NACCHO Affiliate and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : #National #ClosingtheGap #HaveYourSay #NSW Tharawal @ahmrc #VIC @VAHS1972 #QLD @Apunipima 25 yrs @QAIHC_QLD #NT @CAACongress #WA Bega #ACT @nimmityjah #Tas

1.1 National : Our Coalition of Peaks #HaveYourSay survey on Closing the Gap sent to hundreds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled organisations and their networks, inviting responses from both individuals and organisations.

1.2 National : A trial at 22 Aboriginal health centres around the country is hoping to improve quality of life for Aboriginal people living with chronic disease.

2.1 NSW : Matthew James from Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation has written an insightful article on Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing in an Australian urban community. 

2.2 NSW : AHandMRC and Hitnet Community Hubs provide connection and access to information for difficult-to-reach and digitally excluded populations across Australia.

2.3 NSW : Aboriginal patient experience : BHI and the Centre for Aboriginal Health are working together to collect the experiences and outcomes of care for Aboriginal people admitted to NSW public hospitals

3.VIC : VAHS encourages seniors /elders to get active and have fun with their Senior Games 

4.1 QLD : This week the Cape York mob celebrate 25 years since Apunipima Cape York Health Council emerged from a health conference held at Pajinka Wilderness Lodge, near Injinoo, in 1994.

4.2 QLD : Nominations for the 2019 QAIHC Awards for Excellence are open!

5.WA : Bega Garnbirringu Health Service receives a $3.5 million grant to help fund a new multi-storey social service and training facility
7. NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs promotes 9th day of the 9th month which is International FASD awareness day!

8. ACT : Winnunuga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and community Services #Historymaking turning of the soil for new ACCHO Medical Centre 

9. Tas : Tasmanian Government signs the Closing the Gap Partnership Agreement between the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies and the Council of Australian Governments

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Our Coalition of Peaks #HaveYourSay survey on Closing the Gap sent to hundreds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled organisations and their networks, inviting responses from both individuals and organisations.

There is a discussion booklet that has background information on Closing the Gap and sets out what will be talked about in the survey.

The survey will take a little bit of time to complete. It would be great if you can answer all the questions, but you can also just focus on the issues that you care about most.

To help you prepare your answers, you can look at a full copy here

The survey is open to everyone and can be accessed here:

https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/coalition-of-peaks/have-your-say/

1.2 National : A trial at 22 Aboriginal health centres around the country is hoping to improve quality of life for Aboriginal people living with chronic disease.

Under the trial, patients receive one-on-one education and care by specialised pharmacists working in the centres.

Pharmacist Angela Madden says people need to understand their medications or they stop taking them.

We also hear from Lorraine and Margaret who are experiencing the benefits of the program.

Listen to the ABC Radio National Life Matters Interview HERE

Learn more how NACCHO is involved in the oversight and management of several projects and programs related to medicines and pharmacy. NACCHO also provides national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander medicines policy leadership.

See NACCHO Website 

2.1 NSW : Matthew James from Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation has written an insightful article on Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing in an Australian urban community. 

 

Tharawal Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS) is based in Airds, NSW and celebrated its 35th year of operation in 2018.

Tharawal AMS provides healthcare, social and cultural support services to Indigenous Australians across South West Sydney. Tharawal AMS is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (ACCHO), independent of the Government, Primary Health Networks (PHNs) and independent of but aligned in principle to other AMSs across Australia.

The Byala team, Byala meaning ‘lets talk’ in the local Dhawaral People’s dialect, is a multi-disciplinary team made up of 7 staff. The team is led by a Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (MHNP) and includes an Aboriginal Mental Health Worker, Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Worker, Aboriginal Youth Worker and a Psychologist. Access to a second Psychologist for 2 days of the week and a Child Psychologist 1 day a week.

The Byala team provides direct service to Indigenous Australians aged 5 years and older.  Services are delivered in a number of modes including individual and group, office-based and outreach (including hospital visits, home visits, school visits and other service visits). To meet the needs of our target community both appointment-based and walk-in clinics are offered. 71% of the Byala team are Aboriginal.

The success of the Byala team is grounded in the fact that Tharawal AMS is a community controlled and run organisation for the local Aboriginal Community by the local Aboriginal Community that places equal importance on the complementary role of clinical and cultural staff. We are a service run by the Community we serve and accountable to the Community we serve.

See full article HERE

2.2 NSW : AHandMRC and Hitnet Community Hubs provide connection and access to information for difficult-to-reach and digitally excluded populations across Australia.

Armidale 

The Hubs enable people to connect to online services, access and share culturally appropriate health and social information.

Hitnet was first utilised by the AH&MRC as a practical tool for services to use through the Head Lice project, whereby relevant content central to the project was loaded onto the Hub and placed in the local AMS for the community to engage with. The local AMS in question has a range of projects and activities which they are enthusiastic to promote to their community through Hitnet. Another Member Service saw the value of Hitnet and included it in a funding grant application. This specific Member was successful in their application and was able to purchase a Hub for their service.

The AH&MRC engages with our Members and their communities in meaningful ways. Through a range of face-to-face, online, workshops, training and collaborations initiatives, we aim to communicate, educate and promote Aboriginal health. These are proven and effective means to connect with and learn from our Members.

Hitnet fulfils a service need of sharing locally generated content and key public health messages with Members, their staff and the wider community. The Hubs offer an effective method for engaging with the community and sharing important educational material in a timely, culturally safe and innovative way.

Each Hitnet Hub is used on average 1,000 times per year, representing purposeful interactions. Hitnet is essentially a one-stop-shop for all health promotion content. The team at Hitnet provide 3 monthly reports which provide reach and engagement metrics for their Hubs. This data can help to assess individual community needs and guide the development of health programs.

The AH&MRC have been able to purchase Hitnet Hubs for Orange Aboriginal Medical Service, Tamworth Aboriginal Medical Service, Pat Dixon Medical Centre, and Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation. (Pictured above )

Hitnet Hubs have enabled Member Services to access culturally appropriate health promotion resources and online services.

2.3 NSW : Aboriginal patient experience : BHI and the Centre for Aboriginal Health are working together to collect the experiences and outcomes of care for Aboriginal people admitted to NSW public hospitals.

For the first time, every adult patient who identifies as Aboriginal will be invited to provide feedback on their admitted patient or maternity care experience during 2019.

The Adult Admitted Patient Survey asks Aboriginal people who have recently been admitted to a NSW public hospital for feedback about their experiences of care. This survey is mailed out to people about three months after the end of their hospital stay.

The Maternity Care Survey asks Aboriginal women who recently gave birth in a NSW public hospital about the care they received. This survey is mailed out to women about three months after their baby is delivered.

The results of these surveys will provide hospitals with valuable information about what they are doing well and where they can improve care to better meet the needs of Aboriginal people.

Promotional materials are available to help increase awareness of the survey program among Aboriginal people and to encourage them to respond when they receive a questionnaire. These materials can be accessed below, or alternatively, please contact us to request printed copies.

BHI published a Snapshot report, Aboriginal people’s experiences of hospital care, in July 2019 which highlights key findings at a statewide level for 459 Aboriginal people who shared their experiences of care in the Emergency Department Patient Survey 2017–18 and 550 Aboriginal people who shared their experiences of care in the Adult Admitted Patient Survey 2017.

BHI previously published a Patient Perspectives report on the experiences of care for Aboriginal people, which drew on data from almost 2,700 Aboriginal patients who were admitted to a NSW public hospital in 2014.

Healthcare in Focus 2017 examined healthcare in the context of three important dimensions of performance – accessibility, appropriateness and effectiveness – for more than 60 measures. One third of these measures related to the experiences and outcomes of Aboriginal people.

To find out about upcoming releases of survey results that reflect the experiences of Aboriginal people, please refer to our Reports Plan.

See Website HERE

3.VIC : VAHS encourages seniors /elders to get active and have fun with their Senior Games 


Seniors games is every Wednesday 11am-2pm at 2 Wright Street in Reservoir so feel free to come join in the fun. The group love to have new additions and competitors for the teams.

4.1 QLD : This week the Cape York mob celebrate 25 years since Apunipima Cape York Health Council emerged from a health conference held at Pajinka Wilderness Lodge, near Injinoo, in 1994.

Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima) is celebrating their 25th Anniversary this week. On 14th September 1994 Apunipima was established as a health advocacy organisation. The Cape York Land Council held a Health Summit t Pajinka Lodge, near Injanoo at the tip of Cape York.

The summit, attended by Traditional Owners, Elders and Community health leaders of 17 Cape York communities, included a key focus to address the worsening health outcomes of Cape York’s Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders.

From these humble beginnings, Apunipima has grown from an initial membership base of 34 to almost 1000 in 2019.

From an advocacy beginning, today Apunipima delivers comprehensive primary health care services across 11 Cape York communities and covers the largest geographical area of any Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation in Queensland. Apunipima is a significant employer in Cape York with 30% of our team being made up of community-based employees.

Apunipima employs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioners, Health Workers, outreach Midwives, Allied Health professionals, a paediatrician and numerous GPs.

Aileen Addo, Apunipima’s Board Chair said, ‘This milestone is a great opportunity for us to acknowledge and reflect on how far our organisation has come, and also how much more work with the people of Cape York is needed to improve our health.’

Over 25 years, Apunipima’s model of care has improved health outcomes for the people on the Cape – from closing the gap on life expectancy to dramatic improvements in infant mortality. Apunipima is committed to expand and enhance their services to deliver greater health and wellness improvements across the Cape.

4.2 QLD : Nominations for the 2019 QAIHC Awards for Excellence are open!

The Awards provide a platform to recognise the outstanding achievements of individuals and organisations within the Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Sector.

Award nominations are only open to QAIHC Member Services.

Find out more at https://qaihc.eventsair.com/2019-qaihc-awards/.

5.WA : Bega Garnbirringu Health Service receives a $3.5 million grant to help fund a new multi-storey social service and training facility

Kalgoorlie-Boulder’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practice this week received a $3.5 million grant to help fund a new multi-storey social service and training facility on MacDonald Street.

State Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt on Monday presented a Lotterywest cheque to Bega Garnbirringu Health Service when he met staff and board members to discuss the work the centre was doing in the region.

The funding covers about one third of the estimated $10 million project, with the proposed facility to feature a culturally appropriate training area, youth spaces, large rooms for community information and recreation sessions, rooms for family meetings and culturally appropriate counselling, and an administration area for the management of Bega’s social and wellbeing services. The new facility will also allow Bega to grow its current team of about 110 staff members to more than 150 in the future.

Bega chief executive Clive Holt said there was a high demand for both the centre’s clinical and social services, and the new facility would better equip staff to meet the needs of the Goldfields’ indigenous community.

“This funding means we can redevelop our existing ageing physical infrastructure to a point that we can accommodate our workforce, not only today, but going into the future,” he said.

“The last financial year we did just over 15,000 consultations so I think when you look at those sorts of numbers, there is clearly a demand for our services.”

Mr Holt said the new facility would also allow Bega to expand its range of services in areas including emergency relief, senior support, health promotion and suicide prevention.

“The client numbers continually increase so there is increasing demand for our current services, but we also are under pressure to provide an increased scope of services to the community,” he said.

“There is a massive focus on mental health at the moment and we are seeing more and more demand and we need to be in a position where we can meet that demand in the future.”

Bega will work with architects to develop a final design for the facility, with Mr Holt hoping the project will be complete within 18 to 24 months.

7. NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs promotes 9th day of the 9th month which is International FASD awareness day!

To mark the day Congress hosted a brunch this morning at our Gap Clinic .

Visitors grabbed something to eat and found out about FASD.

Fetal Alcohol Sprectrum Disorder is the most common preventable disability, and preventing #FASD is a whole-of-community responsibility. Mothers never intentionally put their children at risk.

If you or anyone you know is pregnant, planning to be pregnant or might be pregnant, remember:

“NO alcohol is best for Dad, Mum and Bub”

8.ACT : The recent turning of the soil ceremony marks the start of the build of Winnunga’s brand new health facility with funding provided by the ACT Government.

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services is an Indigenous-led health care facility that provides culturally safe, holistic health care services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Canberra and the surrounding regions.

‘The new build for Winnunga Nimmityjah Health and Community Services is a wonderful example of ACT Government’s support for self-determination of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services,’ said Nikki Gotovac, Director of ACT Health Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Partnerships Team.

‘We recognise the experience and expertise of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to run their own services. The funding will allow Winnunga to determine how to use the grant to best fit the needs of the community’.

Construction on the new facility is expected to start shortly and will be completed towards the end of 2020.

For further information on the range of health services and programs provided by Winnunga, visit www.winnunga.org.au

9. Tas : Tasmanian Government signs the Closing the Gap Partnership Agreement between the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies and the Council of Australian Governments.

Roger Jaensch,Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

Another step has been taken towards improving outcomes for Tasmanian Aboriginal communities, with the Tasmanian Government signing the Closing the Gap Partnership Agreement between the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies and the Council of Australian Governments.

This historic agreement ensures the equal participation and shared decision making by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on Closing the Gap.

Since coming to Government in 2014, the Hodgman majority Liberal Government has led the journey of reconciliation to re-set the relationship with Tasmanian Aboriginal communities.

Aboriginal people are now recognised in the Tasmanian Constitution as Tasmania’s first people, we have updated the Aboriginal and Dual Naming Policy to improve inclusivity and we have strengthened the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1975.

Last year, the Premier committed to delivering the next phase, guided by the principles of empowerment and self-determination, to deliver a community-led strengths-based strategy that enables Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to thrive.

This is in stark contrast to the Labor party, who continue to shout from the sidelines, not willing to put in the work to deliver what really matters to Tasmanians.

The Hodgman majority Liberal Government will work closely with all Tasmanian Aboriginal communities to ensure everyone is able to have their say as we deliver a shared purpose – one that recognises Aboriginal heritage and culture, and one that points to a brighter future for our First People.

NACCHO Affiliate and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : #National @NACCHOChair @HealthJusticeAu #NSW @ahmrc @IAHA_National @Galambila #VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @QAIHC_QLD #SA @Nganampa_Health #WA @TheAHCWA #NT @DanilaDilba #ACT @WinnungaACCHO

1.1 National : NACCHO Aboriginal Men’s Health Ochre Day in Melbourne inspires over 200 delegates

1.2 National : NACCHO Acting Chair Donnella Mills to be keynote speaker at Health Justice Conference in Sydney 

1.3 National : The winner of the Puggy Hunter Scholarship, worth up to $15,000 a year announced

2.1 NSW : AH&MRC alongside the Australian Digital Health Agency produce booklet to provide key information to the community about the My Health Record and how to use it

2. 2 NSW : Graduate Rachel Williams now at Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, where her skills and connection to the community are crucial in providing dental care for local Aboriginal people.

2.3 NSW : For Women’s Health Week Galambila these are some of the amazing women on the Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour team 

2.4 NSW : IAHA supports in principle the NSW Auditor-General’s recommendations; particularly the focus on finalising an Aboriginal mental health policy

3.VIC: VACCHO Acting CEO Trevor Pearce sets the scene at NACCHO OCHRE Day Men’s Health Conference Melbourne around issues important for our Victorian men.

4. QLD : QAIHC Sector Leader online Magazine features Lizzie Adams, the dedicated CEO of Goolburri Aboriginal Health talks about need to invest in young people 

5.SA : Nganampa Health Council partnership targeted the availability, affordability, accessibility and promotion of healthy food in remote communities 

6. WA : AHCWA’s TIS team and QALT project officers are currently attend the WA TIS Workforce Development Program.

7. NT : AMSANT reports staff from 3 of their NT ACCHO’s feature in NT 2019 Health Professional of the Year Awards

8. ACT : Winnunuga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and community Services #Historymaking turning of the soil today at 10.30 am

9.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre Registered Training Organisation short-listed for 4 awards

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : NACCHO Aboriginal Men’s Health Ochre Day in Melbourne inspires over 200 delegates

“ NACCHO Ochre Day is an important event that reflects on the social and emotional issues our men face and are less likely to seek help for themselves. It is a great platform to hear stories of hope and empowerment and to learn what is working in our communities – of strategies that are successful for our men to take better care of their health and wellbeing.

This year’s conference saw great participation from all 200 delegates who embraced the three focus areas of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men being in control, innovative and influential.

 Problems were met with solutions, with many delegates taking home new skills and knowledge to face the challenges in improving the health of men in their communities.”

NACCHO’s commitment is to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males to live longer, healthier lives and reduce the rate of preventable hospitalisations, which is almost three times higher than for other Australian men.”

Mr John Paterson, CEO of Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) and spokesperson for NACCHO said in his opening address at the seventh annual Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference over August 29-30 at Pullman On the Park, Melbourne : Hosted by VACCHO

Read full NACCHO Press Release and report HERE

Read John Paterson’s keynote speech HERE

1.2 National : NACCHO Acting Chair Donnella Mills to be keynote speaker at Health Justice Conference in Sydney 

 

Do you work in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisation or with First Nations communities?

Do you recognise complexity and wonder how to help people with multiple, intersecting need?

Then Health Justice 2019 is for you!

Over 24-25 September in Sydney, this highly engaging program will bring together everyone working at the intersections of legal, health and social need: practitioners, researchers, policy-makers, funders and community members; across disciplines, services, systems and communities.

A fresh approach to conferencing, Health Justice 2019 is less about talking heads and more about opportunities to learn, share and collaborate.

Sessions of particular interest to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and services include:

  • Keynotes from Donnella Mills and Eddie Cubillo, reflecting on their experiences as leaders in Aboriginal community controlled health and legal services and advocating to improve health in their communities
  • Alistair Fergsuon and other voices from collective impact approaches placing communities at the heart and head of responses to increasing social disadvantage, rising crime and community safety fears
  • Roundtable discussion about health justice partnerships and how they are responding to complex and intersecting need
  • Panels and workshops exploring the social determinants of health and how we define outcomes around what communities want
  • Showcasing organisational approaches to improve workforce resilience and targeted workshops to build strategies to support practitioner wellbeing.

Join us to share your insights and be part of the conversation to set new directions for people with intersecting health, social and legal needs and the services that support them.

Registration includes access to highly targeted workshops building capability to work in partnership and to tell the stories about what you do and why it matters.

Visit the conference website to see the full program and register here:healthjustice2019.org/register.

1.3 National : The winner of the Puggy Hunter Scholarship, worth up to $15,000 a year announced 

Shania Charvat was in a tutoring session on campus when she received a call from someone sending her a well-timed lifeline for uni. And the first thing she did was hang up on them.

She laughs she saw the unknown interstate number and assumed “they were trying to sell me a vacuum cleaner or something”. Shania called back three hours later to learn she’d been awarded the national Puggy Hunter Scholarship, worth up to $15,000 a year.

The Australian Government established the scheme as a tribute to the late Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s outstanding contribution to Indigenous Australians’ health and his role as chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.  (1991-2001 )

The scholarship is awarded to an Indigenous student in a health-related discipline.

The Bendigo Bachelor of Human Services/Master of Social Work student and Palawa woman says she can’t put into words how much it means to be a 2019 recipient.

“At the time they called I had $9 in my bank account to last me two weeks, and I thought, how am I going to do this? I sobbed on the phone and said, this is lifechanging for me,” Shania says.

“I’ve never been in the situation where I considered leaving university but weeks before the call I started thinking I’d have to go and earn some money before I could continue the course. The scholarship means I can stay at uni and I can get my degree.”

Shania is in the second year of her four-year course. She came to La Trobe straight after finishing VCE at Bendigo Senior Secondary College to study a Diploma of Health Sciences, planning to eventually become a nurse like her grandmother.

“But I found I really loved learning about psychology,” she says. “It was just so interesting to me and I couldn’t put my text books down, which was a first because I’m dyslexic.

“My lecturers recommended I do psychology or social work. I chose social work and I haven’t looked back since.”

After graduating from the Bendigo course Shania hopes to work with young people in prison.

“I want to show them that prison may be where they’re at now, but it’s not going to be their life, we can change it.”

She’s the first person in her family to go to university, but certainly not the last. Shania’s mum, Sam, now studies Education at the Bendigo Campus, her sister Michellie is here completing a Bachelor of Creative Arts, and her younger sister, Takeetah, plans to pursue her love of sociology here next year.

2.1 NSW : AH&MRC alongside the Australian Digital Health Agency produce booklet to provide key information to the community about the My Health Record and how to use it

Check out this great resource for adults: The My Health Record Storybook.

This little booklet was designed by the AH&MRC alongside the Australian Digital Health Agency to provide key information to the community about the My Health Record and how to use it. There is also one for Youth and Parent/Carer/Guardian’s.

To have a read of the storybook, click on the link :

2. 2 NSW : Graduate Rachel Williams now at Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, where her skills and connection to the community are crucial in providing dental care for local Aboriginal people.

Less than three months after she completed her degree, Rachel Williams started work as an oral health therapist in Inverell, not far from her hometown of Glen Innes. Williams is a Ngemba woman working at the Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, where her skills and connection to the community are crucial in providing dental care for local Aboriginal people.

For many of the people she treats, the nearest specialists are a two‑and-a-half hour drive away. “So we do as much as we can here, rather than just referring it on to someone else.”

Four years ago, Williams received the Rotary Aboriginal Oral Health Scholarship. The scholarship was created in partnership with the University’s Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, established thanks to a $10 million donation from Greg Poche and Kay Van Norton Poche.

It helped her to achieve certificate qualifications as a dental assistant. Afterwards, she began a dental assistant traineeship in Inverell, but dreamed of taking her studies further with a Bachelor of Oral Health.

Again, a scholarship provided crucial support. She completed the degree with support from the Dr Lawrence F Smith Scholarship for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students in Dentistry. “Moving so far from my family and friends, leaving my job and relocating to Sydney was challenging,” she says. “The scholarship was invaluable in helping me adapt.

“Being able to help people in my community, to help close the health gap for Aboriginal people in rural areas, it’s something I have always wanted to do.”

2.3 NSW : For Women’s Health Week Galambila these are some of the amazing women on the Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour team 

2.4 NSW : IAHA supports in principle the NSW Auditor-General’s recommendations; particularly the focus on finalising an Aboriginal mental health policy

IAHA encourage investment in Aboriginal-led, community controlled mental health and social emotional wellbeing services for long-term solutions; based on a strong commitment and a future of our own design”

Nicole Turner, Chairperson of IAHA .IAHA contributes significantly to the national dialogue on health and wellbeing access, equity and solutions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

IAHA supports in principle the Auditor-General’s recommendations; particularly the focus on finalising an Aboriginal mental health policy framework which includes ‘actions to increase the numbers and types of Aboriginal workers across all levels and positions in the mental health workforce.’

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), the national organisation for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce, welcomes the report from Margaret Crawford, New South Wales Auditor-General.

IAHA contributes significantly to the national dialogue on health and wellbeing access, equity and solutions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.  IAHA supports in principle the Auditor-General’s recommendations; particularly the focus on finalising an Aboriginal mental health policy framework which includes ‘actions to increase the numbers and types of Aboriginal workers across all levels and positions in the mental health workforce.’

IAHA CEO Donna Murray said that, “while there have been improvements in the mental health context for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in NSW, significant work still needs to be done.  Increasing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representation in the health and wellbeing workforce at all levels is a critical step towards this.”

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce brings solid returns on many fronts, they have the knowledge and the specialist skills to be part of the sustainable solution going forward.  As an extension of the recommendations around the Aboriginal health workforce, IAHA contends that – consideration of training pathways, retention, supervisory supports and employment priorities is essential for sustainable and long-term change.

The Audit states, “NSW Health provides some funding to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to provide mental health services. These non-government organisations have the cultural and clinical capability to support Aboriginal patients with complex mental health needs, but most advise that they lack the level of staffing and resources to meet community demand,” evidences the need to develop, support and promote the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

3.1 VIC: VACCHO Acting CEO Trevor Pearce sets the scene at NACCHO OCHRE Day Men’s Health Conference Melbourne around issues important for our Victorian men.

Did you know that our ACCOs serve 7000 fellas throughout Victoria and yet they are still over represented in almost every negative health statistic?

More work to do but we’re still here, and still pushing!

If your wondering who those fellas are up on the screen it’s Wayne Tanner, John Nikkelson and Uncle Barry Fary from Bendigo & District Aboriginal Co-Operative in their awesome men’s shed when we went up for a visit (and seriously – that shed rocks!).

4.1 QLD : QAIHC Sector Leader online Magazine features Lizzie Adams, the dedicated CEO of Goolburri Aboriginal Health talks about need to invest in young people 

This edition features Lizzie Adams, the dedicated CEO of Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co. We hear about the changes she’s seen during her time in the Sector and why it’s important to invest in our young people.

Read it now at https://www.qaihc.com.au/publications/sector-leader-magazine

Every year, during the Ochre Day conference, NACCHO hosts a memorial dinner in honour of Jaydon Adams, a young leader whose contribution to youth participation in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health lives on.

See the Foundation Website 

The winner of the 2019 Jaydon Adams Memorial Award was Nathan Taylor from Dandenong and District Aborigines Co-operative Ltd. Pictured here on right with Mark and Lizzie Adams

Nathan was recognised for his exemplary work as an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth worker

Nathan Taylor is employed as a Youth Worker at DDACL. In his role he comes into contact with many Aboriginal young people and is always caring about what they are doing and their health and their current situation. He shows exemplary care and concern for his fellow Koori (male or female) and advocates on their behalf with various providers, especially within our organisation.

Nathan Taylor is always concerned about better health for Aboriginal young people. He has been integrally involved in a good health program for young people early in the morning before school. He arranges to pick them up, gets them to a basketball facility and puts them through their paces, then they get ready and changed and have breakfast. He then drops them off at school.

5 SA : Nganampa Health Council partnership targeted the availability, affordability, accessibility and promotion of healthy food in remote communities 

The 12-month project by Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (NPY) Women’s Council, Nganampa Health Council, Mai Wiru Regional Stores Aboriginal Corporation and the Prevention Centre targeted the availability, affordability, accessibility and promotion of healthy food.

Originally published HERE

Project researcher Professor Amanda Lee said previous research showed that the turnover of foods in what is usually the single store in remote Aboriginal communities was a good indicator of peoples’ dietary intakes, as validated against objective biomedical data. The results of this study also provide insights into broader nutrition issues affecting other Aboriginal communities and wider Australia.

“We have been assessing food security and dietary intake metrics to inform interventions on the APY Lands since 1986 and, despite everyone’s efforts, nutrition and diet-related health had been getting worse,” Professor Lee said.

“But since the communities introduced this concerted intervention in 2018, the stores we worked with have improved the number, range, quality and relative price of fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meats and wholegrain cereals, improved product placement and promotion, and provided healthy takeaways, to help make healthier choices the easiest choices.”

The research team worked with Mai Wiru Regional Stores and the communities to strengthen their store nutrition policy.

Project officer Rhiannon Hutchinson, a trained nutritionist, also worked with members of two specific communities, implementing a range of community-led interventions to increase demand for healthy food. This involved responding to any requests to help improve nutrition, including cooking, product demonstrations, budgeting, sessions for children and young people, recipe development and ‘bush picnics’.

She also worked closely with store managers to help implement the revised Mai Wiru store nutrition policy in these two communities, in a step-wise approach.

Multiple evaluation methods included assessment of store sales data, costs/affordability using the Healthy Diets ASAP (Australian Standardised Affordability and Pricing) methods, and store nutrition policy compliance. Non-intervention communities functioned as staged controls.

Importantly, the project took a strengths-based approach and built on traditional food knowledge. The main dietary message was to “eat store foods that are most like traditional bush foods”. All organisations worked with the communities to improve capacity, build on traditional nutrition knowledge and skills and build community demand for healthy foods.

During the intervention:

  • Improvement in food security metrics were more marked in the stores in the two intervention communities where scores for product availability, product placement, and promotion increased respectively from 80% to 98%, from 64% to 92%, and from 54% to 100%.
  • Improvement in diet was most marked in the community (Pipalyatjara) where both food supply and food demand strategies were in place the longest; the intake of fruit doubled (from 39g to 79g per person/day), the intake of vegetables increased (from 109g to 133g per person/day) and the intake of sugary drinks decreased by 5%. Reliance on bread as the main dietary source of energy decreased by 20%, suggesting less food stress.
  • The average proportion of energy derived from unhealthy (discretionary) foods and drinks from all stores assessed was stable at 45% (compared to around 37% for non-Indigenous communities). However, at Pipalyatjara, the proportion of energy derived from unhealthy foods decreased to 39%.
  • A healthy diet on the APY Lands became more affordable than an unhealthy diet, costing 15% less; the cost of fruit and vegetables was only 6% higher than in Alice Springs. Over the year, on the APY Lands, the cost of a healthy diet increased by about 2% and the cost of an unhealthy diet increased by 5%. In comparison, in Alice Springs the cost of a healthy diet increased by 7%, while the cost of an unhealthy diet increased by 5%.

The project was funded by the Medical Research Future Fund to address Aboriginal food security and dietary intake. Lack of food security – when all people, at all times, have physical, economic and social access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life – is still a significant contributor to poor health in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Professor Lee said the project confirmed that multi-strategy, community-lead nutrition projects focusing on both supply and demand could improve Aboriginal food security and diet rapidly and should be implemented nationally at scale.

“The stores in the two intervention communities now score almost 100% against all the metrics assessed. For example, they have moved sugary drinks fridges to the rear of the store, no longer stock large sizes of sugary drinks, and cross-subsidise the price of healthy choices, such as fresh produce, lean meats and water.

“The key was to work collaboratively to strengthen the store nutrition policy, monitor implementation regularly, feed results back to the communities, and support community demand for healthier options,” she said.

Working with remote communities who can intervene in their food system in a more contained manner than in less isolated communities has resulted in findings that can be applied more broadly to other Aboriginal communities and wider Australia.

For example, the project has shown that there is a direct relationship between product placement and promotion in food outlets and dietary intake. Results reinforce the notion that policy regulation and market intervention are required to improve food security and diet.

6. WA : AHCWA’s TIS team and QALT project officers are currently attend the WA TIS Workforce Development Program.


The National Best Practice Unit for Tackling Indigenous Smoking is hosted the 2-day workshop at the Rendezvous Hotel in Scarborough.

Picture above : AHCWA TIS and QALT project officers with Greg Hire formally from the Perth Wildcats after he presented on the ‘A Stitch in Time’ organisation. Greg founded the organisation in 2014 which aims to provide programs for youth, aged 12-25 in the Perth Metro and Regional communities.

7. NT : AMSANT reports staff from 3 of their NT ACCHO’s feature in NT 2019 Health Professional of the Year Awards

Congratulations to the winners of the 2019 Health Professional of the Year Awards!

Rebecca Earle, James Arratta, Rrapa Dhurrkay, Dr Meredith Hansen-Knarhoi and Rebecca Matthews were recognised on Friday for their outstanding contributions.

Danila Dilba GP, Dr Meredith Hansen-Knarhoi, has been recognised as the GP of the Year at the NT Health Professional of the Year awards over last weekend.

Dr Hanson-Knarhoi is passionate about Aged Care and women’s health and goes beyond the role of an ordinary GP when caring for her nursing home patients. Meredith’s compassion, humanism and respect for culture sets a strong example for excellence in primary health care.

The 2019 recipients are:

GP or other Doctor working in Primary Health Care of the Year 
Dr Meredith Hansen-Knarhoi (GP, Danila Dilba Palmerston Clinic)

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner of the Year 
Rrapa Dhurrkay (Senior Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Miwatj Elcho Island Clinic)

Nurse and/or Midwife of the Year 
Rebecca Earle (Remote Area Nurse, Julanimawu Clinic Bathurst Island)

Allied Health Practitioner of the Year 
Rebecca Matthews (Remote visiting podiatrist, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress)

Primary Health Care Support Person of the Year 
James Arratta (Belyuen Health Centre)

8. ACT : Winnunuga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and community Services #Historymaking turning of the soil today at 10.30 am

We are across all social media platforms. Make sure you keep up to date with what is happening in our community and around Australia in Aboriginal Health.

Follow the ongoing push for change and massive improvements in moving forward with the new building for Winnunuga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and community Services.

9.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre Registered Training Organisation short-listed for 4 awards

For the first time, the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre Registered Training Organisation (NACCHO Affiliate for Lutruwita/Tasmania) entered the above and were short-listed for 4 awards:

Swinburne University of Technology Industry Collaboration Award and Training Provider of The Year for our RTO; and for students trained in our RTO Certificate IV course in Alcohol and Other Drugs – Rotary Club of Deloraine Vocational Student of the Year Award Finalists Keeomee Mansell of the Aboriginal Health Service in Burnie and Janelle Williams of Cygnet now employed by the Bridge Salvation Army in Hobart; and for the TasTAFE Aboriginal Student of the Year Award Finalist, our staff member Dionne Bishop trained by our RTO and employed by the AHS in Hobart, the only finalist candidate not trained by Tas TAFE, won a Special Commendation – the only such award conferred on the night.

A very big night for our only Aboriginal RTO in this State.

NACCHO Affiliate and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : National watch Pat Turner #QANDA #NSW GWAMS @ahmrc #VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @Apunipima @DeadlyChoices #WA Wirraka Maya #SA #NT @MiwatjHealth #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #TAS

1.1 National : Did you miss our CEO Pat Turner on Q and A this week ? Watch HERE

1.2 National :  Keynote speakers announced for NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference 2019 in Melbourne next week Has your ACCHO Registered ?

1.3 National : ACCHO’s invited to attend Health Data Portal Co-design Workshops: September – October 2019

1.4 National iSISTAQUIT “implement Supporting Indigenous Smokers To Assist Quitting” program is starting now, and we need your help and ideas – so here is how you can help us.

2.I NSW : The ANFPP team at Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service hosted morning tea with the Aunties from Baabayn

2.2 NSW : AH&MRC launches new website 

3.VIC : VACCHO and the Aboriginal breast screening project in partnership with BreastScreen Victoria.

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Baby One Program health worker training

4.2 QLD : AFL Brisbane Lions superstar leads Deadly Choices campaign to increase 715 Health Checks 

5. SA : The Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement, Dr Roger Thomas, is commencing State-wide consultation to seek the views of Aboriginal communities to improve relations between government and Aboriginal people.

6.WA : Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

7. NT : Check out what the awesome Miwatj Health AMS TIS team in Gapuwiyak have been up to over the recent school holiday break.

8. ACT : Ms Julie Tongs, CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service has calls on Ms Rosie Batty AO to assist with advocacy

9. TAS : Heather Sculthorpe NAIDOC Speech 2019

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Did you miss our CEO Pat Turner on Q and A this week ? Watch here

WATCH HERE

Panellists: Linda Burney, Shadow Minister for Indigenous Australians; Julian Leeser, Co-Chair of Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition; Jacinta Price, Director of Indigenous Program, CIS; Patricia Turner, CEO of National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation; and Sally Scales, Uluru Statement Delegate. (who replaced Noel Pearson at the last moment )

 From transcript panellist Pat Turner, a legendary figure in Indigenous affairs:

“We survived here for 60,000 years before the last 200 and we’ve been devastated more in the last 200-plus than the 60,000 years before that … we want to have the right to share the power and to make the decisions about the future of our people in our own country.”

Jacinta Price thought the debate “distracts us from what’s really going on” – issues such as violence and suicide in Indigenous communities.

Pat Turner shot back.

A distraction?

“It hasn’t distracted me because we’re working very hard to close the gap. And to ensure that Aboriginal voices are at the table in negotiations with government as equals.”

She concluded: “We’re waiting for no one. We’re getting on with the job.”

1.2 National :  Keynote speakers announced for NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference 2019 in Melbourne next week Has your ACCHO Registered ?

We are very fortunate this year to have an illustrious line-up of speakers and are expecting to host around 200 male delegates from across the country.

 The conference aims to increase access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males to primary health care services, and participation in healthy lifestyle activities within the community.”

Mr John Paterson, CEO of Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) and spokesperson for OCHRE DAY

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) will hold its seventh annual Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference on 29-30 August at Pullman On the Park, Melbourne.

This year’s conference will focus on three aspirational topics around Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men being: in-control, innovative and influential.

The NACCHO Ochre Day Conference is an important event that draws attention to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health issues and their impact on their social and emotional health in a holistic way.  The enduring theme for the conference is – Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It!

The NACCHO Ochre Day Conference was established in 2012 to provide a strategic focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health issues in a holistic way

Read or Download  full press release here

For further information on the conference and to register online, click here.

1.3 National : ACCHO’s invited to attend Health Data Portal Co-design Workshops: September – October 2019

A series of co-design workshops will be conducted around Australia during September and October 2019. The co-design workshops will allow health service representatives to:

  • Gather input for future nKPI, OSR, HCP and QLIK Interactive Report enhancements based on your July-August 2019 reporting experience; and
  • Discuss Stage 2 OSR requirements and how to effectively gather the required data.

Co-design workshop locations, dates and venue details are set out here :

How to register for a co-design workshop

An Eventbrite invitation was sent to all health services on 26 July 2019. If you would like an invitation sent to you please send us your name and email address to indigenousreporting@health.gov.au. Seats are strictly limited and fill up quickly so please register ASAP.

Cost:

Like all previous Portal co-design workshops conducted in 2017, 2018 and February-March 2019, travel, accommodation and expenses to attend a co-design workshop is at your health services’ expense.

Do you have other colleagues who want to attend?

This email invitation can only be used by you. If you want a colleague to attend, please email us their name and email address to indigenousreporting@health.gov.au

Please note that due to a high level of interest we request that no more than two people from your health service attend, where possible. This will ensure we have a wide representation from the sector attending the co-design workshops.

Not able to attend?

Consultation is an important part of developing the Portal. If you are unable to attend a co-design workshop, you can still contribute. Details of how to do this will be communicated to you soon.

More Information:

If would like more information about the co-design workshops, please contact us at indigenousreporting@health.gov.au

1.4 National iSISTAQUIT “implement Supporting Indigenous Smokers To Assist Quitting” program is starting now, and we need your help and ideas – so here is how you can help us.

Our focus is to improve health providers’ (HP) provision of smoking cessation care for pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Download the full poster

Poster-iSISTAQUIT call for resources

We are currently developing our training materials into an on-line format, making social media resources, and exploring effective ways of recruiting services.

Register your interest: We invite Aboriginal Health Services, Tackling Indigenous Smoking Sites, and Mainstream Health Services to be Partner Services of the iSISTAQUIT team in implementing iSISTAQUIT, to take the iSISTAQUIT_survey or email iSISTAQUIT@newcastle.edu.au and we will arrange a call or zoom meeting

Become an Advisor: We are looking for Advisors to support us developing:

  1. a) The online training format for Health Professionals and /or
  2. b) The social media campaign.

Send us your resources: To develop the media campaign, we are looking for resources that are provided to pregnant women to support smoking cessation (print, digital, video or social media).

If you have developed resources or have examples that you give to pregnant women or ideas for messages for quitting in pregnancy, please contact us and/or send your resources iSISTAQUIT@newcastle.edu.au

2. I NSW : The ANFPP team at Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service AHS hosted morning tea with the Aunties from Baabayn

The Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) is a nurse-led home visiting program that supports women pregnant with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander child to help them become the best mum possible.

ANFPP mums are offered support and guidance during early pregnancy and on into their baby’s infancy and toddlerhood. The ANFPP is an important early investment in the future of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in local communities.

We are part of the Australian Government’s commitment to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

It was a great morning yarning about the program and showing them around our new office.

2.2 NSW : AH&MRC launches new website 

The AH&MRC Board of Directors and staff are delighted to announce the launch of our new website. The website is the next phase of the AH&MRC rebrand, with the logo being announced in September 2018.

VIEW new website HERE

“We have gone through a transition period and we now have a clear direction of our organisation, with a website as the representation.” says Scott Monaghan, Chairperson of the Board of AH&MRC

The AH&MRC website has been created to promote success stories from the sector, job openings and local events, professional learning opportunities, accredited courses, research development and more.

“We want members and the community to use the website to keep up to date.” concluded Mr Monaghan.

The August Edition of Message Stick is out now!

Read about the new AH&MRC website, the Closing the Gap on Indigenous Health Conference, the PHN and ACCHS Roundtable and opportunities to work with AH&MRC and our members.

Read more here >> http://bit.ly/33QDlw8

3.1 VIC : VACCHO and the Aboriginal breast screening project in partnership with BreastScreen Victoria.

Our COO Helen Kennedy and Susan Forrester are with Gina Bundle from The Womens at our ICAP Forum modeling one of the many breastscreening shawls currently being designed by so many of our incredible women around Victoria. this Aboriginal breastscreening project is done in partnership with BreastScreen Victoria.

Gunditj Corp staff members Charmaine Clarke and Sherry Johnstone with our Susan Forrester showing off the incredible artworks created by local Gunditjmara women that will be used in our Aboriginal breastscreening shawl project with BreastScreen Victoria

These beautiful shawls will be used to keep our women culturally safe and strong during screening sessions.

If you want to know more about this project contact us on 03 9411 9411.

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Baby One Program health worker training

In a recent edition of Apunipima ACCHO Cape Capers there was mention of the training taking place at the Cairns office, with the Nutritionist Team providing workshops based around increasing knowledge on nutrition in the communities for pregnant women, mums and infants.

The Baby One Program and Bump 2 Bubba teams took on meaningful discussions, cooking sessions, team building exercises and workshops around ways to improve resources and processes in getting the ‘better health’ message across.

It was clear that the group provided valuable ideas for the future and gained more insights into what will be key messages for the Cape’s future health.

4.2 QLD : AFL Brisbane Lions superstar leads Deadly Choices campaign to increase 715 Health Checks 

5. SA : The Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement, Dr Roger Thomas, is commencing State-wide consultation to seek the views of Aboriginal communities to improve relations between government and Aboriginal people.  

Dr Thomas has already undertaken some targeted consultation with Aboriginal stakeholders.

This has developed an engagement reform proposal for his State-wide consultation.

Premier Steven Marshall committed in his Aboriginal Affairs Action Plan released in December 2018 to develop a model to facilitate and enable better engagement between the Government and Aboriginal communities and for Aboriginal views to be more represented in government decision-making.

The Premier said it was critical that the views of Aboriginal peoples were heard across all levels of government.

“I am committed to ensuring Aboriginal South Australians are adequately represented in the decisions that affect them,” said the Premier.

Dr Thomas urged Aboriginal South Australians to get involved in the consultation process.

“I encourage all Aboriginal people, communities and organisations to share their views, by attending a consultation session, or to provide written feedback on the recommended model,” Dr Thomas said.

The Commissioner has developed eleven draft guiding principles as a reference point for the discussion and development of potential models of Aboriginal engagement:

Once the Commissioner has consulted with Aboriginal communities over the coming three months, a report will be presented to the Premier for Cabinet to consider.

Aboriginal South Australians are encouraged to have their say during the consultation process, and can do so via a number of channels:

1. Attend a consultation:

The Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement will visit many sites across South Australia, and lead the consultation with Aboriginal people, organisations and representatives, over the next three months. To find out more information about the Commissioner’s visits across South Australia, arrange a meeting, or to request more information, contact the Office of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement (OCAE) or visit dpc.sa.gov.au/aboriginal-engagement

2. Provide written feedback:

Feedback Forms will be provided at all the consultation meetings. Alternatively, you may submit your feedback online. Detailed written submissions are also welcome and can be emailed to the Office of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement at AboriginalEngagement@sa.gov.au

3.Call

Office of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement:

Free call: 1800 931 733

6.1 WA : Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

Recently it was Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Awareness Day, and we’re sharing the last story in our series profiling inspirational people leading the charge to make FASD history in the Pilbara in collaboration with Telethon Kids, BHP Western Australia and Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation.

Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD, through supporting their partners not to drink during pregnancy.

After watching, please SHARE this video with your networks to help raise awareness of the role that men can play in the prevention of #FASD.

7.1 NT : Check out what the awesome Miwatj Health AMS TIS team in Gapuwiyak have been up to over the recent school holiday break.

Listen up! Come check out what our awesome TIS team in Gapuwiyak have been up to over the school holiday break. It’s great to see djamarrkuli have fun and learn about ngarali (tobacco) and healthy lifestyles.

And sports

Miwatj AMS TIS worker Thomas Guyula from Gapuwiyak, is passionate about educating and helping people understand the dangers of smoking!

8. ACT : Ms Julie Tongs, CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service has calls on Ms Rosie Batty AO to assist with advocacy

Ms Julie Tongs, CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service has called  on Ms Rosie Batty AO, to use her address at the annual EMILY’s List Oration to be held in Canberra on Wednesday 21 August to urge the ACT Government to reverse its decision to defund the ACT Legal Aid Commission’s specialist family violence service.

Julie Tongs noted that Aboriginal women are vastly over-represented as victims of crime including as victims of domestic violence. She said:

“The most recent data reveals an Aboriginal woman is 35 times more likely to be hospitalised due to domestic violence related assault than a non-Aboriginal woman.”

Julie Tongs further noted the Legal Aid Commission has assisted hundreds of women a year, including many Aboriginal women, who have been subjected to violence and abuse.

Download the full Press Release HERE

WNAHCS Media Release 2019 – Rosie Batty

9. TAS : Heather Sculthorpe NAIDOC Speech 2019

The national theme for NAIDOC this year is Voice, Treaty, Truth. This is a summary of the Aboriginal community demands in the Statement From The Heart developed at Uluru 2 years ago.

Achieving these goals, based on the recognition of Aboriginal people in the Australian Constitution, is regarded by some as the basis for reconciliation – as enabling Aborigines and non-Aborigines to move forward together towards a better future.

The proposal for a ‘Voice to Parliament’ is the most controversial of these demands. The former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull immediately dismissed the idea calling it a third chamber of the federal Parliament: the Senate, the House of Representatives, and the Aboriginal Voice. In fact it would have only the power to advise and so would be less a decision making body than the former Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission which did have some power to determine policy and make financial decisions.

Instead of the risky business of trying to get changes agreed to the Australian Constitution, many are now advocating State level treaty making as a means of changing the power imbalance between Aboriginal people and the State. That would have to go very much further than the simple wording changes to State Constitutions made by the Tasmanian Parliament and others which simply state the obvious fact that Aborigines were the first people of this country.

A treaty would need to cover matters like the return of lands, a guaranteed income through a share of the gross domestic product of the country or a similar formula, and protections for Aboriginal language and culture. The benefits of a treaty were summed up by Michael Mansell in his book about treaty and statehood as follows:

Aboriginal communities need essential and fundamental tools to replicate what once was – an ordered, civilised, united Aboriginal society that took care of its own and managed its affairs – and restore it in a modern world. The fundamental tools needed include land ownership, empowerment, financial guarantees, cultural integrity and self-determination. The longer Aboriginals are denied these essential assets the longer we will see despair and frustration, and the more we will have to revisit the consequences of disadvantage.

We would expect these fundamental requirements to be additional to basic services provided to everyone in Australia like health, housing and education. These service areas are still failing Aboriginal people, starting from the significant gap in life expectancy.

How do we reach equivalent life outcomes for our people without becoming just like white people, without becoming assimilated into the values and lifestyle of those who invaded our lands and nearly destroyed our people?

We start by the truth-telling referred to in the Uluru Statement. We’ve seen the beginning of that process in the massacre mapping of the continent by Dr Lyndall Ryan and others, decades after the first version of Lyndall’s book on Aboriginal Tasmania was published. We see it increasingly in the story telling of Aboriginal writers, play wrights and song writers like puralia meenamatta/Jim Everett, Cheryl Mundy, Nathan Maynard, and Dewayne Everett-Smith. And in the art works and photographs of Ricky Maynard, Janice Ross Lowery Maynard, Rodney Gardner and many others. And now in the curriculum materials in Tasmanian schools through the highly praised ORB multi-media package.

Truth telling must start with being clear that this country and this State were not settled peacefully but through violence and treachery. In our case, the treachery occurred when our Old People were persuaded to give up their guerrilla war against the invaders and board the boats bound for Flinders Island. They were persuaded that this was the only way to prevent the rest of their people being slaughtered and that they would soon return to their home lands. Instead most of them died on Flinders Island.

This is how Walter George Arthur described the treachery in 1846, writing from Wybalena on Flinders to Queen Victoria in London, England:

The humble petition of the free Aborigines Inhabitants of Van Diemen’s Land now living upon Flinders Island …That we are your free children that we were not taken prisoners but freely gave up our country to Colonel Arthur then the Governor after defending ourselves, Your petitioners humbly state to your Majesty that Mr Robinson [George Augustus] made for us and with Colonel Arthur an agreement that we have not lost from our minds since and we have made our part of it good. Your petitioners humbly tell Your Majesty that when we left our own place we were plenty of people, we are now but a little one.

In any normal human understanding, this must surely be an undertaking to make a peaceful settlement with a treaty. Lutruwita/Tasmania is well over due to make good on this promise. And not just any promise: an undertaking between equal sovereigns.

What the Education Department’s ORB lacks is Aboriginal decision making and control, things that the national Coalition of Peak Close the Gap organisations has stressed to be every bit as important as targets and indicators. As recognised by the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody nearly 3 decades ago, it is the lack of Aboriginal control and decision making that has resulted in the disparities in life outcomes so prevalent today. Let’s keep in mind that this is the main area that needs to improve if we are to get anywhere near reconciliation in this country.

We are very pleased that so many people keeping coming back year after year to help us mark the start of NAIDOC week. In the future we may be able to use this occasion to celebrate together but for now at least we must use the occasion as a reminder that we still have a long way to go.

Nayri nina-tu.

Heather Sculthorpe

 

 

NACCHO Affiliate and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : National CEO Pat Turner speech #Voice #ClosingTheGap #QANDA #AMSANT25Conf Plus @QAIHC formally opens new building for Queensland peak ACCHO body

1.1 National : Our CEO Pat Turner keynote speech at AMSANT 25 Anniversary Conference in Alice Springs

1.2 Close the Gap Steering Committee meets at NACCHO office in Canberra

1.3 : National : How history can help shape the debate about an Indigenous voice to Parliament. Features Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner

2.1  NSW : Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Dental Clinic is the first of its kind on the Central Coast.

2.2 NSW : Katungul ACCHO : Otitis Media & Eye Health Manager Dean Haycox, has just returned from an upskill opportunity with Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

3.Victorian Government Government investing $13.6 million over two years for all Traditional Owners in Victoria to prepare for treaty and to pave the path forwards for future treaty negotiations.

4.1 QLD : QAIHC formally opens new building for Queensland peak body

4.2 QAIHC Chairperson wins prestigious AMA award

5. WA : The South West Aboriginal Medical Services clinic on wheels visited Newton Moore Senior High School’s Clontarf Academy boys .

6. SA : Clifford Warrior from Port Lincoln ACCHO lives a fast life with active family 

7.1 AMSANT Our Health Our Way 25Yrs Anniversary Conference See Photo album of the event #AMSANT25Conf

7.2 : NT Aboriginal Peak Organisation’s condem the NT Government’s decision to ignore Royal Commission recommendations

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Our CEO Pat Turner keynote speech at AMSANT 25 Anniversary Conference in Alice Springs

  “We have started the task of determining priority reforms that we think are needed to accelerate the life outcomes of our peoples, and to be built into a new National Agreement on Closing the Gap for the next ten years.

We need a radical shift to the way governments work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples at all levels of policy design and implementation.

The first priority reform area we have proposed to governments is to ensure the full involvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in shared decision making at the national, state and local or regional level and embedding their ownership, responsibility and expertise to close the gap.

This will ensure that, over time, all of us have a seat at the table and responsibility for making decisions about what governments do in our areas and communities. “

Pat Turner CEO NACCHO at AMSANT Conference : Read full speech HERE

Please note Pat Turner will be on Q and A Monday 19 August 

Read June Oscars : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner

Read Barb Shaw 2 speeches AMSANT Chair

Read Donna Ah Chee Congress ACCHO CEO

1.2 Close the Gap Steering Committee meets at NACCHO office in Canberra

1.3 : National : How history can help shape the debate about an Indigenous voice to Parliament. Features Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner

Dr Will Sanders:Senior fellow at the Australian National University’s Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.-

Pat Turner: Arrente Woman from Alice Springs. Pat was Commonwealth public service from the 1970’s onward. She was CEO of ATSIC for 4 years from 1994 to 1998 and is now the CEO of NACCHO, the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Michael Dillon: Visiting fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research at the Australian National University.

Robert Tickner: Former Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs in the Hawke and Keating governments.

Alison Anderson: Former ATSIC Commissioner

Listen HERE

2.1  NSW : Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Dental Clinic is the first of its kind on the Central Coast.

Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Services has launched the first Aboriginal dental clinic on New South Wales’ Central Coast.

A special ceremony in Darkinjung country took place last Thursday, launching the new facility that will provide culturally appropriate dental treatment to First Nations people.

Although completed in October last year, industry and community leaders gathered for bush tucker, traditional dance and a didgeridoo performance to formally open the clinic.

The Wyong dental clinic was developed through a collaboration between Yerin and the Central Coast Local Health District.

Yerin CEO Belinda Field said the establishment of this new clinic was a major milestone for the Central Coast First Nations community.

“We are so proud to open this new clinic for our mob to offer dental treatments and oral hygiene solutions that are performed in a culturally safe and responsive manner,” Ms Field said.

“Like in many other areas, there is a considerable gap between the dental health of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians.”

According to the NSW Government’s current Aboriginal Oral Health Plan, Indigenous communities are twice as likely to experience untreated dental decay.

“Yerin Eleanor Duncan is excited to be leading the way to level the playing field in this vital area,” Ms Field said.

This new dental clinic adds to Yerin’s 23 years of health services to Indigenous Australians across the Central Coast.

The organisation provides culturally appropriate and safe primary health care in areas such as dental, GP, mental health, early childhood, chronic disease, permanency support programs, and alcohol and other drugs.

2.2 NSW : Katungul ACCHO : Otitis Media & Eye Health Manager Dean Haycox, has just returned from an upskill opportunity with Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

We caught up with Dean (Pictured left ) and asked him about the experience.

Why did Poche offer you the opportunity to attend the course?

I was a successful applicant for their scholarship program in 2017 and sp they offered me the the opportunity to up-skill cancer awareness skillset for AHW –AHP .
This skill set provided information on cancer, treatment stages, support services, screenings and early detection and prevention.

Prior to the course my knowledge was limited, but now I understand the importance of early detection and screening programs for breast screen, testicular, bowel, melanoma etc. A lot of Koori people are apprehensive about screening as they are worried about the outcome of the tests, but if cancer is detected early it can be treated.

What did you enjoy most about the course?
The skills we learnt were excellent but the highlight for me was visiting the Melanoma Institute and the Cancer Institute; the work these organisation are doing around
treatment and screening is amazing.

What’s one interesting take-away from the course?
I didn’t know about immunotherapy, which is a type of cancer treatment where the immune system is “switched back on” to help fight cancer in the later stages.

What message did you take with you that you would like the community to know?
I want people to understand that cancer screening programs are for detecting cancer early, the earlier the better. Too many people die from cancer because it is picked up too late- if it is picked up early it can be treated and monitored.

Images courtesy of Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

3.Victorian Government Government investing $13.6 million over two years for all Traditional Owners in Victoria to prepare for treaty and to pave the path forwards for future treaty negotiations.

Jill Gallagher ( pictured right with Rachel Stephen-Smith) is a proud Gunditjmara woman and Victoria’s Treaty Advancement Commissioner. Working with community to progress treaty & establish an Aboriginal Representative Body.

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Gavin Jennings today announced a treaty readiness funding package of $13.6 million over two years, which will give equitable and flexible support to Traditional Owners in formally and nonformally recognised areas.

Victoria is leading the nation in negotiating treaty with its First Peoples as part of its pledge to progress self determination.

From September 16, Aboriginal Victorians will vote in the historic election of the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria. The Assembly will be the voice of Aboriginal people in Victoria as it works with the State to design a framework for future treaty negotiations.

The treaty readiness funding package recognises the diverse circumstances and aspirations of Traditional Owners in Victoria on their journey towards treaty and the need to provide equitable support to enable all Traditional Owners to participate in negotiations.

The investment will support Traditional Owners in regions without formal recognition to undertake research and map family groups and Traditional Owner structures.

Engagement officers will be employed across Victoria to provide on-the-ground support to Traditional Owners.

The package includes investment in a significant partnership between nation-building service providers including the Federation of Victorian Traditional Owner Corporations, First Nations Legal and Research Services, and

Aboriginal Victoria’s Traditional Owner Programs. This partnership will ensure that Traditional Owners in formally and non-formally recognised areas can access core support and resources across three streams: foundational support, recognition support and treaty readiness support.

Traditional Owners will also be supported to pursue additional nation-building activities, as determined by them, to meet their specific needs and priorities. These activities could include healing and family reunification, cultural knowledge sharing, advice on formal recognition process, treaty education and policy development.

Immediate work is underway to build nation-building support capacity and recruit Engagement Officers. Funding will be available for Traditional Owners to access shortly. For further information visit aboriginalvictoria.vic.gov.au or for more information on the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria election, visit firstpeoplesvic.org.

4.1 QLD : QAIHC formally opens new building for Queensland peak body

The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) yesterday officially opened its new building in Russell Street, South Brisbane.

Cover photo Building opening QAIHC Hall of Famers Uncle Jeff Timor and Aunty Mary Martin with QAIHC CEO Neil Willmett

Photo above  Previous Chairpersons of QAIHC (L-R) Sheryl Lawton, Aunty Gail Wason, Lizzie Adams, and Kieron Chilcott

Last year QAIHC moved into new offices, to meet the growing needs of the Sector. Today the building will be officially opened by community leaders, and a smoking ceremony held to cleanse the building and promote the wellbeing of those who work in and visit it.

“The building opening celebrates QAIHC’s journey fighting for health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples”, said CEO Neil Willmett.

“The need for a bigger building is indicative of our growing workforce – one that allows us to better service our members, and the Sector.

“The building also makes a statement. Externally, vibrant colours announce your arrival and serve as a reminder to all that QAIHC is here, providing leadership to the Sector and acting as a conduit for information to and from stakeholders.

“Internally, a history of the organisation and key people involved in its establishment can be found, reminding staff and visitors of those who came before us, and those for whom we’re working.”

QAIHC is a peak organisation that is focused on strengthening the capability and capacity of our membership and improving the health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders.

Established in 1990, QAIHC is a vital player in ensuring that an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective is embedded into health service delivery. Find out more at www.qaihc.com.au

4.2 QAIHC Chairperson wins prestigious AMA award

Chairperson of the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), Aunty Gail Wason, was recently awarded the prestigious Australian Medical Association Queensland’s (AMAQ) Excellence in Health Care Medal. Pictured above Centre with QAIHC CEO Neil Willmet on right

The award recognises Aunty Gail’s unwavering commitment to improving the health and wellbeing of her community. She is the Chief Executive Officer of Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Primary Health Care Service and has more than 25 years’ experience in Aboriginal affairs and health.

Aunty Gail strives to ensure that the community has access to the full range of high quality, culturally appropriate primary health care services that empower clients to fully participate in the management of their own health.

On winning the award, Aunty Gail said, “I’m surprised and humbled to receive this award when there are so many people in our Sector doing good work. I’m thankful for the acknowledgement bestowed upon me by the AMAQ”.

“This award is a team effort. Between the team at QAIHC and at Mulungu, I have so many people who help me succeed and I’m grateful for all those I work with, particularly those who don’t get recognition for the arduous and meaningful work they do.

“Previous Chairs and CEOs of QAIHC have done some pioneering and innovative work for the Sector and their work shouldn’t go unrecognised. The Sector is where we are today, in part, because of them.”

QAIHC CEO Neil Willmett “It’s great to see a humble leader getting recognition and a mainstream award for her dedication to improving the health and wellbeing of Queenslanders”, he said.

“Aunty Gail has experienced first-hand how important it is for clients to be appropriately cared for when attending an Aboriginal Medical Service. The thoroughness and diligence these services show is an important factor in closing the gap, and these are two of Aunty Gail’s strong points”, said Mr Willmett.

5.1 WA : The South West Aboriginal Medical Services clinic on wheels visited Newton Moore Senior High School’s Clontarf Academy boys .

Hosting the clinic on wheels at South-West schools, the clinic enables students to have their health check during school hours.

The clinic also provides the opportunity for students to discuss any health-related issues in a safe, confidential space.

The Clontarf Foundation exists to improve the education, discipline, self-esteem, life skills and employment prospects of young Aboriginal men.

The foundation works by using the existing passion that Aboriginal boys have for football to attract the boys to school and keep them there.

Any Aboriginal boy enrolled at the Newton Moore Senior High School can apply to be part of the program.

“Health and well-being is an important part of our program. Our boys all enjoy a good feed and their footy, but learning how to make good choices with what they eat and drink is crucial,” Newton Moore SHS Clontarf Academy director Boyd Davey said.

“In conjunction with the Federal Government Department of Health and Ageing and SWAMS, we are able to deliver annual health assessments.

“Firstly this gives our boys access to quality medical care, secondly establishes relationship with a medical practice to break down future barriers and thirdly, allows us to learn more about the healthy state of our academy and where we need to focus our attention to improve outcomes.”

The clinic will return to the school in Semester Two to follow up with the students.

“Building a strong relationship with students whilst they are in their school years will hopefully enable them to continue prioritising their health as they grow into adults and start having families of their own. This continuity will help to close the gap for future generations.” SWAMS chief executive Lesley Nelson said.

The clinic’s mobile facility travels with a qualified nurse, doctor and aboriginal health worker.

6. SA : Clifford Warrior from Port Lincoln ACCHO lives a fast life with active family 

I was born in Ceduna, started school in Port Lincoln, completed primary school in Coober Pedy and finished high school back in Port Lincoln. I am the youngest of three with two older sisters. The smell of freshly cut grass and overcast mornings is how I remember my days at Lincoln South Primary School (Lincoln Gardens).

Originally published HERE 

I remember my first football game for Mallee Park and still have the trophy from that season. My first goal was at the town primary school oval. I stood about five metres from goal when the ball landed in my arms and the umpire blew his whistle yelling “mark!” One of the older boys put his arm around me and told me to kick it through the middle.

I went back, started walking forward into a slow jog and kicked it as hard as I could and it went straight for the middle…then curved left for a point. Soon the ball came back as I was on the goal line when I picked it up for a quick little sledge-hammer kick over the line so I had just done a seven-point play (fist pump).

We moved to Coober Pedy when I was about 10. Growing up in a multicultural town was quite an experience. My first job there was with some other boys, putting price tags on basketball cards for $5. I shot my first kangaroo (malu) with Dad when I was 11 and now I take my boys hunting with me. Returning to Port Lincoln was something I put off for as long as possible so Mum let me finish the school year off first. I returned in 2000 for summer. The weather was not as hot as Coober Pedy and I was often asked why was I wearing jeans and a jumper when it was “hot”. It took me a week or so to adjust.

I started at Port Lincoln High School that year, where I met Antoinette then fell in love around 2001. We completed year 12, then had our first child Shauna when we were 18. We moved around for a bit including to Western Australia when Anti got a job in sport and rec and I worked in the local abattoir. When we decided to go back to Port Lincoln we had little Cliffy; two years later Leo was born. After buying our home I thought we needed a dog – we didn’t, I know that now so lesson learnt. Anyway his name is Snowy, he’s a husky and likes to trash our yard.

I want to play sport for as long as I can so health and fitness are important. With huge support from Anti I recently finished second in an eight-week challenge at F45 so shout out to the team for a life-changing experience. I had the privilege of playing football with my dad when he was in his 50s so I hope to do the same with my boys. I now coach under 11s, which little Cliffy plays in. He’s already better than me and also plays under 9s with Leo. He always tries to kick the ball to him. Shauna plays netball and has had a pretty good career and will no doubt continue to excel.

For the past nine years I have worked at the Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service in the social and emotional wellbeing team. I have a Graduate Diploma in Substance Use through Sydney Uni so I also provide drug and alcohol support. With an active family that plays multiple sports life is pretty fast and full on but I would not change it. Anti makes life easy. With the talent these kids have I suspect life will get a lot faster. Talent definitely skipped a generation in my case. I love watching my children play sport so I will try to stay in one piece hoping one day I can play alongside them.

7.1 AMSANT Our Health Our Way 25Yrs Anniversary Conference See Photo album of the event #AMSANT25Conf

View the Album HERE 

See Album 2

Our Health, Our Way! Conference last week…!

7.2 : NT Aboriginal Peak Organisation’s condem the NT Government’s decision to ignore Royal Commission recommendations

We support the NT Aboriginal Peak Organisation’s statement released today, condemning the NT Government’s decision to ignore Royal Commission recommendations in announcing a new youth detention facility site beside the Darwin adult prison.

The APO is asking the NT Government to reconsider its decision and to work collaboratively with the community to help our young people transform their lives.#YouthJustice

NACCHO and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : National @NACCHOChair #NSW @Walgett_AMS #VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @Apunipima #WA South West #SA PLAHS #NT @CAACongress @DanilaDilba #Tas Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

1.1 National : NACCHO Chair meets Productivity Commissioner to discuss current evaluation of Indigenous government policies and programs

1.2 AMA President in National Press Club address supports Uluru Statement from the Heart

1.3 National Chair of AMSANT and CEO of of Anyinginyi Aboriginal Health Corporation Barbara Shaw will deliver the opening plenary for the Indigenous Health Justice Conference in Darwin

2. NSW : The Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service and the Dharriwaa Elders Group have both expressed concerns about saltwater solution for drought and the potential effect on community health.

3. VIC : VACCHO partners with other peak health organisations to develop and support 8 actions for a A Healthier Start for Victorians Strategy

4.1  QAIHC will hold Youth Health Summit in September

4. 2 Qld : The Apunipima ACCHO TIS Team launches smoke-free signage at Charkil Om in Napranum Cape York 

5. WA : South West Aboriginal Medical Service in partnership to upgrade youth centre

6. SA : PLAHS ACCHO and Port Lincoln community come together for this year’s NAIDOC Week events .

7.1 NT : Congress CEO, Donna Ah Chee delivering the powerful history of the Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program 

7.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin mobile clinic provides back to school health checks for Palmerston Indigenous Village

8. TAS : Two seats should be set aside for Tasmanian Aboriginal MHAs to be chosen by Aboriginal people in an enlarged State Parliament, traditional owners say.

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : NACCHO Chair meets Productivity Commissioner to discuss  current evaluation of Indigenous government policies and programs

Donnella Mills Acting Chair of NACCHO this week met in Cairns with Romlie Mokak Productivity Commissioner to discuss the current Indigenous evaluation strategy : pictured above Left to Right Donnella , Romlie , Wuchopperen Chair  Sandra Levers and CEO Dania Ahwang

The Australian Government has asked the Productivity Commission to develop a whole-of-government evaluation strategy for policies and programs affecting Indigenous Australians, to be used by all Australian Government agencies. The Commission will also review the performance of agencies against the strategy over time.

They will consult widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, communities and organisations, and with all levels of government. We will also consult with non-Indigenous organisations and individuals responsible for administering and delivering relevant policies and programs.

The Commission released an issues paper to guide people in preparing a submission. It sets out some of the issues and questions the Commission has identified as relevant at the early stage of the project. Participants should provide evidence to support their views, including data and specific examples where possible.

The paper was released on 26 June 2019.

Initial submissions are due by Friday 23 August 2019.

More info Submissions HERE

1.2 AMA President in National Press Club address supports Uluru Statement from the Heart

 “The ongoing failure to address Indigenous health is also unforgivable and unacceptable. There are immediate things we can do to turn things around.

The AMA supports the Uluru Statement from the Heart. The Australian Parliament must make this a national priority.

Giving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people a say in the decisions that affect their lives would allow for healing through recognition of past and current injustices. It would underpin all Government endeavours to close the health and life expectancy gap.

We need to also look at and address the broader social determinants. This requires cooperation and unity of purpose from all relevant Ministers and portfolios.

We must take out the politics and fearmongering. We must do the right thing by the First Australians. The AMA welcomed the stated intent of the Minister for Indigenous Australians, Ken Wyatt, to hold a referendum on Constitutional recognition for Indigenous peoples.

It is time for unity. Let’s build on that. ”

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, who addressed the National Press Club as part of Family Doctor Week, 

Download full speech HERE

AMA President Press Club Address

1.3 National Chair of AMSANT and CEO of of Anyinginyi Aboriginal Health Corporation Barbara Shaw will deliver the opening plenary for the Indigenous Health Justice Conference in Darwin

Also speaking will be Donella Mills (Chair) Lawyer and A/Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), Donella is leading the development of Health Justice Partnerships in North Queensland and is recognised nationally as a leader in this field in the Indigenous context.

 Indigenous Health Justice Conference, 13 & 14 August 2019. #NILC2019 #IHJC2019

Download the full program HERE 

2. NSW : The Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service and the Dharriwaa Elders Group have both expressed concerns about saltwater solution for drought and the potential effect on community health.

Key points:

  • Residents and some experts are concerned about the health implications of bore water high in sodium
  • It may taste bad, but there are no regulated health-based limits on sodium levels in drinking water
  • A process of reverse osmosis is used to take sodium out of drinking water, but councils are worried about the cost

Chairman of the Elders Group Clem Dodd said the bore water was not healthy.

“You got to have water. I don’t care who you are — animal or person, you can’t go without water,” he said.

“But too much salt in it [is not good] … you got to get good water.”

The salt in the Bourke and Walgett bore water meets the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines but it exceeds the aesthetic (taste) limit.

There is no health-based sodium limit in those guidelines.

Health authorities contacted local doctors about potential health implications for patients with kidney disease, high blood pressure, heart failure, or who are pregnant.

‘Too much salt’

Jacqui Webster, a salt reduction expert from the George Institute for Global Health, has been working with the Walgett community on improving health outcomes there.

She said, while most salt in the average diet came from food, high salt levels in drinking water was a genuine health concern in these communities.

“Too much salt in the diet increases blood pressure, and increased blood pressure is one of the key contributors to premature death from heart disease and stroke in Australia,” Dr Webster said.

“You’ve got a high proportion of the community who are Aboriginal people, and we know Aboriginal communities already suffer disproportionately from high rates of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney disease.

“It’s really important that poor diets — including the high sodium content of the water — are addressed.”

Dr Webster said sodium could also make the drinking water taste unpleasant and people may turn to sugary drinks instead, which could compound health issues.

 Read full report HERE 

3. VIC : VACCHO partners with other peak health organisations to develop and support 8 actions for a A Healthier Start for Victorians Strategy

This consensus statement outlines practical recommendations to the Victorian Government to turn the tide on obesity. The focus is on children and young people to give them the best chance for a healthier start to life.

Download: A Healthier Start for Victorians – Summary (PDF, 701 KB)

Download: A Healthier Start for Victorians – Full Report (PDF, 2 MB)

A Healthier Start for Victorians has been developed by the Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Roundtable and is supported by a broad base of health and wellbeing organisations.

 

Over the past two decades, Victorian adult obesity rates have increased by 40 per cent and today two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese. Almost one in four Victorian children are overweight or obese.

The combined impact of poor diet and being overweight or obese is one of Victoria’s greatest health challenges.

Overweight and obesity, unhealthy diets and physical inactivity are avoidable risks for chronic health conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and several cancers.

A Healthier Start for Victorians lists eight practical recommendations to the Victorian Government to turn the tide on obesity.

These recommendations focus on children and young people to give them the best chance for a healthier start to life. They are as follows.

Action to prevent obesity in Victoria

1.Engage and support local communities to develop and lead their own healthy eating and physical activity initiatives

These should be community-based and focus on local areas or population groups with the highest rates of overweight and obesity.

2.Protect children from unhealthy food and drink marketing

This includes prohibiting advertising, promotion and sponsorship in publicly owned and managed places. Priority should be given to areas around schools, children’s sporting events and activities, and public transport.

3.Implement a statewide public education campaign to encourage healthy eating

This should focus on population groups with the highest rates of overweight and obesity.

4.Implement initiatives to improve family diets, particularly in children’s early years

This should focus on increasing food literacy and prioritising specific population groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

5.Support schools to increase students’ physical activity and physical literacy

This should take a whole-of-school approach, be reflected in the curriculum and be supported by training and professional development.

6.Increase the scope of and strengthen compliance with the existing School Canteens and Other School Food Services Policy

This should take a whole-of-school approach, be reflected in the curriculum and be backed by a monitoring and enforcement framework.

7.Develop a whole-of-government policy that requires healthy food procurement

This should incorporate the Healthy Choices guidelines and apply to all publicly owned and managed facilities and settings.

8.Develop and implement a strategy to get Victorians walking more

This should emphasise the need for walking infrastructure and urban design to make it safer and easier for people to walk to local destinations like shops, public transport, and schools.

Recommendations should be supported by an overarching Victorian obesity prevention plan that is overseen by a ministerial taskforce. This will ensure a whole-of-government approach to addressing obesity prevention as a Victorian health priority.

4.1  QAIHC will hold Youth Health Summit in September

Addressing disparity amongst our youth, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisation (ATSICCHO) Model of Care is designed to be responsive to the needs of the communities that we serve.

According to the 2016 ABS Census data, one third of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders are aged between 15–34 years. As such, it is vital that we monitor the health of this cohort to support a stronger First Nations culture in Australia’s future.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people are overrepresented in youth justice, and alcohol and other drugs are at harmful levels of use. Childhood obesity, rheumatic heart disease, social and emotional distress, and trauma are also present at high rates. To support our young people to thrive, physically and mentally, QAIHC and its Member Services are developing a Youth Health Strategy 2019–2022.

Central to the development of the Strategy is the QAIHC Youth Health Summit 2019. The Summit will be held in Brisbane on 12 September and is intended to be an open conversation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people (ages 18-25) about their current state of wellbeing.

The Summit will be focussing on Calm Minds, Strong Bodies, Resilient Spirit addressing a range of topics including:

  • Exercise
  • Nutrition
  • Healthy relationships
  • Support networks
  • Mental health
  • Sexual health
  • LGBTQI needs
  • Chronic disease.

Sessions will be facilitated in an environment of cultural safety to promote honest and free discussions between delegates.

If you’re an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person aged 18-25 living in Queensland and want to express an interest in attending, go to

Website 

4.2 Qld : The Apunipima ACCHO TIS Team launches smoke-free signage at Charkil Om in Napranum Cape York 

The TIS Team launched smoke-free signage at Charkil Om in Napranum. Professor Tom Calma, National Coordinator for the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program unveiled the signage alongside HAT member Roy Chavathun and Sonia Schuh PHC Manager.

TIS staff Dallas McKeown, Neil Kaigey, Darlene Roberts and Lorna Bosen hosted the launch and provided health information to those present.

5. WA : South West Aboriginal Medical Service in partnership to upgrade youth centre

The Bunbury PCYC unveiled its newly renovated youth space on Monday, July 15, designed to foster positive social and emotional development for local youth.

The upgrade is the product of a partnership between the youth centre, South West Aboriginal Medical Service, Breakaway Aboriginal Corporation and the Red Cross, with financial support from the City of Bunbury.

Originally published HERE

The upgrade included new interiors, a pool table, an air hockey table, a games console, a TV and lounges to complement the existing sporting facilities available at the Bunbury PCYC, which is used by more than 100 people weekly.

The Bunbury PCYC is one of 19 community youth centres in WA and provides a number of activities and accredited training programs for youth people of all ages.

South West Aboriginal Medical Service chief executive officer Lesley Nelson said the space was bound to have a positive impact on both the social and emotional development of local youth.

“The environment in which young people spend their time has been found to decisively impact on a young person’s health and development,” she said.

“We currently host a very active and engaged youth program at the Bunbury PCYC so we have been able to involve them directly in the planning of this space.

“With their help, we have been able to design an area that has a really positive energy, a space that encourages social development and active participation.”

Breakaway Aboriginal Corporation chair Renee Pitt echoed Ms Nelson’s sentiments and said the nature of the all inclusive programs allowed youth to come together in a positive environment.

“Breakaway and their partners are creating a safe environment where the kid’s involvement has given them ownership of the space, care and responsibility,” she said.

“The programs and activities that are being offered is emphasising the uniqueness of coming together that has not been available previously until now.

6. SA : PLAHS ACCHO and Port Lincoln community come together for this year’s NAIDOC Week events .

NAIDOC Week in 2019 had the theme of ‘Voice, Treaty, Truth’ with Port Lincoln celebrations beginning with the community march along Tasman Terrace on July 5.

Aboriginal Family Support Services hosted a dress up disco for children at the Mallee Park Clubrooms on July 9 before the annual Community Cookout was held at the Mallee Park Wombat Pit the following day, hosted by Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service.

The annual event involved PLAHS preparing foods including kangaroo stew and wombat while Centacare Port Lincoln provided a barbecue and a morning tea area was organised by Port Lincoln Red Cross.

PLAHS health promotions officer and NAIDOC Week Committee member Morgan Hirschausen said the weather was not ideal but the event was well supported.

Port Lincoln Aboriginal Community Council, with support from Gidja Club held the Elders Lunch at the Grand Tasman Hotel on Thursday, which was attended by about 30 elders.

The council’s indigenous community links manager Heather Hirschausen-Cox said they were happy with the turnout and the event continued to be an important part of NAIDOC Week.

7.1 NT : Congress CEO, Donna Ah Chee delivering the powerful history of the Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program 

Congress CEO, Donna Ah Chee delivering the powerful history of the Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) at the tenth annual conference. ANFPP is a nurse-led home visiting program that supports families pregnant with an Aboriginal child to help them become the best parents possible.

ANFPP Team Congress! Pictured here with CEO, Donna Ah Chee; General Manager Health Services, Tracey Brand and Chief Medical Officer Public Health, Dr John Boffa

7.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin mobile clinic provides back to school health checks for Palmerston Indigenous Village

This week the Mobile Clinic spent time with the Palmerston Indigenous Village to provide back to school health checks for kids. They put on a BBQ lunch, face painting and a jumping castle! Children participating in the health check received a back pack to prepare them for their return to school.

8. TAS : Two seats should be set aside for Tasmanian Aboriginal MHAs to be chosen by Aboriginal people in an enlarged State Parliament, traditional owners say.

“If successful, Tasmania will be the first State to guarantee an Aboriginal voice in the parliament,” 

New Zealand has done it for 150 years. The State of Maine in the US has 3 seats for Indians. It’s time for Tasmania to catch up and lead the rest of Australia.

The change would enable Aborigines to speak for the dispossessed and powerless and participate in governing Tasmania.”

Tasmanian Land Council spokseman Michael Mansell said the move would be an Australian first

See Full Report 

Under the proposal, a separate electoral roll would be created to elect indigenous representatives from a single electorate encompassing the entire state.

The proposal has been put forward jointly by the Elders Council of Tasmania Aboriginal Corporation, Cape Barren Island Aboriginal Association, Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre and the Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania, and will be presented on Monday to a parliamentary committee conducting an inquiry into the number of seats in the lower house.

Download the Submission HERE

No. 13 Joint Submission Aboriginal Organisations_Redacted

Their submission likens the idea to parliaments in the US state of Maine, and in New Zealand, where designated seats have been set aside for Maori representatives since 1867.

The groups said their proposal was “about improving representative democracy in Tasmania” .

“Providing for political representation of a people denied such access for over 200 years is overdue,” it said.

“It can be argued the political system in Tasmania has been racially prejudiced against Aboriginal representation . The system is geared against Aboriginal people effectively participating in parliamentary democracy.”

While it acknowledges the concept would give more value to a single vote in an Aboriginal electorate than a vote in one of the five existing lower house seats, it said dispossession and discrimination had left Aboriginal people “without a sound land and economic base, and a modicum of justice” .

“Political representation is more crucial for the survival and welfare of Aboriginal people than it is for any other sector in Tasmania,” the submission read.

The groups said the state’s constitution should be amended to create the Aboriginal electoral roll and designated seats in parliament, even if the push to increase the number of MHAs was rejected.

Twenty submissions have been lodged with the inquiry, which held its first public hearing in Launceston last month.

Premier Will Hodgman told the committee that a 35-seat House of Assembly would require an estimated $7.9 million to set up and about $7.2 million in extra ongoing costs each year.

 

NACCHO and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : #NSW @ahmrc #VIC @VACCHO #OchreDay #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @GidgeeHealing Goolburri #SA Nunkuwarrin Yunti #WA @TheAHCWA #NT @AMSANTaus #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #TAS

1.1 National : Watch NACCHO CEO appearance on the ABC TV the Drum for NAIDOC week

1.2 National : Federal Department of Health launches a new website

1.3 National : NACCHO support of Adam Goodes 2014-2019 ” Aboriginal Health and Racism “ #TheFinalQuarter

2.1 Armajun Aboriginal Health Service Armidale hold NAIDOC Week celebration

2.2 NSW : AHMRC The July Edition of Message Stick is out now!

2.3 NSW : Barrier between NSW Indigenous patients and hospital staff: report

3.1 VIC : VACCHO to co-host 2019 OCHRE DAY Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne 

4.1 Qld : QAIHC welcomes Minister Ken Wyatt to their new offices in Brisbane

4.2 QLD : Renee Blackman CEO of Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa on fact finding road trip 

4.3 QLD : Goolburri ACCHO : Jaydon Adams Foundation Indigenous Jets Ipswich Jets 2019

5.SA : Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti  the mob going smoke-free in Adelaide’s Prisons.

6.WA : AHCWA : Derby Aboriginal Health Service (DAHS) in Derby completed their final block of training in our Cert II Family Wellbeing Training Course

7.1 NT : Team AMSANT travelled to Sydney this week for national NACCHO workshop

7.2 : NT Katherine West Health Board traveling with our friend Healthy Harold to the schools talking about smoking 

8. ACT : Julie Tongs CEO Winnunga ACCHO Canberra congratulates Aunty Thelma Weston the 2019 National NAIDOC Female Elder of the Year

9. Tas: Tasmanian NAIDOC Aboriginal award winners 

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Watch NACCHO CEO appearance on the ABC TV the Drum for NAIDOC week

Watch ABC TV IView Friday 12 July Edition 

1.2 National : Federal Department of Health launches a new website

Welcome to the new health.gov.au website

We think you’ll find it a better website. We’ve:

  • changed the way it looks and works so it’s easier to use
  • reorganised our content so it’s easier to find
  • rewritten our content so it’s easier to understand
  • improved navigation and search
  • begun consolidating our other Health websites into this one, so more of our information is in one place

Department Press Release

The new website has been developed through comprehensive research and testing with our stakeholders.

Health.gov.au users told us they couldn’t find what they were looking for and when they did, it was often out of date and hard to read. Content was also often replicated and spread across more than 90 Health-owned websites.

The new website has better functionality and content has been written in plain English to improve the experience of all users.

An improved search function will search the new and old website during the transition period to ensure all relevant content is picked up. Better analytics will help us understand our users and continue to respond to their needs.

This project has been, and will continue to be, a major exercise. We expect it will take up to 12 months to completely rewrite our content.

In the meantime, Health topics that have not yet been fully revised will have a short introduction on the new site and links to old content for detail. Links to the old website will still work until we decommission our old website.

We won’t decommission the old site until we are satisfied the new website is complete.

Preview the new site

1.3 National : NACCHO support of Adam Goodes 2014-2019 ” Aboriginal Health and Racism “ #TheFinalQuarter

In 2015 NACCHO supported our good friend of NACCHO Adam Goodes with a ” Racism is a driver of Aboriginal ill health ” campaign that attracted a record 50,000  Likes and shares on our Facebook page reaching 846,848 followers

READ OUR NACCHO RACISM Post HERE

Watch to Final Quarter HERE

This followed our 2013 sponsorship of the first All-Indigenous team to represent Australia that Adam co captained with Buddy Franklin

Missed the Channel 10 Broadcast ? Watch HERE

2.1 Armajun Aboriginal Health Service Armidale hold NAIDOC Week celebration

More than 40 people attended the Armajun Aboriginal Health Service in Armidale on Thursday morning, but it had nothing to do with anything medical and everything to do with their NAIDOC Week morning tea.

Armajun program manager Deb Green said the day was fantastic.

“As the day gets on, we’ll get more community members who will just wander in,” she said.

“There will be an area left open so they can just come in and have a meal, and have a chat if other people are around.

“The whole week has been absolutely brilliant. We should be very, very proud of our community, and every service provider that has hosted an event over the last two weeks, it’s just been amazin

See Photo Album 

2.2 NSW : AHMRC The July Edition of Message Stick is out now!


Read about AH&MRC staff celebrating NAIDOC Week 2019, wrap-ups for Yarn Up, Your Health Your Future and the Dubbo Symposium and an update on the 2019 flu season.
Read about it here >> http://bit.ly/2XQldhR

2.3 NSW : Barrier between NSW Indigenous patients and hospital staff: report

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in NSW hospitals have reported being treated with less respect and dignity than non-Indigenous patients.

The Bureau of Health Information surveyed about 36,000 patients in hospitals and emergency rooms between 2017 and 2018.

The bureau’s chief executive, Diane Watson, said nearly all of the 1,000 First Nation patients were happy with their overall care, but some clear trends emerged.

Director for Aboriginal Health Geri Wilson-Matenga said new training programs would be designed to help medical staff with cultural communication and understanding.

3.1 VIC : VACCHO to co-host 2019 OCHRE DAY Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne 

 

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities.

REGISTER and other information on this years Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference

Please visit the NACCHO website.

3.2 VIC : Aboriginal Victorians are twice as likely to be hospitalised for mental health issues, compared to the wider population

A history of marginalisation and cultural dispossession has contributed to lower emotional and social wellbeing among Aboriginal Victorians, the state’s mental health royal commission has heard.

Key points:

  • Aboriginal Victorians are twice as likely to be hospitalised for mental health issues, compared to the wider population
  • Almost half of the state’s Aboriginal population has a relative who was removed under the policies which lead to the Stolen Generations
  • One elder told the commission the western concept of mental health was neither familiar, nor helpful for Aboriginal people

Wemba Wemba elder Auntie Nellie Flagg ( Pictured above ) described the mental anguish that accompanied the relentless racism she experienced growing up in the north-west Victorian town of Swan Hill in the 1960s. See Full Report 

Helen Kennedy, from the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, said: “They’re losing their life to suicide at twice the rate.”

“We’re not seeing improvements.”

Ms Kennedy told the commission part of the problem was a lack of recognition of the profound trauma arising from a long history of marginalisation and the dispossession of land, culture and children.

Almost half of all Aboriginal Victorians have a relative who was removed under policies which lead to the Stolen Generations.

“These impacts have been brutal,” Ms Kennedy said.

“They have left a legacy of enduring trauma and loss that continues to affect Aboriginal communities, families and many individuals is in many compounding ways.”

Culturally appropriate services critical

Ms Kennedy told the inquiry that developing culturally appropriate services staffed by Aboriginal people was critical.

She said Victoria had only eight Aboriginal mental health workers statewide.

“We are lagging behind other states,” she said.

“We need a massive reinvestment to support a growing skilled Aboriginal workforce.”

Ms Kennedy said one approach proving successful elsewhere was the creation of trauma-informed community “healing centres” aimed at helping individuals build stronger connections to culture, community, family, spirituality, their mind and emotions.

“What we’re doing now is not working. We have to have a different approach,” she said.

“Looking after people’s social and emotional wellbeing and supporting protective factors … we know that works.”

See Full Report

4.1 Qld : QAIHC welcomes Minister Ken Wyatt to their new offices in Brisbane

QAIHC CEO Mr Neil Willmett  was pleased to welcome Ken Wyatt MP to their new office this week. They discussed a range of topics including the great work QAIHC Members were doing, the work QAIHC leads in the Sector, and the importance of strong partnerships with government and stakeholders.

4.2 QLD : Renee Blackman CEO of Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa on fact finding road trip 

Setting off yesterday to Burketown to meet with Council, Aboriginal Land Council and Consumers re health services. Robust discussions- great feedback – NWHHS, Gidgee Healing and WQPHN working with the community to improve health outcomes

Renee Blackman second from LEFT

4.3 QLD : Goolburri ACCHO : Jaydon Adams Foundation Indigenous Jets Ipswich Jets 2019

 Big thank you to photographer for these amazing pictures. see more HERE

5.SA : Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti  the mob going smoke-free in Adelaide’s Prisons.

 

There have been some inspiring stories and changes going on. #BeHealthyBeSmokefree #Rewriteyourstory

6.WA : AHCWA : Derby Aboriginal Health Service (DAHS) in Derby completed their final block of training in our Cert II Family Wellbeing Training Course

Last month, students from the Derby Aboriginal Health Service (DAHS) in Derby completed their final block of training in our Cert II Family Wellbeing Training Course, all graduating successfully with ease.  The course runs over a 4 day period and is part of the Family Wellbeing program at AHCWA that aims to support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people and their communities within WA. The aim of the program is to increase awareness of the contributing factors that impact on family wellbeing and identify strategies to help build better foundations to overcome these factors.

Congratulations to the students from DAHS!

For more information on the training please contact our Family & Wellbeing Program Coordinator, Ken Nicholls on (08) 9227 1631 or email ken.nicholls at ahcwa.org.

7.1 NT : Team AMSANT traveled to Sydney this week for national NACCHO workshop 

7.2 : NT Katherine West Health Board traveling with our friend Healthy Harold to the schools talking about smoking 

We have been traveling with our friend Healthy Harold to the schools in the Katherine West region. Healthy Harold has been yarning to the kids about their dreams when finishing school and how smoking could affect their dreams.

More Pics Here

What’s your Smoke Free Story?

8. ACT : Julie Tongs CEO Winnunga ACCHO Canberra congratulates Aunty Thelma Weston the 2019 National NAIDOC Female Elder of the Year

Thelma Weston, a descendant of the Meriam people of the Torres Strait, is like no other. Her life is a story of survival, achievement, hope, love and celebration.

Despite only having a limited education, Aunty Thelma trained as a nurse and became a fully qualified health worker.
At age 83, Aunty Thelma still works full time at Winnunga Aboriginal Health and Community Services in Canberra, using her skills to manage the needle exchange program.

She has a long history of outstanding involvement and achievements in the community and has sat on a number of local and national committees and boards.
Aunty Thelma is on the board of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association (NATSIHWA) and regularly travels across Australia to attend board meetings.

As a breast cancer survivor, Aunty Thelma has worked with Breast Cancer Network Australia to encourage other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to connect, seek support and information about the disease.

Aunty Thelma is much loved, admired and well respected, not only in her workplace and amongst her clients, but in the wider ACT community and across Australia.  She is a wonderful example of a wise and caring Torres Strait Islander woman who has achieved much for her family and community.

9. Tas: Tasmanian NAIDOC Aboriginal award winners 

Congratulations Rob Braslin Aboriginal of the year. Congratulations Zack Riley-youth of the year; Adam Thompson-artist of the year; Taylah Pickett-scholar of the year (award accepted on her behalf by Raylene); Sherrin Egger-sportsperson of the year. Congratulations to all nominees and all award winners 🖤💛❤️

NACCHO and ACCHO Members #NAIDOC2019 Good News Stories : 5 of 5@NACCHOChair #NSW @Galambila @ahmrc #Vic @VACCHO_org @VAHS1972 #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @Apunipima #SA @AHCSA_ #WA @TheAHCWA #NT @DanilaDilba @CAACongress #Tas

1.1 National : NACCHO supports the pledge this week by the Coalition Government to hold a national referendum on constitutional change to recognise Indigenous voices in the constitution.

1.2 National : Our Acting NACCHO Chair Donnella Mills this week was on the panel at the NAIDOC Corporate breakfast in Cairns talking #VoiceTreatyTruth

1.3 National : The new National Indigenous Australians Agency was launched on 1 July 2019

2.1 NSW : The team at AH&MRC celebrate NAIDOC week

2.2 NSW : Huge NAIDOC Week turnout at Galamibila ACCHO and Ready Mob Picnic in the Coffs Harbour sunshine

2.3 NSW: Greater Western ( Sydney ) AMS Thanks the South Sydney Rabbitohs for a sharing NAIDOC Week

3.1 VIC : Parliamentary Secretary for Health (VIC) shares a NAIDOC morning team with Team VACCHO

3.2 VIC: Deadly day at the annual NAIDOC March in Melbourne that started at VAHS ACCHO 

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York coverage of Cairns NAIDOC celebrations

4.2 QLD : The QAIHC AOD Our Way 2 Project aims to address the use and harms of crystal methamphetamine (Ice) and other substances.

5. WA : Midland NAIDOC is AHCWA’s main event for the week, where all of our staff were on hand to help out for the day.

6. SA : Good news story about AMIC Mums and Bubs trainee Cherie Burnett who is currently doing her studies at AHCSA.

7.1 NT : The Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin Mobile team went down to Mindil Beach with the Mobile Clinic for Larrakia Nation’s Road Safety Barbeque.

7.2 NT : Congress Alice Springs NAIDOC Sports and Family Fun Day

8.TAS : It’s NAIDOC Week, so here’s nipaluna (Hobart’s) weather in palawa kani

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : NACCHO supports the pledge this week by the Coalition Government to hold a national referendum on constitutional change to recognise Indigenous voices in the constitution.

We welcome Minister Wyatt’s call to all Australians to join him on the journey to constitutional recognition of Australia’s First Nations peoples and support the creation of a voice for Indigenous Australians to influence the Australian Parliament.

NACCHO stands ready to do our part in achieving the best possible outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples throughout Australia, and we will continue to take a leadership role in the Coalition of Peaks Partnership with the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) on Closing the Gap.”

NACCHO Chief Executive Officer, Ms Patricia Turner AM said after the Ministers speech. Pictured above Left to Right with Pat : Tom Calma Co Chair Reconciliation Karen Mundine CEO Reconciliation and Donnella Mills Acting NACCHO Chair 

” Truth-telling about Indigenous Australians’ experience of colonisation is not a new idea, says Pat Turner, who heads the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO).

“I think our people have been engaged in truth-telling in many different forums over many decades,” she said. “It’s a question of whether there is a willingness in the greater Australian population to come to terms with the history of Indigenous people since colonisation.”

Ms Turner , who along with Mr Wyatt is co-chair of the joint council on Closing the Gap questioned the Minister’s seeming failure to commit to an Indigenous “Voice” of the kind envisaged in the landmark 2017 Uluru Statement from the Heart.

“People want more clarity on what the Minister means when he refers to hearing the ‘voices’ of individuals, families, communities and organisations.

What does that mean? The Uluru statement was very clear on having a more formal voice at a national level”, she said.

Additional text Pat Turner interview with SMH 10 July READ In FULL HERE

Pat will be a panellist on the ABC The Drumshow on Friday 12 July at 6pm.

Download full PDF Copy of NACCHO Press Release HERE

Read the Minister’s full National Press Club speech HERE

Or watch replay on ABC TV I View HERE

The NACCHO executive team attended the National Press Club conference by Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Indigenous Australians for NAIDOC Week 2019.

1.2 National : Our Acting NACCHO Chair Donnella Mills this week was on the panel at the NAIDOC Corporate breakfast in Cairns talking #VoiceTreatyTruth

Pictured below from Left to Right Founder of IndigenousX LukeLPearson , Donnella Mills ,Joann Schmider CQ Uni and Former NACCHO Chair 2001-03 Pat Anderson ( now Chair Lowitja Institute )

1.3 National : The new National Indigenous Australians Agency was launched on 1 July 2019

2.1 NSW : The team at AH&MRC celebrate NAIDOC week

2.2 NSW : Huge NAIDOC Week turnout at Galamibila ACCHO and Ready Mob Picnic in the Coffs Harbour sunshine

CEO Reuben Robinson ( Left ) with team Galambila member 

Watch Channel 9 interview with Reuben HERE

NAIDOC CELEBRATES WITH A HEALTHY MESSAGE

2.3 NSW: Greater Western ( Sydney ) AMS Thanks the South Sydney Rabbitohs for a sharing NAIDOC Week

SEE MORE PHOTO’s HERE

3.1 VIC : Parliamentary Secretary for Health (VIC) shares a NAIDOC morning team with Team VACCHO

VACCHO Exec were joined by Karen Heap VACCHO Chair and CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Co-operative ( And NACCHO Board Member) , Anthony Carbines Parliamentary Secretary for Health and Tiana Koehrer and Allara Pearce

3.2 VIC: Deadly day at the annual NAIDOC March in Melbourne that started at VAHS ACCHO 

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York coverage of Cairns NAIDOC celebrations 

 

4.2 QLD : The QAIHC AOD Our Way 2 Project aims to address the use and harms of crystal methamphetamine (Ice) and other substances.

Phase 1 of the project involved training 480 frontline workers, mostly from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations in 22 communities across Queensland, to better support clients and families impacted by problematic Ice and other substance use.

Phase 2 of the project is currently in the planning stage. Jermane Herbohn and Rita Francis have recently started at QAIHC as AOD Project Officers joining Eddie Fewings, AOD Manager. More information about the QAIHC AOD Our Way 2 Project will be released shortly.

#QAIHCdelivers #IndigenousHealth

5. WA : Midland NAIDOC is AHCWA’s main event for the week, where all of our staff were on hand to help out for the day.

Hundreds of our mob visited Midland Oval and joined us celebrating the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The event was free and combines cultural activities, live entertainment, youth zone, family friendly attractions and FREE food.#NAIDOC2019

6. SA : Good news story about AMIC Mums and Bubs trainee Cherie Burnett who is currently doing her studies at AHCSA.

7. NT : The Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin Mobile team went down to Mindil Beach with the Mobile Clinic for Larrakia Nation’s Road Safety Barbeque.

Larrakia Nation put on a breakfast and their Arts in the Grass program, NT Remote Alcohol and Other Drugs provided community education, Orange Sky was there with their free laundry and shower service van and OneDisease came along to engage with the community. It was fantastic to see all of these services coming together to provide support and to see the community members enjoying this fresh dry season morning!

7.2 NT : Congress Alice Springs NAIDOC Sports and Family Fun Day

See more pics Here

8.TAS : It’s NAIDOC Week, so here’s nipaluna (Hobart’s) weather in palawa kani

Listen Hear 

NACCHO and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : @NACCHOChair #NAIDOC2019 theme speaks to NACCHO’s priorities #voice, #treaty and #truth Plus Feature @DeadlyChoices #QLD #NSW #VIC  #WA #NT #SA #ACT  #TAS  

1.1 National : NACCHO Press Release : NAIDOC week theme speaks to NACCHO’s priorities voice, treaty and truth.

1.2 National : Our CEO Pat Turner meets with Northern Land Council to highlight the work of the Coalition of Peaks / Closing the Gap 

1.3 National : OCHRE Day Registrations open for the National Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne August 29 to 30 

  2.1 NSW  : AH&MRC  Communique to Stakeholders: AH&MRC Acting Chief Executive Arrangements

2.2 Katungul ACCHO : It pays in more ways than one to have a 715 Health Check

2.3 NSW : Survey of Aboriginal patient experience people admitted to NSW public hospitals.

3.1 VIC : VACCHO meets with the Victorian Minister of Mental Health 

3.2 VIC : VAHS would like to congratulate our staff member Chris Saunders who was crowned Mr. NAIDOC 2019.

FEATURE 4. QLD : Queensland’s Indigenous life expectancy gap is now the lowest in Australia, shows the overall positive impact the Brisbane-based Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) Deadly Choices is having among communities

5.1 WA : Aboriginal health Research Alliance in Kimberley big winners with Lotterywest grant of $2,920,185

5.2 WA : KAMS Aboriginal youth representatives met with Roger Cook MLA to share recommendations from Empowered Young Leaders forums in the Kimberley.

6. SA : AHCSA proudly launch their newest and deadliest resource, the ‘Deadly Sights’, a Communicare and MBS guide for the ACCHO Sector.

7. NT AMSANT’S 25 YEARS of health leadership conference 7-8 August 2019, Alice Springs 

8. ACT The June 2019 edition 17 pages of the Winnunga AHCS Newsletter is available

9.TAS : NAIDOC events in nipaluna ( Hobart ) and pataway ( Launceston )

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 NACCHO Press Release : NAIDOC week theme speaks to NACCHO’s priorities #voice, #treaty and #truth

“ NACCHO encourages the government to accelerate the call for a Voice to Parliament and supports a Makarrata Commission to supervise the treaty process as necessary steps towards true reconciliation. The voice will respond to both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s exclusion from the constitution and will help include our say in the development of significant laws and policies that affect our lives.

We work with Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) across the nation for the sustainable delivery of comprehensive primary healthcare services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.  Over the years, we have seen the increased accessibility and quality of services and medicines across states and territories.

It is our collective challenge along with our Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services sector to make a real difference in Closing the Gap. As we celebrate NAIDOC week, let’s continue our national conversations around voice and treaty grounded in truth-telling. Speaking truth to our country’s past will lay a strong foundation for a brighter, stronger and more equitable future for all.”

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills said, “The NAIDOC theme speaks to NACCHO’s priorities. Having an Indigenous voice to Parliament is an important step in protecting and ensuring the interests of Indigenous communities are represented at the highest levels of government

Download or read the NACCHO Press Release HERE

NACCHO NAIDOC Week 2019 Media Statement FINAL (1)

 

1.2 National : Our CEO Pat Turner meets with Northern Land Council to highlight the work of the Coalition of Peaks / Closing the Gap

Left to right :  NLC CEO Marion Scrymgour, NACCHO CEO Pat Turner and NLC Senior Policy Trish Rigby 

Left to right  : NLC Chairman Sam Bush-Blanasi, NACCHO CEO Pat Turner , NLC Deputy Chairman John Christopherson and AMSANT CEO John Paterson

2.3 National : OCHRE Day Registrations open for the National Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne August 29 to 30

Registrations for this year’s Ochre Day Men’s Conference are now live!

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Ochre Day Men’s Health conference provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to share knowledge, design concepts and strengthen relationships that all work to directly improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men..

To register for this year’s Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne, please proceed to follow the below link.

Ochre Day Accommodation

To take advantage of the Ochre Day conference room rates which have been arranged with Pullman on The Park, Melbourne, please proceed to follow the link below.

NACCHO OCHRE DAY WEBSITE 

2.1 NSW  : AH&MRC  Communique to Stakeholders: AH&MRC Acting Chief Executive Arrangements

Dear Stakeholders,

On the 3rd of July 2019, interviews will be taking place for the recruitment to the Chief

Executive Officer position at the AH&MRC until such time as the appointment is finalised the following arrangements are in place, Ms Tania Brown will be acting as the Chief Executive Officer and Mr Avnit Raj will be acting as the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of the AH&MRC.

On behalf of the AH&MRC Board of Directors and the staff at the AH&MRC we would like to thank Raylene for her dedication, direction and commitment that she has provided to the

AH&MRC and we wish Raylene all the best and great success as the Chief Executive Officer of Awabakal Aboriginal Medical Service.

2.2 Katungul ACCHO : It pays in more ways than one to have a 715 Health Check

Congratulations to Kaiden Fernando and Sean Kinchela who are the winners of Katungul’s Deadly Choices Deadly Blues Origin experience.

Kaiden and Sean had their 715 Health Check at Katungul, picked up a Deadly Blues jersey and automatically went into the draw to win an all expenses paid trip to Sydney to see the final State of Origin game this month.

Pictured: Katungul Admin Team Leader, Cherie Russel and Director of Community Services, Angela Nye draw the winners today in our Batemans Bay clinic!

2.3 NSW : Survey of Aboriginal patient experience people admitted to NSW public hospitals.

BHI and the Centre for Aboriginal Health are working together to collect the experiences and outcomes of care for Aboriginal people admitted to NSW public hospitals.

For the first time, every adult patient who identifies as Aboriginal will be invited to provide feedback on their admitted patient or maternity care experience during 2019.

The Adult Admitted Patient Survey asks Aboriginal people who have recently been admitted to a NSW public hospital for feedback about their experiences of care. This survey is mailed out to people about three months after the end of their hospital stay.

The Maternity Care Survey asks Aboriginal women who recently gave birth in a NSW public hospital about the care they received. This survey is mailed out to women about three months after their baby is delivered.

The results of these surveys will provide hospitals with valuable information about what they are doing well and where they can improve care to better meet the needs of Aboriginal people.

BHI previously published a Patient Perspectives report on the experiences of care for Aboriginal people, which drew on data from almost 2,700 Aboriginal patients who were admitted to a NSW public hospital in 2014.

Healthcare in Focus 2017 examined healthcare in the context of three important dimensions of performance – accessibility, appropriateness and effectiveness – for more than 60 measures and one third of these measures related to the experiences and outcomes of Aboriginal people.

To find out about upcoming releases of survey results that reflect the experiences of Aboriginal people, please refer to our Reports Plan.

3.1 VIC : VACCHO meets with the Victorian Minister of Mental Health 

Acting CEO of VACCHO Trevor Pearce and Hon. Martin Foley Minister for Mental Health met this week to confirm new resourcing so VACCHO can support Community consultations into the Royal Commission in Mental Health Services.

Trevor believes that we need “…to support strong Aboriginal voices and input.”

See background story Melbourne’s Indigenous people in grips of mental health crisis

3.2 VIC : VAHS would like to congratulate our staff member Chris Saunders who was crowned Mr. NAIDOC 2019.

VAHS sponsored Chris to participate as an candidate in this year’s Mr. NAIDOC.

VAHS would also like to congratulate all other winners and all the nominees from last night’s event. No doubt all the winners will make the Victorian Aboriginal Community proud during NAIDOC 2019.

Sports Person – Marissa Williamson
Miss NAIDOC – Yirgjhilya Lawrie
Mr NAIDOCs – Chris Saunders
NAIDOC Patron Uncle Jack Charles

*Photo source – 3KND

4. QLD : Queensland’s Indigenous life expectancy gap is now the lowest in Australia, shows the overall positive impact the Brisbane-based Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) Deadly Choices is having among communities

The State Government’s 2018 Closing the Gap report card, which indicates Queensland’s Indigenous life expectancy gap is now the lowest in Australia, shows the overall positive impact the Brisbane-based Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) is having among communities.

IUIH’s flagship Deadly Choices engagement and health promotion program is considered the most recognised Indigenous brand in Australia, and welcomed almost 600 participants at this year’s Junior Murri Carnival, which started this week at Brendale’s South Pine Sporting Complex.

The inaugural 2-day Junior and Senior Murri Netball Carnival began Thursday at the State Netball Centre in Nathan.

As with all Deadly Choices initiatives, mandatory health checks need to have taken place before confirmation of each individual registration to these free events.

The directive is one wholeheartedly supported by notable Deadly Choices Ambassadors, former Brisbane Broncos, Queensland and Australian rugby league players Steve Renouf and Petero Civoniceva, plus fellow former NRL Dally M Player of the Year Preston Campbell.

The trio will be joined by another former NRL representative and newly appointed Deadly Choices Ambassador, Brenton Bowen; Olympic weightlifter, Brandon Wakeling; NRLW representative, Tallisha Harden; former Olympic sprinter Patrick Johnson, plus Reds rugby players Moses Sorovi and Duncan Paia’aua.

“Participation in any Deadly Choices program requires individuals to commit to a comprehensive health check and complementing health management plan, so there’s strong health values associated with the brand,” confirmed Renouf.

“This is a brilliant school holiday initiative which has become one of our most frequented events among local communities.

“We get real outcomes across the whole spectrum of the community; from infants, adolescents and our elders, everyone is positively affected.

“This program enables us to motivate kids into ideal lifestyle choices with respect to nutrition, exercise and education.”

There’s added anticipation surrounding the future successes of the Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival, as youngsters aged 3-4 years are already being indoctrinated into the Deadly Choices ways, through the highly successful Deadly Kindies Program.

Over a 12-month period (2017-18), this initiative recorded 300 percent increases in kindy enrolments across Queensland, which is music to the ears of Deadly Kindies Ambassador, Johnathon Thurston.

‘I’m a Dad to four little ones and I know just how important Kindy is,’ confirmed Thurston.

‘At Kindy our kids get to play and learn and get ready to go to school.’

Education is a vital pillar in the pro-active health pursuits of Deadly Choices, which is assisting IUIH to provide a national blueprint towards greater life expectancy among Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

“Deadly Choices is well engrained within communities throughout South-east Queensland, ensuring members are healthy, active and obviously educated around what needs to be done to be living a very healthy lifestyle for themselves and their families,” added Civoniceva.

“Programs like the Junior Murri Carnival will hopefully light the fire within our little people in what they want to achieve in life and make positive steps towards achieving those goals and chasing their dreams.”

Testament to this mantra is Preston Campbell, who despite his diminutive frame escalated himself to cult status in the NRL, claiming the 2001 Dally M Player-of-the-Year title and securing a 2003 premiership ring with the Penrith Panthers.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices,” confirmed Campbell.

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back. I love being at events like the Junior Murri Carnival, spending time and staying connected with community.”

The Netball component to this year’s Junior Murri Carnival will take place as a stand-alone event at the home of the Queensland Firebirds, the all-new Queensland State Netball Centre in Nathan.

Held on July 5-6, the junior girls will participate in clinics and educational sessions with the Firebirds and Deadly Choices teams, before participating in the Netball Carnival on the final day of the event.

The inaugural Senior Open Women’s competition will run alongside the juniors, with major plans being discussed towards greater participation in 2020 and beyond.

5.1 WA : Aboriginal health Research Alliance in Kimberley big winners with Lotterywest grant of $2,920,185

  • Lotterywest has awarded a grant of $2,920,185 towards the establishment of the Kimberley Aboriginal Health Research Alliance
  • Alliance aims to co-ordinate research and improve health in the Kimberley region

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt has welcomed the establishment of the Kimberley

Aboriginal Health Research Alliance, made possible by a grant of $2,920,185 from Lotterywest.

The Aboriginal-led alliance consists of six organisations representing Kimberley-wide Aboriginal communities, research institutes, universities and health service providers.

The founding members of the alliance are Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services, WA Country

Health Service, Rural Clinical School of Western Australia, The University of Notre Dame Australia – Nulungu Research Centre, Telethon Kids Institute and the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia.

The focus of the alliance will be in promoting Aboriginal-led research methodologies, building the capacity of Aboriginal researchers, and monitoring the implementation of health research in the Kimberley.

The grant from Lotterywest will contribute towards support staff, developing training and resources, information technology and other supports to create avenues for community involvement in research and health services.

Comments attributed to Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt:

“It is fantastic that through Lotterywest, the McGowan Government is able to support the establishment of the Kimberley Aboriginal Health Research Alliance.

“All the organisations that will form part of the alliance have a strong track record in both research and in delivering better health outcomes for people in the Kimberley.

“The research that will come about as a result of this investment will improve service delivery, health care practice and improved health outcomes for the Kimberley region.”

5.2. WA : KAMS Aboriginal youth representatives met with Roger Cook MLA to share recommendations from Empowered Young Leaders forums in the Kimberley.

They focused on collaboration & ensuring young Aboriginal people are heard & their actions are supported into the future

The Kimberley region is one of 12 sites across Australia selected by the Australian Government to participate in The National Suicide Prevention Trial.

The 12 locations chosen for the Trial have a higher than average suicide rate and this major trial aims to find the most effective approaches to suicide prevention for at-risk populations and share this knowledge across Australia.

Each year about 3,000 Australians take their lives and the suicide rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders is about twice that of non-Indigenous people.

The Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial is helping to develop a model of suicide prevention that meets the unique and culturally-sensitive needs of the region’s Aboriginal communities.

The communities involved are: Broome, Bidyadanga, Dampier Peninsula, Derby, Fitzroy Crossing, Halls Creek, Kununurra, the Kutjunka region and Wyndham.

Preventing suicide is a complex problem and a one-size-fits-all strategy for dealing with the challenge may not be the best approach. This is exactly what this prevention trial is all about.

SEE WEBSITE 

6. SA : AHCSA proudly launch their newest and deadliest resource, the ‘Deadly Sights’, a Communicare and MBS guide for the ACCHO Sector.

A fantastic effort by the Eye Health Team and Quality Systems Team here AHCSA

7. NT AMSANT’S 25 YEARS of health leadership conference 7-8 August 2019, Alice Springs 

Our Health, Our Way – 25 Years of Health Leadership Conference, at the Alice Springs Convention Centre in the Northern Territory.

We are hoping to get a big turnout from members to celebrate and showcase the success of our sector.

Member’s rate of $300, which includes the Gala Dinner.

If you are interested to put a stall at the conference, please contact us or for any other enquiries please feel free to contact Mia Christophersen – mia.christophersen@amsant.org.au

or on mobile – 0429 991 763.

ACCOMMODATION

Attendees wanting to book their accommodation can find a 20% discount (best available rate at the time)
by typing the code below or by calling 08 8950 8022 / emailing: doubletreealicesprings.reservations@hilton.com

DISCOUNT CODE: GCONA

REGISTRATION

[ CLICK HERE ]

8. ACT The June 2019 edition 17 pages of the Winnunga AHCS Newsletter is available

Read Download HERE

Winnunga_AHCS_Newsletter_June_2019 Winnunga_AHCS_Newsletter_June_2019

9.TAS : NAIDOC events in nipaluna ( Hobart ) and pataway ( Launceston )

Launceston

NACCHO Our Members #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : Features National @NACCHOChair #LowitjaConf2019 @Apunipima #715HealthChecks #QLD @QAIHC_QLD #CEOSleepout $ #NT @KenWyattMP visits @AMSANTaus #NSW Katungul #Vic MDAS #WA South West AMS #SA #ACT

Feature article this week 715 Health Checks 

1.1 National : Relationships key to better Indigenous Health – and the 715 health check is paving the way says Dr Mark Wenitong

1.2 National : Donnella Mills Acting @NACCHOChair broadcast interview at Lowitja Conference in Darwin

1.3 National : Donnella Mills Acting @NACCHOChair and John Paterson CEO AMSANT presents at Lowitja  the Coalition of ACCO Peaks on #ClosingtheGap

1.4 National : Michaela Coleborne the new NACCHO Director of Policy visits Lowitja Conference Darwin meeting many of our stakeholders like End RHD

2. NSW : Katungul ACCHO newly appointed CEO for the next 12 months, Joanne Grant talks about what motivates her to get out of bed every day

3. Vic MDAS Family and Community Services team supports our clients as they strive to achieve their own goals in life.

4. QLD :QAIHC CEO sleeps out to raise vital funds for homelessness : Please Donate HERE

5.1 WA : The South West Aboriginal Medical Service and City of Bunbury have been working together to deliver a $28 million multi-faceted facility for those living in the region. 

5.2 WA : AHCWA Starts new course in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Primary Health Care Practice

6. SA : AHCSA_ Study redefines gender policy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples 

7. NT : Minister Ken Wyatt visits AMSANT office in Darwin after opening Day 2 Lowitja Conference ( See Video )

8.ACT : Winnunga ACCHO adviser says reports expose ACT disinterest in Aboriginal care

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

Feature article this week

1.1 National : Relationships key to better Indigenous Health – and the 715 health check is paving the way says Dr Mark Wenitong

“You really have to engage with the local Aboriginal community, so they feel comfortable to come in and get their 715.

 You need to understand cultural sensitivities to get a proper medical history – you can’t diagnose if you don’t know what’s really going on with a patient, so building that trust is really critical.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have the worst health outcomes of any community in Australia.

We have a responsibility as health professionals to take care of this community, the same way that we take care of any part of our community. 

 Our people can actually take care of themselves if they have the education and the information in their hands.”

Dr Mark Wenitong Apunipima Health Service

Mark is one of a kind. Descending from the Kabi Kabi tribal group of South Queensland, Mark is one of the first Aboriginal men to graduate as a Doctor and is now a powerful advocate for improving Indigenous health outcomes.

Mark says he was inspired to become a Doctor by his mother who was one of the first Aboriginal Health Workers to be trained in Queensland. Her work with the Cape York community, in particular tackling the surge of sexually transmitted diseases in the region at the time, inspired a passion for better health within the family.

“Mum’s legacy was what really made me want to become a Doctor. I wanted to be able to help our mob to look after their own health, to provide a cultural lens. For me, that’s why it’s so important that Aboriginal Doctors are part of our service system, we can translate research, evidence and even program work into real practice” says Mark.

“With more Aboriginal Doctors, we can relate to our people, overcome barriers and build cultural resonance.”

After studying and graduating from the University of Newcastle in 1995, Mark is now based in Cairns at Apunipima Health Service, working with the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait communities up north, both in the clinic and out in communities.

Mark says, the annual health check for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, item 715 under the Medicare Benefits Schedule, provides enormous opportunities for GPs to engage with Indigenous communities about their health needs.

View the video case study herehttps://youtu.be/lUgJsjtiItA

“The importance of 715s can’t be overstated – it’s one of the most important innovations that Medicare, and the Government, has brought in. We needed to do it, because we needed to get an understanding of what people’s health profile was before they were unwell. Why wait until patients come to us with a chronic disease? Let’s start screening early,” says Mark.

With Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2.3 times more likely to suffer a chronic condition, the annual health check is designed to provide early detection and prevention. Mark says the assessment is critically important in improving Indigenous health outcomes.

“There’s a couple of aspects to a 715 that are really important. The first is the screening – there are lots of people that are asymptomatic – meaning they aren’t showing symptoms yet –  that could have early disease like diabetes, hypertension. These patients may not come in until they get symptoms because people still think they have to be sick to come to a clinic. It’s an important way to engage the community, so they know they can come to a clinic whenever they need do,” says Mark.

“The other important aspect is that it’s a comprehensive assessment – a complete head to toe. By screening a broad array of physical, social and emotional factors, we get a really good picture of individual and community level health. Because we can identify problems early, we can also start early treatment.

“At a community level, we get really great data from undertaking the 715. We work with the local Elders groups to deliver 715 health check days out in the community, and screen people that otherwise wouldn’t come to the clinic. It gives us an idea of what the issues are at a really local level. We can then look at broader issues that affect the whole community, like immunisation, dementia, mental health and social wellbeing and can work to develop appropriate programs that tackle the specific issue a community might be experiencing.”

The annual health check is available for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of all ages, however nationally less than 30 per cent of patients are accessing the check.

Mark says it’s important to engage young patients with getting a 715 early as part of educating people about how to stay healthy.

“I see young people come in for their 715 and they’re very well. But I talk to them about health maintenance, talk to them about what they could end up like. Their uncle whose overweight, with no teeth and smoking outside. Our young people want to look deadly and fit, so we can help them with information and tips to stay in good health.

But with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Doctors representing less than 1% of the general practitioner workforce it’s important that all GPs understand the benefits of a 715 for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

Mark says the key to improving mainstream health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients is to encourage practices to engage with their local community to build cultural competency.

“If Aboriginal people walk into a service and don’t feel welcome, they won’t come back. Access is a big issue – creating a safe space for people to feel welcome is important,” says Mark.

“You really have to engage with the local Aboriginal community, so they feel comfortable to come in and get their715. You need to understand cultural sensitivities to get a proper medical history – you can’t diagnose if you don’t know what’s really going on with a patient, so building that trust is really critical.

“Most GPs can do this fairly well with most people, so it’s just a matter of then learning a little bit more about Aboriginal social and cultural issues to be able to relate to these patients in the right way. If you do, you’ll make a big difference.

“Some mainstream practices I’ve worked with have done really simple things, like putting Aboriginal health posters up in the waiting room or hiring and Aboriginal Health Worker or Aboriginal receptionist to help people feel welcome.”

Mark’s message to health professionals is simple – help your Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients in the same way you help any others.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have the worst health outcomes of any community in Australia. We have a responsibility as health professionals to take care of this community, the same way that we take care of any part of our community.  Our people can actually take care of themselves if they have the education and the information in their hands.”

The 715 health check is available annually to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of all ages. Further information, including resources for patients and health practitioners is available at www.health.gov.au/715-health-check.

1.2 National : Donnella Mills Acting @NACCHOChair broadcast interview at Lowitja Conference in Darwin

1.3 National : Donnella Mills Acting @NACCHOChair and John Paterson CEO AMSANT presents at Lowitja  the Coalition of ACCO Peaks on #ClosingtheGap

Read Full Speech Here

1.4 National : Michaela Coleborne the new NACCHO Director of Policy visits Lowitja Conference Darwin meeting many of our stakeholders like End RHD

NACCHO are a founding member of the RHD alliance, leading work to across Australia. ( with Vicki Wade on right )

Read NACCHO and RHD HERE

2. NSW : Katungul ACCHO newly appointed CEO for the next 12 months, Joanne Grant talks about what motivates her to get out of bed every day

What motivates you to get out of bed every day to come and work at Katungul and why?
I firstly want to pay my respects to the Walbunja peoples, some of whom are family, of the Yuin nation and I am really honoured to be able to work on their land and with the local Aboriginal Communities along the far South Coast of NSW.
There is well documented evidence of the disparity faced by Aboriginal people in Australia and still today our people are denied their basic human rights. The opportunity to make a change for our people is what really motivates me.

Working in the health sector has been an eye opening experience for me as we see daily the ‘real’ effects of colonisation and trans-generational trauma which presents in many forms, for our mob eg AOD, mental health, chronic disease, family breakdown to name a few. To be able to work in an organisation like Katungul, that can provide services and programs directly to our communities, and who value cultural safety is what I believe will make a genuine difference.

What are you most excited about taking on in the next 12 months?

I am keen for the challenge that lies ahead of me. Whilst I have been apart of the executive team at Katungul for nearly 4 years, to take the reins of our organisation requires a whole new level of responsibility, way of thinking and commitment.
I see my role as an opportunity to build on our successes and have us recognised for the work we do.

It disappoints me at times that our Government still does not fully value the significant role of an Aboriginal community controlled organisation, which is evident when you look at the funding options that bypass us. I believe, we hold the vital keys and answers to our solutions!  I am keen to take the lead and have us write our own narrative of change as we move forward.

What can you personally bring to you role?

MMM.. talking myself up is not a big strength of mine, but when I look at my employment history I believe I can bring 30 plus years of demonstrated experience and commitment of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples with me.

When I left year 12 my first real job was with the Human Rights Commission, handling complaints of racial discrimination around Australia. This was a not just a job but a real life lesson for me, at that young age.It really opened my eyes up to the injustices my people faced. These stories have stayed with me throughout my employment journey and always motivates me to champion change.

What do you think will be your biggest challenges?

Working in any Aboriginal organisation is a hard ask, as we face many political challenges, at all levels including by our own communities. There seems to be a perception out there that we, Aboriginal organisations, receive a plethora of funding and are able to address ALL issues faced by our communities.

Unfortunately this is not the case, and we need to be clear and concise about what we can and cannot do and exceed where we are able to.  Living in regional Australia itself is a challenge as local resources are limited which means we have to access support and services for our clients out of area. This is clearly evident in the AOD space with all clients requiring residential treatment/care having to leave the area and  their family and Kinship networks which at times can be problematic.

What can the community expect to see from you in this role?

They can expect to see an Aboriginal woman lead with integrity, take on the challenges as they arise and to put the needs of the communities we serve  at the centre of our business.

3. Vic MDAS Family and Community Services team supports our clients as they strive to achieve their own goals in life.

We have specialist teams focussing on the different needs within our community:

• Aged and Disability
• Children’s Placement Services
• Family Services
• Youth Services
• Homelessness and Housing Services

Our staff work from a “Best-Interest Case Practice Model” – that means we support clients to achieve their goals and maintain their connections to their community, their families and, importantly, their culture.

Website

4. QLD :QAIHC CEO sleeps out to raise vital funds for homelessness : Please Donate HERE

Last night ( Thursday 20 June ) the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) CEO, Neil Willmett, slept out on the cold, hard concrete of Brisbane’s Powerhouse as part of the Vinnies CEO Sleepout.

The annual event raises much needed funds and awareness to address homelessness in Australia. For the CEOs involved it is one night of discomfort, but for more than 116,427 Australians, including more than 22,000 Queenslanders, homelessness is a constant reality.

This is the third year that Mr Willmett has participated in the CEO Sleepout, a cause close to his heart.

“It is well known that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are over-represented in the homeless population. Across Australia, approximately 25% of people who access specialist homelessness services identified as being Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander,” said Mr Willmett.

Mr Willmett is striving to raise a minimum of $5,000 to help the St Vincent de Paul Society Queensland (Vinnies) provide support to people in crisis.

“I am proud to participate in the Vinnies CEO Sleepout. As the CEO of QAIHC, I lead an organisation whose membership has a positive impact on the most vulnerable. Across the whole of Queensland, the homeless population is in the thousands. Homelessness can have profound and ongoing effects on people and their health and wellbeing,” Mr Willmett said.

Funds raised at the Vinnies CEO Sleepout enables Vinnies to provide vital services to people experiencing homelessness. Vinnies provides emergency accommodation, advocacy support, budgeting services, living skills programs, emergency relief, transitional housing and access to programs that help rebuild the lives of Australians living in poverty.

To donate, visit www.ceosleepout.org.au/fundraisers/neilwillmett/brisbane

5.1 WA : The South West Aboriginal Medical Service and City of Bunbury have been working together to deliver a $28 million multi-faceted facility for those living in the region. 

Plans for the construction of an all-encompassing Indigenous health hub are progressing despite the project not yet receiving state or federal funding.

Last week council agreed to transfer city-owned land to SWAMS to develop the health campus.

Originally published HERE

Lot 4669 Forrest Avenue, Carey Park which is known as Jaycee Park will be transferred to SWAMS with the city agreeing to waive the development application fee of $34,196.

City of Bunbury Mayor Gary Brennan said the health hub would be a welcomed addition to the region.

“We are pleased to be able to provide the land to SWAMS for their health precinct and council would like to acknowledge all the hard work they do as well as the excellent service they provide to the community,” he said.

“By expanding their practice they will be able to do even more for their clients and make health care available and more accessible to those who need it.”

SWAMS chief executive Lesley Nelson thanked council for prioritising Indegenous health.

“This is about looking at a one-stop health hub to bring all of our programs and services under the one roof, in the one location,” she said.

“Strong local commitment and continuity are required to close the gap and that is why this purpose built, local facility is so important.”

During planning for the new purpose-built hub, SWAMS has partnered with University of Technology Sydney, to ensure an innovative, cutting edge design which will deliver positive outcomes for clients.

The build will include clinical and research facilities, administrative offices, dedicated maternal and child health facility and an outdoor Indigenous park in the one location.

There will also be a fenced-off children’s playground, landscaped gardens and new toilet facilities all open to the public.

Ms Nelson said they were still looking for funding partners and had sent the health hub plans out to a number of ministers.

“The total project will be around $28 million but if there is opportunities to undertake work at different stages that’s what we’ll do,” she said.

“We’re positive that it will happen, the first stage we’ll be looking at is building the health and wellbeing community centre and the landscaping and the park.

“That will get us started and showcase to the local community that something is happening on the site that is exciting.

“We know it’s important and this is part of trying to close the gap at a local level from the community – in terms of driving what they want to see here.”

SWAMS will now submit the development application to the City for assessment.

Once it has been approved, construction is expected to be completed within 12 months.

For more information visit www.swams.com.au.

5.2 WA : AHCWA Starts new course in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Primary Health Care Practice

NEW COURSE STARTING THURSDAY JULY 25th 2019

If you are interested in completing the Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Primary Health Care Practice” course or would like more information please email shirley.newell@ahcwa.org. or phone 92771631.

6. SA : AHCSA_ Study redefines gender policy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples 

Read and /Or Download Report HERE

7. NT : Minister Ken Wyatt Visits AMSANT office in Darwin after opening Day 2 Lowitja Conference 

8.ACT : Winnunga ACCHO adviser says reports expose ACT disinterest in Aboriginal care

 ” THE release in late 2018 of two reports – “The Family Matters Report 2018”, which concerns  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care or in touch with the child protection system, and the Bureau of Statistics report “Prisoners in Australia 2018″– are a wake-up call for Canberra.” 

Jon Stanhope is employed as an adviser at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service

Originally Published HERE 30 Jan 2019

Jon Stanhope
Jon Stanhope.

“The Family Matters Report 2018”, which measures the trends in over-representation of Aboriginal children in out-of-home-care is as depressing as it is distressing. The report includes a jurisdiction-by-jurisdiction report card on the implementation of best practice in child protection as represented by the Aboriginal Child Placement Principles and the four building blocks of the Family Matters Roadmap. “The Family Matters Report” is a collaborative effort of SNAICC-National Voice for our Children, the University of Melbourne and Griffith University. In other words, it is rigorous and credible.

In summary, the report reveals (and not for the first time) that the ACT is among the worst-performing jurisdictions in Australia and, on a number of specific and major measures, the worst-performing jurisdiction in Australia when it comes to the care of Aboriginal children in contact with the child-protection system.

In relation to the Aboriginal Child Placement Principles, recognised nationally as of fundamental importance to the management and care of Aboriginal children in out-of-home care, the ACT is identified as the only jurisdiction in Australia that has refused to include in its child-protection legislation any of the recognised elements of self-determination or a human-rights-based framework for participation in child protection decision making such as consulting Aboriginal community controlled organisations and involving them in decisions about the placement or care of Aboriginal children.

In light of the ACT government’s practice of excluding Aboriginal participation in child protection it is no surprise that the ACT has the highest rate of Aboriginal children in touch with the care and protection system in Australia and the third highest rate of removal of Aboriginal children from their families in Australia. An Aboriginal child in the ACT is 14 times more likely than a non-Aboriginal child to be in out-of-home care.

Stunningly, despite these quite shameful outcomes the ACT has the lowest level of funding in Australia for intensive family support and the second lowest level of family support generally.

Unsurprisingly, there are clear linkages between children who have been removed from their family by care and protection services and poverty, disadvantage and ultimately contact with the criminal justice system. The ABS report – “Prisoners in Australia 2018” – to the extent that it exposes and details the over-representation of Aboriginal men and women in prison in the ACT, confirms the depth of the failure of the ACT government and justice system to address either the causes of or appropriate response to Aboriginal offending.

The headline finding in the ABS report is that the ACT has the highest ratio of Aboriginal people in jail in Australia. An Aboriginal person in Canberra is 17.5 times more likely than a non-Aboriginal person to be sent to prison. The next highest is WA with a ratio of 16 followed by the NT where the ratio is 12. The ACT also stands out as the jurisdiction with the highest increase in relative imprisonment of Aboriginal people between 2008 and 2018, with an increase over the 10 years of a massive 100 per cent. In that same period WA and SA reduced the relative imprisonment rate by 9 per cent and 1 per cent respectively.

There is perhaps no single better illustration of the extent of inequality in Canberra than that the city with the highest median household income, the highest rates of home ownership and private health insurance, the fastest growing median house price and the highest mean income in the nation also has the highest rate of indigenous incarceration.

There is a range of other data reported by the ABS that is as equally shocking as the raw rate of indigenous incarceration. For instance the rate of prior imprisonment (or recidivism rate) of Aboriginal prisoners currently in the AMC is a mind blowing 90 per cent, the highest in Australia. Of the 109 Aboriginal detainees in the AMC on June 30 a staggering 99 of them were recidivists.

Equally alarming is the rate of increase in the ACT in the crude imprisonment rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Between 2017 and 2018 the rate in the ACT increased by 12 per cent to produce an increase over the six-year period from 2012 to 2018 of 89 per cent against a national average of 24 per cent. By way of comparison the growth in incarceration, over the same six years, in the NT, WA and SA was 8 per cent, 15 per cent and 18 per cent respectively.

That the rate of increase in the incarceration of Aboriginal people in the ACT, over the last six years, is 65 per cent higher than the national average and that the rate of relative imprisonment has doubled in the last 10 years is deeply alarming and surely demands immediate and independent investigation and an urgent response. However, for that to occur there needs to be someone in government who actually cares.

My fear is that the ACT government has sensed that the Canberra community doesn’t really care that much about the level of indigenous disadvantage and poverty in Canberra and has accordingly decided that there is no need for it to either.

Jon Stanhope is employed as an adviser at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service.

NACCHO Our Members #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : Features National @NACCHOChair @KenWyattMP #NSW @ahmrc #RedfernAMS #KatungulACCHO#VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @DeadlyChoices #WA @TheAHCWA #WirrakaMayaACCHO #NT @CAACongress

1.1 National : Minister’s ongoing talks about the Closing the Gap refresh

1.2 National : CEO Pat Turner presents at international Conference in New Zealand about developing a  ” Roadmap to end RHD “

1.3 National : Our Deputy CEO Dawn Casey co chair Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Systems Evaluation: Health Sector Co-design Group (HSCG) Download Communiqué for February 2019

2.1 NACCHO joins Redfern AMS congratulating Aunty Dulcie Flower OAM  on receiving an Order of Australia Medal (OAM)

2.2 NSW : Download the 75 Page AH&MRC report om World No Tobacco Day and the work being done by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) in tobacco control.

2.3 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Fathers and Sons video launched

3.VIC : VACCHO SEWB Gathering for members , training ,celebrating culture and spending time together.

4.1 QLD : QAIHC  Mobile health scoping study to address cardiovascular disease risk factors

4.2 QLD : The Deadly Choices Maroons health campaign being implemented by Community Controlled Health Services throughout Queensland kicks in over coming weeks

5.1 WA : AHCWA recently delivered our Aboriginal Health Worker Immunisation Course at the Bega Garnbirringu Health Service in Kalgoorlie.

5.2 WA : Alfred Barker Chairperson of Wirraka Maya working to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

6.NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs Medical Director on Queens Birthday Honour List

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

 

1.1 National : Minister’s ongoing talks about the Closing the Gap refresh

Our Acting NACCHO Chair Donnella Mills and representatives of the Coalition of Peaks met in Canberra this week with Minister for Indigenous Australians Ken Wyatt for constructive and positive ongoing talks about the Closing the Gap refresh and the Partnership Agreement with the Coalition of Peaks.

1.2 National : CEO Pat Turner presents at international Conference in New Zealand about developing a  ” Roadmap to end RHD “

Our CEO Pat Turner presenting powerful case studies at Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference in NEW Zealand this – keeping governments accountable to community priorities in health

Developing a new Roadmap to end RHD Pat talked about the partnership of NACCHO with the RHD coalition

1.3 National : Our Deputy CEO Dawn Casey co chair Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Systems Evaluation: Health Sector Co-design Group (HSCG) Download Communiqué for February 2019

The Department of Health commissioned a national evaluation of the Australian Government’s investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care, which occurs primarily through the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme.

This evaluation is occurring over four years from 2019-2022 and includes the evaluation team working closely with a Health Sector Co-Design Group (HSCG).

The HSCG’s third meeting in February was the first meeting in the implementation phase of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Systems Evaluation.

After an Acknowledgement of Country and a welcome by the acting co-chairs – Dr Casey and Ms Young – members were invited to discuss what was ‘top of mind’ coming into the meeting.

Download Communique HSCG Meeting No.3 Communique – 2019_05_31

2.1 NACCHO joins Redfern AMS congratulating Aunty Dulcie Flower OAM  on receiving an Order of Australia Medal (OAM)

On behalf of the Aboriginal Medical Service Board, Staff and Community we wish Aunty Dulcie Flower congratulations on receiving an Order of Australia Medal (OAM) on the weekend.

Aunty Dulcie is an AMS founding member, volunteer, a staff member and continues today as a long standing board member.

Dulcie was instrumental in the development of the Aboriginal Health Worker Program, which ensures our communities are advocated and cared for by appropriately skilled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce staff.

Read Dolcie’s interview about Indigenous rights activism HERE

Dulcie has had distinguished career as a Registered Nurse and Lecturer, an activist and mentor, but above all a friend to many.

Congratulations Aunty Dulcie!

2.2 NSW : Download the 75 Page AH&MRC report om World No Tobacco Day and the work being done by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) in tobacco control.

Around the world last month, activities for World No Tobacco Day 2019 put the spotlight on “tobacco and lung health”, aiming to increase awareness of tobacco’s impact on people’s lung health and the fundamental role lungs play for the health and well-being of all people.

The campaign also served as a call to action, advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption and engaging stakeholders across multiple sectors in the fight for tobacco control.

In Australia, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW (AH&MRC) sponsored an innovative Twitter Festival, hosted by Croakey Professional Services, to profile the work being done by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) in tobacco control.

Download the report from Here

NoTobaccoDay_Report_Final

Or from Croakey

https://croakey.org/read-all-about-it-download-the-communitycontrol-twitter-festival-report/

NACCHO social media contribution page 11 -15

2.3 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Fathers and Sons video launched

Katungul Koori Connections Officer Wally Stewart talking about last years Father & Sons Camp; a fantastic program that brings people back to country, helping to keep culture alive and encourage a healthy lifestyle.

Music created by participants of the Katungul Music/Dance program run by Sean Kinchela & Wally Stewart.

Video courtesy of Afterglow. We’d like to thank them for their generosity & partnership – www.afterglow.net.au S

 

3.1 VIC : VACCHO SEWB Gathering for members , training ,celebrating culture and spending time together.

VACCHO’s Whitney Solomon, ETU Program Coordinator SEWB, delivering Ice Prevention training to Victoria’s awesome SEWB Aboriginal Health Workers at VACCHO’s SEWB Gathering


Proud Waywurru woman Sam Paxton from Djimba (in red), guides SEWB Aboriginal Health workers through a yarning circle at our SEWB Gathering

Proud Wagiman man Nathan Patterson from Iluka Art & Design [-o-] leads a painting workshop while proud Gunditjmara woman Laura Thompson from The Koorie Circle teaches SEWB Aboriginal health workers to create contemporary Aboriginal designed and inspired jewellery made from sustainably sourced timber.

So it’s not all work at our SEWB Gatherings, it’s also about celebrating culture and spending time together.

4.1 QLD : QAIHC  Mobile health scoping study to address cardiovascular disease risk factors

“This type of m-health innovation has the potential to provide culturally responsive and appropriate primary health care that can be embedded in our models of care.

Preliminary data suggest m-health technology can increase engagement and ownership throughout the patient journey and facilitate sustainable positive heath behaviour changes.

As cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of disease for First Nations Peoples, we are committed to exploring options that empower individuals to improve the management of their health, as well as improve access to health services.”

Chief Executive Officer of QAIHC, Neil Willmett, is excited about the potential the app has to improve health care access and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with hypertension.

The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples taking antihypertensive medication has increased, indicating a rise in the number of people at risk of cardiovascular disease.

The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have partnered on a mobile health (m-health) scoping study for the screening and management of cardiovascular disease.

CSIRO have developed an app that can be customised for blood pressure monitoring and are interested in learning how it could work within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisation (ATSICCHO) sector’s models of care. Specifically, CSIRO and QAIHC are seeking input from the sector about how m-health could help manage risk factors for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with cardiovascular disease.

An m-health based model of care could facilitate blood pressure and medication management in people who have been diagnosed with hypertension, reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Additionally, the scoping study will assess how a m-health based model of care could be adapted or enhanced to support preventative health interventions addressing cardiovascular disease risk factors such as increasing physical activity, improving dietary intake, and reducing smoking rates.

Between April and June 2019, QAIHC and CSIRO are conducting consultations to seek input from regional, remote, and urban ATSICCHOs on the use of m-health for the management of risk factors for people with cardiovascular disease. This feedback will be used to inform development of the hypertension m-health app.

Outcomes of the scoping study will be shared with the ATSICCHO Sector in the coming months.

4.2 QLD : The Deadly Choices Maroons health campaign being implemented by Community Controlled Health Services throughout Queensland kicks in over coming weeks

Two legends of QRL, supporting our state-wide Deadly Maroons campaign.
Book in now for your health check, at a participating AMS and score one of these deadly shirts.

“ The Deadly Maroons health campaign is being implemented by Community Controlled Health Services throughout Queensland and further strengthens delivery of our Deadly Choices messages which aim to empower our people to take control of their health – to stop smoking, to eat healthier and exercise more,”

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health CEO Adrian Carson

The Deadly Choices – Deadly Maroons State-wide preventative health campaign moves full throttle over coming weeks, with a host of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women featuring for Queensland in the annual State of Origin match on Friday June 21 in Sydney, before the men do battle in Perth on Sunday June 23.

Fans will have the opportunity to mix and mingle with all the NRLW superstars this weekend during the QRL’s traditional pre-Origin Fan Day on Sunday at South Pine Sporting Complex at Brendale, where the Deadly Maroons team will also be out in force.

NRLW forward mainstay Tallisha Harden, who was a standout in the Indigenous All Stars match earlier in the year, has made a speedy recovery from ankle surgery to earn her place in the side and is hoping to turn the tables on the Blues this year.

Former Jillaroo and World Cup winner, Jenni-Sue Hoepper returns to the representative scene following an extended maternity break, while livewire centre Amber Pilley caps off a stellar 12 months, earning her first Queensland cap after an NRLW Premiership-winning season with the Brisbane Broncos.

There’s been considerable talk surrounding the injection of Stephanie Mooka, who was a standout at the recent NRLW National Championships and is likely to form a formidable centre pairing with Pilley.

All four proud, Indigenous women advocate the importance of healthy living and are supportive of the Deadly Maroons program, which helps promote healthy lifestyle choices among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“The Deadly Maroons campaign is an amazing partnership initiative between the Queensland Rugby League and the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s Deadly Choices preventative health program,” confirmed Harden.

“As a speech pathologist with the Institute, a representative of the Deadly Maroons and a Deadly Choices Ambassador, I’ve seen first-hand how these programs make a positive difference in the lives of so many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“Winning next Friday is what we’re all about when we go into camp this weekend, but I also know all the girls are aware of the Deadly Maroons campaign and are looking forward to supporting this deadly promotion.”

The support of the women is matched by an unwavering commitment among the men’s team who have already generated immense interest right across Queensland.

“The Deadly Maroons health campaign is being implemented by Community Controlled Health Services throughout Queensland and further strengthens delivery of our Deadly Choices messages which aim to empower our people to take control of their health – to stop smoking, to eat healthier and exercise more,” added Institute for Urban Indigenous Health CEO Adrian Carson.

“Football is so much more than a game – it is a vehicle to drive important health messages for our people and to encourage our people to access their local Community Controlled Health Services for support to make deadly choices, including completing a regular Health Check.

“Our Deadly Choices shirts have played a key role in driving demand for preventative health care, contributing to an incredible 4000% increase in Health Checks in South East Queensland and leading to the expansion of Deadly Choices across Queensland, with support from Queensland and Australian Governments.”

“Through Deadly Choices, we’re making a real difference in closing the health and life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and with the support and commitment of the QRL, and ongoing support from Queensland and Australian Governments, momentum will be enhanced over coming years.”

5.WA : AHCWA recently delivered our Aboriginal Health Worker Immunisation Course at the Bega Garnbirringu Health Service in Kalgoorlie.

The training is run in conjunction with the Communicable Disease Control Directorate Department of Health and is a nationally accredited immunisation course that provides Aboriginal Health Practitioners with the knowledge and skills to promote and safely immunise clients across all ages.

For more information on the course, contact our Immunisation Coordinator, Stacee Burrows at stacee.burrows@ahcwa.org

5.2 WA : Alfred Barker Chairperson of Wirraka Maya working to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD, through supporting their partners not to drink during pregnancy. “‘Grog before, during and after pregnancy is no good for Dad, Mum and bub’.

6.NT : Congress ACCHO Alice Springs Medical Director on Queens Birthday Honour List

“Congress is very proud to have Dr Sam’s outstanding contribution recognised on the 2019 Queens Birthday Honours list with an OAM” 

Congress Chief Executive Officer, Donna Ah Chee.

Congress Medical Director, Dr Sam Heard has been awarded an Order of Australia Medal in the Queen’s Birthday honours, for his contribution to Medicine. Dr Heard was recognised for his work as a GP across the Northern Territory and his tireless commitment to the education of doctors and other medical staff for over 20 years, particularly through extensive training of GP registrars.

He served 9 years as Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Regional Director and 10 years as Chair of Northern Territory General Practice Education.

As Congress’ Medical Director, Dr Heard is applying his wealth of knowledge and experience to assist Congress in the vital work we are doing in Aboriginal health especially in the recruitment, retention and training of our current and future medical workforce.

 Dr Heard provides clinical leadership to Congress’ 14 clinics in Alice Springs and across six remote Central Australian communities.