NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services #WomensAFLFooty #BecauseofHerWeCan #herruleshergame @DeadlyChoices #JuniorMurriCarnival @IUIH_ #NSW @AHMRC #IndigenousHealthSummit #VIC #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre hosting #OCHREday2018

1. This weeks Feature : Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) health workers are kicking a few health goals with their women’s footy team #becauseofherwecan

2.1 National : NACCHO Chairs and Executive appear at Constitutional recognition relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

2.2 National : NACCHO in partnership to Improving medication management in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

2.3.NACCHO supporting the eye health needs of Indigenous people

3.QLD : Much more than Sport at Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival

4.Vic : $13.7 million to continue Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (ACAC) and receive culturally sensitive planning and case management from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (ACCO)

5.NSW : AHMRC and NSW Health #IndigenousHealthSummit report

6. NT AMSANT Nomination open for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Excellence Awards

7. TAS : National ACCHO’s  to travel to Hobart in August for the National NACCHO Male Health Conference : Registrations Free

8. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti Campaign

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.WA Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) health workers are kicking a few health goals with their women’s footy team #becauseofherwecan

In 2018 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) identified an opportunity to partner with West Kimberley Women’s Football League. KAMS saw this as a chance to not only promote the benefits of team sport but to link Aboriginal Medical Services to local teams.

KAMS looks forward to the bright future of women’s footy in the Kimberley and the benefits this brings to the health of entire communities

Come and see these footy players who also happen to be KAMS Aboriginal Health Worker students this Friday at the NAIDOC celebration in front of the police station. They can test your blood sugar levels or blood pressure. You can also chat to them about health worker training at KAMS

When women’s footy started in Broome it was a first for many. For us old girls it was something we always wanted to do growing up, because although we got to kick the footy around with our dads and brothers, God forbid us girls could take to the field!

Today for these young guns, Darliah Killer and Sophira “Lala” Buaneye, their footy careers have just begun. This is their start to something far bigger! From their ‘grass roots’ beginnings on the dirt oval in Looma to the green grass of Broome, yet I hope to see them go all the way to the MCG in professional women’s AFL.

Broome Girls Academy has watched them grow over the past five years, their effortless talents and naturally ease with the football leaves us all in awe and sometimes envy.

To these girls and all the others who can make an AFL dream a reality – be thankful to the many women who have gone before you who worked tirelessly to make Womens footy happen. Grab every opportunity, and the football with both hands!

#becauseofherwecan

#herruleshergame

2.1 National : NACCHO Chairs and Executive appear at Constitutional recognition relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

 ” It depends on whether you go a functional representation—whether it’s legal services, health services, educational services or whatever, as representation for a voice, or you go from another elected structure, depending on what its functions are.

From the community-controlled health perspective, I’d definitely support the establishment of a health commission, because we are such an integrated part of the health architecture of this country and we’re getting better results, I believe. We do need to grow our delivery of comprehensive primary health care in the areas where we don’t deliver at the moment in order to make sure that we can avoid preventable hospital admissions which, I believe, we do do where we’re working very well.

That’s the high cost to the states—the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in hospitals, just like in jails, at the negative end of the spectrum. Whereas, if we invested more in our model of the community-controlled health care at the local level, we could lower hospital admissions in my experience. I think a health commission has an important role to play.

The biggest failures are in economic development and wealth creation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. I think much more needs to be done in areas where there is little or no employment in creating innovative employment and wealth creation initiatives, given that we own so much land.

 We’ve never been given the resources to really develop that in a way that is consistent with our culture and our responsibilities to country, along with making sure that all of the residents get a fair cut of the wealth that’s created. “

Pat Turner NACCHO CEO responding to Senator Dodson’s question “ How would bodies like NACCHO or First Nations controlled organisations sit with the voice? “ Picture above from WA hearing

Download or Read the 23 Page Transcript HERE

NACCHO Appearance at Constitutional Recognition

2.2 National : NACCHO in partnership to Improving medication management in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Equitable access and effective use of medicine is critical to closing the gap in health and life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and other Australians.

Professor Amanda Wheeler from Griffith University’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland, has formed a partnership with the Pharmacy Guild of Australia and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO).

The research team will work with Aboriginal Health Services and community pharmacies to promote culturally appropriate medication review services and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and well-being.

The Pharmacy Guild is the peak organisation for community pharmacy owners and they are working with the Commonwealth Department of Health on the Pharmacy Trial Program (PTP). The PTP aims to trial new and expanded community pharmacy programmes to improve health outcomes for consumers and/or extend the role of pharmacists in the delivery of primary healthcare services through community pharmacy.

“The Pharmacy Guild and Griffith researchers have been working together for quite some time,” says Professor Wheeler.

“It’s long been known that Indigenous communities face some big problems with access to medicines, advice and review services, it’s just not a simple fix,” she says.

“Establishing and maintaining trust and respectful relationships are crucial elements of what we’re trying to achieve.”

Professor Adrian Miller, formerly of Griffith University, will be subcontracted through Central Queensland University and will lead governance from an Indigenous research/cultural responsiveness perspective. NACCHO is viewed as a critical partner to further support appropriate community engagement and service provision.

This is the third major research project Professor Wheeler has conducted in partnership with the Pharmacy Guild into improving services provided by community pharmacies.

The research will develop, implement and evaluate the outcomes of culturally appropriate medication review services for Indigenous peoples (known as the IMeRSe Feasibility Study), which will be delivered by community pharmacists working with patients and staff of Aboriginal Health Services.

The purpose of the service is to empower patients to better manage their medicines, enhance adherence, avoid medication-related problems and prevent hospitalisations.

This will be a two-year feasibility study across Queensland, Northern Territory and New South Wales and is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health (see http://6cpa.com.au/pharmacy-trial-program/indigenous-medication-review-service-feasibility-study/).

2.3.NACCHO supporting the eye health needs of Indigenous people

Vision 202 CEO Judith Abbott and Policy and Advocacy Manager Danielle Williams met with Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt and NACCHO Deputy CEO Dawn Casey to discuss the eye health needs of Indigenous people and those in aged care

3.QLD : Much more than Sport at Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival

Participation in any Deadly Choices program requires individuals to commit to a comprehensive health check and complementing health management plan, so there’s strong health values associated with the brand,

We get real outcomes across the whole spectrum of the community; from infants, adolescents and our elders, everyone is positively affected.

To date, comprehensive health care management plans for more than 35,000 individuals have been activated among an Indigenous population of almost 70,000 in South-east Queensland.”

Deadly Choices ambassadors, former Brisbane Broncos, Queensland and Australian rugby league players Steve Renouf

Up to 600 South-east Queensland families are expected to converge on the St Lucia grounds of the University of Queensland on July 2-4, where competition in rugby league and netball will be staged for children (6-12 years), during the Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival.

And as with all Deadly Choices initiatives, mandatory health checks will have taken place before confirmation of each individual registration to this free event. The directive is one wholeheartedly supported by notable Deadly Choices ambassadors, former Brisbane Broncos, Queensland and Australian rugby league players Steve Renouf and Petero Civoniceva, plus fellow former NRL player Preston Campbell.

“The Junior Murri Carnival is a very important part of the Deadly Choices event mix, with overall health and well-being of communities at its core.

“This program enables us to motivate kids into ideal lifestyle choices with respect to nutrition, exercise and education.”

Deadly Choices is providing a national blueprint towards greater life expectancy among Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, with Civoniceva relishing the opportunity to contribute.

“Deadly Choices is well engrained within communities throughout South-east Queensland, ensuring members are healthy, active and obviously educated around what needs to be done to be living a very healthy lifestyle for themselves and their families,” said Civoniceva.

“Programs like the Junior Murri Carnival will hopefully light the fire within our little people in what they want to achieve in life and make positive steps towards achieving those goals and chasing their dreams.”

Rugby league in particular has been synonymous with Indigenous representation from the great Artie Beetson, our first ever Maroons captain in State of Origin; a wonderful man and leader who left a tremendous legacy.

“And now with Greg Inglis as captain of Queensland, it’s fantastic to have such great role models and people out there achieving amazing things and showing our young people that if you work hard and dream big, you can achieve anything.”

Testament to this mantra is Preston Campbell, who despite his diminutive frame escalated himself to cult status in the NRL, claiming the 2001 Dally M Player-of-the-Year title and securing a 2003 premiership ring with the Penrith Panthers.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices,” confirmed Campbell.

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back. I love being at events like the Junior Murri Carnival, spending time and staying connected with community.”

From Caboolture down to Tweed Heads, across to Stradbroke Island and into Laidley, there were more than 9,000 new patients accessing local Aboriginal health services during the 12 months to June 2017, through Aboriginal Health Clinics under the jurisdiction of IUIH, the management arm of Deadly Choices.

“There’s an obvious appetite and consciousness among south-east Queensland communities to become more responsible for their own health,” confirmed IUIH CEO Adrian Carson.

Extensive health services provided by communities – for communities, are offered via the IUIH network, which has just topped 20 allied health clinics, following the acquisition of a fully-equipped Margate health service.

“Collectively it equates to happier, healthier communities.

“Importantly, life expectancy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders will increase as will the overall quality of life for all individuals through this strategic health practice framework.

“With the Indigenous population of south-east Queensland expected to double to more than 150,000 people over the next 15 years, the importance of our communities continuing to make healthy choices are an imperative, as are the positive frameworks we’re establishing through programs like the Junior Murri Carnival.”

4.Vic : $13.7 million to continue Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (ACAC) and receive culturally sensitive planning and case management from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (ACCO)

 ” We’ve invested $225 million in Aboriginal child and family services since 2014 – more than doubling the investment by the previous Liberals Government.

The future of Aboriginal children matters – and that’s why we will continue to prioritise Aboriginal self-determination and focus on improving outcomes for them.”

Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos

The Andrews Labor Government is expanding key supports for vulnerable Aboriginal children in care to ensure they remain connected to culture, community and country.

At the Aboriginal Children’s Forum today, Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos announced $13.7 million to continue Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (ACAC), which enables Aboriginal agencies to assume legal responsibility for the welfare of a child in care.

The Australian-first initiative – which began last year – allows a child to receive culturally sensitive planning and case management from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (ACCO) that understands their needs.

Under the new funding boost, two extra case work teams will be recruited by 2020, to triple the number of Aboriginal children to receive case management to 108.

This funding – part of $53.3 million announced in the Victorian Budget 2018/19 to support Aboriginal children – will also enable ACAC to be delivered by a further two ACCOs, with a total of 216 children authorised plus a fourth ACCO in pre-authorisation phase by 2020.

A further $6.4 million will be provided to ACCOs to grow their services, and support an estimated 331 Aboriginal people to complete a VET or higher degree – including in social work or community services – or traineeships.

The Labor Government is also working to address the overrepresentation of Aboriginal young people in the youth justice system by enhancing culturally appropriate programs.

As part of the $10.8 million investment through the latest Budget, $5 million will be used to continue to expand the Koori Youth Justice Program, which provides community-based intervention and responses for Aboriginal young people at risk of entering the criminal justice system.

The program provides early intervention assistance to Aboriginal young people while at school, as well as camps and other connecting-to-culture activities. There has been a 27 per cent increase in the number of young people engaged in this program since 2017.

The Labor Government is prioritising Aboriginal child and family services under its landmark Roadmap for Reform agenda and the ground-breaking tripartite agreement, Wungurilwil Gapgapduir: Aboriginal Children and Families Agreement.

We are building family and community capacity, reducing the number of Aboriginal children in care and keeping children who cannot live safely at home connected to their extended family, culture and country.

5.NSW : AHMRC and NSW Health #IndigenousHealthSummit report

The 5th Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Summit featured big discussions from leading thinkers, policymakers and practitioners – on stage, on CroakeyTV and on Twitter – on how to reset Indigenous health.

In this final post in Croakey’s coverage from the one day biennial #IndigenousHealthSummit event in Sydney, you can watch a compilation of interviews with presenters and organisers by Croakey contributing editor Summer May Finlay, and check out graphic artwork depicting the discussions (by Devon Bunce from Digital Story Tellers), and some tweets and selfies that captured some themes and moments in the day.

Full Report HERE

 

6. NT AMSANT Nomination open for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Excellence Awards

The 2018 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner (ATSIHP) Excellence Awards are open for nominations. Minister for Health, Natasha Fyles, said the awards are an opportunity to acknowledge the outstanding performance and contribution made by our ATSIHP workforce.

“Our dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners play a unique and important role in providing primary health care across the NT, often in challenging circumstances and locations,” Ms Fyles said.

“I encourage the community to get behind the awards and nominate someone you know to be doing a great job in one of the categories.”

The ATSIHP categorise are:

  • Remote Practitioner
  • Urban Practitioner
  • Specialist Practitioner
  • New Practitioner

Ms Fyles said the ‘Legend’ Award will be presented to the overall winner from the four award categories.

Assistant Minister for Suicide Prevention, Mental Health and Disabilities, Ngaree Ah Kit, said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioners play an important role in catering to the health needs of Indigenous Territorians.

“The ATSIHP awards are a fantastic mechanism to celebrate their wonderful contributions and the positive impact they have had on clients and the wider community and I encourage all Aboriginal health service users to nominate a worthy practitioner today,” Ms Ah Kit said.

These awards are managed by the Northern Territory Department of Health and are delivered in partnership with

United Voice, the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory and the Rotary Club of Darwin Sunrise.

Nominations close 5.00 pm on Friday 20 July 2018, with recipients announced at an event in Alice Springs in September.

For more information please visit the ATSIHP website http://www.atsihp.nt.gov.au/ or contact Aboriginal Workforce Development, People and Organisational Capability on (08) 8922 7096 or ATSIHPexcellenceawards.doh@nt.gov.au

7. TAS : National ACCHO’s  to travel to Hobart in August for the National NACCHO Male Health Conference : Registrations Free

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

8. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti Campaign

9.ACT : Winnunga ACCHO June Newsletter

Download Here

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter June 2018

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features @KenWyattMP #MurriCarnival launch @DeadlyChoices @IUIH_ @QAIHC_QLD #NSW @awabakalltd ACCHO #VIC @VAHS1972 #SA #WA #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre #ACT #NT @DanilaDilba Plus #IGAwards2018

1.NACCHO is encouraging all our ACCHO’s to enter the Indigenous Governance Awards Applications Extended 20 July

2.1 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO forms a partnership that aims to deliver tangible positive employment results for healthy futures

2.2 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service facilitates Students and young children to have had their hearing tested by the Hear Our Heart Ear Bus Project

2.3 NSW : Aboriginal Mental Health The Mental Health Commission of NSW wants to understand what is important to you in community-based mental health services and supports.

3.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin : Deadly Choices Ambassador Steven Motlop from Port Adelaide speaks out about Men’s Mental Health for recent Men’s Health Week

4.1 Apunipima ACCHO marks Men’s Health Week with an important message about Deadly Choices

4.2 At the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Yulu-Buri-Ba hearing help to deliver children a brighter future

4.3 QLD : Minister Ken Wyatt announces funding of over $600k for the next 3 years for the Murri Carnival

5.SA : Ceduna Koonibba AHS Board, CEO and staff hosts Lowitja Board and community meeting over two days

6. ACT treaty needed to right past wrongs made against Indigenous people

7. VIC : Check out the Healthy Lifestyle Team and Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc. Nutrition team at the Victorian Food Forum

8. WA : Congratulations to Moorditj Koort CEO Jonathan Ford for winning the community person of the year Perth NAIDOC Award

9. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre NAIDIC week

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.NACCHO is encouraging all our ACCHO’s to enter the Indigenous Governance Awards Applications Extended 20 July

 

Reconciliation Australia has extended the application period for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations to apply for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards. Entries are now closing on Friday 20th July.

The Awards publicly recognise and celebrate outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations, projects and initiatives that make extraordinary contributions to communities and the nation.

In 2018, Reconciliation Australia and the BHP Billiton Foundation are proud to run the awards for the first time in partnership with the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute, a national centre of governance excellence.

By entering the awards, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations, projects and initiatives across the country have the chance to share in $60,000 of prize money, as well as corporate mentoring, feedback from an esteemed judging panel, and media and networking opportunities.

Past winners have found the awards to be a springboard to further exposure and bigger opportunities. Western Desert Dialysis (Purple House) CEO Sarah Brown said the awards helped provide the organisation the credibility and recognition to secure further funding and expand their operations.

“Along with the prize money and the corporate sponsorship, we have made sure that we have sucked the juice out of every opportunity that has come our way because of this award,” she said.

“We have found more friends and partners, recruited fabulous staff and generally been able to lift the profile of who we are and what we do.

“It has made us all very proud and determined to work harder.”

Ms Brown said the awards play an important role in highlighting the life-changing work of organisations and groups practicing good Indigenous governance.

“It is so important that there are opportunities to tell good news stories about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations,” she said

Reconciliation Australia CEO Karen Mundine said she encouraged organisations and groups of all shapes and sizes to consider applying for an award.

“We know there are organisations, initiatives and projects around the country that are making important contributions to their communities, and the nation, by putting culture at the heart of their governance,” she said.

Ms Mundine said effective Indigenous governance melds traditional governance and responsibilities, based on culture and kinship, with the requirements of mainstream organisations, including financial and legal accountability.

“By creating governance models that are effective and legitimate in two worlds, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations are examples of successful self-determination and two-way governance in action,” she said.

The two award categories are Category A: Indigenous-led incorporated organisations and Category B: Indigenous-led non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Winners in each of the two categories will receive $20,000, and highly commended organisations in each category will each be awarded $10,000.

Applications or recommendations for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards can be made online at

www.reconciliation.org.au/iga or by calling 02 6273 9200.

Applications close Friday 20 July 2018.

2.1 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO forms a partnership that aims to deliver tangible positive employment results for healthy futures

“From the Awabakal point of view, the AES partnership allows us to recruit local Aboriginal people through an organisation with extensive contacts and a proven record of mentoring and preparing people for work.

Not only are we supporting another Aboriginal organisation, we’ve gained some great employees who have a passion for working in this sector, and that can be hard to find,”

Awabakal CEO, Raylene Gordon.

In Newcastle on the New South Wales North Coast, idyllic images of a coastal paradise with pristine golden beaches and perfect surf give way to some far less postcard friendly realities for the region’s Indigenous population who experience lower rates of employment than non-Indigenous people and lag behind in key mental and physical health barometers.

It is no secret that good health and financial security go hand-in-hand. Improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people of the region means also improving their opportunities for employment, which is why two of Newcastle’s key Indigenous organisations, the Aboriginal Employment Strategy (AES) and Awabakal, have formed a partnership that aims to deliver tangible positive results for the local community.

The partnership has been driven by an AES national strategy to work with more Aboriginal businesses and organisations around the country, and has already led to 35 placements of Aboriginal people at Awabakal by the AES since November 2016.

“The AES and Awabakal share a mutual purpose of existence, both organisations work towards creating social impact. We want to show that through collaboration we can achieve more, we’re combining our respective areas of expertise to support local people and grow Aboriginal employment opportunities and Aboriginal business, together,” says Leroy Wilkinson, AES Manager, People and Culture.

Founded in Newcastle in 1977, Awabakal is an Aboriginal community controlled health service that delivers culturally appropriate primary health care services, advocacy and social and emotional support to Aboriginal people.

Awabakal is also the largest employer of Aboriginal people from the local area, currently employing around 100 Aboriginal staff. Awabakal offers opportunities in a growing number of positions across a wide range of sectors, including medical, transport, aged care, early childhood, and mental health, among others.

The partnership between the organisations has been shaped by the AES’ holistic approach to recruitment which includes supporting clients to identify and overcome broader challenges.

For example, if an AES client is facing issues with housing, or issues with health, the AES will work directly with Awabakal to address those issues. AES recruits also receive up to six months of mentoring and support after their placement at Awabakal, meaning they are more likely to move into positions they are most likely to succeed in and enjoy.

As well as significant recruitment into existing positions at Awabakal, the two organisations have worked together on identifying and creating new positions entirely, such as an all new Community Liaison position created to achieve closer grassroots promotion of Awabakal services and personalised support for local people.

27 year-old Aaron Simon is one of Awabakal’s recent recruits through the AES and one of two new Awabakal Community Liaison workers. The position is Aaron’s first full-time job and one he’s excelling at after nine months in the role, despite having no prior health work experience, proving him to be one of the major success stories of the partnership so far. Aaron has now joined Awabakal’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking team and is about to complete a Certificate IV in Mental Health.

“When I went to the AES I was desperate for any work at the time, I didn’t have any experience working in health, but the opportunity at Awabakal came up and I thought I’d give it a shot and it’s been great for me,” says Aaron.

“I see a lot of unemployed people out where I live and a partnership like this creates opportunities for people in the community who are wanting to get a start in life.”

The valuable employment and mentoring services provided by the AES are supported by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet.

2.2 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service facilitates Students and young children to have had their hearing tested by the Hear Our Heart Ear Bus Project.

Hearing check: Macquarie University audiology student Kim Laing tests Ryan Finn after the Ear Bus Project visited Wellington on Monday. Photo: MARK RAYNER

The bus was in town on Monday, where it visited Barnardos Early Learning Centre for the first time, before going to all primary and high schools later that day and on Tuesday.

The bus comes to town once a term for two or three days to test children and provide follow-up checks and has a partnership with the Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service.

Originally published HERE

READ MORE: Hear Our Heart receives $750,000

The not-for-profit project had good news earlier this week when was awarded $750,000 over the next five years from the Sydney-based Walter and Eliza Hall Charitable Foundation.

“We have been looking for a special organisation to partner with for some time that has a genuine focus on Indigenous health,” Walter and Eliza Hall Charitable Foundation Chief Executive Officer Helen Cook said.

The Dubbo-founded Hear our Heart ear bus project provides free ear health education, targeted hearing testing and free access to ear specialists to children.

2.3 NSW : Aboriginal Mental Health The Mental Health Commission of NSW wants to understand what is important to you in community-based mental health services and supports.

Your survey response will help the Commission to develop a set of evidence-based principles for planning, developing and monitoring community services and supports in NSW that work for people living with mental health issues and their families and carers.

We want to know what is working well and what is not working and what your vision of community support is.

Please consider filling in the 10-minute online survey. It will be open until 29 June 2018.

Take the survey

If you have any questions, please contact Reena Masrani, who can be reached on
02 9859 5200 or at reena.masrani@mhc.nsw.gov.au

3.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin : Deadly Choices Ambassador Steven Motlop from Port Adelaide speaks out about Men’s Mental Health for recent Men’s Health Week

WATCH HERE

If you are worried about how you are feeling, book an appointment at any Danila Dilba clinic with a GP to arrange to speak to one of our experiences counsellors. #MensHealthWeek

Also for men’s health week Danila Dilba staff took part with a stall at Raintree Park in Darwin

4.1 Apunipima ACCHO marks Men’s Health Week with an important message about Deadly Choices

 ” Joseph Oui, BJ Saylor and Jermane Herbohn from Apunipima attended the official opening of the Mulungu Mens Health Hub in Mareeba.

The event was supported by supported by Deadly Choices advocate Patrick Johnson and staff from Mulungu, community groups and locals from the Mareeba district.

It is great to see this important space made available for men’s healing “

From the 11th -17th June it was International Men’s Health Week, an annual event to promote awareness of preventable health problems in men and boys.

The theme this year is,  “Men and Families: Making Healthy Connections,” a timely reminder to men and boys that good health means more than a visit to the doctor.

This week Apunipima is encouraging all men to participate in an activity that will assist them in connecting to culture, country, family and community. This form of connection is a vital component of men’s health and empowers men to take greater control and responsibility for their health.

Across Cairns and Cape York, Apunipima staff have been involved in a variety of activities to celebrate International Men’s Health Week.

These include a reef fishing trip, the opening of a Mens Wellbeing Centre in Mareeba and men’s group gatherings across Cape York.

Apunipima Cape York Health Council offers a comprehensive suite of men’s health programs throughout the year; these include Men’s Groups, Workshops, Education Sessions, Counselling, Culture Workshops and Men’s Health Clinics delivered by Apunipima’s Social and Emotional Wellbeing Centres and Primary Health Care Centres throughout Cape York

4.2 At the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Yulu-Buri-Ba hearing help to deliver children a brighter future

 ” Thank you to the wonderful staff from Yulu-Buri-Ba Aboriginal health clinic for your contribution and care to those in the community.

What a way to finish off the day, announcing new audiology equipment for the Yulu-Buri-Ba Aboriginal Health centre.

This gear will have a massive impact for children across SE Queensland, with additional ear screening available for children 0-4 years.

Ken Wyatt Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM

The Turnbull Government is taking action to ensure the early detection and treatment of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in South-East Queensland.

The Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, said children needed to grow up with good hearing so they could reach their full potential and be able to embrace all of the opportunities that come their way.

“Hearing loss at a young age can have lifelong consequences in education, employment and overall wellbeing so early detection and treatment is essential to minimise its impact,” Minister Wyatt said.

“Infants and children are like little sponges—their young lives are about soaking up information and developing language and social skills daily, which is why good ear health is critical.

Minister Wyatt joined Member for Bonner, Ross Vasta, at the local Yulu-Burri-Ba clinic in Wynnum to meet local families.

“The Australian Government will provide the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health with more than $27,000 for the purchase of audiology equipment to conduct diagnostic audiology tests in local clinics including Yulu-Burri-Ba,” Minister Wyatt said.

“The results of these tests will trigger appropriate and swift follow up measures where necessary, to address any potential hearing loss.

“Work like this is critical because the overall rate of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is among the highest in the world, up to 10 times more than among the broader Australian population of children.”

Mr Vasta said the new equipment would help ensure local children had the best start in life.

“In the hands of trained health professionals like those at Yulu-Burri-Ba, this funding will make a significant difference to children and their families accessing timely hearing assessments,” said Mr Vasta.

“I commend the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health for its key role in the planning, development and delivery of comprehensive healthcare services to First Nations people in South-East Queensland.”

The Turnbull Government is making a significant investment of more than $79 million (2018–19 to 2021–22) for a range of activities to improve the ear and hearing health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the nation.

This includes $30 million announced in the 2018–19 Budget for a new outreach program to provide an annual hearing assessment and referral for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0–6 years.

The Government is also increasing access to clinical services, including surgery, providing equipment, training health professionals and raising awareness of otitis media symptoms and the need for regular surveillance and early treatment.

4.3 QLD : Minister Ken Wyatt announces funding of over $600k for the next 3 years for the Murri Carnival

A partnership between Deadly Choices IUIH and QAIHC which will have a specific focus on targeting STI and BBV.

5.SA : Ceduna Koonibba AHS Board, CEO and staff hosts Lowitja Board and community meeting over two days.

We are inspired by your work and strong vision for the future.

6. ACT treaty needed to right past wrongs made against Indigenous people

 “It is an interesting coincidence that the newly declared ACT Reconciliation Day public holiday falls between two significant anniversaries relevant to Aboriginal demands for sovereignty and self-determination without which reconciliation is illusory. It was held the day after the first anniversary of the presentation of the Uluru Statement and two weeks before the thirtieth anniversary of the Barunga Statement.”

Julie Tongs OAM is the CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service

The Barunga Statement, despite having been effectively ignored for the last 30 years, has been given life by the Northern Territory government which has announced that it will, consistent with the demands incorporated in the statement, begin negotiations with the Aboriginal people of the Northern Territory for a treaty.

In committing to negotiations for a treaty, the Northern Territory has followed the example of the governments of South Australia and Victoria where the path to a treaty has been the subject of detailed consideration. Regrettably, the incoming Liberal government in South Australia has terminated the process for a treaty in that state. However Luke Foley, the Opposition Leader in New South Wales, the jurisdiction with the largest Indigenous population in Australia, has accelerated the momentum for state-based treaties by committing a Labor government in NSW to a treaty with that state’s Aboriginal people.

While differing in content and structure, the Barunga and Uluru Statements are in essence concerned with the same issues, namely self-determination, self-management, sovereignty, land rights, truth telling, an historical reckoning and justice. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Australia are calling for these rights to be recognised and guaranteed through a treaty or a makarrata.

The response of successive national governments, of both persuasion, over the last 30 years to the widespread aspiration of Indigenous Australians for a treaty has been disappointing, to say the least.

Then prime minister Bob Hawke receives the Barunga statement from Galarrwuy Yunupingu in Arnhem Land in 1988.Then prime minister Bob Hawke receives the Barunga statement from Galarrwuy Yunupingu in Arnhem Land in 1988.Photo: Fairfax Media

 

On June 12, 1988 when the then-Prime Minister Bob Hawke was handed the Barunga Statement by one of its main proponents, the then-chairman of the Northern Land Council, Galarrwuy Yunupingu, he promised that he would enter into a treaty with Indigenous Australia during that term of government, before 1990. Unfortunately, after returning to Canberra with the Burunga Statement, the Prime Minister abandoned his commitment to a treaty. So disappointed was Galarrwuy Yunupingu that the promised treaty did not eventuate that he asked for the Barunga Statement to be returned to his people. In doing so he made the following comment:

“Sovereignty turned into a treaty, the treaty turned into reconciliation and reconciliation turned into nothing.”

He asked, therefore, for the Statement to be returned to Barunga, where he said: “. . . we will hold a sorry funeral ceremony. We will dig a hole and bury it. It will be a protest . . . The time has come to send a strong message to Canberra and the world about the disgraceful state of Indigenous Australia, where governments have failed . . .”

The rejection by the current Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, of the central features of the Uluru Statement from the Heart was far more categorical than that of Bob Hawke 30 years earlier. It is of course not only the federal government that has failed to meet the expectations or needs of Aboriginal people. ACT-specific data on Indigenous disadvantage in Canberra, whether it be incarceration rates, child protection, housing, educational outcomes, rough sleeping, homelessness, drug abuse, mental health or poverty, is as bad, and in many cases worse, than in other jurisdictions in Australia.

In response to the aspiration of Aboriginal people across Australia for formal recognition of their sovereign rights and rightful place in their own country, progressive governments in South Australia and Victoria, followed by the Northern Territory government and now the Labor Opposition in NSW, have not been prepared to wait for leadership or action from the Commonwealth, and each has formally committed to the negotiation of a state-based treaty.

However, in light of the example of these other jurisdictions, it is a matter of some surprise that the ACT government has not evinced any interest in exploring the question of a treaty with the Aboriginal community of Canberra. The fanfare greeting the declaration by the ACT government of the Reconciliation Day Public Holiday, and its purported commitment to reconciliation, should be considered against its apparent disinterest in a treaty and indeed the paucity of new Indigenous-specific funding in the recent ACT budget. It is, after all, a widely, if not universally-held view within the Aboriginal community that a negotiated treaty is a pre-condition to achieving reconciliation.

An additional barrier to reconciliation in the ACT is the assumption that native title in the Territory was extinguished by the conversion of all land in the Territory (other, perhaps, than some historical cemeteries and old stock routes) into leasehold following the transfer of the land from NSW to form the national capital. This issue presents a massive challenge to our capacity to ever achieve reconciliation in Canberra.

If we in the ACT cannot find a way of reversing the extinguishment of native title, even if that requires us to deem that native title is to be treated as having not been extinguished, or alternatively by establishing an appropriate compensation regime in recognition of the fact that it has been extinguished, then we are doomed to never be reconciled.

It is time for the ACT government to get serious about reconciliation. It is time we in Canberra began to talk about a treaty to acknowledge and right the wrongs perpetrated by the dispossession of Aboriginal people in the ACT from their lands, without consent and without compensation.

7. VIC : Check out the Healthy Lifestyle Team and Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc Nutrition team at the Victorian Food Forum

We presented to over 400 nutrition experts and industry professionals about how Deadly Dan can influence our kids to make healthy lifestyle choices. We loved sitting alongside The Community Grocer and Parents Voice to discuss making the healthy choice the easy choice!

We also got to screen the Deadly Dan film. Haven’t seen it yet? Check it out on our Facebook page, website or follow this link!
https://youtu.be/1eYSHoD45SE

#VFF2018 #vahshealthylifestyleteam #staysmokefree

8. WA : Congratulations to Moorditj Koort CEO Jonathan Ford for winning the community person of the year Perth NAIDOC Award.

Jonathan has put in extreme amount of commitment into his community by gaining long term funding for Moorditj Koort, he’s triple the size in 12 months to provide Health service across Perth area, establishing two new site’s one in Midland and the other in Cockburn currently delivering services to 500+ chronic disease, 400 Aboriginal children receiving health checks per year 60+ healthy lifestyle participates per year.

Early 2018 The Department of Communities, Child Protection and Family Support has awarded a $20 million contract to a consortium of four Noongar Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations to provide Aboriginal In-Home Support Services.

Jonathon had joined with Wungening Aboriginal Corporation, Coolabaroo Community service and Ebenzer home to make this happen for our noongar people, not only that he sits on numerals panels Telethon Kids Institute Aboriginal reference group, State Government supporting community Forums, Ngala Reconciliation Action group, former chair of the premier and cabinet emerging leaders group.

Jonathon participants in regular cultural awareness sessions to GP’s, Health professionals and social service to improve system change and increased cultural security. In the past 4 years Jonathon has help 20 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders become full qualified Health Practitioners, he encourages our people to live the dream and is open to help other succeed in their career choice. Well done Jon.See More

— with Jonny Ford.

9. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre NAIDIC week
Thank you

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features @DeadlyChoices #NSW Armajun #QLD @GidgeeHealing and Carbal ACCHO #VIC @VAHS1972 #SA @AHCSA #WA #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre #ACT #NT @DanilaDilba Plus @FaCtS_Study #IGAwards2018

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

1.3 NACCHO offers discounted subscriptions and trials of the Clinical Decision Support System UpToDate for all practices

2.1 SA : Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service, Quitline and Puyu Blasters jion forces in Murray Bridge health promotion

2.2 SA : Pika Wiya Aboriginal Health Service hosted a Social and Emotional Wellbeing Day on Tuesday, June 5 to address chronic diseases in a culturally sensitive way.

3.NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Services tours New England to understand the challenges facing our Indigenous communities

4.QLD : Carbal Medical Services expands health services for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community

5.VIC : VAHS and Deadly Choices health promotion at the AFL Long Walk

6.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO staff came out in force for the Larrakia Nation Family Fun day 

7.WA :Tracy Westerman visited Karratha for Indigenous mental health in the Pilbara

8. TAS: The latest Virgin aircraft Tinamirakuna named after the Macquarie River in lutruwita (Tasmania)

9.ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service $11 million delayed

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations that place culture at the heart of their governance are invited to apply for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards (IGAs), which were launched today.

Reconciliation Australia and BHP Billiton are proud to run the awards for the first time in partnership with the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute, a national centre of governance excellence.

Established in 2005, the IGAs publicly recognise and celebrate outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations and projects that make extraordinary contributions to communities and the nation.

Organisations that are displaying effective Indigenous governance are encouraged to apply, with prizes including corporate mentoring, feedback from the judging panel, media and networking opportunities, and a share in $60,000.

Reconciliation Australia CEO Karen Mundine said it was important to showcase the high achievers in Indigenous governance, so that they get the accolades they deserve – and so that broader Australia understands their important contributions.

“For more than a decade, the IGA winners have shown that so much is possible when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander develop innovative and robust systems of governance by putting culture at the heart of what they do,” Ms Mundine said.

Australian Indigenous Governance Institute CEO Michelle Deshong said governance was the foundation stone that enabled Indigenous peoples and communities to build a prosperous future.

“The ability to come together, set goals, and put things in place to achieve their goals, allows people to build a self-determined future,” Ms Deshong said.

“For Indigenous peoples, this means navigating a complex and interconnected web of cultural, environmental, economic and political influences. Celebrating those who have done this well fills us with ideas, confidence and inspiration.”

The two award categories are Category A: Indigenous-led incorporated organisations and Category B: Indigenous-led non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Winners in each of the two categories will receive $20,000, and highly commended organisations in each category will each be awarded $10,000. Ms Mundine said the IGAs have a history of attracting high caliber nominations from organisations around the country, from the bustling capital cities to our most remote communities.

“In 2018, we want to see applications from organisations and projects that are making a difference in their communities, through community engagement, varying governance models and cultural practices.

Applications or recommendations for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards can be made online at http://www.reconciliation.org.au/iga or by calling 02 6273 9200. Applications close Saturday 30 June 2018.

There are two award categories:

  • Category A: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in Indigenous incorporated organisations.
  • Category B: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Each category is looking for governance that demonstrates:

  • Innovation
  • Effectiveness
  • Self-determination and leadership
  • Cultural relevance and legitimacy
  • Future planning, sustainability and governance resilience.

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

The Australian National University is seeking partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families. We want to partner and work with local organisations and communities to make sure the research benefits the community.

Who are we?

We work at the Australian National University (ANU). The study is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers. Professor Victoria Hovane (Ngarluma, Malgnin/Kitja, Gooniyandi), along with Associate Professor Raymond Lovett (Wongaibon, Ngiyampaa) and Dr Jill Guthrie (Wiradjuri) from NCEPH, and Professor Matthew Gray of the Centre for Social Research and Methods (CSRM) at ANU will be leading the study.

Study Question: What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

How are we going to gather information to answer the study question?

A Community Researcher (who we would give funds to employ) would capture the data by interviewing 100 community members, running 3 focus groups for Men / Women / Youth (over 16).  We would interview approx. 5 community members to hear about the story in your community.

We know Family Violence happens in all communities. We don’t want to find out the prevalence, we want to know what your communities needs to feel safe. We will also be mapping the services in your community, facilities and resources available in a community.  All this information will be given back to your community.

What support would we provide your service?

We are able to support your organisation up to $40,000 (including funds for $30 vouchers), this would also help to employ a Community Researcher.

Community participants would be provided with a $30 voucher to complete a survey, another $30 for the focus group, and another $30 for the interview for their time.

What will we give your organisation?

We can give you back all the data that we have captured from your community, (DE identified and confidentialised of course).We can give you the data in any form you like, plus create a Community Report for your community. There might be some questions you would like to ask your community, and we can include them in the survey.

How long would we be involved with your community / organisation?

Approximately 2 months

How safe is the data we collect?

The data is safe. It will be DE identified and Confidentialised. Our final report will reflect what Communities (up to 20) took part in the study, but your data and community will be kept secret.  Meaning, no one will know what data came from your community.

If you think this study would be of benefit to your community, or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Victoria Hovane and the FaCtS team on 1800 531 600 or email facts.study@anu.edu.au.

1.3 NACCHO offers discounted subscriptions and trials of the Clinical Decision Support System UpToDate for all practices. 

 Download the brochure

UpToDate Brochure – Staying UpToDate

UpToDate is an evidence-based clinical decision support system and extensive medical database. Used to answer clinical questions, improve medical knowledge and helps provide consistent, best practice care on the full spectrum of medical conditions.

It is proven to change the way medical professionals practice medicine, and is currently used across a range of our practices.

Key features of UpToDate® include:

  • Evidence-based medical content that is researched, created, and continually updated by over 6,500 leading physicians
  • Practice Changing Updates – highlights specific new recommendations and/or updates that UTD anticipate may change usual clinical practice
  • 25 Specialties – UTD contains all of the internal medicine subspecialties (at a level that meets the needs of the subspecialist), all of primary care, internal medicine, ob/gyn, pediatrics, general surgery, and more – all in one resource.
  • Graphics Search – This powerful search engine feature allows you to search tens of thousands of pictures, charts, movies, illustrations and more – all without ever leaving UpToDate®
  • Medical Calculators – More than 165 medical calculators are available with the subscription
  • Drug Information – A select drug database of more than 5,600 unique drug entries (in partnership with Lexicomp®) including adult, pediatric, and international drugs and a drug interactions tool that provides graded adverse reaction information between drug-to-drug and drug-to-herb interactions.
  • Patient Information – UTD includes more than 1,500 Patient Information articles about the most common medical conditions and therapies.
  • Accredited Education Resource – accredited from a range of colleges including the RACGP & ACRRM allowing staff to earn CME/CPD Points

Contact details

James Dixon from UpToDate

In the meantime, don’t hesitate to contact me at james.dixon@wolterskluwer.com or Mobile: 0401 855 882, if you have any questions.

2.1 SA : Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service, Quitline and Puyu Blasters jion forces in Murray Bridge health promotion

Smoking is more than just an expensive habit – it steals lifetimes and tears families apart, those present at a World No Tobacco Day event have been told.

In Edwards Square, Murray Bridge last Thursday, several Aboriginal health organisations joined forces to warn about the long-term consequences of smoking.

Originally published here

T-shirts designed by local artist Harley Hall were given out as people pledged to live smoke-free, or help friends and family do so; sausages were cooked and songs sung.

Mr Hall said smoking had always been a big part of his family.

He had lost both of his nannas to emphysema, he said; his father had had lung cancer and his mother now had a reduced lung capacity as well.

“So much of our community is smoking,” he said.

“Family means everything to us blackfellas, so it’s time to start now, time to take the pledge.”

Harold Bundamarra Stewart, now aged in his 60s, said he finally managed to quit 25 years ago.

“I struggled all my life,” he said.

“I had my first cigarette when I was 15 years old.

“Now I’ve dedicated my life to helping get that message out there about the dangers of smoking.”

It was a significant factor in diabetes, he said, and three or four other diseases came along with it.

He urged all smokers to seek help from health services.

“It’s very important to have support,” he said.

“I struggled – I quit seven times in my life and always went back.

“But you can give up successfully.”

The event was organised by the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service, Quitline and Puyu Blasters.

Get help: Quitline 13 78 48, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service 8531 0289.

 

2.2 SA : Pika Wiya Aboriginal Health Service hosted a Social and Emotional Wellbeing Day on Tuesday, June 5 to address chronic diseases in a culturally sensitive way.

HEALTH: Pika Wiya CEO Alan Morris and Country and Outback Health Indigenous Health Project Officer Jacinta McKenzie at Pika Wiya’s Social and Emotional Wellbeing Day

Originally published HERE

The theme of the event, which was held in conjunction with Country and Outback Health, was ‘Wellness our way’, bringing a host of traditional healers on site for consultation.

The event showcased programs that focus on mental and physical personal care, such as Stepping Stones, headspace and Family Violence Legal Service Aboriginal Corporation.

Pika Wiya CEO Alan Morris highlighted the importance of integrating traditional healers into medicine.

“We (Pika Wiya) are the largest users of traditional healers, or Ngangkari’s, outside of the APY,” Mr Morris said.

“Using bush medicine to heal mind, spirit and body are integral to the ongoing success of the Aboriginal community.

“Their medicine and ways of healing compliment the more traditional western medicine.”

Tom Powell from Red Dust Healing was a guest speaker at the event, focusing on how to deal with grief, loss and trauma.

Country and Outback Health’s Indigenous Health Project Officer Jacinta McKenzie said the day was all about caring for the mind and making better choices.

“Every person and family has different things going on within their life to overcome to be able to get to that next stage,” she said.

“Grief and loss; we have a lot in the community that impacts on people as well. We try to encourage people to look after themselves a bit better to try to deal with it separately.”

The event also gave the organisations the chance to bring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into Pika Wiya to complete their Medicare Health Assessment.

3.NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Services tours New England to understand the challenges facing our Indigenous communities

Service providers with Aboriginal clients are invited to attend a local workshop this month to understand the challenges facing our Indigenous communities.

SEE EVENTS Calendar

The workshops have been developed by Spirit Dreaming for the Armajun Aboriginal Health Service in response to feedback they received from communities in the areas where they provide primary health care services: Tenterfield, Armidale, Glen Innes, Inverell, Tingha and Walcha.

Originally published HERE

“The workshops came about through consultation with our communities in our service region,” said Armajun program manager James Sheather.

“They’ve told us there is a need for more mental health wellbeing services in community, so we are hoping these workshops will start the ball rolling by providing community and service suppliers with information sessions to help them understand the issues being faced by their clients.”

Mr Sheather said the workshop would challenge and test past perceptions of Aboriginal Peoples and their culture.

“It is designed to address cultural realities in order to improve service delivery to Aboriginal clients and co-workers,” he said.

“We will explore the three major issues which impact on Aboriginal peoples of today; transgenerational trauma; lateral violence and cultural loads.”

Facilitator Mel Brown, an Aboriginal Ngunnawal woman, will identify and ask participants to consider the actual and potential impacts of these issues upon their community.

“She will also show them available resources and help them develop the skills for managing clients and families who are affected by these issues,” Mr Sheather said.

The Tenterfield workshop will be held at the Visitor Information office on June 15 between 9.30am and 3.30pm.

4.QLD : Carbal Medical Services expands health services for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community

Carbal Medical Services has opened a new centre in Guy St as it prepares to ramp up its clinical practice and community services.

CEO Brian Hewitt said the clinic in Warwick was “bulging at the seams”.

“We now deliver 29 different programs across the darling downs on top of the two full clinics that we operate in Warwick and Toowoomba.”

Originally published HERE

The increased services in Warwick will address an growing demand for culturally appropriate medical care in the region.

Carbal Medical Services now has 7000 clients across the Darling Downs.

Toni Park with Carbal Medical Centre patient, Githabul elder Amos Close. Photo Jayden Brown / Warwick Daily News
Toni Park with Carbal Medical Centre patient, Githabul elder Amos Close. Photo Jayden Brown / Warwick Daily News Jayden Brown

“If we identify a gap, we don’t sit around and wait for funding. We will set up a program and make it happen,” Mr Hewitt said.

The new community services centre in Guy St would focus on delivering health programs to tackle smoking, drug and alcohol abuse and low-intensity mental health.

The Warwick clinic also plans to increase the number of doctors to cater to rising demands for GP and allied health care.

Practice manager Kerry Stewart said the waiting list for doctor appointments signified the community’s investment in health.

“We certainly get a strong engagement from the community,” Ms Stewart said.

She put the success down to staff cultural awareness training and empowering patients.

“There is a focus on assisting people to take initiative on their own health which makes them want to attend their appointments,” Ms Stewart said.

 

EVERYONE COUNTS: Carbal helps Indigenous and non-Indigenous people of all ages.
EVERYONE COUNTS: Carbal helps Indigenous and non-Indigenous people of all ages. Contributed

Patients travel from as far as Stanthorpe and Inglewood to access specialised care in Warwick.

Ms Stewart said the expansion of services for the community’s Indigenous population was a positive step in reconciliation week.

“Being able to offer more services for Indigenous people in the community contributes to the broader reconciliation movement and making Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people feel valued.”

“It is a long road but if everyone works together we will eventually get there in closing the gaps.”

4.2 :  Queensland State Minister for Health checks out Gidgee Healing Deadly Choices Program

Steven Miles, Queensland State Minister for Health and Paul Woodhouse, North West Hospital and Health Service Chair who came down to Mount Isa Special School today to check out the Deadly Choices program!

5.VIC : VAHS and Deadly Choices health promotion at the AFL Long Walk

Check it out the Essendon legend himself Anthony McDonald-Tipungwuti wearing the VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt out during the warm up for Dream Time at the G. The other players also wore the shirts as well… What a moment !

If you want your very own VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt just like Tippa the only way you can get one is to complete a health check at VAHS. So call us and book your health check on 03 9419 3000

6.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO staff came out in force for the Larrakia Nation Family Fun day 

Danila Dilba staff came out in force for the Larrakia Nation Family Fun day to celebrate their 20th Anniversary at the Jingili Water Gardens on 26 May.

It was a great day with lots of cultural activities and community coming down. Congratulations to Larrakia Nation for this important milestone and thanks to all our staff who helped out on the day. #LivingStronger #LivingLonger

7.WA :Tracy Westerman visited Karratha for Indigenous mental health in the Pilbara

Pioneering Aboriginal psychologist and WA Australian of the Year winner Tracy Westerman visited Karratha last week to deliver specialised training in indigenous mental health to psychologists and social workers from across the region.

Originally published HERE

Over a two-day workshop at the Karratha Leisureplex, the internationally recognised psychologist spoke to local staff about how to identify signs of mental health issues such as depression in Aboriginal clients and intervene early in a culturally appropriate way.

The event marks the first time Dr Westerman, who grew up in Tom Price, has returned to the Pilbara since winning WA Australian of the Year in November.

She said the training would fill in gaps in professionals’ knowledge on indigenous mental health, which was too often “invisible” in mainstream psychology training.

“We get people skilled up in identifying the different signs of depression and knowing how to treat depression in a more culturally specific way, because the more we can get conditions at an early stage, the more we can prevent the escalation of those issues in the community more generally,” she said.

“I want people to be more tuned into those early signs and also how to work on and prevent mental health issues in Aboriginal communities, which are often very different to working with non-indigenous communities.”

The workshop, which was supported by the WA Primary Health Alliance and facilitated by Mission Australia, was attended by about 40 mental health and drug and alcohol counselling staff from Mission Australia, headspace, Hedland’s Youth Involvement Council and Bloodwood Tree.

Mission Australia Hedland clinical lead Amanda MacBride said Dr Westerman’s training was invaluable for her and her colleagues for its focus on indigenous mental health.

“We can get cultural training but it’s general, and we can get more mental health training in our field, but to find that combination is rare, so that’s what makes this so enriching because we need that combination up here in the Pilbara,” she said.

“You are going to have Aboriginal clients here … so you need those tools.”

8. TAS: The latest Virgin aircraft Tinamirakuna named after the Macquarie River in lutruwita (Tasmania)

 

9.ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service $11 million delayed

About $11 million has been set aside over three years for a new facility for Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service, a 2016 election promise.

The majority of the money will be delivered to Winnunga later than proposed, with about $8 million of the funding being delivered in 2020-21

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #NSW @awabakalltd #QLD @TAIHS__ #VIC @VAHS1972 #SA #WA #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre #ACT #NT Plus @FaCtS_Study #IGAwards2018

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

2.QLD : Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Services (TAIHS),Wins AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

3.1 NSW : Why Aboriginal Community Controlled Health organisations like Katungul Aboriginal Community Corporation and Medical Service (ACC&MS) works best for Aboriginal people.?

3.2 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO Quit Crew Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4 .VIC : Yohanand sees his role as helping to run VAHS so it can improve Indigenous health in Victoria.#NRW2018

5.WA : Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya ACCHO , offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke

6. SA : Ultramarathon is no sweat for Zibeon Fielding in quest to raise funds for remote dialysis treatment

7. NT : AMSANT  : Inaugural NT Aboriginal Leadership and Governance Forum to be held Alice Springs

8.1 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO featured in primary health magazine

8.2 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : A treaty with Aboriginal people of Tasmania

9.ACT May 28 Australia’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations that place culture at the heart of their governance are invited to apply for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards (IGAs), which were launched today.

Reconciliation Australia and BHP Billiton are proud to run the awards for the first time in partnership with the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute, a national centre of governance excellence.

Established in 2005, the IGAs publicly recognise and celebrate outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations and projects that make extraordinary contributions to communities and the nation.

Organisations that are displaying effective Indigenous governance are encouraged to apply, with prizes including corporate mentoring, feedback from the judging panel, media and networking opportunities, and a share in $60,000.

Reconciliation Australia CEO Karen Mundine said it was important to showcase the high achievers in Indigenous governance, so that they get the accolades they deserve – and so that broader Australia understands their important contributions.

“For more than a decade, the IGA winners have shown that so much is possible when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander develop innovative and robust systems of governance by putting culture at the heart of what they do,” Ms Mundine said.

Australian Indigenous Governance Institute CEO Michelle Deshong said governance was the foundation stone that enabled Indigenous peoples and communities to build a prosperous future.

“The ability to come together, set goals, and put things in place to achieve their goals, allows people to build a self-determined future,” Ms Deshong said.

“For Indigenous peoples, this means navigating a complex and interconnected web of cultural, environmental, economic and political influences. Celebrating those who have done this well fills us with ideas, confidence and inspiration.”

The two award categories are Category A: Indigenous-led incorporated organisations and Category B: Indigenous-led non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Winners in each of the two categories will receive $20,000, and highly commended organisations in each category will each be awarded $10,000. Ms Mundine said the IGAs have a history of attracting high caliber nominations from organisations around the country, from the bustling capital cities to our most remote communities.

“In 2018, we want to see applications from organisations and projects that are making a difference in their communities, through community engagement, varying governance models and cultural practices.

Applications or recommendations for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards can be made online at http://www.reconciliation.org.au/iga or by calling 02 6273 9200. Applications close Saturday 30 June 2018.

There are two award categories:

  • Category A: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in Indigenous incorporated organisations.
  • Category B: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Each category is looking for governance that demonstrates:

  • Innovation
  • Effectiveness
  • Self-determination and leadership
  • Cultural relevance and legitimacy
  • Future planning, sustainability and governance resilience.

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

The Australian National University is seeking partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families. We want to partner and work with local organisations and communities to make sure the research benefits the community.

Who are we?

We work at the Australian National University (ANU). The study is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers. Professor Victoria Hovane (Ngarluma, Malgnin/Kitja, Gooniyandi), along with Associate Professor Raymond Lovett (Wongaibon, Ngiyampaa) and Dr Jill Guthrie (Wiradjuri) from NCEPH, and Professor Matthew Gray of the Centre for Social Research and Methods (CSRM) at ANU will be leading the study.

Study Question: What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

How are we going to gather information to answer the study question?

A Community Researcher (who we would give funds to employ) would capture the data by interviewing 100 community members, running 3 focus groups for Men / Women / Youth (over 16).  We would interview approx. 5 community members to hear about the story in your community.

We know Family Violence happens in all communities. We don’t want to find out the prevalence, we want to know what your communities needs to feel safe. We will also be mapping the services in your community, facilities and resources available in a community.  All this information will be given back to your community.

What support would we provide your service?

We are able to support your organisation up to $40,000 (including funds for $30 vouchers), this would also help to employ a Community Researcher.

Community participants would be provided with a $30 voucher to complete a survey, another $30 for the focus group, and another $30 for the interview for their time.

What will we give your organisation?

We can give you back all the data that we have captured from your community, (DE identified and confidentialised of course).We can give you the data in any form you like, plus create a Community Report for your community. There might be some questions you would like to ask your community, and we can include them in the survey.

How long would we be involved with your community / organisation?

Approximately 2 months

How safe is the data we collect?

The data is safe. It will be DE identified and Confidentialised. Our final report will reflect what Communities (up to 20) took part in the study, but your data and community will be kept secret.  Meaning, no one will know what data came from your community.

If you think this study would be of benefit to your community, or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Victoria Hovane and the FaCtS team on 1800 531 600 or email facts.study@anu.edu.au.

2.QLD : Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Services (TAIHS),Wins AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

 ” A very BIG congratulations to our deadly health team for winning the AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award.  This is an incredible recognition for all the hard work our health staff do, and the commitment they show to our community. And, thanks to Aunty Di Ross for making the trip to Melbourne and attending the dinner on Friday night, so that she could accept the award on our behalf “

TAIHS ACCHO MOB

AGPAL is excited to announce the winners for the AGPAL & QIP Excellence Awards.

With six award categories open for nominations,our judging panel were wowed by the numerous stories of team work, innovation, safety and quality, and quality improvement initiatives. We thank everyone who took the time to submit a nomination.

The Excellence Winner and Highly Commended Recipient for each category was announced at the AGPAL& QIP 2018 Conference Gala Dinner, held on Friday 18 May 2018 at the Grand Hyatt Melbourne. These achievements were recognised over the period 30 June 2015 to 30 December 2017.

Due to the high calibre of nominations for the QIP Community Organisation of the Year Award, our judging panel created an extra award category announced on the night to recognise the significant efforts two organisations have undertaken to recognise diversity.

Please join us in congratulating each of the AGPAL & QIP award winners, listed below.

 

AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

Excellence Winner – Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Services (TAIHS), Queensland

Highly Commended – Nidjalla Waangan Mia, Western Australia

Please join us in congratulating each of the AGPAL award finalists, listed below.

Finalists  AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Queensland

Awabakal Medical Service, New South Wales

Ngaanyatjarra Health Service, Northern Territory

3.1 NSW : Why Aboriginal Community Controlled Health organisations like Katungul Aboriginal Community Corporation and Medical Service (ACC&MS)works best for Aboriginal people.?

The CEO of a NSW based  Aboriginal community controlled health service says it’s important for  Government and other  non -Aboriginal health practitioners to understand what they actually do and why throwing lots of money at  health service delivery is not the only solution.

A recent   mainstream media report suggested that  the roll out  of Aboriginal only services is  “driving a dangerous racial wedge and putting Australia on a slippery slope towards its own form of apartheid “….. but  despite the claim the Katungul Aboriginal Community Corporation and Medical Service (ACC&MS) has  successfully provided   health care to  Koori people on the Far South Coast of New South Wales for the last 46 years.

CEO Robert Skeen told CAAMA  NEWS  that as well as being the largest employer of Koori  people on the far south  coast  ….Katungul also  has a large knowledge  base of older  people  who  are still actively involved in the sector.

Listen to the full interview here :

3.2 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO Quit Crew Tackling Indigenous Smoking

This Sunday the 27th of May the Awabakal Quit Crew will be heading over to Boolaroo Rugby fields, home to the mighty Awabakal United Eagles Women’s League tag and Men’s Rugby League Team.

The Quit Crew will have giveaways and prizes to be won. Join us from 12pm – 4pm

4 .VIC : Yohanand sees his role as helping to run VAHS so it can improve Indigenous health in Victoria.#NRW2018

They were one of my clients before, and that got me reading the Federal Government’s Closing the Gap report. That’s when I became aware of the differences in health outcomes between Aboriginal people and the rest of Australia,

The biggest fact that stood out to me was life expectancy, where the average gap with the rest of Australia is more than 10 years. In this day and age?

It’s well documented that many Aboriginal people would rather not go to a mainstream clinic, which is why a lot health issues have gone unaddressed for years. A health service run by Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people makes it easier for them to talk about the issues they’re facing.”

Yohanand – who also goes by John – came across the life expectancy figures when working as a senior consultant at chartered accountants Saward Dawson, who have many not-for-profit clients, including VAHS

With an annual turnover of around $20 million and some 200 staff, the VAHS is Victoria’s largest Aboriginal-controlled health service, and John says community control allows it to make a difference

Download Summary-of-VAHS-Strategic-Plan-2017-2022

Yohanand is now VAHS’s Chief Financial Officer, a position he gained in early 2017, just before starting his MBA at Melbourne Business School thanks to a scholarship funded by our Senior Executive MBA Class of 2003.

“If it wasn’t for the scholarship, I wouldn’t have even thought about applying for the program. It really encourages me that there are other people out there who think about the challenges we face and how hard it is to attract people with the skills that are needed to run a business.”

As a not-for-profit organisation, Melbourne Business School is committed to helping passionate people like Yohanand improve the lives of others.

Yohanand sees his role as helping to run VAHS as well as possible so it can improve Indigenous health in Victoria.

“It’s won’t be me that makes a change in health outcomes for Indigenous Victorians, but I can help hire the right people and have as many clinics operate across Victoria as possible to achieve that outcome.

“I’ve always been very passionate about the not-for-profit sector, and I want to make sure that, wherever I work at, I’m always making a difference that will last beyond me. It’s not just about me being there.”

5.WA : Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya ACCHO , offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke.

Are you aware of the dangers of passive smoking?

Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya, offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke.
If you need help quitting smoking, give us a call on 08 9172 0444#WMHSAC #BeAtYourBest #WirrakaMaya

VIEW HERE

6. SA : Ultramarathon is no sweat for Zibeon Fielding in quest to raise funds for remote dialysis treatment

 ” Mr Fielding was running to raise money for The Purple House, an organisation that provides dialysis to some of Australia’s most remote communities.

Aside from the more than $40,000 raised so far, he wants to promote a healthy lifestyle to other Indigenous Australians.”

From ABC TV COVERAGE

Photo: Rob De Castella and Zibeon Fielding celebrate after the big race. (Facebook: Indigenous Marathon Project)

I’m knackered. My legs are blown out, I’m about to kick the feet up and have a sleep.”

Starting at 4am in the APY Lands town of Indulkana, Zibeon Fielding has just finished a 62-kilometre ultramarathon.

The feat, which is about the same as running one and a half full marathons, comes just five weeks after Mr Fielding completed the Boston Marathon.

It would be hard to find two more different experiences.

“The temperature and the weather conditions were horrible that day, and it was just bucketing down rain,” he said of running in Boston.

“It was minus 15 degrees and you couldn’t feel any circulation from your elbow to your fingertips.”

In the APY Lands, Mr Fielding completed the entire ultramarathon on an unsealed road, which varies from gravel to red dirt.

He also had to contend with wildlife — early on he spotted a pack of dingoes while he was still running in the dark.

“You’re out running on your own, where in Boston there are thousands of other runners,” he said.

Mr Fielding was running to raise money for The Purple House, an organisation that provides dialysis to some of Australia’s most remote communities.

Aside from the more than $40,000 raised so far, he wants to promote a healthy lifestyle to other Indigenous Australians.

“I’m here to make a change, with Indigenous people and their health and wanting to be a role model and lead a brighter and better future,” he said.

“I want to see more of our people becoming healthy so they can have better lives.”

‘The first 42 kilometres was just a warm-up’

The seasoned runner is an alumni of the Indigenous Marathon Project.

In 2016, he and 11 other Indigenous Australians ran the New York Marathon after six months of training.

World champion marathon runner Rob De Castella developed the initiative and was on hand for the entire ultramarathon, encouraging Fielding along the way.

“I’m incredibly proud,” he said.

“This is the face of Indigenous Australia that I want all Australians to see.

“I think it is so important for our country to have these really bright, shining lights — our Aboriginal and Islander men and women.”

Mr De Castella said the 62-kilometre run was no easy feat.

“To run 62 kilometres, that’s a marathon, and then you almost need to keep going for another half marathon,” he said.

“We talk about hitting the wall at 30 kilometres, and the struggle to get through — the battle of the mind over the body over that last 12 kilometres.

“The 42 kilometres was just a warm-up for Zibeon.”

He said Mr Fielding’s achievements were a testament to kind of change he wanted to see coming out of the Indigenous Marathon Project.

“It’s not about taking a group of Indigenous people to New York to run a marathon, it is about what they do afterwards,” Mr De Castella said.

“The journey really starts when you cross the finish line and that’s exactly what we’ve seen with Zibeon.

“Doing something that is hard — running a marathon in six months — gives you an incredible sense of pride and self-respect.

As for his next challenge, Mr Fielding hasn’t ruled out going even further.

But first, food.

“Hopefully I’ll get a snag, if I could find a burger that’d be great,” he quipped.

7.1 NT : AMSANT  : Inaugural NT Aboriginal Leadership and Governance Forum to be held Alice Springs

The Office of Aboriginal Affairs’ Inaugural NT #Aboriginal #Leadership and #Governance Forum will be held in Alice Springs next Friday, 25 May. #AGMP Manager, Wes Miller, will be a panelist at the event.

Registration is free and open now at www.tinyurl.com/yaupmbhg. We hope to see you there!

7.2 NT : AMSANT  : Re shaping the Youth Justice System

8.1 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO featured in primary health magazine

Download a copy primaryhealthmatters8-v5

WHEN Primary Health Tasmania started looking at commissioning mental health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, our research pointed to a need for a strong focus on social and emotional wellbeing.

To do this, we needed to build our understanding about how resources could best be used to improve social and emotional wellbeing by turning to local Aboriginal communities themselves.

Primary Health Tasmania worked with seven organisations to co-design services aimed at building resilience and empowering people to have a role in managing their mental health.

Australian Government-funded activity encompasses a range of culturally appropriate events, from on country experiences and grief and loss workshops, to mental health

Programs designed to build the capacity of service providers to better support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal clients were also commissioned.

They aim to help strengthen different organisations’ health-related knowledge.

The following organisations have been commissioned to deliver services to support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people:

  • Cape Barren Island Aboriginal Association (north east)
  • Circular Head Aboriginal Corporation (north west)
  • Flinders Island Aboriginal Association (north east)
  • Karadi Aboriginal Corporation (south)
  • Rural Health Tasmania (north west)
  • South East Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (south)
  • Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (statewide).

“These programs were crafted by listening to the expert advice of these organisations, most of which are Aboriginal community-controlled organisations,” Primary Health Tasmania’s Susan Powell says.

Adopting a co-design approach that included the learnings of established local organisations was critical to giving the programs the best chance of success for Aboriginal people taking part in them, she says.

“We asked them to propose services they thought had the best chance of improving the social and emotional wellbeing of local Aboriginal people, based on what they know is needed and will work,” Ms Powell says. 

8.2 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : A treaty with Aboriginal people of Tasmania

9.ACT May 28 Australia’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday

This year will proudly have Australia’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday on Monday 28th May. Reconciliation Day and is a time to learn more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories, to share that knowledge and help us grow

Members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community can access Transport Canberra’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Bus to attend the event. The bus will be departing from Bay 4 of the Queanbeyan bus interchange on Morisset Street from 9.30am on Monday 28 May, and will shuttle between the interchange and the event throughout the day. See below schedule for approximate timings – places are limited.

9.30am – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4
10am – Glebe Park

10.30am – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4

11am – Glebe Park

11.30am – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4

12pm – Glebe Park

12.30pm – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4

1pm – Glebe Park

2.15pm – Glebe Park to Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #NSW #QLD @QAIHC_QLD #VIC @VAHS1972 @DeadlyChoices #WA @TheAHCWA #NT #ACT

1.1 National : Funding opportunity for ACCHO’s : Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP) $35 Million Available

2.1 NSW : For NSW ACCHO members Indigenous bubs need to be counted for a passport to life

2.2 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) Taylor and co arrive to help raise Organ Tissue Donation awareness in Indigenous communities

3.ACT New $12 Million facility for Winnunga ACCHO as they celebrate 30 years

4. 1 QLD : GALANGOOR Duwalami Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service TEN YEARS MAKES YOU MORE STRONG

4.2 QLD : QAIHC helps Palm Island lay health foundation plan for next 10 years

5. WA :  AHCWA staff are currently in the Kimberley’s completing the Gibb River Challenge to raise money for the RFDS.

6. TAS: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre Remembering Kikatapula

7. SA: Please help Zibeon get people back home for treatment and give generously to help open the doors to the first remote dialysis clinic on the APY lands.

8.1 VIC : VAHS Deadly Choices Education session Friday 18 May

9. NT Congress Alice Spring new Tackling Smoking Ads

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Funding opportunity for ACCHO’s : Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP) $35 Million Available

The objective of the IAHP is to provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with access to effective high quality health care services in urban, regional, rural and remote locations across Australia.  This includes through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, wherever possible and appropriate, as well as mainstream services delivering comprehensive, culturally appropriate primary health care.

WEBSITE

The expected outcomes of the IAHP include improvements in:

  • The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
  • Access to high quality, comprehensive and culturally appropriate primary health care; and
  • System level support to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care sector to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of services.

Implementation of the IAHP aligns with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander Health Plan 2013-2023: Implementation Plan which focusses on systematic service improvement and addressing geographic disparities through more effective and innovative regional arrangements.  The Implementation Plan can be found on the department’s Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 website.

 

About the Major Capital Works Program Grant Opportunity

This Grant Opportunity is for Expression of Interest applications as Stage One in a two-stage application process for funding under the IAHP Major Capital Works Program.  The objective of this Grant Opportunity is to improve access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to safe and effective essential health services through the provision of culturally appropriate, fit for purpose health infrastructure across Australia.  Further information on the type of activities and projects eligible to be funded under this Grant Opportunity are included in the IAHP Major Capital Works Program Stage One EOI Guidelines.

Eligibility:

Organisations will be eligible to apply if they satisfy all of the eligibility criteria outlined in the IAHP Major Capital Works Program Stage One EOI Guidelines and the IAHP Major Capital Works Program Stage One EOI Application Form, which includes that the organisation must currently receive primary health care funding to deliver clinical services under the IAHP.

Total Amount Available (AUD):

$35,000,000.00

Instructions for Lodgement:

All applications must be submitted on the IAHP Major Capital Works Program EOI Stage One Application Form, following the instructions and eligibility requirements included in the Application Form and Grant Opportunity Guidelines, and emailed to Grant.ATM@health.gov.au by the stated closing date and time.

Before completing the application form, please read the documents attached to this Grant Opportunity Package which include the Grant Opportunity Guidelines, the IAHP Guidelines, the application form, and the department’s funding agreement standard terms and conditions.

2.1 NSW : For NSW ACCHO members Indigenous bubs need to be counted for a passport to life

The NSW Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages has found that up to 10 percent of Indigenous babies are going unregistered in some parts of NSW.

Speaking at the South Sydney Rabbitohs’ Indigenous Round, NSW Registrar of Births Deaths & Marriages Amanda Ianna launched a new campaign to encourage Aboriginal mums to register their bubs, as well as a new range of commemorative birth certificates.

“The number of Indigenous people still not registering births is far too high,” Ms Ianna said.

“It causes problems for children when they need a birth certificate to enrol in school or organised sport or, when they’re older, get a driver’s licence or tax file number.

“A birth certificate is a passport to many things in life that we often take for granted.

“Some mums are under the misconception they have to pay to register their baby or they assume the hospital does it for you. That’s not the case.”

The ‘Our Kids Count’ campaign encourages Aboriginal mums to register their bubs and includes this video: http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/Aboriginal

Ms Ianna also unveiled a new range of commemorative birth certificates, including three new skin tone variations on the best-selling ‘baby handprint’ design.

“For parents, the commemorative certificates allow them to honour their cultural heritage while celebrating one of the most significant events of their lives,” she said.

“They are designed for people of all backgrounds, including Indigenous communities, recently arrived migrants and multicultural families who now call NSW home.”

In addition to the handprints, there is also a Ken Done original, May Gibbs’ favourite characters Snugglepot and Cuddlepie and two Bananas in Pyjamas designs.

Who can I ask for help?

Our team are here to help, so you can phone 13 77 88 to yarn.

Speak to your local Aboriginal Medical Service, Local Aboriginal Land Council, Cultural Centre, Aboriginal Health Practitioner or community centre. Staff in hospitals and medical practices or your local Aboriginal Liasion Officer can give you information.

For more information on the certificates visit:

http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au or call 13 77 88

2.2 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) Taylor and co arrive to help raise Organ Tissue Donation awareness in Indigenous communities

Having all played on the weekend, Ash Taylor, Braidon Burns, Tyrell Fuimaono and Will Smith jump on a bus … where are they going?

The quartet of NRL guns head to Kennard Park, Wellington, naturally.

While most top flight rugby league players stay at home or enjoy some much deserved family time after game day, Taylor gave that up to lead a small convoy to the bush to help promote a worthy cause.

Originally published HERE

The foursome was spreading the organ tissue donation message, a day put on by Donate Life, in conjunction with the Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) and Organ Tissue Donation Services (OTDS) to raise awareness within Aboriginal communities in the Central West.

For the Gold Coast Titans halfback, one touted as a future State of Origin No.7 for the Maroons, coming out to an area he’s previously supported was a no-brainier.

The fact there was a bit of footy on at the same time was just the icing on the cake.

“I’ve been here a few times. I watched a game here last year too,” Taylor said before kick-off of the first grade game between the Cowboys and Westside on Sunday.

Taylor hails from Toowoomba while Burns is originally from Coonamble.

“It’s always a good game here,” Taylor continued.

“I love coming out and watching country footy, it reminds me of home. I’m really excited to watch it.”

3.ACT New $12 Million facility for Winnunga ACCHO as they celebrate 30 years

The Winnunga Aboriginal Health Service, which celebrated 30 years of excellence last weekend, will soon be able to continue to do its important work in a brand new facility with support from the ACT Government.

Minister for Health and Wellbeing Meegan Fitzharris and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs Rachel Stephen-Smith will join Winnunga Nimmityjah Health and Community Services and the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body on Saturday to reaffirm the ACT Government’s commitment to the service, which delivers on an election promise for a new Winnunga Nimmityjah facility.

“Winnunga Nimmityjah plays such an important role in our community and delivers quality health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our region every day,” Minister Fitzharris said.

“The ACT Government’s support of Winnunga Nimmityjah is long standing and I hope our partnership will grow so we can continue to focus our efforts on closing the gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“I’m very pleased to announce that the $12 million funded in last year’s Budget will be provided to Winnunga Nimmityjah as grants to build a modern new facility that Winnunga Nimmityjah will own. The ACT Government will support Winnunga Nimmityjah throughout the delivery of the project.

“The ACT Government has committed to work closely with Winnunga on the new facility, and planning and preliminary work has already commenced,” said Minister Fitzharris.

Minister Stephen-Smith said each year more than 4,000 people used Winnunga’s wide range of services.

“Winnunga Nimmityjah means strong health in the Wiradjuri language, and Canberra is lucky to have had such a strong and supportive health service for local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders for the last 30 years

4. 1 QLD : GALANGOOR Duwalami Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service TEN YEARS MAKES YOU MORE STRONG

GALANGOOR Duwalami Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service in Hervey Bay, Queensland, has celebrated 10 years of business

Director Graham Douglas said the service has been working to close the Health gap in the local community but there’s still plenty more to be done.

“We’re going really well, the Wakka Wakka man told the Koori Mail. “We get specialists in once a month as well as the general clinic services, which are always busy. We moved to a new clinic in 2017 and we had to have two buildings next to each other to meet the demand.”

Mr Douglas said marking 10 years was an important milestone for the service.

“We’ve had our ups and downs, “he said. “Back in 2008 we only had three staff and they all did two jobs each. We are growing now. We’ve been working hard and we haven’t stopped looking out for the community. We are doing really well. We’re thinking smart’.

Mr Douglas said now with more staff, the aim of the service remains the same- it’s always for the community.

“We’ve got a few success stories, he said.

“It’s about seeing smiles on people’s faces when they get stronger and healthier.”

4.2 QLD : QAIHC helps Palm Island lay health foundation plan for next 10 years

Guests included Townsville Hospital and Health Service boards Chair Tony Mooney, Northern Queensland Primary Health Network Director Suzanne Andrews and QAIHC – Queensland Aboriginal and Islander health Council Board Chair Kieran Chilcott, who signed a statement of intent recommitting to Closing the Gap on Palm Island.

A plan that will lay the foundation for a healthier Palm Island for the next 10 years was launched in the north Queensland Aboriginal shire last month.

The Palm Island health Action Plan 2018 to 28 was launched at the local PCYC before a large audience that included Elders community members and invited guests.

Photo Suzanne Andrews and story originally published in Koori Mail

Palm Island Major Alf Lacey said it was significant for the community.

“It means a lot to our community when decision makers respect us and involve us in the planning and delivery of things that affect us deeply, he said. “Our community is a unique community and therefore our desire to Close the Gap needs a unique solution. This plan strikes that balance. It is important to celebrate success; however, we need to remain focused on the long journey ahead in meeting the objectives of this plan”.

Ethel Wharton, who was the matron at Palm hospital from 1967 for about 20 years and was presented with a photo and a card acknowledging her service .

State Townsville MP Scott Stewart said the Palm Island Health Action Plan would provide a clear road map for the future delivery of health care.

“This is a document developed by Palm Islanders for Palm Islanders, he said. ”The community has told us how they want to be cared for and what they need to live strong, long and healthy lives. Today we launch the plan in partnership with community and commit to making their vision a reality.”

Mr Mooney said the Health Service and Council had embraced the opportunity to grow the influence Palm Islanders had over their own health.

“There is evidence that shows when people have greater engagement with their health they have better health outcomes,”he said. “Good primary health is essential to warding off chronic illness, being healthy and living longer. Our excellent staff at Palm’s Joyce Palmer Health Service will always be there when people get sick but this new centre is all about helping Palm Islanders stay well.” Mr Stewart said key components of the plan were already being implemented with the $16.5 million Palm Island Primary Care Centre under construction.

The project is being funded through 8.5 million for the State Government’s Significant Regional Infrastructure Project program, $4.7 million from the Making Tracks Indigenous Health Investment Strategy and $3.3 million from the Townsville Hospital and Health Service.

“We are already seeing the first green shoots of what this plan will deliver for Palm Islanders,” Mr Stewart said.

“This centre will expand and improve Palm Islanders access to primary health services and provide a hub for social and emotional wellbeing and dental maternal and child health services. A transition will begin to slowly transfer delivery of these services to the community.”

In coordination with the launch a Palm Island Primary Health Fair was held at the PCYC.

The event included sporting clinics by the Townsville Fire and former North Queensland Cowboys star Ray Thompson, a healthy lunch catered locally, interactive primary health stalls and local entertainment.

5. WA :  AHCWA staff are currently in the Kimberley’s completing the Gibb River Challenge to raise money for the RFDS.

The 12 staff members left Derby on Sunday, travelling on the Gibb River Rd, reaching Ellenbrae station last night. Next stop is Home Valley Station where they’ll be able to have a hot shower and a much-needed rest.

The Gibb River Challenge is a socially competitive 660km team relay event raising community awareness and money for charity. The event runs over one week from Derby to El Questro.

6. TAS: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre Remembering Kikatapula

This week marks the death of Kikatapula, also known in life as ‘Black Tom’ or Tom Birch.

From the east coast, he saw the first ships arriving in lutruwita; was stolen from his family and brought up around Richmond; rejoined his tribe; was arrested for murder but released; spoke several Aboriginal languages.

was a major figure in the wars of resistance; later joined Robinson’s expeditions as a guide; contracted dysentery at Wybalenna and died during this week in 1832 at pataway, the area around today’s town of Burnie.

waranta tangara Kikatapula, mangina rrala;
lungkana rruthina pataway-ta. Krakani nayri, ngini.
We mourn Kikatapula, brave warrior; killed at pataway.
Rest peacefully, beloved ancestor.

7. SA: Please help Zibeon get people back home for treatment and give generously to help open the doors to the first remote dialysis clinic on the APY lands.

Zibeon Fielding is a 24 year old man from Mimili Community and an Aboriginal Health Worker at ‘Local’ in the far-north-west region of South Australia on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankingtjara Lands(APY). Zibeon is determined, passionate and wants to help his people live long, healthy and happy lives.

In 2016, Zibeon was selected into the Indigenous Marathon Project (IMP), a foundation established by World Champion Robert De Castella. A testament to his determined spirit, Zibeon tried out for the squad for four consecutive years before being accepted into the program. Zibeon has now trained under the IMP, completed a New York City Marathon and is now taking on his biggest challenge yet.

Please help Zibeon get people back home for treatment and give generously to help open the doors to the first remote dialysis clinic on the APY lands.

THE CHALLENGE

Zibeon’s challenge….and dream, is to run an Ultra Marathon – 62km from his community of Mimili, to neighbouring Indulkana. It’s a long, long way…the length of ONE AND A HALF MARATHONS through harsh desert country and further than he has ever run before.

As part of his training Zibeon is now set to run another ‘WORLD’S BIG SIX MARATHON’ in Boston (USA), April 16th 2018. (Proudly sponsored by Epic Good Foundation http://epicgood.com.au/)

With the support of the South Australian Film Corporation, Zibeon is filming his journey towards the run and will share the mental and physical obstacles he endures. He will reveal what’s required to push the boundaries of ones physical capacity and provide an educational journey that allows the audience to share his pain, moments of doubt and absolutely dogged perseverance.

Zibeon will start his run on 20th of May.

THE GOAL

The ultimate goal is to raise $50,000 for The Purple House – Western Desert Dialysis. The money will be used to help get the doors open at the first remote dialysis unit on the APY lands – Pukatja / Ernabella SA.

Opening in 2018, the new dialysis unit will provide much needed ‘on country’ dialysis for Anangu people. Indigenous people from remote Australia are being diagnosed with kidney failure at unprecedented rates and without ‘on country’ treatment options, dialysis patients are forced to relocate Alice Springs or Adelaide…many miles from home.

With every step he takes…millions over the 5 months training and 5+ hour final ultra marathon, Zibeon is striving to bring about positive change to all those he cares about and even to those he doesn’t know yet. Zibeon hopes to reconnect old people with their homes and inspiring young people to do right by themselves.

With your help, Zibeon will get the doors open at the new Pukatja Dialysis Unit and start to bring people home to country and their families.

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP?

Please click the ‘DONATE’ button and give generously, SHARE on social media and follow Zibeon on his epic journey

DONATE HERE $20 $50 $100 Etc

8.1 VIC : VAHS Deadly Choices Education session Friday 18 May

 

9. NT Congress Alice Spring new Tackling Smoking Ads

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features Pat Turner CEO co hosting @NITV #ThePoint #Budget2018NACCHO @GidgeeHealing #BecauseofHerWeCan @awabakalltd @Wuchopperen @CAACongressPlus News from #NSW #QLD #VIC #ACT

1.1 National : Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner co hosts a special Indigenous Health edition of NITV The Point 3 May 2018

1.2 National : NACCHO’s Budget proposal to accelerate Closing the Gap in Indigenous Life Expectancy

1.3 National : SistaQuit needs a few more ACCHO sites for an Indigenous smoking cessation trial for pregnant Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women who smoke 

2.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing Mt Isa An Indigenous health forum with more than advice for women

2.2 QLD  : Wuchopperen Health Service to raise awareness for Domestic Violence Prevention Month

3.NSW :Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle : Australian Ninja Warrior star Jack Wilson signs on to help fight chronic Indigenous obesity

4. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO leads the way May 27 , Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

5.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder diagnostic centre opens in Alice Springs amid ‘huge demand’

5.2 NT : Sir Michael Marmot visits Congress Alice Springs  

6.VIC : Planning the Closing the Gap future

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.National : Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner co hosts a special Indigenous Health edition of NITV The Point 3 May 2018

View the full program here

https://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/1214949955803/the-point-3-may

In my view, the only way to improve outcomes for Aboriginal people – no matter what the sector – is to put Aboriginal programs in Aboriginal hands

It would come as no surprise to any of you to hear me say that an ideal Australia should be one without any gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians

We are all aware of the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and how a succession of well-intended Governments have struggled to make any progress

Just look at the situation for our young people

At the moment, Indigenous children starting school have twice as many developmental hurdles

Young Aboriginal people are almost five times as likely to commit suicide

Young Aboriginal people are over 30-times more likely to be in juvenile detention

None of us want to see these sorts of statistics

None of us want to see the horrific system failures such as Dondale ever repeated again

We must build a fair and just society in which first Australians can flourish on equal terms and in which our kids get the chance they deserve

We need to do this by putting Aboriginal programs into Aboriginal hands

Closing the health gap with #715 Health checks

The gap in health and life expectancy between Aboriginal and other Australians is not closing

The burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island population is 2.3 times higher than for the rest of the population – Funding should reflect this

But it is much higher in remote areas

Yet a dangerous myth persists that Aboriginal and Torres Strait people receive ample funding

To address the disparity, the Commonwealth, in particular, needs to do more

The Commonwealth must lift expenditure not just to match the States’ spend of $2 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for every $1 for the rest of the population, but to match the burden of disease – i.e. $2.30 for every non-Indigenous dollar The Commonwealth only spent $1.21 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island person for every $1 spent on the rest of the population

The Closing the Gap targets should remain

But the Government seems to be walking away from these targets and reinventing a softer scheme in which it is less accountable

Until Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are fully engaged and have control over their health and wellbeing any ‘refresh’ will be marginal at best, and certainly won’t close the gap

We need radically different action to achieve the targets, but let’s start simply by putting Aboriginal programs in Aboriginal hands

1.2 National : NACCHO’s Budget proposal to accelerate Closing the Gap in Indigenous Life Expectancy

On Budget night follow #Budget2018NACCHO

Aboriginal Health Download NACCHO Pre #Budget2018 Submission : Budget proposals to accelerate #ClosingTheGap in #Indigenous life expectancy

1.3 National : SistaQuit needs a few more ACCHO sites for an Indigenous smoking cessation trial for pregnant Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women who smoke 

The SISTAQUIT Study aims to improve the provision of timely, evidence-based smoking cessation care to pregnant Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women who smoke and who attend an Aboriginal Medical and Health Service for their ante-natal care.

The study involves a randomized controlled trial testing the SISTAQUIT intervention against ‘usual care’ (all sites receive SISTAQUIT either now or later).

We will to do this through on-site face to face interactive webinar training, free trial resources, free oral NRT for all study sites and financial reimbursement to both study sites and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who consent to participate in the study.

The SISTAQUIT Team are aiming to recruit 30 study sites nationally and are very excited to have already recruited 22 ACCHOs from NSW, Queensland, NT, WA and SA.

We would love to hear from any ACCHOs who would be interested in becoming a study site or those who would like more information on the study.

If your service would like to be a part of this vital trial to help us understand how to provide the best chance of quitting during pregnancy then please call or email Ms Joley Manton on (02) 4033 5720 Mobile 0439 613 836 or email: joley.manton@newcastle.edu.au or sistaquit@newcastle.edu.au

2.QLD  : Gidgee Healing Mt Isa An Indigenous health forum with more than advice for women

The first Indigenous Women’s Health Forum launched at the Mount Isa Golf Clubhouse on Tuesday, May 1.

Gidgee Healing Regional Manager of Deadly Choices Daniella Solakovic said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have some of the poorest health statistics, so the aim of this event is for women to come together to hear from their peers and specialists on key aspects of health and share their personal experiences.

Originally Published here

The two-day event discussed the subjects of nutrition, sexual health, domestic violence, cancer and wellbeing and self care.

Ms Solakovic said they wanted the women to leave after the event with confidence.

“Confidence with the knowledge acquired from the topics we have discussed. Confidence to share the information with others in the community, confidence to access the support services within the community and confidence to remember they are worthy, loved and not alone,” she said.

The second day of the event had a pamper element as the women participated in a number of wellness based activities.

“We had weaving classes, cooking, nail painting, yoga, waxing, face masks and even hair cutting,” Ms Solakovic said.

“We want to acknowledge women and the hard work they do on a day-to-day basis.”

Special guest speaker and Deadly Choice ambassador Rhonda Purcell said meeting together and building networks is were we can get strength from one another.

“We come from a long line of women in our culture from which to draw strength from.

“I grew up in a house with domestic violence and saw a lot of things a child should never see,” Ms Purcell said

I can say today, I got my strength from my mother, she is my inspiration and always will be.”

Special Guest Shellie Morris is an indigenous Australian singer who in 2014 won the NAIDOC National Artist of the Year award.

Ms Morris has worked with numerous organisations using music as a healing tool.

“Meeting together like this is like a moment of respite used to empower us to be strong and know our self worth and that we can achieve anything,” she said.

2.2 QLD  : Wuchopperen Health Service to raise awareness for Domestic Violence Prevention Month

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited will hold outreach, clinic – based and online activities across Domestic Violence Prevention Month (May 1 – 31) to raise awareness of domestic and family violence and the pathways to change.

Social and Emotional Health Acting Manager Spencer Browne said Domestic Violence Prevention Month was all about encouraging people to speak up.

‘Wuchopperen’s theme for Domestic Violence Prevention Month 2018 is #SaySomething. Wuchopperen is encouraging anyone  affected by domestic or family violence to say something, whether it’s to ring an organisation like ours and ask for help, or check in on someone you are concerned about, speaking up makes a difference.’

‘Wuchopperen recognises that domestic and family violence harms individuals, families and communities and we have a range of culturally appropriate, specialised programs to provide advice, care and support for people experiencing, or committing domestic violence.

‘Our services include men’s and women’s yarning groups, youth programs, specialist counselling for men and women, a psychologist and clinical psychologist, court support and free legal advice.

‘Wuchopperen is committed to supporting healthy, respectful relationships which generate healthy families and healthy communities.’

Activities

#SaySomething Social Media Campaign

Community organisations, local schools and individuals will be encouraged to use the hashtag to promote domestic and family violence prevention and awareness.

Sample messages include:

[SCHOOL] says domestic and family violence is everyone’s business #SaySomething #DVPM18

[ORGANISATION] says healthy relationships matter #SaySomething #DVPM18

Week 1

Tuesday 1 – Friday 4 May

School based activities – domestic and family violence education and awareness, healthy relationships education and awareness

Week 2 

Tuesday 8 May, Wednesday 9 May

Wuchopperen male and female Family Support Workers providing outreach services at Manoora Community Centre

Murray St, Manoora

Thursday 10, Thursday 11, Friday 12 May

Wuchopperen male and female Family Support Workers providing outreach services at the Mooroobool Community Hub

Shang St, Mooroobool

Week 3 

Monday 14 – Friday 18 May

Information and awareness activities at Stockland Shopping Centre and Pease St IGA

Week 4 

Tuesday 21 – Friday 25 May

Community event at Wuchopperen Manoora featuring guest speakers, the community sector and a healthy meal

This release can be accessed online here.

 

3.NSW :Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle : Australian Ninja Warrior star Jack Wilson signs on to help fight chronic Indigenous obesity

Jack Wilson, the ‘Deadly Ninja’ from Channel 9’s Australian Ninja Warrior (ANW) series visited with Awabakal on Monday 23 April, showing off his deadly ninja moves and helping to inspire the Indigenous community.

Jack is a proud Indigenous Australian from Mount Isa who is on a mission to educate Aboriginal men, women and children to live a healthy lifestyle and always reach for their goals.

See full media coverage here

During his time on ANW Jack was best known for proudly wearing traditional body paint and Budgie Smugglers in the colours of the Aboriginal flag.

After a difficult upbringing, Jack has overcome his struggles with drug and alcohol abuse to become a successful distance runner and role model to Indigenous youth. He has now partnered with Awabakal to become an ambassador for their Indigenous health programs.

“Jack is the type of personality that our young people will really connect with and look up to,” says Raylene Gordon, Chief Executive Officer of Awabakal.

“His connection to culture and ability to overcome the challenges in his life is really inspiring,” Raylene continued.

Jack’s recent visit to Awabakal included an exercise session and motivational talk with the participants of their Knock Out Health Challenge, which is a collaboration between Awabakal and Love the Life (LTL) to encourage healthy living amongst staff and Awabakal community members.

Awabakal also arranged for Jack to show the Awabakal kids his moves at the Ninja Parc obstacle course at Howat Gym in Cooks Hill as part of their school holiday program. This was intended as a fun and engaging activity which helped to inspire and educate the kids to exercise and navigate the obstacles in everyday life.

For more details about Awabakal’s services and work with the Indigenous community, visit http://www.awabakal.org or phone (02) 4918 6400.

4. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO leads the way May 27 , Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

IGPA CANBERRA CONVERSATION PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES

RECONCILIATION IN THE ACT – ARE WE THERE YET?

DATE: Thursday 31 May 2018

TIME: 12.30pm – 1.30pm

VENUE: Function Room, Theo Notaras Multicultural Centre, 180 London Circuit, CANBERRA CITY

ABOUT: On 27 May 2018 the residents of Canberra will enjoy a public holiday, Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

This seminar will explore the extent to which genuine and sustainable progress has been made in achieving reconciliation in the ACT.

Discussion will centre on a range of data, summarised below, which reflects the extent to which Aboriginal people in Canberra continue to experience disadvantage and of the adequacy of the local response to these matters, including the degree of self-determination accorded the Aboriginal community.

  •  Native title has been completely extinguished in the ACT;
  •  Canberra’s Indigenous students fall two years behind their non-Indigenous peers in educational outcomes;
  • Canberra’s Indigenous people are 21 times more likely to be incarcerated compared to non-Indigenous people, and the ACT has the second highest rate of Indigenous incarceration in Australia;
  • An Aboriginal child in Canberra is 12 times more likely than a non-Aboriginal child to be removed, under a care and protection order, from its parents and the ACT has the second highest rate of removal of Aboriginal children in Australia;
  •  7.6% of Canberra’s Aboriginal community report that they live in housing in which they do not have access to working sewerage facilities;
  •  46% of Indigenous males and 39% of indigenous females in the ACT over the age of 15 used an illicit drug or other substance in the last year; and
  • 35% of Aboriginal children in Canberra live in poverty;

This IGPA seminar is co-sponsored by Winnunga Nimmityjah AHCS and is jointly convened by Professorial Fellow Jon Stanhope AO and Adjunct Professor Dr Khalid Ahmed PSM.

THE PANEL JULIE TONGS OAM has been the Chief Executive Officer of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service since 1998. Julie is a Wiradjuri woman and was born in Whitton. She has more than 30 years’ experience working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs and in particular in advising, formulating, implementing and evaluating public health initiatives, programs and policy at a local, regional and national level.

Julie has been a national leader and strong advocate of quality improvement initiatives within the Aboriginal Community Controlled sector. She is the recipient of a number of awards, including the ACT Governor General’s Centenary Medal, the ACT Indigenous Person of the Year, and the ACT Local Hero Award. In 2012 Julie was honoured with the Medal of the Order of Australia.

LOUISE TAYLOR is currently the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Legal Aid ACT. Louise is a Kamilaroi woman born and raised in inner city Sydney. For a significant portion of her career Louise was a specialist Family Violence prosecutor at the Office of the ACT Director of Public Prosecutions.

Louise has a particular interest in women’s issues especially in relation to family, domestic and sexual violence and is passionate about the importance of access to justice for women, particularly for Aboriginal and other marginalised women. She is a long time Convenor of the ACT Women’s Legal Centre Management Committee, a past member of the ACT Domestic Violence Prevention Council and former Chair of the ACT Ministerial Advisory Council on Women. Louise was the 2009 recipient of the ACT International Women’s Day Award, and is a member of the Law Council of Australia’s Indigenous Legal Issues Committee.

5.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder diagnostic centre opens in Alice Springs amid ‘huge demand’

 

The Northern Territory’s first diagnostic centre for foetal alcohol spectrum disorder has opened in Central Australia — where paediatricians estimate one in five children could suffer from the disorder.

Key points:

  • It is estimated more than 500,000 Australians have FASD but it is often not diagnosed
  • The new centre aims to diagnose children early so they can get listed on the NDIS
  • Early diagnosis could also help keep those with the disorder out of prison

 

The centre, launched by the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (CAAC), will use the first commonly adapted diagnostic tool to ensure early diagnosis of the disorder.

It will also offer a team of paediatricians, psychologists and other health professionals like speech pathologists to help asses at-risk children.

Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is an impairment to the brain caused by mothers consuming alcohol while pregnant.

It causes severe developmental delays, disability, learning difficulties, memory impairment and behavioural problems.

Known as the invisible disability, people with FASD can often go undiagnosed and untreated.

Yet it is estimated more than 500,000 people have FASD in Australia.

Congress child and family services senior manager Dawn Ross said the centre would help ensure those impacted were diagnosed early and services would be immediately available.

“Many children are presenting with [developmental] delays and Congress felt that it was important to not only do full health checks, but that wraparound services and support was given for children,” Ms Ross said.

“Every parent wants to know if there’s a delay that there’s a service out there that’s going to be provided for them.”

Diagnosis could keep children out of prison

Dr James Fitzpatrick, a paediatrician and researcher working with children who have FASD, said 36 per cent of people in juvenile detention in Western Australia had the disorder.

Not only would early diagnosis help get children listed on the National Disability Insurance Scheme and accessing support, he believed it could help lower prison rates.

Drug and Alcohol Services Australia chief executive Carol Taylor agreed, saying a lot of the youth problems in Alice Springs stemmed from intellectual impairment, and “throwing them in prison won’t solve the problem”.

Disorder is a ‘threat to culture’

While Ms Taylor welcomed the new centre opening, she warned that demand would be huge, particularly from Indigenous residents.

“We do have a lot of babies that come into DASA, they’re almost all Aboriginal kids,” Ms Taylor said.

For this reason, Dr Fitzpatrick indicated that reducing the impacts of the disorder could also help preserve Indigenous culture.

“[FASD] is a threat to the very culture that needs to be passed on through stories, song and tradition,” he said.

5.2 NT : Sir Michael Marmot visits Congress Alice Springs  

6.VIC : Planning the Closing the Gap future

The national Closing the Gap agenda and the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework are being refreshed this year. These are important documents. They guide policy and funding priorities in Aboriginal affairs, and set out how government will be held accountable for achieving those priorities.

Aboriginal people know what’s best for themselves, their families and their communities. That’s why the Victorian Government will be led by Aboriginal Victorians around what the new Closing the Gap agenda and Victorian Aboriginal Affairs framework should look like.

Throughout the first half of 2018, there will be a range of opportunities for Aboriginal Victorians to have their say and lead the refresh of both national and Victorian frameworks.

For more information on Closing the Gap or the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework see the Discussion Guide and Factsheet.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features @DanilaDilba and @DeadlyChoices partnership promotes healthy lifestyle messages Plus News from #CongressUN18 #NSW #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #ACT

 1.International : National Congress Intervention at the United Nations

2.1 NSW Katungul ACCHO IRESPECT group are now equipped to talk about DV amongst their peers, family and in the community on effort to minimise this issue

2.2 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) Aboriginal Children’s Therapy Team presents video at a national conference on rural health on the important role of the Aboriginal Health Worker

3.1 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin and the Deadly Choices mob share their healthy lifestyle messages at The Michael Long Learning and Leadership Centre Darwin

3.2 NT : Over 80 Congress ACCHO Alice Springs staff make Deadly Choice by running the Barrett Drive Mile

3.3 : Senator Simon Birmingham, Federal Minister for #Education and Training checking out Congress’ #Childcare today #earlyyears #AboriginalHealthinAboriginalHands @Birmo

4.VIC: VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team #Hertribe #HisTribe and Deadly Ninja Warrior

5.QLD : Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) will receive almost $250,000 to prepare Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across the south-east for the NDIS rollout.

6. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Download the April Newsletter

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 1.International : National Congress Intervention at the United Nations

National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples Co-Chair Jackie Huggins delivered an intervention at the United Nations in New York on Thursday 19th April 2018 during the 17th Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII).

This key speech by National Congress comes only days after Co-Chair Rod Little emphasized the need for the Australian government to implement UNDRIP during his engagement with the Commonwealth People’s Forum in London.

National Congress Intervention

This year, Australia took up its seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council. The Foreign Minister, the Honourable Julie Bishop, has spoken about Australia’s proud human rights record. In international forums, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is always strongly supportive of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

In many regards, these statements are hypocritical in the extreme.

Particularly, Australia has been severely criticised for its human rights failures in its asylum seekers and refugee policy, and in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs.

Late last year, the final report by the United Nations Human Rights Committee on Australia’s human rights record was released, which noted ongoing problems in protecting the rights of refugees and asylum seekers; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; women, especially in the context of gender-based violence; LGBTIQ people and all people to live free from racism and religious intolerance.

Full Transcript here National Congress – UN Intervention – 24 April 2018

 

2.1 NSW Katungul ACCHO IRESPECT group are now equipped to talk about DV amongst their peers, family and in the community on effort to minimise this issue

Another valuable and positive outcome from the IRESPECT program. This programs aim was to bring up issues about domestic violence in our community against women.

This group are now equipped to talk about DV amoung there peers, family and in the community on effort to minimise this issue. All of the participants enjoyed the program and look forward to putting new skills into practice. Remember “Because of Her we Can”. Well Done guys.

2.2 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) Aboriginal Children’s Therapy Team presents video at a national conference on rural health on the important role of the Aboriginal Health Worker

View Video Here

“Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) has worked with the Big Cares team for the past 12 months and in that time has produced several amazing videos which have showcased our work.

Originally published

“They have been as diverse as promoting our Aboriginal Medical Service to promoting the work of a program which helps young Indigenous men to strive for a positive life, to a NAIDOC event at a small Aboriginal community. These videos have helped to promote the services and programs that we deliver to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in western NSW.

“On all levels, from the shoot, to production and editing the Big Cares team are thoroughly professional, delightful and easy to work with because they really care about delivering a polished product that helps their clients make a difference.

“Recently, WACHS used one of the videos made with the Aboriginal Children’s Therapy Team to present at a national conference on rural health on the important role of the Aboriginal Health Worker in the care of Aboriginal children with speech and hearing impairment. We highly recommend Big Cares to other not-for-profit organisations and recommend video as a powerful tool to tell a story and make a lasting impact.”

– Rebekah Bullock, executive manager of communication and information technology at WACHS.

3.1 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin and the Deadly Choices mob share their healthy lifestyle messages at The Michael Long Learning and Leadership Centre Darwin

The Michael Long Learning and Leadership Centre would like to give a big shout out to Nathan Appo and Sean Yorston from Deadly Choices, and the team from Danila Dilba who popped in to share their healthy lifestyle messages with the students from Yarralin and Kalkarindji last week. Health education is a key element of the MLLLC Education Program.

With NT Thunder

3.2 NT : Over 80 Congress ACCHO Alice Springs staff make Deadly Choice by running the Barrett Drive Mile

Over 80 staff across the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress workforce formed Team Congress 2018 in the Alice Springs Barrett Drive Mile on Friday evening.

Well recognised in uniform promoting Deadly Choices health checks and a no smoking message, the team included representatives from all sections of Congress’ multidisciplinary workforce, including the Chief Executive Officer, Executive and Senior Managers, Doctors, Aboriginal Health Practitioners, Allied Health Practitioners, Clients Service Officers, Nurses, Cleaners, Early Childhood Educators, Researchers, Corporate staff and Health Promotion staff.

Pictures above supplied by Tracey Donnellan Brand

The team concept was initially inspired by Congress Podiatrist and champion runner, Brad White and has proven to harnesses social dynamics, peer interaction and the promotion of healthy lifestyles.

Congress has been participating in the event since 2016 and from modest beginnings the team has grown to a sizeable force that dominated the event’s novelty race.

Event organisers praised Congress’ strong participation that contributed almost a third of all the competitors and helping to make the event a big success.

3.3 : Senator Simon Birmingham, Federal Minister for #Education and Training checking out Congress’ #Childcare today #earlyyears #AboriginalHealthinAboriginalHands @Birmo

4.VIC: VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team #Hertribe #HisTribe and Deadly Ninja Warrior

Today the Healthy Lifestyle team are excited to be hanging out with the Deadly Ninja Warrior- Jack Wilson. Visiting Bubup Wilam and Yappera teaching the kids some

Ninja skills and having loads of fun!

#Histribe

#HerTribe reunion video

 

5.QLD : Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) will receive almost $250,000 to prepare Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across the south-east for the NDIS rollout.

The Palaszczuk Government has today (24 April) launched a project to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability living in south-east Queensland access the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

Minister for Disability Services and Seniors Coralee O’Rourke announced Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) would receive almost $250,000 to prepare Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across the south-east for the NDIS rollout.

SEE IUIH NDIS Website

“It’s very important every effort is made to ensure all Queenslanders benefit from the opportunities the NDIS presents,” Mrs O’Rourke said.

“Around 38 per cent of the state’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reside in south-east Queensland, from Somerset in the north to the Scenic Rim and Gold Coast in the south, and west into the Lockyer Valley.

“Our experience with the rollout so far is that a higher level of engagement is required to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability register to receive the support they need under the NDIS.”

Mrs O’Rourke made the announcement during a visit to the IUIH’s Yulu-Burri-Ba Clinic at Capalaba. Member for Capalaba Don Brown said the Palaszczuk Government was focused on ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders with disability received the support they need to access the NDIS.

“This funding will help enlist the support of a local service provider specialising in Indigenous health issues to connect with this target group and engage them in the NDIS transition process,” Mr Brown said

IUIH Chief Executive Officer Adrian Carson said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability were much more likely to come on board the scheme if they are approached by a person or organisation they trust and with whom they have an existing relationship.

“It’s also important they can get the information and help they need easily and quickly from an organisation that is based in their community and which understands and values their cultural identity,” he said.

“NDIS Readiness is an urgent priority for Indigenous communities in the south-east because Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 1.7 times more likely to have a disability than non-Indigenous people, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are 2.5 times more likely to have a disability.

“This funding will help us reach out to them through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in the south-east to ensure everybody who needs disability support receives it from day one.”

The IUIH NDIS Readiness Project will employ four full-time and one part-time staff members.

In the south-east, the rollout is due to begin on 1 July 2018 for Logan and Redlands, Brisbane suburbs north of Brisbane River, Brisbane suburbs south of Brisbane River, Fraser Coast, North Burnett, South Burnett and Cherbourg, Gold Coast and Hinterland, as well as in Cairns, Cassowary Coast, Tablelands, Croydon, Etheridge, Cape York and Torres Strait.

This will be followed by rollout in Moreton Bay including Strathpine and Caboolture, Sunshine Coast, Noosa and Gympie on 1 January 2019.

What is the NDIS

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is a new way of providing support to Australians living with a significant and permanent disability.

The NDIS provides eligible Australians with the reasonable and necessary support to live an ordinary life, and to be more independent and actively participate in their communities.

It offers the person choice and control over how, when and where they use their supports to achieve their goals.

The IUIH NDIS Readiness Project team will do what they can to help you understand this new scheme.

You can find more information by reading the Frequently Asked Questions document – or you can

– visit www.ndis.gov.au

– call the Government information line on 1800 800 110 between 8am and 11pm Monday to Friday

– email the IUIH NDIS team at ndis@iuih.org.au.

Information sessions will be held at the following locations (all at 10am)

  • 26 April – YBB – Capalaba – My Horizon, 1/15A Runnymede Rd, Capalaba
  • 3 May – Brisbane ATSICHS – Gabba – Level 1, 55 Annerley Road, Woolloongabba QLD
  • 9 May – Brisbane ATSICHS – Logan – 41 Station Road, Logan Central QLD
  • 2 May *9:30am – Kalwun – Miami – Miami Beach Surf Life Saving Club – 2 Hythe St, Miami
  • 17 May *9:30am – Kalwun – Miami – Miami Beach Surf Life Saving Club – 2 Hythe St, Miami
  • 22 May – Brisbane ATSICHS – Logan – 41 Station Road, Logan Central QLD
  • 28 June – Moreton ATSICHS – TBA
  • 10 July – Moreton ATSICHS – TBA

6. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Download the April Newsletter

Download HERE Winnunga AHCS Newsletter April 2018 (003)

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features @AMAPresident Dr Michael Gannon visits our #NT ACCHO’s in Central Australia Plus News from #NSW #TAS #QLD #VIC #WA #SA #ACT

1. NT : This week the President of the AMA Dr Michael Gannon paid a flying visit to our ACCHO’s in Central Australia : His 2 day diary

2.1 NSW : Indigenous culture at the heart of new Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services (ACC&MS) home care project

2.2 NSW : Yerin Incorporating Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Centre inaugural Health Care Quality Committee

3. QLD : Apunipima celebrates the first anniversary of its Wellbeing Centres :  It has been a year of milestones and learnings for the team that ‘hit the ground running’ 12 short months ago.

4. SA : Nganampa Health Council’s 2017 Annual Report is now available

5. WA : Two Aboriginal women, leaders in Aboriginal health care in Western Australia, have been recognised for their lifelong dedication and commitment to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people.

6.VIC : The Commission for Children and Young People welcomes the appointment of  former NACCHO Chair Justin Mohamed as Victoria’s new Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People

7. TAS : A yarn with Assoc. Professor Greg Phillips April 20

8.1 ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Download the April Newsletter

8.2 ACT : Winnunga has commenced a new program for first time mothers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1. NT : This week the President of the AMA Dr Michael Gannon paid a flying visit to our ACCHO’s in Central Australia : Here is his 2 day diary

Day 1.1 Pintupi Homelands Health Service Kintore

Thank you for welcome to Pintupi Homelands Health Service, @WDNWPT Purple House Dialysis Unit in Kintore, NT.

Social, economic, human benefits of delivering health care on country, under community control in evidence

Day 1.2 Urapuntja Health Service Utopia

Fabulous welcome to Urapuntja Health Service Utopia, NT.

Innovative, impressive primary healthcare service delivery in difficult setting. Shocking Diabetes rates. Exciting new Dialysis service. Real answers of course lie in prevention, addressing social determinants of health

Day 2 .1 Congress Alice Springs

Thank you to Congress Alice Springs for the meeting/tour. Fabulous integration of doctors, nurses, midwives, AHWs, allied health experts. Disc. housing, water, social determinants of health, proposed rural training hubs as way to build medical workforce in regional Australia

Day 2.2 Congress Alice Springs; Harm caused by cannabis

Talking to Doctors, Aboriginal Health Workers about harm caused by cannabis in Alice Springs. Any permissive messaging on Gunja extremely harmful to local Indigenous population and their mental health.

Will impair prevention messages my colleagues working so hard on

Day 2.3 : NPY  Ngaanyatjarra, Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara Women’s Council  

Thank you to Andrea Mason, Angela Lynch NPY Women’s Council. Fascinating insights into the work of Ngangkari, wellness models, Mental

2.1 NSW : Indigenous culture at the heart of new Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services (ACC&MS) home care project

 

“At the heart of our philosophy of Koori Health in Koori Hands is the health and wellbeing of our Elders,

By our Elders maintaining their lifestyle and connection to culture and country, we will be able to keep them independent and at home for longer.”

CEO of Katungul ACC&MS Robert Skeen also emphasised the connection to country experienced by Aboriginal Elders that is a key driver of the project

A new $1.4 million culturally-sensitive Indigenous seniors home care project, designed for Bateman’s Bay in New South Wales, has been agreed to and launched between aged care provider IRT Group and the Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Community and Medical Services (ACC&MS).

The project is designed to suit Indigenous cultural preferences and recognises that Aboriginal seniors have a connection to country and a desire to age in place, while also aiming to support older aboriginal people to stay in their own homes as they age.

Following the government grant funded project’s launch on 9 April signified by the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), there is expected be a first meeting of the Project’s Steering Committee, formed to guide the project’s community-based and community-led approach to Indigenous aged care over the next three years.

IRT Group Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Patrick Reid says the project addresses barriers to accessing aged care by assisting Aboriginal seniors to apply for government home care funding assistance.

He also adds that IRT’s registered training organisations, IRT Academy, will support the project with delivery of a Certificate III training package for Indigenous trainees to provide culturally-appropriate home care services.

“Through the work of our IRT Foundation, we aim to provide equity in aged care service provisions to all seniors in the community,” Mr Reid says.

“We’re proud to partner with Katungul which has been working for the last 25 years to enable Aboriginal people to live healthy lives, enriched by a strong living culture, dignity and justice.”

Following the Project’s Steering Committee’s first meeting, a Koori Aged Care Community Yarn Up information session will also be held.

This session will have experts on hand to answer questions about the benefits of Koori Home Care, as well as the training offered by IRT Academy.

2.2 NSW : Yerin Incorporating Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Centre inaugural Health Care Quality Committee

This week Yerin had their inaugural Health Care Quality Committee meeting.
The purpose of the Committee is to provide the Yerin Incorporating Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Centre Board and CEO with expert clinical advice on clinical governance, patient experience and quality management of systems

3. QLD : Apunipima celebrates the first anniversary of its Wellbeing Centres :  It has been a year of milestones and learnings for the team that ‘hit the ground running’ 12 short months ago. 

“We have been able to employ community members into all positions in the centres, which include Receptionists, SEWB workers and Team Leaders.”

Our team leaders are also leaders in their community, which fits beautifully into the Apunipima Model of Care and is something that sets our service apart.”

Tanya Robinson, the Social Emotional Wellbeing Services Manager said it was important for the centres to have a strong local workforce

Last week marked the first anniversary of Apunipima’ s Wellbeing Centres in Cape York.

It has been a year of milestones and learnings for the team that ‘hit the ground running’ 12 short months ago, at centres in Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge.

The Social Emotional Wellbeing services were set up in 2009 by the Royal Flying Doctor Service, in April 2017 Apunipima assumed responsibility and took over the management of these centres.

The role of the Apunipima Wellbeing Centres is to support the broad social and emotional wellbeing needs of each community. Each centre works to the Apunipima Model of Care, a community driven, community led model that focuses on all aspects of cultural, emotional, environmental and spiritual wellbeing.

Setting up a new service arm within any organisation can be a challenging time, Apunipima took these challenges in their stride, keeping community at the forefront of all changes.

“It was really important that the transfer to Apunipima management of the centres had no negative impact on clients using the services. I think we can be really proud of how that unfolded; it was a seamless transition.” Said Bernard David, who was the Regional Manager for Social Emotional Wellbeing at Apunipima.

Apunipima’ s Social Emotional Wellbeing team spent a lot of time in each community, before, during and after the changeover, meeting with all of the stakeholders to ensure that community members were involved in how the program would be delivered into the future.“

Both Bernard and Tanya agree that the future is looking great for the Wellbeing Centres. “We are constantly looking at how we can better service our clients and that will be our focus in the coming months.” Said Tanya.

4. SA : Nganampa Health Council’s 2017 Annual Report is now available

The Annual Report highlights a number of significant achievements in the past year including:

Download copy here

• Excellent child and women’s health program outcomes
• An enhanced program of specialist visiting teams
• Strong Anangu employment and training outcomes
• An improved chronic disease management program leading to increased adult health checks
• Continuing high levels of participation in our sexual health screen and continued low levels of infection
• Innovative and collaborative public health programs
• Robust, leading edge information technology systems
• A continued strong financial position

To reduce our impact on the environment we have reduced the number of annual reports we have printed.

If you would like to receive a paper copy of this year’s report, or receive a notification next year by email, please send us a private message.

5. WA : Two Aboriginal women, leaders in Aboriginal health care in Western Australia, have been recognised for their lifelong dedication and commitment to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people.

 

Two Aboriginal women, leaders in Aboriginal health care were posthumously honoured with the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia’s prestigious lifetime achievement awards at the State Sector Conference Dinner

Donnybrook Elder Gloria Khan and Derby Elder Maxine Armstrong have dedicated their lives to advancing the agenda for Aboriginal health in WA.

AHCWA Chairperson Vicki O’Donnell said both women had made positive differences to their communities.

Maxine, who passed away in March 2018, was the last of five founding members of the Derby Aboriginal Health Service, and had served as the Derby Aboriginal Health Service Chairperson for over 15 years. Maxine was also Chairperson of the Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service Board for over 10 years and a Director on the AHCWA Board for more than a decade.

“Maxine was a passionate advocate for Indigenous and Aboriginal health, with her driving force to ‘help her people’,” Ms O’Donnell said.

“In particular, she was steadfast in her commitment to address the alarming rate of chronic disease in indigenous communities, the unacceptable rate of suicide and the impact of drugs on individuals, their families and their communities.

“Maxine was particularly proud of her efforts to secure funding for key medical facilities such as the Derby Aboriginal Health Service Dialysis Hub and Renal Health Centres in Derby, Kununurra and Fitzroy Crossing. She was also integral to the establishment of a refuge for Indigenous women.”

Maxine’s dedication and commitment to Aboriginal primary health was passionate and instrumental in developing strong partnerships with many community stakeholders across WA and Australia.

Gloria, who passed away in February 2018, was a passionate leader who worked tirelessly to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people both in WA and across Australia.

She served as the AHCWA chairperson from 2005 to 2008, during which time she was also the Chair and the Deputy Chair of the South West Aboriginal Medical Service and Executive Director of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Gloria also sat on several committees including the Ministerial Council for Suicide Prevention and the Telethon Kids Institute’s WA Aboriginal Child Health Survey Steering Committee, the largest and most comprehensive study into the health, wellbeing and development of Indigenous children.

“Gloria was a strong, proud Nyoongar woman who dedicated many years of service to Aboriginal health in WA and across Australia,” Ms O’Donnell said.

“Along with her kindness and compassion, she brought a wealth of knowledge to the sector as a nurse and a trained counsellor, with experience in the areas of domestic violence, sexual assault, grief and drug and alcohol abuse.

“Gloria’s depth of knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal health at the local, state and national level gave her the opportunity to advocate these issues in many forums.

“She showed true leadership, advocacy and commitment to help close the life expectancy gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people of Australia.”

Maxine and Gloria’s legacies will continue through the efforts of others to ensure the advances and progress they made will continue.

More than 260 delegates from around the state are attending AHCWA’s annual state sector conference at the Esplanade Hotel Fremantle over April 11 and 12.

Yesterday, AHCWA unveiled its revolutionary new health atlas, Mappa, which provides cutting edge mapping technology to help align patients with local healthcare providers.

Tomorrow will see Federal Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt launch AHCWA’s Western Australia Aboriginal Youth Health Strategy 2018-2023: Today’s young people, tomorrow’s leaders.

Developed with and on behalf of young Aboriginal people in WA, the strategy is the culmination of almost a decade of AHCWA’s commitment and strategic advocacy in Aboriginal youth health.

Over the two days, 15 workshops and keynote speeches will be held. AHCWA will present recommendations from the conference in a report to the state and federal governments to highlight the key issues about Aboriginal health in WA and determine future strategic actions.

6.VIC : The Commission for Children and Young People welcomes the appointment of  former NACCHO Chair Justin Mohamed as Victoria’s new Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People

The Commission for Children and Young People welcomes the appointment of Justin Mohamed as Victoria’s new Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People.

Mr Mohamed is a proud Aboriginal man of the Gooreng Gooreng nation near Bundaberg in Queensland. He has dedicated the past 25 years to working towards building a stronger and healthier nation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

‘Mr Mohamed is well known as a strong and experienced advocate, and I look forward to working alongside him to advance the rights and interests of Aboriginal children and young people in Victoria,’ Principal Commissioner Liana Buchanan said.

The appointment comes at a time when Victoria has made significant commitments and some progress in tackling long-standing issues for Aboriginal children, particularly those in out-of-home care.

‘There remains much work to be done to tackle discrimination, improve services and ensure that Aboriginal children and young people in Victoria can fully enjoy the rights that many take for granted,’ Ms Buchanan said.

More information about the appointment can be found in the Minister for Families and Children media release: Introducing A New Champion For Aboriginal Young People

Mr Mohamed will begin his tenure on 28 May.

Listen to radio interview

Treaty is connected self worth and empowerment for Aboriginal youth: Justin Mohamed

Victoria has a new Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People and he says the state is changing the course of the Indigenous community with its combined efforts on dealing with children in care and a treaty with the state’s Indigenous people.

Justin Mohamed will take up the position next month, well credentialed as a former head of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, and a former chief executive of Reconciliation Australia.

Victoria is the only state to have a Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young people and the state has been grappling with a 60 per cent increase in the number of children entering care between 2013 and 2015

7. TAS : A yarn with Assoc. Professor Greg Phillips April 20

8.1 ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Download the April Newsletter

Download HERE Winnunga AHCS Newsletter April 2018 (003)

8.2 ACT : Winnunga has commenced a new program for first time mothers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies

Download Brochure : ANFPP brochure

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO #6rrhss Deadly Good News stories :#NSW #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA #ACT Including @Galambila @DeadlyChoices @IUIH_ @WinnungaACCHO

1.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour leads the way incorporating cultural healing artwork into new building and staff uniforms

1.2. NSW : Indigenous Doctor to specialise in women’s health and high-risk pregnancy care. after graduating this month

2.1 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin hosts Wurrumiyanga community on Bathurst Island with information about improving health and career pathways in health.

2.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board Timber Creek’s Women’s Health Day 2018.

3.QLD :Institute for Urban Indigenous Health :Because of Her I must : Adrian Carson and Aunty Pamela Mam

4SA : Colourful health bus provides medical services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in remote areas

5. VIC : Officially launch in Mildura partnership with MDAS & Deadly Choices hosting a community day for the mob.

6. 1 ACT : Winnunga has commenced a new program for first time mothers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies.

6.2 ACT : Winnunga Save a date : celebrating 30 Years of excellence ACCHO health

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 NSW: Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour leads the way incorporating cultural healing artwork into new building and staff uniforms

On behalf of the Board and management, NACCHO congratulates the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Coffs Harbour on the opening of its new reception and patient waiting area. It is good that staff and community members alike will benefit from this new facility.

It is also great to have the Commonwealth Government’s financial support for this initiative. It is pleasing to see the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service improving its facilities for the benefit of our community, and I congratulate you on your continued efforts to improving Aboriginal health outcomes in the region.”

Pat Turner CEO NACCHO

Galambila ACCHO Compassionate, Respectful, Empowering & Inclusive

This week the Chair of the Galambila ACCHO Rueben Robinson officially opened the new building and reception at a smoking ceremony on Gumbaynggirr country

Local artist, Brentyn Lugnan, who designed the artwork for the building and is also embedded on the staff shirts.

Brentyn attended the opening and explained the story his art that follows the journey from the foundations of the family / community thru to the travels of kangaroos ,  middens connecting to country and the role of bush medicine  for Gumbaynggirr people

1.2. NSW : Indigenous Doctor to specialise in women’s health and high-risk pregnancy care. after graduating this month

 

 “I had the opportunity to undertake placement at the Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Medical centre in Wyong, attend rural obstetrics clinics in Moree – the birthplace of my Nan, and complete an elective subject at the Menzies School of Health Research in Brisbane, which explored barriers to early diagnosis and poor outcomes in gynaecological cancers in Indigenous women,” 

Following in the footsteps of her Aunty, Professor Gail Garvey, Nicole Whitson is proud to be the third person to graduate from her large Indigenous family of almost 40 immediate relatives.

Commencing her studies at the University as an Open Foundation student, Nicole persevered with her studies and has become a doctor, graduating with a Bachelor of Medicine with Distinction.

Nicole said she was particularly interested in medical care for Indigenous people and enjoyed the opportunity to tailor her study to reflect her interests.

It was through this practical experience that Nicole realised her desire to specialise in high-risk pregnancy care.

Reflecting on her experience at the University of Newcastle, Nicole said she was “glad to study in a supportive environment.

“As an Indigenous medical student from a large family with little exposure to the tertiary education system, I expected to encounter challenges but I had a lot of support from the University, its Wollotuka Institute, and my husband Elliot.”

Nicole said she was grateful for her time at university, not only to realise her dream of becoming a doctor, but to have built a network of life-long friends.

“One of the highlights was definitely the close-knit community, I met some of my best friends during my studies at university,” Nicole said.

The University of Newcastle has graduated approximately one-third of Australia’s Indigenous doctors and today celebrates a proud milestone, graduating its largest ever cohort of Indigenous students from the Joint medical Program, with ten students crossing the graduation stage today.

2.1 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin hosts Wurrumiyanga community on Bathurst Island with information about improving health and career pathways in health.

This week visiting students from Xavier Catholic College in the Wurrumiyanga community on Bathurst Island came to visit Danila Dilba.

The students got an overview of our organisation, including information about improving health and career pathways in Danila Dilba.

Great to see the enthusiasm of these students and their interest in health.

2.2 NT : Katherine West Health Board Timber Creek’s Women’s Health Day 2018.

A successful day where the ladies from Timber Creek region and Bulla community came together to yarn about women’s health.

A shout out to SARC Katherine for coming long. Thank you Victoria Daly Regional Councill for your spport.

#oneshieldforall

3.QLD :Institute for Urban Indigenous Health :Because of Her I must : Adrian Carson and Aunty Pamela Mam

Adrian Carson has worked in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health for more than 25 years and has been the CEO of the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health since 2011.

Adrian nominated Aunty Pamela Mam’s story to lead the Because of Her campaign, a celebration of women who have made our communities what they are today.

Aunty Pamela Mam (Aunty Pam) was one of the first Aboriginal nurses in Queensland. She was the first Nurse Manager of the Aboriginal and Islanders Community Health Service Brisbane (now ATSICHS Brisbane) and the first Manager of the Jimbelunga Nursing Centre – where she worked for 15 years.

Raised on Palm Island, Aunty Pam started working as a Nurse Aide at Palm Island Hospital, later receiving permission to train as a nurse at Townsville Hospital.

She went on to study midwifery at the Royal Women’s Hospital in Brisbane and in conjunction with her late husband, Uncle Steve Mam, was hugely active in advocating for and establishing many services that exist today.

Adrian says that he chose to nominate Aunty Pam because of the sacrifices she has made to lead our community to where we are today. He says, “She has supported IUIH since we were established in 2009 and has always been here for us when we needed her.

“Aunty Pam is a great leader in the community and we are so lucky to have her as our patron. Her hard work and tireless efforts to make sure we are accessing the health care we need in the way that we need it has made a huge impact on the health of our people.

“Through her amazing work in the community, she connects all of us to our humble beginnings.”

He mentions that Aunty Pam has impacted his life greatly by providing support within the work that IUIH does. He says, “She has always been a great support for me, she always gives a good counsel, and she’s there when I need her.”

“She lives by three words, commitment, compassion and dedication. These are the qualities that IUIH as an organisation reflects on when working with and for our people.”

Aunty Pam continues to serve as the patron for IUIH, and supports many other community projects that focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in South East Queensland.

To recognise Aunty Pam’s contribution the Because of Her project was launched at Aunty Pam’s 80th birthday celebration held at Jimbelunga Nursing Centre in March this year.

Share your own story of a deadly woman in your life at www.facebook.com/IUIHBecauseofHer

Image: Adrian Carson (IUIH), Aunty Pamela Mam, Jody Currie (ATSICHS Brisbane)

4SA : Colourful health bus provides medical services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in remote areas

 See original story in full here 

Remote communities often grapple with challenges of distance from health care and support, but an outreach service for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in South Australia’s Riverland is hoping to change this, with the help of a bus.

Bright and colourful, the Pi:Lu Bus is designed to be a safe place for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to receive help and health advice.

The bus is highly regarded and well recognised by Riverland locals, with a role of providing specific health prevention messages and free testing.

The mobile service is one of only a few in Australia.

“The bus is available to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community who may not be able to get into our service for reasons that they could not have transport available or their funds may be really low,” Riverland Aboriginal Health Service coordinator Corinne Thompson said.

“I think the bus is helping to build relationships between our local Aboriginal people and some of our mainstream services as well.

“Any needs that the community have around their health, we’re there to support them.”

Community shines spotlight on its health

The Pi:Lu Bus was returned to the community last year at NAIDOC Week celebrations following extensive consultation around local health services.

Previously known as the Peelies Bus — the Aboriginal word for eyes — the bus travelled the region conducting health examinations, with a particular focus on eyes.

It was decomissioned for five years due to mechanical troubles, but a push from the community saw its re-commissioning and name change to the Pi:Lu Bus — Aboriginal for all-seeing eyes.

“Aboriginal people, Torres Straight Islander people have vastly different health needs to mainstream Australia,” Ms Thompson said.

“I guess we need to be working more to get those prevention messages out there.”

5. VIC : Officially launch in Mildura partnership with MDAS & Deadly Choices hosting a community day for the mob.

6. 1 ACT : Winnunga has commenced a new program for first time mothers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies.

See attached brochure ANFPP brochure (2)

6.2 ACT : Winnunga Save a date : celebrating 30 Years of excellence ACCHO health 

 

7. WA : @AHCWA pioneering new ways of working in Aboriginal Health :Our Culture Our Community Our Voice Our Knowledge

VIEW HERE

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Including #Tullawon AMS @DeadlyChoices @CAACongress @Apunipima #Anyinginyi NT @June_Oscar #WomensVoices

1.1 National  : NACCHO Chair attends opening of Yalata Blue House 

1.2 MIMS-NACCHO Partnership

2.1 QLD :  Talkin Tukka : What’s a healthy lifestyle in Cape York?

2.2 QLD : Patrick Johnson becomes a Deadly Choices Ambassador

2.3 : June Oscar heads for Queensland Wiyi Yani U Thangani #WomensVoices project

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs takes part in CTG Refresh

3.2 NT : Anyinginyi Health supports Tennant Creek alcohol restrictions ,they  must be longer and tougher

Includes new Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up Video Tennant Creek kids  

4.WA : Earbus and South West Aboriginal Medical Service performs checks for Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School Students 

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.1 National  : NACCHO Chair attends opening of Yalata Blue House 

NACCHO Chairperson John Singer was invited by NACCHO member Tullawon Health Service to the launch and opening of the “Yalata Blue House “ for men’s health, social, and cultural activities.

Media Report from Here

The new men’s shed at Yalata SA is set to provide men in the community a space to talk openly about any issues they may be facing.

The ‘Yalata Blue House’ was officially opened last month with a group of about 25 men attending the unveiling.

Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia project officer Joshua Riessen has been involved in the creation of the men’s shed at Yalata and said it was “great” to see it opened.

“I help the men drive activities and health activities such as around the ‘no smoking’ message – it is a place where we want to spread that message and hope to change attitudes slowly,” he said.

“There was a women’s equivalent, a mum’s and bubs space, where women could come together and talk about any issues and we wanted something for the men too.

“It is a safe space and place to talk about any health issues, and it is also a platform for visiting GPs to go over and talk to the men about their health and make sure they are not ashamed to talk about any issues.”

Mr Riessen said the shed project had been in the works for the past few months and was planned in conjunction with community leaders and organisations.

He estimated men from as young as 16 to those in their 70s would use and benefit from the new space.

Mr Riessen said the creation of the men’s shed would have a positive impact on the Yalata community.

“As well as being a safe space to talk, the men will also undertake activities such as arts and crafts, for example traditional painting, and woodwork,” he said.

“They can go to the shed to do these things and sell their items, which can generate some revenue to put back into the house to keep the activities going.”

An estimated 40 men have already been through the shed between its unveiling and the recent official opening and Mr Riessen said the reaction from community members had been “very positive”.

“They are really opening up about personal health issues and are having discussions with the other men,” he said.

“People feel comfortable in the shed and it also helps to bring the community together.”

 1.2 MIMS-NACCHO Partnership

MIMS is partnering with NACCHO to provide all their clinics access to the most up-to-date and relevant medicines information through eMIMS.

Download and share this info : MIMS-NACCHO discount offer

MIMS is proud to partner with NACCHO and work together to achieve health equality for Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and contribute to the Close the Gap Campaign.

By joining our efforts, we strive to ensure that all Australians live a long, healthy and happy life.  eMIMS is a trusted and well-established resource, and remains your complete guide to Product Information, Consumer Medicine Information, Product Images, Drug Interactions and PBS information for all registered medicines in Australia.

MIMS is offering all clinics a discounted rate for eMIMS subscriptions at $165.00 incl. GST per user.

This is a generous discounted offer, our standard single user price for eMIMS is $299.00.

To take advantage of this offer and support this MIMS and NACCHO partnership:

Please email Kumar Singh at kumar.singh@mims.com.au with your order details

(your name, clinic name, clinic address, phone number, eMIMS Cloud or Classic, and how many users you will need at the clinic)

eMIMS is available as two platforms:

eMIMSCloud needs internet connection

  • Internet-based and can be accessed from wherever you are on any internet abled device.
  • In eMIMSCloud you will find additional content such as tools and calculators to help you make decisions based on evidence based parameters.
  • Drug Allergy interactions checker.
  • With eMIMS Cloud there is nothing to install or update
  • No updates are required by you.

eMIMS Classic does not rely on internet connection

  •  eMIMS Classic can be installed on a network or single PC/laptop.
  • You will be provided with a license key which will activate your subscription.
  •  MIMS will provide you with a DVD in April August and December; monthly medicines information updates need to be manually downloaded and installed for months other than when you receive a DVD. MIMS will provide you with an email each month to notify you that the updated information
  • You do not need to logon to eMIMS Classic – you simply need to open it and leave it open during working hours.
  •  Downloaded to sit on your hard drive from a DVD.

 

2.1 QLD :  Talkin Tukka : What’s a healthy lifestyle in Cape York?

A new Indigenous media project launching today will bring listeners all the latest information, thanks to a new partnership between Black Star Radio and Apunipima Cape York Health Council.

Talkin Tukka is the program. Inspired by Black Star’s regular Bush Tukka segments, the new program is about our healthy Indigenous foods and a whole lot more! It also focuses on other healthy foods available for Indigenous people to blend with their wild caught and harvested bush tukka: the best of our traditional and modern knowledge.

Talkin Tukka also features health experts, food and nutrition experts, including for women’s, men’s and children’s health. It will build and support the great movement for good health we see across the Cape, providing ideas, information and positive health messages for Indigenous families.
The partnership is a great fit for Apunipima and Black Star, who each blend traditional and cutting-edge knowledge in all they do.

Apunipima Cape York Health Council represents 17 communities in the Cape and into the Torres Strait. It provides culturally appropriate, community-controlled primary health care and advocacy services in 11 of those communities and plans to build a primary health care Centre in each community over the coming years. A dedicated personnel of health practitioners and indigenous health staff services are always on call or standby to handle any emergency.

Black Star Radio, operated by Queensland Remote Aboriginal Media (QRAM) also operates across Cape York – in 16 locations, along with a further eight communities in remote Queensland. Also owned and managed by community, our role is to provide essential and reliable radio services “as good as the services that people in our capital cities take for granted”. Black Star takes an innovative approach to remote Indigenous broadcasting, using the latest digital and online technologies combined with the might and reach of broadcasting, to support communication within and between communities.

Both organisations are central to life in the Cape and the program will be heard widely. It’s a “must take” category program across the Black Star network of stations, which means all Black Star communities in the Cape will get the show, with their local programming resuming at 10 am.
QRAM/ Black Star Director Neville Reys and CEO of Apunipima Paul Stephenson, signed the 12-month contract today.

Neville Reys said “this is a wonderful new show for our listeners across the Cape. There’s no other health show that understands the healthy aspects of our lifestyle in the Cape, our fish and other wild food – and also the difficulties we have with getting access to other healthy food.”
Paul Stephenson for Apunipma said, “the partnership between Black Star Radio and Apunipima will see both organisations working closely with communities seeing lasting benefits in the areas of health nutrition and health improvement”.

2.2 QLD : Patrick Johnson becomes a Deadly Choices Ambassador

Honoured to meet the Deadly Team at the Kalwun Health Clinic on my second day as a Deadly Choices Ambassador. #deadlychoices

Great to catchup with the Kalwun Men’s Health Group for a yarn and a feed. #deadlychoices

2.3 : June Oscar heads for Queensland Wiyi Yani U Thangani #WomensVoices project

We’re heading to Queensland for the Australian Human Rights Commission‘s Wiyi Yani U Thangani #WomensVoices project. We’ll be in Brisbane on Saturday at the WOW Australia festival, before heading to Logan and Mt Isa.

We’re looking forward to hearing from Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women & girls.

Your valuable contribution will help identify key challenges and priorities and help influence positive change for our children and the future generations

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs takes part in CTG Refresh

Co-Chair Jackie Huggins with Josie Douglas from the Central Land Council, Donna Ah Chee – CEO of Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (CAAC) and Mischa Cartwright (Director Stakeholder Engagement & Communications Office of Aboriginal Affairs – NT Department of Local Government & Community Services).

The Closing The Gap Refresh Roundtables moved to Alice Springs last week. Co-Chair Jackie Huggins participated in the discussions with attendees.

Jackie met with celebrated Arrernte elder Margaret Kemarre Turner OAM (pictured).

 

3.2 NT : Anyinginyi Health supports Tennant Creek alcohol restrictions ,they  must be longer and tougher

In early 2018 the Thumbs Up! team visited Tennant Creek to deliver a community workshop for children focussing on alcohol and other drugs awareness.

The first day of their visit coincided with the tragic assault of a young girl and after speaking to community Elders and prominent citizens it was agreed that the workshop should go ahead. This powerful song is the result, written and sung by the children with

Media Report

Aboriginal corporations in Tennant Creek have asked the Northern Territory’s new Liquor Commission for tougher alcohol restrictions in the town, with a view to making them permanent.

The commission held a public consultation in Tennant Creek on Wednesday about whether the restrictions, which were extended by three months in March, should be relaxed or retained.

Proposed alcohol quantities (per person/day):

  • 1x six-pack of beer or pre-mix
  • 1x carton mid-strength or light beer
  • 1x bottle of wine
  • 1x one-litre cask wine
  • 1x fortified wine
  • No spirits
  • No alcohol for sale on Sundays

Tighter controls on takeaway alcohol were imposed in the remote town in February, in response to police figures showing an increase in alcohol-fuelled crime and the alleged rape of a toddler.

In a joint submission, the Anyinginyi Health, Julalikari Council, and the Papulu Apparr-Kari language centre told the commission they want a further reduction in alcohol quantities available for sale.

They said they would like those new restrictions to be in place for at least 12 months, with the possibility of making them permanent.

“We do not believe the restrictions are adequate… they have achieved little in terms of reducing alcohol consumption in our community,” the submission read.

The three Aboriginal corporations also want pubs, clubs, and bottle shops in the town to be held accountable for “degrading” environmental standards on their premises, including toilet and bathroom facilities.

“We remind the commission that we are not a community of animals and everyone in our municipality is entitled to the minimum standards of environmental health,” the submission said.

“Unless licensees are capable of delivering a standard that most Australians would regard as acceptable, they should not hold a liquor licence.”

Up to $300 paid for 2-litre cask of wine

The Aboriginal corporations want random inspections of licensed premises and licensees who sell alcohol to intoxicated customers, banned drinkers, and pregnant women should be held accountable.

A discussion about the number of pubs, clubs and bottle shops in Tennant Creek, compared to the town’s population size, was also needed, said Barbara Shaw, general manager of Anyinginyi Health.

“Reducing the number of alcohol outlets will certainly go a long way to managing the problem,” Ms Shaw said.

According to the submission, black-market alcohol sales are not being properly monitored, with people paying up to $300 for a two-litre cask of wine.

“We are also experiencing greater levels of sly grog-running. More effort needs to be applied to monitoring illegal alcohol activities,” the submission said.

The group is also calling for police and security staff in Tennant Creek to undertake a cross-cultural training course.

This would provide them with “a better understanding of local Aboriginal social structures and the attendant norms and practices that define the Warumungu world view,” the submission stated.

The Aboriginal corporations want therapeutic support and “wrap-around” programs for people who end up on the Banned Drinkers Register (BDR) because of chronic alcoholism.

They have asked the commission to refer to the Tennant Creek Alcohol Management Plan and Action Plan 2014-2017, which reflects a “great amount of community consultation” and outlines strategies to reduce alcohol-related harm.

4.WA : Earbus and South West Aboriginal Medical Service performs checks for Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School Students

The students of Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School in Glen Iris recently received a helping hand from one of Western Australia’s premier health services.

Media Report

The Earbus Foundation of WA visited the school and provided free hearing checks on Thursday, March 22.

Djidi Djidi students Kassie Allan and Deakin Williams were lucky enough to have their traditional indigenous designs placed on the bus.

Earbus chief executive officer Paul Higginbotham said the service first came to the school in November 2016, assisted by the South West Aboriginal Medical Service.

“When we drove in, the kids’ faces just lit up because this is the first time they have seen it like this,” he said. “Our job is to make sure that if they have got an ear problem it doesn’t turn into hearing loss.”

Through its Community Giving Fund, Aurizon presented the Earbus with a $20,000 grant. The funding allowed the health service to visit schools across the South West.

Piacentini and Sons also made a contribution to the Earbus service