Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC

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1.1 International : Community Health Centres Survey 2017

2.1 National  : NACCHO and Heart Foundation Resources survey 2017

2.2 National : Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic

2.3 NACCHO Presents #FASD Poster at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

Members

3.QLD : TAIHS ACCHO Townsville leads the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­Indigenous families

4.NSW : Wellington ACCHO Health Choices and community the focus at inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout

5. WA : AHCWA Members complete training course

6. VIC : Mallee ACCHO #MDAS to hold Pamper and Pap event for women clients

7. SA: AHCSA Sexual Health and Maternal Health Tackling Smoking Teams

8. NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs CEO’s present at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 International Community Health Centres Survey 2017

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The International Federation of Community Health Centres (IFCHC) is seeking input from staff and board members of Community Health Centres (CHCs) around the world, as well as associations that represent CHCs. If this applies to you, we encourage you to answer the brief survey below. The survey takes approximately 5 minutes to complete. All questions with an * are required.
All other questions are optional. Survey responses will help IFCHC to focus its operational activities for the near future.

 

2.1 National  : NACCHO and Heart Foundation Resources survey

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The Heart Foundation is committed to improving the heart health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

In this survey, we are seeking your feedback on how we can improve the use and effectiveness of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources, for both health professionals and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

 
We would greatly appreciate your time and opinions on our information resources and tools, to better understand the:
– use and awareness of our resources,
– cultural appropriateness of our resources for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community,
– suitability of the language, format and style of our resources.
 
We recognise that your time is valuable and thank you for your help. Link below

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Resource Survey – ACCHO

 

2.2 National : Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic

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The Koori Mail latest edition on sale Nov 15 , features the The National Centre of Indigenous Excellence TATU – Talking About Tobacco Use #QUIT4LIFE Comic.

The TATU Schools Program created the comic, encouraging students to discuss the benefits of a smoke free lifestyle, and develop community ideas to reduce the harm caused by tobacco use.

‘Traditional smoke heals – tobacco smoke kills.

2.3 NACCHO Presents #FASD Poster at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

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NACCHO Policy Officer Bridie Kenna pictured with symposium chair Professor Sandra Eades and FASD project members Dr Nikki Percival and Hayley Williams .Bridie was presenting  a poster on the FASD Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Project. A collaboration between NACCHO, Menzies School of Health Research and the Telethon Kids Institute.

3.QLD : TAIHS ACCHO Townsville leads the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­Indigenous families

 

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TOWNSVILLE will lead the country in ­delivering an internationally acclaimed health and wellbeing program for ­indigenous families. The Townsville Aboriginal and Islander Health Service (TAIHS) will steer the new initiative, called the First Thousand Days Australia.

Picture Above : Heather Lee, TAIHS Integrated Services Manager/ Midwife of Maternal and Child Heath, Kerry Arabena, Chair of Indigenous Health at the University of Melbourne and new family, Emma Woods and Shane Mitchell with 5 month old twin girls Ahliyah and Shanielle, pictured at the TAIHS clinic for the launch of the first Australian trial of the First Thousand Days. Picture: Shae Beplate

It will be rolled out across North Queensland and focus on babies’ first two years of life beginning at conception. This period is when the foundations of optimum health, growth, and neurodevelopment across the lifespan are established.

This international movement, which ­focuses on nutrition, has been broadened by a group of Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander health researchers and practitioners to ­include child protection, early life ­literacy, the role and contribution of men and the range of other issues that impact on indigenous parents and infants in Australia.

TAIHS chair Morris Cloudy said ­although they had a successful record of ­providing quality health care and social ­services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait community, there remained many obstacles to ensuring kids received the best possible opportunities in life.

“We believe that this model will assist us in addressing these gaps,” he said.

Heather Lee, midwife and manager of TAIHS’ Child and Maternal Health services, said it was important for future generations.

“The aspiration for me personally is to have healthier women, children and dads in our community.”

Ms Lee said TAIHS aimed to ­decrease the number of chronic diseases within the community.

Chair of ­Indigenous Health at the University of ­Melbourne Professor Kerry Arabena, who heads the One Thousand Days initiative nationally, said it was a unique indigenous-designed and managed intervention that would improve co-ordination between services and organisations catering to Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander child and maternal health.

“It will also ensure that the so-called ­social determinants of health, including housing, education, employment and ­exposure to racism and discrimination, are addressed,” she said.

4.NSW : Wellington ACCHO Health Choices and community the focus at inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout

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History was made in Dubbo at the weekend with the inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout held at Apex Oval. More than 20 men’s and mixed teams competed across five divisions on Saturday and Sunday, with organisers Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) and NSW Touch hailing it a great success.

“We’ve certainly had a couple of thousand people through the gates,” WACHS marketing and communications manager Jodie Evans said.

“I think what we’ve proven is you can have all ages and all shapes and sizes actually playing and no one actually has any issues with that, and having mixed teams is great too, it just brings different elements into it.

“Next year we hope to build on the women’s sides and certainly bring the kids in.

NSW Touch game development officer Stacey Parker said she was impressed by the “outstanding” quality of play on show, with players coming from as far away as Western Australia.

“We look forward to what’s going to happen in 2018,” she said. “Hopefully we can double the numbers.”

Touch football wasn’t the only focus of the weekend, with the crew from QuitBFit on hand at the smoke and alcohol-free event to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Current and former NRL stars were on hand to help spread the message, including Scott Prince (who played with the All-Blacks), Timana Tahu, Nathan Merritt, Cody Walker and Will Smith.

“We’re trying to get that communication through from a young age that smoking isn’t great for you and drinking so much soft drink,” Evans said.

“It’s all about healthy eating and living, and sport is obviously vital to that.”

“Being at the inaugural National Indigenous Touch Football Knockout was something special and something I won’t forget,” Prince said. “It was great to see the family coming together to promote healthy choices.”

5. WA : AHCWA Members complete training course

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Staff from AHCWA, Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service – East Perth office, Carnarvon Medical Service Aboriginal Corporation and the Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service recently completed an Internal Auditor Training Course at AHCWA’s head office in Highgate.
The two-day training course enabled the participants with the skills and knowledge to prepare for and participate in a quality audit. The types of audits may include external or internal systems audit or process or products/service audits.
Participants were given the opportunity to work through the process of reviewing designated documentation; identifying and developing checklists and audit-related documentation; preparing audit schedules; gathering, analysing and evaluating information; and reporting findings to the lead auditor in a fun and interactive setting.
Thanks to Claire, the Quality & Compliance Officer at AHCWA and Christine from SAI Global for organising and delivering a very informative, interesting and useful course.

6. VIC : Mallee ACCHO #MDAS to hold Pamper and Pap event for women clients

AMMAFTER a successful pilot event last year, Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) will hold the second Pamper and Pap day on November 30 at MDAS Commun­ity Hall.

Prevention and health promotion officer Jade Klaebe said  MDAS had decided to make the event annual.

“We held this event at around the same time last year for the first time, and we had 67 Aboriginal women attend.

7. SA: AHCSA Sexual Health and Maternal Health Tackling Smoking Teams

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The team was up at Coober Pedy hosting a Womens Pamper Day….lots of fun, laughter & education.

8. NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs CEO’s present at Lowitja NHMRC #ResearchTranslation17

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Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #TAS

1.1 National: NACCHO members elect new Chair and Deputy

1.2 NACCHO TV view NACCHO AGM videos on line

1.3 Heart Foundation survey Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources

2.ACT : Deadly Choices promote Deadly Roos at Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO 

3.QLD : Johnathan Thurston 2018 Queensland Australian of the Year

 4. 1 WA : Kalgoorlie Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) team – Make a Change” hip hop project

4.2 WA  : SWAMS celebrates two decades of Aboriginal health care

5. 1 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) clocks up 25 years

5.2 NSW : Katungul Aboriginal Corporation has joined forces with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Brisbane (IUHI) to deliver the Deadly Choices program on the Far South Coast.

6. Vic : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Ambassadors win title

7.NT Miwatj Health Service : Christina’s Story on Quit Smoking Tobacco

8 SA : Artists painting their Indigenous songlines to stay healthy and strong

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 National: NACCHO members elect new Chair and Deputy

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) members have elected John Singer as their new Chairperson and Donella Mills as Deputy Chairperson at the last week NACCHO Annual General Meeting in Canberra

See Background

https://nacchocommunique.com/2017/11/03/news-from-nacchoagm2017-143-accho-members-vote-in-new-naccho-chair-and-deputy-chair/

1.2 NACCHO TV view NACCHO AGM videos on line

View over 40 videos HERE

https://www.facebook.com/pg/NacchoAboriginalHealth/videos/?ref=page_internal

1.3 Heart Foundation survey Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources

 

The Heart Foundation is committed to improving the heart health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
In this survey, we are seeking your feedback on how we can improve the use and effectiveness of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources, for both health professionals and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.
 
We would greatly appreciate your time and opinions on our information resources and tools, to better understand the:
 
use and awareness of our resources,
– cultural appropriateness of our resources for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community,
– suitability of the language, format and style of our resources.
We recognise that your time is valuable and thank you for your help. Link below
 

 

2.ACT : Deadly Choices promote Deadly Roos at Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO 

“Winnunga is excited to be part of the Deadly Choices Deadly Roos campaign. The more organisations like ours can work together, the closer we can move towards Closing the Gap and improving the health outcomes in our communities”,

Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs OAM.

“We know from our Deadly Choices campaign that people respond to health promotion messages from celebrities and sporting legends.

Partnerships like this one with the Deadly Roos and Winnunga Nimmityjah are a powerful vehicle for positive change in the lifestyle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.”

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health CEO, Adrian Carson, echoed Ms Tongs’ sentiment.

Pictured above Julie Tongs with the Deadly Choices team and Team NACCHO Oliver Tye and Kayla Ross

Prevention being better than cure is the message of the day at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services today, as the Narrabundah clinic welcomed Australian rugby league legends in Canberra for their 2017 Rugby League World Cup game against France.

Australian Kangaroos squad members Cooper Cronk and Dane Gagai, and Coach Mal Menginga, joined former Kangaroo Steve Renouf to spread the word about the importance of getting regular health checks. The clinic visit is one of a series of events throughout Australia during the 2017 World Cup.

In September, Federal Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM announced that legendary Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga and other Indigenous and non-Indigenous players would become ambassadors for the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s Deadly Choices program, to extend its message across Australia.

Deadly Choices is a community-based healthy lifestyle campaign launched in 2013. There is particular focus on young people, as well as the importance of exercise, education, school attendance, quitting smoking, and regular preventive health checks.

Through media campaigns, sports carnivals and community events Deadly Choices has prompted:

  •  almost 19,000 annual health check-ups in South East Queensland;
  •  1,155 smoke-free household pledges; and
  •  more than 3,300 smoker interventions.

Community members who get their 715 Health Check at a participating Aboriginal Medical Service – such as Winnunga Nimmityjah – during the World Cup can score a special edition Deadly Kangaroos World Cup jersey.

3.QLD : Johnathan Thurston 2018 Queensland Australian of the Year 

HE IS a legend on the field, a hero in the community — and now Johnathan Thurston is on his way to becoming Australian of the Year.

The NRL star was last night recognised for his tireless commitment to helping others, taking out the 2018 Queensland Australian of the Year award at a ceremony in Brisbane.

His stellar career as a rugby league player is matched by his community endeavours, which includes championing the Achieving Results through Indigenous Education academy and serving as an ambassador for an anti-ice campaign ran by the Apunipima Cape York Health Council.

4. 1 WA : Kalgoorlie Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) team – Make a Change” hip hop project

 

The Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) team at Bega Garnbirringu Health Service created a music video to educate and empower young people in the Goldfields region to not take up smoking. The hip hop music video was created during a week-long workshop in June 2017.

The Bega Garnbirringu TIS team also created TV ads, radio ads and other informational materials by using the video as a main theme.

The Bega Garnbirringu TIS team engaged and educated the hip hop participants on smoking cessation through regular visits. Participants included East Kalgoorlie Primary School and Kalgoorlie-Boulder Community High School students (Clontarf and Kalgoorlie Girls Academy).

Participants were also informed about smoking issues and how to change the culture of smoking. Participants were provided with information about second-hand smoke and prevention strategies. The education sessions assisted participants to create a hip hop song. The participants were given the opportunity to write poetry/raps which included local heritage and culture in their health messages, vocal coaching and learnt how to create a video clip.

In less than four months, the hip hop video received more than 5,700 views on Bega Garnbirringu YouTube channel. Community Members liked the video sharing on Facebook and other social media platforms. Community Members recognised participants in the video, and complimented them on their enthusiasm, participation and efforts.

The participants were interviewed informally during and after the workshop. It was reported that they loved and enjoyed the workshop. Participants were aware of smoking harms and recognise support services of Bega Garnbirringu TIS team that delivers education to the local community on a regular basis. Participants noted that they will never smoke, and ask family and friends to not smoke or to quit smoking.

The Hip Hop video can be found here. The TV advertisement can be found here. The GWN7 promotional segment can be found here.

4.2 WA  : SWAMS celebrates two decades of Aboriginal health care

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) is celebrating its milestone 20th birthday with a week-long festival of events being held across the South West from 16-22 December 2017.

SWAMS, an Aboriginal Community Controlled organisation, plays a pivotal role in improving the quality of life for Aboriginal people in the South West, through the delivery of culturally focused primary health care.

“Twenty years ago, no such service existed. Aboriginal people were dying from preventable disease, diabetes was rife, and a lack of cultural awareness in tertiary medicine made it difficult for Aboriginal people to get the specialist care needed,” SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said.

“All that has changed now. We are a thriving organisation with highly trained staff working across six clinics to improve the quality and quantity of life for thousands of Aboriginal people under our care,” Ms Nelson said.

“This isn’t just a celebration for SWAMS. This is a celebration for an entire community and for those community members who had a vision for better Aboriginal health care back in 1997.”

“We still have a long way to go, but I think it’s safe to say that they would be proud of the organisation SWAMS has become and the difference we make to the community.”

The celebrations will take place in Bunbury, Busselton, Manjimup, Collie and Harvey and will include a series of free family picnics in each town, featuring a BBQ lunch, birthday cake and entertainment.

The highlight of the festival programme is a ticketed 20th Anniversary Gala Evening at the Bunbury Regional Entertainment Centre, with live entertainment by The Merindas and comedian Kevin Kropinyeri.

Gala tickets can be purchased from http://www.trybooking.com/329821 or from the SWAMS administration building located at 3/30 Wellington Street, Bunbury (cash only).

SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival events:

Please refer to the attached schedule.

For more information on the SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival, contact the office on (08) 9791 1166 or email info@swams.com.au.

5. 1 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) clocks up 25 years

“From little things big things grow.”

That is what founding member of the Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS), Aunty Joyce Williams, said to herself 25 years ago when the service was launched.

It has certainly been the case for the organisation which flourished over the last two decades to now service locations across the state.

The milestone was celebrated with the help of community members, ambassadors and services at Pioneer Park on Friday – a sight to behold for Aunty Joyce who reminisced on the service’s early days.

“From little things big things grow – I always said that and I believe it,” she said.

“It’s still happening, it’s still growing.

“Look at all the students here – in years to come these children will remember this day.”

Aunty Joyce gave credit to CEO Darren Ah-See who she said has done a wonderful job in the organisation’s progression.

WACHS chairperson, Marsha Hill, agreed the milestone was a big day for the indigenous community of Wellington.

The Move it Mob Style crew kept school students entertained.

“It is a massive milestone acknowledging the Elders who set up the service,” she said

“It took a lot of time, effort and dedication for a mob of people in a time that it wasn’t a positive experience for Aboriginal people.”

She said the service initially started with one drug and alcohol worker, and has since grown to employ close to 100 staff members across NSW.

“It has allowed opportunities for staff to train and earn professional qualifications so the best quality service can be delivered to the community,” Marsha said.

She added the service has expanded across the state to include Moree, Dubbo, Mt Druitt, and soon to be Penrith and the Blue Mountains.

“It’s a really good service to work for and an absolute pleasure to see our community healthy and have access to the best and quality health care,” Marsha said.

Friday’s celebrations were attended to by local schools and services, QuitBFit ambassadors, and special guests including Move it Mob Style, NRL and former NRL players Timana Tahu, Nathan Merritt, Ash Taylor, Will Smith Braidon Burns, and Tyrone Roberts.

5.2 NSW : Katungul Aboriginal Corporation has joined forces with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Brisbane (IUHI) to deliver the Deadly Choices program on the Far South Coast.

Steve Renouf (left), Aidan Sezer (centre), and Jack Wighton (right) were on hand to help promote Katungul’s partnership with Deadly Choices.

Rugby league legend Steve Renouf announced the partnership at a community event in Narooma on Saturday, November 4.

Current Canberra Raiders players Jack Wighton and Aidan Sezer also attended the event at NATA Oval.

The partnership expands the delivery of Deadly Choices across Australia, representing an ongoing commitment by community controlled health organisations to Close the Gap in Indigenous life expectancy.

Deadly Choices is a community-based healthy lifestyle campaign launched in 2013. It has a particular focus on young people, as well as the importance of exercise, education, school attendance, quitting smoking, and regular preventive health checks.

Renouf said the partnership with Katungul was an important part of Deadly Choices’ aim to spread its Indigenous health message across Australia.

“The big thing for Deadly Choices is we get Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who historically weren’t getting their health check to get them,” he said.

“We’ve launched a partnership with the Kangaroos and the Rugby League World Cup. We were in Canberra on Friday night, and we launched a week ago in Melbourne with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service down there.”

Robert Skeen, CEO of Katungul, said the partnership was an achievement born from months of planning.

“We are really excited to partner with Deadly Choices to further expand the program and the benefits it provides to community,” he said.

“We’re empowering our community to make Deadly Choices, by getting their health checked and spreading the message that prevention is better than cure.”

Wighton and Sezer, both of an Indigenous background, helped promote the new partnership, with Wighton stressing the importance of such events.

“I love coming out to these things,” he said. “Helping our people is a big thing, and these events are giving a rise to people getting healthy.”

Sezer also sees the importance in community events, and thinks the pathway to health is often a mindset.

“You can see from the turnout how much the Indigenous community appreciates the fact that Deadly Choices have provided this day for them to enjoy,” he said.

“I think it (staying healthy) is more about people keeping a good mind-frame, and taking days like this as a blessing to come down and enjoy it.”

In September, Federal Minister for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt AM announced that legendary Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga and other Indigenous and non-Indigenous players would become ambassadors for the Deadly Choices program.

Community members who get their 715 Health Check at a participating Aboriginal Medical Service – such as Katungul – during the World Cup can score a special edition Deadly Kangaroos World Cup jersey.

6. Vic : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Ambassadors win title

Congratulations to NJS Storm for winning the grand final at the A.C.T Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Netball Tournament! What an honour to be able to take home the trophy in memory of Neil Smith! Good job to the girls who played all 8 games undefeated. We are proud to have you as healthy lifestyle ambassadors! Enjoy the victory!

#vahsHLT #BePositive #BeBrave #BeStrong #StaySmokeFree

7.NT Miwatj Health Service : Christina’s Story on Quit Smoking Tobacco

Check out the incredible Christina from Galiwin’ku, Elcho Island, NT, Australia her sharing story on why she decided to quit smoking tobacco.

Ft. our legendary #YakaNgarali workers, Glen Gurruwiwi and Oscar Datjarranga.

We could not be more proud of the strength and determination Christina has shown in her quitting journey. If you want to #StartTheJourney like Christina, contact Glen or Oscar today!

8 SA : Artists painting their Indigenous songlines to stay healthy and strong

Dorothy Ward taps her head and her heart as she explains the process of painting her songlines.

“My family had the knowledge, the knowledge with culture, of every dreamtime rock hole … they bring the story into the painting,” she says.

“They start doing their own dreaming, from their grandmother or grandfather. They bring that story up to the canvas, they make it known, they do it with their mind and heart and it strengthens them and they be, you know, they strong.”

Article originally published here

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/oct/17/the-artists-painting-their-indigenous-songlines-to-stay-healthy-and-strong

Ward is one of several hundred Indigenous artists who travelled to Adelaide for the Tarnanthi festival of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art at the weekend.

She is sitting with other artists from the Warakurna arts centre in remote Western Australia. Warakurna represents artists from the Ngaanyatjarra lands, communities whose country is on the Western Australian side of the Gibson desert, 330km east of Uluru.

They are waiting for the three-day art fair to begin. Twenty-four stallholders, representing Indigenous arts centres from around Australia, have brought their best work to Adelaide to sell in the Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute. The art fair is part of the Tarnanthi festival of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, a citywide festival that runs until 22 October.

In the Ngaanyatjarra lands, as in many remote communities, art is one of the main sources of income.

“Art provides another income stream,” Warakurna arts centre’s manager, Jane Menzies, tells Guardian Australia. “One can’t live off the Centrelink dole payments. It’s woeful, unsustainable out there … the cost of living is so high.”Welfare payments range between $540 a fortnight for the unemployment benefit and $890 for the aged care pension. Once the bills are taken out, it’s barely enough to cover the cost of petrol.

“A lot of our artists are travelling for funerals, and funerals are not just 10km up the road, it’s 800km up the road,” Menzies says. “The elders are doing this sometimes three times a month. The cost of doing this is much higher than the money that they receive from the government.”

Art is also a way of building resilience in communities straddling the divide between Indigenous cultural traditions and the western expectations of state and federal governments.

“It empowers people to share their knowledge, to collaborate and paint that knowledge and ensure that it has a place that’s ongoing: a legacy, which clearly has huge benefits for mental health and wellness,” Menzies says.

The role of art as cultural maintenance is particularly important when people become too old or unwell to travel on country themselves.

Once a week, a busload of artists from Warakurna travel 100km down the Great Central Road to Kungkarrangkalpa aged care facility in Wanarn to paint and hear the stories of old people who can no longer return home.

“It gives the old people an opportunity to paint their Tjukurrpa [a Ngaanyatjarra word meaning culture or dreaming] with artists and to see their family,” Menzies says.

When they age they go there and they paint, paint, paint

Dorothy Ward

Ward, who takes part in the visits every Friday, says it helps to keep both older and younger people “healthy and strong”.

“They keep the knowledge into their system, whole body, to work through it,” she says. “When they age they go there and they paint, paint, paint.”

Across the border in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands in South Australia, art is playing a more direct role in improving the health of people in remote communities. They are holding an auction to raise money to pay for nurses to run a dialysis centre at Pukatja, a remote community formerly known as Ernabella. Pukatja is about 1,300km north of Adelaide and 420km south of Alice Springs.

Since the Northern Territory closed its borders to out-of-state dialysis patients in 2009, dialysis patients in Pukatja and other APY communities have had to travel more than 1,000km south to Port Augusta

or to Adelaide, to receive treatment.

Purple House, a community-controlled health organisation based in Alice Springs that has helped six remote communities in the territory and three in WA open local dialysis centres, has secured a federal funding grant to build a four-chair dialysis centre and nurses’ accommodation in Pukatja.

But the funding does not cover operational costs. Purple House has already raised $180,000 and hoped to raise the final $150,000 needed to cover the first 12 months at an auction on the last day of the art fair on Sunday.

Leading artists from the APY lands’ prolific arts centres, including Jimmy Pompey, Robert Fielding Punnagka and Nura Rupert, donated works to the auction. A number of the artists also have pieces showing in the Tarnanthi exhibition at the Art Gallery of SA, which will run until January.

The largest piece at the auction, a women’s collaborative work from Tjala Arts, was expected to sell for $30,000 alone.

It sold for $69,000 and has been donated to the SA Museum to form part of an installation with dialysis machines about the impact of kidney failure in remote communities.

In total, the auction raised $169,300, enough to open the doors of the new dialysis centre.

Addressing the crowd following the auction, one Pukatja/Ernabella elder, who had been living in Adelaide to receive dialysis, said she was going to roll up her swag and “hit the road to Ernabella!”.

Others who might otherwise have put off treatment to avoid leaving their home will also be able to receive treatment locally, Purple House chief executive Sarah Brown says.

“There are a number of senior artists who have got family on dialysis and this will mean that they’ll be able to get home from Adelaide, Port Augusta and Alice Springs back to the APY lands, and there’s a lot of people who know that they’re going to need dialysis soon who may actually otherwise choose not to start dialysis and pass away on country,” she says. “And if that happens, all their cultural knowledge and all their creative spirit will be lost to the whole of Australia.”

Diabetes is the second leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, behind heart disease. According to Australian Bureau of Statistics figures, rates of death from diabetes in 2016 were 4.9 times higher for Indigenous Australians than non-Indigenous Australians.

Indigenous people are five times more likely to be hospitalised from chronic kidney disease, whether linked to diabetes or other causes, than non-Indigenous Australians. In remote communities in the central desert region, Brown says, rates of kidney disease can be between 15 and 30 times the national average.

Purple House opened its first remote dialysis centre at Kintore in the Pintupi homelands, 550km west of Alice Springs, in 2004.

Paniny Mick and Wawiriya Burton with the APY women’s painting. Photograph: Tjala Arts

“We started to get people home, very gently and quietly and carefully, and people’s health just improved enormously,” Brown says. “People who had been stuck in town painting for carpetbaggers, dodgy art dealers, were suddenly back out in their community able to support their family through painting for their art centre.”

The Kintore clinic and the central Purple House clinic in Alice Springs were kickstarted by funds raised at an art auction, just like the Pukatja centre. Subsequent centres have been built and run using mining royalties, government grants and philanthropic donations.

Brown hopes a new Medicare item number for remote community dialysis, proposed by the expert taskforce conducting a review of the Medicare Benefits Scheme, will provide ongoing funding.

“So then we know as long as people want to go home for dialysis and they’re well enough to go that we’ll have the money to be able to do it,” she says. “We’re really hoping that that’s going to start in the next year or so, and the donated money will run the service up until then. Anything left can go to making sure that this service is really robust and we’re working to help people get home safely.”

  • Guardian Australia travelled to Adelaide courtesy of the Art Gallery of South Australia.

 

 

 

Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #TAS #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #TAS

1.1 #NACCHOagm2017 and Members’ Conference Program launched

2.NSW : Award winning Katungul Aboriginal Corporation  in new partnership with Deadly Choices

3. WA : AHCWA Gap between Indigenous and non-indigenous longevity surges in WA

4.SA: National Disability Insurance Scheme Aboriginal community consultation

5.QLD : Apunipima’s ACCHO Napranum Centre Working to National Standards

6. VIC : VACCHO : Korin Korin Balit-Djak: Aboriginal health, wellbeing and safety strategic plan 2017–2027 

7. NT: AMSANT APO NT :  Failure guaranteed if you don’t involve us, say Aboriginal organisations

8.ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter September 2017

9. Tas: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Hobart seeks OZ Day move

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 #NACCHOagm2017 and Members’ Conference Program launched

 Download the 48 Page Conference Program

NACCHO 2017 Conference Program

You can follow on Twitter , Instagram and Facebook using HASH Tag #NACCHOagm2017

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM will provided a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website

2.NSW : Award winning Katungul Aboriginal Corporation  in new partnership with Deadly Choices

It’s important to all our staff, because even though we work for the organisation, we are still community members and part of the wider family,

 All our staff have a strong investment in not only seeing Katungul succeed, but because of our long community and family history, we also have those ties with the community, so it’s not only about what’s happening now but also building a strong base for future generations.

Those historical family and cultural ties reflects our ‘Koori health in Koori hands’ philosophy.”

Katungul chief executive officer Rob Skeen said the awards had definitely been a huge boost for staff, particularly receiving the peer-to-peer recognition of both the people’s choice and NAIDOC awards

Since taking over as CEO last year, Mr Skeen has seen the number of employees grow from 30 to 56 and the health service was getting recognition for its accomplishments from a range of other services and government entities.

Katungul has won the Excellence in Business Award in the Far South Coast Regional Business Awards. This follows their recent win in the Eurobodalla Business Awards.

The Excellence in Business award recognises a business employing more than 20 people that has attained significant growth and is able to demonstrate the specific strategies and processes implemented to achieve sustainable growth over the previous 24 months.

Katungul Aboriginal Corporation provides culturally appropriate health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities on the Far South Coast of NSW. Staff are committed to providing high quality treatment and services in a culturally appropriate way.

Facilities include general practice and medical and dental clinics. Allied health programs are in place for eye health, otitis media and maternity care. There are many outreach programs available to serve the wider community.

At Katungul, they strive to work in partnership with local health services to ensure all specific medical, dental, social and emotional wellbeing needs are satisfied to a high standard.

Katungul serves communities from Eden to Batemans Bay.

Katungul will now be a finalist  in the NSW State Business Awards to be decided in Sydney in late November.

This is a significant achievement and reflects the hard work put in by all staff and the Board over the last few years.

Katungul and Deadly Choices will launch their partnership with a community day on Saturday 4 November

3. WA : AHCWA Gap between Indigenous and non-indigenous longevity surges in WA

The disparity between the life expectancy of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal West Australians has surged, bucking a national trend that shows a closing of the gap, a new report has found.
The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report, released this week, shows the life expectancy gap between indigenous and non-indigenous West Australians increased from 14.7 years to 15.1 years in men and 12.9 years to 13.5 years in women in a comparison of data between 2005-2007 and 2010-2012.
Nationally, the gap decreased from 11.4 years to 10.6 years for men and remained stable at 9.6 years to 9.5 years for women during the same period.

The figures come despite the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017: Western Australia report showing small increases in the life expectancy of indigenous males in WA from 64.5 to 65 years and indigenous females from 70 to 70.2 years between 2005–2007 and 2010–2012.

Aboriginal Health Council of WA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said despite the improvements to indigenous longevity and several other health outcomes, there was still a long way to go and health education remained a key focus.

“Positively, this report identifies several areas of improvement in Aboriginal health, including a 48% drop in deaths from circulatory diseases and five-fold increase in the rate of indigenous health checks being claimed,” Ms Nelson-Cox said.

The report showed a substantial increase in the rate of indigenous-specific health checks being claimed, rising from 42 per 1000 in 2006-07 to 254 per 1000 in 2014-15, she said.

“This is a significant move that shows health education campaigns and our commitment to making health checks more available to Aboriginal communities are having an impact,” she said.

“But we remain deeply concerned at several findings, including that the rate of indigenous women smoking during pregnancy is five times higher than non-indigenous women and the disparity in notifications for sexually transmitted infections for indigenous Australians.

“In addition, the death rates for chronic diseases are much higher for indigenous Australians than non-indigenous Australians.

“To that end, this report highlights the need for greater investment in evidence based, culturally safe, high quality responsive and accessibly primary health care for Aboriginal people in WA.

“AHCWA urgently calls on the government to provide further support to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) who continue to be the strongest, most effective means to addressing the gap in health outcomes.

“Without this investment, achieving our Closing the Gap targets will remain out of reach.”

Ms Nelson-Cox said while it was recognised that governments invested significant funding in Aboriginal health, Aboriginal community and community-controlled organisations were the most effective agencies.

There also needed to be greater transparency and accountability of other stakeholders in the sector, she said.

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) currently engaged as members.

4.SA: National Disability Insurance Scheme Aboriginal community consultation

Read over 25 NACCHO Disability NDIS articles HERE

 5.QLD : Apunipima’s ACCHO Napranum Centre Working to National Standards
 

Charkil-Om Primary Health Care Centre received AGPAL accreditation for the first time in September, just after celebrating its first birthday in August.

AGPAL (Australian General Practice Accreditation Limited) accreditation is independent recognition that a practice meets the requirements of governing industry standards which are set by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

Apunipima’s Quality and Risk Manager Roberta Newton said accreditation acknowledged the high standard of care being provided to the community by the Charkil-Om team.

‘So stringent are the AGPAL standards that many mainstream clinics need more than one go to achieve accreditation,’ she said.

‘To achieve it first time is a real coup, not only for the staff but also for our community.’

While AGPAL accreditation is not mandatory, all Apunipima primary health care centres are either accredited or working towards accreditation.

‘We wanted the community to know that their health and wellbeing is our priority,’ Roberta said.

‘By choosing to attend an accredited practice, our patients know they will get quality and safe care that meets the national standards.’

The Centre offers a full range of culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care services including doctors, nurse and maternal and child health worker supported by a range of visiting services, and is fast becoming a real hub for the community.

Charkil-Om Primary Health Care Centre manager Kelvin Coleman said the AGPAL team were impressed with both the Centre and its operation.

‘The AGPAL accreditors were particularly impressed that we were able to source full time permanent doctors and committed staff to deliver such comprehensive services in a remote area,’ he said.

“All of our staff played a valuable role in working together meet the AGPAL standards. Receiving AGPAL accreditation is an acknowledgement of the dedication, care and commitment of our staff.’

‘I am incredibly proud of what our team have achieved, not only for ourselves, but most importantly for our community.’

6. VACCHO : Korin Korin Balit-Djak: Aboriginal health, wellbeing and safety strategic plan 2017–2027 

Key messages

  • Korin Korin Balit-Djak means ‘Growing very strong’ in the Woi wurrung language. It provides an overarching framework for action to improve the health, wellbeing and safety of Aboriginal Victorians now and over the next 10 years.
  • The purpose of Korin Korin Balit-Djak is to realise the Victorian Government’s vision for ‘Self-determining, healthy and safe Aboriginal people and communities’ in Victoria.

VIEW WEBSITE HERE

Korin Korin Balit-Djak emerges at a significant time for both Aboriginal communities in Victoria and the government. It follows the government’s commitment to self-determination for Aboriginal Victorians.

The Department of Health and Human Services commissioned work that has informed both Korin Korin Balit-Djak and the discussion about Aboriginal self-determination across all areas of the Victorian Government and community. This research and discussion has underpinned a new policy platform for Aboriginal health, wellbeing and safety.

Korin Korin Balit-Djak is informed by an extensive consultation process with Aboriginal communities across Victoria, as well as a strong evidence base, including Koolin Balit evaluation findings (Victorian Government 2012). The plan details how the department will work with Aboriginal communities, community organisations, other government departments and mainstream service providers – now and into the future – to improve the health, wellbeing and safety of Aboriginal people in Victoria.

Korin Korin Balit-Djak covers five domains:

  • Aboriginal community leadership
  • prioritising Aboriginal culture and community
  • system reform across the health and human services sector
  • safe, secure, strong families and individuals
  • physically, socially and emotionally healthy Aboriginal communities.

Korin Korin Balit-Djak will be reviewed and updated every three years.

Korin Korin Balit-Djak is guided by the government’s vision to achieve optimum health, wellbeing and safety for all Victorians so they can live the life they value. It aligns with the department’s strategic directions and aspires to address, and ultimately eliminate, systemic racism within the Victorian health and human service sectors.

Digital story: Dixon Patten

Victorian Aboriginal artist Dixon Patten was commissioned by the department to produce the artwork titled Korin Korin Balit-Djak. In this video, he explains how his artwork depicts the way the department will work with Aboriginal communities to ensure the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people.

7. NT: AMSANT APO NT :  Failure guaranteed if you don’t involve us, say Aboriginal organisations

“We have been calling on the Minister for Indigenous Affairs to clarify and formalise the Community Development Program reform process since last December. Every request is met with silence,

The Prime Minister and Minister for Indigenous Affairs never tire of talking about how they want to do things with us, not to us. That they want new ways of working with Aboriginal people. Yet here is a program that affects the lives of 29,000 Indigenous people and has caused immense harm, and we still can’t get confirmation of a process that includes us,”

John Paterson CEO AMSANT spokesperson from APO NT

The Australian Government must step out from behind closed doors and involve Indigenous people in a transparent process for reforming the discriminatory remote ‘work for the dole’ scheme, the Aboriginal Peak Organisations NT (APO NT)1 urged today.

The Government committed to reviewing the program, called the ‘Community Development Program’ (CDP) and consulting with remote communities in May 2017.

Australia’s election to the world’s leading human rights body, the UN Human Rights Council, this week relied on a pledge to support the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples ‘in both word and deed’. The Declaration requires the Government to work in partnership with Aboriginal people and respect the right to self-determination.

“The Australian Government said to the world that it would tackle Indigenous disadvantage in partnership with our people. Meanwhile the Government’s racially discriminatory program results in Aboriginal people receiving more penalties than other Australians, and hurts our communities,” said Mr Paterson.

“If the Government is serious about the promises it made to get elected to the Council, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs will immediately announce an independent and transparent reform process involving a partnership with Aboriginal people,” added Mr Paterson.

APO NT launched a positive alternative to CDP in Canberra last month (APO NT alternative to CDP). Our model would create 10,500 part time jobs to be filled by people in remote communities who currently get less than the minimum wage to do work they should be employed and paid properly to do. Our model would create new jobs and enterprises, strengthen communities and get rid of pointless administration. It has incentives to encourage people into work, training and other activities, rather than punishing people who are already struggling.

David Ross from APO NT, said, “Thirty-three organisations from around Australia have endorsed our new model. We have done the work, we want to talk, and we want a program that will actually deliver positive outcomes on the ground.”

“The Australian Government appears to be unable to put the rhetoric of collaboration into practice. What do all these commitments mean if they don’t deliver a seat at the table on this fundamental issue? Let’s not repeat the mistakes of the past and impose a top-down program from Canberra that is guaranteed to fail in remote Australia,” Mr Ross concluded.

KEY FACTS ABOUT THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SCHEME

The CDP is the main program of job related assistance for unemployed people in remote areas of Australia. It is the equivalent of job active (formerly JSA) and Disability Employment Services in the rest of the country.

The CDP has around 35,000 participants, around 83% of whom are identified as Indigenous.

People with full time work capacity who are 18-49 years old must Work for the Dole, 25 hours per week, 5 days per week, at least 46 weeks per year (1150 hours per year). Under job active Work for the Dole only starts after 12 months, and then for 390-650 hours per year.

Despite having a caseload less than a 20th the size of job active, more penalties are applied to CDP participants than to jobactive participants.

In the 21 months from the start of CDP on 1 July 2015 to the end of March 2017, 299,055 financial penalties were applied to CDP participants. Over the same period, 237,333 financial penalties were applied to jobactive participants.

8.ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter September 2017

Download a PDF copy HERE

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter September 2017

9. Tas: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Hobart seeks OZ Day move

 

Welcome your comments about all these ACCHO stories

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Smoking : Features Our ACCHO Members at #OTCC2017 #Deadly good news stories #TAS #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #TAS

1.1 #NACCHOagm2017 and Members’ Conference Program launched

1.2. National : The Redfern Statement Alliance Call for Funding to be Reinstated to the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples

2. Tas: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre at #OTCC2017

3. VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service Healthy Lifestyle Team at #OTCC2017

4. NT : Miwatj AMS Arnhem Land and Congress at #OTCC2017

5.QLD : Deadly Choices at @OTCC2017

6 SA : AHCSA and Quitline at #OTCC2017

7.WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service ‘you CAN quit’ film project 

8. ACT/NSW  :Tom Calma Don’t Make Smokes Your Story

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 #NACCHOagm2017 and Members’ Conference Program launched

 Download the 48 Page Conference Program

NACCHO 2017 Conference Program

You can follow on Twitter , Instagram and Facebook using HASH Tag #NACCHOagm2017

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM will provided a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website

1.2. National : The Redfern Statement Alliance Call for Funding to be Reinstated to the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples .

“We need to reset the relationship by supporting the operations of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples.”

Pat Turner, NACCHO CEO said a positive step is needed (Pictured above at Redfern Statement launch June 2016)

See Redfern Statement Update NACCHO Aboriginal Health Priorities : 1st Anniversary of the #Redfernstatement

On the eve that the Australian Government has secured a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council, the Redfern Statement Alliance Leaders met to discuss its relationship with the Australian Government.

Securing this position to the UN Council does not reflect the relationship this Government has with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

In 2008 there was bi-partisan support for the National Congress as an elected voice of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

Co-Chair Jackie Huggins said, “National Congress is an elected body with more members than some of the major political parties. Although our relationship has improved with Government, it has been through minor contract work and is ineffective.”

Co-Chair Rod Little said, “National Congress is strongly committed to the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

We have consistently called on the Australian Government to honour its commitment and not just sit idly on the UN Human Rights Council when our people are suffering.”

The recent UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous People’s report delivered a verdict to the Australian Government on the status of Aboriginal Australia and called for the reinstatement of funds to the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples.

The Redfern Statement Alliance Leaders call on Prime Minister Turnbull to seize the opportunity to do the right thing and invest in the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples as a lead Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisation.

Australia is now going to be overseeing the human rights records of other nations whilst serious human rights violations are being committed against our people daily.

2. Tas: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre at #OTCC2017

Here’s Tina Goodwin, TAC tobacco worker, on stage at the Oceania Tobacco Control Conference is Tasmania this week with Hone Harawura.

Tina announced Hone as the winner of the Tariana Turia award which recognises significant contributions to Indigenous tobacco control.

Hone has worked as a community activist and parliamentarian on many issues of importance to Maori. He wants to see tobacco companies sued for all of the death and destruction they cause to Maori, Aboriginal and other Indigenous communities.

Hone’s words: “Those bastards (Big Tobacco) are making people addicted and they are killing our people. Let’s sue them!”Anyone want to help with the legal case? Pictured below with Tom Calma

3. VIC : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service Healthy Lifestyle Team at #OTCC2017

Representing Deadly Dan and ready to take on day 1 of the Oceania Tobacco Control Conference 2017 in Hobart.

Very excited to hear from our friends in other Tackling Indigenous Smoking Teams and mainstream organisations from Aus, NZ and Pacific Islands today.

Learning about the progress and challenges as we aim for a Tobacco Free Pacific by 2025!

 

The team exploring kunanyi this morning. Checking out the view and getting our 30 minutes of exercise in before day 2 of the Oceania Tobacco Control Conference.

Having a great time. Loving learning about the rich Aboriginal history of this area and meeting other passionate like minded health professionals.

If you can’t tell from our faces it was very cold at the top!

#otcc2017#kunanyi#hobart#vahsHLT#StaySmokeFree

4. NT : Miwatj AMS Arnhem Land and Congress at #OTCC2017

5.QLD : Deadly Choices at @OTCC2017

6 SA : AHCSA and Quitline at #OTCC2017

7.WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service ‘you CAN quit’ film project ( Note not at #OTCC2017)

Young people in four remote communities in Western Australia’s East Pilbara — where up to 80 percent of community members smoke — have joined forces with filmmakers on a campaign to urge people to give up the deadly habit.

From NIT

The youngsters from Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji in WA are shedding light on the personal stories of local smokers to warn about the dangerous habit in a series of short films.

Fifteen-year-old Clintesha Samson, who was involved in the films and doesn’t smoke, said she would like to see people in her community stop for the sake of their health.

She said she thought film was a good way to get the message across.

The series of films are part of a ‘you CAN quit’ project that has documented the stories of community members who have kicked the habit and those who have been affected by smoking-related illnesses.

The project was organised by Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking team.

The young people involved were responsible for researching, shooting, editing and promoting the films.

Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service regional tobacco coordinator Danika Tager said smoking rates in the East Pilbara were high and more needed to be done to support communities to address tobacco addiction.

“Smoking rates in remote East Pilbara communities are as high as 80 percent and tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death and disease in this population,” Ms Tager said.

“Through this important film project we hope to encourage people in these communities to quit smoking, as well as air the many benefits of quitting and where they can find help and support.”

The films are being shown in communities and also aired on TV and social media.

The Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service is a community-controlled health organisation that provides primary health care, 24-hour emergency services and preventative health and education programs in the communities of Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji.

8. ACT/NSW Tom Calma Don’t Make Smokes Your Story

Download the evaluation report

Evaluation-Report_National-Tobacco-Campaign-Indigenous

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #TAS

 1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations : Only 21 days to go

2.1 Congress Alice Springs Breast Cancer Awareness Month #Deadly Choices

2.2 CONGRESS IS NOW VACCINATING AGAINST THE MENINGOCOCCAL OUTBREAK

3. Vic : VACCHO, VAHS ,BADAC and Quit Victoria proud to partner with the Ballarat Carnival to provide a healthy and smoke free environment

4. NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service Indigenous students at Guyra Central School are looking good in new glasses.

5. WA : AHCWA : Mental Health Week has an Aboriginal focus for the first time 

6. QLD : Deadly Choices /Deadly Roos ambassador, Greg Inglis making healthy choices

7. SA : Major auction Art Fair to raise funds for dialysis centre in Ernabella SA.

8. TAS : FIAAI ‘No Smokes No Limits’ Public Health Campaign Launched

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 1.1 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations : Only 21 days to go

On Tuesday 10 October there was only 21  days to go and due to high demand  the conference AGM is nearly booked out

This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

2.1 Congress Alice Springs Breast Cancer Awareness Month #Deadly Choices

October is breast cancer awareness month and provides an opportunity to focus on breast cancer and the impact the disease has on our mob.

Congress is offering the first 200 eligible* Aboriginal women that have a women’s health check or cervical screen at any Congress Clinic, or a mammogram at Breast Screening NT an exclusive Deadly Choices Breast Cancer Shirt.

To find out if you’re eligible and to book an appointment, call (08) 89514 400 or your local Congress clinic today.
*To be eligible you must an Aboriginal congress client and due for a mammogram, cervical or women’s health check during the promotion period. Pink ribbon shirts are strictly limited and will be substituted for available health check initiative deadly choices shirts when stock runs out.

2.2 CONGRESS IS NOW VACCINATING AGAINST THE MENINGOCOCCAL OUTBREAK

Congress encourages all Aboriginal people aged between 12 months and 19 years to attend your nearest Congress clinic to be vaccinated against meningococcal disease.

While meningococcal disease is rare, it can be life threatening.

No appointment is needed.

3. Vic : VACCHO, VAHS ,BADAC and Quit Victoria proud to partner with the Ballarat Carnival to provide a healthy and smoke free environment

“The Vic NAIDOC Committee and the Ballarat Carnival Committee are proud to announce that this year’s Carnival will be completely Smoke Free!

VACCHO, VAHS and Quit Victoria are proud to partner with the Carnival to provide a healthy and smoke free environment for the whole Community.

We believe in creating a space where everyone can breathe fresh air and celebrate coming together for such a brilliant event. Call the Aboriginal Quitline (13 QUIT – 13 78 48) for tips and support on how you can go smoke free too.

P.s. Look out for Deadly Dan, the No Smokes Man at the Carnival on Saturday. He’ll be stoked to hear the news!”

#vicnaidoc #alwaysproudball2017 #smokefree #smokefreezone #vaccho #vahs #quitvictoria #BADAC

Sponsors

On behalf of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Co-operative and the Carnival Committee, we would like to say a HUGE thank you to the following organisations for their generous support. Without you, the carnival would not be possible.

Victorian Naidoc
Wadawurrung – Wathaurung Aboriginal Corporation
VicHealth
Ballarat Council
FedUni Aboriginal Education Centre
Victorian Aboriginal Health Service
Aboriginal Victoria
Department of Health & Human Services, Victoria
@victorian aboriginal justice agreement
Oxfam
Ballarat Koorie Engagement Action Group – KEAG
Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc
Woolworths
Central Highlands Water
AFL Victoria
AFL Goldfields
Netball Victoria
Quit Victoria
Pitcha Makin Fellas
AIME
Basketball Ballarat
Lake Wendouree Football Netball Club
The North Ballarat Sports Club
Hands On Health Australia
RMIT University
Victoria University, Melbourne Australia

We are really looking forward to delivering the 2017 carnival with you!

4. NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service Indigenous students at Guyra Central School are looking good in new glasses.

Thanks to a visit from the Brien Holden Vision Institute eye clinic, Ethan Harris and Nioka Levy no longer need to sit at the front of the class.

From HERE

A number of students had their eyes examined by a visiting optometrist.

The eye doctor attended the school for eye checks in late August.

The clinic is part of Armajun Aboriginal Health Service.

It’s ran and organised by Aboriginal Education officer Alecia Blair and Guyra Central School health officer Nellie Blair.Some eye problems are more common in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than they are with non-Indigenous people.

Read all NACCHO 44 Aboriginal Eye Health stories here

5. WA : AHCWA : Mental Health Week has an Aboriginal focus for the first time 

Aboriginal Health Council of WA chairwoman Michelle Nelson-Cox said it was an “absolute tragedy” that suicide was one of the leading causes of death among young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“The death of even one of our young people to suicide is not acceptable,” she said.

AHCWA believes there needs to be a greater focus on increasing and improving access to culturally appropriate and locally responsive suicide prevention programs for Aboriginal youth in WA.

WA Mental Health Week has an Aboriginal focus for the first time this year, with a complementary theme recognising the importance of country.

Indigenous Australians are twice as likely to take their own lives as non-indigenous Australians, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics Causes of Death 2016 report released last month.

Suicide was the fifth-leading cause of death for indigenous Australians, compared to the 15th for non-indigenous Australians, with suicide deaths accounting for a greater proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths (5.5 per cent), compared to non-indigenous Australians (1.7 per cent).

In its 50th year, WA Mental Health Week has added a complementary Aboriginal theme to its main theme — “connect with country, community and you for strong social and emotional wellbeing”.

Goldfields elder Trevor Donaldson said he was especially concerned about the high rate of youth suicide among Aboriginal people.

He said he felt many of the services previously offered had done nothing to help.

“I think the government should be held accountable for every one of those deaths because they deliver so little, ” he said.

“Aboriginal youth have nothing here in the Goldfields. The system is failing our youth, education is failing our youth.

“And I feel frustrated because I know what is going to happen — there is going to be another tragedy and ministers from left, right and centre will be coming here to supposedly deal with it and nothing will change.”

Suicide was the second leading cause of death after transport accidents among the Goldfields’ 15-24-year-olds, according to a 2015 Goldfields Health Profile by the Planning and Evaluation Unit.

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealthDay : Australia’s new digital #mentalhealth gateway now live

6. QLD : Deadly Choices /Deadly Roos ambassador, Greg Inglis making healthy choices

WATCH HERE

Hear what Deadly Roos ambassador, Greg Inglis has to say about the Deadly Roos and making healthy choices. #DeadlyChoices #DeadlyRoos #RISE Ken Wyatt

See NACCHO Background story

“Deadly Choices is what I like to call a ‘jewel in the crown’ of Indigenous health, achieving some stunning results since it kicked off in South East Queensland four years ago.

The Deadly Kangaroos is an expansion of this program, using the star power of the ambassadors and the excitement of this year’s World Cup to reach more even communities.

Our national rugby league stars need to be in peak physical condition to play at the top of their game and we appreciate the players’ support to start discussions with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about ways to improve their health “

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said legendary Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga and other Indigenous and non-Indigenous players would become ambassadors for the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s Deadly Choices program, to extend its reach across Australia.

The launch in Canberra was attended by the NACCHO Chair Matthew Cooke (pictured on right )

Members of the elite Australian Kangaroos Rugby League 2017 World Cup squad will headline the expansion of a successful grassroots campaign to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Deadly Choices is a community-based health lifestyle campaign launched in 2013.

There is particular focus on young people and the importance of exercise, education, school attendance, quitting smoking and regular preventive health checks.

Through media campaigns, sports carnivals and community events it has prompted:

    • Almost 19,000 annual health checkups in South East Queensland
    • Active patient numbers to triple to over 330,000
    • 1,155 smoke-free household pledges
    • More than 3,300 smoker interventions

“Experience shows that sport and sporting legends can help communities kick major goals in health awareness and foster real change,” the Minister said.

“I encourage everyone to support Australia in the World Cup in October, just as the Kangaroos are supporting better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and all Australians.”

The ambassadors will make appearances at game day events as the Australian team travels through the ACT, New South Wales, the Northern Territory and regional Queensland for the World Cup.

“Key ambassadors for the Deadly Kangaroos are Johnathan Thurston and Greg Inglis,” the Minister said. “Also, the best three players from the national men’s and women’s teams at the Arthur Beetson Deadly Choices Murri Rugby League carnival will also be chosen as community ambassadors to promote positive health messages.

“Merchandise, including a special Deadly Kangaroos World Cup jersey, has been produced as an incentive for people to have a health check.

“The messages will also be promoted through television, radio, social media and at coaching clinics and Aboriginal community controlled health services.”

The Australian Government is contributing $235,000 to help support the Deadly Kangaroos campaign

The Rugby League World Cup runs from 26 October – 2 December 2017.

7. SA : Major auction Art Fair to raise funds for dialysis centre in Ernabella SA.

The Purple Hose is hosting major auction Art Fair to raise funds for dialysis centre in Ernabella SA.

An increasing number of Anangu are forced to leave their homes and families for renal dialysis treatment. Purple House is holding this major auction to raise funds to secure a Pukatja Dialysis Centre in Ernabella, South Australia.

Works of art have been donated by artists from all of the seven art centres from the APY Art Centre Collective. Works available include paintings, ceramics, work on paper, wood carving, photography and printmaking. Don’t miss this opportunity to add to your collection while making a lasting difference to communities in the APY Lands.

Details

8. TAS : FIAAI ‘No Smokes No Limits’ Public Health Campaign Launched

Flinders Island Aboriginal Association’s Tackling Smoking Program has recently launched their latest ‘No Smokes No Limits’ public health campaign with billboards being revealed across Tasmania. These billboards feature motocross imagery and Aboriginal ambassadors Jay and Josh Woolley from WSM Freestyle.

As part of this campaign, smokers are encouraged to contact their local health service, general practice or the Quitline for assistance in giving up the habit. This campaign seeks to denormalise smoking, and is in stark contrast to some of the messaging typically associated with extreme sports that are often sponsored by energy drinks or other consumables associated with poor health outcomes.

FIAAI CEO Maxine Roughley said “This program especially targets young people who are our future and we are proud to be supporting such an important health issue.”

FIAAI will be looking to expand this campaign to buses and other mediums in the future, with billboards currently being found in several parts of the state including Hobart, Launceston, East Devonport, Burnie and others. FIAAI will also be presenting at the upcoming Oceania Tobacco Control Conference (October 17-19) regarding this campaign.

The FIAAI Tackling Smoking Team can be contacted on 6334 5721 for more information.

-ENDS

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #TAS

1.1 NACCHO CEO Pat Turner to build on the success of Aboriginal Community Control Health Services

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations : Only 28 days to go

2. Vic : VAHS ACCHO Healthy Lifestyle Team love supporting the Fitzroy Stars Netball Club

3.NSW : In the Shoalhaven region Aboriginal Health is everyone’s business

4.NT : Ken Wyatt opens our NACCHO #OchreDay2017 summit in Darwin

5. QLD : Inquiry into service delivery in remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities : Draft report consultation

6.ACT : NACCHO/Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service mental health webinar  in conjunction with the Mental Health Professionals Network

7.WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking team to create Anti Smoking Ads

8. Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre to celebrate our communities journey of breast cancer & raise awareness

9.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

10. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 NACCHO CEO Pat Turner to build on the success of Aboriginal Community Control Health Services

Pat Turner has been appointed for a further three years until July 2020 by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Board.

NACCHO Deputy Chairperson, Sandy Davis welcomed Ms Turner’s appointment highlighting her extensive life experiences in Aboriginal affairs, government, academia and corporate practice.

Sandy also ‘acknowledged her invaluable record of public service achievements and that her leadership style comes at an important time for NACCHO with new governance arrangements to be discussed with members’ at our Annual General Meeting in Canberra in November.

Pat will help create real, meaningful and lasting change for NACCHO that will strengthen community control and keep Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands’ he said.

Pat recently finalised a new network funding agreement for supporting community controlled Aboriginal health service with the Commonwealth. This will allow for better, more targeted investment in efforts to close the health gap for Aboriginal people. Pat has consistently said that ‘governments at all levels must do more to join the dots between education, housing, employment and other social determinants if we are to significantly improve health outcomes for our people and Close the Gap they have spoken about for the best part of a decade.’

Pat has been delivering on the Board’s agenda to consult with members to update our NACCHO Constitution and she has spent the last few months criss-crossing Australia to obtain the views and opinions of our Members and Affiliates about NACCHO constitutional changes.

She will continue to work on strengthening and expanding the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector, maintaining its strategic directions, cutting unnecessary red tape and building a closer relationship between all our organisations. ‘We want to build on the success of community control in improving health outcomes for our people’ she said.

Pat is of Arrernte and Gurdanji descent and was awarded the Order of Australia (AM) in 1990 for her contribution to public service.

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations : Only 28 days to go

On Tuesday 2 October there was only 28  days to go and due to high demand  the conference AGM is nearly booked out

This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

Download NACCHO 2017 Members Conference and AGM Draft

NACCHO Conference Website

2. Vic : VAHS ACCHO Healthy Lifestyle Team love supporting the Fitzroy Stars Netball Club

Photos above : Introducing the Fitzroy Stars Junior Netball Carnival Teams!

The VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team love supporting our Fitzroy Stars Football/Netball Club netballers.

These girls and boys are representing the Healthy Lifestyle Values and doing us proud today! Well done everyone on being deadly team players and making healthy choices!

Check out their other healthy lifestyle tips below. HERE

#vahsHLT #StaySmokeFree #BePositive #BeDeadly #BeAware #Lovethegame

3.NSW : In the Shoalhaven region Aboriginal Health is everyone’s business

Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District (ISLHD) has joined local Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, the Primary Health Network and the University of Wollongong in committing to work together to bring about positive changes to Close the Gap on health inequalities for our Aboriginal communities.

From Here

A partnership agreement was formally signed on Friday by leaders of the South Coast Aboriginal Medical Service; Oolong House – Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Centre; Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service; Waminda South Coast Women’s Health and Welfare Aboriginal Corporation; University of Wollongong; COORDINARE – South Eastern NSW Primary Health Network; and Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District.

A special ceremony, including a corroboree, smoking ceremony and performances by the Doonooch Dancers led by Joe Brown-McLeod and Larry McLeod,

and a stirring welcome to country by Uncle Tom Moore preceded the official signing of the agreement.

ISLHD Chief Executive Margot Mains said the agreement aims to support, promote and strengthen the existing local relationships and strong ties that have been developed over many years.

“The signing of the partnership agreement marks a new beginning for our journey in working collaboratively to close the health and life expectancy gap between Aboriginal people and non-Aboriginal Australians,” Ms Mains said.

4.NT : Ken Wyatt opens our NACCHO #OchreDay2017 summit in Darwin

Losing his nephew to the same preventable disease that afflicts so many Aboriginal Australians galvanised Ken Wyatt to make indigenous men’s health a “top priority” of his political agenda.

Read full speech here NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health @KenWyattMP Speech ” Men’s health, our way. Let’s own it!” – is a powerful conference theme

Read NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health #OchreDay2017 Conference Press release

@KenWyattMP and @jpatto12 raising awareness of issues in Aboriginal men’s health

The Federal Indigenous Health Minister says his nephew was a promising musician but died in June, aged just 35, after a battle with diabetes and chronic renal and heart disease.

“One of Jason’s killers was kidney failure, the same devastating condition that claimed the life of beloved musician, Dr G Yunipingu,” Mr Wyatt told a national men’s health conference in Darwin.

“His close family and friends are now working on a media project to fulfil his dying wishes – to get the word out to indigenous men in particular, to take their health seriously, to own it.”

Aboriginal men have the poorest health of any group within the Australian population, which Mr Wyatt says is “nothing short of a national tragedy”.

They suffer kidney health problems at five times the rate of their non-indigenous counterparts, and are dying more than 10 years younger.

Winner of the Jaydons Adams Award 
From the left, Mr Mark and Mrs Lizzie Adams with Nathan Cubillo-Jones and AMSANT CEO John Paterson
 He’s just graduated this year from his studies as an Indigenous health practitioner and in between playing local Aussie rules and Rugby league, he worked tirelessly with Danila Dilba health service and has recently been appointed manager of the new Malak clinic.

5. QLD : Inquiry into service delivery in remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities : Draft report consultation

The draft report is scheduled to be released in early October 2017.
We are seeking your comments and views on the draft report, and will be undertaking further consultation during October and early November.

The Commissioner Bronwyn Fredericks will be briefing and consulting with stakeholders in the following locations:

  • 9 October 2017 (1pm to 3pm) – Cairns, Doubletree Hilton Hotel
  • 10 October 2017 – Yarrabah
  • 11 October 2017 – Kowanyama
  • 12 October 2017 – Lockhart River
  • 13 October 2017 – Aurukun
  • 16 October 2017 – Gladstone (LGAQ conference)
  • 17 October 2017 – Woorabinda
  • 20 October 2017 – Brisbane

Further consultations will be scheduled in the coming weeks at Mt Isa, Mornington Island, and Thursday Island – details will be published on the QPC website as they become available.

Consultations will include round tables in Cairns, Mt Isa, Thursday Island and Brisbane.

Please register your interest to attend a consultation or round table here.
If you would like to meet with the Commissioner or the inquiry team either as part of the consultation rounds or via teleconference, please contact us on (07) 3015 5111 or enquiry@qpc.qld.gov.au

6.ACT : NACCHO/Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service mental health webinar  in conjunction with the Mental Health Professionals Network 

On Wednesday the 13th of September 2017, NACCHO facilitated a mental health webinar in conjunction with the Mental Health Professionals Network as part of its professional development work.

This mental health webinar focused on reducing the mental health impacts of indigenous incarceration on people, communities and services.

The discussion was conducted by an Indigenous interdisciplinary panel (see below for further details). A post-discussion Q&A was also conducted between the panel and guests, recordings of which can be accessed below.

THE PANEL

Julie Tongs OAM                      (CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service)

Dr Louis Peachey                      (Rural Generalist)

Dr Marshall Watson                 (Psychiatrist)

Dr Jeff Nelson                            (Psychologist)

Facilitator: Dr Mary Emeleus (General Practitioner and Psychotherapist).

7.WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking team to create Anti Smoking Ads

The project, organised by Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking team, will be carried out with funding from a Healthway Indigenous Health Promotion grant and the Federal Government’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking Program.

Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service regional tobacco coordinator Danika Tager said smoking rates in the East Pilbara were exceptionally high and more needed to be done to support communities to address tobacco addiction.

Filmmakers will work with youth in four remote Aboriginal communities in the East Pilbara to shed light on the personal stories of local smokers and warn about the perils of the deadly habit.

Young people, assisted by a professional production team, will create a series of short films as part of the “you CAN quit” project, to document the stories of community members who have successfully kicked the habit and those who have been affected by smoking-related illnesses in Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji.

Statistics from the Federal Department of Health show that tobacco smoking is responsible for one in five Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths, with the number substantially higher in remote areas.

“Smoking rates in remote East Pilbara communities are as high as 80% and tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death and disease in this population,” Ms Tager said.

“Through this important film project we hope to encourage people in these communities to quit smoking, as well as air the many benefits of quitting and where they can find help and support.”

Filming of the four short films will start September 19. It is expected the films will be screened in each community on completion and also be aired on indigenous television stations and social media.

Ms Tager said the project was unique in that the films would be entirely community owned and directed, giving young people the opportunity to actively make a difference in their community.

“Youth will be responsible for all aspects of researching, shooting, editing and promoting the films” she said.

“All too often NGOs will come into a community with a health message that may or may not be relevant, and expect it to change people’s behaviour,” she said.

“What we are doing here is empowering the community to send its own messages and fight tobacco-related harm using its own experience and stories.”

The project will also involve a series of posters to celebrate non-smokers in the communities, and offer education sessions and details about the availability of support programs.

The Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service (PAMS) is a community controlled health organisation that provides primary health care, 24-hour emergency services and preventative health and education programs in the communities of Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji.

8. Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre to celebrate our communities journey of breast cancer & raise awareness

Please join us at piyura kitina (Risdon Cove) on Thursday, 12th October at 1.30pm, to celebrate our communities journey of breast cancer & raise awareness of this disease.
Afternoon tea, will be provided, please contact Emma on
6234 0777 or Freecall 1800 132 260 if you require transport.

9.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

The South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium (the Consortium) was launched on 18 May 2017, as a collaborative partnership formed between the South Australian Aboriginal Health Partnership (comprising of SA Health, Aboriginal Health Council of SA and Department of Health – Commonwealth) and the South Australian Academic Health Science and Translation Centre.The Translation Centre represents a partnership between SA Health, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), University of Adelaide, Flinders University, University of South Australia, Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Health Consumers Alliance of South Australia, Adelaide Primary Health Network, Country SA Primary Health Network and Cancer Council SA. The Translation Centre has 9 priority areas of which one is Aboriginal Health.
Consortium Vision

The Consortium’s vision is to reduce the impact of chronic disease experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in South Australia through the successful implementation of the priorities identified within 3 plans: The South Australian Aboriginal Cancer Control Plan 2016-2021, the South Australian Aboriginal Heart and Stroke Plan 2017-2021 and the South Australian Aboriginal Diabetes Strategy 2017-2021.How will the Consortium Work

The responsibility to oversee the implementation activity of the SA Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium rests within its governance structures. The Consortium has 5 active working groups including an Executive Group, an Aboriginal Community Reference Group and three condition-specific leadership groups representing Diabetes, Cancer and Heart and Stroke. We refer to the people and organisations on these groups as our members.

Who is working in the Consortium Coordinating Centre?

The team comprises of two full time staff. Wendy Keech is the Senior Research Translation Manager and Executive Officer. Wendy is supported by Douglas VJ Clinch, in a Project Officer role overseeing and supporting the various governance groups of the Consortium. Strategic policy and cultural advice and support is being provided by Kim Morey and Neville Fazulla both on a part-time basis to the team, and have particular focus on supporting the community reference group. Andrea McKivett, has been providing her clinical, technical and cultural support to the team since the inception of the Consortium, with Katharine McBride recently joining the team to provide technical support one day a week. The team come from various backgrounds and disciplines required to support the work of the Consortium, and all are passionate people with a strong commitment to making a difference to the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people in South Australia.
If you would like any further information please don’t hesitate to contact Wendy Keech, on (08) 81284228, email: wendy.keech@sahmri.com or Doug VJ Clinch, on (08) 81284893 or email: douglas.clinch@sahmri.com.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #TAS

1.1 NACCHO CEO Pat Turner continues a 6 month national ” Constitutional ” members roadshow in Northern NSW

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations : Only 33 days to go

2.QLD : Nhulundu ACCHO Health Service Gladstone opens  new “state-of-the-art” medical centre 

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs : Right Tracks Collaboration Giving Better Health a Sporting Chance

3.2 NT Congress Aboriginal Health Training Award News

4.NSW Armajun Aboriginal Health Service :  The Aboriginal communities smiling again (and saving millions)

5.VIC : Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative Creating healthier smiles for Aboriginal children in Bendigo, Loddon Mallee

6. WA : Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation hosts Joe Williams Mental Health and Suicide Workshop

 7.SA: Nunkuwarin Yunti of SA Community Health Day 4 October

8.TAS: TAC Aboriginal Health and Mutton Bird Yarning Circle

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 NACCHO CEO Pat Turner continues a 6 month national ” Constitutional ” members roadshow in Northern NSW.

Since April our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner has been consulting with our 140 NACCHO members about major changes to the NACCHO constitution that will  be presented to members at the NACCHO AGM 2 November in Canberra : Members To Register for AGM

Yesterday Pat presented the proposed changes at Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour to a regional meeting of approx. 10 Northern and Tableland NSW NACCHO Members ( from Port Macquarie to Ballina )

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations : Only 33 days to go

 On Monday 18 September there was only 45 days to go and due to high demand  the conference AGM is nearly booked out

This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

Download NACCHO 2017 Members Conference and AGM Draft

NACCHO Conference Website

2.QLD : Nhulundu ACCHO Health Service Gladstone opens  new “state-of-the-art” medical centre :

 “A great day for the community of Gladstone

A special mention and big thanks to my Deadly Sister, Carly Cooke, who as the former General Manager led the search for a new property in the Gladstone Region to relocate the Medical Centre from Manning Street South Gladstone to a location that better met the needs of our community now in the heart of Gladstone on Goondoon Street. Thank you for your vision and dedication, the Community is now reaping the rewards.

The overall Project Management by Faye McGown with our local builders JADA were outstanding, producing a modern state of the art facility. Very impressive work to say the least, a blue print for others to follow!

A big thank you to our local Leaders; Mayor Matt Burnett, Deputy Mayor Chris Trevor and Local Member for Gladstone Glenn Butcher MP for all of their significant support and commitment to our Medical Centre and the Community at large.

Thank you to the many dedicated staff and Board Directors who made today possible – you are all greatly appreciated. We achieved this milestone together as a Team

Matthew Cooke CEO Nhulundu Health Service ( and NACCHO Chair )

IT’S hoped a new “state-of-the-art” medical centre will cater for those patients left in the “lurch” after two practices closed in the last two months in the Gladstone region.

Watch TV Interview HERE

The Calliope and Gladstone Valley Medical Centres, which are both owned by Medifield, closed after the company was placed in administration.

However, with the official opening of Nhulundu Health Service’s new building on Goondoon St yesterday, patients will have some much-needed options.

FROM HERE

Although the service has a specific focus on indigenous health, Nhulundu chief executive officer Matthew Cooke said anybody could use the service.

Member for Gladstone Glenn Butcher said this would take up some of the “void” left behind from the closure of the two centres.

“I’m urging all Gladstone people to make sure they come and use this facility, it’s not just an indigenous facility,” he said.

Mr Butcher was confident Nhulundu would not face the same issues that other service providers had because of the structure of the organisation.

He said the more people the service could get through the door the more they chance they could expanding in the future.

“This building is now capable of doing a lot more,” he said.

Some of the possibilities that were mentioned include dental work and blood taking.

Mr Cooke said it was significant for the region to have the new centre open.

“Today marks an almost three year journey to finding a place here in the Gladstone region, where we can find a sustainable home, now and into the future,” he said.

“This is a full bulk-billing and integrated service.

“It’s not just a primary health care or general practice, we have aged care, we have visiting specialists, we run several allied health programs and we have a health promotion team.”

25 years in the making -Richard Johnson

The Central Queensland Regional Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisation, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service and soon to be established Family Wellbeing Centre, along with existing Aged Care Services and Deadly Choices, will all be based at the new facility.

The building is where QGC used to be.

Gladstone Region Mayor Matt Burnett said it was fantastic to have such a “state-of-the art” facility in Gladstone.

“It’s been said that other medical practices in Gladstone and Calliope have been closing, here we have a fantastic new facility opening,” he said.

“Sometimes things don’t always go well but other times they go amazing, and this is an amazing facility.”

Picture above Lizzie Adams

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs : Right Tracks Collaboration Giving Better Health a Sporting Chance

“Congress is excited to join Redtails/Pinktails and the ADF in delivering the Right Tracks program in Alice Springs and to our remote communities.

This program has the right people and the right support from key stakeholders, including the CAFL, to assist with the complex issues shaping the health of young people through empowerment and mentoring, as well as improved access to essential health services and information.”

 Congress CEO Donna Ah Chee said of the program 

On Saturday an exciting collaboration between Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, the Australian Drug Foundation (ADF) and Central Australian Football Club – Redtails/Pinktails was officially launched, fittingly, during the Central Australian footy finals.

The Right Tracks program was originally set up and run by volunteers led by local native title holder Ian McAdam and Rob Clarke through the Redtails/Pinktails Central Australian Football Club. Now, through a new partnership with Congress and the ADF, it will be brought to even more young people in Alice Springs and surrounding remote communities, working directly with each male and female football club and local softball and netball clubs.

Right Tracks aims to educate and assist in health and wellbeing, tobacco, alcohol, violence and sexual health education and treatment, job ready mentoring, work experience, language and culture, whilst using sport as the means to engage. Through mentoring, the youth accessing the program are groomed into role models, leaders and mentors for their own communities, to create change.

Through the support of Congress and funding agreements with the Australian Drug Foundation and Department of Health Northern Territory Government, 3 Sports Health Promotion positions were created within Congress’ Health Promotion Section to undertake this exciting work.  The team has now been formed, including founding volunteer Ian McAdam, who is joined by Darren Talbot and Sarah Carmody.

The ADF’s Northern Territory Manager, Margie Fahy had to say “Working on the ground across a range of local communities, this partnership is delivering prevention projects tailored to the needs of the area.

“The Australian Drug Foundation commends Central Australian Aboriginal Congress for their strong leadership role within this community partnership.”

The program was launched by the Hon. Dale Wakelfield MLA, Minister for Territory Families who was proud to do so on behalf of the Hon. Natasha Fyles, NT Minster for Health.

ADF’s Head of Program Delivery, Allan Casse also contributed to proceedings, which were witnessed by an audience of important guests including Member for Namatjira, Chansey Paech, Commonwealth and Olympic marathon runner Robert De Castella as well as important members of the local and Territory football and sporting communities.

3.2 NT Congress Aboriginal Health Training News:

Congress #ACCHO Alice Springs wins major Training Large Employer of the Year Award 

4.NSW Armajun Aboriginal Health Service :  The Aboriginal communities smiling again (and saving millions)

Aboriginal oral health care: double the services, half the cost Public Aboriginal oral health care models compared

“Fly-in fly-out services are more expensive than local services, yet we still provide so many dental and allied health services in this way.“This research tells an important story about community engagement, and the benefit of employing locally and building local capacity.”

Debbie McCowen, Chief Executive Officer of the Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, said.

See 7.30 Report ABC TV   The Aboriginal communities smiling again (and saving millions)

Photo: Dental technician Paul Talbot at his mobile denture clinic in Moree

The latest Closing The Gap report reveals Australia is failing to meet its Aboriginal health targets.

Could a system that engages local communities inspire more effective ways to deliver much needed services?

Aboriginal Australians have significantly higher rates of dental disease than the wider Australian\ population. It is an issue compounded for people in rural and remote areas with less access to public dental services, and is linked to higher risk of other chronic health conditions.

Recognising the high need for public oral health services targeting Aboriginal communities, governments have invested in several service delivery models using distinctive approaches.

A comparison of two models that provide public oral health services specifically for Aboriginal patients has found a significant difference in costs and outputs, with implications for future policy and funding decisions.

Published in the Australian Dental Journal , the research was conducted by the University of Sydney’s Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, Centre of Translational Data Science and faculties of Health Sciences and Dentistry, with the Armajun Aboriginal Health Service in Inverell, NSW.

The cost and output of Model A, the major oral health service for Aboriginal people in rural NSW delivered by the state government, was compared with Model B, a collaboration between the Poche Centre and Armajun.

Dental weighted activity units (DWAUs) are the national measure of productivity in publicly funded oral health services. The NSW government applies this measure to local health districts and grant programs. During 2014 and 2015 the government set the NSW price per DWAU at $589.

Over the same two-year period, Model A cost $ $1,800 per DWAU and Model B cost $370 per DWAU.

Model A delivered just over 1,600 DWAUs with total funding of over $3.6m, and Model B delivered over 3,000 DWAUs with total funding of just over $1.4m.

Summary of funding and DWAU for models A and B for the period of 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2015:

“Following the troubling lack of progress presented in the latest Closing The Gap report, our model provides a valuable example of another way of doing things,” said lead author Dr Kylie Gwynne, a research affiliate of the Poche Centre.

“The Poche Centre is committed to pursuing evidence-based approaches to health care, and we thank the NSW Centre for Oral Health Strategy for supporting this study by providing DWAU data for analysis.”

The main difference between the two models is the centralised versus localised coordination.

Model A delivers services across the state from a city-centre clinic, as well as dentists operating on a fly-in fly-out basis at host clinics across NSW. It provides blocks of oral health care to communities and draws on the infrastructure and community links of the host Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service.

In contrast, Model B delivers services almost entirely in local communities, employing local Aboriginal staff wherever possible. Initially operating in three communities, the service expanded in the first year to include nine Aboriginal communities in central northern NSW with local community partnerships and accountability. It is staffed almost equally by dentists and oral health therapists, and new graduate clinicians live near and work across communities using fixed and portable equipment in multiple locations including clinics, schools, health care settings and other community locations.

According to the authors, the results raise important questions around how such services should be delivered in the future.

“Good public policy evaluates and adjusts service models over time as circumstances and needs change,” said Dr Gwynne.

“There’s growing recognition the fly-in fly-out model is no longer appropriate as workforce shortages are addressed and rural and remote health services are better able to recruit and retain oral health clinicians.

“Yet, while the state government has committed to changing its approach, the federal government just recently increased its funding for fly-in-fly-out dentistry.

“With limited resources and oral health outcomes in Aboriginal communities still poor, we must focus on service delivery models that are proven to be effective and efficient.”

5.VIC : Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative Creating healthier smiles for Aboriginal children in Bendigo, Loddon Mallee

A new program aimed at improving the oral health and hygiene of Aboriginal children will be trialled in the Loddon Mallee.

The $250,000 initiative will see preschool-aged children given tooth packs and fluoride varnish through preschools, early children services and health organisations.

Photo above : INITIATIVE: Bendigo West MP Maree Edwards, Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative CEO Raylene Harradine, and Bendigo East MP Jacinta Allan

Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative will lead the year-long pilot, with the help of other Aboriginal-controlled health organisations across the region.

Levels of tooth decay are higher among Aboriginal children than non-Aboriginal children: those aged five and under are hospitalised for dental care at almost one and a half times the rate of other children.

The average number of filled, decayed or missing teeth is also about twice as high among Aboriginal children aged six to 11 as it is among their non-Indigenous counterparts.

6. WA Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation hosts Joe Williams Mental Health and Suicide Workshop

The Carnarvon Medical Services Aboriginal Corporation hosted a series of mental health and suicide prevention events involving Joe Williams. Joe is a Wiradjuri man from New South Wales, best known for his professional sporting achievements. He played in the National Rugby League for the Rabbitohs, Panthers, and Bulldogs, before taking up professional boxing. Joe uses these achievements as a platform to speak about his experiences of mental illness, substance misuse, and suicidal ideation and to advocate for change.

During his two-day visit, Joe addressed the Carnarvon Suicide Prevention Network, participated in a boxing session with young people at the PCYC, sang songs at an evening yarning session, and delivered a motivational talk to local school students.

Throughout the events in Carnarvon, Joe spoke about the healing power of gratitude, exercise, medication, resilience, and connection to land and culture.

Community members were touched by Joe’s honesty and inspired by his commitment to improving the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by these issues.
You can find out more about Joe’s work at his website: www.joewilliams.com.au

People seeking support and information about suicide prevention can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14.

 7.SA: Nunkuwarin Yunti of SA Community Health Day 4 October

Coming up next week – our deadly Community Fun Day at Whitmore Square!!!

There will be entertainment and fun for everyone, with a BBQ lunch provided PLUS live music, a jumping castle, a smoothie bike, henna sessions, games on the basketball court, a pop-up circus workshop from Cirkidz and much much more.

Bring the whole mob along! We can’t wait to see you there!

#BeHealthyBeSmokeFree

8.TAS: TAC Aboriginal Health and Mutton Bird Yarning Circle

Aboriginal Health #AIDAConf2017 : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #TAS #QLD #WA #SA #VIC

1.1 : NACCHO CEO attends AMA’s Indigenous Health Taskforce 

1.2 : National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

1.3 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

2 .1 NSW: Awabakal ACCHO Leading Indigenous doctors visit to inspire the students to pursue their dreams

2. 2 NSW Awabakal is Tackling Indigenous Smoking

3. VIC : VACCHO supports a YES vote for Equality

4. WA: AHCWA : Football benefits Indigenous communities long after the siren

5. QLD : Deadly Choices 2017 STATE QUEENSLAND MURRI CARNIVAL IN REDCLIFFE has kicked off

6. NT : $6 Million Health Centre for Umbakumba,Groote Eylandt

7. TAS : FIAAI ‘No Smokes No Limits’ Public Health Campaign Launched

8.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 NACCHO CEO attends AMA’s Indigenous Health Taskforce 

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner and Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt, attended the AMA’s Indigenous Health Taskforce meeting last weekend to discuss the Government’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health priorities and actions.

The Taskforce identifies, develops, and recommends Indigenous health policy and strategies for the AMA, and includes Federal Councillors, AMA members, and Indigenous health organisations.

Issues discussed included the growing incidence of type 2 diabetes among young Indigenous people, renal disease, preventable hospital admissions and deaths, mortality rates, and the use of the Medicare Benefits Scheme (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

The Taskforce also discussed racism within the health system in Australia, and recognised the need for more programs and strategies to eradicate racism from the entire health workforce

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations : Only 45 days to go

 Last Monday 18 September there was only 45 days to go and we are nearly booked out

This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.3 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

Register HERE

Download the 2 day Ochre Day Program

final 2017-Ochre-Day-Program

2 .1 NSW: Awabakal ACCHO Leading Indigenous doctors visit to inspire the students to pursue their dreams

A group of leading Indigenous doctors visited Maitland High School on Tuesday to inspire the students to pursue their dreams.

Eight doctors from the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association told the students their experiences and ran medical workshops, including plastering and handwashing with the use of a UV light to detect germs.

The program was part of AIDA’s visit to the Hunter, which included a stop in at Awabakal in Newcastle.

Maitland High was chosen due to its high Aboriginal population (12 per cent).

AIDA president Kali Hayward said they wanted to show the students the opportunities available and leave a lasting impression. “You can’t underestimate the value of a role model,” she said

2. 2 NSW Awabakal is Tackling Indigenous Smoking

Awabakal is facing the issue of increased smoking rates in the community head on with the launch of their I’m Quitting campaign which took place in September  at Awabakal Medical Service.

The campaign is part of the national Tackling Indigenous Smoking program and aims to reduce smoking rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with Awabakal highlighting the problem on a local level.

 The launch event saw 25 ‘quit kits’ issued to existing smokers who are looking to cut down or completely quit the habit. The kits include a branded shirt to raise awareness, a 30 day progress chart with health information on the first month of quitting, pledge magnets to remind people why they were quitting, Nicotine Replacement Therapy voucher and more.

When discussing the campaign, Chief Executive Officer Raylene Gordon said that smoking rates within the Aboriginal community were continuing to increase and Awabakal was committed to supporting the community in their efforts to quit.

“The I’m Quitting campaign has been introduced to help support members of our community who are wanting to reduce or completely stop smoking all together and it is a program of which I am incredibly proud,” said Raylene.

“Smoking is a real issue for the Aboriginal community it is the most preventable cause of early death, with smoking accounting for one in every five deaths.

“This is an unacceptable figure. The I’m Quitting campaign is designed to assist community members on their quitting journey by providing useful information and quit tips, along with supporting them through our Medical Service to ensure they stay on track,” said Raylene.

Awabakal Project Officer and I’m Quitting participant, Ray Kelly, said he has decided to quit smoking for not only his own health but also for his daughters.

“I have been smoking for about 15 years and I can feel the damage it has caused. I’m mainly quitting for my three daughters, I need to be there for them as they grow and I need to be a healthy role model,” said Ray.

“My goal is to quit completely and while I have attempted to do so in the past, I’m really focussed on making this time stick.

“Even in the last week or so since cutting back I have noticed a difference, I feel healthier while I train and my tastebuds have changed,” concluded Ray.

Awabakal are encouraging anyone that is thinking of quitting smoking to contact Awabakal Medical Service on 02 4907 8555.

3. VIC : VACCHO supports a YES vote for Equality

VACCHO supports the right of every Australian to get married regardless of their gender or sexuality.

We oppose this non-binding postal survey that asks ‘anyone’ to determine the human rights of our LGBTI families and friends, however believe the most powerful act to effect positive change, is to vote yes.

VACCHO will be unequivocally supporting the Equality Campaign, and encouraging our Member organisations to vote yes, as well as ours and the wider community to do the same.

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who identify as LGBTI often experience multiple levels of marginalisation and discrimination. VACCHO is significantly concerned about the implications this campaign will have on the social and emotional wellbeing of the Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander LGBTI community, their families and mainstream brothers and sisters. Already we have witnessed deplorable content generated from the No Campaign.

We know LGBTI people suffer uniquely high rates of suicidality, same-sex attracted people are up to 14 times more likely to attempt suicide. This statistic will be compounded in our LGBTI community, especially for our young brotherboys and sistergirls.

It saddens us that in 2017 the Federal Government can stand silent and allow this level of vilification and discrimination to occur.

Discriminatory legislation is an impediment to the LGBTI Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander community achieving the highest attainable standard of health, instead this process is widening the health inequalities of First Australians.

We hope that the Parliament will respect the outcome of the Equality campaign, work swiftly to deliver marriage equality, and heal the harm.

4. WA: AHCWA : Football benefits Indigenous communities long after the siren

Football has the ability to build a strong heart and mind, and it is making our kids more disciplined and coordinated with their body skills as well as their mentality.

Indigenous sporting personalities needed to be particularly mindful that they were role models for their communities.

They have kids that look up to them and their competitiveness in the sporting industry, and [players need to recognise their] connection to culture and must not forget that they come from a grass roots level “

Michelle Nelson-Cox is speaking about the positive impact footy has on Indigenous communities in Western Australia

Ms Nelson-Cox, a Whadjuk Noongar woman, is the chairperson of the Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

Originally Published HERE

“[Football] is very important to have around, not only for aspiring young kids who fantasise about being an elite sportsperson, but also because of our elite sportspeople who are creating a positive profile [in the community],” she said

A recent report by the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre – After the Siren: The community benefits of Indigenous participation in Australian Rules Football – has highlighted the physical health, mental well being and community connectedness benefits that flow from playing football.

AFL is the second-most popular team sport among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, with almost 45,000 Indigenous players, and in WA, one in four Indigenous men play the sport.

Indigenous boys living in remote areas and playing football had 20 percent lower rates of truancy from school than those that did not play, according to the report.

In the past year adult Indigenous players reported higher life satisfaction than those who did not participate, and they were twice as likely to rate their health as excellent.

Fifty-six percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who played football were assessed as being in excellent health, compared to 48 percent of children that had not engaged with the sport

Report co-author and Senior Research Fellow, Dr Sean Gorman from Curtin University’s School of Media, Culture and Creative Arts, said the report also found that AFL is an inclusive sport that offers wide accessibility irrespective of socio-economic background.

“Whether it is urban or regional areas, the role of football plays is massive, not just in terms of getting communities engaged, it is massive in terms of the way it presents a positive aspect to people’s lives that are, if we look at social and economic indicators, not great,” he said.

“Football is a really important social mechanism for Aboriginal people to engage their agency, but also to participate in something that all Australians love.”

Dr Gorman also highlighted the important role elite-level Indigenous players held in the community.

“They are seen as significant contributors to the way Aboriginal people feel great pride and great resonance that enables them to see something other than the horrible statistics that we see time and time again,” he said.

“The role they play is completely vital to the way Aboriginal people can feel proud and safe and valued, whether that is in urban, regional or remote Australia.”

Ms Nelson-Cox said Indigenous sporting personalities needed to be particularly mindful that they were role models for their communities.

“They have kids that look up to them and their competitiveness in the sporting industry, and [players need to recognise their] connection to culture and must not forget that they come from a grass roots level,” she said.

Dr Gorman said that for many professional Indigenous players, there was a deeper narrative associated with their participation in AFL.

“When you talk to Aboriginals about why they play they say ‘I am not playing for myself, I am representing my family and my community’,” he said.

“It becomes a deeper narrative, a stronger narrative, which as a broader community we need to appreciate and understand.

“This is where the report becomes so salient because it is how we connect all these disparate narratives up, and we can start to appreciate on a greater level the contribution these men and women have made over time.”

One such role model is the Fremantle Dockers’ woman’s team Vice Captain and Noongar woman Kirby Bentley, who spoke at the launch of the After the Siren report on Thursday.

“I am still one of the most elite Indigenous female footballers in the country and for me that is not so much about saying how good I think I am. It’s more about what I can do with the position I am in,” she said.

The number of women’s football teams has doubled since AFL Women’s League was introduced this year, according to the report.

AFL is also making its mark on remote communities in the far-north of WA.

“It is an integral part of the Western Desert communities,” Michael McMonigal said.

McMonigal is the program manager of Ngurra Kujungka [Inc], an non-for-profit organisation leading the development of the Western Desert’s first community driven, regional sport and recreation program.

“It has a very positive influence on the community, in terms of their overall physical, mental and emotional wellbeing,” he said.

“We are hoping to develop programs and pathways for these young footballers to follow in the future.”

In 2003, Newcrest Mining Ltd began sponsoring the annual Western Desert League, a football competition created to benefit and engage the Martu people, the traditional owners of a large part of central WA.

 

5. QLD : Deadly Choices 2017 STATE QUEENSLAND MURRI CARNIVAL IN REDCLIFFE has kicked off

Arthur Beetson Foundation has announced that 2017 Deadly Choices Arthur Beetson Foundation Murri Rugby League Carnival will take place at Dolphin Oval Redcliffe from 20th to 23rd September.

The Carnival involves teams from across Queensland and is a real show piece of Indigenous Rugby League Talent.

Three Competitions take place over four days include Under 15’s Boys, Open Women’s and Open Men’s. Some exciting additional events and activities will be announced very soon.

The Carnival is much more than Rugby League as it also has a major focus on Health and Education. All players have to complete a “Health Check” as a requirement to participate and all Under 15’s Boy participants must have attended school 90% of time

.
Peter Betros Chairman of QRL stated the “ this Carnival highlights the great reach the game of Rugby League has across Queensland and the Arthur Beetson Foundation should be congratulated in providing this opportunity for so many to get involved”

Brad Beetson, son of the late Arthur Beetson and Board Member of the Arthur Beetson Foundation stated “ Dad through his life had a passion on improving the lives of young indigenous it’s great that the foundation can continue this by using his other great passion of Rugby League the vehicle to do so”.

Murri Rugby League is an annual four day rugby league carnival for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queensland rugby league teams. Queensland Rugby League (QRL) has awarded the Arthur Beetson Foundation with the tender for the next three years. The Foundation has employed MRL (Qld Pty Ltd) to event manage the Murri Rugby League carnival.

Giving Back

A significant portion of Arthur Beetson Foundation generated revenue will be invested back into Indigenous Rugby League programs and structures endorsed by the QRL to establish sports focused sustainable community activities.

Murri Rugby League aims to:

  • Raise the representation of Indigenous players from the current 11% in the National Rugby League to 15%, an overall 4% growth in participation over a 3-5 year time frame.
  • Provide structure in a drug and alcohol free environment for players to have the opportunity to develop a direction into representation at a national level.
  • Work with the network of Indigenous communities in Queensland to promote and develop the carnival as a state event.
  • Develop a sponsorship alliance which will support the participation of all Communities and contribute to the staging of the carnival as an annual event.

About The Murri Rugby League Carnival

The Murri Carnival is a very important date on the Indigenous calendar and is much more than a rugby league event. The Carnival has certain basic rules. An adult person cannot play in the Carnival unless they:
. undergo a health check; and
. enrol to vote or, if enrolled, make sure that their enrolment details are current.

An under 15 player cannot play in the Carnival unless they;
. undergo a health check; and
. have a 90% school attendance record.

Each year a number of people are identified as possible suffers of diabetes a disease that shortens the life span of too many Indigenous Australians.

In 2014 the under 15 side travelled to New Zealand and a Men’s team travelled to Fiji to play and take part in a cultural exchange. The QRL Indigenous under 15 team also played the curtain raiser to the NRL Indigenous All Star Game at Suncorp Stadium last February 2015 against a New South Wales Koori team

6. NT : $6 Million Health Centre for Umbakumba,Groote Eylandt 

The community of Umbakumba on the Territory’s Groote Eylandt is celebrating the opening of a new $6 million health centre.

The Member for Arnhem Selena Uibo said the jointly funded facility was sorely needed in the remote island community, 600 kilometres southeast of Darwin.

The community is located approximately 50 km east of Angurugu situated inside Little Lagoon, Point Langton on the northeast coast of Groote Eylandt. Umbakumba is approximately 50 km east of Angurugu on Groote Eylandt, which is 650 km east of Darwin and 50 km off the Arnhem Land coast in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Apart from the fortnightly freight barge service from Darwin, Umbakumba is generally accessed by air.

Groote Eylandt airport, located 1 km from Angurugu, is the main air access point for the island. Owned and maintained by Gemco, the airstrip is sealed and there are flights to and from Nhulunbuy/Darwin most days.

Travel time to Nhulunbuy: 30-50 minutes, to Darwin: 1.5-2 hours. A 50 km dirt road links Angurugu to Umbakumba. Charter flights can also be arranged direct to Umbakumba which has a dirt airstrip that can accommodate twin engine light aircraft.

There is a reasonable dirt road from the airport to Umbakumba. However, a 4-wheel drive is essential and given the number of rivers and streams, travel throughout the island during the wet season can be difficult.

“Groote Eylandt residents want and deserve to access high quality health services,” Ms Uibo said.

“We know that improving the health of Groote Eylandt people, boosts the community and makes the Territory a healthier and stronger place.”

The $6 million build has been funded through a tripartite Regional Partnership Agreement including:

$3 million from Groote Eylandt Bickerton Island Enterprises

$2 million from the Northern Territory Government

$1 million from the Australian Government

Ms Uibo said it was a great example of local decision making with the Groote Eylandt Bickerton Island Enterprises group working with the Territory and Federal Governments to improve health.

“The original clinic was so run down that the costs of repairs was prohibitive,” Ms Uibo said.

“Local contractor GCC was awarded the contract to build a new facility in January last year and after significant challenges including weather and distance they have delivered a state of the art facility for community.

The new Yinumarra health Centre facilities include:

  • new emergency services with an ambulance bay and a single bed emergency rooms
  • five consulting rooms including men’s, women’s and children’s consulting areas
  • dental room
  • drug storage room
  • multi-purpose room
  • enhanced security and privacy for staff and clients
  • reception and internal and external waiting area

The centre is one of three to be opened, with Ngukurr Health Centre opened last week and Numbulwar Health Centre opening tomorrow

7. TAS : FIAAI ‘No Smokes No Limits’ Public Health Campaign Launched

Flinders Island Aboriginal Association’s Tackling Smoking Program has recently launched their latest ‘No Smokes No Limits’ public health campaign with billboards being revealed across Tasmania. These billboards feature motocross imagery and Aboriginal ambassadors Jay and Josh Woolley from WSM Freestyle.

As part of this campaign, smokers are encouraged to contact their local health service, general practice or the Quitline for assistance in giving up the habit. This campaign seeks to denormalise smoking, and is in stark contrast to some of the messaging typically associated with extreme sports that are often sponsored by energy drinks or other consumables associated with poor health outcomes.

FIAAI CEO Maxine Roughley said “This program especially targets young people who are our future and we are proud to be supporting such an important health issue.”

FIAAI will be looking to expand this campaign to buses and other mediums in the future, with billboards currently being found in several parts of the state including Hobart, Launceston, East Devonport, Burnie and others. FIAAI will also be presenting at the upcoming Oceania Tobacco Control Conference (October 17-19) regarding this campaign.

The FIAAI Tackling Smoking Team can be contacted on 6334 5721 for more information.

 

8.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

The South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium (the Consortium) was launched on 18 May 2017, as a collaborative partnership formed between the South Australian Aboriginal Health Partnership (comprising of SA Health, Aboriginal Health Council of SA and Department of Health – Commonwealth) and the South Australian Academic Health Science and Translation Centre.

The Translation Centre represents a partnership between SA Health, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), University of Adelaide, Flinders University, University of South Australia, Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Health Consumers Alliance of South Australia, Adelaide Primary Health Network, Country SA Primary Health Network and Cancer Council SA. The Translation Centre has 9 priority areas of which one is Aboriginal Health.

Consortium Vision

The Consortium’s vision is to reduce the impact of chronic disease experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in South Australia through the successful implementation of the priorities identified within 3 plans: The South Australian Aboriginal Cancer Control Plan 2016-2021, the South Australian Aboriginal Heart and Stroke Plan 2017-2021 and the South Australian Aboriginal Diabetes Strategy 2017-2021.

How will the Consortium Work

The responsibility to oversee the implementation activity of the SA Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium rests within its governance structures. The Consortium has 5 active working groups including an Executive Group, an Aboriginal Community Reference Group and three condition-specific leadership groups representing Diabetes, Cancer and Heart and Stroke. We refer to the people and organisations on these groups as our members.

Who is working in the Consortium Coordinating Centre?

The team comprises of two full time staff. Wendy Keech is the Senior Research Translation Manager and Executive Officer. Wendy is supported by Douglas VJ Clinch, in a Project Officer role overseeing and supporting the various governance groups of the Consortium. Strategic policy and cultural advice and support is being provided by Kim Morey and Neville Fazulla both on a part-time basis to the team, and have particular focus on supporting the community reference group. Andrea McKivett, has been providing her clinical, technical and cultural support to the team since the inception of the Consortium, with Katharine McBride recently joining the team to provide technical support one day a week. The team come from various backgrounds and disciplines required to support the work of the Consortium, and all are passionate people with a strong commitment to making a difference to the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people in South Australia.

If you would like any further information please don’t hesitate to contact Wendy Keech, on (08) 81284228, email: wendy.keech@sahmri.com or Doug VJ Clinch, on (08) 81284893 or email: douglas.clinch@sahmri.com.

Aboriginal Health #RUOKday: Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #TAS #QLD #WA #VIC

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

1.2 National ANSANT Danila Dilba : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

2.NT : Ngukurr remote community and Sunrise ACCHO opens new $5.93 million culturally appropriate delivery of health services

3.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal centre’s new Rrala milaythina-ti (strong in Country Project)improving health and wellbeing 

4. NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service #RUOKDay backs several mental health programs

5. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Hopevale and Mossman Gorge Celebrate R U OK

6. WA : AHCWA embarks on leading strategy for Aboriginal youth health

7. VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle mob up for any challenge

 8.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

 This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

DOWNLOAD the Full 2 Day Program released this week

2017-Ochre-Day-Program

Register HERE

2.1 NT : Ngukurr remote community and Sunrise ACCHO opens new $5.93 million culturally appropriate delivery of health services

” An absolute privilege and pleasure today to officially open the new Ngukurr health clinic run by Sunrise Health. Great to have the Numbulwar Red Flag dancers help to open the clinic with the Hon. Warren Snowden MP and finishing the opening ceremony was Ngukurr school students who sang a few songs!”

Member Arnhem Selena Uibo

The community of Ngukurr in the Territory’s southern Arnhem Land is celebrating the opening of its new federally funded Health centre .

The Member Arnhem Selena Uibo says the $5.93 million dollar building will improve health services in the region.

“All Territorians are entitled to control over their lives and access to high quality services,” she said.

“Building strong and healthy remote communities is key to developing a stronger Northern Territory.

“Here on the edge of the Roper River the community of Ngukurr will help to lead the way.”

The new build was completed as part of the Commonwealth funded $50.29 million Health and Hospitals Fund Regional Priority program to upgrade 11 remote health centres across the NT.

Northern Territory business Probuild built the new health centre at Ngukurr which features:

  • Culturally appropriate design with separate male and female entrances
  • A drive-through ambulance bay
  • State-of-the-art emergency facilities
  • Dental room
  • Hearing room
  • 8 consulting rooms
  • Secure administration area for improved staff safety and security for drug storage
  • Enhanced security for staff and patients

Ms Uibo said Sunrise Aboriginal Health Service will operate the health centre.

“Separate male and female entry areas and treatment rooms allow for a culturally appropriate delivery of health services,” she said.

“That will encourage more community members to access the health services they need earlier.

“The new improved facilities will also help to attract to staff, offering facilities to deliver primary health as well as acute and emergency care to the Ngukurr community.”

Newly constructed health centres are expected to be opened in Umbakumba and Numbulwar next week.

3.TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal centre’s new Rrala milaythina-ti (strong in Country Project)improving health and wellbeing 

 ” The Tasmanian Aboriginal centre’s new Rrala milaythina-ti (strong in Country Project) is getting Aboriginal people from all over Tasmania out on country and improving health and wellbeing as well as strengthening connections to country, people, language and culture.”

Check out Strong in Country Facebook Page

Twenty-one participants have just completed the project’s biggest trip yet- a four-day, at times challenging, trek on the 46 km three Capes Walk, which winds through eucalypt forests, button grass plains and rainforest, over mountains and along the edge of the huge dolerite cliffs of the Tasman Peninsula in Southern Tasmania.

Albeit a fair few stiff pairs of legs, the participants aged from 15 to 65 returned last week inspired to get out more, to keep fitter, to challenge themselves and continue building connections with their people and country.

Participants reported great benefits to their physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wellbeing and spoke of belonging and spiritual connections.

Some were experienced bush walkers, while for others it was a first- and now they are hooked.

Lily Castle, from Hobart, was one of them. “It was a challenge I really enjoyed”, the 18-year old said.

“I found I had to push myself harder than I had before. It was a blessing to meet new people and hear some old stories and be part of a great group.

“It was absolutely spectacular to be standing on the top of cape Pillar and Cape Hauy. It’s an experience I will never forget or take for granted.

“I feel like now I have done this, I know whatever I put my mind to or whatever I want to achieve, whatever challenge, it’s just determination and willpower.

There were many times I thought “I can’t keep going”, even the first day.

“I feel more powerful, just with small things that I want to change that I can do it; I believe in myself more.

“I feel more connected to the community. I got to meet people who taught me a lot about my ancestors and about Tasmanian Aboriginal history. I feel more connected to my culture now”.

Ms Castle said the trip was also an opportunity to get away from smokes and grog, and she now feels more equipped to tackle these addictions.

Like other participants, Ms Castle is keen to join in upcoming trips, including some to remote places with significant Aboriginal heritage.

There have also been day trips and smaller overnight adventures to cater for people with different fitness levels, ages, availability and family situations.

Aboriginal heritage worker Sharnie Read, one of the project organisers, said some trips have been tied into Aboriginal heritage consultations and NAIDOC celebrations.

“A lot of the trips are about taking community members out and giving them a strong connection to country and teaching them about the history and cultural landscape and heritage, and also bonding as a group, she said.

Ms Read said the participation of older people had been invaluable, with their generosity in sharing community and family history and knowledge, which provided generational links, and inspired lifelong fitness.

Funded by Primary Health Tasmania under the Federal Government’s Primary Health Networks Program, Rrala milaythina-ti is a ‘Participation Action Research project aiming to show that Aboriginal people ‘s wellbeing increases through contact with country.

“Jilian Mundy was a participant on the three Capes trip.

4. NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Service #RUOKDay backs several mental health programs

“I think it needs to be promoted more, because there’s a lot of issues out there that don’t get addressed, there is a great need in the Indigenous community, and that grief, loss and intergenerational trauma added to the struggle.

As a project manager at Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, James Sheather has backed several mental health programs in the region

Originally Published HERE

Take a minute, change a life – that was the call from mental health advocates in the lead up to World Suicide Prevention Day

It is a message that resonates with many locals, who are painting the town yellow in anticipation of RUOK Day today – an event that encourages us to ask friends and family if they’re feeling low.

“If something tells you in your gut that something’s not quite right – that is the time to have the conversation,” director of the Hunter Institute of Mental Health Jaelea Skehan said.

“As difficult as it might be to start a conversation and to reach out and ask ‘Are you ok?’, it is actually much harder for someone who is currently in distress and despair to put their hand up and ask for help. There’s great power in us as a community learning how to and being brave enough to actually offer help.”

Part of the conversation thinktank for RUOK Day, Ms Skehan encouraged locals to trust their gut instincts. If you notice someone acting withdrawn or ‘not themselves’, she said, it is time to reach out.

Ross Hill senior psychologist education Karina Hutching, who has been championing a series of mental health information sessions for local public schools this month, said the RUOK Day message was for every day.

“It’s an ongoing message that we promote connectedness to others and that we promote our wellbeing and the health of those around us,” she said.

She said the sessions aimed to teach children about the supports available to them in the school environment, and their own ability to improve their mental state.

Sleep, water and exercise was the focus at Inverell Public School on Wednesday, as students learnt about the power they have to improve their mental health. The combined wellbeing and fitness workshop is running in every local school before RUOK Day.

Good SPACE (Suicide Prevention through Awareness, Courage and Empathy) project co-ordinator Fiona Livingstone, who runs Aboriginal suicide prevention workshops with rugby league star Nathan Blacklock agreed. She said unresolved grief due to the consequences of colonisation was one reason Aboriginal people are more likely to suffer from mental illness.

“Our research tells us, and certainly Aboriginal participants in our workshops are in agreement that this all stems from colonisation when the lives and the world of Aboriginal people changed dramatically,” she said.

She said other factors included racism, discrimination, inequality and a shorter lifespan.

Good SPACE runs a number of mental health workshops in Inverell and the region, including two free suicide prevention workshops. If anyone is interested in educating themselves on suicide prevention, contact Ms Livingstone on 0427 072 105 or fiona.livingstone@newcastle.edu.au.

Local RUOK Day activities will be held at Victoria Park today Thursday, September 14.

If you need help, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 for free, 24 hour crisis support.

5. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Hopevale and Mossman Gorge Celebrate R U OK?

The communities of Hopevale and Mossman Gorge will celebrate R U OK? this month.

R U OK? is a national suicide prevention charity inspiring people to check in, listen, encourage action, and check in again.

Hopevale

Hopevale will celebrate national R U OK? Day on 14 September with a community event in the park featuring a suicide prevention talk and community barbeque.

Apunipima’s Social and Emotional Wellbeing Centre team, with support from My Pathway, are coordinating the event.

Social and Emotional Wellbeing Counsellor Dorothy Deshong, who will deliver the talk, said the main message of R U OK? Day was importance of checking in with people and encouraging them to take action.

‘People who are feeling socially or emotionally unwell can often be helped simply by having someone care enough to listen to their problems and direct them on the right path to receiving help,’ she said.

‘The message is also that the best way to know if someone is feeling bad is to take time out, and ask them directly, R U OK?.’

‘We want to encourage people to check in with others as it increases the chances of a person accessing help. This is especially important when someone is experiencing depression and grief. It is also hoped that people will use this day as the perfect opportunity to reach out for help if they need it.’

Mossman Gorge

Mossman Gorge will focus on the R U OK? message throughout September.

Apunipima Social and Emotional Wellbeing Team Leader Donna Henning said she and the team wanted to spread the R U OK? message to community in a variety of ways.

‘We have an R U OK? banner between the Mossman Gorge Wellbeing Centre and Primary Health Care Centre and it will stay up for the month of September,’ she said.

‘Our Youth Worker Ben and Adult Worker Bacho will play touch footy with community with an R U OK? football and be there to have conversations social and emotional wellbeing.’

‘We also have R U OK? information cards to give out to community and even R U OK? serviettes to use in our regular women’s and men’s activities.’

Donna said she hoped R U OK? message would spark conversations about the importance of checking in with friends, family and colleagues.

‘It’s so important to check in, and keep checking in,’ she said.

‘Sometimes people find it hard to share their real feelings but even if it takes a while, keep asking. The person knows you are there and that’s a good thing in itself. Asking, taking the time to listen, encouraging action and checking in are the keys to helping people move through challenging times.’

 

6. WA : AHCWA embarks on leading strategy for Aboriginal youth health

Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia youth workers will travel to the Kimberley this week as part of a national first project exploring the most significant health issues facing young Aboriginal people in regional WA.

AHCWA staff will host a series of age appropriate workshops with young indigenous people and health workers across the state, including in the Kimberley, Mid-West, Pilbara, Goldfields and South-West before the end of the year.

Results of the workshops will form part of AHCWA’s Aboriginal Youth Health Strategy – a new blueprint that will document the most important health concerns of young people and the availability of local health services.

“We are excited to undertake the first ever WA Aboriginal Youth Health Strategy in Australia and hear directly from young people in WA about the health issues they are most concerned about,” AHCWA Aboriginal youth coordinator Hayley Thompson said.

“Over the years there have been general strategies conducted about youth health in Australia but this is the first time a strategy has been undertaken exclusively for young Aboriginal people in WA.

“We know that mental health, drugs and alcohol are among the most pressing issues facing young indigenous youth today, along with boredom, which can lead to young people engaging in criminal activity and violent behaviours.

“This plan will help us to navigate the most significant health issues facing young Aboriginal people in remote WA, determine how accessible health services are and the best way forward to provide the support they need.”

On Wednesday, the team will host a workshop with children aged between five and 10 at the Broome Youth and Families Hub before travelling to Derby on Thursday for a workshop with young people at Derby Aboriginal Health Service.

On Friday, they will speak with staff at Headspace and Aarnja in Broome.

Youth workers will gauge health-related information as part of the workshop, asking young people between the ages of five and 24 about health issues in their communities, where they would go for help and what the word “healthy” means to them.

“This is about working with children and young people on an age appropriate level to determine the health issues of most concern and ensure they know where to seek help should they need it,” Ms Thompson said.

“Workshops will be presented in a fun, engaging way and be tailored to a variety of literacy levels, locations and interests of the group.

“Through this project, AHCWA hopes to achieve a better sense of the health issues affecting young people in each region and any potential gaps that may need attention.

“We hope that by chatting face-to-face with young people and service providers in each region it will provide richer data and more comprehensive information.”

AHCWA is the peak body for Aboriginal health in WA, with 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) currently engaged as members.

7. VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle mob up for any challenge

Our Kirrip Challenge Champs in Melton have been going great guns in The Six Week Challenge!

Last night we took on Week 4’s Boxing session at Melton Waves Gym…what a turn out > Welove seeing the young ones bringing their families along and encouraging each other to find that extra burst of energy.

Bring on Challenge night!!

8.SA : Aboriginal Health Council of SA  and South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium

The South Australian Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium (the Consortium) was launched on 18 May 2017, as a collaborative partnership formed between the South Australian Aboriginal Health Partnership (comprising of SA Health, Aboriginal Health Council of SA and Department of Health – Commonwealth) and the South Australian Academic Health Science and Translation Centre.

The Translation Centre represents a partnership between SA Health, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), University of Adelaide, Flinders University, University of South Australia, Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Health Consumers Alliance of South Australia, Adelaide Primary Health Network, Country SA Primary Health Network and Cancer Council SA. The Translation Centre has 9 priority areas of which one is Aboriginal Health.

Consortium Vision

The Consortium’s vision is to reduce the impact of chronic disease experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in South Australia through the successful implementation of the priorities identified within 3 plans: The South Australian Aboriginal Cancer Control Plan 2016-2021, the South Australian Aboriginal Heart and Stroke Plan 2017-2021 and the South Australian Aboriginal Diabetes Strategy 2017-2021.

How will the Consortium Work

The responsibility to oversee the implementation activity of the SA Aboriginal Chronic Disease Consortium rests within its governance structures. The Consortium has 5 active working groups including an Executive Group, an Aboriginal Community Reference Group and three condition-specific leadership groups representing Diabetes, Cancer and Heart and Stroke. We refer to the people and organisations on these groups as our members.

Who is working in the Consortium Coordinating Centre?

The team comprises of two full time staff. Wendy Keech is the Senior Research Translation Manager and Executive Officer. Wendy is supported by Douglas VJ Clinch, in a Project Officer role overseeing and supporting the various governance groups of the Consortium. Strategic policy and cultural advice and support is being provided by Kim Morey and Neville Fazulla both on a part-time basis to the team, and have particular focus on supporting the community reference group. Andrea McKivett, has been providing her clinical, technical and cultural support to the team since the inception of the Consortium, with Katharine McBride recently joining the team to provide technical support one day a week. The team come from various backgrounds and disciplines required to support the work of the Consortium, and all are passionate people with a strong commitment to making a difference to the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people in South Australia.

If you would like any further information please don’t hesitate to contact Wendy Keech, on (08) 81284228, email: wendy.keech@sahmri.com or Doug VJ Clinch, on (08) 81284893 or email: douglas.clinch@sahmri.com.

 

 

Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #TAS #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

2. TAS : No Smokes No Limits” Campaign – Nova Peris up and running for the Flinders Island Aboriginal Association

3. ACT : Latest News and Customer survey at Winnunga AHCS

4. NT Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation In Relay for Life

5.VIC : Better health teaching the aim of VACCHO  summit

6. NSW Celebrations for Awabakal ACCHO 40th anniversary

7.WA : Wirraka Maya Aboriginal Medical Service KIDS LOVE SEEING THEIR EARS ON VIDEO

8.QLD : Deadly Choices Murri carnival to celebrate Big Artie’s life 

9. SA  : Lift’em feet; it’s now fun to run

10. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

 This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

Register HERE

 

2. TAS : No Smokes No Limits” Campaign – Nova Peris up and running for the Flinders Island Aboriginal Association

Nova Peris was Special Guest Speaker at the Flinders Island Running Festival – brought over by Flinders Island Aboriginal Association .Photo with Nova & FIAAI staff in front of Banner Ads – their new ‘NO SMOKES-NO LIMTS” Campaign

The Flinders Island Aboriginal Association Incorporated (FIAAI) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation established in 1971 by a group of local Aboriginal people and their partners. FIAAI is governed by an Aboriginal Board of Management elected by the community.  The Board provides strategic direction to the organisation and delegates the day to day operations to the CEO.

FIAAI provides a range of services on Flinders Island including: Primary Health and Aged Care,  Housing, Youth Services, a Statewide Tackling Smoking & Healthy Lifestyle Project and three business enterprises.

The Primary Health and Aged Care service employs a full time registered nurse, a number of health assistants/home carers and a range of visiting health professionals including a general practitioner, physiotherapist, dietician and diabetes educator.  Services include the delivery of Aboriginal Flexible Aged Care packages, seniors exercise classes and craft activities, chronic disease early intervention and prevention activities, pharmacy services, development of care plans and a range of health promotion activities including weekly Mum’s and Bub’s program.

The aged care program is designed to support people to stay healthy and living in their own homes and provides in home assistance as well as Meals on Wheels.

The FIAAI Healthy Lifestyle project is based in Launceston and outreaches across Tasmania focusing on delivering health promotion messages around tobacco, nutrition and physical activity.

FIAAI supports enterprise development to improve employment opportunities on the Island and owns Thule Farm, Freckles Cafe and the local Bakery.

‘NO SMOKES-NO LIMTS” Campaign

* To increase the number of Aboriginal smokers who make supported quit smoking attempts

* To de-normalise smoking in Tasmanian Aboriginal communities and to normalise quit smoking behaviour

* To protect children from the harm of second hand smoke and to grow a new generation of children who are smokefree

* To increase the number of smokefree homes and cars in Tasmania

* Develop Flinders Island Smokefree Action Plan

Each of these will have activities, outputs and short, medium and long term outcomes against them.

So far we have thought about utilising our social media in the following ways

* A stronger “call to action” from existing marketing material – identifying by region where people could be directed for the best support.
* Promote a smokefree identity amongst elders and leaders focussing on protecting children and grandchildren from the harms of smoking.
* Signage for smoke free workplaces, homes and cars.

See Facebook Page

Quote from Jay Woolley – AMBASSADOR – No Smokes No Limits”

To summarise your key reasons for not smoking are:

  • Doing such a physically demanding sport, smoking would have stopped me from getting the most out of my body and reaching my potential /dreams.
  • Finances: FMX is expensive, smoking a pack a day could cost you about $7000 a year, that’s a start up motorbike
  • Getting involved early in Motorbike sports creates that expectation you needed to train and be fit to achieve your goals /aspirations – smoking doesn’t support that.

3. ACT : Latest News and Customer survey at Winnunga AHCS

Storage Container – New Addition to the Winnunga AHCS Premises

If you’ve visited Winnunga AHCS recently, you may have seen the latest addition to our premises. Once a plain white storage container, now transformed into an eye catching and culturally safe office and meeting space, was funded by the Justice and Community Safety Directorate (JACS) as part of the Justice Reinvestment (JR) Trial Program.

The new space was beautifully painted by talented and respected artists Uncle Mick Huddleston, Buddy Martin and Rayne Huddleston.

The JR Trial Program is a family focussed program which aims to assist in reducing the over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the ACT justice system. It is a partnership between Winnunga AHCS and JACS.

Left to right: Buddy Martin, Rayne Huddleston and Uncle Mick Huddleston

Winnunga AHCS 2017 Client Satisfaction Survey

Winnunga conducted the annual client satisfaction survey in June 2017. The purpose of the survey was to seek client feedback over a snapshot period. The survey was disseminated to people at medical reception areas and was made available in hard copy. 84 responses were received with 69% reporting they had used Winnunga services for more than three years, 24% between 1 and 3 years, 1.2% between 1 and 6 months and 6% for less than 1 month.

The services most reported being utilised were doctors/nurses, which stood at 94%. This was followed by   counselling and mental health support at 69%, the dental clinic at 54%, hearing and eye health at 36%, groups (including women’s group, men’s group, no more boondah, diabetes, mums and bubs, healthy cooking, wellbeing/anxiety group, touch football and basketball) at 30%, physiotherapy at 30%, support with Centrelink matters, probation/parole, legal issues, care and protection and or housing/accommodation at 27%, Community days/events at 26%, dieticians at 23%, drug and alcohol support at 23%, transport at 20%, diabetes and liver clinic at 15%, tobacco, midwifery program at 6% and NSP at 4% . Under ‘Other Support’ comments received were: Social Health Team (x1) and Psychiatry (x1).

The low response rates for NSP, could be due to the service being primarily accessed through other points of Winnunga (ie administration entrance).

Three questions were allocated specifically for smoking cessation support, which were answered by 96% of   survey participants. 30% reported they had received support from Winnunga with smoking cessation. Of the 30%, 75% stated the most useful support was Nicotine Replacement Therapy, followed by the No More Boondah Group at 58%, phone contact by workers at 33%, information/education at 33%, counselling at 17%, and visits to workplaces at 13%. One respondent noted under ‘other’: fellowship of others trying to change their lifestyle (ie peer support).

98% of survey participants answered the question ‘overall how satisfied are you with Winnunga’s services?’ with 89% of respondents stating they were either very satisfied or satisfied with Winnunga’s services. 11% reported their satisfaction as being neutral. No one reported being unsatisfied or very unsatisfied.

When responding to ‘Would you recommend Winnunga Services to others?’ 97% reported ‘yes’, and 3% reported ‘no’.

When asked ‘what do you like best about the services provided by Winnunga?’ 

  * Know your doctor personally, health checks, bulk billing              

* Clinics, including Diabetes clinic                                              

*Easy access, no need for appointment                                            

* The friendly service and transport

*Staff are very welcoming and always respond to enquiries                       

* All of it (after hours works well)  

* NSP gives us access to clean packs                                                

* Community involvement                         

 * The range of services available within the comfort of Winnunga           

* Groups                                          

 * Social Health Team helps the community                                    

* Number and type of practitioners

* Level of personal care in times of trauma/severe illness             

* All services are under the one roof

* Winnunga has been a great service for me, helping me with physical and mental health problems. I wouldn’t be doing anywhere near as good without the help I’ve had from Winnunga.

When asked ‘How do you think Winnunga could improve on the services we deliver?’ responses included:

* Bigger building                             

* Less wait time to get into dental                            

* Kids room                                  

* If it isn’t broken don’t fix it       

* More Aboriginal Drs                                                  

* Book appointments                 

* More space                                   

* More mental health services                                  

* More community outreach  

 

Winnunga AHCS would like to thank everyone who participated in the June 2017 survey. This is an important tool for receiving client feedback and the Management Team has carefully considered all feedback provided. As a result Winnunga AHCS has commenced to investigate ways we can start implementing some of the ideas clients raised through the feedback received.

Purpose Built Facility                                                                                                                                                              The demand for current services is forecast to grow significantly in the coming years. In 2019-20, the number of occasions of service is forecast to increase by almost 25,000 contacts from around 46,000 contacts in 2014-15 to around 70,000. Winnunga AHCS agrees the current building is unsuitable for the range of services provided. Winnunga AHCS is pleased to note the ACT Government announced as part of the 2017-2018 Budget, funding will be provided for a purpose built facility over a four year period. We have undertaken some preliminary work in strategic planning for the current and future needs of the organisation and look forward to continuing this work through a feasibility study to assess options for the redevelopment of Winnunga AHCS premises to a modern fit for purpose community health centre facility, similar to latest standards of mainstream facilities.

                                                                                                                                              Winnunga AHCS agrees it is vital to provide opportunities for community engagement and participation in the ACT through Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations. As such Winnunga AHCS will continue to deliver groups (ie women’s group, men’s group, cooking group, wellbeing group, mums and bubs group), clinics such as the diabetes, child health, eye care and liver clinic, wellbeing services to detainees at both the AMC and Bimberi, the Boxing Club/fitness gym, touch football and community days including the annual Sorry Day Bridge Walk, NAIDOC event and the Children’s Christmas Party.

Winnunga AHCS will continue to build on opportunities for community engagement. One of which will provide an increased understanding on who our clients are. For example we know clients come to Winnunga AHCS from 246 postcodes around Australia. There are approximately 66 postcodes in the ACT. However, we want to know more about the issues impacting on the approximately 4,500 regular clients who access the service including whether people are on benefits, employed, in contact with the Care and Protection system, have legal matters and their housing situations. This information will build on the robust data collection Winnunga AHCS has undertaken since 2006 and ensure we continue to focus on the areas most needed to respond to and support client need.

Winnunga AHCS has continued to engage with the ACT Government tender process for the management of Boomanulla Oval. We were the only organisation invited to proceed to stage two and are engaged in detailed negotiations with the tender team about the basis on which future management arrangements might proceed. Judd Studio (consultants) have been appointed by Winnunga AHCS to assist with this process whom have been undertaking community consultations and working together with the Boomanulla Oval Steering Committee. We will keep the community informed as the negotiations progress.

4. NT Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation In Relay for Life

Check out our deadly Public Health Unit kitted out in their Relay For Life Australia shirts!

Miwatj Health have nominated a huge team this year, including #YakaNgarali, Raypirri Rom, Admin, Nhulunbuy Clinic, Gunyungara Clinic & Yirrkala Clinic!

We hope to see you all down there supporting such a worthy cause! Thank you to the Relay For Life Gove for all your hard work and effort so far!

5.VIC : Better health teaching the aim of VACCHO  summit

VACCHO CEO Jill Gallagher, more work to meet parity. All health workforce & services must be culturally safe.

From the Koori Mail

Improving how Aboriginal health is taught in Victorian universities was the focus of a summit last month in Melbourne.

Led by Weenthunga Health Network with the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), the summit attracted participants from around the state.

Weenthunga’s Steff Armstrong said thousands of students are graduating from health courses each year, but some still don’t have the skills required to work with Aboriginal people.

“They go into these health professions and the question is not really asked about what can we do for Aboriginal people,” the Gamilaraay woman told the Koori Mail. “A lot of them don’t have the opportunity to learn about Aboriginal health from Aboriginal people.

There is a national curriculum framework on Aboriginal health, and it must be made available to all the health degrees.

“Students have to do so many hours of placement, and there’s only so many Aboriginal organisations that can take them to teach them about Aboriginal health.

“Sharing”

“What needs to happen is a sharing of information so all students can access it. Unfortunately, what is happening now is that universities design their teaching material and hold on to it for themselves.”

Ms Armstrong said the representatives from universities at the summit were keen to share their materials to get health improvements, but it is a matter of changing the culture at universities.

“There was a lot of goodwill at the summit”, she said.

“But these big institutions need to share their resources; that’s how we will get better resourced graduates and better health outcomes for our people.”

Weenthunga executive officer Lin Oke said that alongside the aspect of sharing resources, it is essential Aboriginal health is taught with the guidance of Aboriginal people.

“There’s only a small number of Aboriginal academics.” She said.

“They cant teach all of the students coming through health qualifications, and Aboriginal health organisations can only take so many students on for placements.

“Clearly, the number of students outweighs the resources we’ve got and the number of academics.

“There is not a lot of sharing culture between universities.”

6. NSW Celebrations for Awabakal ACCHO 40th anniversary

Major Hunter Valley Indigenous health and community organisation Awabakal has celebrated its 40th anniversary, with about 400 people attending a dinner in Newcastle which featured Aboriginal performer Casey Donovan.

Community members, local businesses and government representatives came together with some of Awabakal’s founding families at the event to take a walk down memory lane and celebrate how far the organisation has come.

Chief officer Raylene Gordon said the event was an opportunity to give back to a community that has given so much to Awabakal.

Forty years is an incredible achievement and there have been so many individuals and families who have helped the organisation over the years to make it what it is today”, she said.

“It was wonderful that we were able to recognise and acknowledge their contribution in front of so many important people in our community.

“We had some great speeches throughout the night with some of our Elders sharing their memories with us, and on top of that we had so many great entertainers including the amazing Casey Donovan, Street Warriors, Nu Roads and Jacob Ridgeway.

“I would like to thank everyone who joined us for the event, to our board of directors for helping bring the event to life, to those who supported us behind the scenes and to everyone in our community who has played a part in the growth of Awabakal over the last 40 years

“I look forward to celebrating many more successes in the years to come.”

7.WA : Wirraka Maya Aboriginal Medical Service KIDS LOVE SEEING THEIR EARS ON VIDEO

 

Mining company Fortescue has provided funds to address children’s ear health in Pilbara region of Western Australia.

The Earbus Foundation has received $3800 to help with the purchase of a video otoscope to allow medical staff to help diagnose potential diseases.

Fortescue has also provided $30,000 worth of Qantas flights to help with visits to the Pilbara by medical specialists.

Earbus chief officer Paul Higginbotham said foundation staff spend one week a month in Pilbara communities, providing comprehensive ear screening to Aboriginal children.

“Kids love the (otoscope) device because for the first time they can see inside their own ears,” he said.

“It is an important tool to engage and educate children and makes ear disease real and understandable .”

Mr Higginbothan said the Earbus Foundation worked with Wirraka Maya Aboriginal Medical Service and the Royal Flying Doctor Service to develop a model of continuous care.

Fortescue’s community Support grants program supports a variety of community initiatives with a focus on education and training, Aboriginal engagement, health and wellness, community safety and involvement economic development and environmental responsibility.

The next round of the grants programs opens for applications on September 1. For information, visit http://www.fmgl.com.au

8.QLD : Deadly Choices Murri carnival to celebrate Big Artie’s life 

 “The Carnival is much more than Rugby League as it also has a major focus on Health and Education.

All players have to complete a “715 Health Check” as a requirement to participate and all Under 15’s Boy participants must have attended school 90% of time.

Peter Betros Chairman of QRL stated the “ this Carnival highlights the great reach the game of Rugby League has across Queensland and the Arthur Beetson Foundation should be congratulated in providing this opportunity for so many to get involved”

Brad Beetson, son of the late Arthur Beetson and Board Member of the Arthur Beetson Foundation stated “ Dad through his life had a passion on improving the lives of young indigenous it’s great that the foundation can continue this by using his other great passion of Rugby League the vehicle to do so”.

FROM NIT

NRL legends are lacing up the 2017 Murri Rugby League Carnival, a celebration of Indigenous sport at its very best.

For the first time in the carnival’s seven-year history, a legends game will take place on Thursday, September 21.

More than 30 former NRL greats will line up for the Arthur Beetson All Stars versus Brisbane Broncos Legends match.

They will include Gary Belcher, Steve Renouf, Preston Campbell and Nathan Blacklock for the All Stars and Julian O’Neil, Jharal Yow Yeh, Darren Smith, Cliff Lyons, Petero Civoniceva and Chris Walker for the Old Boys.

The game is set to be a highlight of the Arthur Beetson Foundation Deadly Choices Murri Rugby League Carnival.

The carnival will be held at Dolphin Oval in Redcliffe, Queensland, from September 20 to 23. More than 20,000 spectators and a record 53 teams of more than 1300 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander players are expected to attend.

Brad Beetson, son of the late Arthur Beetson and board member of the Arthur Beetson Foundation, launched the carnival and legends match.

“Dad was absolutely passionate about young Australians, and particularly young Indigenous Australians, achieving better health, education and welfare outcomes,” he said.

“He would be proud that many of the NRL stars he had so much to do with have come out to play in the Legends game to support the carnival and he would have been so pleased to see the huge number of teams travelling from all over Queensland to compete in the Under 15s, Men’s and Women’s competitions.”

League legend Steve Renouf, who still holds the record for the most tries for the Brisbane Broncos, said the carnival was a key event for raising the representation of Indigenous players in the NRL.

“The Murri Rugby League Carnival is recognised as a showpiece of Indigenous sporting talent and it really does provide an environment that encourages community to take responsibility for looking after their health,” he said.

“We’ve got teams attending from all over Queensland, including from the Torres Strait, Mt Isa and the Gold Coast.

“With so many competitors, I’m really looking forward to watching some really talented players on field.

“I am particularly excited and honored to be playing for the Arthur Beetson All Stars, named after the legend who did so much for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, against many of my former Broncos team mates.”

A three-hour highlights package from the carnival will be broadcast on Fox League during the NRL grand final weekend. Action from each of the fields will also be live streamed for the first time, including the legends match.

9. SA  : Lift’em feet; it’s now fun to run

Would you rather do a long distance run or have a health check ?.

Some people might prefer to avoid both, but not the members of the Northern Adelaide Local Health Network “Lift “Em Foot” team.

Almost 140 Aboriginal people put up their hand – and lifted their feet – to take part in the City to Bay fun run next month, which requires them to either walk or run between 3 km and 12 km.

Getting an Aboriginal Well Health Check was a condition of entry.

Health check coordinator Danielle Lovegrove said participants wanted to take part in the fun run because it combined exercise with catching up with friends and family, providing an opportunity to motivate each other.

“A Lift’Em Foot” Facebook page was established and some participants got together to train for the event,” she said.

“Having a Well Health Check was well received because our clients are interested to know their health status, particularly when there is a family history of medical issues.

“Everything we do as part of a Well Health Check addresses conditions that do affect Aboriginal people, such as the early detection of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer and kidney disease.

Ms Lovegrove says that while the check is a tool that uses observations such as blood pressure, blood sugar, waist circumference and body mass index, it’s also a conversation starter.

“The tests lead to conversation about whether the client smokes, drinks alcohol, their diet and if they exercise”, she said.

“We provide information that is often new to them such as the link between waist circumference and heart disease, diabetes and stroke”.

The health checks are run by Watto Perrunna Aboriginal Primary Health Care Service.

Clients and their families are also encouraged to attend health promotion courses such as gym programs, yoga, taichi, vegie growing, healthy cooking and safe preparation.

 

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