement Commissioner

6.AHCWA :Western Australia joins the nationally delivered National Disability Insurance Scheme NDIS

7. NT : AMSANT : Racism likely at play in low Indigenous kidney transplants

8.QLD ATSICHS Brisbane Reports record Health Checks

9.Tasmania : Ida West Aboriginal Health Scholarship closes 21 December

10.ACT : Winnunga News : Download November 2017 Edition

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Our First News Post in 2018 will be January 18 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.International : Our Indigenous public health takes a leap forward on the international stage

The World Federation of Public Health Associations (WFPHA) is pleased to announce the formation of its first Indigenous Working Group.

Watch Video Here

In April 2017, at the 15th World Congress on Public Health, over 40 Indigenous delegates at the Yarning Circle supported the formation of an Indigenous Working Group. This working group was ratified by the Governing Council of the WFPHA on the 15th of November 2017.

It is estimated that there are 370 million Indigenous People across 70 countries around the world. Many Indigenous Peoples are a minority in their own country, experience poorer health, have lower life expectancy and are among the most disadvantaged people in their population.

Michael Moore, President of the WFPHA, said “The formation of this group demonstrates the WFPHA commitment to working with Indigenous peoples from around the world to improve their health and wellbeing.”

The group will be co-chaired by Adrian Te Patu from New Zealand who is also a member of the Governing Council, and Carmen Parter from Australia who is the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Vice President for the Public Health Association of Australia. Emma Rawson from New Zealand and Summer May Finlay from Australia are co-vice chairs.

“The Indigenous Working Group aims to assist in reducing the health disparity and inequities experienced by Indigenous people globally,” said Mr Te Patu.

Mr Te Patu recognizes the “differences among Indigenous peoples but also our similarities which are the strengths of this group.”

The Working Group is underpinned by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. Self-determination is a key component of the Declaration; therefore the Indigenous Working Group will be led by Indigenous peoples.

“It is important to recognize that this group embodies Indigenous self-determination and will be led by Indigenous peoples,” said Mr. Moore.

“To address public health concerns among Indigenous peoples culturally appropriate solutions are required. The Governing Council understands that Indigenous Nations know what is required and have the skills and capacity to address the issues they face,” said Mr Moore.

Carmen Parter, Co-Chair said “This is an opportunity for Indigenous peoples to come together to support each other and seek out research collaborations that develop the evidence base that informs global Indigenous public health policies.”

The Working Group’s objectives are: to bring together Indigenous peoples from around the world to share and learn from each other, engage in collective advocacy, partner with existing international groups working in Indigenous affairs, and source any funding or in-kind support to support the work of the Indigenous Working Group.

Indigenous members of WFPHA are invited to join the Working Group, with non-Indigenous people invited to join as associate members.

The Working Group hopes to hold its first face to face meeting in May 2018 at the WFPHA General Assembly in Geneva.

More information about the Working Group can be found on the WFPHA website: http://www.wfpha.org/about-wfpha/working-groups/indigenous-working-group.

Please follow the Working Group on Twitter @IndigenousWFPHA

2. National : NACCHO Sol Bellear AM tribute and Bellear family thank you 

#SolsLastMarch #StateFuneral for Sol Bellear AM ” Remembered as a giant of a man “ 

3.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Our thanks to CEO Robert Skeen providing this years ”  Secret Santa ”

3.2 NSW : Wellington ACCHO to feature in ‘Break it Down’ Mental Health Series

 ” Wellington’s Indigenous community left a film crew inspired as they took part in a workshop aimed at creating conversation about mental health for Indigenous people. 

Charity organisation, Desert Pea Media (DPM), spent two weeks in Wellington recently working on a media project with around 20 local students, councilors, community members and organisations.”

Originally published here

‘Break it Down’ – a story-telling project funded by NSW Primary Health Network – involves six communities around Western NSW. Participants assist crew in writing and recording a song, before shooting a music video and creating a series of short films with a focus on community members.

The material will be compiled into a mental health awareness campaign using a ‘90s hip hop approach. It will be worked into the curriculum, across social media and other broadcast opportunities.

Creative director, Toby Finlayson, said the content produced in Wellington was nothing short of amazing.

“Both the high schools have been involved which isn’t a common thing, but a really fantastic example of the community coming together to do something positive,” he said.

Toby said the stories shared by William Hill, Kristy White and Mary Henderson were particularly inspiring.

“One of the films we created was with William Hill who tells his story about his reconnection with culture and country, and how that helped him grow as a person,” he said.

“Mary grew up in Wellington on Nanima Reserve and shared her story of what life was like during the mission days, how things are different and the shameful treatment of Indigenous people in NSW, and especially Wellington in the past.

“It is very important for young people to understand the context of their community and history of their older community members still here in Wellington.”

Toby said participants were very responsive to discussing mental health in what was a challenging but creative process.

“It’s not easy talking about this stuff, and not a lot of people want to talk about it, so young people who live and breath the trauma and grief associated with life in Indigenous communities I think were really brave and inspirational to see them taking leadership and responsibility for change,” he said. “We were really inspired by the Wellington Indigenous community.”

3.3 NSW : Tharawal ACCHO Dr Josie Guyer is the inaugural winner of the RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Growing Strong Award.

‘As the Aboriginal parent that I have, Mum has always inspired me, She’s had quite a tough life; things haven’t been easy for her but she’s always very encouraging. Seeing how proud my mum is of me for winning this award, it just makes me feel like everything is worth it.

’Aboriginal people seem to have a different level of connection when you tell them that you’re Aboriginal as well,’ And I certainly have a different level of empathy and understanding, coming from an Aboriginal family with similar health problems that I see my patients having.”

‘That’s really rewarding and I think allows me to be a better doctor.’

When discussing the kind of emotions stirred by winning the Growing Strong Award, Dr Guyer is definite in her response.

Originally published HERE

RACGP President Dr Bastian Siedel presented Dr Guyer with the Growing Strong Award at GP17 in October.

The Growing Strong Award was established in 2017 to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander general practice registrars.

Winning this award is a particularly significant feat for someone who is relatively new to the world of general practice. Dr Guyer worked as a nurse for the best part of 20 years before deciding she wanted a new challenge.

Now in her second year as a general practice registrar, Dr Guyer works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients at the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation in Airds, on the outskirts of Sydney, where she strives to contribute to closing the healthcare gap.

Dr Guyer feels that developing a close connection with her patients is one of the most important steps to improve health outcomes.

‘Aboriginal people seem to have a different level of connection when you tell them that you’re Aboriginal as well,’ she said.

‘That’s really rewarding and I think allows me to be a better doctor.’

Dr Guyer has found that connecting on this level also helps to educate her patients on preventive health measures.

‘It does take a lot of perseverance, but I think [educating patients about] preventive health is really important and empowers them to make changes to their lifestyle,’ she said.

‘I talk to kids and parents about valuing education, because I really think that’s the only way we can make changes.’

Dr Guyer cites the people with whom she has worked during her own education as invaluable throughout her journey as a general practice registrar.

‘I’ve met doctors who have been fantastic mentors. Especially because they are quite open and honest about sharing their journey with us as registrars, and often medicine is not an easy road,’ she said.

‘It’s really good to know that sometimes it’s tough and that’s okay, you just keep persevering. That has been really encouraging.’

Dr Guyer’s determination is supported through her passion for general practice.

‘I love the diversity in general practice, and the challenges that come with chronic and complex care,’ she said. ‘Also dealing with the social determinants of health, because they obviously play a big part in the general wellbeing of people.’

Dr Guyer is grateful for having had the opportunity to attend GP17 in Sydney in October, where she was inspired by the people she met and heard speak during presentations. She was humbled to be the first recipient of the Growing Strong Award, which was presented to her by RACGP President Dr Bastian Siedel.

Dr Guyer hopes this type of honour will instil ambition in future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander general practice registrars.

‘Aboriginal [and Torres Strait Islander] people can become doctors, because I’ve done it,’ she said. ‘That’s a really powerful story to tell people

4. Nganampa Health Council operates a Smoking Cessation and Healthy Lifestyles program encouraging Anangu to lead healthy lifestyles.

The Tjitkita Nyuntu Ngayuku Malpa Wiya – Smoking Cessation program have created this incredible painting to be used for health promotion and as a resource on the APY Lands.

The painting tells the story of smoking and its effect on children.

We are committed to reducing smoking rates and making all houses and cars smoke free to protect children from the health effects of smoking.

It is possible for Anangu to give up smoking and if you would like help, talk to our clinic staff. #NHCPeople

5.VIC : @VACCHO_CEO Jill Gallagher AO named Treaty Advancement Commissioner

 

Aboriginal Health, Healing , Self Determination Reconciliation and a #Treaty

6.AHCWA :Western Australia joins the nationally delivered National Disability Insurance Scheme NDIS

The State Government has confirmed that Western Australia will be joining the nationally delivered National Disability Insurance Scheme.

This will see the end of the WA NDIS trial.

All current participants in the WA NDIS trial will transfer to the nationally delivered Scheme from April 2018 until 31 December 2018.

For more information, please visit

7. NT : AMSANT : Racism likely at play in low Indigenous kidney transplants

Low kidney transplant rates for Indigenous Australians are “shocking”, “unacceptable”, and are likely to be driven by racism, the Australian Medical Association (AMA) has said.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dialysis patients are less likely than other Australians to receive a transplant — remote patients have a tenth of the chance, and urban patients a third of a chance, research suggests.

“I’m shocked by those figures. A ten-fold gap is entirely unacceptable,” AMA president Dr Michael Gannon said.

“The topic of racism in our health system is an uncomfortable one for doctors, nurses, but it has to be one of the possible reasons for this kind of disparity.

“If there’s reasons why Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are not being transplant-listed, they need to be investigated, but the problems need to be fixed.”

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt said he was disheartened by the disparities, and will urge the Australian Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Board to look into the issue.

“I’d describe it as extremely disappointing,” Mr Wyatt said.

“It’s something I want to focus on for the next 12 months of starting to heighten the awareness — we have to have more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accessing organs.”

A patient must undergo a “work-up” of health tests to be accepted on to the active waiting list for a new kidney, and each state and territory operates a separate wait list.

Read full article here

8.QLD ATSICHS Brisbane Reports record Health Checks

Our community accessed our primary health more than ever in 2017. This year you mob had 4857 health checks which is a 36% increase and we saw 2863 new patients. A healthy choice is a deadly choice!

Each year we prepare a series of publications highlighting our achievements.

We are proud to present Our Community, Our Work, Our Stories, our 2016-17 Annual Report

We believe it provides valuable insights into the key issues affecting our community in Brisbane and Logan and how we are working towards reinstating the wellbeing of our people – person by person, family by family, generation by generation.

Take a look at what we have achieved over the past 12 months.

http://e.issuu.com/embed.html#27714854/55404302

Download our 2016-17 Annual Report

Download our 2016-17 Financial Statements

To get a hard copy of our annual report or financial statements email marketing@atsichsbrisbane.org.au

9.Tasmania : Ida West Aboriginal Health Scholarship closes 21 December

10..ACT : Winnunga News : Download November 2017 Edition

DOWNLOAD PDF HERE

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter November 2017

Thank you for your support of our NACCHO Good News Stories in 2017

 

NACCHO tribute to Sol Bellear AM Aboriginal activist : ” Last March for Sol ” and State Funeral details announced

” Sol Bellear leaves an important legacy that must be carried on by the board of NACCHO and all our members if Indigenous Australians are to ever enjoy health services and standards that other Australians take for granted.

Throughout his career he advocated a philosophy of community control, self-reliance and independence, attributes that would be vital for the survival of ACCHO’s over the decades

We would like to record our sincere gratitude and admiration for Sol’s service to our nation and communities, and tender our profound sympathy to his family and community in their bereavement.”

NACCHO Chair John Singer speaking on behalf of all the 143 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services throughout Australia said he was saddened to hear of the untimely passing of one of the nation’s leading spokespeople on Aboriginal health issues, Mr Sol Bellear AM. ( see our full Press Release below ) Or Download

NACCHO tribute to Sol Bellear AM Aboriginal activist

Last march Sol Bellear AM

Health, justice and land rights Legend Sol Bellear AM will lead his last march at a State Funeral to be held in Redfern on Saturday.

Sol’s family, friends and supporters are invited to gather at Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service on Redfern Street from 10am for a last march to the State Funeral service at Redfern Oval starting at 11am.

WHEN: Saturday 9 December 2017

WHERE:

  • March from 10am outside Aboriginal Medical Service, Redfern Street
  • Service from 11am at Redfern Oval

For any enquiries please email media@alc.org.au or call 02 9689 4444

“ So they took our children away. They forced us from our ancestral lands. They held our wages and savings in trust, and then found better ways to spend the money. We were forced into slavery, denied equal wages and prevented from ever building generational wealth.

That great lie still underpins thinking in Indigenous affairs policy today. So it’s time to do something different, and time to acknowledge that the case for self-determination for Aboriginal people in Australia isn’t just compelling – it’s overwhelming. “

Sol Bellear AM 1951 -2017 : When NACCHO TV recorded over 100 interviews throughout Australia in 2015 Sol was our first interview : VIEW HERE

NACCHO Press Release :

NACCHO tribute to Sol Bellear AM Aboriginal activist

 NACCHO Chair John Singer speaking on behalf of all the 143 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services throughout Australia said he was saddened to hear of the untimely passing of one of the nation’s leading spokespeople on Aboriginal health issues, Mr Sol Bellear AM

Sol was a respected elder, friend, lifetime Aboriginal activist, a co-founder and Chair of Aboriginal Medical Service Redfern and a recently appointed NACCHO board member.

Sol Bellear a Bundjalung man from Mullumbimby was also the first chair of the Aboriginal Legal Service when it was founded in the early 1970s.

In 1990 Sol became a member of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC), where he served as deputy chair before stepping down in 1994.

Throughout his career he advocated a philosophy of community control, self-reliance and independence, attributes that would be vital for the survival of ACCHO’s over the decades.

Mr. Singer said Sol Bellear was an inspiration to everyone involved with or interested in Aboriginal issues and specifically Indigenous health. He was admired and respected leader who served his community for nearly 50 years.

” Sol was a tireless worker for his people,” Mr Singer said.

“He travelled all over Australia and the world championing the cause of Indigenous Australians as we have had historically some of worst health outcomes in the western world.

“He was a fearless advocate not afraid to take on politicians and bureaucracies.

“And he certainly was a man of great compassion and commitment to improving the health of his Redfern Community and all Indigenous Australians.”

“Sol Bellear leaves an important legacy that must be carried on by the board of NACCHO and all our members if indigenous Australians are to ever enjoy health services and standards that other Australians take for granted,” Mr Singer concluded.

Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC

 

Nov 30

1.National Health Medical and Research Council (NHMRC) Road Map 3 public consultation will close on 10 December 2017

2.VIC : VAHS : The women in first Aboriginal woman MP Lidia Thorpe’s family have a history of blazing trails in health

3. SA : Nganampa Health Council : Anangu Study Scholarship Pirpantji Rive-Nelson – University of Queensland Student Doctor MD IV

4. NT  : Congress Alice Springs wins major National Indigenous Employment Award

5.1. NSW : Awabakal Early Learning awarded Excellent rating

5.2 : NSW : How Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation and South Western Sydney Local Health District work together to achieve better outcomes for mental health clients.

6.1 QLD : QAIHC Queensland awards for excellence in Indigenous health service delivery : QAIHC Member of the Year Award – Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service Aboriginal Corporation

6.2 QLD : QAIHC Conference focuses on providing quality health care to Indigenous communities

7.WA : AHCWA are pleased to announce the following Executive Board Members elected at a recent  AGM

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.National Health Medical and Research Council (NHMRC) Road Map 3 public consultation will close on 10 December 2017

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A reminder that the National Health Medical and Research Council (NHMRC) would like your feedback on the draft Road Map 3: A strategic framework for improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health through research (Road Map 3).

The draft Road Map 3 public consultation will close on 10 December 2017 and we invite you to make a submission through the website here:

www.nhmrc.gov.au/health-topics/indigenous-health/draft-road-map-3-public-consultation

Road Map 3 will guide and communicate NHMRC’s objectives and investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research for the next decade. Road Map 3 follows on from the release of Road Map 1 in 2002 and Road Map 2 in 2010.

Further information and background please contact Nous Group via email:

NHMRCroadmap3@nousgroup.com.au.

2.VIC : VAHS The women in Victoria’s first Aboriginal woman MP Lidia Thorpe’s family have a history of blazing trails.

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When Ms Thorpe gives her maiden speech in the Victorian Parliament today as the state’s first Aboriginal woman MP, her 84-year-old grandmother Alma Thorpe will be there to watch.

View Lidia’s powerful ” maiden ” speech HERE

In the ’70s Alma Thorpe was one of the founders of the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service. Her own mother set up a funeral fund for Aboriginal people in the ’60s to ensure proper burials.

Ms Thorpe said the strong women in her family had inspired her career in politics.

“All the women in my family have fought for Aboriginal people for a very long time,” she told NIT.

The new Member for the inner Melbourne electorate of Northcote said an Aboriginal woman in the Victorian parliament was “well overdue”.

She was sworn in earlier this week after storming to a historic win for the Greens in a November 18 by-election for the Legislative Assembly seat.

Ms Thorpe, a Gunnai-Gunditjmara woman from Victoria’s south-east and western districts, said even she was surprised by her overwhelming win.

“I was totally in shock,” she said.

“I thought it was going to be close — a close win or a close loss.

“I was not expecting the support we got. Everyone in Northcote is sick of the old parties and wanted to see change.”

Ms Thorpe said as an MP she would continue to care for country and would fight for a Great Forest National Park, which would cover big areas of the central Victorian highlands.

Overcrowded public transport systems were also a problem in Northcote.

She said she would also advocate for clan-based treaty in Victoria.

Ms Thorpe will take leave from her duties as chair of Victoria’s NAIDOC Week Committee.

Ms Thorpe has worked in Aboriginal health, education, employment and funeral services and run her own event management business since leaving school at the age of 14.

Wendy Caccetta NIT Report

https://nit.com.au/meet-victorias-first-female-aboriginal-mp/

3. SA : Nganampa Health Council : Anangu Study Scholarship Pirpantji Rive-Nelson – University of Queensland Student Doctor MD IV

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For many residents of the APY Lands it can be difficult to undertake tertiary level education. In general, if students want to study they are relocated to a foreign environment far from their friends and family. Not to mention, it can be very expensive!

Nganampa Health Council introduced the Anangu Study Scholarship as a way to make tertiary education a bit easier for our people and ultimately to maximise the number of Anangu staff that we employ.

Pirpantji Rive-Nelson is currently in his final year of a Doctor of Medicine program with the University of Queensland, completing his clinical years in the Toowoomba Rural Clinical School.

“I chose this program at the University of Queensland because it is highly ranked on international and domestic scales. Additionally, I have previously studied in Brisbane for my Bachelor of Nursing undergraduate degree, so it made sense to return to Brisbane.

I applied for the NHC student scholarship during my Nursing undergraduate and have been provided financial support with my accommodation. Studying at University is an extremely difficult time with little income. Therefore, I have maximised the opportunity for support from our health care provider.

The benefit of receiving NHC student scholarship is that it has given me the basics of life in terms of stable accommodation. This support has been invaluable and enables to me to focus on completing my studies. I have been most grateful for the support NHC has provided me, and once I complete my studies and work in Alice Springs Hospital in 2019, I plan to fulfil my personal notion of return of service to our communities and people of the APY Lands. I sincerely hope other Anangu will pursue academia and health professions, so we can be a part of the provision of health care for our families and people.“

4. NT Congress Alice Springs wins major National Indigenous Employment Award

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Central Australian Aboriginal Congress recognised as joint winner of the Stan Grant Indigenous Employment Award at the 2017 at the Australian HR Institute Awards.

Accepting the award in Melbourne on behalf of Congress is General Manager HR Kim Mannering and Aboriginal Staff Advisory Group Chair Andrew Lockyer.

Congratulations to board, leadership, staff and for your efforts to employ additional 67 Aboriginal people to roles across Congress compared to this time in 2014.

5.1. NSW : Awabakal Early Learning awarded Excellent rating

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On Thursday 7 December, Awabakal Ltd will be awarded an ‘Excellent’ rating – the highest rating possible – for their Wickham Preschool from the Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority.

The presentation, which will take place at the Preschool in Wickham, will recognise Awabakal’s outstanding achievement as a leader in Early Learning and Education.

Awabakal is the first Early Childhood Service in the Newcastle and Hunter Region and the first Aboriginal service in New South Wales to achieve the ‘Excellent’ rating and is a particularly noteworthy merit.

This award places Wickham Preschool in the top 0.003 per cent of all Early Childhood Services in the country and is based on criteria including excellent educational care, leadership that contributes to the development of community and commitment to sustained excellent practice through continuous improvement and planning.

When discussing the rating announcement, Awabakal’s Early Learning and Education Principal, Renee Smith said this recognition was a huge achievement for the organisation.

“This is the biggest recognition in our field and to be the first Aboriginal Early Childhood Service in the state to be awarded this rating is an extraordinary achievement,” said Ms Smith.

“The staff at Awabakal are constantly searching for ways to continually deliver the best educational and social outcomes to our children and families, and we take pride in delivering the highest quality learning experiences so that we can create a community of leaders.

“I feel privileged to work for an organisation who is leading the way, providing innovative programs and showcasing excellence in service delivery and to have this recognised on a national platform is amazing,” concluded Ms Smith.

Awabakal Chief Executive Officer, Raylene Gordon, commented on the rating award saying the success of their Early Learning and Education department is reflective of the hard work and commitment the team have to the children in the community.

“Our preschool service is utilised by a number of families and children within our community and the staff who work at both Wickham and Glendale are dedicated to providing the best services to all.

“It is an honour to have the Wickham Preschool awarded an ‘Excellent’ rating and we look forward to achieving this across both sites in the near future. I would like to congratulate the entire Early Learning and Education team on this achievement,” concluded Ms Gordon.

5.2 : NSW : How Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation and South Western Sydney Local Health District work together to achieve better outcomes for mental health clients.

View Here

https://youtu.be/JmsbgmL2M-o?list=PLmdoKIibCmXbDqiQ_7O8ggmmBq9DWhQKo

6.1 QLD : QAIHC Queensland awards for excellence in Indigenous health service delivery : QAIHC Member of the Year Award – Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service Aboriginal Corporation

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QAIHC Member of the Year Award – Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service Aboriginal Corporation

From Website

Quality of Service Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation values the responsibility of providing a quality health service to all residents of Yarrabah and will maintain a high standard of care across all levels of the organisation

Leadership Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation will endeavour to represent the Yarrabah community through strong leadership to ensure the delivery of health services are maintained and improved upon as determined by the needs of the clients.

Commitment Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation strives to provide 100% commitment to all levels of the organisation business and in its capacity to support the Yarrabah community.

Accountability Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation aims to be accountable to the appropriate stakeholders within the organisation, the Yarrabah community, non-Government and Government sector.

Teamwork Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation recognises and understands the value of teamwork and insists upon a team approach in service delivery and management to maximise outcome

The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) honoured the state’s top achievers in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector (ATSICCHS) at the inaugural QAIHC Awards for Excellence ceremony, in Brisbane on Tuesday night (14 November 2017).

The QAIHC 2017 Awards for Excellence recognise and celebrate the outstanding achievements of individuals and organisations within the Sector.

QAIHC Chief Executive Officer, Mr Neil Willmett congratulated all the winners and finalists and encouraged them to continue their good work.

“The QAIHC Awards for Excellence are instrumental in acknowledging the significant contributions of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Services in improving health outcomes for our people,” he said.

“I congratulate all the nominees for the work you are undertaking to eliminate the disparities in health and wellbeing experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Queensland.

“Individually and collectively we continue our journey towards making a difference in the delivery of comprehensive primary health care,” Mr Willmett said.

The winners of the QAIHC 2017 Awards for Excellence are:

  • QAIHC Partnership Excellence Award – Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health
  • QAIHC Innovation Excellence Award – Carbal Medical Services
  • QAIHC Patient Satisfaction & Service Excellence Award – The Dental Team, Wuchopperen Health Service
  • QAIHC Leader of the Year Award – Aunty Gail Wason, Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation
  • QAIHC Member of the Year Award – Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service Aboriginal Corporation

CheckUp, Health Workforce Queensland, General Practice Training Queensland, and General Medical Training James Cook University are proud partners of the QAIHC 2017 Awards for Excellence.

6.2 QLD : QAIHC Conference focuses on providing quality health care to Indigenous communities

The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) held their annual State Member Conference in Brisbane on Tuesday 14 November 2017.

The theme for the conference, ‘Delivering quality health services to our communities,’ aligns with QAIHC’s aim of ensuring that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have the right access to equitable, culturally competent, and high-quality care.

With twenty-eight QIAHC Members servicing communities across Queensland, QAIHC is committed to supporting their Members to deliver optimal and culturally responsive primary healthcare services.

Mr Neil Willmett, Chief Executive Officer, QAIHC said the conference provided members with the opportunity to come together to discuss a range of policy, research, and legislative requirements relevant to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

“The conference covered a range of topics pertinent to the Sector including the Australian Government National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 and the proposed Commonwealth Funding Model,” he said.

“We were fortunate to have guest speakers from the Commonwealth and State health departments who were able to provide an update on the national agenda for Indigenous health and reinforce the commitment towards closing the gap in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Queenslanders.

“As an integral part of the Queensland Health Care system, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector plays a critical role in the delivery of quality comprehensive primary health care to our communities,” Mr Willmett said.

QAIHC is the peak organisation representing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector (ATSICCHS) in Queensland at both a state and national level. Membership is open to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Services in Queensland.

 

7.WA : AHCWA are pleased to announce the following Executive Board Members elected at a recent  AGM attended by delegates and observers from our Member Services. Congratulations to:

Chairperson: Vicki O’Donnell

Deputy Chairperson: Raymond Christophers

Secretary: Fabian Tucker

Treasurer: Susan Oakley

 

 

Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC

A now 16

1.1 International : Community Health Centres Survey 2017

2.1 National  : NACCHO and Heart Foundation Resources survey 2017

2.2 National : Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic

2.3 NACCHO Presents #FASD Poster at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

Members

3.QLD : TAIHS ACCHO Townsville leads the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­Indigenous families

4.NSW : Wellington ACCHO Health Choices and community the focus at inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout

5. WA : AHCWA Members complete training course

6. VIC : Mallee ACCHO #MDAS to hold Pamper and Pap event for women clients

7. SA: AHCSA Sexual Health and Maternal Health Tackling Smoking Teams

8. NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs CEO’s present at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 International Community Health Centres Survey 2017

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The International Federation of Community Health Centres (IFCHC) is seeking input from staff and board members of Community Health Centres (CHCs) around the world, as well as associations that represent CHCs. If this applies to you, we encourage you to answer the brief survey below. The survey takes approximately 5 minutes to complete. All questions with an * are required.
All other questions are optional. Survey responses will help IFCHC to focus its operational activities for the near future.

 

2.1 National  : NACCHO and Heart Foundation Resources survey

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The Heart Foundation is committed to improving the heart health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

In this survey, we are seeking your feedback on how we can improve the use and effectiveness of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources, for both health professionals and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

 
We would greatly appreciate your time and opinions on our information resources and tools, to better understand the:
– use and awareness of our resources,
– cultural appropriateness of our resources for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community,
– suitability of the language, format and style of our resources.
 
We recognise that your time is valuable and thank you for your help. Link below

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Resource Survey – ACCHO

 

2.2 National : Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic

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The Koori Mail latest edition on sale Nov 15 , features the The National Centre of Indigenous Excellence TATU – Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic.

The TATU Schools Program created the comic, encouraging students to discuss the benefits of a smoke free lifestyle, and develop community ideas to reduce the harm caused by tobacco use.

‘Traditional smoke heals – tobacco smoke kills.

2.3 NACCHO Presents #FASD Poster at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

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NACCHO Policy Officer Bridie Kenna pictured with symposium chair Professor Sandra Eades and FASD project members Dr Nikki Percival and Hayley Williams .Bridie was presenting  a poster on the FASD Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Project. A collaboration between NACCHO, Menzies School of Health Research and the Telethon Kids Institute.

3.QLD : TAIHS ACCHO Townsville leads the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­Indigenous families

 

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TOWNSVILLE will lead the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­indigenous families. The Townsville Aboriginal and Islander Health Service (TAIHS) will steer the new initiative, called the First Thousand Days Australia.

Picture Above : Heather Lee, TAIHS Integrated Services Manager/ Midwife of Maternal and Child Heath, Kerry Arabena, Chair of Indigenous Health at the University of Melbourne and new family, Emma Woods and Shane Mitchell with 5 month old twin girls Ahliyah and Shanielle, pictured at the TAIHS clinic for the launch of the first Australian trial of the First Thousand Days. Picture: Shae Beplate

It will be rolled out across North Queensland and focus on babies’ first two years of life beginning at conception. This period is when the foundations of optimum health, growth, and neurodevelopment across the lifespan are established.

This international movement, which ­focuses on nutrition, has been broadened by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander health researchers and practitioners to ­include child protection, early life ­literacy, the role and contribution of men and the range of other issues that impact on indigenous parents and infants in Australia.

TAIHS chair Morris Cloudy said ­although they had a successful record of ­providing quality health care and social ­services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait community, there remained many obstacles to ensuring kids received the best possible opportunities in life.

“We believe that this model will assist us in addressing these gaps,” he said.

Heather Lee, midwife and manager of TAIHS’ Child and Maternal Health services, said it was important for future generations.

“The aspiration for me personally is to have healthier women, children and dads in our community.”

Ms Lee said TAIHS aimed to ­decrease the number of chronic diseases within the community.

Chair of ­Indigenous Health at the University of ­Melbourne Professor Kerry Arabena, who heads the One Thousand Days initiative nationally, said it was a unique indigenous-designed and managed intervention that would improve co-ordination between services and organisations catering to Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander child and maternal health.

“It will also ensure that the so-called ­social determinants of health, including housing, education, employment and ­exposure to racism and discrimination, are addressed,” she said.

4.NSW : Wellington ACCHO Health Choices and community the focus at inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout

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History was made in Dubbo at the weekend with the inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout held at Apex Oval. More than 20 men’s and mixed teams competed across five divisions on Saturday and Sunday, with organisers Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) and NSW Touch hailing it a great success.

“We’ve certainly had a couple of thousand people through the gates,” WACHS marketing and communications manager Jodie Evans said.

“I think what we’ve proven is you can have all ages and all shapes and sizes actually playing and no one actually has any issues with that, and having mixed teams is great too, it just brings different elements into it.

“Next year we hope to build on the women’s sides and certainly bring the kids in.

NSW Touch game development officer Stacey Parker said she was impressed by the “outstanding” quality of play on show, with players coming from as far away as Western Australia.

“We look forward to what’s going to happen in 2018,” she said. “Hopefully we can double the numbers.”

Touch football wasn’t the only focus of the weekend, with the crew from QuitBFit on hand at the smoke and alcohol-free event to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Current and former NRL stars were on hand to help spread the message, including Scott Prince (who played with the All-Blacks), Timana Tahu, Nathan Merritt, Cody Walker and Will Smith.

“We’re trying to get that communication through from a young age that smoking isn’t great for you and drinking so much soft drink,” Evans said.

“It’s all about healthy eating and living, and sport is obviously vital to that.”

“Being at the inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout was something special and something I won’t forget,” Prince said. “It was great to see the family coming together to promote healthy choices.”

5. WA : AHCWA Members complete training course

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Staff from AHCWA, Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service – East Perth office, Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation and the Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service recently completed an Internal Auditor Training Course at AHCWA’s head office in Highgate.
The two-day training course enabled the participants with the skills and knowledge to prepare for and participate in a quality audit. The types of audits may include external or internal systems audit or process or products/service audits.
Participants were given the opportunity to work through the process of reviewing designated documentation; identifying and developing checklists and audit-related documentation; preparing audit schedules; gathering, analysing and evaluating information; and reporting findings to the lead auditor in a fun and interactive setting.
Thanks to Claire, the Quality & Compliance Officer at AHCWA and Christine from SAI Global for organising and delivering a very informative, interesting and useful course.

6. VIC : Mallee ACCHO #MDAS to hold Pamper and Pap event for women clients

AMMAFTER a successful pilot event last year, Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) will hold the second Pamper and Pap day on November 30 at MDAS Commun­ity Hall.

Prevention and health promotion officer Jade Klaebe said  MDAS had decided to make the event annual.

“We held this event at around the same time last year for the first time, and we had 67 Aboriginal women attend.

7. SA: AHCSA Sexual Health and Maternal Health Tackling Smoking Teams

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The team was up at Coober Pedy hosting a Womens Pamper Day….lots of fun, laughter & education.

8. NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs CEO’s present at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

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NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Sugartax News : @Apunipima Dr Mark Wenitong launches #SugaryDrinksProperNoGood

 

 ” This campaign is straightforward – sugary drinks are no good for our health.It’s calling on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks.’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Cape York experience a disproportionate burden of chronic disease compared to other Australians.’

‘Regular consumption of sugary drinks is associated with increased energy intake and in turn, weight gain and obesity. It is well established that obesity is a leading risk factor for diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease and some cancers. Consumption of sugary drinks is also associated with poor dental health.

Water is the best drink for everyone – it doesn’t have any sugar and keeps our bodies healthy.’

Apunipima Public Health Advisor Dr Mark Wenitong

Read over 30 NACCHO articles Health and Nutrition HERE

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/nutrition-healthy-foods/

Read over 15 NACCHO articles Sugar Tax HERE  

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/sugar-tax/

Apunipima Cape York Health Council  launched its Sugary Drinks Proper No Good – Drink More Water Youfla social marketing campaign on Thursday 2 November.

The campaign was developed with, and for, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cape York, and is supported by the national Rethink Sugary Drink Alliance – a group of organisations, including Apunipima, Diabetes Australia and the Cancer Council, concerned about the health impacts of sugary drinks.

The launch will see the campaign webpage (part of the Rethink Sugary Drink website) go live, and the release of three videos featuring NRL legend Scotty Prince inviting people to Drink More Water Youfla.

Channel 7 News Coverage

#SugaryDrinksProperNoGood and #DrinkMoreWaterYoufla.

VIEW HERE

Media was invited to Apunipima’s Cairns office where the three clips were distributed, a sugary drinks display set up, and Apunipima Public Health Medical Advisor Dr Mark Wenitong was for interview and photos opportunities.

‘This campaign is straightforward – sugary drinks are no good for our health. It’s calling on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks like soft drinks, sports drinks and fruit drinks,’ Dr Wenitong said.

Head of Prevention at Cancer Council Victoria and spokesperson for Rethink Sugary Drink Alliance Craig Sinclair said Apunipima’s campaign was prevention – focused and could save lives.

‘This is a vitally important campaign that has the capacity to not only improve lives but save them.’

‘It may sound simple, but cutting out sugary drinks can have a big impact on your health. Sugary drinks are key contributor to being overweight or obese which puts you at risk of cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, and kidney disease. Apunipima Cape York Health Council is to be congratulated for taking this innovative prevention-led approach.’

The campaign was funded by the Australian government via the Northern Queensland Primary Health Network (NQPHN).

‘We’re pleased to be supporting Apunipima in this comprehensive health promotion initiative to address consumption of sugary drinks, which are one of the key contributors to overweight and obesity,’ said NQPHN CEO Mr Robin Moore.

‘Apunipima have a strong track record of developing and undertaking effective health promotion initiatives for our local communities, and are a key agency improving the skills and knowledge of the health promotion workforce across the region.’

‘NQPHN is committed to helping to close the gap and we are confident this initiative will make a significant contribution to that goal.’

Prominent Far Northern doctor calls for Australian sugar tax

A PROMINENT doctor has reignited calls for a sugar tax, in order to prevent the Far North’s chronic disease rate from climbing even higher.

Apunipima Cape York Health Council has launched a federally-funded social media campaign, to discourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from consuming sugary drinks.

The “Sugary Drinks Proper No Good — Drink More Water Youfla” campaign, featuring videos by NRL legend Scotty Prince.

It calls on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks, like soft drinks, sports drinks, and fruit drinks.

The campaign has been launched to tackle the high rate of chronic diseases in the Far North such as Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Apunipima public health medical advisor Dr Mark Wenitong said a sugar tax placed on junk food and beverages would go a long way to helping reduce this rate.

“We’ve seen this happen in a few South American countries, in Mexico,” he said.

“If those countries can introduce (a sugar tax) as a health benefit to their population, then I don’t see why we can’t.

“I know the beverage industry will often say ‘this will affect the most disadvantaged people, because they’ll have to pay’, our answer to that is, it’s killing most disadvantaged people already, because they’ve got higher risk factors.

“It affects their chronic disease status more than other people in Australia.”

Cairns Hospital, earlier this year, became one of the first hospitals in Queensland to implement strategies to restrict patient and staff access to soft drinks.

Vending machines and the two cafes at the hospital only sell sugar-free soft drinks.

Dr Wenitong said the Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service should go an extra step by restricting other junk food being sold at its facilities, like chocolate bars and chips.

“At some stage, I think they’ll have to think about the accessibility of those things, particularly for younger people,” he said.

“I don’t think it’s a bad idea, by at least making them less visible and less accessible, so kids just don’t see them and want them.”

CHHHS executive director Tina Chinery said they had received no complaints from patients, staff or visitors when their healthier drink strategy was rolled out earlier this year.

“Healthcare facilities play an important role in promoting the health and wellbeing of patients, staff and visitors,” she said.

“Cairns Hospital is leading by example and creating environments that support patients, staff and visitors to make healthy choices easy.”

NACCHO #715 Aboriginal Health Check #Prevention : #DeadlyRoos partnership between @DeadlyChoices , @VAHSCEO and @Kangaroos

 

” VAHS is excited to be part of the Deadly Choices Deadly Roos campaign. The more we can all work together, the closer we can move towards Closing the Gap and improving the health outcomes in our communities”,

VAHS CEO Michael Graham.Community members who get their 715 Health Check at a participating Aboriginal Medical Service – such as VAHS – during the World Cup can score a special edition Deadly Kangaroos World Cup jersey.

“We know from our Deadly Choices campaign that people respond to health promotion messages from celebrities and sporting legends,

“Partnerships like this one with the Deadly Roos and VAHS are a powerful vehicle for positive change in the lifestyle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health CEO, Adrian Carson, echoed Mr Graham’s sentiment.

Prevention being better than cure is the message of the day at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS) last week, as the Fitzroy clinic welcomes Australian rugby league legends in Melbourne for the opening of the 2017 Rugby League World Cup.

Australian Kangaroos squad member James Maloney and Coach Mal Meninga will join former Kangaroo Steve Renouf to spread the word about the importance of getting regular health checks.

The clinic visit is one of a series of events throughout Australia during the 2017 World Cup.

In September, Federal Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM announced that legendary Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga and other Indigenous and non-Indigenous players would become ambassadors for the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s Deadly Choices program, to extend its message across Australia.

See NACCHO Article Sep 8

“Deadly Choices is what I like to call a ‘jewel in the crown’ of Indigenous health, achieving some stunning results since it kicked off in South East Queensland four years ago.

The Deadly Kangaroos is an expansion of this program, using the star power of the ambassadors and the excitement of this year’s World Cup to reach more even communities.

Our national rugby league stars need to be in peak physical condition to play at the top of their game and we appreciate the players’ support to start discussions with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about ways to improve their health “

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said legendary Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga and other Indigenous and non-Indigenous players would become ambassadors for the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s Deadly Choices program, to extend its reach across Australia.

The launch in Canberra was attended by the NACCHO Chair Matthew Cooke (pictured on right )

Deadly Choices is a community-based healthy lifestyle campaign launched in 2013. There is particular focus on young people, as well as the importance of exercise, education, school attendance, quitting smoking, and regular preventive health checks.

Through media campaigns, sports carnivals and community events Deadly Choices has prompted:

  • almost 19,000 annual health check-ups in South East Queensland;
  • 1,155 smoke-free household pledges;
  • more than 3,300 smoker interventions; and
  • active patient numbers to triple to over 330,000 in the next few years.

Welcome comments

 

Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #TAS #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #TAS

1.1 #NACCHOagm2017 and Members’ Conference Program launched

2.NSW : Award winning Katungul Aboriginal Corporation  in new partnership with Deadly Choices

3. WA : AHCWA Gap between Indigenous and non-indigenous longevity surges in WA

4.SA: National Disability Insurance Scheme Aboriginal community consultation

5.QLD : Apunipima’s ACCHO Napranum Centre Working to National Standards

6. VIC : VACCHO : Korin Korin Balit-Djak: Aboriginal health, wellbeing and safety strategic plan 2017–2027 

7. NT: AMSANT APO NT :  Failure guaranteed if you don’t involve us, say Aboriginal organisations

8.ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter September 2017

9. Tas: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Hobart seeks OZ Day move

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 #NACCHOagm2017 and Members’ Conference Program launched

 Download the 48 Page Conference Program

NACCHO 2017 Conference Program

You can follow on Twitter , Instagram and Facebook using HASH Tag #NACCHOagm2017

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM will provided a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website

2.NSW : Award winning Katungul Aboriginal Corporation  in new partnership with Deadly Choices

It’s important to all our staff, because even though we work for the organisation, we are still community members and part of the wider family,

 All our staff have a strong investment in not only seeing Katungul succeed, but because of our long community and family history, we also have those ties with the community, so it’s not only about what’s happening now but also building a strong base for future generations.

Those historical family and cultural ties reflects our ‘Koori health in Koori hands’ philosophy.”

Katungul chief executive officer Rob Skeen said the awards had definitely been a huge boost for staff, particularly receiving the peer-to-peer recognition of both the people’s choice and NAIDOC awards

Since taking over as CEO last year, Mr Skeen has seen the number of employees grow from 30 to 56 and the health service was getting recognition for its accomplishments from a range of other services and government entities.

Katungul has won the Excellence in Business Award in the Far South Coast Regional Business Awards. This follows their recent win in the Eurobodalla Business Awards.

The Excellence in Business award recognises a business employing more than 20 people that has attained significant growth and is able to demonstrate the specific strategies and processes implemented to achieve sustainable growth over the previous 24 months.

Katungul Aboriginal Corporation provides culturally appropriate health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities on the Far South Coast of NSW. Staff are committed to providing high quality treatment and services in a culturally appropriate way.

Facilities include general practice and medical and dental clinics. Allied health programs are in place for eye health, otitis media and maternity care. There are many outreach programs available to serve the wider community.

At Katungul, they strive to work in partnership with local health services to ensure all specific medical, dental, social and emotional wellbeing needs are satisfied to a high standard.

Katungul serves communities from Eden to Batemans Bay.

Katungul will now be a finalist  in the NSW State Business Awards to be decided in Sydney in late November.

This is a significant achievement and reflects the hard work put in by all staff and the Board over the last few years.

Katungul and Deadly Choices will launch their partnership with a community day on Saturday 4 November

3. WA : AHCWA Gap between Indigenous and non-indigenous longevity surges in WA

The disparity between the life expectancy of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal West Australians has surged, bucking a national trend that shows a closing of the gap, a new report has found.
The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report, released this week, shows the life expectancy gap between indigenous and non-indigenous West Australians increased from 14.7 years to 15.1 years in men and 12.9 years to 13.5 years in women in a comparison of data between 2005-2007 and 2010-2012.
Nationally, the gap decreased from 11.4 years to 10.6 years for men and remained stable at 9.6 years to 9.5 years for women during the same period.

The figures come despite the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017: Western Australia report showing small increases in the life expectancy of indigenous males in WA from 64.5 to 65 years and indigenous females from 70 to 70.2 years between 2005–2007 and 2010–2012.

Aboriginal Health Council of WA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said despite the improvements to indigenous longevity and several other health outcomes, there was still a long way to go and health education remained a key focus.

“Positively, this report identifies several areas of improvement in Aboriginal health, including a 48% drop in deaths from circulatory diseases and five-fold increase in the rate of indigenous health checks being claimed,” Ms Nelson-Cox said.

The report showed a substantial increase in the rate of indigenous-specific health checks being claimed, rising from 42 per 1000 in 2006-07 to 254 per 1000 in 2014-15, she said.

“This is a significant move that shows health education campaigns and our commitment to making health checks more available to Aboriginal communities are having an impact,” she said.

“But we remain deeply concerned at several findings, including that the rate of indigenous women smoking during pregnancy is five times higher than non-indigenous women and the disparity in notifications for sexually transmitted infections for indigenous Australians.

“In addition, the death rates for chronic diseases are much higher for indigenous Australians than non-indigenous Australians.

“To that end, this report highlights the need for greater investment in evidence based, culturally safe, high quality responsive and accessibly primary health care for Aboriginal people in WA.

“AHCWA urgently calls on the government to provide further support to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) who continue to be the strongest, most effective means to addressing the gap in health outcomes.

“Without this investment, achieving our Closing the Gap targets will remain out of reach.”

Ms Nelson-Cox said while it was recognised that governments invested significant funding in Aboriginal health, Aboriginal community and community-controlled organisations were the most effective agencies.

There also needed to be greater transparency and accountability of other stakeholders in the sector, she said.

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) currently engaged as members.

4.SA: National Disability Insurance Scheme Aboriginal community consultation

Read over 25 NACCHO Disability NDIS articles HERE

 5.QLD : Apunipima’s ACCHO Napranum Centre Working to National Standards
 

Charkil-Om Primary Health Care Centre received AGPAL accreditation for the first time in September, just after celebrating its first birthday in August.

AGPAL (Australian General Practice Accreditation Limited) accreditation is independent recognition that a practice meets the requirements of governing industry standards which are set by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

Apunipima’s Quality and Risk Manager Roberta Newton said accreditation acknowledged the high standard of care being provided to the community by the Charkil-Om team.

‘So stringent are the AGPAL standards that many mainstream clinics need more than one go to achieve accreditation,’ she said.

‘To achieve it first time is a real coup, not only for the staff but also for our community.’

While AGPAL accreditation is not mandatory, all Apunipima primary health care centres are either accredited or working towards accreditation.

‘We wanted the community to know that their health and wellbeing is our priority,’ Roberta said.

‘By choosing to attend an accredited practice, our patients know they will get quality and safe care that meets the national standards.’

The Centre offers a full range of culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care services including doctors, nurse and maternal and child health worker supported by a range of visiting services, and is fast becoming a real hub for the community.

Charkil-Om Primary Health Care Centre manager Kelvin Coleman said the AGPAL team were impressed with both the Centre and its operation.

‘The AGPAL accreditors were particularly impressed that we were able to source full time permanent doctors and committed staff to deliver such comprehensive services in a remote area,’ he said.

“All of our staff played a valuable role in working together meet the AGPAL standards. Receiving AGPAL accreditation is an acknowledgement of the dedication, care and commitment of our staff.’

‘I am incredibly proud of what our team have achieved, not only for ourselves, but most importantly for our community.’

6. VACCHO : Korin Korin Balit-Djak: Aboriginal health, wellbeing and safety strategic plan 2017–2027 

Key messages

  • Korin Korin Balit-Djak means ‘Growing very strong’ in the Woi wurrung language. It provides an overarching framework for action to improve the health, wellbeing and safety of Aboriginal Victorians now and over the next 10 years.
  • The purpose of Korin Korin Balit-Djak is to realise the Victorian Government’s vision for ‘Self-determining, healthy and safe Aboriginal people and communities’ in Victoria.

VIEW WEBSITE HERE

Korin Korin Balit-Djak emerges at a significant time for both Aboriginal communities in Victoria and the government. It follows the government’s commitment to self-determination for Aboriginal Victorians.

The Department of Health and Human Services commissioned work that has informed both Korin Korin Balit-Djak and the discussion about Aboriginal self-determination across all areas of the Victorian Government and community. This research and discussion has underpinned a new policy platform for Aboriginal health, wellbeing and safety.

Korin Korin Balit-Djak is informed by an extensive consultation process with Aboriginal communities across Victoria, as well as a strong evidence base, including Koolin Balit evaluation findings (Victorian Government 2012). The plan details how the department will work with Aboriginal communities, community organisations, other government departments and mainstream service providers – now and into the future – to improve the health, wellbeing and safety of Aboriginal people in Victoria.

Korin Korin Balit-Djak covers five domains:

  • Aboriginal community leadership
  • prioritising Aboriginal culture and community
  • system reform across the health and human services sector
  • safe, secure, strong families and individuals
  • physically, socially and emotionally healthy Aboriginal communities.

Korin Korin Balit-Djak will be reviewed and updated every three years.

Korin Korin Balit-Djak is guided by the government’s vision to achieve optimum health, wellbeing and safety for all Victorians so they can live the life they value. It aligns with the department’s strategic directions and aspires to address, and ultimately eliminate, systemic racism within the Victorian health and human service sectors.

Digital story: Dixon Patten

Victorian Aboriginal artist Dixon Patten was commissioned by the department to produce the artwork titled Korin Korin Balit-Djak. In this video, he explains how his artwork depicts the way the department will work with Aboriginal communities to ensure the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people.

7. NT: AMSANT APO NT :  Failure guaranteed if you don’t involve us, say Aboriginal organisations

“We have been calling on the Minister for Indigenous Affairs to clarify and formalise the Community Development Program reform process since last December. Every request is met with silence,

The Prime Minister and Minister for Indigenous Affairs never tire of talking about how they want to do things with us, not to us. That they want new ways of working with Aboriginal people. Yet here is a program that affects the lives of 29,000 Indigenous people and has caused immense harm, and we still can’t get confirmation of a process that includes us,”

John Paterson CEO AMSANT spokesperson from APO NT

The Australian Government must step out from behind closed doors and involve Indigenous people in a transparent process for reforming the discriminatory remote ‘work for the dole’ scheme, the Aboriginal Peak Organisations NT (APO NT)1 urged today.

The Government committed to reviewing the program, called the ‘Community Development Program’ (CDP) and consulting with remote communities in May 2017.

Australia’s election to the world’s leading human rights body, the UN Human Rights Council, this week relied on a pledge to support the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples ‘in both word and deed’. The Declaration requires the Government to work in partnership with Aboriginal people and respect the right to self-determination.

“The Australian Government said to the world that it would tackle Indigenous disadvantage in partnership with our people. Meanwhile the Government’s racially discriminatory program results in Aboriginal people receiving more penalties than other Australians, and hurts our communities,” said Mr Paterson.

“If the Government is serious about the promises it made to get elected to the Council, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs will immediately announce an independent and transparent reform process involving a partnership with Aboriginal people,” added Mr Paterson.

APO NT launched a positive alternative to CDP in Canberra last month (APO NT alternative to CDP). Our model would create 10,500 part time jobs to be filled by people in remote communities who currently get less than the minimum wage to do work they should be employed and paid properly to do. Our model would create new jobs and enterprises, strengthen communities and get rid of pointless administration. It has incentives to encourage people into work, training and other activities, rather than punishing people who are already struggling.

David Ross from APO NT, said, “Thirty-three organisations from around Australia have endorsed our new model. We have done the work, we want to talk, and we want a program that will actually deliver positive outcomes on the ground.”

“The Australian Government appears to be unable to put the rhetoric of collaboration into practice. What do all these commitments mean if they don’t deliver a seat at the table on this fundamental issue? Let’s not repeat the mistakes of the past and impose a top-down program from Canberra that is guaranteed to fail in remote Australia,” Mr Ross concluded.

KEY FACTS ABOUT THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SCHEME

The CDP is the main program of job related assistance for unemployed people in remote areas of Australia. It is the equivalent of job active (formerly JSA) and Disability Employment Services in the rest of the country.

The CDP has around 35,000 participants, around 83% of whom are identified as Indigenous.

People with full time work capacity who are 18-49 years old must Work for the Dole, 25 hours per week, 5 days per week, at least 46 weeks per year (1150 hours per year). Under job active Work for the Dole only starts after 12 months, and then for 390-650 hours per year.

Despite having a caseload less than a 20th the size of job active, more penalties are applied to CDP participants than to jobactive participants.

In the 21 months from the start of CDP on 1 July 2015 to the end of March 2017, 299,055 financial penalties were applied to CDP participants. Over the same period, 237,333 financial penalties were applied to jobactive participants.

8.ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter September 2017

Download a PDF copy HERE

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter September 2017

9. Tas: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Hobart seeks OZ Day move

 

Welcome your comments about all these ACCHO stories

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Smoking : Features Our ACCHO Members at #OTCC2017 #Deadly good news stories #TAS #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #TAS

1.1 #NACCHOagm2017 and Members’ Conference Program launched

1.2. National : The Redfern Statement Alliance Call for Funding to be Reinstated to the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples

2. Tas: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre at #OTCC2017

3. VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service Healthy Lifestyle Team at #OTCC2017

4. NT : Miwatj AMS Arnhem Land and Congress at #OTCC2017

5.QLD : Deadly Choices at @OTCC2017

6 SA : AHCSA and Quitline at #OTCC2017

7.WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service ‘you CAN quit’ film project 

8. ACT/NSW  :Tom Calma Don’t Make Smokes Your Story

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 #NACCHOagm2017 and Members’ Conference Program launched

 Download the 48 Page Conference Program

NACCHO 2017 Conference Program

You can follow on Twitter , Instagram and Facebook using HASH Tag #NACCHOagm2017

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM will provided a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website

1.2. National : The Redfern Statement Alliance Call for Funding to be Reinstated to the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples .

“We need to reset the relationship by supporting the operations of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples.”

Pat Turner, NACCHO CEO said a positive step is needed (Pictured above at Redfern Statement launch June 2016)

See Redfern Statement Update NACCHO Aboriginal Health Priorities : 1st Anniversary of the #Redfernstatement

On the eve that the Australian Government has secured a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council, the Redfern Statement Alliance Leaders met to discuss its relationship with the Australian Government.

Securing this position to the UN Council does not reflect the relationship this Government has with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

In 2008 there was bi-partisan support for the National Congress as an elected voice of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

Co-Chair Jackie Huggins said, “National Congress is an elected body with more members than some of the major political parties. Although our relationship has improved with Government, it has been through minor contract work and is ineffective.”

Co-Chair Rod Little said, “National Congress is strongly committed to the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

We have consistently called on the Australian Government to honour its commitment and not just sit idly on the UN Human Rights Council when our people are suffering.”

The recent UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous People’s report delivered a verdict to the Australian Government on the status of Aboriginal Australia and called for the reinstatement of funds to the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples.

The Redfern Statement Alliance Leaders call on Prime Minister Turnbull to seize the opportunity to do the right thing and invest in the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples as a lead Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisation.

Australia is now going to be overseeing the human rights records of other nations whilst serious human rights violations are being committed against our people daily.

2. Tas: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre at #OTCC2017

Here’s Tina Goodwin, TAC tobacco worker, on stage at the Oceania Tobacco Control Conference is Tasmania this week with Hone Harawura.

Tina announced Hone as the winner of the Tariana Turia award which recognises significant contributions to Indigenous tobacco control.

Hone has worked as a community activist and parliamentarian on many issues of importance to Maori. He wants to see tobacco companies sued for all of the death and destruction they cause to Maori, Aboriginal and other Indigenous communities.

Hone’s words: “Those bastards (Big Tobacco) are making people addicted and they are killing our people. Let’s sue them!”Anyone want to help with the legal case? Pictured below with Tom Calma

3. VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service Healthy Lifestyle Team at #OTCC2017

Representing Deadly Dan and ready to take on day 1 of the Oceania Tobacco Control Conference 2017 in Hobart.

Very excited to hear from our friends in other Tackling Indigenous Smoking Teams and mainstream organisations from Aus, NZ and Pacific Islands today.

Learning about the progress and challenges as we aim for a Tobacco Free Pacific by 2025!

 

The team exploring kunanyi this morning. Checking out the view and getting our 30 minutes of exercise in before day 2 of the Oceania Tobacco Control Conference.

Having a great time. Loving learning about the rich Aboriginal history of this area and meeting other passionate like minded health professionals.

If you can’t tell from our faces it was very cold at the top!

#otcc2017#kunanyi#hobart#vahsHLT#StaySmokeFree

4. NT : Miwatj AMS Arnhem Land and Congress at #OTCC2017

5.QLD : Deadly Choices at @OTCC2017

6 SA : AHCSA and Quitline at #OTCC2017

7.WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service ‘you CAN quit’ film project ( Note not at #OTCC2017)

Young people in four remote communities in Western Australia’s East Pilbara — where up to 80 percent of community members smoke — have joined forces with filmmakers on a campaign to urge people to give up the deadly habit.

From NIT

The youngsters from Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji in WA are shedding light on the personal stories of local smokers to warn about the dangerous habit in a series of short films.

Fifteen-year-old Clintesha Samson, who was involved in the films and doesn’t smoke, said she would like to see people in her community stop for the sake of their health.

She said she thought film was a good way to get the message across.

The series of films are part of a ‘you CAN quit’ project that has documented the stories of community members who have kicked the habit and those who have been affected by smoking-related illnesses.

The project was organised by Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking team.

The young people involved were responsible for researching, shooting, editing and promoting the films.

Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service regional tobacco coordinator Danika Tager said smoking rates in the East Pilbara were high and more needed to be done to support communities to address tobacco addiction.

“Smoking rates in remote East Pilbara communities are as high as 80 percent and tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death and disease in this population,” Ms Tager said.

“Through this important film project we hope to encourage people in these communities to quit smoking, as well as air the many benefits of quitting and where they can find help and support.”

The films are being shown in communities and also aired on TV and social media.

The Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service is a community-controlled health organisation that provides primary health care, 24-hour emergency services and preventative health and education programs in the communities of Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji.

8. ACT/NSW Tom Calma Don’t Make Smokes Your Story

Download the evaluation report

Evaluation-Report_National-Tobacco-Campaign-Indigenous

Aboriginal Maternity Health Program : #CATSINaM17 @IUIH_ Million-dollar boost for groundbreaking #Indigenous maternity program

“It is informed by Indigenous knowledge and community control with a redesigned health service to provide 24/7 continuity of midwifery care and birthing in an Indigenous birth centre,

“With Indigenous leadership and a team with expertise in Indigenous health and research we can translate what we know works in other settings, and other countries, into practice here in Australia.”

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health CEO Adrian Carson said a key component of the project was the Indigenous control and governance of services.

A maternity program designed to achieve better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their babies has received a $1.1 million grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).

The project, led by The University of Queensland’s Professor Sue Kildea and researchers from the University of Sydney and the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, will implement Birthing on Country on a number of sites with a view to an Australia-wide roll out.

The NHMRC grant will help determine the sustainability of a Birthing on Country service model in each community, along with the impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, their communities and health services.

“The Birthing On Country program has a strong emphasis on culturally and clinically safe care, strengthened support for families, growing a culturally capable workforce and the Indigenous maternal and infant workforce,” Professor Kildea said.

“This program focuses on the year before and the year after birth, as the most important time in life.

“It also allows us to review the effect on three of the most costly health outcomes across the lifespan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: preterm birth, low birth weight and hospital admissions in the first year of life.”

Professor Kildea said the project team was calling on all Australian governments and health organisations to work with them to implement Birthing On Country programs.

“After two decades of research, including consultation with Indigenous elders and communities, we can now enact State and Federal health policy and put into practice national and international evidence of the safety, benefits and cost-effectiveness of culturally safe care,” she said.

“With Indigenous leadership and a team with a wealth of cross-disciplinary expertise in Indigenous and health services, we can translate what we know works in other settings and other countries into practice here in Australia.”

The project, entitled ‘Building on Our Strengths (BOOSt): Developing and Evaluating Birthing On Country Primary Maternity Units’, also includes the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service (ATSICHS) Brisbane, the Waminda South Coast Women’s Health and Welfare Aboriginal Corporation, the Australian College of Midwives, the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives, and the Rhodanthe Lipsett Indigenous Midwifery Charitable Fund.

The NHMRC grant builds on previous funding from the Ian Potter Foundation in Melbourne, the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, ATSICHS Brisbane, the Mater Health Service, Queensland Health and an earlier NHMRC grant.