NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #NT #WA #VIC #SA #NSW #QLD @KenWyattMP

1. NSW Jullums , Bullinah and Bulgarr Ngaru ACCHO/AMS

2. NSW Wellington Aboriginal Corporation AMS

3. South Australia Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service 

4.Western Australia : Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

5.Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6. NT 6. NT Katherine West Health Board

7. QLD Deadly Choices and  Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service

 For NACCHO the acceptance that our Aboriginal controlled health services deliver the best model of integrated primary health care in Australia is a clear demonstration that every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person should have ready access to these services, no matter where they live.

 Lets celebrate and share our ACCHO’s success

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate

or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media     Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.Jullums (Lismore), Bullinah (Ballina), Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (Casino, Maclean and Grafton) Clinic’s

The idea of these workshops is to raise awareness around the different signs and symptoms of heart disease, and also around prevention and management of the disease.

“This is a new, collaborative approach to addressing this issue, but we’re also working together with existing avenues such as healthy lifestyle and exercise programs to assist participants to make the most of what they’ll be learning.”

Aboriginal Chronic Care Officer with NNSWLHD, Anthony Franks

A series of workshops is being held in Northern NSW to raise awareness of the risk factors for heart disease and engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women on ways to reduce their chances of becoming one of the statistics.

Download dates and venues Northern NSW Workshops dates and Venues

ABORIGINAL and Torres Strait Islander women are at least three times more likely to be hospitalised due to heart disease than their caucasian counterparts.

Heart disease is the leading single cause of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

The program consists of three one-day workshops, with the first being held in March at various sites across the North Coast.

The participants will attend each of the three workshop days in March, May and July, with the aim of continuing the education and providing feedback and follow up at the later meetings.

The workshops are a collaboration between the Northern NSW Local Health District (NNSW LHD), local Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS), North Coast Primary Health Network (NCPHN), Solid Mob, and the NSW and Queensland Government health coaching services, Get Healthy and On Track. They are funded by the National Heart Foundation.

Workshops are being held in Grafton, Muli, Casino, Ballina, Maclean, Goonellabah and Tweed Heads.

2. Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service 

Health expo to change bad habits in men

The Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service hosted the QuiBFit Aboriginal Men’s Health Expo in Dubbo.

About 120 men participated from across the region which includes Orange, Coonabarabran, Walgett, Wellington, Dubbo, Parks and Goodooga.

A major focus was tackling Indigenous smoking and mental health and wellbeing.

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service chief executive Darren Ah See said a lot of th e focus in the Indigenous health sector is on “mums and bubs”.

“It’s good to have an event like this for men because they are the reluctant ones about getting their health checks”, he said.

“We want to try to change that norm and get men to take responsibility not only around their health and wellbeing but to be the leaders of their communities and families.

“It’s all about social and health wellbeing but it is also about mentorship and trying to encourage families and individuals to head in the right direction”.

The expo culminated with a corroboree, with more than 300 people attending.

Western NSW Local Health District Aboriginal health and wellbeing director Brendon Cutmore said it was extremely important to focus on preventive health at the expo.

“It is really our opportunity as Aboriginal men to take control of our lives, whether that be through eliminating some of the negative habits people have, things such as smoking, drugs and alcohol, “he said.

“Coming to these types of event sand having discussions around how to make your life healthier, how to be a leader in the community and how to be a leader in your family and how your actions reflect on the people around you – that’s a big take home message.

 3.Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA

 “ I encouraged Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to attend the gathering in Whyalla to benefit from the stories and experiences of their peers.

It is important that these gatherings to take place in regional areas so Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women living outside of Adelaide have the chance to network and share community news.

Previous gatherings have been very successful and attracted many participants from across the state.

These events are also an opportunity for the State Government to strengthen ties with local service providers and gain insight into matters affecting the community.

Status of Women Minister Zoe Bettison

Co-facilitator’s Kimberley from OfW and Zena Wingfield for the in Whyalla today

The first State Aboriginal Women’s Gathering for 2017 was held in Whyalla this week

The gathering took place on Tuesday 28 March at Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service, Whyalla Stuart.

The gatherings gave Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women an opportunity to discuss a range of issues and share news from their communities.

Guest speakers presented information on topics including health, women’s legal services, sports and recreation, mental health and wellbeing, and caring support.

Status of Women Minister Zoe Bettison said the gatherings give women the opportunity to learn from each other, share experiences and discuss issues, in a safe and supportive environment.

The Office for Women has partnered with Whyalla’s Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service to convene this event.

Background

In 2016, five separate State Aboriginal Women’s Gatherings were held across the state to make it easier for women in regional areas to participate.

Whyalla was identified as a significant location for the first gathering of 2017 as a way to provide support and information to Aboriginal women in the region.

Gatherings have also been planned for 2017 in the Far West Coast and the South East.

For more information about the State Aboriginal Women’s Gatherings visit www.officeforwomen.sa.gov.au

4. Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

“ The prevalence of ear disease and hearing loss in Aboriginal kids has a major effect on their speech and educational development, social interactions, employment and future wellbeing,

While many children are vulnerable to chronic ear disease, in WA it represents a significant burden for Aboriginal children who can experience their first onset within weeks following birth.

Aboriginal children can also have more frequent and longer lasting episodes compared to non-Aboriginal children.”

AHCWA Chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said poor ear health was a significant problem among Aboriginal people, particularly children.

Training program to improve ear health among Aboriginal people

A training program to assist Aboriginal Health Workers to provide ear health care to their communities is being delivered around the state by the Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

The two week ear health training program was delivered in four different locations last year, and 23 Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs) have graduated from the course so far.

The program is scheduled to be delivered in at least four more locations this year including Perth, Broome and Kalgoorlie. More trainings will be scheduled for the second half of the year.

The program teaches AHWs how to manage ear infections, carry out screening, identify risk factors and plan ear health promotion and strategies.

AHCWA Chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said poor ear health was a significant problem among Aboriginal people, particularly children.

“The prevalence of ear disease and hearing loss in Aboriginal kids has a major effect on their speech and educational development, social interactions, employment and future wellbeing,” she said.

“While many children are vulnerable to chronic ear disease, in WA it represents a significant burden for Aboriginal children who can experience their first onset within weeks following birth.

“Aboriginal children can also have more frequent and longer lasting episodes compared to non-Aboriginal children.”

Ms Nelson-Cox said people in regional areas were more susceptible to ongoing ear problems.

“Children living in remote communities have some of the highest rates of chronic ear disease in the world,” she said.

“We want to spread the message in regional communities that early detection and treatment of ear diseases in children is vital to ensure optimum development of speech, language, and to minimise the long term effects on educational performance.”

AHCWA has also launched a giant inflatable ear to be used as an interactive teaching tool among Aboriginal communities.

Koobarniny, which means ‘big’ in the Noongar language, is believed to be the first of its type in Australia.

Koobarniny is currently being used at different events around the metropolitan area, but it’s hoped it will travel to regional areas in the future.

 5. Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)
 
 7. QLD Deadly Choices and  Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service

It’s been a great couple of days in the North with today’s visit by Steve Renouf, Lote Tiquiri & Brisbane Broncos James Roberts at the DC Yarrabah Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service Aboriginal Corporation

Please share this post

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #NT #WA #VIC #SA #NSW #QLD #TAS

1. Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

2. Queensland :  Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH)

3.NSW Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Service

4.Northern Territory : AMSANT Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Alice Springs

5.Western Australia : Wirraka Maya Health Service

6. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

 For NACCHO the acceptance that our Aboriginal controlled health services deliver the best model of integrated primary health care in Australia is a clear demonstration that every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person should have ready access to these services, no matter where they live.

 Lets celebrate and share our ACCHO’s success

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate

or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media             Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

Major Mural for VAHS – originally published in the Koori Mail

A huge mural has been completed on the two-storey Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS) building in the Melbourne suburb of Preston.

The mural, at the busy Bell Street/Plenty Road intersection, tells a story of struggle, loss and hope.

Supported by Darebin Council and VAHS, the mural pays tribute to the services’s history of working with Darebin’s Indigenous community and families and saving lives.

It was painted by 2013 Victorian Aboriginal artist of the year Ray Thomas (Gunnai Nation) and internationally renowned mural artist Matt Adnate.

VAHS acting chief executive Michael Graham said the mural represented a journey of self-determination in both holistic health and equality for Aboriginal people.

“The mural includes an Aboriginal community march depicting the faces of the people who campaigned hard to establish VAHS and to fight for recognition of, and equality for, Aboriginal people,” he said.

“Passersby can take a photo of themselves or friends in between the people on the mural at the march.”

Mother and daughter Nikita Rotumah and Yindi are featured on one side of the mural. They represent the importance of support in good health outcomes. The mural also features a poem by creative writer and VAHS employee Joanne Dwyer, written for the 40th anniversary of VAHS. It reads :

Many, many years ago some Elders decided,

That their people needed a meeting place,

Where they could come and be united.

Their aim was community control,

To make decisions of their own,

But it was more than just a meeting place,

For many it was home.

The VAHS was established in 1973 to address the specific medical needs of Victorian Aboriginal communities. The organisation has expanded over the past 40 years to provide a range of medical, dental and social services.

2. Queensland :  Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH)

“Evaluation of this unique model of pregnancy care has shown that women able to access the program engage with health services earlier in their pregnancy and more often,” Mr Carson said.

“They are also less likely to smoke during their pregnancy and are more likely to deliver their bub at the right gestation and at a healthy weight.

“Having the resources to establish this Hub has been integral to our ability to double the number of women able to access this program each year – and it means that we can link more women in with the IUIH Model of Care, a wrap-around service providing accessible and efficient primary health care to our community in South East Queensland.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson said the Hub’s establishment would significantly improve the wellbeing of mothers and their children in South East Queensland.

Photo above : Renee Blackman from Brisbane ATSICHS, Chelsea and Health Minister Cameron Dick visiting the Salisbury Mums & Bubs Hub today. Read IUIH press release here : http://bit.ly/2o30kyw

Mums and Bubs Hub closing the gap

Health Minister Cameron Dick today joined the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) at the official opening of the Birthing in Our Community (BiOC) Mums and Bubs Hub, which offers antenatal and family support services to improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers and their babies.

Mr Dick said the BiOC program was aimed at closing the gap in maternity and birthing outcomes and giving Indigenous infants the best possible start in life.

He said the Hub was established with the help of $3 million of Palaszczuk Government funding for the BiOC program over two years.

“This integral funding has supported the expansion of the program through additional staff to help more mothers and their babies,” Mr Dick said.

“More employees at the Salisbury hub will allow a doubling of the number of women in the program from about 100 per year to about 200 per year.

“The funding has also helped move the program from the Mater Mother’s Hospital (MMH) to establish it at a more accessible location – Salisbury.”

He said the MMH program was limited by its location, due to issues such as parking, transport and logistical barriers to accessing primary care services.

“The new location with expanded services, and the collaborative approach that drives the BiOC, will help us to reach the Close the Gap target for child mortality rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies,” Mr Dick said.

“Through the BiOC program every woman has their own midwife on-call 24/7, and a support team that includes Indigenous health workers, Indigenous student midwives, doctors, and other health professionals.

“The hub will provide continuity of care through pregnancy, birth and labour care, up to six weeks postnatal care, birthing support, Stop Smoking in its Tracks incentive program, perinatal mental health, breastfeeding support and family support services.”

He said research funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council found 97.8 per cent of the women supported by the BiOC program had five or more antenatal visits and only 4 per cent had birthed a low weight baby (less than 2500gms).

Other encouraging improvements between women in the BiOC program and Indigenous women across Australia include:

  • 80 per cent of women in BiOC had their first antenatal visit in the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with the national Indigenous average of 52 per cent
  • 36 per cent of women in BiOC smoked during pregnancy, compared with the national Indigenous average of 48 per cent
  • 7 per cent of women in BiOC gave birth preterm, compared to the national Indigenous average of 14 per cent.

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson said the Hub’s establishment would significantly improve the wellbeing of mothers and their children in South East Queensland.

“Evaluation of this unique model of pregnancy care has shown that women able to access the program engage with health services earlier in their pregnancy and more often,” Mr Carson said.

“They are also less likely to smoke during their pregnancy and are more likely to deliver their bub at the right gestation and at a healthy weight.

“Having the resources to establish this Hub has been integral to our ability to double the number of women able to access this program each year – and it means that we can link more women in with the IUIH Model of Care, a wrap-around service providing accessible and efficient primary health care to our community in South East Queensland.”

3.NSW Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Service

 ” This year, Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Service has been welcomed to the Dalang Project.

“Dalang” is a Dharug word for learning and the Dalang Project has four key outcomes:

  • Improve Aboriginal oral health and prevent obesity in Aboriginal communities
  • Improve local capacity and provide employment for Aboriginal people 
  • Provide a positive learning experience for new graduates in Aboriginal health 
  • Strengthen the evidence in Aboriginal health promotion and early intervention.

“Oral health promotion interventions are more likely to be effective in Aboriginal communities if they achieve community ownership of the intervention or program. ”

Indigenous children on the Far South Coast should have great smiles and healthy teeth thanks to an innovative project funneling resources and training into the local Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Service.

The Dalang Project combines oral health service delivery, with graduate training and delivery of oral health promotion and obesity prevention in Aboriginal communities, and the project is made possible by the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health in the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Sydney.

Rachael Moir is senior project officer Oral Health (Research) at the Poche Centre and visited Katungal medical centre at Narooma last week to catch up with the recent graduates and see the project being implemented in the region.

“It is really exciting to be working with the team at Katungul and we look forward to the year ahead,” Ms Moir said.

The staff at Katungul Medical Service are very grateful for the support and the project as allowed dental therapist Kylie Tran to move and practise in Narooma for 12 months.

Working alongside her is dental assistant Stephanie Morris, who already has her Certificate III in Oral Health and is now working on her Certificate IV, while trainee dental assistant Jaydean Lonsdale is now working on her Certificate III.

Katungal’s dental coordinator Yvonne Stewart said the Dalang Project had allowed these two local women to receive training and start working on improving the health of their fellow Koori people.

“It’s contributing to the oral health of our people from Batemans Bay to Eden and the whole catchment areas of Katungal,” Mrs Stewart said.

“Their primary focus is working on the dental van that will visit as many schools as possible over the next 12 months while we have our dental therapist here.”

Mrs Stewart said Katungul medical service was very grateful for the support of the Poche Centre and the Dalang Project, which meant not only were people being treated but that young people were being educated about how to take care of their teeth and oral hygiene.

“We’re very grateful as it has enabled us to deal with the very high need that people have for dental treatment,” she said. “All our children need a lot more dental treatment.”

Ms Moir explained the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health was established and funded by philanthropists Greg Poche AO and Kay Van Norton Poche in 2008.

The Poches, along with their friend and co-founder Reg Richardson AM, had seen an opportunity for the skills, expertise and resources of the University of Sydney to be harnessed to improve Aboriginal Health.

The focus for the Poche Centre is on “Healthy Kids, Healthy Teeth and Healthy Hearts” and its approach is to ensure each project is guided by the principles of respect and collaboration; following a collective impact process; and incorporating service delivery, service learning, workforce development and research, Ms Moir said.

“Our work is informed by evidence about what works, both from a community capacity building perspective and a prevention, early intervention, treatment and rehabilitation perspective,” Ms Moir said. “As always we work in partnership with communities, Aboriginal health services and local organisations to develop unique responses that meet the particular needs of the communities.”

The Dalang Project is a collaboration between Nepean Blue Mountains Local Health District (NBMLHD), Centre for Oral Health Strategy (COHS), the Rotary Club of Sydney and the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

In February, seven oral health therapy graduates were allocated to a host Aboriginal Medical/Health Service. Majority of the graduates moved away from their family and friends and will embed themselves into their new communities for one year.

This year, Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Service has been welcomed to the Dalang Project.

“Dalang” is a Dharug word for learning and the Dalang Project has four key outcomes:

  • Improve Aboriginal oral health and prevent obesity in Aboriginal communities
  • Improve local capacity and provide employment for Aboriginal people
  • Provide a positive learning experience for new graduates in Aboriginal health
  • Strengthen the evidence in Aboriginal health promotion and early intervention.

“Oral health promotion interventions are more likely to be effective in Aboriginal communities if they achieve community ownership of the intervention or program. In order to provide sustainable and long term oral health promotion in these communities, a large proportion of time will be dedicated to community consultation with each community to identify what type of oral health promotion strategies are needed and culturally competent; and to ensure community ownership of the program,” Ms Moir said.

“Healthy teeth are extremely important for overall health. This is why our Heathy Teeth strategy covers the full spectrum: from influencing oral health policy to delivering oral health services, building capacity within communities, and promoting oral health.”

4. AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs

Close the Gap event in Alice Springs – just some of the moments captured by Patrick Johnson

With Normie Gee and Elisabeth Heenan in Alice Springs.

5. Western Australia : Wirraka Maya Health Service

Wirraka Maya Health Service is leading the fight against FASD in the Pilbara.

Picture: Courtney Fowler

Wirraka Maya Health Service is leading the fight against Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in the Pilbara, raising awareness through a two-month project with a leading FASD consultant on an issue which is a having devastating impact on the community.

FASD occurs when pre-born babies are exposed to alcohol in the womb.

It can cause facial abnormalities, growth deficiencies, skeletal deformities, organ deformities, central nervous system handicaps and behavioural problems in later life and its impact on Pilbara children, while not statistically documented, is suspected to be widespread.

Bringing more than 20 years experience working in the US, Canada and India, Carolyn Hartness is working closely with Pilbara Aboriginal medical services, a Telethon Kids research team and remote communities.

She said increasing awareness of the vast spectrum of disorders associated with FASD was crucial to better prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the disorders.

“I will provide training and consultation in any way I can to keep the message out there that FASD is with us, it’s going to stay with us and people need to be educated,” Ms Hartness said.

“There is a lot of turnover in the health services — that means when we educate people. We can’t think the job is done, we have to continue to educate workers regularly.

“I’m hoping we can train people who are really interested in keeping the information out there and confident enough to facilitate discussions about the topic.

“This is a community issue; the recognition of it has to be a community-driven intervention.”

For many Pilbara health, childcare workers and police, tackling FASD is one of the Pilbara’s most important social issues.

Wirraka Maya chief executive June Councillor said the effects of fetal alcohol exposure were life-long and could include poor health, developmental and educational outcomes.

Senior Sergeant Dean Snashall said because people with FASD were less likely to engage at school, they had a higher likelihood of ending up in the judicial system.

“Often people with FASD have problems educationally, are less likely to go to school and therefore more likely to (play truant) or on the streets when they should be in school,” he said.

“By nature, that leaves them at risk to harming themselves or at risk of committing criminal offences.

“Ninety per cent of crime in the Pilbara is alcohol or drug related … it would be fair to say many of the kids we deal with could be FASD children.”

The Telethon Kids Institute has been studying the spectrum disorder in the WA youth justice system, but a lack of FASD clinics had prevented authorities getting a grip on numbers.

Ms Hartness said when she became aware of FASD in the 1990s, she realised there was a clinical reason behind many of the problems she was seeing within the native American community in the US.

“This is why these kids are in prison, this is why grandparents are coming to parenting classes (instead of parents), this is why all these kids in classes (are restless and can’t learn) … I was just amazed,” she said.

Yet, while FASD is the most common preventable cause of intellectual impairment in developed countries, affecting up to five per cent of people, there still has not been enough research conducted into its various disorders, Ms Hartness said.

She said the biggest challenge was the lack of funding for FASD research and programs and the fact at this stage there was no single tool available to diagnose those with the disorder.

She also said FASD was not just an issue for indigenous communities — research showed it was a wider societal problem.

“Now the research shows, more than likely the next woman in America to have an affected kid is a white professional and educated woman,” she said.

“And a lot of that is the glass of wine (she might have) with dinner every night.”

Ms Hartness said while 80 per cent of women quit drinking during pregnancy, it was the 20 per cent who found it hard to stop that needed help.

She also said the alcoholic drinking women did in the weeks or months before they realised they were pregnant could also play a critical role in causing FASD.

Ms Hartness added the best way to avoid putting a fetus at risk of FASD was by carefully planning pregnancies to avoid the effects of the initial period drinking before women realise they were with child.

“I’m not asking everyone to quit drinking. I am just saying let’s plan pregnancies and let’s be sober during the pregnancy,” she said.

Ms Councillor said although there was a long road ahead in the fight against FASD, Wirraka Maya’s programs were making a difference in the Pilbara community.

“We have established the FASD network, that is a forum or a vehicle to bring people together across the services, across the community to talk about FASD and some of the strategies that we need to put in place to address it and prevent it,” she said.

“We have got our primary health care that we provide to the community, we also provide social and emotional wellbeing programs to the community and that includes family and domestic violence, indigenous family hearings so child sexual abuse, severe mental illness through our personal helpers and mentors program.

“Fetal alcohol goes across all of the whole spectrum and we have them all those services in the one place … we are very well placed in the community to be able to be leading the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder strategy.

“It is quite a broad project, but I think it is important that we do it because for us to make a difference in the future, we have to start now.”

6. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

Penalty for deliberate damage to Aboriginal relics in Tasmania jumps to $1.6m

The penalty for deliberately damaging Aboriginal relics will jump from $1,570 to a maximum of $1.57 million under new legislation tabled by the Tasmanian Government.

The Aboriginal Relics Amendment Bill 2017, which aims to remove or amend outdated elements of the 1975 act, also removes the 1876 “cut-off” date for what is considered Aboriginal heritage.

The date marks the death of prominent Aboriginal woman Truganini, inferring that anything made after that date had no heritage value.

Under the changes, a new Aboriginal Heritage Council will be established and the time available for commencing prosecutions will be extended from six months to two years.

The Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (TAC) chief executive Heather Sculthorpe welcomed parts of the bill, but said it did not go far enough.

“There are two good things about the Relics Amendment,” she said.

“One is they have removed 1876 as the cut-off date beyond which there can be Aboriginal heritage, and secondly, they have significantly increased the penalties for offences under the act,” she said.

“But on the other hand they have removed the offences of strict liability and they have enabled only two years for a prosecution to be brought — that is better than the six months that it was, but we have urged the Government to say that there should be no time limit.”

Ms Sculthorpe said it was “contradictory” of the State Government to introduce stronger protections for Aboriginal relics, while also trying to reopen four-wheel drive tracks in the Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area on Tasmania’s west coast, an area of Indigenous significance.

“What they have not done is look at all the other ways Aboriginal heritage needs to be protected,” she said.

“On the one hand they are amending the relics act, then … they are determined to let four-wheel drive vehicles run amok in takayna [Tarkine].

“Then they are acquiring land to put a cable car on kunanyi [Mount Wellington], as well as to cut down trees and destroy much of the pristine nature of takayna.”

The TAC called on the State Government to increase penalties under the Aboriginal Relic Act 1975 last year, after vandals defaced “priceless” Indigenous rock art believed to be up to 8,000 years old in Tasmania’s Central Highlands.

The ancient ochre paintings in a rock shelter had been scratched with a rock.

Ms Sculthorpe said charges had still not been laid.

Under the current legislation, the maximum penalty for offences against the act is 10 penalty units ($1,570) or up to six months’ jail.

Under the changes, maximum penalties for deliberate acts related to harming relics will be 10,000 penalty units ($1.57 million) for companies and 5,000 penalty units ($785,000) for individuals .

The maximum penalties for reckless or negligent offences will be 2,000 penalty units ($314,000) for companies and 1,000 penalty units ( $157,000) for individuals.

For “lesser offences” the maximum penalty will be 100 penalty units ($15,700) for companies and 50 penalty units ($7,850) for individuals.

Driving over middens to attract fine

Tasmanian Regional Aboriginal Communities Alliance (TRACA) co-chair Rodney Dillon said the changes were overdue and would better protect Indigenous sites under threat from four-wheel drives.

“This act will support us in stopping those sites from being destroyed. If people are going to drive over middens these penalties apply,” he said.

Heritage Minister Matthew Groom said if the legislation was enacted it would be the most significant advancement in the protection of Aboriginal heritage in 40 years.

“It has resulted from consultation with the Aboriginal community,” he said.

“We recognise up front that there will be many people that will think this legislation does not go far enough.

“But what we have seen time and time again where previous governments have sought to do this in one go is that it has failed.”

Government showing ‘two faces’: Greens

Greens leader Cassy O’Connor said the Government was showing “two faces” on Aboriginal heritage.

“You have got this Government with two faces; it says it wants to reset the relationship with Aboriginal Tasmanians and protect Aboriginal heritage, but it wants to unleash four wheel drives in the Tarkine,” she said.

“It just does not make sense, and Aboriginal Tasmanians are not buying it.”

Mr Groom said the Government stood by its position on the Arthur-Pieman Conservation Reserve.

“We have stated very clearly that we believe that there should be access to the Arthur-Pieman but that it should be done in a way which is consistent with the proper protection of natural and cultural values in that area,” he said.

In February the ABC reported volunteers from the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (TAC) and the Wilderness Society found middens, artefact scatters and stone tools in the wilderness region in Tasmania’s north-west.

Following the find, the TAC called for the area to be declared a national park to better protect the sites.

The legislation is expected to be debated next month.

State government’s proposed amendments to the Aboriginal Relics Act 1975 met with lukewarm reception from Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

The state government’s positive changes to the Aboriginal Relics Act are undermined by its disregard for Indigenous Tasmanians, a leading voice in the Indigenous community says.

While she applauded the government’s efforts to amend the Aboriginal Relics Act 1975 so that it was more sensitive to indigenous heritage, Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre chief executive Heather Sculthorpe said the changes did not accord with some of the government’s other policies.

“Whilst they’re bringing in small amendments to the Relics Act, they’re continuing with their determination to open tarkayna [the Tarkine] to 4WD tracks, which will … wreck aboriginal heritage,” Ms Sculthorpe said.

“They’re still chopping down trees in tarkayna … to offend us as the owners of tarkayna.”

The Aboriginal Relics Amendment Bill 2016 seeks to better protect aboriginal heritage in Tasmania.

Some of the amendments the bill proposed were: changing the name of the original act to ‘Aboriginal Heritage Act’; removing a reference to the year 1876 as the so-called cut-off date for aboriginal heritage; increasing penalties for damaging aboriginal heritage; and removing the six-month time limit for the prosecution of offences.

Environment Minister Matthew Groom said the Hodgman government was committed to “reset[ting]” the state’s relationship with the Tasmanian aboriginal community.

He said the government would further consult the aboriginal community to resolve any remaining issues with the act.

Our #ACCHO Members #ClosethegapDay Good News Stories from Cape York #closethegap

 ” Apunipima services around 7,500 people living in 11 remote and very remote Cape York communities. In 2015-16 over 80% of Cape York’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population have accessed Apunipima’s services.

Apunipima runs the health service in Mossman Gorge, has opened new health care facilities in Aurukun and Napranum, and will be opening a new facility in Coen this year.

There is incontrovertible evidence that community driven, community led, culturally appropriate primary health care is key to improving health outcomes amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

Photo above :Apunipima Cape York Health Council carried out 127 health screenings for students at the Cape York Aboriginal Australian Academy.  AURUKUN youngsters received a free health check last week in a bid to prevent chronic disease

16 March marks Close the Gap Day – a day to bring awareness to the Close the Gap campaign and to work out how best to address the challenges of closing the health, employment and education gap for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Prime Minister’s 2017 Close the Gap Report highlights the health challenges facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Apunipima continues to work across physical, social, and emotional challenges to close the gap for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Cape York.

People living in remote communities have worse health outcomes than those living in rural, regional and metropolitan areas

‘14 % of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people live in very remote areas and make up 45% of very remote populations’

What Apunipima is doing:

See opening quote

By increasing the number of community controlled facilities in our communities, we improve access to healthcare and health literacy, employ local people and build community and individual capacity.

Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade (by 2018)

Nationally, this target is not on track.

‘Our investment in the early years is twofold: improving integration of services across health, child care, early childhood education and school resulting in better access to the right services; and intensive support for the children and families who need it most.’

What Apunipima is doing:

Apunipima’s Maternal and Child Health team’s award winning Baby One Program™ is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker led program designed to support women, babies and families from pregnancy until the bub is 1000 days old (nearly three).

In 2015-16,

  • 85 per cent of pregnant women and their families in Cape York were signed up to the Baby One Program™
  • 45 per cent accessed antenatal care before the thirteenth week of their pregnancy
  • 100 per cent received five or more antenatal visits during pregnancy with an average of more than 13 antenatal contacts per pregnancy 83 per cent of babies were born within normal weight range
  • 91 per cent of Cape York babies were born after 36 weeks gestation
  • 80 per cent of children under five were recorded as fully immunised

Close the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a generation (by 2031). 

Nationally, this target is not on track.

‘Over the longer term, Indigenous mortality rates have declined significantly by 15 per cent since 1998. There have been significant improvements in the Indigenous mortality rate from chronic diseases, particularly from circulatory diseases (the leading cause of death) since 1998. However, Indigenous mortality rates from cancer (second leading cause of death) are rising and the gap is widening. There have been improvements in health care access and reductions in smoking which should contribute to long-term improvements in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.’

What Apunipima is doing:

As chronic disease accounts for three quarters of the mortality gap Apunipima is dedicated to preventing and managing chronic disease on Cape York.

Diabetes and chronic kidney disease accounts for the greatest burden of chronic disease amongst our patients.

We employ three Diabetes Nurse Educators, and a Care Coordination team that helps chronic disease patients navigate the health system and access specialist care.

Apunipima provides a GP in each of the 11 communities in which we work.

We are actively working to reduce smoking and improve nutrition, through a range of activities including working closely with community stores, drafting healthy eating guidelines and community cooking demonstrations and classes. These are both key factors in achieving good health.

‘While smoking rates have continued to decline in Australia, the smoking rates of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over are significantly higher than the broader population.’

What Apunipima is doing:

Apunipima received a Tackling Indigenous Smoking Regional Grant as part of the National Tackling Indigenous Smoking program.

Nationally, the goal of the program is to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through local efforts to reduce harm from tobacco.

The Apunipima Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) Team will work closely with Cape York communities to deliver locally appropriate programs and activities that aim to:

  • Engage community members in tobacco cessation activities
  • Improve access to culturally appropriate quit support
  • Encourage and support smokers to quit
  • Encourage and support non-smokers to avoid uptake
  • Raise awareness in communities about the health impacts of smoking and passive smoking
  • Support communities to establish smoke-free homes, workplaces and public spaces

Apunipima’s strategic objectives aim to reduce overall smoking rates by 25 % by 2018 and antenatal smoking rates by 75 % by 2018.

‘Governments are working together to develop the Fifth National Mental Health Plan to improve the wellbeing of all Australians and prioritise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and suicide prevention.’

What Apunipima is doing:

Recognising that mental health is as important as physical health, Apunipima has developed a Social and Emotional Wellbeing Strategy and appointed a team to deliver a range of programs designed to improve people’s capacity and resilience.

Programs include Healthy Relationship training, working with prisoners at Lotus Glen, and Community Support Groups which provide social and emotional wellbeing education and support, especially for Men’s Health.

Apunipima’s Maternal and Child Health team includes a social worker and we also have a Partners in Recovery Coordinator who helps people who have been in mental health facilities reintegrate into community.

Apunipima’s Health Promotion and Men’s Health teams also support a range of community groups like Women’s and Men’s Groups, as well as on-country cultural activities.

‘Between 2006 and 2015 there was a significant decline in the Indigenous kidney disease mortality rate (by 47 per cent)’

What Apunipima is doing:

Apunipima employs a nurse with a special interest in kidney health to support the management of chronic kidney disease on the Cape.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are three and a half times more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes than their non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander counterparts.

Diabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are nine times more likely to experience end stage kidney disease than their non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander counterparts.

As part of addressing the rates of renal failure on Cape York, Apunipima has been monitoring and managing the renal function tests of those at risk with around half of the diabetic patients and 2/3 of the Cardio-Vascular Disease patients up to date over the last six months, for this annual check.

‘However, cancer mortality rates are rising and the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians dying from cancer is widening. Between 1998 and 2015, there was a 21 per cent increase in the cancer mortality rate for Indigenous Australians and a 13 per cent decline for non-Indigenous Australians.’

What Apunipima is doing:

Apunipima provides a GP in each of the 11 communities in which we work.

We encourage people to come for health checks and assist people to travel and stay in Cairns if they are in need of further tests.

We are actively working to reduce smoking through Tackling Indigenous Smoking and improve nutrition, (through a range of activities including working closely with community stores, drafting healthy eating guidelines and community cooking demonstrations and classes) both key factors in achieving good health.

Health workforce

‘It is important to have a strong Indigenous health and aged care workforce to provide culturally appropriate services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, and for the mainstream health care system to employ Indigenous health professionals’

What Apunipima is doing:

Apunipima has a workforce of around 180 employees, with 52% identifying as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

Currently around 25% of Apunipima employees are community based (both living and working in community), which is contributing to Apunipima’s strategic objective to build capacity in Cape York communities.

Apunipima employs 95 people who identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, of which 36 are employed as Health Workers in Queensland, making it one of the largest non- government employers of health workers in the state.

We ensure our Health Workers are provided with appropriate qualifications (with 23 health workers currently enrolled in either Cert III or Cert IV PHC Practice), and are supported to pursue Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency registration as Health Practitioners should they choose to do so.

63% of our current Health Workers are community based, increasing community employment numbers and helping to address the social determinants of health.

Suicide

‘Indigenous suicide rates are double that of non-Indigenous Australians. During 2011 to 2015, among Indigenous Australians, 71 per cent of suicides were male.’

What Apunipima is doing:

Apunipima is addressing this issue through on country and cultural activities, supporting community to develop local solution, increasing community employment, working with men, women, girls and boys to create safe spaces to share challenges and solutions, building community capacity, providing a social worker, engaging with partner agencies and organisations and building our Social and Emotional Wellbeing team.

Our #ACCHO Members #Closethegap Good News Stories from #NT #WA #VIC #SA #NSW #QLD #TAS

1.Northern Territory : Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Alice Springs

2.Western Australia : Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS). 

3.Victoria: Victorian Aboriginal Health Service Healthy Lifestyle Team

4. Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia

5. NSW : Awabakal Medical Service

6.Queensland : Deadly Choices Brisbane  

7. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

 Our #ACCHO Members #CloseTheGapDay Good News Stories from #NT #WA #VIC #SA #NSW #QLD #TAS

 “For NACCHO the acceptance that our Aboriginal controlled health services deliver the best model of integrated primary health care in Australia is a clear demonstration that every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person should have ready access to these services, no matter where they live.

We can more than double the current 140 Aboriginal medical services that will improve health outcomes. Governments at all levels need to make a massive long term investment to redress the social and cultural determinants of health, which are responsible for more than 30 per cent of ill health in our communities.”

On Close the Gap Day lets celebrate our success

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate

or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media             Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.Northern Territory : Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Alice Springs

When Congress started 40 years ago, infant mortality rates were around 170 deaths per 1,000 live births and now they are around 12 . Our babies are no longer dying from easily preventable causes and the challenge has moved to the promotion of healthier development.

 

More than 300 staff are able to provide more than 160,000 episodes of care each year to about 12,000 Aboriginal people living in Alice Springs and in six remote community clinics in Central Australia.”

The Congress’s Chief Executive Officer, Ms Donna Ah Chee, says there has been a 30% decrease in all cause mortality for Aboriginal people in the NT since 2001
Download the Report Here : CPHC Congress Final Report
 

The benefits of ‘Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands’ has received endorsement from a wide-ranging investigation of Australian primary health care services.

The Central Australian Aboriginal Congress in Alice Springs stood out as a leader in the delivery of comprehensive primary health care in a study by Flinders University researchers at the Southgate Institute for Health, Society, and Equity.

Southgate director Professor Fran Baum says the service’s strengths include its ability to provide a one-stop-shop and outreach services, along with free medicines and support, and advocacy on community issues such as improved access to health services, alcohol and early childhood.

Professor Baum says the strengths of Aboriginal community-controlled primary health care service model emerged clearly as part of the six-year study.

“In fact, this model when done well could be described as a world leader in the global push under the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals for Universal Health Coverage,” Professor Baum says.

“The Congress was the best example of all six services studied because it so effectively provides the community with self-determination, and greater control over their own health and health care rather than other more top-down programs run by government and other agencies.

“The genius of the Aboriginal community-controlled model is that it is able to take the best of a strong medical model of care and combine it with a social health model.”

Southgate senior research fellow Toby Freeman says the research bears out other commentary about the need for more Aboriginal community controlled primary health care services and other Aboriginal controlled organisations.

“As chronic disease in Australia continues to rise, and accessibility of health care becomes a greater concern, the research points to the importance of safeguarding and looking at alternative models of health care,” Mr Freeman says.

“We have found Aboriginal community controlled health services can comprehensively help people to tackle ill health and promote good health in the community.”

Read the article “Case Study of an Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Service in Australia: Universal, Rights-Based, Publicly Funded Comprehensive Primary Health Care in Action”

at https://www.hhrjournal.org/2016/12/case-study-of-an-aboriginal-community-controlled-health-service-in-australia-universal-rights-based-publicly-funded-comprehensive-primary-health-care-in-action/ .

The findings have also been the subject of a report “Aboriginal Health in Aboriginal Hands” by Dr Pamela Lyon, at

http://www.flinders.edu.au/medicine/fms/sites/southgate/documents/CPHC%20Congress%20Final%20Report.pdf

2.Western Australia : Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS). 

Past CEO Terry Brennan, current CEO Deborah Woods with MC for the event and respected elder Dr Richard Walley OAM

CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE: A $3.8 million Centre of Excellence for Aboriginal Health has been officially opened by the Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS) on 9 March

It’s been developed in partnership with the WA Centre for Rural Health and will combine clinical primary health care with training, workforce development and research opportunities.

CEO Deborah Woods says the new facility will allow GRAMS and other registered providers to deliver new training opportunities for people working in Aboriginal health.

“It will help us create a future workforce with cultural and practical skills to work within Aboriginal organisations and with Aboriginal colleagues, patients and community,” Ms Woods said.

“The aim is also to get people to reconsider the aim of taking on tertiary education in the health sector particularly in areas that are of great need for Aboriginal people.

“For example doctors, we’ve done extremely well in the recruitment and the education of Aboriginal people to go on and become medical doctors and there’s been a huge influx, but we also need people to look and consider physiotherapy, speech therapy, dentistry and so all of those other allied health areas, there is a great demand for those type of skills in the organisation.”

Background

GRAMS Centre of Excellence in Aboriginal Primary Health Care and Training was developed with the purpose of maintaining Aboriginal community input and control over all GRAMS operations. We aim to increase staff and community understanding of the GRAMS mission, vision and values as well as preparing plans for the future growth of the organisation.

The Centre was developed in partnership with Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS) and the WA Centre for Rural Health (WACRH) and will enable both organisations to create a centre of excellence that blends clinical primary health care with training and research opportunities. It offers three pillars of service delivery: Family Health (child and maternal health); Social, Emotional and Wellbeing and Chronic Disease care.

The Centre includes a newly built training area in which GRAMS and registered training providers can deliver new training opportunities for people working in Aboriginal health. This will provide opportunities to upskill local Aboriginal health staff to more advanced professional roles as well as opportunities for training non-Aboriginal providers in a high functioning Aboriginal community controlled health service in how to best support Aboriginal people in managing their health.

The Centre is located at the GRAMS premises on Rifle Range Road in Geraldton.

The Centre of Excellence achievements to date are as follows:

  • Established a new clinic in Mt Magnet
  • Increased services to the Murchison and Gascoyne districts
  • Improved coordination and quality of clinical services
  • The receipt of funds to expand the GRAMS Rifle Range Road building to develop the Centre of Excellence
  • Partnerships developed with WA Centre for Rural Health (WACRH) supporting the development of the Centre of Excellence in Aboriginal Primary Health Care and Training
  • Improved business management systems and processes
  • Recognition of GRAMS leadership role in research and research translation
  • Implementation of an after-hours service
  • Increased state and national recognition of GRAMS strengths and achievements
  • Increased specialist services
  • Demonstrated improved service partnerships with other health stakeholders through achievements of the Yamatji Regional Forum

3.Victoria: Victorian Aboriginal Health Service Healthy Lifestyle Team

DEADLY DAN – Number 2!

Deadly Dan dropped into the VACSAL Statewide Basketball Carnival on Day One to spread the word about Staying Smoke Free, eating lots of fruit and veg, getting moving and drinking water.

#DeadlyDan#StaySmokeFree#vahshlt

Check us out and LIKE on FACEBOOK

4. Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia

With smoking a well known habit for many people. the Aboriginal Health Council recently sent its Tackling Indigenous Smoking Team, the Puyu Blasters, to a recent McRitchie Park Fun Day.

Originally posted

The community initiative aims to provide regional level engagement with communities through smoking education and raising awareness to reduce Indigenous smoking rates in regional and remote communities in South Australia.

The group put together a smoking survey with the aim of collecting evidence of smoking prevalence in communities (how many smokers and non-smokers) and how many know the dangers of smoking and the existence of environmental smoke or second hand (passive) smoking.

Tackling Indigenous Smoking Project Officer Zena Wingfield said the surveys help to provide the group with a snapshot of the community in terms of what they know about smoking.

“The questions in the survey are not confronting or judgmental about people’s smoking habits,they are probing questions aimed at finding out what people know about smoking,” she said.

“They also aim to uncover what measures people take to provide a smoke free space for the vulnerable; children, pregnant women and those with respiratory issues for example asthma.

“ We also find what the community’s knowledge is of changing laws about smoking in public spaces, for example, outdoor eatery’s, public transport stops and sporting fields/playgrounds.”

The five key areas of the Tackling Indigenous Smoking initiative are:

  • Quality and reach of community engagement
  • Organisations involved in tobacco reduction in the region
  • Building a capacity to support quitting
  • Referrals to appropriate quitting support
  • Supporting smoke-free environment

Those who completed the group’s smoking surveys at the McRitchie Park Fun Day were entered into a draw to win a Coles voucher for their age group.

Alice Abdulla received the $100 Coles voucher for the Family survey, while Jasmine Abdulla won a $50 Coles voucher for completing the Youth Survey.

The Puyu (translation ‘Smoke’) Blasters Programme has project officers based in 5 regional areas in South Australia – Whyalla, Port Augusta, Yalata, Port Lincoln and Coober Pedy.

There are an additional 4 project officers based in Adelaide who travel around to small regional areas and work with local schools, youth, health and community groups.

To get in contact with Ms Wingfield for a support referral or advice to quit smoking, or to organise an educational session, you can reach her on  (08) 8649 9900 or at zena.wingfield@nunyara.org.au.

You can follow the Puyu Blasters on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PuyuBlastersAHCSA/.

5. Awabakal 40 th Anniversary Dinner

Over our 40 years, Awabakal has called many different sites ‘home’, from Newcastle University, Carrington and the corner of Hunter and Tutor Street in Newcastle CBD.

This journey has led us to settle at our current site in Wickham which has been used as a multi-purpose community hub during this time.

We are proud to now have the addition of three more Awabakal sites – our Medical Centre in Hamilton and our Early Learning Centres in Glendale and Wickham. It has been wonderful to see our organisation grow over the past four decades and we look forward to what the future holds for Awabakal.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #40years

40 years respecting the past, leading the future – the legacy lives on

Since 1977, Awabakal has been providing primary health care, aged care, children and family services to Indigenous people living throughout the Newcastle, Lake Macquarie, Port Stephens and Hunter Valley regions. Our legacy lives on through the services we provide.

More info

6. Queensland Deadly Choices

Great to have a visit from the Deadly and talented artist Chern’ee Sutton last week. Chern’ee’s artwork once again appeared on this year’s NRL Indigenous All Stars shirt.

Be quick book in for your health check at your local participating AMS and get a limited edition DC All Stars inspired health check shirt. To locate your nearest clinic visit www.iuih.org.au/clinics

7. Tasmania Aboriginal Centre ( TAC )

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #WA #VIC #SA #NSW #QLD #NT #TAS #ACT

Photo above : South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)  staff at a recent community meeting for the new Busselton outreach clinic opening today are (from left) Aboriginal Health Worker Talicia Jetta, Playgroup Leader Gwen Gray and Indigenous Outreach Worker Janene Gray. See story 1 below

1.Western Australia :  South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

2.Victoria: Victorian Aboriginal Health Service

3. South Australia  : Nunkuwarrin Yunti

4. NSW : Redfern AMS and Galambila/Durri/Werin

5.Queensland : Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation 

6. Northern Territory :  Danila Dilba Health Service /AMSANT

7. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

8. Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service ACT

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate

or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media             Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

Picture above : The Free NACCHO App contains a geo locator, which will help you find the nearest Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (302 Clinics ) in your area and

 Provides heath information online and telephone on a wide range of topics and where you can go to get more information or assistance should you need urgent help

Download details HERE

1.Western Australia :  South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

“Being able to provide quality health care to our community is vital. It’s about building capacity to our services, so our clients have more opportunities to access support,” Ms Nelson said.

“We are proud that Busselton is our fourth outreach clinic located in the South West, including Brunswick Junction, Collie and Manjimup.

“SWAMS is pleased the Busselton clinic will operate from the Busselton Health Campus, as this prime location means easier access to additional services for our clients, if needed.”

SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said the new clinic, located at the Busselton Health Campus, would enable SWAMS to improve access to primary health care services for the Noongar community.

New SWAMS Busselton outreach clinic to boost services

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) will boost services in Busselton with the opening of its new outreach clinic today .

SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said the new clinic, located at the Busselton Health Campus, would enable SWAMS to improve access to primary health care services for the Noongar community.

The Busselton clinic will operate from 10 am to 4 pm on Mondays and Thursdays, and include a Women’s Health Clinic on the last Thursday of every month.

Clients will have access to GP’s, Aboriginal Health Workers and Indigenous Health Workers on-site, with referrals to other specialised SWAMS staff available.

“SWAMS supports Aboriginal health through a range of tailored programs and services, which can include bulk billing, patient transport and home visits,” Ms Nelson said.

“This clinic would not be possible without the support of the WA Country Health Service (WACHS) and our partnership with GP Down South, for our chronic disease program.

“Establishing an outreach clinic in Busselton further cements SWAMS’ vision to provide high-quality, holistic and accessible services to the South West Aboriginal community. SWAMS looks forward to collaborating with other agencies on this vision.”

2.Victoria: Victorian Aboriginal Health Service

From VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Page

Or watch NACCHO TV interview with Laura Thompson

Regional Co-ordinator Healthy Lifestyle and Tobacco Cessation VAHS

Hear out stories, share our stories

Close the Gap Day is on the 17 March and in the lead up to this event, Oxfam have worked with VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team  to share the stories of two of our very own VAHS staff members, Uncle Reg Thorpe and Jacob Nelson. Jacob’s story will follow in the coming weeks.

Their stories are emotional and powerful reminders of how many Aboriginal people in Victoria, are more likely to experience poorer health outcomes than non-Aboriginal people.

Uncle Reg’s story focuses on his love for his family, the importance of self-care and the benefits of physical activity and living a healthy lifestyle.  As well as, the important role all staff at VAHS play in caring for the Community.

https://youtu.be/_dqc1z_qFgQ

3. South Australia  : Nunkuwarrin Yunti

Closing the Gap Day

Closing the Gap Day is approaching and with it comes various community events. These events are aimed at bringing people together to share information and to take action to reduce health inequality.

The Northern Health Network are holding a Closing the Gap Day from 11.30am- 2.30pm on Thursday 23rd March at Tauondi College, Lipson Street, Port Adelaide.

There will be free entertainment, lunch provided and a range of community stalls.

 4. NSW : Redfern AMS and Galambila/Durri/Werin

 

The Hon Ken Wyatt meeting with Redfern AMS chair Sol Bellear and CEO Laverne Bellear 

Aboriginal medical services have proved the longevity of Aboriginal people, so we need the bigger spread and more Aboriginal medical services probably in the next 5-10 years.

We probably need another 100 to 150 Aboriginal medical services throughout the whole country, in cities and remote communities as well, so we’ll be pressuring Ken to make available more funds for the establishment of Aboriginal Medical Services.

”The Aboriginal Medical Service in Redfern is pleased to have Ken Wyatt as the new Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health, but have called for improvement.

Sol Bellear AM, Chair  of the Aboriginal Medical Service in Redfern

View NACCHO TV 30 Minute Doco About Redfern AMS

The Minister meeting with AMS Staff and board members

The Minister meeting Laurel Robinson and Beverly Briggs ( members of the Sapphires )

LAUREL ROBINSON, Beverly Briggs and Naomi Mayers are the three original members of the Sapphires, the first popular Aboriginal all-female group. The movie based on the band’s story is now the most successful Australian film of 2012. Laurel’s son Tony Briggs wrote the play it is based on, and adapted that into a screenplay.

The film depicts the Sapphires as Australia’s answer to the Supremes, and how they were talent-spotted to perform soul numbers for the troops in Vietnam.

March 2017 Eora Elders Olympics

Now in it’s third year, the March 2017 Eora Elders Olympics provided Elders like the Redfern AMS team with an opportunity to enjoy and participate in sporting activities that will promote good health and active ageing.

The Elder Olympians engage in modified sporting activities, competing in a friendly environment. Elders are also connected to expert advice relating to health and well-being to address their nutritional, physical and recreational needs in the lead up, during and after each event which empowers Elders to live healthily

4. NSW : Galambila/Durri/Werin

The READY MOB Tackling Smoking and Healthy Lifestyles team are passionate about raising the awareness of the health impacts of tobacco smoking and chronic disease in Aboriginal communities and promoting positive lifestyle changes.

READY MOB is: Really Evaluate And Decide Yourself Make Ourselves Better.

The name also signifies that the team is READY to work with the community to promote healthy lifestyles.

READY MOB staff can travel to your community in the Mid North Coast to provide health promotion and education about smoking and healthy lifestyles and run healthy lifestyle program and activities. If you would like invite

READY MOB team to your community please email readymob@galambila.org.au or 0428 277 941.

We promised you our first ‘Deadly ‘n’ Ready’ film clip from your youth! In this clip, the youth of the mid borth coast taking the first steps in ‘breaking up with smokes’. Are you ready to end your relationship with Smokes? drop into your Local Aboriginal Medical Service for support 2day. #deadlynready #readymob #smokefreecommunity #buttoutkidsabout

VIEW here and/or  Like the Ready Mob Facebook Page

 

Galambila AMS Coffs Harbour

Durri AMS

Werin AMS  Port Macquarie

 5.Queensland : Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation 

 ” International women’s day is an opportunity for recognition and celebration of women’s achievements in Yarrabah and the wider community,”

To me, ‘Be Involved, Lead the Way’, means to continue to mentor women as up and coming leaders and advocators for change.”

Sue Andrews (pictured above ) from Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation  .GYHSAC is a community-run health organisation , NACCHO member at Yarrabah FNQ delivering primary and preventative health care programs.

Aboriginal Health Workers leadership are very active in the community : NACCHO files

The announcements for Yarrabah’s Young Woman of the Year and Woman of Year were highlights of a program of local speakers at a luncheon to mark International Women’s Day this year.

Nominees included Thelma Yeatman, Sue Andrews, Kirra-Lei Kynuna and Bryanna Smith.

Winners, Gwenneth Yeatman and Destiny Kynuna, said they were honoured to be recognised by their peers, colleagues, families and friends.

Speakers on the day said the theme ‘Be involved, lead the way’ held particular resonance for them.

“International Women’s Day acknowledges and respect all the women from around the world for their contribution to their country and, importantly, their families,” Yarrabah Cr Nadine Cannon said.

Traditional Owner group Gunggandji-Mandingalbay Yidinji also said the day was significant.

“International Women’s Day is a global movement created to unite, empower and inspire women globally to change perceptions, dispel myths, destroy stereotypes and create equality for all women,” Gunggandji-Mandingalbay Yidinji Peoples PBCAC CEO Helen Tait said.

“It’s a step into creation, to allow women to build confidence and step out of their comfort zone into their greatness to live a life aligned with their passion and to be bold.

“Be the change, disrupt the norm and link arms with like-minded women to be the creators of change for the next generation.

“‘Being involved and leading the way’ means to inspire others to connect with their passion, align with their values and live life on purpose.

“Great leaders don’t set out to be a leader, they set out to make a difference.

6. Northern Territory : Danila Dilba Health Service /AMSANT

A Northern Territory Aboriginal health service is working to improve the way Indigenous mothers access health care during their pregnancy and is improving generational health practices along the way.

Aboriginal health practitioner and team leader at the Danila Dilba centre in Palmerston, Tiana McCoy, said a success of the clinic’s model had been using Indigenous healthcare workers to connect with women who would not access health care otherwise.

Photo: Natalia Moore-Deagan says the Indigenous health workers are one reason she goes to Danila Dilba. (ABC News: Lucy Marks)

 A Northern Territory Aboriginal health service is working to improve the way Indigenous mothers access health care during their pregnancy and is improving generational health practices along the way.

Aboriginal health practitioner and team leader at the Danila Dilba centre in Palmerston, Tiana McCoy, said a success of the clinic’s model had been using Indigenous healthcare workers to connect with women who would not access health care otherwise.

“The family support workers who go out into the community and engage the women into the service they become familiar with who people are and they really do come in and they’re comfortable coming in which is excellent,” she said.

Some women access the mother’s clinic for the first time during a monthly gestation diabetes testing session, but healthcare workers are using the three-hour clinic to screen for other conditions and educate the women on general health in an environment that provides a culturally safe service.”The family support workers who go out into the community and engage the women into the service they become familiar with who people are and they really do come in and they’re comfortable coming in which is excellent,” she said.

Some women access the mother’s clinic for the first time during a monthly gestation diabetes testing session, but healthcare workers are using the three-hour clinic to screen for other conditions and educate the women on general health in an environment that provides a culturally safe service.

“They can come in and access the midwives to do their antenatal checks, they can use that time for their children to access other services within the clinic,” Ms McCoy said.

As a result, she said women were engaging with the clinic throughout their whole pregnancy.

“We try and aim for seven antenatal visits throughout the pregnancy, we’re actually hitting that mark, if not more, so for mum and baby that’s huge,” she said.

“It means we’ve got better health outcomes, we’ve got better birth weights and they can access the other services as well so it’s definitely a huge success with engaging the women within our services.”

Tiana McCoy

First time mother Lez Hall, 20, went with her partner to the clinic for the first time and said the service made her feel secure.

“For my first time it’s good to have a midwife with me and everything, so it’s good for my first pregnancy,” Ms Hall said.

“I don’t know much about pregnancy because it’s my first time so it’s good that I know that they’ll tell me what I have to do throughout my nine months.”

Others patients, like 23-year-old Natalia Moore-Deagan, return for their antenatal and diabetes checks, which they only access through the Danila Dilba clinic.

“One of the main reasons [I only come here] is they have Indigenous health workers,” she said.

Ms Moore-Deagan is in the last trimester of her third pregnancy and said she had learnt to improve her health during pregnancy.

“It’s good, it’s healthy, my whole pregnancy for three of my children now has been very healthy and no problems,” she said.

“I’ve learnt to eat healthy, drink healthy and also take my iron tablets.”

The clinic has diagnosed seven cases of gestational diabetes in the past six months and after going on to received treatment and education about diet and exercise, four of women had babies of a healthy weight.

“We’ve seen ladies come in with their first pregnancy they ended up on oral medication and the second pregnancy, they’re diet control so that’s a good step,” Sumaria Corpus said.

The senior gestational diabetes educator said she was working to treat pregnant women and also educate them to prevent future generation from developing diabetes and associated health problems.

“As we’re seeing a lot of young people, from the age of nine years onwards, with diabetes, so this is the best place to stop that chain effect, giving them the right information, giving them the right support so people can make a choice of change and that’s the biggest thing.”

While all the are in Canberra

our Delegates and at the enjoying  in Alice Springs

7. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

Watch Video and hear spoken word here

The TAC is an Aboriginal community organisation developed in the early 1970s and funded by the federal government since 1973. It was incorporated as the Aboriginal Information Service in November 1973 and changed its name to Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (TAC) in August 1977.TAC represents the political and community development aspirations of the Tasmanian Aboriginal community. For an account of its early development see here and here.

Some of its main achievements include:

  • Negotiation of Aboriginal land returns in 1995, 1999, 2005
  • Return of ancestral remains from overseas and Australian institutions
  • Legislative recognition of Aboriginal cultural fishing rights
  • Apology to the Tasmanian Stolen Generations
  • Financial compensation to members of the Stolen Generations
  • Negotiation of land purchases for community ownership
  • Establishment of a range of Aboriginal community services
  • Retrieval and revival of Tasmanian Aboriginal language
  • Improved accountability of Aboriginal heritage protection
  • Establishment of the only Aboriginal Registered Training Organisation in Tasmania
  • Establishment of Tasmanian government services to members of the Aboriginal community

We provide the following services:

  • Community advocacy
  • Cultural heritage programs including land based activities and camps
  • Emotional and social wellbeing programs
  • Exercise and nutrition programs
  • Housing advocacy and home buyers assistance
  • Land management programs on returned lands
  • Law reform and community legal education
  • Legal Service – see here
  • Music and cultural festivals
  • Nutrition advice
  • Palawa kani language retrieval and revival program
  • Prison visiting
  • Publications and publication support
  • Registered training for Aboriginal Health Workers and Cultural Heritage Workers
  • Youth diversion program

8. Winnunga ACT

 Launch Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service’s new Aboriginal Domestic Violence Safety Plan.

 ” New resources have been created for the ACT’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to better support victims and perpetrators of domestic and family violence.

Today I helped launch Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service’s new Aboriginal Domestic Violence Safety Plan.”

Deputy Chief Minister, Yvette Berry, says new resources have been created for the ACT’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to better support victims and perpetrators of domestic and family violence

Picture Above : From NACCHO TV Interview with Julie Tongs Watch Here

The initiative by Winnunga is one of twelve projects that received funding as part of the 2015-16 ACT Women’s Safety Grant Program.

With its $80,710 grant, Winnunga has taken a leading role in helping prevent abuse by developing six fact sheets for the ACT’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

These culturally sensitive resources will provide invaluable information about the support services available to both the victims and perpetrators of domestic and family violence.

The fact sheets will support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to be better informed.

There is much work still to be done as a community to provide more coordinated and effective support for victims, and to hold perpetrators to account. I look forward to continuing to work closely with Winnunga to help prevent domestic and family violence.

Winnunga received the largest grant from the 2015-16 ACT Women’s Safety Grant program, designed to assist community organisations play their part in eliminating domestic and family violence.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our Member’s Good News Stories from WA, NSW ,VIC ,SA, QLD, NT

140-members 

1.Western Australia :  South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

2.Victoria: Budja Budja Medical Clinic

3. South Australia  : Nunkuwarrin Yunti

4. NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS)

5.Queensland : Apunipima Cape York Health Council

6. Northern Territory : AMSANT

naccho-app

Picture above : The NACCHO App contains a geo locator, which will help you find the nearest Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (302 Clinics ) in your area and

 Provides heath information online and telephone on a wide range of topics and where you can go to get more information or assistance should you need urgent help

Download details HERE

1.Western Australia :  South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

awa

Photo : South West Aboriginal Medical Service mental health services have increased with newly appointed mental health coordinator Jacqui Davis and mental health indigenous outreach worker Darin Turvey with long-time social worker Joyce Dimer.

Mental health services in the South West have been boosted with the South West Aboriginal Medical service getting money to increase its capacity to help Aboriginal people experiencing mental illness.

Country WA Primary Health Network has funded SWAMS to boost its delivery of mental health services with a new mental health coordinator and mental health Aboriginal outreach worker.

Country WA Health regional manager Dianne Ritson said the new initiative delivered by SWAMS would provide culturally appropriate and safe services to meet the mental health and healing needs of Aboriginal people in the South West.

“We know that coordinating care for people who have complex health issues, including mental health, is critical so that they get the care they need,” Ms Ritson said.

“The additional services delivered by SWAMS will build on their existing programs, promote service integration and support Aboriginal people in navigating mental health programs including suicide prevention and stolen generation counselling.”

SWAMS’ new mental health coordinator Jacqui Davis started in January this year and will lead the mental health services team while being supported by Aboriginal health workers Elizabeth Narkle and Jenny Wallam.

Chief executive officer Lesley Nelson said the health network’s support was vital in enabling the centre to continue providing best-practice and culturally appropriate health services for the Aboriginal community.

“It’s about building capacity to our mental health services, so our clients have more opportunities to access support,” she said.

“The team will help clients through their journey of getting a proper diagnosis, getting to appointments on time, and being educated on ways to manage their mental health needs through support and understanding.

“It’s the first important step in SWAMS being able to increase its reach in a service that is much-needed for our community.

“We recognise the impact mental health issues can have on families and carers and we want to help our clients through education, counselling and open communication.”

Ms Nelson said the positions would be funded until June 2018, however the roles would be ongoing to meet the needs of the community.

2.Victoria: Budja Budja Medical Clinic 

victoria

The medical team at Budja Budja Medical Clinic display their accreditation which was awarded by Australian General Practice Accreditation Limited.

Patient care at Halls Gap’s Victoria Budja Budja Medical Clinic was rewarded after it received a national award of accreditation.

Australian General Practice Accreditation Limited chair Dr Richard Choong said accreditation showed the practice made a significant investment and commitment to quality on a day-to-day basis and across all levels of the practice team.

“Achieving accreditation is a major achievement for any practice and a clear demonstration that Budja Budja Medical Clinic is striving to improve their level of care to both patients and the community,” he said.

“Practices seek accreditation because they want to do their best and view this as another step towards excellence in patient care.

3.South Australia  : Nunkuwarrin Yunti .

2017 Aboriginal Spirit Colour Fun Run & Walk

dsc2335-1280x1000

On January 29th 2017, the Nunkuwarrin Yunti Tackling Tobacco Team held its annual Spirit Colour Fun Run & Walk at Fremont Park, Elizabeth.

Over 150 people joined in on celebrating smoke free environments, being healthy and smoke free.

What a fabulous day! To view more photos from the event visit http://tacklingtobacco.nunku.org.au/2017-spirit-colour-fun-run-walk/

Are you an Aboriginal person living in the Adelaide metropolitan area who needs support to quit smoking? Contact tacklingsmoking@nunku.org.au or phone 08 8406 1600

dsc2331-1280x1000

4.NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS)

nsw

Aboriginal Health Services Community Forum – 14 Mar 2017, Rooty Hill
Tuesday 14 March 2017, 10:00 – 13:00 more details below  

There’s a new health care provider for indigenous people in the western Sydney and Nepean Blue Mountains regions.

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) will take control of indigenous health services at Western Sydney Local Health District and Nepean Blue Mountains Local Health District facilities for the next two years.

The arrangement will see WACHS manage “culturally safe” services for population health, chronic care, mental health and drug and alcohol issues.

Funding has been allocated to the group under the federal government’s Indigenous Australians’ Health Program. The NSW Ministry of Health will also contribute funds.

“We are very pleased to have formally signed off on the funding agreement, following negotiations with the Commonwealth and state governments,” WACHS chief executive Darren Ah See said.

WACHS will take the reigns from WentWest, which has run services including the Aboriginal Health Unit at Mount Druitt.

The changeover will officially take affect on April 1.

WACHS has worked within indigenous communities in regional NSW for 25 years.

It opened Aboriginal health services in Orange, Coonamble and Dubbo, and re-opened another in Moree that had been closed for several years.

WSLHD chief executive Danny O’Connor said the organisations would work closely to provide the best care for Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander people.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosingtheGap Run and Walk : 3 ways you can support Indigenous Marathon Foundation

imp

 ” IMP uses the marathon as a vehicle to promote healthy lifestyles to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Running is accessible to any age, ability and location and has the tremendous power to instil a sense of personal accomplishment when one has pushed beyond what they thought possible.

Robert De Castella Founder Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF)

You are invited by the Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF) support the project in 3 ways

  1. To participate in their Closing the Gap Run-and-Walk, held on the eve of the release of the Prime Minister’s 2017 Closing the Gap Report.
  2. Donate or assist in fundraising The Indigenous Marathon Foundation Ltd is a registered health promotion charity Donations over $2 are tax deductable and support our programs and inspirational Graduates celebrate Indigenous achievement, resilience and promote health and physical activity PO Box 6127 Mawson ACT 2607 (02) 6162 4750
  3. The search for the 2017 squad of the Indigenous Marathon Project : Promote to your community see 2017 Remaining try-out tour dates and locations below  

The IMF are a not-for-profit organisation that uses running to drive social change, create young leaders and address Indigenous health and social issues by celebrating Indigenous resilience and achievement.

Their program has inspired communities across Australia to take up running not just for exercise, but also to connect and share stories in a supportive environment.

Healthy lifestyle programs like those run by the IMF are a vital part of the Australian Government’s initiative to close the substantial gap in health, education and employment outcomes between Indigenous and other Australians.

Please come to join runners from the IMF and staff from the Department’s IAG Health Branch for a 5 kilometre run-and-walk to support the successful impact sport and recreation programs have in Indigenous communities and kick start the launch of the 2017 Closing the Gap Report.

1.Event details 

Date: Monday 13 February 2017 Time: 6:45 am arrival for a 7:00 am start

Location: Reconciliation Place, Lake Burley Griffin 

Please bring a water bottle or something to drink on the way. A light breakfast will be available after the run and a coffee van will also be present at the site.

Please RSVP to Rachael at Rachael.Norman@pmc.gov.au

3.The search for the 2017 squad of the Indigenous Marathon Project

The search for the 2017 squad of the Indigenous Marathon Project began in Canberra on February 1 when former world champion runner and IMP Founder Rob de Castella, and 2014 IMP Graduate and Head Coach Adrian Dodson-Shaw put applicants through their paces for a place on the life-changing project.

No running experience is required, as the project is not necessarily looking for athletes, but for young Indigenous men and women who show the potential to become community leaders.

The national tour will visit communities around Australia and select six men and six women in a trial that includes a 3km run for women and 5km run for men, in addition to an interview with Mr Dodson-Shaw. The group will also be expected to complete a Certificate III in Fitness, First Aid & CPR qualification and Level 1 Recreational Running coaching accreditation as part of the project’s compulsory education component.

There were a record number of applications in 2016, and high numbers are anticipated for the 2017 try-outs.

“There’ll be some pretty exciting times ahead as we begin the national IMP 2017 try-out tour, and what better place to start than the nation’s capital,’’ Mr Dodson-Shaw said.

“It’s going to be a busy two months on the recruitment drive but I’m looking forward to meeting the applicants and choosing the next squad to take on the New York City Marathon.”

Mr de Castella said the selection of a new squad is always an exciting time.

‘’The marathon is synonymous with struggle and achievement and it is one of the hardest things you can choose to do,’’ he said. ‘’Doing a full marathon from no running experience, on the other side of the world, in the biggest city in the world, in the biggest marathon in the world, is an incredible feat of hard work and determination.

‘’We are now recruiting a new squad to follow in the footsteps of the 65 IMP Graduates we have produced since 2010.

‘’I encourage every young Indigenous man and woman who wants to make change happen to come along and be part of this amazing life-changing and life-saving adventure!’’

Try-outs are open to all Indigenous men and women aged 18-30, and applications can be made on the day.

The IMP is a program of the Indigenous Marathon Foundation, a not‐for‐profit Foundation established by Rob de Castella. Each year IMP selects a squad of 12 young Indigenous men and women, to train for the New York City Marathon in November, complete a compulsory education component – a Certificate III in Fitness, media training and coaching accreditation – and through their achievements celebrate Indigenous resilience and success.

The IMP relies on the generous support of the Australian Government Department of Health, Department of PM&C, Department of Regional Australia, local Government, Arts and Sport, Qantas, ASICS, Accor and the Australian public.

For more information please contact Media Manager Lucy Campbell on (02) 6162 4750 or 0419 483 303. More information about IMP can be found at or visit our Facebook page, The Marathon Project. ABN 39 162 317 455

2017 Remaining try-out tour dates and locations

  • Newcastle  February 8  8am

Empire Park, Bar Beach

  • Sydney  February 10  6pm

Redfern Oval

  • Perth  February 14  8am

Lake Monger, between Leederville and Wembley

  • Karratha  February 15  5pm

Bulgarra Oval

  • Broome  February 16  5pm

Peter Haynes Oval (Frederick Street)

  • Adelaide  February 21  8am

Barratt Reserve, West Beach

  • Brisbane  February 28  8am

QSAC Track Kessels Road, Nathan

  • Townsville  March 1  8am

Muldoon Oval

  • Cairns  March 2  5pm

Pirate Ship, The Esplanade

  • Thursday Island  March 3  5pm

Mr Turtle

  • Alice Springs  March 8  5pm

Head Street Oval

  • Port Macquarie  March 11  11am

Westport Park

  • Darwin  March 20  6pm

Outside Darwin Military Museum, Alec Fong Lim Drive

  • Timber Creek  March 21  6pm

Timber Creek Oval

NACCHO #ACCHO Member News : Western Sydney returns to culturally appropriate Aboriginal Community Controlled Health

aws

“The scope of the arrangement includes operations of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Health Services provided from the Mt Druitt premises as well as Aboriginal health services to Penrith and the Healthy4Life services to Nepean Blue Mountain areas,

WACHS will work closely with WentWest to transition their current operational  arrangement to WACHS for the 1 April deadline “

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service  CEO Darren Ah See said the organisation is extremely pleased to have formally signed off on the funding agreement following negotiations with the Commonwealth and State Governments

See background to original closure

 July 2015 SMH report Aboriginal Health Service closes over unpaid tax bill

Photo above : WACHS CEO, Darren Ah See, Uncle Greg Simms, Blacktown-Mt Druitt Hospital General Manager, Sue-Anne Redmond and WentWest Primary Health Netowrk CEO, Walter Kmet. Photo: As reported in Wellington Times

The Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) has announced its tender for the provision of culturally appropriate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services to Western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains has been successful.

The joint tender process was led by the Commonwealth government in partnership with the NSW Ministry of Health.

The Commonwealth funding has been awarded to WACHS under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme for Western Sydney and Nepean Blue Mountains regions for 2016-17 and 2017-18.

The NSW Ministry of Health is also providing funding for the provision of culturally safe services for Aboriginal people including population health, chronic care, mental health and drug and alcohol.

Under this arrangement, WACHS will formally take on these services from the 1 April 2017.

Currently the Western Sydney Primary Health Network (WentWest) over sees the operations of the Sydney West Aboriginal Health Service (SWAHS), which is supported by funding from both the NSW Ministry of Health and the Commonwealth Government.

WentWest CEO, Walter Kmet welcomed the funding announcement.

“WACHS has a long-standing reputation for a strong business model which delivers culturally appropriate services. WentWest will work closely with WACHS during the transition of these services in line with the new arrangement.”

Western Sydney Local Health District CEO, Danny O’Connor also confirmed a commitment to working closely with WACHS and the PHN to strengthen Aboriginal health services in the city’s west.”

“WSLHD has already developed a relationship with WACHS and is looking forward to the opportunities that this new arrangement will bring to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Western Sydney.”

CEO of Nepean Blue Mountains PHN, Lizz Reay said she was looking forward to the continuation Healthy4Life program in the Blue Mountains region.

Have you got a similar good news story about one of our ACCHO members ?

nhn

NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

km-kw

While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Human Rights : Nomination open 2017 National Indigenous #HumanRights Awards

nihra-2017-save-the-date-invitation_version-2

 ” The National Indigenous Human Rights Awards recognises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who have made significant contribution to the advancement of human rights and social justice for their people.”

The awards were established in 2014, and will held annually. The inaugural awards were held at NSW Parliament House, and were welcomed by the Hon Linda Burney, MP and included key note speakers Dr Yalmay Yunupingu, Ms Gail Mabo, and Mr Anthony Mundine. A number of other distinguished guests such as political representatives, indigenous leaders and others in the fields of human rights and social justice also attended.

The Awards were presented by leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander elders, and leading Indigenous figures in Indigenous Social Justice and Human Rights. All recipients of the National Human Rights Award will be persons of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage.

To nominate someone for one of the three awards, please go to https://shaoquett.wufoo.com/forms/z4qw7zc1i3yvw6/
 
For further information, please also check out the Awards Guide at https://www.scribd.com/document/336434563/2017-National-Indigenous-Human-Rights-Awards-Guide

AWARD CATEGORIES:

 

DR YUNUPINGU AWARD – FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
 
To an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of Human Rights for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples. Dr Yunupingu is the first Aboriginal from Arnhem Land to achieve a university degree. In 1986 Dr Yunupingu formed Yothu Yindi in 1986, combining Aboriginal (Yolngu) and non-Aboriginal (balanda) musicians and instrumentation.

In 1990 was appointed as Principal of Yirrkala Community School, Australia’s first Aboriginal Principal. Also in that year he established the Yothu Yindi Foundation to promote Yolngu cultural development, including Garma Festival of Traditional Cultures Dr Yumupingu was named 1992 Australian of the Year for his work in building bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities across Australia.

THE EDDIE MABO AWARD FOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN SOCIAL JUSTICE

In memory of Eddie Koiki Mabo (1936-1992), this award recognises an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of Social Justice for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Eddie Koiki Mabo was a Torres Straits Islander, most notable in Australian history for his role in campaigning for indigenous land rights.

From 1982 to 1991 Eddie campaigned for the rights of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to have their land rights recognised. Sadly, he died of cancer at the age of 56, five months before the High Court handed down its landmark land rights decision overturning Terra Nullius. He was 56 when he passed away.

THE ANTHONY MUNDINE AWARD FOR COURAGE

 

To an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of sports among Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Anthony Mundine is an Australian professional boxer and former rugby league player. He is a former, two-time WBA Super Middleweight Champion, a IBO Middleweight Champion, and an interim WBA Light Middleweight Champion boxer and a New South Wales State of Origin representative footballer. Before his move to boxing he was the highest paid player in the NRL.

In 2000 Anthony was named the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Person of the Year in 2000. He has also won the Deadly Award as Male Sportsperson of the Year in 2003, 2006 and 2007 amongst others.

He has a proud history of standing up for Indigenous peoples, telling a journalist from the Canberra Times: “I’m an Aboriginal man that speaks out and if I see something, I speak the truth.”

NACCHO Members Aboriginal Health Good News : @Apunipima ‘s Mossman Gorge gains AGPAL Accreditation again

 mossman_gorge_agpal_websml

‘ The people of Mossman Gorge deserve the best health care and facilities we can provide and I am incredibly proud of my team for their achievement.

’Mossman Gorge Primary Health Care Centre is a real family centred practice focussing on indigenous health and chronic disease, supported by a full complement of allied health services and a visiting physician.

So stringent are the standards that many mainstream clinics need more than one go to achieve accreditation.”

Sharryl Ellington, Practice Manager for the centre

ap-2

Watch a recent NACCHO TV interview

with Sharryl about her ACCHO journey

Mossman Gorge Primary Health Care Centre, the Aboriginal community controlled health service for Mossman Gorge, has achieved the coveted AGPAL Accreditation again with ease.

AGPAL Accreditation means that safe, high quality health care is delivered according to recognised national standards. Accreditation recognises the achievements of health care teams to meet the requirements of established standards contained within the Royal Australian College of General Practitioner Standards.

Accreditation reflects a practice’s commitment to continuous quality improvements – via systems, processes, policies, culture, risk management and staff training.

Providing services to the community of Mossman Gorge, the Primary Health Care Centre is run by Apunipima Cape York Health Council, the community controlled health organisation for Cape York.

With over 250 patients, the clinic offers a full range of comprehensive primary health care services including a doctor, nurse and maternal and child health worker supported by a range of visiting services.

Mossman Gorge Primary Health Care Centre is a real family centred practice focussing on indigenous health and chronic disease, supported by a full complement of allied health services and a visiting physician.

Chief Executive of Apunipima, Cleveland Fagan said, ‘This is a tremendous achievement that we can all be proud of. For many years it has been accepted that Aboriginal people can receive second rate health care and our mission at Apunipima is to provide health care that is second to none in Australia and this accreditation takes us one step closer to achieving that aim.’

It means we can really say to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Mossman Gorge that they are getting “at least” the Australian standards of quality of primary health care that are available to any other community in Australia.’