NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : #NSW @DeadlyChoices Katungul ACCHO @awabakalltd #Yerin ACCHO #NT @CaaCongress @DanilaDilba #SA @DeadlyChoicesSA @NunkuYunti #VIC @VACCHO_org #WA

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner joined an amazing line up of experience in all endorsing community controlled for all Australians at our discussions at PHMOZ

2.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Batemans Bay making Deadly Choices by opening gym for clients

2.2 NSW : Yerin ACCHO on central coast is leading the way in Aboriginal health promotion by holding an ACCHO Commmunity Health Expo 

2.3 NSW : The Awabakal Ltd Quit Crew visited Nikinpa Aboriginal Child & Family Centre last week to do a presentation about TIS (Tackling Indigenous Smoking).

3.1 NT : Congress Alice springs : Skills boost “the best medicine” for Aboriginal health as ten Aboriginal Health Practitioner Trainees graduate

3.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin Deadly Choices team visits the Garaworra Supported housing program

4. VIC : VACCHO staff get a run down on the 2018 Victorian election campaign

5.1 SA : The Deadly Choices team are out on the APY lands supporting one of our partners the PAFC Power Aboriginal Program

5.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO Newsletter January-July edition 2018.

6. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Aurukun was a hive of healthy activity last weekend with the annual River to Ramp Fun Run and Walk. 

7 WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Matters – Men’s Health Marmun Pit stop flyer.

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner joined an amazing line up of experience in all endorsing community controlled for all Australians at our discussions at PHMOZ : With Donna Ah Chee CEO and Doctor John Boffa Congress Alice Springs and Doctor Tim Senior 

 

2.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Batemans Bay making Deadly Choices by opening gym for clients

The Batemans Bay Katungul Gym has now been officially opened.

Big thanks to Preston Campbell for attending and speaking on behalf of IUIH & Deadly Choices.

Preston talked to the community about his story & why spaces like these are so important for our Physical & Mental health

What a great turn out to the Katungul Batemans Bay Gym opening.

WATCH VIDEO 

Always important to have the community support. Once you complete a 715 Health Check and receive your Deadly Choices shirt you’ll have access to the gym. #DeadlyChoices

2.2 NSW : Yerin ACCHO on central coast is leading the way in Aboriginal health promotion by holding an ACCHO Commmunity Health Expo 

Will you be joining us for our Community Health Expo next month?

Come along and learn about what health care services Yerin Incorporating Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Centre offers to the Central Coast Aboriginal community.

REGISTER FOR FREE: https://yerin-community-health-expo.eventbrite.com.au

This event offers the Central Coast Aboriginal community an opportunity to actively engage with their health and wellbeing and learn more about the culturally appropriate health care services that are available to them.

2.3 NSW : The Awabakal Ltd Quit Crew visited Nikinpa Aboriginal Child & Family Centre last week to do a presentation about TIS (Tackling Indigenous Smoking).

The presentation included a Smokerlyzer demonstration to show the CO (carbon monoxide) reading in the bloodstream.

Thank you to everyone who attended the presentation!

If your organisation is interested in educating your workforce about the damages of smoking, give the Quit Crew a call on (02) 4918 6400.

We can provide the tools to support smokers to cut back or quit smoking.

3 NT : Congress Alice springs : Skills boost “the best medicine” for Aboriginal health as ten Aboriginal Health Practitioner Trainees graduate

A record number of Aboriginal Health Practitioners [AHPs] will today graduate from the Congress AHP Traineeship program; a partnership with Batchelor College.” Congress’ General Manager – Health Services, Tracey Brand said today.

“Ten Aboriginal Health Practitioners from our AHP Traineeship program – including three from our bush clinics – will graduate with their Certificate IV Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) and two senior AHPs will graduate with a Diploma in Aboriginal Primary Health Care.

“Aboriginal Health Practitioners are a strategic priority for our workforce. AHPs are critical to the work of Congress in delivering culturally safe and responsive comprehensive primary health care to our people” said Ms Brand.

Aboriginal Health Practitioners are recognised nationally as a fundamental component of Aboriginal comprehensive primary health care. As well as providing primary health care, AHPs provide cultural security and safety, disease prevention and health promotion, and local community knowledge.

They work within multidisciplinary health care teams to achieve better health outcomes for Aboriginal people and play a key role in facilitating relationships between other health professionals to provide care that meets the client’s physical, social, emotional and cultural needs.

Tallira Anderson is one of the ten graduates. “As a young mum, I was inspired to become an Aboriginal Health Practitioner to be a role model for my daughter.”

“Growing up seeing too many of my family with preventable chronic illnesses, I want to make a difference. I am now a graduate AHP and proud to be working in the new Congress Northside clinic.” said Ms Anderson.

“Following a challenging period in recruiting AHPs in 2016, Congress embarked on a mission to develop our own and launched the Congress AHP traineeship program. The graduations this week are evidence of the program’s success.” continued Ms Brand.

“AHP graduates are to be congratulated on their achievement in attaining their qualification.

“Congress now employs 21 AHPs across our town and remote clinics and will continue to invest in the AHP workforce by employing a minimum of three AHP trainees each year.”

 

3.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin Deadly Choices team visits the Garaworra Supported housing program
Tracey from our Deadly Choices team visits the Garaworra Supported housing program run by Anglicare NT every fortnight on Mondays and helps prepare some Good Quick Tukka.
Yesterday Corn, Zucchini & Carrot fritters were on the menu.
Thanks to Alberto Dhamarrandji and his little sister Anneka Dhamarrandji, Jackson Mills and Serena Morgan pictured here for helping out #deadlychoices #AnglicareNT

4. VIC : VACCHO staff get a run down on the 2018 Victorian election campaign
Victoria has been a leader for Aboriginal Affairs across Australia. The state has embraced the concept of selfdetermination for Aboriginal people, recognising it is the only policy to produce real and sustainable outcomes for Community.
Download a PDF copy VACCHO-STATE-ELECTION-2018-WEB
Since 2006 there have been a number of strategies and frameworks that have been co-designed with Aboriginal leaders and their communities. They prioritise areas including education, health, human services, economic participation, child protection and leadership.
These community-led reforms across Victoria are improving Aboriginal People’s lives. We are seeing healthier babies and mums, more young people completing year 12, and a large increase in immunisation rates for Aboriginal children across the state.

Our communities have the solutions, and we will continue to ensure our voice is heard in achieving better health outcomes for all Victorians. It is vital that the partnerships between Community and government continues. Keep walking with us.

We ask for:
• Multi-partisan commitment to continue legitimate engagement with Aboriginal communities, and reforms
based upon self-determination.
• To honour existing plans, fund their implementation and ensure future policies are based on the principles
of self-determination.
• Continued support of Aboriginal involvement in strategic decision-making at all levels of government.

5.1 SA : The Deadly Choices team are out on the APY lands supporting one of our partners the PAFC Power Aboriginal Program

WillPower Program community visits 2 Amata  Ernabella Mimili Indulkana
 Massive thx to all students & teachers 4 hosting us, it’s been an amazing few days with more to come

5.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO Newsletter January-July edition 2018.

Download copy here Newsletter_Jan-July 2018

6. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Aurukun was a hive of healthy activity last weekend with the annual River to Ramp Fun Run and Walk. 

Almost 100 entrants ran, jogged or walked the seven kilometre course from Obon to the finish line at the picturesque Aurukun Landing.

Deputy Mayor Edgar Kerindun oversaw the race formalities and was on hand to congratulate the participants and winners at the finish line. The overall winner was Gabriel waterman, who set an impressive pace given the hot conditions.

The overall winner was Gabriel waterman, who set an impressive pace given the hot conditions.

The biggest smile of the day went to eight year old Althea Koomeeta, who won a push bike for winning her age group.

The success of events like this are the result of a large group of coommitted stakeholders working together. The River to Ramp Fun Run and Walk was supported by the following organisations: Skytrans, Rio Tinto, Glencore, ALPA, Island and Cape Stores, Kang Kang Café, Ercson, Preston Law, Apunipima, Cape York Employment, Koolkan School, PCYC Indigenous Programs, G&R Wills, Kondo Korp, Pikkuws Restaurant and Builders North.

7 WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Matters – Men’s Health Marmun Pit stop flyer.

 

With; Stan Masters – Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Derbarl Yerrigan Below is the Derbarl Yerrigans Marmun Pit stop flyer. They help men promote better health For more information about Marmun Pit Stop go to or 9421 3888

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : National @CPMC_Aust #ACT @WinnungaACCHO celebrates 30 years #NSW @Galambila #QLD @IUIH_ @DeadlyChoices @Apunipima #RUOKDay #NT @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.1 National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner met this week with Minister Ken Wyatt and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) the peak body representing the specialist medical colleges in Australia.to discuss building our health workforce

1.2 National : Our Deputy CEO Dr Dawn Casey attended the Parliamentary Friends Group for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eyehealth

2. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services (WNAHCS) last night celebrated its 30th anniversary

Winnunga last night celebrated its 30th anniversary , as it continues to go from strength to strength – providing responsive, appropriate services, tailored to the needs of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in Canberra

Picture above : Wally Bell welcome to country at dinner celebrating 30 years of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health : Pictures below Geoff Bagnall

  

The Ngunnawal people are the Traditional Owners of the lands that the ACT is located on. However, there are many Aboriginal people from other parts of the country living in and visiting Canberra.

This is mainly due to the mobility of people generally, connecting with family, the histories of displacement, and employment opportunities particularly in the Commonwealth public service.

Winnunga was established in 1988 by local Aboriginal people inspired by the national mobilisation of people around the opening of the new Parliament House in May and the visit by the Queen.

The late Olive Brown, a particularly inspirational figure who worked tirelessly for the health of Aboriginal people, saw the need to set up a temporary medical service at the Tent Embassy site in Canberra and this proved to be the beginning of Winnunga.

Mrs Brown enlisted the support of Dr Sally Creasey, Carolyn Patterson (registered nurse/midwife), Margaret McCleod and others to assist. Soon after ACT Health offered Mrs Brown a room in the office behind the Griffin Centre to run a clinic twice a week (Tuesday and Thursday mornings) and on Saturday mornings. Winnunga operated out of this office from 1988 to 1990. The then Winnunga Medical Director, Dr Peter Sharp, began work at Winnunga in 1989.

Other staff worked as volunteers. In January 1990 the t ACT Minister for Health at the time, Wayne Berry, provided a small amount of funding. By 1991 the clinic was operating out of the Griffin Centre as a full time medical practice. In that same year the ACT attained self-government.

In 2004 Winnunga moved to its current premises at Boolimba Cres in Narrabundah, and employs over 60 staff. Winnunga has grown into a major health service resource for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the ACT and surrounding region, and delivers a wide range of wholistic health care services.

3.1 NT:Congress Alice Springs expands its number of town clinics to service needs of clients

Today I visited Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and it was beaut to get a tour of the new clinic with manager Catherine Hampton.

The clinic at North Side Shopping Complex will provide comprehensive primary health care services for all Aboriginal people living in the North Side area

Warren Snowdon is the local Federal member for Lingiari

People living in the north of Alice Springs will now have access to a new clinic as primary health care service Central Australian Aboriginal Congress expands its network.

The new Congress Northside Clinic in the Northside Shopping Centre held an open day on Saturday September 8 and begin providing services from Wednesday September 12.

It will cater for nearly 2000 clients living in the town’s north, including Trucking Yards, Charles Creek and Warlpiri Camp.

Congress chief executive officer Donna Ah Chee said the clinic would have doctors, Aboriginal health practitioners, nurses, podiatry services, a dietician, a diabetes educator and also offer care coordination and social and emotional well-being help.

Ms Ah Chee said it would also provide advocacy and other support to families in the northside area.

“Providing a smaller clinic closer to our clients is an exciting development and builds on the success of our Larapinta and Sadadeen clinics that opened in 2016,” she said.

The new clinic has nine consultation rooms, a double treatment room and two allied health treatment rooms.

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress said it had found that smaller, multidisciplinary teams delivered better continuity of care, access and chronic disease outcomes.

3.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board sponsors SMOKE FREE Sports Day

Our Quit Support Team had a great weekend at Freedom Day Festival
KWHB were a proud sponsor to make the festival smoke free 🚭to protect everyone from harmful cigarette smoke.

Check out the AFL and Basketball teams next to our deadly archway!

What’s your smoke free story?


National Best Practice Unit Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour : Pharmacists and Indigenous Community Health with Chris Braithwaite

SHPA caught up with Chris Braithwaite, a pharmacist with the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Northern NSW.

Chris spoke to us about:

  • his journey to working with indigenous communities
  • what an average day looks like
  • the challenges posed by existing funding models for home medicines reviews
  • cultural competence and institutional racism

Listen to the Podcast HERE 

4.2 NSW : Number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months

The number of birth registrations for babies born to Aboriginal mothers in NSW has almost doubled in the past 6 months since the introduction of a new online birth registration system by the NSW Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages (BDM).

Attorney General Mark Speakman announced the success of the online registration form as a result of the Our Kids Count campaign which aims to increase Aboriginal birth registrations through better access to information about the birth registration process.

“The number of unregistered Aboriginal births has traditionally been too high, but we’re closing the gap by highlighting the importance of registration and making the process faster and easier to complete,” said Mr Speakman.

“A birth certificate allows people to fully participate in society and without one, many of the basic opportunities we take for granted such as enrolling in school, sport or getting a driver licence, become unnecessarily complicated and out of reach.”

New figures show the average number of children registered to Aboriginal mothers since March 2018 has increased 82 per cent since the last quarter of 2017, and a 101 per cent increase since 2016.

NSW Registrar for Births Deaths & Marriages, Amanda Ianna said the new online birth registration has been popular among all sections of the community since it was introduced in April 2018.

“The take up rate for the online form has exceeded all our expectations with over 90 per cent of all NSW birth registrations now being made through the online system. The form is intuitive and people can complete it at a time and place that suits them,” Ms Ianna said.

BDM has spread the message about the benefits of birth registration during visits to Aboriginal communities and through brochures and online material, including an educational video.

For more information about Our Kids Count, visit: www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/Aboriginal

5.1 QLD : Cronulla Sharks announce a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

This partnership will bring life-changing benefits for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples right across Australia,

The Sharks players will assist in educating youth about the importance of taking a preventative approach to their health, and living healthy lifestyles. This includes reducing the negative impacts of smoking and drinking alcohol, and advocating consistent attendance at school.

It provides the kids a chance to make positive decisions around being a deadly student. It’s about our young ones looking at the opportunities available, with education being the passport towards achieving their dreams.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson.

Club stalwart and 2001 Dally M Player of the Year, Preston Campbell returned to his former NRL club recently, as the Cronulla Sharks announced a partnership with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s (IUIH) Deadly Choices preventative health program.

As a Deadly Choices Ambassador, Campbell has been instrumental in assisting to bring about better health and educational outcomes among Indigenous communities in Australia; a formula which the Sharks will now implement to boost existing and future community programs within its Sharks Have Heart portfolio.

A huge thank you to Deadly Choices and local elder Aunty Deanna Schreiber for designing and creating our farewells gifts to JT

“The Deadly Choices – Cronulla Sharks partnership will help reinforce those positive mental and physical health outcomes among communities, through the promotion of healthy eating, active participation in sport, and emphasising the importance of a good education,” said Campbell.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices.

“When you have kids at such an impressionable age it’s important to direct plenty of positive messaging and ensuring they create good habits for themselves.

“I’ve had a chance to speak with the boys today about the Deadly Choices programs and they’re excited about the impact they’ll have on our young kids”

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back.”

As explained by Sharks Have Heart General Manager George Nour, empowering youth within communities is exactly what the Sharks intend to achieve through the Deadly Choices partnership.

“Sharks Have Heart are extremely proud to launch our partnership with Deadly Choices,” Nour said. “To be associated with such a strong and respected brand within the Indigenous community is only going to strengthen our programmes within our diversity pillar.”

At the launch, the Sharks were provided a snapshot of what it means to make Deadly Choices and be role models for community, with Campbell joined by fellow long-term Deadly Choices Ambassador and former league international Steve Renouf in discussing their roles.

Sharks Co-Captain Wade Graham, a member of the Australian World Cup squad last year and twice an Indigenous All Star in 2016 and 2017, was joined by Indigenous teammates Andrew Fifita, Jesse Ramien and Edrick Lee at the program launch.

Graham was excited by the Sharks new partnership and to be teaming up with Deadly Choices.

“I think staying fit is extremely important in this day and age, particularly for the youth and if the Sharks and Deadly Choices can encourage as many people as possible to get the body moving, to eat healthy and to have an active lifestyle, it is going to be extremely beneficial to the Indigenous community,” Graham said.

“I am looking forward to working with Deadly Choices who do outstanding work in the Indigenous community and to be helping to spread their important messages,” he added.

In 2016-17 in South East Queensland alone, the Deadly Choices team delivered 145 education programs to more than 1860 participants. The team also held 10 community and sporting events, with almost 1500 attendees and participants.

5.2 QLD :  Apunipima SEWB Program Community Implementation Manager talks about R U OK Campaign #RUOKDay #RUOKEveryday

WATCH HERE

Today and every day is RU OK Day? Start a conversation and support your friends, colleagues, family and community.

6.WA : AHCWA staff attended the Baby Coming -You Ready Research Project launch


This innovative project began with Kalyakool Moort research. The highly collaborative project has embodied passion and commitment to improve perinatal wellbeing and engagement for women and men at this significant time.

The ‘Baby Coming-You Ready?” Rubric has been developed, digitised and designed by Aboriginal women, men and researchers.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Governor-General visits @WinnungaACCHO Plus #NSW #StrokeWeek2018 Events @Galambila @ReadyMob @awabakalltd #Tamworth #VIC #BDAC #BADAC #QLD @Apunipima #NT @AMSANTaus @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

2.QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service was honoured and pleased by a visit on September 3 from his Excellency the Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove and Lady Cosgrove.

Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs briefed their Excellency’s on the range of services which are provided to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Canberra and the region.

Sir Peter was particularly interested in the range and breadth of services which are provided to the community and learn that of the almost 7000 clients which Winnunga sees each year that almost 20% are non- Indigenous.

Sir Peter was also very interested to explore with Julie Tongs the rationale for the decision that has been taken in the ACT by the ACT Governmnet and Winnunga Nimmityjah to establish an autonomous Aboriginal managed and staffed health clinic within the Alexander Maconochie Centre to minister to the health needs of Aboriginal prisoners.

Following the briefing Sir Peter and Lady Cosgrove joined all staff for afternoon tea.

It was Chris Saddler an Aboriginal Health Practitioner at Winnunga and Lieutenant Nam’s birthday so the visitors sang happy birthday to both . Sir Peter  gave Chris and Julie a medal with the inscription Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia with the Crown and a wattle tree.

2.1 QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

The current guidelines recommend that a stroke risk screening be provided for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people over 35 years of age. However there is an argument to introduce that screening at a younger age.

Education is required to assist all Australians to understand what a stroke is, how to reduce the risk of stroke and the importance be fast acting at the first sign of stroke.”

Dr Mark Wenitong, Public Health Medical Advisor at Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima), says that strokes can be prevented through a healthy lifestyle and Health screening, and just as importantly, a healthy pregnancy and early childhood can reduce risk for the child in later life.

Naomi Wenitong  pictured above with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media and celebrate Stroke Week in your community.

Listen to the new rap song HERE  or Hear

The song, written by Cairns speech pathologist Rukmani Rusch and performed by leading Indigenous artist Naomi Wenitong, was created to boost low levels of stroke awareness in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said the rap packed a punch, delivering an important message, in a fun and accessible way.

“The Stroke Rap has a powerful message we all need to hear,’’ Ms McGowan said.

“Too many Australians continue to lose their lives to stroke each year when most strokes can be prevented.

“Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song, remember and act on its stroke awareness and prevention message – it could save their life.”

Ms McGowan said the song’s message was particularly important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities who were over represented in stroke statistics.

Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islanders are twice as likely to be hospitalised for stroke and are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians. These alarming figures were revealed in a recent study conducted by the Australian National University.

There is one stroke every nine minutes in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are overrepresented in stroke statistics. Strokes are the third leading cause of death in Australia.

Apunipima delivers primary health care services, health screening, health promotion and education to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people across 11 Cape York communities. These health screens will help to make sure you aren’t at risk  .

We encourage you to speak to an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health Practitioner or visit one of Apunipima’s Health Centres to talk to them about getting a health screen.

What is a stroke?

A stroke occurs when the blood flow to the brain is interrupted, depriving an area of the brain of oxygen. This is usually caused by a clot (ischaemic stroke) or a bleed in the brain (haemorrhagic stroke).

Brief stroke-like episodes that resolve by themselves are called transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs). They are often a sign of an impending stroke, and need to be treated seriously.

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

What to do in case of stroke?

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

The Australian National Stroke Foundation promotes the FAST tool as a quick way for anyone to identify a possible stroke. FAST consists of the following simple steps:

Face – has their mouth has dropped on one side?

Arm – can they lift both arms?

Speech – Is their speech slurred? Do they understand you?

Time – is critical. Call an ambulance.

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

The @Galambila ACCHO and @ReadyMob staff  hosting #strokeweek2018 on Gumbaynggirr country ( Coffs Harbour ) : Special thanks to Carroll Towney, Leon Williams and Katrina Widders from the Health Promotion team #ourMob#ourHealth #ourGoal #fightstoke @strokefdn

Recently released Australian National University research, found around one-third to a half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their 40s, 50s and 60s were at high risk of future heart attack or stroke. It also found risk increased substantially with age and starts earlier than previously thought, with high levels of risk were occurring in people younger than 35.

The good news is more than 80 percent of strokes can be prevented,’’ said Colin Cowell NACCHO Social Media editor and himself a stroke survivor.

“This National Stroke Week, we are urging all Australians to take steps to reduce their stroke risk.

“As a first step, I encourage all the mob to visit to visit one of our 302 ACCHO clinics , their local GP or community health centre for a health check, or take advantage of a free digital health check at your local pharmacy to learn more about your stroke risk factors.

“Then make small changes and stay motivated to reduce your stroke risk. Every step counts towards a healthy life,” he said.

Top tips for National Stroke Week:

  • Stay active – Too much body fat can contribute to high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Get moving and aim exercise at least 2.5 to 5 hours a week.
    •Eat well – Fuel your body with a balanced diet. Drop the salt and check the sodium content on packaged foods. Steer clear of sugary drinks and drink plenty of water.
    • Drink alcohol in moderation – Drinking large amounts of alcohol increases your risk of stroke through increased blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, obesity and irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation). Stick to no more than two standard alcoholic drinks a day for men and one standard drink per day for women.
    • Quit smoking – Smokers have twice the risk of having a stroke than non-smokers. There are immediate health benefits from quitting.
    • Make time to see your doctor for a health check.  Ask for a blood pressure check because high blood pressure is the key risk factor for stroke. Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and atrial fibrillation are also stroke risks which can be managed with the help of a GP.National Stroke Week is the Stroke Foundation’s annual stroke awareness campaign.

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

WHEN Aboriginal elder Aunty Pam Smith first had a stroke she had no idea what was happening to her body.

On her way back to town from a traditional smoking ceremony, she became confused, her jaw slack and dribbling.

FROM HERE

Picture above : CARE: Coral and Bill Toomey at National Stroke Awareness Week.

“I started feeling headachey, when they opened up the car and the cool air hit me I didn’t know where I was – I was in LaLa Land,” she said.

A guest speaker at the Stroke Foundation National Stroke Awareness Week event in Tamworth, Ms Smith has created a cultural awareness book about strokes for other Aboriginal people.

Watch Aunty Pams Story

She hopes it will teach others what to expect and how to look out for signs of a stroke, Aboriginal people are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-Indigenous people.

But, most still don’t go to hospital for help.

“Every time we went to a hospital we were treated for one thing, alcoholism – a bad heart or kidneys because of alcohol,” Ms Smith said.

“We were past that years ago, we’re up to what we call white fella’s things now.”

Elders encouraged people to make small changes in their daily lives, to quit smoking, eat a balanced diet and drink less alcohol.

For Bill Toomey it was a chance to speak with people who understood what it was like to have a stroke. A trip to Sydney in 2010 ended in the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital when he was found unconscious.

Now in a wheelchair, Mr Toomey was once a football referee and an Aboriginal Health Education Officer.

“I wouldn’t wish a stroke on anyone,” Mr Toomey said.

“I didn’t have the signs, the face didn’t drop or speech.”

His wife Coral Toomey cares for him, she was in Narrabri when he was rushed to hospital.

“Sometimes you want to hide, sit down and cry because there’s nothing you can do to help them,” she said.

“You’re doing what you can but you feel inside that it’s not enough to help them.”

Stroke survivor Pam Smith had a message for her community.

“Please go and have a second opinion, it doesn’t matter where or who it is – go to the hospital,” she said.

“If you’re not satisfied with your doctor go to another one.”

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

Did you know that Aboriginal people are up to three times more likely to suffer a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians, and twice as likely to die from a stroke?

This week is National Stroke Week, so make sure you know the signs of a stroke and call 000 if you suspect someone is experiencing a stroke.

Common risk factors for stroke include:
– High blood pressure
– Increasing age
– High cholesterol
– Diabetes
– Smoking

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

Veronica and Meagan had the opportunity to work closely with a group of the women in town. The ladies got to work on their paintings whilst participating in the Family Wellbeing training which focused on dealing with conflict and recognising personal strengths.


The week ended with a delicious lunch out bush and lots of smiles!

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

Chair of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance [AMSANT], Donna Ah Chee, said it wasn’t just the arrival of spring in the deserts of Central Australia to be welcomed today as the Aboriginal community-controlled health sector celebrated the graduation of 10 future leaders in receiving Diplomas in Leadership and Management.

“This is of course a wonderful achievement for each of the graduates who have put in a lot of hard work while still holding on to their full-time jobs,” said Ms Ah Chee.

“But just as important is what it means for the entire Aboriginal community controlled health sector—these women and men are the future, they are our future leaders in what are difficult, complex roles, they are role models for younger people, they are role models for their families and communities.

“Already organisations are moving graduates into managerial and team leader roles, and we are looking towards future intakes of students across a range of training opportunities in the sector— in management, administration, cultural leadership, community engagement and research.”

John Paterson, CEO of AMSANT reflected at the graduation ceremony in Alice Springs that while the work in the sector was very challenging, it was extraordinarily fulfilling.

“It really is the best sector to work in, no two ways about it.

“These new graduates are at the heart of what Aboriginal community control in comprehensive primary health care is about, it’s about people with lived experience in their own communities and families and having the strength and tenacity to take on the challenges we face in Aboriginal primary health care here in the Northern Territory.”

The graduates were drawn from the Katherine West Health Board, Anyinginyi Health, Miwatj Health and the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress).

Anyinginyi graduate, Nova Pomare, said that it hadn’t always been easy to get through the course.

“It was pretty hard working full time, studying and having to leave home away from family to attend the face-to-face course work in Darwin,” she said.

“But we were supported by our work places who have shown faith in our abilities and committed to our futures.”

Graduates of Diploma in Leadership and Management:

Anita Maynard Congress Velda Winunguj Miwatj Health

Carlissa Broome Congress Stan Stokes Anyinginyi Health

Glenn Clarke Congress Mahalia Hippi Anyinginyi Health

Samarra Schwarz Congress Nova Pomare Anyinginyi Health

John Liddle Congress Lorraine Johns Katherine West Health Board

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

 

 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

National Child Protection week began for VACCHO and the Victorian Aboriginal Children and Young People’s Alliance (Alliance) at the 2018 Victorian Protecting Children Awards on Monday 3 September 2018.

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) annual awards recognise dedicated teams and individuals working within government and community services who make protecting children their business.

We are pleased to announce that two of the 13 award winners were Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations and Members of VACCHO and the Alliance.

Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

This award was established by DHHS in partnership with the Victorian Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People, in memory of Aunty Walda Blow – a proud Yorta

Yorta and Wemba Wemba Elder who lived her life in the pursuit of equality.

Aunty Walda was an early founder of the Dandenong and District Aboriginal Cooperative and worked for over 40 years improving the lives of the Aboriginal community. This award recognises contributions of an Aboriginal person in Victoria to the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people.

Karen ensures the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people are always front and centre.

Karen has personally committed her support to the Ballarat Community through establishing and continuously advocating for innovative prevention, intervention and reunification programs.

As the inaugural Chairperson of the Alliance, Karen contributions to establishing the identity and achieving multiple outcomes in the Alliance Strategic Plan is celebrated by her peers and recognised by the community service sector and DHHS.

Karen’s leadership in community but particularly for BADAC, has seen new ways of delivering cultural models of care to Aboriginal children, carers and their families, ensuring a holistic service is provided to best meet the needs of each individual and in turn benefit the community.

The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

This award is for a team within the child and family services sector who has made an exceptional contribution to directly improve the lives of children, young people and families,

BDAC have lead the way, showing the Alliance member organisations what it takes to run the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18) program. BDAC have adapted a child protection model to incorporate holistic assessment and an Aboriginal cultural lens to support the children and families.

They have evidence that empowered decision making improves outcomes, particularly family reunification. The BDAC CEO, Raylene Harradine and Section 18 Pilot team have shown dedication, empathy and long term commitment in getting the program right for their organisation and clients, so that they can share their learning and program model with other ACCOs.

Their leadership in community has created waves of innovation in delivering cultural models of care to vulnerable Aboriginal children, carers and their families, achieving shared outcomes for all.

VACCHO and the Alliance walk away feeling inspired by all to do the best we can for our Koori children and young people, congratul

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : From #NT @AMSANTaus @DanilaDilba @DeadlyChoices #QLD @IUIH_ @QAIHC #NSW @awabakalltd #VIC @VACCHO_org #TAS #OchreDay2018

1.1 National : Closing the Gap Refresh briefing to Garma Festival NT

1.2 National : End RHD Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Working Group meets in Perth.

2. NSW : Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle region expanding to a regional model to meet demand for Aboriginal medical services and Mums and Bubs Group

3.VIC : VACCHO  The Victorian Government is investing $8.4 million to boost the number of Aboriginal health workers in the system and provide more culturally appropriate mental health services for Aboriginal Victorians.

4.1 NT : AMSANT NT Government Safer Communities and Generational Change: Alcohol Reform Progress Update Report and BDR Evaluation Response

4.2 NT: Danila Dilba Deadly Choices ACCHO Darwin delivering education on nutrition in schools

5. QLD:  IUIH ACCHO System of Care Conference 2018 – Brisbane – 27-28/08/2018

6 Tas : NACCHO National #Ochreday2018 nipaluna (Hobart)

Note : Other states and Territories covered next week 

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Closing the Gap Refresh briefing to Garma Festival NT

Professor Ian Anderson, Deputy Secretary, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, and Ms Andrea Mason, Co-chair of the Prime Ministers Indigenous Advisory Council, had the privilege of hosting a briefing session on the Closing the Gap Refresh at the Garma Festival Key Forum.

Held over four days in north-east Arnhem Land, Garma celebrates the local Yolngu people and their culture and is one of Australia’s most significant Indigenous events.

The gathering attracts over 2,500 people from all across the country and around the world and this year celebrated its 20th Anniversary

The festival’s Key Forum brings together people from all backgrounds, including business, community and political leaders, academics and journalists, students and educators as well as everyday Australians.

Ian spoke about the Closing the Gap refresh process so far, outlined the people and groups who have been consulted, the information that has been gathered and what the next steps are.

Watch Here

Andrea talked about her experience with the refresh process, how the Indigenous Advisory Council has been involved and reflected on some of the key issues raised by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Watch Here

Background

A decade after Australian governments committed to the Closing the Gap framework, three of the seven national targets are on track and four will expire later this year.

Australian governments acknowledge they need to work differently with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

This includes genuine partnership with Indigenous leaders, organisations and communities, to identify the priorities that will inform better programs and services, to close the gap.

A Special Gathering of prominent Indigenous Australians met in Canberra for two days in February this year to discuss priorities for the next decade of Closing the Gap. Participants from all states and territories met to share their experiences and help influence the next steps in Closing the Gap.

From this, ten representatives presented a statement to Council of Australian Governments (COAG) meeting who agreed all governments will undertake community consultations on the refresh, prior to agreeing on the new Closing the Gap framework, targets and performance indicators by 31 October 2018.

Around 1,000 people represented their communities, businesses and organisations at consultations around the country. We also asked people to share their views on the best way to refresh Closing the Gap on our website.

Feedback from consultations and submissions will now be used to inform the new Closing the Gap targets.

1.2 National : End RHD Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Working Group meets in Perth.

Great meeting of the End RHD Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Working Group in Perth. Together, we’re committed to in Australia.

Attended bt Pat Turner CEO NACCHO and John Paterson CEO AMSANT

Thanks for hosting AHCWA!

2.1 Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle region expanding to a regional model to meet demand for Aboriginal medical services and Mums and Bubs Group

Photo above We’ve opened two new Mums and Bubs Group & Clinic locations in the Lake Macquarie and Port Stephens regions!

Local Aboriginal community organisation Awabakal has expanded their health services by opening two new Community Clinics in Cardiff and Raymond Terrace in New South Wales. These two additional full-time sites will help to deliver a broad range of health services and community programs to their growing Awabakal community.

The new community clinics will complement the Awabakal Medical Service in Hamilton which will continue to operate as the primary location for giving Aboriginal families in the area access to primary health care, advocacy, social and emotional support. The existing service will also continue to offer more specialised health care and dental services.

As a result of extensive demographic research, Awabakal is taking action to provide comprehensive primary health care in the Cardiff and Raymond Terrace communities where high numbers of Aboriginal people reside and require accessibility to heath care. Because of this expansion, Awabakal has redesigned their model of care to integrate closely with other Awabakal services.

The new clinics will focus on co-locating Awabakal’s primary health care services with other services (such as aged care, NDIS, mental health, playgroup and mums and bubs groups), depending on the population need and demographics. This will see an expansion in the Awabakal team with the creation of more jobs in these regions and career progression for current staff.

This expansion signals the beginning of a growth phase of Awabakal as they plan to gradually expand their services to two other possible sites in the near future to help improve the health and wellbeing of Indigenous people in regions in need.

With more than 40 years behind them as an Aboriginal-managed not-for-profit organisation, Awabakal continues to set the standard for providing culturally appropriate health services to Indigenous people to help improve the health and wellbeing of the Aboriginal community.

Visit www.awabakal.org for more information about Awabakal’s services.

3.VIC : VACCHO  The Victorian Government is investing $8.4 million to boost the number of Aboriginal health workers in the system and provide more culturally appropriate mental health services for Aboriginal Victorians.

Minister for Mental Health, Martin Foley said the funding would support two new workforce initiatives designed to improve the mental health and social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal Victorians.

The new initiatives include an Aboriginal Mental Health Traineeship Program for Aboriginal people interested in a career in mental health services, and the provision of ten new clinical and therapeutic mental health positions in Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations across Victoria.

The Traineeship Program aims to boost the number of Aboriginal people working in mental health, increase culturally safe and inclusive mental health care for Aboriginal people, and to strengthen partnerships between Aboriginal communities and their local health service.

As part of the program ten Aboriginal Victorians will be offered placements at eight mental health services while they undertake tertiary mental health studies.

The ten new clinical and therapeutic mental health positions will be located within Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations across Victoria including Ballarat, Swan Hill, Warrnambool, Healesville, Halls Gap, Heywood, Morwell, Portland, Purnim and suburban Preston.

The positions may include clinicians from a range of disciplines, such as mental health nurses, occupational therapists, psychologists and social workers, as determined by the needs of each organisation.

This funding is on top of the Labor Government’s $4 million investment in Aboriginal mental health demonstration projects in the Victorian Budget 2018-19.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Mental Health Martin Foley

“Historically Aboriginal people have had difficult experiences with the mental health system, so what we want to do is to break down barriers and build trust.”  

“Everyone working in mental health should be considering how they can make things better for Aboriginal Victorians with mental illness, ensuring they receive culturally appropriate treatment, care and support.”

“Having Aboriginal health workers in the system will help achieve this and foster cross-cultural understanding.”

Quote attributable to Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Natalie Hutchins

“These initiatives, which are important in helping the mental health, social and emotional well-being of Aboriginal Victorians, also break down barriers and help strengthen the relationship with local health services.”

4.1 NT : AMSANT NT Government Safer Communities and Generational Change: Alcohol Reform Progress Update Report and BDR Evaluation Response

The Territory Labor Government is on track to deliver on all 219 recommendations of the Riley Review with 50 now completed since February and work well underway on implementing the remaining recommendations.

The recommendations signify the biggest alcohol reforms in the Territory’s history and are designed to reduce alcohol related harms and alcohol related violence and crime.

Some of the key recommendations completed to date include:

· Establishing an Independent Liquor Commission with public interest and community impact tests in decision making
· Take away license moratorium
· Police Auxiliary Liquor Inspector legislation commenced and first intake now working in Alice Springs
· Floor price legislation passed and ready to commence 1 October
· Last Drinks survey with Police established
· Alcohol Reform Implementation Team established
· Youth AOD grants rollout
· Introduced Police powers to suspend liquor license for 48 hours
· Good Sports program operates in 87 sporting clubs
· Darwin Waterfront included in CBD designated area
· Pregnant women and alcohol use – screening and referral processes established
· FASD Steering committee established
· Early Childhood Development Plan launched

Extensive consultation is happening with Local Government, Australian Government, Industry reference groups, Liquor stores, community alcohol reference groups, industry stakeholders, and health and community stakeholders.

The past six months have seen a new level of engagement take place, including:

· Meetings with 129 unique organisations;
· Over 250 separate meetings including 693 individuals;
· Established 6 key working groups and they are, the Industry Reference group, Small Bars and restaurants, Liquor Act Re-Write group, Data & Evaluation group, Alcohol on the Water group and Liquor Stores, and;
· 11 editions of the eNewsletter delivered to over 700 local key stakeholder

The Territory Labor Government’s response to the independent BDR evaluation report was also released today.

The BDR Evaluation covers the first 6 months of operation and was conducted independently by Menzies School of Health Research and released in June 2018.

The Territory Labor Government promised to bring back the BDR after it was scrapped by a chaotic CLP government.

The BDR is just one of the suite of tools this government has implemented to tackle alcohol fuelled violence and crime, and the Territory Labor Government will adopt recommendations within the evaluation report to further strengthen the BDR.

Since commencement, a total of 6,120 persons have been placed on the BDR and as of 31 July, there were 3,526 people on the register.

All recommendations have been supported or supported in principle.

The next evaluation of the BDR will cover the first 12 months of operations and will be reported in December 2018.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Health, Natasha Fyles:

Territorians have a right to live in safe communities, and that’s why the Territory Labor Government has undertaken the most comprehensive alcohol reforms in the NT’s history.
Tackling alcohol abuse and the crime and harms it causes remains the biggest social issue in the Territory. We continue to have unacceptable rates of alcohol related crime and anti-social behaviour, and this is our response to tackle this issue in an evidence-based and co-ordinated approach.

From our new auxiliary liquor inspectors monitoring our bottle shops, more police officers on the beat with stronger powers and better resources, to strengthening our liquor legislation – we are putting everything in to tackling alcohol dysfunction, to create generational change for the Northern Territory.

The 6 month evaluation report contained a number of recommendations but also showed that the BDR is meeting its policy objectives.

The BDR is an important part of our plan to limit the supply of alcohol to problem drinkers. It’s one of the ways we are tackling alcohol fuelled violence and crime.

The Territory Labor Government will continue to evolve and improve the BDR based on evidence, and this evaluation response provides that pathway forward.

Link to progress update report of the 219 recommendations of the Riley Review:
https://alcoholreform.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/564211/NTG_Table_2018_AUG_ART.pdf

Link to the Territory Labor Government’s response of the independent 6 month evaluation of the BDR:
https://alcoholreform.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/564207/Response-to-BDR-Evaluation-Report_WEB.pdf

4.2 NT: Danila Dilba Deadly Choices ACCHO Darwin delivering education on nutrition in schools

Great work by our Deadly Choices team delivering education on Nutrition at Moulden Primary school today. The kids drew the 5 fruit groups, then presented to each other what food group they had.#DeadlyChoices

5. QLD:  IUIH ACCHO System of Care Conference 2018 – Brisbane – 27-28/08/2018

The IUIH System of Care Conference was aimed at providing education and skills to General Practitioners about a systematised way of providing high quality health care to Indigenous people in order to Close the Gap.
Learning objective
  1. Participants learnt about the IUIH System of Care and how it addresses the health needs of Indigenous Australians
  2. Participant will now understand how a systematised approach to primary health care can work in Indigenous health
  3. Participants learnt about a systematic and successful way of implementing a CQI process within Indigenous health services
  4. Participants will understand how a regional clinical governance system in Indigenous health with ensures high quality care and patient safety.

PIC3

Pic 4

6 Tas : NACCHO National #Ochreday2018 nipaluna (Hobart)

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programs only aimed at males as perpetrators,’ the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (NACCHO) website states.

FROM RACGP Doug Hendrie

By contrast, Ochre Day – which runs over 27–28 August – is intended to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander masculinities and resilience.

‘[We focus on] respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children,’ the website states.

Ochre Day originated in 2012, when Cape York Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health worker Dan Fischer decided to focus on positive approaches to men’s health in his community, aiming to prevent a problem rather than try to solve it after the fact.

Many communities around Australia have since founded their own men’s groups.

The Ochre Day goal is to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men to live longer, healthier lives.

At the Ochre Day welcome ceremony, Federal Minister for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt – who is of Noongar, Yamatji and Wongi descent – told the Ochre Day National Men’s Health Conference in Hobart that transforming health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men is possible.

‘If we are to truly transform the health status of our First Australians, we need every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander man to take responsibility and be proud of themselves and their heritage – proud of the oldest continuous culture on Earth, and the traditions that kept us healthy, from the very beginning,’ he said.

‘[O]ur fathers, grandfathers and uncles — as well as our mothers, aunties and grandmothers — must play a key role in protecting our children. Our men, in particular, must be warriors for our children’s welfare and future, every day.’

In the speech, Minister Wyatt also announced the beginning of a 10 year National Male Health Strategy, beginning in 2020.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : From #NT #QLD #NSW #VIC #WA Features New Optimal Care Pathway for our mob with cancer provides principles & guidance to ensure that #cancer care is culturally safe and responsive @CancerAustralia

1.VIC : Melanie Hill Lane Aboriginal Health Worker and Cancer Survior from MDAS ACCHO Kerang has been part of developing Australia’s first Indigenous Cancer Protocol

2.1 NSW : Penrith is set to become the home of a new primary health care service that will help to address the health needs of the local Aboriginal community.

2.2 NSW: Summer Hunt now in charge at Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation #becauseofherwecan

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs : Blow Breathe Cough video activity in Western Arrernte

3.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Deadly Choices Building up a new generation of future leaders

4.1 WA: AHCWA : Commencing the delivery of the Certificate II Family Well-being

5.1 QLD : Rapid Response Syphilis Testing at Wuchopperen Health Service

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

 

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.VIC : Melanie Hill Lane Aboriginal Health Worker and Cancer Survior from MDAS ACCHO Kerang has been part of developing Australia’s first Indigenous Cancer Protocol

“Melanie Hill Lane with her children (From L) Dakoda 11, Chardae 9,Taj 13 and Kai 16. Picture: Daryl Pinder.”

When Melanie Lane was diagnosed with cancer six years ago, she became part of a grim and growing statistic: the rising number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders afflicted by the disease, with a 40 per cent greater likelihood of dying from it than non-indigenous Australians.

A non-smoker and Aboriginal health worker, the mum of four was blown away by her surprise lung tumour diagnosis at the age of 37 during a scan for an unrelated complaint.

Now recovered, she says the treatment and round of surgeries that cleared her two years later — including a partial lung removal — would probably have been a vastly better experience with a new cancer protocol being launched this week by Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt.

Download Optimal care pathway for Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander people with cancer

optimal-care-pathway-for-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-with-cancer

The Australian-first “Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer” includes a detailed series of printed resources to be distributed throughout the health system aimed at practitioners and patients. It works from the principle that indigenous Australians have specific cultural needs and their outcomes will be better if these are taken into account.

Low screening rates and later-stage diagnoses are troubling hurdles, according to Jacinta Elston, pro-vice-­chancellor (indigenous) at Monash University and, like Ms Lane, a contributor to the new Cancer Australia resource.

“We know Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are not getting the best out of the system,” said Professor Elston, a breast cancer survivor herself. “Whether it’s late presentation to healthcare services or lack of access to same-stage treatment, which could be to do with cultural appropriateness of services or people living in poverty not having the same access.

“Or Stolen Generations, where people have a lot of other things going on in life, or people living with chronic diseases; if you’re living with other diseases … then being in the right mindset to do all the right preventative things might be difficult.”

With cancer now the second- leading cause of death of indigenous Australians after cardiovascular disease, Mr Wyatt predicted the new approach could have a significant effect on attempts to close the gap on indigenous health disadvantage.

“The impacts of trauma across generations of our people, including historical events, must be acknowledged and addressed,” he said. “It is important for health services and programs to understand that the biological impact of stress and trauma can be an underlying cause of poor health.”

VIEW VIDEO

Prof Tom Calma explains how the new Optimal Care Pathway will help to ensure quality care for Indigenous Australians with cancer to improve their treatment experience & outcomes

A new, first of its kind, Optimal Care Pathway released today identifies approaches to quality care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer to improve their cancer treatment experience and outcomes.

Cancer is the third leading cause of fatal burden of disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are, on average, 40 per cent more likely to die from cancer than non-Indigenous Australians.

Healthcare that is patient-focused and that is respectful of, and responsive to, the preferences, needs and values of patients, is critical to good health care outcomes.

The Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer provides health services and health professionals across all sectors in Australia with principles and guidance to ensure that care is responsive to the needs of Indigenous people.

Cancer Australia is calling on health professionals and health services involved in the delivery of cancer care at every level to read, use, adopt and embed the Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer into their practice.

The Optimal Care Pathway is accompanied by consumer resources, which outline what patients should expect on the cancer pathway, and the care they should be offered, from tests and diagnosis, through to treatment and care after treatment, management of cancer that has spread, and end-of-life care.

Cancer Australia has partnered with the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Victoria, in collaboration with Cancer Council Victoria, to develop this first population-based Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer.

Cancer Australia gratefully acknowledge the contribution of Cancer Australia’s Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control, who provided high level expert advice and guidance throughout the development of the Optimal Care Pathway.

For more information

2.1 NSW : Penrith is set to become the home of a new primary health care service that will help to address the health needs of the local Aboriginal community.

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) recently announced the opening of the new Penrith Aboriginal Medical Service clinic, which is set to help fill the gap in the health needs of Aboriginal locals.

WACHS’ Executive Manager of Business Services, Adam Stuart, said the clinic will deliver a comprehensive primary health care service, similar to the services offered at their Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service centre in Mt Druitt.

“We look forward to establishing a new service to really address something that is probably a gap in the health needs of the Aboriginal population in that area,” he said.

“There is a whole range of access barriers sometimes to the hospital system, so this is about a service that provides a culturally safe service for that area and that community.”

The new clinic will create six positions with a GP, nurses, Aboriginal health workers and transportation aids set to help make up the service.

Mr Stuart said these services were a recognition of the Aboriginal population’s health needs in the Nepean Blue Mountains region.

“We know that the Aboriginal population in the Nepean and western Sydney area is one of the largest numbers in the country and the demographics of that population show they are a lot younger community,” he said.

“The other thing is that we know that the disparities in health outcomes is well documented, so we want to look at a primary health care service that can assist in going some way in addressing that need.”

Mr Stuart said it was important to provide better access to care for the Aboriginal community.

“We are trying to address those access barriers and what we would consider our preventable hospital admissions that can be prevented by timely access to appropriate primary health care,” he said.

Located in Lawson Street, Penrith, the establishment of the clinic was a result of funding provided by the Department of Health and the Ministry of Health in 2017.

“We want to acknowledge the support of NSW Ministry of Health and the local health district for providing $1.5 million in capital works funding,” Mr Stuart said.

2.2 NSW: Summer Hunt now in charge at Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation #becauseofherwecan 

Above :Incoming Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation CEO Summer Hunt, chairperson Jan Etrich and outgoing CEO Barry Stewart.

COOMEALLA Health Aboriginal Corporation (CHAC) has appointed Summer Hunt as its new chief executive officer.

Ms Hunt will transition to the role after three years working as deputy CEO to Barry Stewart.

Mr Stewart and Ms Hunt were appointed in 2015 in the roles of CEO and deputy CEO respectively, and at that time implemented a three-year plan for Mr Stewart to oversee a set of key changes required to stabilise and improve the organisation. Ms Hunt undertook an intensive on-the-job training program before moving into the CEO role.

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs : Blow Breathe Cough video activity in Western Arrernte 

Australian Hearing and Menzies School of Health Research have collaborated to create an animated version of this classroom favourite: the Blow Breathe Cough activity in Western Arrernte . Check it out!

View Video HERE 

3.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Deadly Choices Building up a new generation of future leaders

Deadly Choices ran a session on Leadership at Moulden Primary School with the grade 5s, followed by playing a traditional Indigenous game called Edor. Our Deadly Choices team recently added Moulden Primary school, meaning we can now deliver education on healthy lifestyles to school kids of all ages. Building up a new generation of future leaders.

4.1 WA: AHCWA : Commencing the delivery of the Certificate II Family Well-being

With the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia – AHCWA commencing the delivery of the Certificate II Family Well-being, AHCWA Youth Committee members have taken the opportunity to participate and develop our skills. We have found it to be very beneficial not only for our professional careers in the Health Sector, but also our personal lives 💫

For more info on the Certificate II Family Well-Being, please contact AHCWA on 9227 1631.

5.1 QLD : Rapid Response Syphilis Testing at Wuchopperen Health Service

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited  rolled out rapid, point of care testing for syphilis on Monday 13 August.

The tests are part of an $8.8 million Australian government initiative to combat the syphilis outbreak in northern Australia.

Wuchopperen CEO Dania Ahwang said she welcomed the new tests.

‘These tests will make a difference to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in northern Australia, and may even save lives.’

‘We welcome the Australian Government’s investment in this critically important public health issue.’

‘I urge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 – 39 to come in for a point of care test from Monday onwards. If you are outside that age group and have concerns, standard blood tests are always available.’

Wuchopperen Medical Director Dr Jacqueline Mein said the new tests offered a range of benefits.

‘The finger prick test takes 15 minutes to get a result compared to a standard blood test which can take a number of days to get processed,’ she explained.

‘This means that the client can get their results fast, and any follow up tests or treatment can be booked in on the spot.’

‘Point of care testing reduces the risk of the condition being passed on while clients are waiting for their results, or of not being able to get in touch with a client once the results are in.’

‘I
n the event of a positive test, it also makes it easier to find out who a client may have passed the condition on to.’

Wuchopperen has received 3000 tests, and will be offering them to all clients aged 15 – 39. The tests are available from the Manoora and Edmonton facilities from Monday 13 August.

Image: Registered Nurse Amon Nteziryayo conducting a rapid test

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #NT @MiwatjHealth at #GARMA2018 @DanilaDilba #WA @TheAHCWA #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @Apunipima #VIC @VACCHO_org #ACT @June_Oscar #WomensVoices

1.WA : AHCWA : $1 million of funding for the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia to help empower Aboriginal communities to improve their health and wellbeing

2.1 NT : William Tilmouth, the chairman of Children’s Ground, delivers his speech at Garma 2018

2.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO supporting Homeless Week in Darwin

2.3 : Low aromatic fuel available for sale in Darwin, in a win for remote communities in the region battling petrol sniffing.

3.1 NSW : Aboriginal Chronic Conditions Conference promotes ACCHOs

3.2 Bulgarr Ngaru ACCHO  Grafton hosted a morning tea breast screening

4.VIC : VACCHO signs an MoU with Peter McCallum Cancer Clinic 

5.QLD : The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council and Apunipima Cape York Health Service brought on-board to support delivery of the ice addiction program in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

6.ACT : The Wiyi Yani U Thangani team is heading Canberra

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

For more info and to REGISTER

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.WA : AHCWA : $1 million of funding for the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia to help empower Aboriginal communities to improve their health and wellbeing

It gives me great satisfaction to see this program progress to the next phase. Delivering programs like this locally is important because it is those who are on the ground that understand the issues facing their communities best, and can provide input into how to best address those particular issues.

As the first program of its kind in Western Australia, I am proud to be part of a State Government that supports initiatives to help Aboriginal individuals, families and community organisations improve their health and wellbeing.

I look forward to seeing this program continue to progress as we work toward increasing the mental health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people across Western Australia.

WA Mental Health Minister Roger Cook:

As the Family Wellbeing Project enters its next phase, Aboriginal communities across Western Australia are receiving training from the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia to deliver the program to help improve mental health and wellbeing.

The Family Wellbeing Project is the first program of its kind in Western Australia and aims to empower Aboriginal individuals, families and community organisations to take greater control over their lives, and fully participate in the community to help improve their health and wellbeing.

Death by suicide is a major cause of early death in Aboriginal people. In 2016, the death by suicide rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians was more than three and a half times the rate of non-indigenous Australians.

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia is currently training Aboriginal Medical Services, Aboriginal workers and community members in the Central Desert region to build their capacity to take ownership, so they can go on to deliver the Family Wellbeing Project in their own communities.

More training is taking place in the Perth metropolitan region in August, with training expected to be completed in the Central Desert, Perth metropolitan, South-West and the Goldfields regions by the end of the year.

By the end of 2019, it is expected the Pilbara, Kimberley and Murchison/Gascoyne regions will all have received training, so the program can then be delivered on a local level, by local people, across the State.

For support, call beyondblue on 1300 224 636 for 24/7 free counselling or Lifeline in a crisis situation on 13 11 14.

2.1 NT : William Tilmouth, the chairman of Children’s Ground, delivers his speech at Garma 2018

 ” The Uluru Statement from the Heart is the collective statement from our people across nations. There should be no debate. What has been asked for is clear.

These days my energy is on lifting the voice and governance of the grassroots. Where the answers lie.

At Children’s Ground we see what can happen when you are culturally empowered ­‐ a whole community, family and kids are mobilised into taking ownership and control and being a part of their own destiny.

William Tilmouth, the chairman of Children’s Ground, delivers his speech at Garma 2018.

Mr Timouth is also Chair of Congress ACCHO Alice Springs

WATCH VIDEO HERE

Firstly I want to recognise the traditional owners of this beautiful country and your ancestors. I recognise the old people who are our past and present and the young people who are our next generation and future. To distinguished and special guests.

My thanks to the Yothu Yindi Foundation for having me and the Children’s Ground team here today.

This year Garma is about truth telling. I will share some of my truths.

My key message today is this. Don’t keep creating a foundation for our children that is fragmented and fractured. But create a foundation that is solid and grounded in the depth of our heritage, spiritually, culture language and identity.

As opposed to what is now more of the same.

The tired, worn-out, tried and tested forced and failed policies of assimilation and yesteryear. A system designed by colonisation to disempower us to fracture us and our families. Designed to take and whittle away at everything that we held close and that defined us as a people.

I have a good command of English but I cannot speak my own language

A system designed to favour the oppressor and to keep the oppressed down and dependent on the meagre rations and handouts. To divide us giving preference and voice to some and not to others.

It is up to all of us to think seriously about what we are doing, why we are doing it and how we are doing it.

Our kids don’t need to be fixed. Our kids need to grow up as Aboriginal children with rights and opportunities, with a voice and the ability to control their own destination.

I am mix-matched – a creation by others who decided they knew what was best for me. I am a product of assimilation. I am a product of being denied my identity, my family, my country, culture and my language.

In the west I am a success. I was the kid who came good – became a model working citizen, living in my own home, paying my rent in advance, hiding my identity and keeping my relatives at a distance.

What you see today, you might think is acceptable – but to me it’s not.

Why? Because I have spent a lifetime, along with my brothers and sisters, trying to rebuild and recapture all that was stolen and denied us.

The tragedy of all that is that not one Aboriginal person escaped the policy that was then and still is in the mindset of decision makers today.

Assimilation is just a heartbeat away in everything we aspire to achieve as a people.

There are too many sorries and not enough truths

I have a good command of English but I can not speak my own language. I have grandchildren but I was denied my mother and father.

Sometimes I don’t know where I belong or where I’m going – or who am I?

That is a question that you are left with: Who am I?

Coming here was hard for me, coming back up north. I was stolen and taken to Croker Island. Minjilang and its people hold some of my fondest memories as a child. There was heaps of nature but very little or no nurture. Notwithstanding the efforts of the cottage mothers who had to spread their love over 12 or so distraught children each.

Leaving Alice Springs was hard because I still cling onto home.

I am the sum of my experiences and my experiences are such that my life doesn’t have the cultural integrity and grounding that it should have.

I’m not recognised in native title.

I’m not recognised in land rights.

When my father’s traditional lands were given back, my brother and I were not even notified of the ceremonial handback. The apology meant nothing to me – there are too many sorries and not enough truths.

I get the chance to speak here because I have made the English language my friend and people feel comfortable with that. But what does it mean to have a voice, if that voice is not really heard or understood?

We are talking about constitutional change. Recognition in white society. Legislative changes that has to happen.

The Uluru Statement from the Heart is the collective statement from our people across nations. There should be no debate. What has been asked for is clear.

These days my energy is on lifting the voice and governance of the grassroots. Where the answers lie.

At Children’s Ground we see what can happen when you are culturally empowered ­‐ a whole community, family and kids are mobilised into taking ownership and control and being a part of their own destiny.

William Tilmouth is the chair of Children’s Ground.

This is the speech he gave at Garma festival 2018

2.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO supporting Homeless Week in Darwin

Greet to see the Danila Dilba crew as well as staff from different businesses and organisations from Darwin today at Mindil beach for Homelessness Week. Right now, more than 116,000 Australians are homeless, meaning 1 in every 200 people.

It was great to see the support from local organisations working together today to help homeless people and campaign for increased support. #HW2018

2.3 : Low aromatic fuel available for sale in Darwin, in a win for remote communities in the region battling petrol sniffing.

The Shell Coles Express service station in Winnellie has become the first site in Darwin to stock low aromatic fuel, joining around 175 other outlets across the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion said that low aromatic fuel was a proven success in reducing harm.

“Petrol sniffing can have a major impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals, their families and entire communities.

“Research has shown that the rollout of low aromatic fuel has reduced the instance of petrol sniffing by 88 per cent in communities with low aromatic fuel since 2005. We know that a comprehensive regional approach works best, which is why I am pleased that low aromatic fuel is now available from one outlet in Darwin.

“This will allow anyone travelling to communities from Darwin to fill up with low aromatic fuel, or take low aromatic fuel with them for use in small engines such as boat engines or lawn mowers. Low aromatic fuel is already available in almost all Northern Territory communities outside of Darwin.

“This is good news for communities, visitors and contractors or other workers bringing machinery and fuel into communities.

“The Australian Government helps to reduce the impact of petrol sniffing through the supply of low aromatic fuel, working in partnership with fuel manufacturers, retailers, distributors and mechanics.

“I commend Viva Energy Australia for their work to make low aromatic fuel available in Darwin, which will help to improve health and wellbeing in remote communities.”

Scott Wyatt, CEO of Viva Energy Australia said, “We are incredibly proud to have supported the government’s petrol sniffing prevention program since 2007, and over the past four years we have been manufacturing the product at our Geelong refinery and supplying it into the Northern part of Australia.

Having LAF now available at the Shell Coles Express Winnellie service station in Darwin is an important step for people filling up in Darwin before heading to remote communities.”

3.1 NSW : Aboriginal Chronic Conditions Conference promotes ACCHOs

ACCN Co-Chair Bob Davis on how the @NACCHOAustralia sector provides culturally safe local health services & the burden of multiple funding sources.

MC for   conference was Troy Combo from Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (Casino)

 

Need for transformative change that includes social determinants. Build environments that support self mgt & healthy living.

3.2 Bulgarr Ngaru ACCHO  Grafton hosted a morning tea breast screening

On Wednesday the 1st of August, Bulgarr Ngaru Grafton hosted a morning tea breast screening in Maclean for our female patients that were eligible to have a mammogram done.

During the wait, there was a deadly morning tea provided for the Elders and patients to enjoy. A spread of fruit, vegetables, cake and sandwiches!

The morning was a success! Having several patients arrive for their appointment and to then share a nice morning tea while taking in the beautiful weather with our staff (Kristy-Lee, Fiona and Jaleesa) and our well respected Elders.

If you are between the ages of 40 to 74 years and are interested in having your breast screening mammogram done, the team at Bulgarr will be organising a group booking for the months of September and November. We encourage you to get into contact with Kristy-Lee, at the Grafton AMS and ask how you can make your appointment!

4.VIC : VACCHO signs an MoU with Peter McCallum Cancer Clinic 

 

Peter Mac CEO Dale Fisher: cancer outcomes for Aboriginal peoples are not good enough. As a specialist centre we have an obligation to improve these outcomes. We want to be leaders in a culturally safe way.

WATCH VIDEO here 

5.QLD : The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council and Apunipima Cape York Health Service brought on-board to support delivery of the ice addiction program in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

 

The Queensland state government is investing $5.4 million across two years towards helping regional families break the cycle of ice addiction.

Almost one-in-three children who go into state care have a parent with a current or previous methamphetamine problem, child safety minister Di Farmer said on Sunday.

The new ‘Breakthrough for Families’ program aims to help parents break the cycle of addiction so they can safely look after their children.

“This drug causes rapid damage within families. Most of the harm is to children under the age of five, and usually happens less than a year after the parent starts using ice,” Farmer said in a statement.

“These families need specialist help if they aspire to being good parents to their children.”

The program will target Cape York, Townsville, Cairns, the Sunshine Coast, Logan and Caboolture, Mackay, Darling Downs, West Moreton and South West, and the Wide Bay.

It will include individual support sessions, public workshops and forums, and will be delivered by Apunipima Cape York Health Service, Lives Lived Well, Drug Arm and Bridges Aligned Service.

The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council and Apunipima Cape York Health Service brought on-board to support delivery of the ice addiction program in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

6.ACT : The Wiyi Yani U Thangani team is heading Canberra

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Canberra, Wreck Bay and Nowra

Canberra
Location Date Time Address Who? Registration
Gugan Gulwan Youth Aboriginal Corporation Tuesday 28 August 2018 9:00am – 1:00pm 1 Gratton Court Waniassa ACT 2903 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Tuesday 28 August 2018 2:00pm – 5:30pm Central Plaza 16 Bowes Place, Phillip ACT 2606 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in the Australian Public Service only Register
Women’s Legal Centre Wednesday 29 August 2018 12:30pm – 4:30pm Conference Room, Ground Floor, 21 Barry Dr, Turner ACT 2601 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
Wreck Bay
Jervis Bay High School Thursday 30 August 2018 12:00pm – 4:00pm Dykes Avenue Jervis Bay ACT 2540 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
Nowra
Nowra Showground Friday 31 August 2018 09:00am – 1:30pm Committee Room, Nowra Showground, 20 West Street, Nowra NSW 2541 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #NT @DanilaDilba @EvonneGoolagong @DeadlyChoices #QLD @IUIH_ #SA @Nganampa_Health #WA @TheAHCWA #VIC @VAHS1972

1.1 National: ACCHO sector represented at 2018 COAG Health Council Indigenous Health Round Table meeting in Alice Springs

1.2 National:  Consultation to inform the development of the National Tobacco Strategy are now open! Closes 17 August 

2.NT: Danila Dilba ACCHO Deadly Choices team supports Evonne Goolagong Foundation at Darwin launch

3.1 NSW : Condobolin Aboriginal Medical Centre :  Peter Macdonald, heart transplant pioneer, helping close the Indigenous life-expectancy gap

3.2 NSW : Pius X ACCHO to receive more than $400,000 for New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services program

4. SA : Nganampa Health Council ACCHO launches new anti-smoking posters

5. WA : AHCWA : Meet our newest graduates of our Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice program

6.1 QLD : IUIH is proud & excited to have just won the Large Employer of the Year category for the Metropolitan region at the Queensland Training Awards

6.2 QLD : IUIH Deadly day out at the Indigenous Seniors’ Games 

7. VIC : VAHS complete your health check at VAHS, you can grab a special VAHS, Deadly Choices, The Long Walk and Essendon FC shirt.

For more info and to REGISTER

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National: ACCHO sector represented at 2018 COAG Health Council Indigenous Health Round Table meeting in Alice Springs

The ACCHO sector was represented by John Singer NACCHO Chair, Donna Ah Chee CEO and Dr John Boffa Congress Alice Springs and AMSANT John Paterson

Key Points made by NACCHO Chair

1.Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and other Organisations need to be positioned as the primary service delivery method for Indigenous specific services.

2.We need investment to ensure we achieve health equity and accountability of the mainstream health services and systems to be part of closing this gap

3.We need the Government to genuinely listen and act on the voices of Aboriginal people, particularly on the Close the Gap Framework

The Indigenous Health Leadership Group was represented by IAHA , CATSINAM , NATSTIHWA and AIDA and Lowitja

1.2 National:  Consultation to inform the development of the National Tobacco Strategy are now open! Closes 17 August 

SEE NACCHO SMOKING ARTICLES

The Australian Government Department of Health has engaged Siggins Miller Consultants Pty Ltd (Siggins Miller) to undertake the development, consultation and drafting of the next iteration of the National Tobacco Strategy (NTS).

It is anticipated that the next NTS will build on the aim of the current NTS to improve the health of all Australians by reducing the prevalence of tobacco smoking and its associated health, social and economic costs and the inequalities it causes.

The proceeding online written submission template will firstly invite you to provide a standalone submission. Following this, you will have the opportunity to respond to a number of additional questions which primarily draw on the Priority Areas in the current NTS. You may choose to complete either or both of these options.

This online written submission portal will close at close of business on 17 August, 2018.

If you have further questions about the consultation process or have difficulty with the online platform, please contact Siggins Miller Consultants at 1800 106 052 or email us at nationaltobaccostrategy@sigginsmiller.com.au. It should be noted that the 1800 number provided is a message bank service in which you can leave your inquiry, a senior Siggins Miller staff member will endeavour to return your call within 72 hours.

You are able to save and continue your written submission at any time during the process by clicking on the button ‘Save page and continue later’ below. You will be asked to provide an email address, where a link of your submission will be sent to the email address.

You can continue with your submission by pressing on the link.

2.NT: Danila Dilba ACCHO Deadly Choices team supports Evonne Goolagong Foundation at Darwin launch

The Evonne Goolagong Foundation held a come and try tennis day at the new tennis centre at Marrara.

Danila Dilba staff came along to support the day and ran a stall with Deadly Choices health information.

Evonne spoke about her journey to winning Wimbledon and coaching clinics were held for school kids. It was great to see Evonne also have a talk with local Larrakia Elders.

A great event for our young people promoting healthy lifestyles, tennis and believing in yourself.

Evonne Goolagong Foundation

WEBSITE 

Since 2005, Evonne has run the Goolagong National Development Camp for Indigenous girls and boys. Using tennis as a vehicle to promote better health, education and employment, the program has awarded school scholarships, produced university scholars, tennis players, coaches, and sports administrators and has helped with employment placement.

Since 2012, under the auspices of the Evonne Goolagong Foundation and in conjunction with the Australian Government,  the Dream, Believe, Learn, Achieve programme has conducted Tennis Come and Try Days nationwide giving access to Goolagong State Development Camps which in turn feed into the GNDC .

In the Australia Day Awards 2018 Evonne was awarded Australia’s highest honour. She was appointed as a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) for eminent service to tennis as a player at the national and international level, as an ambassador, supporter and advocate for the health, education and wellbeing of young Indigenous people through participation in sport and as a role model.

Watch Evonne receive her award on Rod Laver Arena. Click on this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PgtXqBGqrg

On 5th June 2018 Evonne received the Philipe Chatrier Award, the International Tennis Federation’s highest accolade given for exceptional contributions to tennis on and off the court.

3.1 NSW : Condobolin Aboriginal Medical Centre :  Peter Macdonald, heart transplant pioneer, helping close the Indigenous life-expectancy gap

Every six weeks or so Peter MacDonald flies out to the Condobolin Aboriginal Medical Centre, in central-western New South Wales, to look after the health needs of the locals.

See Full ABC story here

Centre manager Katie Worthington said Professor Macdonald had been coming since 2006.

“We have this long-standing joke with Peter that he’s the longest-standing doctor in rural Condobolin because, you know, doctors come and go, but Peter’s been coming for over 10 years,” she told 7.30.

It all began 12 years ago, when an Aboriginal patient and his wife told Professor Macdonald about the lack of medical services in Condobolin.

“She was the one who approached me and said there’s basically nothing out at Condobolin, certainly no specialist services, and would I be prepared to come out and do a clinic there,” Professor Macdonald said.

“I said, ‘Yeah, it’d be a nice change to working in the big city hospital on a daily basis’.

“So I flew out for the first time in December 2006.”

‘You can see the health benefits’

Anna Dargin was one of Peter Macdonald's first patients in Condobolin

Anna Dargin was one of Professor Macdonald’s first patients and she still sees him regularly.

“We need someone to come in like this here, to do all the things, the treatment here rather than having to go away,” she told 7.30.

“It was a real treat seeing him today.”

Professor Macdonald said: “I’m seeing patients that I’ve seen many years in the past and it’s good to see them come back.

“And you can see the benefits in their health over the long term.”

He sees the Condobolin work as an opportunity to give back.

“As a group, the Indigenous population tend to have … more coronary risk factors, and they tend to develop coronary artery disease and heart disease at a younger age,” he said.

“They are seriously disadvantaged and, as you know, we’ve got this awful gap in life expectancy between the Aboriginal community and non-Indigenous Australians.

“What I do coming out here won’t solve this problem but at least it’s something. It’s an attempt to try and address the problem.”

3.2 NSW : Pius X ACCHO to receive more than $400,000 for New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services program

The Coalition Government is set to wave through more than $400,000 to Pius X Aboriginal Corporation in Moree, in a bid to boost access between the organisation and mothers and babies.

“It will provide better access to healthcare including antenatal care and practical advice for mothers, and immunisation and health checks for children before they start school,” Member for Parkes electorate Mark Coulton said.

Picture above : Pius team: Raimone French, Janelle Munro, Cherie Piening, Zoe Duke, Ros Rose, Aimee Connors and Amanda Saunders

Mr Coulton made the announcement last week that the funding will come from the larger pool of more than $1 million, which will be spread across Aboriginal health services in New South Wales.

Bourke Aboriginal Health Service and Dubbo Aboriginal Health Service have also been flagged to receive part of the share.

The $426,780 reserved for Pius X in Moree will go to the establishment of the New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services.

The program attempts to build on the government’s commitment to halve the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infant mortality.

“We are seeing positive health results including a decrease in smoking rates during pregnancy, a decrease in rates of low birth weight babies and improved childhood immunisation rates,” Mr Coulton said of the program.

“This is an important health program that will help our local children have a great start to life.”

Minister for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt AM noted the program had already been rolled out in other parts of Australia and that the results spoke for themselves.

“An Australian Institute of Health and Welfare study in 2014 showed that families participating in the New Directions program registered improvements in seven out of the eight national Key Performance Indicators on maternal and child health,” Minister Wyatt said.

Pius X nurse manager Ros Rose said that the rate of infant mortality was a particular concern in the local health district.

“There is a 6.1 per cent difference in mortality rates between the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities,” she said.

Ms Rose cited many reasons for the disparity, such as socio-economics and cultural barriers.

“Some people just assume that they’re welcome into the woman’s home. Never assume that you’re welcome,” she said.

“They will also visit them and speak at them. There’s a difference between speaking at them and speaking with them.

“We [Pius X] will have midwives go out into the community with an Aboriginal health worker, someone who knows the community. They will speak with these women and ask for their input.”

Pius X CEO Donna Taylor said she was pleased to hear that the local organisation had secured the vital funding.

4. SA : Nganampa Health Council ACCHO launches new anti-smoking posters

Have you seen our new anti-smoking posters yet? We should have them out in your community soon! Three of them were done by Kaylene Whisky from Iwantja and one by Pantjiti Lewis in Pukatja.

Thanks Kaylene and Pantjiti for creating such vibrant paintings for us to make into posters.
Remember, if you are thinking about quitting, come and see the clinic as we can help.

5. WA : AHCWA : Meet our newest graduates of our Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice program

All three men passed with flying colours providing a huge boost to the male AHW workforce.

Congratulations to Jay Ryder, Jarrod Minniecon, and Ken Nicholls.

6.1 QLD : IUIH is proud & excited to have just won the Large Employer of the Year category for the Metropolitan region at the Queensland Training Awards

6.2 QLD : IUIH Deadly day out at the Indigenous Seniors’ Games 

What a deadly day out at the Indigenous Seniors’ Games last week at Shorncliffe.

Congrats to the Purga Porcupines team who took out the day!

2nd place team: Nalingu Possums I 3rd place team: Morayfield Stingers

Individual results: Mobility winner: Les Parker, Goodna Goannas I Over 70s: Tom Kairupan I Ten Pin Bowling: Robert Graham, Kambu Kookaburras I Numbers Board: Catherine Thurland, Purga Porcupines I Hole in the Wall: Kay Long, Morayfield Stingers I Quoits: Harold Leedie, Gympie Gold I Darts: Eddie Thompson, Kambu Kookaburras I Overall individual champion: Ernie Chong, Kambu Kookaburras

 

 

7. VIC : VAHS complete your health check at VAHS, you can grab a special VAHS, Deadly Choices, The Long Walk and Essendon FC shirt.

Don’t forget to get complete your regular health check this year!

A health check is a deadly way to manage your health but also detect any risk factors that can lead to a chronic disease.

If you complete your health check at VAHS, you can grab a special VAHS, Deadly Choices, The Long Walk and Essendon FC shirt.

Ring VAHS on 03 9419 3000 to book you and your family in for your health checks.

#vahsDC #StaySmokeFree #VahsHealthCheck

Essendon Football Club Deadly Choices The Long Wal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #NSW Redfern ACCHO @Walgett_AMS #WA @TheAHCWA #NT @AMSANTaus @CAACongress @DanilaDilba #Tasmania #OCHREDAY2018

1.1 NSW: Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service has positive feedback after 12 months trial of Aboriginal Health TV : 300 ACCHO clinics to be now rolled out nationally 

1.2 NSW : Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service (WAMS), Brewarrina Aboriginal Health Service Limited (BAHSL) Healthy Bus Stop to check on kids in Brewarrina, Walgett

2.1 NT : AMSANT and Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin : Listening and Hearing are Two Different Things’ report on workshops for Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the NT

2.2 NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs attend successful first meeting in Alice Springs of the NT Tripartite Forum advising NT and Australian Gov’s on implementing all the reforms from the NT Royal Commission.

3.WA : AHCWA staff were formally acknowledged for their years of dedication and commitment to the Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

4.QLD : Jaydon Adams Memorial Foundation Regional Male Ochre Conference and Dinner 8 -10 August 

5. VIC : Aunty Pam #ThisGirlCan – Aunty Pam Aboriginal elder, who cares very deeply about the health of her people

6. TAS : NACCHO and RACGP training for Tasmanian ACCHO’s

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

For more info and to REGISTER

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 NSW: Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service has positive feedback after 12 months trial of Aboriginal Health TV : 300 ACCHO clinics to be now rolled out nationally 

“We have had positive feedback that Redfern ACCHO patients are more assertive when they see and talk about the programs, and a lot of discussion among patients themselves especially when they can relate to the programs,”

At Sydney’s inner-city Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service, where the system has been under trial for the past year, clinic co-ordinator Maree Tohi is convinced it drives change.

Picture above from left, Lucia Moschella, 6, ‘Aunty’ Phemie Bostock, Siena Moschella, 4, Amelia Moschella, Carmela Moschella, six months, and Maree Tohi, the medical clinic co-ordinator at the Aboriginal Medical Service Co-operative in Redfern, Sydney. Picture: Hollie Adams.

From the Australian 

Indigenous health is about to get a digital shot in the arm, with the ­nationwide rollout of a TV network to capitalise on the time ­people spend in waiting rooms before seeing a medical practitioner.

Aboriginal Health TV will have therapeutic value in its own right, featuring localised, culturally specific programming on screens in about 300 Aboriginal Medical Service facilities around the country and in mainstream services with high numbers of indigenous clients.

Segments will be presented in indigenous languages where appropriate and much of the content will be locally produced, then professionally edited and redistributed via online connections. The aim is to address the national disparity in indigenous health, particularly with chronic conditions.

It is believed to be a world first in indigenous health, delivering messages on subjects as varied as smoking, eye and ear checks, skin conditions, diet, immunisation, sexual health, diabetes and drug and alcohol treatment services.

Noongar man Christopher Lawrence, an epidemiologist who has been at the heart of developing the project, said: “It will be an ­opportunity for people to tell their own stories, and encourage other Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander people to take care of their health and wellbeing, but also for communities to see everyday ­people, not actors … chosen for their looks, or whatever.”

With a $3.4 million, three-year commitment to be announced by Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt, the network is being ­developed by Tonic Health Media, the communications powerhouse built by ABC medical broadcaster Norman Swan and psychiatrist and health services entrepreneur Matthew Cullen.

See NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosetheGap TV

Minister @KenWyattMP announces New $3.4 million Digital Aboriginal Health Television @TonicHealth_AU Network to Help in Closing The Gap

“We expect to g et a lot of indigenous individuals onto the network, with content that’s dominated by Aboriginal presenters and with local content where we can, particularly linguistically appropriate content,” Dr Cullen said. “Plus there’ll be public health messaging, particularly from the commonwealth.”

Research has shown that targeted audio-visual messaging in medical waiting rooms tends to encourage patients to bring up specific issues with practitioners and modify behaviour. “There’s lots of data that people watch the screens, then discuss the issues they’ve seen with their ­GP and with their families,” Dr Cullen said.

“This has got so much potential and we’re only just scratching the surface,” Professor Lawrence said, praising Mr Wyatt’s insight in backing the plan. Dr Swan’s credibility was also pivotal, Professor Lawrence said. “He’s really made an impact because he is trusted and admired in these communities.”

1.2 NSW : Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service (WAMS), Brewarrina Aboriginal Health Service Limited (BAHSL) Healthy Bus Stop to check on kids in Brewarrina, Walgett

Royal Far West, in partnership with the Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service (WAMS), Brewarrina Aboriginal Health Service Limited (BAHSL) and Ronald McDonald House Charities, will deliver the free child health checks in Brewarrina (August 13) and Walgett (August 14-15).

The health checks will be alongside the WAMS Healthy for Life checks.

In May this year Royal Far West’s major fundraiser Ride for Country Kids visited Walgett and Brewarrina, and the charity is looking forward to once again bringing the Healthy Kids Bus Stop to these communities.

It will be the first time the Bus Stop will be in Brewarrina since 2014, and will be hosted by the Gainmara-Birrilee Preschool. Walgett Community College Primary School is hosting the Bus Stop’s fourth visit to Walgett.

Other key partners include local pre-schools, schools, councils and community service organisations.

The program is designed as a collaborative exercise to benefit young children within the community at no cost to their parents/carers.

Assessments include a child health check; hearing screening; dental check; fine and gross motor skill development screening; language and speech development check; and a food nutrition check, all at the one location in either a morning or afternoon appointment.

Children requiring further assessment will be referred to appropriate local services, and those with complex needs may also be referred to Royal Far West’s Paediatric Developmental Program.

Katrina Ward, Manager, BAHSL, is pleased to be able to support this important screening activity.

Brewarrina Mayor Phillip O’Connor said he was thrilled that Royal Far West is once again bringing this important and innovative program to the town.

“As well as being a fun and interactive experience, these health assessments help to identify and support our local children with health and developmental needs that might otherwise go unnoticed,” he said.

Register for the Bus Stop at www.royalfarwest.org.au/programs, or call Jennifer Goonan on 02 8966 8557 for more information.

To help support children in rural and remote areas of Australia, please call 1800 500 061 or go to the website www.royalfarwest.org.au

2.1 NT : AMSANT and Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin : Listening and Hearing are Two Different Things’ report on workshops for Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the NT

Throughout May and June 2018 Danila Dilba, on behalf of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance of the NT (AMSANT) met with people throughout the Northern Territory to talk about the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the NT. Workshops and community meetings were held in the NT’s major population centres (Katherine, Tennant Creek, Alice Springs, Darwin), and in three remote communities in East Arnhem (Nhulunbuy, Milingimbi and Galiwin’ku).

Download the Report HERE

 Listening and Hearing are Two Different Things – Final Report 6 July 2018

The workshops provided information to community members and service providers about the outcomes of the Royal Commission and a broad outline of proposals for legislative reform, and gathered information about community members’ experience of the child protection system and views on the proposed reforms.

Serious concerns about the current system and its failure to deliver good outcomes for families and children were raised. AMSANT compiled a report – ‘Listening and Hearing are Two Different Things’ detailing the feedback from these workshops and making recommendations for reforms.

For further information please feel free to contact Joy Mclaughlin Joy.Mclaughlin@ddhs.org.au or Tess Kelly tess.kelly@ddhs.org.au “

2.2 NT : AMSANT and Congress Alice Springs attend successful first meeting in Alice Springs today of the NT Tripartite Forum advising NT and Australian Gov’s on implementing all the reforms from the NT Royal Commission.

Federal Minister David Gillespie and Territory Minister Dale Wakefield welcomed the congregation of the first Tripartite Forum to discuss both Governments’ response to the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory.

Pictured above : Chair Donna Ahchee from @CAACongress kept a clear focus on Aboriginal leadership, public health and real action. John Paterson @AMSANTaus

The Tripartite Forum is a newly-established advisory body that highlights the importance of working together to support implementation of the reforms resulting from the Royal Commission.

The first meeting was an opportunity to establish strong foundations for the future work of the Tripartite Forum, which will oversee the development of a 10-Year Generational Strategy, build on the Territory’s Early Childhood Plan and ensure strong Aboriginal engagement.

Participating in the Tripartite Forum were representatives from the Aboriginal-controlled sector, other nongovernment organisations, the Commonwealth government and the Territory government.

Each brings with them relevant experience, skills, qualifications and other credentials to contribute to the Forum’s work.

Both Ministers expressed confidence the Forum would help address generational change for families and children in the Northern Territory. “I look forward to working with the Northern Territory Government and the community sector to enact greater protections for children,” Dr Gillespie said. “The Tripartite Forum will be key to reforms in child protection in the Northern Territory.”

Ms Wakefield said collaboration is the key to successfully implementing reform of the youth justice and child protection systems. “The Northern Territory Government is investing significantly in reforms to create generational change and make a brighter future for all Territorians,” she said.

“However we can only succeed if we are all pulling in the same direction. This forum will give us the guidance and direction to achieve real change”.

Earlier this month, Ms Donna Ah Chee was announced as the Chairperson of the Tripartite Forum. She is a highly respected Aboriginal woman with 30 years’ experience in the Northern Territory as a CEO, Chairperson and Board member.

The Forum will meet quarterly and comprise representatives from: a) Northern Territory Government b) Commonwealth Government c) Aboriginal Peak Organisations NT (APO NT) d) Northern Territory Council of Social Service (NTCOSS) e) North Australia Aboriginal Justice Agency (NAAJA)

3.WA : AHCWA staff were formally acknowledged for their years of dedication and commitment to the Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

The Certificates of Recognition were presented to the following staff members for their loyalty and hard work that contributes to the ongoing success of AHCWA and the support provided to our Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

3 Years Clara Titus – Senior Quality & Compliance Officer
Shaun Wyn-Jones – Senior Policy Officer
5 Years Deepa Vaghijani – Assistant Accountant
7 Years Susie Schipp – Finance Assistant

And a special congratulations to Sharon Bushby on her 10th Anniversary of Service to AHCWA.

4.QLD : Jaydon Adams Memorial Foundation Regional Male Ochre Conference and Dinner 8 -10 August 

 

Jaydon Adams Memorial Foundation Regional Male Health Ochre Day Conference Dinner 2018


Tickets and Enquiries Lizzie Adams ceo@goolburri.org.au

5. VIC : Aunty Pam #ThisGirlCan – Aunty Pam Aboriginal elder, who cares very deeply about the health of her people

As an Aboriginal elder, who cares very deeply about the health of her people, Aunty Pam Pedersen from the Yorta Yorta people, literally jumped at the opportunity to be one of Richmond’s participants in our partnership with VicHealth and its This Girl Can Victoria campaign.

Watch Video HERE

“This year I’ll be 75 and competing in my 5th or 6th half marathon. So I’m still out there showing my people, if you dream it you can achieve it.”

But it hasn’t always been this way for Aunty Pam, daughter of famous Aboriginal activist and Fitzroy player, Sir Douglas Nicholls, whom the AFL’s Indigenous Round is named after. Twenty-five years ago she felt unfit and overweight and despite thinking she wasn’t good at sport and people might point and laugh, something had to change.

“When I was turning 50, I looked at myself and thought, ‘Oh my goodness, I really need to do something about myself, because I wasn’t active at all.

“So I started walking and then I thought the walking is too slow, so then I started to run! I’d always be last, but I didn‘t care. People used to wait for me, and the kids, they were absolutely gorgeous. They’d come up to me and say, ‘you’re such an inspiration!”

Despite her incredible optimism and sunny outlook, Aunty Pam, who this year was given a clean bill of health after battling breast cancer, still faces her own fears of judgement around how she looks.

“My main goal is to be healthy and unfortunately I’m putting on a bit of weight and that bothers me.

“I mean sometimes, some days, I have really bad days because I think I look terrible today. But I think I can’t let it bother me too much … I have to get over it and just strive, strive you know, to get going and do things.”

Throughout her fitness journey, Aunty Pam has tried numerous sports from walking to running, swimming and triathlons. Each sport presents it challenges, but she’s determined to continue to be a role model for her people.

“Get out there and show non-Aboriginal people that us Aboriginal people are just as capable,” she says.

VicHealth research reveals that worrying about being judged stops many women from being physically active. In fact, 41% of Victorian women feel too embarrassed to exercise in public. Which is why campaigns like This Girl Can Victoria are so important. Empowering women to be active whenever, wherever and however they choose, in a supportive environment.

After tackling many obstacles Aunty Pam is proof that, “This girl can run and achieve.”

6. TAS : NACCHO and RACGP training for Tasmanian ACCHO’s

Some great conversations happening here! Videoconferencing “selfie” included, we are working with the Burnie and Launceston sites as well.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #WA Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services #herruleshergame #TAS #OCHREDAY2018 #QLD @Wuchopperen @DeadlyChoices #NT @AMSANTaus #NSW @ahmrc #VIC @VAHS1972

1.National : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey underway

2.1 NSW :AHMRC : Download 5th Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Summit

2.2 NSW: Bullinah Aboriginal Health Service (BAHS) in Ballina to build a purpose-built culturally appropriate health facility.

2.3: NSW : Greater Western Sydney Aboriginal Health Service excited to be opening soon a new clinic in Penrith

3.1 NT : AMSANT Calls on clients to remain in #myHealthRecord

3.2.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin participated in the Annual NAIDOC march

4.1 : Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) launches Her Rules Her Game mural. #becauseofherwecan

4.2 The staff at Wirraka Maya celebrating NAIDOC 2018,

5.1 TAS : National ACCHO’s  to travel to Hobart in August for the National NACCHO Male Health Conference : Registrations Free

6.1 QLD : Wuchopperen Warriors Cycling Team and our Chairperson Donnella Mills getting ready for the march

6.2 QLD : Making Deadly Choices and being a positive leader and role model and how to live a healthy lifestyle.

7.1 VIC :  VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team and Gamblers Help

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey underway


The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait people has been improving over the last two decades. The most recent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander survey showed that smoking rates have decreased from nearly one in two people over the age of 15 in 2002 (49%) to less than two in five (39%) in 2014-15. The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people drinking alcohol at levels that cause short term and lifetime risk has also decreased.

The next Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander survey has commenced with interviewers to visit all states of Australia in urban, regional and remote communities to create a national picture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Shellie Morris, a proud Warduman and Yanyuwa woman and the 2014 NAIDOC National Artist of the Year said “If the health survey knocks on your door, make sure you get involved. Everyone’s story matters. Do it for yourself and do it for your community.”

The survey runs until March 2019 and will collect detailed information about health and health-related actions, and is a key dataset for understanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing. Results will assist in the administration, evaluation and planning of health and social policies, programs and services, including determining the prevalence of specific long-term illnesses and developing more effective nutrition and physical activity programs. Previous results have been used to revise blood pressure test guidelines and promote quit smoking campaigns.

For the first time, this Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander survey will include voluntary hearing tests. This information will be of importance as poor hearing can have major impacts on a person’s health and education. The survey also collects a range of information about social well-being.

The first survey results will be available from late 2019 and will be used by a wide range of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, health researchers, public health advocates, government, clinicians and community health organisations.

A promotional video about the 2018–19 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS) can be viewed here:

Results from the previous NATSIHS are available in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Updated Results, 2012-13 (cat. no. 4727.0.55.006) on the ABS website http://www.abs.gov.au

2.1 NSW :AHMRC : Download 5th Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Summit

Please download, read and share the AHMRC report compiling our coverage of the recent 5th Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Summit

DOWNLOAD HERE NSW IndigenousHealthSummit_Report

Summer May Finlay and Marie McInerney covered the #IndigenousHealthSummit for the Croakey Conference News Service.

Warm thanks to all who contributed to the coverage, through their presentations, interviews, tweeting and engagement.

TEAM AHMRC 

2.2 NSW: Bullinah Aboriginal Health Service (BAHS) in Ballina to build a purpose-built culturally appropriate health facility.

Board of the Bullinah Aboriginal Health Service (BAHS) are extremely happy to announce the recent purchase of land in Ballina that will eventually be the home of our purpose-built culturally appropriate health facility.

Download full Press Release 

BAHS_Media_Release_New-Building_13July2018_Final

‘It’s been a great week for our Bundjalung Nation with this recent purchase, which we have been saving funds for over 10 years, so, it’s a long time coming’ says Chairperson, Brenda Holt.

BAHS was established in 2008 to work with other partners in the Ballina, Byron Bay, Mullumbimby, and Evans Heads areas, to improve health and wellbeing outcomes of Aboriginal People and their families, through our model that is based on the principle of selfdetermination.

Founding member and current Board Member, Aunty Nancy Walke, is extremely excited by this purchase. Aunty Nancy, said, we will be keen to hold a number of consultations with our Aboriginal Community across our region, as we feel it is really important to get their input into the shape and design of this new building.

Board Member Dave Kapeen, says it is really important to have a cultural theme throughout the building, and hopefully we can get enough funds together to house a cultural art centre as well that will showcase our local artists, and maybe a coffee shop too that our young ones can work in. They are our future!

The site for the new building will be on the corner of Grant and Tamar Streets Ballina. Bullinah Board have confirmed that future consultations will occur in the coming months

2.3: NSW : Greater Western Sydney Aboriginal Health Service excited to be opening soon a new clinic in Penrith

3.1 NT : AMSANT Calls on clients to remain in #myHealthRecord

Australians have three-months to opt-out of the Federal Government’s online health database, ‘My Health Record’.

But the message from John Paterson CEO of AMSANT after 6 years experience is broadly supportive — against the warnings of privacy advocates and some IT security experts.

Doctors say My Health Record will help improve services to rural Australians, Indigenous Australians and other vulnerable people in the community.

LISTEN HERE

2.2.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin participated in the Annual NAIDOC march.

This was another amazing day, walking proudly side by side with our partner organisations and community.

Thank you to the Topend NAIDOC committee for making this day so deadly and thank you to the guest speakers for your inspiring words. #NAIDOCWeek #becouseofherwecan

4.1 : Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) launches Her Rules Her Game mural. #becauseofherwecan

See More Pictures HERE 

4.2 The staff at Wirraka Maya celebrating NAIDOC 2018,

 

“Because of Her, We Can”
#NAIDOC2018 #BecauseOfHerWeCan #WMHSAC #BeAtYourBest#WirrakaMaya

5.1 TAS : National ACCHO’s  to travel to Hobart in August for the National NACCHO Male Health Conference : Registrations Free

 

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt 

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

6.QLD : Wuchopperen Warriors Cycling Team and our Chairperson Donnella Mills getting ready for the march

6.2 QLD : Making Deadly Choices and being a positive leader and role model and how to live a healthy lifestyle.

Having a yarn with the participants of the Lloyd McDermott Rugby Development Team. Talking about the importance of being a positive leader and role model and how to live a healthy lifestyle. Too deadly you mob!!!

7.1 VIC :  VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team and Gamblers Help

VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team and Gamblers Help joined the Collingwood Knights F.C at training to chat about the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation ‘Love the Game Not the Odds’ Gambling Awareness program.

The players were all really engaged which allowed for lots of great discussion.

Join us next Wednesday to watch the ‘Love the Game Not the Odds’ themed round; Collingwood Knights F.C vs cohealth game at Victoria Park. Game starts at 12pm!

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services #WomensAFLFooty #BecauseofHerWeCan #herruleshergame @DeadlyChoices #JuniorMurriCarnival @IUIH_ #NSW @AHMRC #IndigenousHealthSummit #VIC #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre hosting #OCHREday2018

1. This weeks Feature : Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) health workers are kicking a few health goals with their women’s footy team #becauseofherwecan

2.1 National : NACCHO Chairs and Executive appear at Constitutional recognition relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

2.2 National : NACCHO in partnership to Improving medication management in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

2.3.NACCHO supporting the eye health needs of Indigenous people

3.QLD : Much more than Sport at Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival

4.Vic : $13.7 million to continue Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (ACAC) and receive culturally sensitive planning and case management from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (ACCO)

5.NSW : AHMRC and NSW Health #IndigenousHealthSummit report

6. NT AMSANT Nomination open for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Excellence Awards

7. TAS : National ACCHO’s  to travel to Hobart in August for the National NACCHO Male Health Conference : Registrations Free

8. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti Campaign

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.WA Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) health workers are kicking a few health goals with their women’s footy team #becauseofherwecan

In 2018 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) identified an opportunity to partner with West Kimberley Women’s Football League. KAMS saw this as a chance to not only promote the benefits of team sport but to link Aboriginal Medical Services to local teams.

KAMS looks forward to the bright future of women’s footy in the Kimberley and the benefits this brings to the health of entire communities

Come and see these footy players who also happen to be KAMS Aboriginal Health Worker students this Friday at the NAIDOC celebration in front of the police station. They can test your blood sugar levels or blood pressure. You can also chat to them about health worker training at KAMS

When women’s footy started in Broome it was a first for many. For us old girls it was something we always wanted to do growing up, because although we got to kick the footy around with our dads and brothers, God forbid us girls could take to the field!

Today for these young guns, Darliah Killer and Sophira “Lala” Buaneye, their footy careers have just begun. This is their start to something far bigger! From their ‘grass roots’ beginnings on the dirt oval in Looma to the green grass of Broome, yet I hope to see them go all the way to the MCG in professional women’s AFL.

Broome Girls Academy has watched them grow over the past five years, their effortless talents and naturally ease with the football leaves us all in awe and sometimes envy.

To these girls and all the others who can make an AFL dream a reality – be thankful to the many women who have gone before you who worked tirelessly to make Womens footy happen. Grab every opportunity, and the football with both hands!

#becauseofherwecan

#herruleshergame

2.1 National : NACCHO Chairs and Executive appear at Constitutional recognition relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

 ” It depends on whether you go a functional representation—whether it’s legal services, health services, educational services or whatever, as representation for a voice, or you go from another elected structure, depending on what its functions are.

From the community-controlled health perspective, I’d definitely support the establishment of a health commission, because we are such an integrated part of the health architecture of this country and we’re getting better results, I believe. We do need to grow our delivery of comprehensive primary health care in the areas where we don’t deliver at the moment in order to make sure that we can avoid preventable hospital admissions which, I believe, we do do where we’re working very well.

That’s the high cost to the states—the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in hospitals, just like in jails, at the negative end of the spectrum. Whereas, if we invested more in our model of the community-controlled health care at the local level, we could lower hospital admissions in my experience. I think a health commission has an important role to play.

The biggest failures are in economic development and wealth creation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. I think much more needs to be done in areas where there is little or no employment in creating innovative employment and wealth creation initiatives, given that we own so much land.

 We’ve never been given the resources to really develop that in a way that is consistent with our culture and our responsibilities to country, along with making sure that all of the residents get a fair cut of the wealth that’s created. “

Pat Turner NACCHO CEO responding to Senator Dodson’s question “ How would bodies like NACCHO or First Nations controlled organisations sit with the voice? “ Picture above from WA hearing

Download or Read the 23 Page Transcript HERE

NACCHO Appearance at Constitutional Recognition

2.2 National : NACCHO in partnership to Improving medication management in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Equitable access and effective use of medicine is critical to closing the gap in health and life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and other Australians.

Professor Amanda Wheeler from Griffith University’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland, has formed a partnership with the Pharmacy Guild of Australia and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO).

The research team will work with Aboriginal Health Services and community pharmacies to promote culturally appropriate medication review services and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and well-being.

The Pharmacy Guild is the peak organisation for community pharmacy owners and they are working with the Commonwealth Department of Health on the Pharmacy Trial Program (PTP). The PTP aims to trial new and expanded community pharmacy programmes to improve health outcomes for consumers and/or extend the role of pharmacists in the delivery of primary healthcare services through community pharmacy.

“The Pharmacy Guild and Griffith researchers have been working together for quite some time,” says Professor Wheeler.

“It’s long been known that Indigenous communities face some big problems with access to medicines, advice and review services, it’s just not a simple fix,” she says.

“Establishing and maintaining trust and respectful relationships are crucial elements of what we’re trying to achieve.”

Professor Adrian Miller, formerly of Griffith University, will be subcontracted through Central Queensland University and will lead governance from an Indigenous research/cultural responsiveness perspective. NACCHO is viewed as a critical partner to further support appropriate community engagement and service provision.

This is the third major research project Professor Wheeler has conducted in partnership with the Pharmacy Guild into improving services provided by community pharmacies.

The research will develop, implement and evaluate the outcomes of culturally appropriate medication review services for Indigenous peoples (known as the IMeRSe Feasibility Study), which will be delivered by community pharmacists working with patients and staff of Aboriginal Health Services.

The purpose of the service is to empower patients to better manage their medicines, enhance adherence, avoid medication-related problems and prevent hospitalisations.

This will be a two-year feasibility study across Queensland, Northern Territory and New South Wales and is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health (see http://6cpa.com.au/pharmacy-trial-program/indigenous-medication-review-service-feasibility-study/).

2.3.NACCHO supporting the eye health needs of Indigenous people

Vision 202 CEO Judith Abbott and Policy and Advocacy Manager Danielle Williams met with Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt and NACCHO Deputy CEO Dawn Casey to discuss the eye health needs of Indigenous people and those in aged care

3.QLD : Much more than Sport at Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival

Participation in any Deadly Choices program requires individuals to commit to a comprehensive health check and complementing health management plan, so there’s strong health values associated with the brand,

We get real outcomes across the whole spectrum of the community; from infants, adolescents and our elders, everyone is positively affected.

To date, comprehensive health care management plans for more than 35,000 individuals have been activated among an Indigenous population of almost 70,000 in South-east Queensland.”

Deadly Choices ambassadors, former Brisbane Broncos, Queensland and Australian rugby league players Steve Renouf

Up to 600 South-east Queensland families are expected to converge on the St Lucia grounds of the University of Queensland on July 2-4, where competition in rugby league and netball will be staged for children (6-12 years), during the Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival.

And as with all Deadly Choices initiatives, mandatory health checks will have taken place before confirmation of each individual registration to this free event. The directive is one wholeheartedly supported by notable Deadly Choices ambassadors, former Brisbane Broncos, Queensland and Australian rugby league players Steve Renouf and Petero Civoniceva, plus fellow former NRL player Preston Campbell.

“The Junior Murri Carnival is a very important part of the Deadly Choices event mix, with overall health and well-being of communities at its core.

“This program enables us to motivate kids into ideal lifestyle choices with respect to nutrition, exercise and education.”

Deadly Choices is providing a national blueprint towards greater life expectancy among Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, with Civoniceva relishing the opportunity to contribute.

“Deadly Choices is well engrained within communities throughout South-east Queensland, ensuring members are healthy, active and obviously educated around what needs to be done to be living a very healthy lifestyle for themselves and their families,” said Civoniceva.

“Programs like the Junior Murri Carnival will hopefully light the fire within our little people in what they want to achieve in life and make positive steps towards achieving those goals and chasing their dreams.”

Rugby league in particular has been synonymous with Indigenous representation from the great Artie Beetson, our first ever Maroons captain in State of Origin; a wonderful man and leader who left a tremendous legacy.

“And now with Greg Inglis as captain of Queensland, it’s fantastic to have such great role models and people out there achieving amazing things and showing our young people that if you work hard and dream big, you can achieve anything.”

Testament to this mantra is Preston Campbell, who despite his diminutive frame escalated himself to cult status in the NRL, claiming the 2001 Dally M Player-of-the-Year title and securing a 2003 premiership ring with the Penrith Panthers.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices,” confirmed Campbell.

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back. I love being at events like the Junior Murri Carnival, spending time and staying connected with community.”

From Caboolture down to Tweed Heads, across to Stradbroke Island and into Laidley, there were more than 9,000 new patients accessing local Aboriginal health services during the 12 months to June 2017, through Aboriginal Health Clinics under the jurisdiction of IUIH, the management arm of Deadly Choices.

“There’s an obvious appetite and consciousness among south-east Queensland communities to become more responsible for their own health,” confirmed IUIH CEO Adrian Carson.

Extensive health services provided by communities – for communities, are offered via the IUIH network, which has just topped 20 allied health clinics, following the acquisition of a fully-equipped Margate health service.

“Collectively it equates to happier, healthier communities.

“Importantly, life expectancy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders will increase as will the overall quality of life for all individuals through this strategic health practice framework.

“With the Indigenous population of south-east Queensland expected to double to more than 150,000 people over the next 15 years, the importance of our communities continuing to make healthy choices are an imperative, as are the positive frameworks we’re establishing through programs like the Junior Murri Carnival.”

4.Vic : $13.7 million to continue Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (ACAC) and receive culturally sensitive planning and case management from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (ACCO)

 ” We’ve invested $225 million in Aboriginal child and family services since 2014 – more than doubling the investment by the previous Liberals Government.

The future of Aboriginal children matters – and that’s why we will continue to prioritise Aboriginal self-determination and focus on improving outcomes for them.”

Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos

The Andrews Labor Government is expanding key supports for vulnerable Aboriginal children in care to ensure they remain connected to culture, community and country.

At the Aboriginal Children’s Forum today, Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos announced $13.7 million to continue Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (ACAC), which enables Aboriginal agencies to assume legal responsibility for the welfare of a child in care.

The Australian-first initiative – which began last year – allows a child to receive culturally sensitive planning and case management from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (ACCO) that understands their needs.

Under the new funding boost, two extra case work teams will be recruited by 2020, to triple the number of Aboriginal children to receive case management to 108.

This funding – part of $53.3 million announced in the Victorian Budget 2018/19 to support Aboriginal children – will also enable ACAC to be delivered by a further two ACCOs, with a total of 216 children authorised plus a fourth ACCO in pre-authorisation phase by 2020.

A further $6.4 million will be provided to ACCOs to grow their services, and support an estimated 331 Aboriginal people to complete a VET or higher degree – including in social work or community services – or traineeships.

The Labor Government is also working to address the overrepresentation of Aboriginal young people in the youth justice system by enhancing culturally appropriate programs.

As part of the $10.8 million investment through the latest Budget, $5 million will be used to continue to expand the Koori Youth Justice Program, which provides community-based intervention and responses for Aboriginal young people at risk of entering the criminal justice system.

The program provides early intervention assistance to Aboriginal young people while at school, as well as camps and other connecting-to-culture activities. There has been a 27 per cent increase in the number of young people engaged in this program since 2017.

The Labor Government is prioritising Aboriginal child and family services under its landmark Roadmap for Reform agenda and the ground-breaking tripartite agreement, Wungurilwil Gapgapduir: Aboriginal Children and Families Agreement.

We are building family and community capacity, reducing the number of Aboriginal children in care and keeping children who cannot live safely at home connected to their extended family, culture and country.

5.NSW : AHMRC and NSW Health #IndigenousHealthSummit report

The 5th Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Summit featured big discussions from leading thinkers, policymakers and practitioners – on stage, on CroakeyTV and on Twitter – on how to reset Indigenous health.

In this final post in Croakey’s coverage from the one day biennial #IndigenousHealthSummit event in Sydney, you can watch a compilation of interviews with presenters and organisers by Croakey contributing editor Summer May Finlay, and check out graphic artwork depicting the discussions (by Devon Bunce from Digital Story Tellers), and some tweets and selfies that captured some themes and moments in the day.

Full Report HERE

 

6. NT AMSANT Nomination open for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Excellence Awards

The 2018 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner (ATSIHP) Excellence Awards are open for nominations. Minister for Health, Natasha Fyles, said the awards are an opportunity to acknowledge the outstanding performance and contribution made by our ATSIHP workforce.

“Our dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners play a unique and important role in providing primary health care across the NT, often in challenging circumstances and locations,” Ms Fyles said.

“I encourage the community to get behind the awards and nominate someone you know to be doing a great job in one of the categories.”

The ATSIHP categorise are:

  • Remote Practitioner
  • Urban Practitioner
  • Specialist Practitioner
  • New Practitioner

Ms Fyles said the ‘Legend’ Award will be presented to the overall winner from the four award categories.

Assistant Minister for Suicide Prevention, Mental Health and Disabilities, Ngaree Ah Kit, said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioners play an important role in catering to the health needs of Indigenous Territorians.

“The ATSIHP awards are a fantastic mechanism to celebrate their wonderful contributions and the positive impact they have had on clients and the wider community and I encourage all Aboriginal health service users to nominate a worthy practitioner today,” Ms Ah Kit said.

These awards are managed by the Northern Territory Department of Health and are delivered in partnership with

United Voice, the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory and the Rotary Club of Darwin Sunrise.

Nominations close 5.00 pm on Friday 20 July 2018, with recipients announced at an event in Alice Springs in September.

For more information please visit the ATSIHP website http://www.atsihp.nt.gov.au/ or contact Aboriginal Workforce Development, People and Organisational Capability on (08) 8922 7096 or ATSIHPexcellenceawards.doh@nt.gov.au

7. TAS : National ACCHO’s  to travel to Hobart in August for the National NACCHO Male Health Conference : Registrations Free

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

8. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti Campaign

9.ACT : Winnunga ACCHO June Newsletter

Download Here

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter June 2018