NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #NationalCloseTheGapDay Media : Press Releases from Stakeholders @AusHealthcare @RACGP @TheRACP @ranzcog @TheRACP @AbSecNSW @strokefdn @ACRRM and coverage #NT @CAACongress #WA #QLD #VIC #NSW #ACCHO events

Contents of our CTG NACCHO Post 

National Close the Gap Campaign Launched at Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation ACCHO

Stakeholders CTG Press Releases

1.AHHA

2.RACGP

3.RANZOG

4.ACCRM

5.ACEM

6 ABSEC

7.Labour Party

8. Greens Party

9. RACGP

10. Stroke Foundation

11. Coalition Government 

ACCHO Members

Congress ACCHO Alice Springs

Gidgee ACCHO Mt Isa

Mallee ACCHO Victoria

Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Cover )

Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour

Kimberly Aboriginal Medical Service

National Close the Gap Campaign Launched at Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation ACCHO

A national campaign highlighting the health and well-being of Indigenous people was launched in Campbelltown today.

Close the Gap Day was established to celebrate community practices that are positively affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation in Airds was chosen to host the launch due to its valuable contributions to the local community.

Campbelltown mayor George Brticevic said the event was important not just for Macarthur, but for the rest of Australia as well.

“The importance we place on everyone in our community being able to enjoy a comparable standard of life can’t be understated,” he said.

“Close the Gap Day is a reminder of the inequalities Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people still face today, and a call to action for the entire community.

“The fact that the report is being launched here in Campbelltown is a great credit to our Aboriginal community leaders and the important work being done by the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation.”

South-western Sydney has the largest growing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in Australia, but the health of the community as a whole trails well behind non-Aboriginal Australians.

According to the most recent census, Aboriginal men on average live to 69 compared to non-Aboriginal men who live to 80.

Non-Aboriginal women live to 84 compared to Aboriginal women who live to 73.

The 2019 Close the Gap report, “Our Choices, Our Voices”, was released this morning.

The report, prepared by the Lowitja Institute, is being released at a community event at Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation – Aboriginal Medical Service South Western Sydney, as part of National Close the Gap day events around the country.

National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples co-chair Rod Little said the report highlighted the incredible work being carried out by Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations (ACCOs) to improve the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

“The stories in the report clearly demonstrate that when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are involved in the design and delivery of the services they need, we are far more likely to succeed,” he said.

The report comes one month after the Commonwealth Government’s Closing the Gap report was tabled in federal parliament, showing a lack of progress on most targets.

In his address, Prime Minister Scott Morrison restated the government’s commitment to work collaboratively in a formal partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Mr Little said he hoped National Close the Gap Day would encourage further commitment to address the challenge of health inequality.

“Health outcomes and life expectancy in Aboriginal communities are affected by many different factors, such as housing, educational opportunity, access to community-controlled primary health services, a culturally safe workforce, racism, and trauma and healing,” he said.

“I want Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to have the same opportunity to live full and healthy lives, like all other Australians.

“We are optimistic that by supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander led initiatives and a commitment to working in genuine partnership, that we can close the gap.”

Download the CTG report HERE

ctg2019_final2_web

ACCHO CTG Stakeholders

1.AHHA

‘Today is National Close the Gap Day—and to truly close that gap we badly need a refreshed focus on the social determinants of health, including income, education, racism and intergenerational trauma’, says Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA) Chief Executive Alison Verhoeven

‘These factors account for over one-half of the difference in health outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians.

‘To reduce such inequities, as a nation we need to have concrete action on things many non-Indigenous Australians take for granted. Things such as quality housing, effective education, jobs, community activities, access to healthy food and clean water, and access to appropriate healthcare.

‘When we say “appropriate healthcare” we mean more than medically appropriate—we mean culturally safe healthcare services.

‘When dealing with the healthcare sector Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples should feel safe and secure in their identity, culture and community. There should be no challenge to whether they should be able to access culturally safe services. Whether a service is “culturally safe” or not needs to be determined by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people themselves.

‘In this vein, we have much to do in tackling institutional racism—which is different to individual racist acts, and mostly goes unacknowledged.

‘For example—a recently published study of the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) Registry showed that Indigenous patients were less likely than non-Indigenous patients to be added to the transplantation waiting list during the first year of renal replacement therapy; this disparity was not explained by differences in patient- and disease-related factors. The authors concluded that changes in policy and practice are needed to reduce these differences.

‘There was also the case of a government department providing 26 different streams of funding for various ‘body parts’ (diabetes, heart disease and so on) to a holistic Aboriginal Medical Service—and then demanding 26 different streams of accountability for the money. Apart from the unreasonable reporting load, this kind of administration is screaming “we don’t trust you” to the funding recipients—and don’t imagine that they don’t feel it.

‘We need to go right back to the original 2008 Close the Gap Statement of Intent signed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG). That statement was founded on an understanding that population health outcomes are fundamentally the result of social determinants and that governments need to work in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their organisations to achieve beneficial outcomes.

‘The 2018 commitment by COAG to a formal partnership approach with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to Close the Gap is a long overdue step in the right direction.

‘In addition to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples having a leadership role in Aboriginal health, let’s also ensure that there is strong investment in Aboriginal health services, and prioritised development of an Aboriginal health workforce to deliver both Aboriginal-specific and mainstream health services’, Ms Verhoeven said.

2. RACGP

Dr Schramm points to Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) as a proven example of the success that comes with people being involved.

‘Their strength is that, as it says, they are community-controlled,’ she said. ‘They’re developed by the community, for the community.

‘So that’s the power behind them – the community have a say in how their health service is run, the programs and how it’s all going to work … [ACCHSs] set themselves up to address the needs of Aboriginal people and health, and they’re culturally safe, competent services for people to go to.’

Full Press Release HERE


Dr Tim Senior, Medical Advisor for RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, also spoke at this week’s event, emphasising the need for non-Indigenous Australians to truly consult with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities about what is needed to close health gaps.

‘We actually have to do much more listening than talking, particularly around issues of cultural safety.

‘This is not up to us to decide or judge, this is up to thousands of local communities around Australia to decide and judge if we are getting this right,’ Dr Senior said.

‘And then listen, and act on that.’

Taking action to achieve health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people #ClosetheGap

Dr Tim Senior, Tharawal CEO Darryl Wight, Leanne Bird, Prof Jenny Reath, and Chair RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health A/Prof Peter O’Mara at the launch of the #ClosetheGap Report at Tharawal AMS

3.RANZGP

The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) supports Close the Gap Day as an important opportunity to reflect on the social and health disparities present between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians.

The recently released Closing the Gap Report 2019 once again showed that in many areas Australia is not making progress.

In recognition of the need for ongoing action to address the social determinants of health and the mental health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the College recently updated its Position Statement to call for the recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the Australian Constitution.

The RANZCP supports the establishment of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander advisory body to guarantee an Indigenous voice in political decision-making, as recommended in the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

In order to realise truth-telling and promote health, the RANZCP also supports the establishment of a Makarrata Commission to guide the treaty process and to provide a basis for truth-telling.

The inclusion of mental health targets in any refresh to the Close the Gap strategy, designed and implemented in collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, is also a crucial part of working towards achieving health equity.

For more information, see Position Statement 68: Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the Australian Constitution.

4.ACRRM

On Close the Gap Day 2019, ACRRM says it is time to build on the solutions

The Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) sees this Close the Gap Day as a time to focus efforts on the strategies that are successfully delivering better health outcomes to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

ACRRM is a Close the Gap Campaign member and welcomes the Government’s recent commitment to progress its future work in full partnership with peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups.

Alongside this, ACRRM commits to sharpening its own efforts to contribute toward health equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

ACRRM President Dr Ewen McPhee says that after 11 years of closing the gap, if we are to achieve health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples by 2030, we need to build on what’s working.

“Health inequality has by most counts, worsened in the 11 years since the Close the Gap Strategy was produced,” he says.

“We need to work harder and smarter and learn from the many success stories of how community-centred, culturally-appropriate, primary-care is improving health outcomes for Australia’s first peoples.

“It is known that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients access health services more, where they feel they are culturally safe and respected and have strong relationships with practitioners, especially where there are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors and staff to support them.

“The College recognises that by ensuring our doctors are dedicated and culturally competent and, by growing and supporting our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Fellows, we are able to make an important contribution.

“Most ACRRM doctors have significant numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and our members are practising in some of the country’s highest needs, remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“Our College has more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander members now than ever before and since introducing its own selection process in 2017, ACRRM has seen continuing record numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctor enrolments to its training programs.

“The College also continues to build on its Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health curricula and courses to ensure our members are trained and supported to provide their medical services as effectively as possible,” Dr McPhee says

National surveys demonstrate ACRRM registrars continue to be distinguished among general practice registrars for their interest in and likelihood of working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

“Today we are happy to build on the outstanding contributions of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors and all our dedicated members working in rural and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities,” Dr McPhee says.

ACRRM is proud of the exceptional work of its members in serving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and sees great promise for the future in both the passion and the capacity of the doctors that it continues to attract.

5.ACEM

Emergency departments (and health systems generally) have been poor at providing culturally safe and appropriate environments for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

ACEM recognises that in order to help o close the gap in health outcomes emergency departments and the health system must improve our accessibility and responsiveness to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

2018 ACEM report examining the experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) and non-Indigenous patients presenting to Australian emergency departments shows Indigenous patients are overrepresented, both in their number of presentations to EDs relative to their proportion of population (in remote, very remote and metropolitan areas).

For many patients, the emergency department is the front door to the health system. The experience of any patient presenting to an ED is one that may then shape their steps into specialist or other care, and their opportunities to achieve optimal health and life outcomes, so it is particularly important that the care we provide is culturally safe.

Since 2008 disparities health and life outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have been measured and tracked as part of the Australian Government’s Closing the Gap strategy, which has sought to identify and reduce these disparities with non-Indigenous populations of Australia.

As the government and Coalition of Australian Governments finally pursue meaningful partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, leaders and peak bodies to close these gaps, ACEM is continuing its work to build culturally safe emergency departments and an emergency medicine workforce that is responsive to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. To achieve this, we recognise that this work needs to be led from Aboriginal communities and organisations. We must also better enable the growth and development of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander emergency specialist workforce.

The College’s Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) Steering Group has been working to establish partnerships with key Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations (such as the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association)
This year the College’s RAP Steering Group is renewing ACEM’s Innovate RAP in partnership with Reconciliation Australia. The College’s inaugural RAP was released in 2017 with design by Indigenous artist Luke Mallie. Just nine (of more than 100) deliverables in that RAP have so far not been achieved and will be reincorporated into the next RAP (2019–21), being produced by Marcus Lee Design.
The College is undertaking a broad body of work to build these relationships, including:

  • Embedding Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency into the ACEM Curriculum Framework.
  • Awarding the Joseph Epstein Scholarshipto support the training and development of an Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or Māori advanced trainee.
  • Accrediting Indigenous Health Special Skills posts for rural health.
  • Developing careers resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors working in emergency medicine.
  • Advocating for more Indigenous Health Liaison Officers to be employed in emergency departments.
  • Increasing the numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander trainees, Diplomates and  Certificants.
  • Introducing mandatory cultural competence activitiesinto its Specialist CPD program.

The action plan guides the priorities and work of the College as it continues its commitment to equity in the health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and seeks to build environments, systems and structures to support the training, development and careers of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce in emergency medicine.

6 .ABSEC

Closing the Gap will only be successful if Aboriginal communities lead the solutions according to NSW Aboriginal peak body AbSec

Currently in NSW as well as across Australia, the gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal kids continues to widen across the child protection system.

In NSW, Aboriginal children are now almost 9 times more likely to be involved in the child protection system, an increase from almost 7 times for the previous year.

On Close the Gap day, it is a reminder that Aboriginal communities need to lead on the solutions to make sure that the inequalities faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are addressed Tim Ireland, Chief Executive Officer at AbSec, whose goal is to reduce the over-representation of Aboriginal kids in the child protection system, said:

“The gap is widening. Aboriginal children are now 11 times more likely to be removed from their families than non-Indigenous children, an increase from last year. “Closing the Gap will only be successful if Aboriginal communities lead the solutions.

We need a genuine partnership between governments and Aboriginal communities that invests in Aboriginalled solutions, designed by Aboriginal people, and delivered by Aboriginal organisations.

Only then will we have an approach that is tailored to the needs of our children, families and communities, supporting them to thrive, strong in culture and identity.”

7. Labour Party

If elected, a Shorten Labor Government will move quickly to agree on a process with First Nations people to make the Voice a reality – including a pathway to a referendum. Labor supports a Voice.

We support enshrining it in the Constitution. This is our first priority for Constitutional change.
First Nations peoples must have a say in the matters that affect their lives and policies must be co-designed with full free and prior informed consent.

Download full Press Release

Bill Shorten CTG PR

 ” A Shorten Labor Government will invest $5 million towards closing the gap in
South Australia by assisting the Port Adelaide Football Club in establishing the
Aboriginal Centre of Excellence.

The Aboriginal Centre of Excellence will help close the gap for Indigenous students
by providing boarding capacity for 50 both male and female students from metro,
rural and regional South Australia.”

Download Labour CTG Press Release

Labor Party

8. Greens Party

The Greens have today announced their election commitment to work with First Nations peoples to address Australia’s unfinished business, close the gap and achieve justice

Australian Greens Senator Rachel Siewert said a commitment to self-determination must be at the heart of closing the gap, and that this approach has been sadly lacking.

Download or Read Greens Press Release

Greens Press Release

9. RACP recognises Indigenous leadership on National Close the Gap Day

The RACP is urging all Australian people to recognise Indigenous leadership and success on National Close the Gap Day 2019.

The RACP is a founding member of the Close the Gap Campaign for Indigenous health equality, a campaign by peak Indigenous and non-Indigenous health bodies to close the health and life expectancy gap by 2030.

“We have a right to self-determination and full participation in decision-making about matters that affect us. We need to invest in and support on the ground voices and solutions. An investment in our community-controlled organisations is an investment in success,” Commissioner Oscar said.

RACP President Associate Professor Mark Lane said Indigenous leadership and community-control are central.

“Without self-determination, it is not possible for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to fully overcome the legacy of colonisation and dispossession, and the ongoing impacts on health.

Professor Noel Hayman, Chair of the RACP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Committee, said “to make real, long-term gains in Indigenous health, the health system needs to recognise the highly skilled leadership of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are best placed to mobilise action and build the platform for change.”

“The RACP’s focus is on improving access to medical specialists for Indigenous people, and we have great examples of where this is being done innovatively and effectively,” Professor Hayman said

10. Stroke Foundation determined to close the gap

By Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan

Read over 100 NACCHO Aboriginal Health Stroke Articles HERE

Equal access to healthcare is a basic human right, but sadly, this is not the reality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

Today is Close the Gap Day – an important initiative which aims to achieve health equality within a decade.

Here at the Stroke Foundation, we believe this is a goal well worth fighting for. All Australians need and deserve to have access to best practice health care.

Currently, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are overrepresented in stroke statistics.  This is harrowing and it must change.

Indigenous Australians are twice as likely to be hospitalised with stroke and 1.5 times as likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians.

A 2018 Australian National University study found one-third to a half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their 40s, 50s and 60s were at high risk of future heart attack or stroke.  Alarmingly, high levels of risk were also found in people under the age of 35.

Our vision is for a world free from disability and suffering caused by stroke, but there is so much to do in our own backyard.

Stroke Foundation is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations to improve the health outcomes of Indigenous communities. This includes access to health checks and increasing stroke awareness by delivering targeted education on what a stroke is, how to prevent it and how to spot the F.A.S.T signs of stroke.

Our commitment to establishing a national telestroke network is also a big step towards transforming emergency stroke treatment for regional and rural Australia.

Stroke can be prevented, it can be treated and it can be beaten. We must act now to stem the tide of this devastating disease by closing the gap and delivering health equality.

The facts
The burden of disease for stroke in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is 2.3 times that of non-Indigenous Australians.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 1.5 times more likely to die from stroke as non-Indigenous Australians.

11. Coalition Government 

Today is National Close the Gap Day, a day we re-affirm our commitment to delivering better outcomes for our First Australians.

The Coalition Government under the leadership of Prime Minister Scott Morrison (ScoMo) has re-framed the Government’s Closing the Gap agenda and established a new partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak organisations as well as state and territory governments to drive the next phase of Closing the Gap.

We are committed to this because we know that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians must have a say in their future and be a part of our shared efforts to improve the life outcomes of our First Australians.

That is why under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy we have doubled the percentage of Indigenous organisations receiving contracts under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

When I became Minister for Indigenous Affairs only 30 per cent of our services funded to deliver better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities were delivered by Indigenous organisations.

Today, I am proud to say that 60 per cent of our services are delivered by Indigenous organisations.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people must be at the heart of our nation’s commitment to deliver a better future for all Australians including our First Australians.

#ClosetheGap #closethegap2019 #nationalclosethegapday #indigenous#IAS

ACCHO Members

Congress ACCHO

Gidgee ACCHO Mt Isa

Mallee ACCHO Victoria

It’s all happening today in the MDAS Health Mildura carpark with a BBQ for National Close the Gap Day. #closethegap #mildura #deadlychoices

Deadly Choices

Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Cover )

Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour

Closing the Gap recognition Awards
Lovely welcome by Aunty Kim

Kimberly Aboriginal  Medical Service

A message from the KAMS CEO Vicki O”Donnell on Close the Gap Day #closethegap

NACCHO Members #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #National @IndigMaraProjct @Mayi_Kuwayu #NT Katherine West #Wurli-Wurlinjang #Sunrise ACCHO’s @HOTNORTH #QLD @Apunipima @Wuchopperen #TAS #VIC #NSWVotes2019 Both major party policies #WA @TheAHCWA #ACT

1.1 National : Indigenous Marathon Project a community focussed health initiative that uses the simple act of running as a vehicle to promote the benefits of healthy and active lifestyles. #RunSweatInspire

1.2  Mayi Kuwayu TV ads going live today March 14 in a number of ACCHO health clinics around Australia

2.1 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Cairns celebrated 10 years of Mums and Bubs program

2.2 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO team continues to roll out Mental Health First Aid training and Midwife workshop on Cape York

3. NT : Katherine West, Wurli-Wurlinjang and Sunrise Health Services ACCHO’s meet with 100 health professionals to enhance communication between hospitals, primary health and public health services

4.1 NSW : NSW Labor Leader, Michael Daley and Shadow Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, David Harris, have today announced Labor’s policies to better support Aboriginal communities across NSW. Press Release

4.2 NSW : ACCHO’s in Northern NSW partner with TAFE NSW to support and service qualifications that upskill the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care workforce

5. Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO opens new tulaminakali Health clinic in Devenport 

6. ACT : Beds at the troubled Ngunnawal Bush Healing Farm are likely to lay empty for longer after the government back tracked on plans to look for a provider for a residential program by early this year.

7. WA : AHCWA  headed to Bunbury last week to deliver the Certificate II in Family Wellbeing to a group of 10 students. 

8. VIC : MDAS ACCHO : Mallee Mums find support and strength in each other

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Indigenous Marathon Project a community focussed health initiative that uses the simple act of running as a vehicle to promote the benefits of healthy and active lifestyles. #RunSweatInspire

“ Running a marathon is one of life’s ultimate challenges. To run a marathon from some of Australia’s most remote and harshest places is truly an amazing accomplishment.

When our runners cross the finish line of the world’s biggest marathon, in the world’s biggest city, after overcoming unimaginable challenges, they know they can achieve anything.

The lessons learnt and the pride felt are taken home and used to educate and inspire others about the importance of personal pride, healthy lifestyles, good nutrition and regular physical activity,”

Rob De Castella Indigenous Marathon Project

Picture Above EMOTIONAL: Jessica Bartholomew, Cyrus Morseu and Debra Hegarty after the New York Marathon 2018

The Indigenous Marathon Project (IMP) was founded in 2010 by former World Champion marathon runner Rob de Castella. IMP is not a sports program, but a community focussed health initiative that uses the simple act of running as a vehicle to promote the benefits of healthy and active lifestyles.

IMP annually selects, educates, trains and takes a group of inspirational young Indigenous men and women aged 18-30 to compete in the world’s biggest marathon – the New York Marathon.

Through this, IMP promotes the importance of healthy and active lifestyles throughout Indigenous communities, and creates Indigenous role models.

 ” Mr Fielding was running to raise money for The Purple House, an organisation that provides dialysis to some of Australia’s most remote communities.

Aside from the more than $40,000 raised so far, he wants to promote a healthy lifestyle to other Indigenous Australians.”

From ABC TV COVERAGE

From NACCHO May 2018

Starting at 4am in the APY Lands town of Indulkana, Zibeon Fielding has just finished a 62-kilometre ultramarathon.

The feat, which is about the same as running one and a half full marathons, comes just five weeks after Mr Fielding completed the Boston Marathon.

Port Macquarie March 2018

Port Macquarie last weekend welcomed three former Olympians Australian Olympians Nova Peris, Rob de Castella, Steve Moneghetti to support a new program for improving the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“It’s so good to see because everyone knows there is an abundance of talent in communities but minimal opportunities.

Running can change people’s lives and the IMP graduates have themselves become inspirations.

It’s a beautiful thing to see with Port Macquarie getting behind it.”

Olympian Nova Peris pictured below with Charlie Maher said the Bush to Beach Project was awesome : 

WATCH VIDEO \

Additional Text and Photo Port Macquarie News

“The project enables participants to visit the partner community in recognition of their commitment, Providing the opportunity to learn and share culture, experiences and stories with one and another while working towards creating change.

This is the first year of the program and we are proud to have the young Ntaria participants visiting Port Macquarie in March for the 2019 Port Macquarie Running Festival.

“In order to make sure the program is sustainable and can make lasting change for many years ahead we are holding a fundraiser in conjunction with the Port Macquarie Running Festival. ”

Charlie Maher Ambassador

NACCHO’s Social Media editor Colin Cowell promoted the project nationally and attended the lunch on Saturday, March 9 fundraising to support the Bush to Beach Project.

The founder of Bush to Beach Charlie Maher said around $6000 was raised from the event.

Mr Maher was emotional in his speech at the fundraiser saying he was blown away by the support.

He said it had been a “real experience” having kids from his hometown of Hermannsburg visit.

Mr Maher said friendships were formed between the participants of the program from Port Macquarie and Hermannsburg.

“Our kids realised how much they had,” he said.

“We are trying to teach them to always be grateful, humble and appreciate what you have.”

The is the first of two visits of by the Northern Territory participants to Port Macquarie.

They will return in September.

The Port Macquarie participants of Bush to Beach will visit Hemmannsburg next month (April).

1.2  Mayi Kuwayu TV ads going live today March 14 in a number of ACCHO health clinics around Australia

Mayi Kuwayu is a major new study that will provide a far greater understanding of the value of culture for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Mayi Kuwayu Study looks at how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander wellbeing is linked to things like connection to country, cultural practices, spirituality and language use.

Our research team will follow a large number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and ask about their culture and wellbeing. As a longitudinal study, we will survey people and then ask them to take the same survey every few years, so that we can understand what influences changes over time.

This is the first time a national study of this type has been done and will provide an evidence base to allow for the creation of better policies and programs.

This study has been created by and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander controlled research resource.

The Mayi Kuwayu team are experienced at working closely with communities across Australia, and the study has majority Aboriginal staffing and study governance (decision making) structure.

The Mayi Kuwayu launch video can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/297654156

In exactly one month, MK Study leader Ray Lovett will be running the Boston Marathon as part of his ongoing commitment to The Indigenous Marathon Foundation, a charity led by world champion and former Olympian Rob de Castella which uses running to promote health and resilience and celebrate achievement in young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and women.

We’ll keep you posted on what you can do to be part of Ray’s marathon effort! #ourculturescount #RunSweatInspire

By sharing your story, you can help create a better understanding of how culture affects health and wellbeing over time.

TAKE THE SURVEY 

2.1 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Cairns celebrated 10 years of Mums and Bubs program

The Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program, First Time Mums, has been running for ten years this year at Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen).

The First Time Mums Program is a client-centred, home visiting program providing care and support to mums pregnant with their first Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander baby until bub turns two.

The Program aims to assist first time pregnant mums and their families to develop knowledge and skills to improve the long-term health, social and economic future of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.

The dedicated team of Nurse Home Visitors and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Partnership Workers have completed over 5,000 home visits to clients in the past ten years, providing a culturally safe service to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. The Family Partnership Workers help to promote trust and respect between the clients and their families, the broader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community and local health providers.

Nurse Supervisor of the First Time Mums Program at Wuchopperen, Helen Moss, says the program has made a huge difference to the lives of over 350 families since its inception in Cairns.

“Over the past ten years we have seen the program grow dramatically and help hundreds of mums and bubs, with fantastic results. While the clinical results speak for themselves, the relationships we see our team form with the clients, the mums with their babies, and the mums with each other is the most incredible part of the program.

It is such a rewarding program to be a part of, the whole team really get to know the mums and bubs on a very personal level and seeing the mothers creative positive change for themselves and their families is deeply heart-warming. Ultimately we feel their success is our success!” says Helen.

The First Time Mums program has shown the importance of ongoing support and community in the direct health outcomes of mothers and their babies.

“100% of the babies who have come through the program were fully immunised by the time they turned two, which has had a significant impact on the long-term health of the babies, and 97% of our babies were within a healthy birth weight range. This is a huge achievement and sets up a really solid base for the rest of the child’s life,” says Helen.

Birth weight is a crucial aspect of new born health, with data from Queensland Health showing in 2015‐2016, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies were 1.8 times as likely to be low birth weight compared with non‐Indigenous babies.

2.2 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO team continues to roll out Mental Health First Aid training and Midwife workshop on Cape York

Apunipima’s Social Emotional Wellbeing Community Implementation Manager, Bernard David, was in Hope Vale last week.

Bernard was delivering Mental Health First Aid Training to staff from Apunipima and Hope Vale Council.

Mental Health First Aid Training is a three day training course that teaches you how to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis.

The training helps participants to identify, understand, and respond to signs of addictions and mental illnesses.

Earlier this month a group of expectant mums in Aurukun got together to celebrate their pregnancies.

The group were invited by Apunipima’s Midwife in conjunction with the PHaMs team to share their pregnancy stories, complications and individual family challenges. It also gave the women an opportunity to discuss ways they could support each other at this exciting time.

The women hope to have another yarning session closer to the time for the women to fly out of community to deliver their babies in Cairns.

This will give them a chance to discuss ways to manage the challenges associated with being away from home for extended periods of time, their options for support services in Cairns, labour, birth and early breastfeeding and parenting.

3. NT : Katherine West, Wurli-Wurlinjang and Sunrise Health Services ACCHO’s meet with 100 health professionals to enhance communication between hospitals, primary health and public health services

 

 “We need to be mindful of how we approach research in Aboriginal communities. Research must be done in partnership and not done to Aboriginal people

Sinon Cooney from Katherine West Health Board says of research

Health experts gathered in Katherine this week 14-15 March for Hot North, a four-year National Health and Medical Research Council funded research program led by Menzies School of Health Research.

The event will bring more than 100 health professionals together from local health services, such as Katherine Hospital, Katherine West, Wurli-Wurlinjang and Sunrise Health Services to enhance communication between hospitals, primary health and public health services and to share the latest research and findings on regionally specific health concerns

This time last year a group of health experts gathered in Katherine and called for more emergency housing to help fix chronic health problems here.

A year later, the same problems remain.

Those same health experts will gather in Katherine on Thursday and Friday this week for Hot North, a four-year National Health and Medical Research Council funded research program led by Menzies School of Health Research.

This time workshop will hear about regionally important health concerns such as antimicrobial resistance, disability and ageing, diabetes in pregnancy and youth, rheumatic heart disease, and new initiatives in skin health.

The event will bring more than 100 health professionals together from local health services, such as Katherine Hospital, Katherine West, Wurli-Wurlinjang and Sunrise Health Services to enhance communication between hospitals, primary health and public health services and to share the latest research and findings on regionally specific health concerns.

Hot North director, Professor Bart Currie said a major focus of the workshops is to give researchers, clinicians and other health professionals an opportunity to network, collaborate and share research.

“It gives researchers and Katherine health professionals the opportunity to strengthen relationships and facilitate learning experiences that develop and transform health practices across northern Australia.

“By developing a community of medical researchers and clinicians, HOT NORTH is connecting a wide range of experts to address the current and future challenges facing the tropical north”, said HOT NORTH Director, Professor Bart Currie.

With 65 activities funded to date, HOT NORTH-supported research and translation is investigating a wide range of health issues facing the Indigenous people living in northern Australia.

As one of the top Aboriginal health providers in the country, Katherine Hospital plays an important role in helping to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health outcomes.

Katherine Hospital’s head physician Dr Simon Quilty said, “The Katherine region is huge, and the challenges in providing health care in this remote and tropical region, that’s bigger than Victoria and Tasmania combined, are immense.

“Not only do we have the logistic issues of servicing over 13,000 people who live in remote communities, but these people come from over 20 different tribal nations with different beliefs and expectations of health.

“HOT NORTH provides a fantastic forum for health care professionals from across the north of Australia to mix with academics engaged in remote, tropical and Indigenous health to come up with ideas of how to do things better.”

Katherine Hospital and the health clinics servicing Katherine have made significant progress over the past number of years.

It now ranks as one the top hospitals in Australia for its relationship with its Indigenous patients.

“It’s the transfer of research and practical experience into better service delivery that will help us close the gap across the north and protect the north from tropical and emerging diseases,” added Professor Currie.

Based at Menzies, HOT NORTH utilises a strong collaborative approach between researchers and community, drawing on the expertise of research professionals from eight of Australia’s leading research organisations:

  • Menzies School of Health Research
  • James Cook University
  • Telethon Kids Institute
  • Marie Bashir Institute & The University of Sydney
  • Doherty Institute & The University of Melbourne
  • South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute
  • QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute
  • Burnet Institute

4.1 NSW : Ten Aboriginal communities across NSW will receive significant infrastructure and service upgrades, thanks to a $55 million investment by the NSW Liberals & Nationals Government. 

 

Minister for Planning and Housing Anthony Roberts and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Sarah Mitchell today announced the funding, which is part of the new Roads to Home program, aimed at improving the quality of life and economic opportunities in discrete Aboriginal communities.

Pictured with Roy Ah See Chair NSW ALC yesterday at Bowraville launch 

“This is about connecting with some of our isolated communities in NSW and providing them with the facilities and services that they deserve,” Mr Roberts said.

“Some of these communities are facing challenges such as emergency vehicles having difficulty locating patients due to lack of street signs, waste not being collected due to unpassable roads, and school buses being unable to reach children because of road and drainage issues.”

The investment will deliver essential road upgrades to improve the connectivity of these communities, including road surfacing, stormwater and drainage, kerbs and footpaths, street and public space lighting, and power and telecommunication upgrades.

The Government will also update land tenure rules in these communities, which have been a primary barrier to home ownership and land development.

Ms Mitchell said the upgrades will have more than just a physical effect on the local communities.

“As a Government, it is crucial we do what we can to ensure these communities have access to the same standards and ongoing maintenance as their neighbours,” Ms Mitchell said.

“These upgrades will make it easier for people to get to and from work and school, improve road safety, and allow communities to grow and start new businesses and ensure these communities have access to the same standards and ongoing maintenance as their neighbours.”

NSW Aboriginal Land Council (NSWALC) Chairman Roy Ah See welcomed today’s announcement.

“This announcement will change the lives of First Australians in discrete communities for the better. This has been a priority for NSWALC, and I appreciate that the Liberals & Nationals Government has listened to and acted on our concerns,” Mr Ah See said.

“This announcement will help build up Aboriginal communities, unlock opportunities and provide the ability for many to move toward home ownership and greater economic independence. This is another example of what can be achieved when government works with Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people.”

The first 10 communities to benefit from the NSW Government’s initial $55 million investment are:

  • Bellwood Reserve, Nambucca (Nambucca Shire LGA)
  • Bowraville, Nambucca (Nambucca Shire LGA)
  • Cabarita, Forster (Mid-Coast LGA)
  • Gingie Mission, Walgett (Walgett Shire LGA)
  • Gulargambone Top, Weilan (Coonamble LGA)
  • La Perouse Mission, La Perouse (Randwick LGA)
  • Namoi Reserve, Walgett (Walgett Shire LGA)
  • Narwan Village, Armidale (Armidale Dumaresq LGA)
  • Three Ways, Griffith (Griffith LGA)
  • Wallaga Lake Koori Village, Merrimans (Eurobodalla LGA)

Work will start in these communities this year.

4.1 NSW : NSW Labor Leader, Michael Daley and Shadow Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, David Harris, have today announced Labor’s policies to better support Aboriginal communities across NSW. Press Release

 

This builds on Labor’s previous significant announcements including a pathway to negotiate a Treaty or Treaties with the First Peoples of the State.

Mr Daley said: “Labor has always acknowledged the unique cultural heritage of the First Peoples as a priority.

“The Liberals and Nationals have spent eight years paying lip service to policies in Aboriginal Affairs but they haven’t made any substantive policy or legislative changes.”

Mr Harris said: “It’s important that a NSW Labor Government continues to build on the existing relationship with the NSW Aboriginal community to achieve lasting generational change.”

Under further measures announced today, Labor will:

  • Appoint an Aboriginal Affairs Advocate for Children and Young People – The Advocate will be a voice for Aboriginal children in government policy and legislation and will work side by side with the Advocate for Children and Young People. Labor will work with Aboriginal communities to develop the role, determine its focus and make sure that it is Aboriginal-led to empower Aboriginal communities.
  • Allocate $5 million over four years to reinstate traditional burning practices – Expanding traditional burning practices will open up country for the local Aboriginal community and restore the traditional forest structure. These programs will create employment and training opportunities for Aboriginal communities.
  • Adopt the principles of Justice Reinvestment – A strategy that aims to reduce incarceration rates and improve social outcomes by directing resources into communities with high rates of imprisonment. Labor will deliver $4.5 million over four years to fund three pilot programs, which will be delivered through NGOs, and deliver a coordinating authority.
  • Make a formal apology to victims of state-sanctioned massacres in NSW – Recent research identified at least 68 massacres in NSW between 1788 and 1872, resulting in the deaths of approximately 1,653 Aboriginal people.
  • Move the Department of Aboriginal Affairs to Premier and Cabinet – This demonstrates NSW Labor’s commitment to a future Treaty Process which will need cross portfolio co-ordination at the highest level.
  • Fund the NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group (AECG) – The AECG is a not for profit Aboriginal organisation that provides advice on all matters relevant to education and training. Labor will deliver $4 million of additional money over four years which will enable the organisation to increase its participation in developing and supporting Aboriginal education across NSW.
  • Secure the future of the Girls Academy – Provide $3.9 million in funding over four years to secure the future of the Girls Academy, a program focused on increasing school attendance and retention rates. Currently, the Clontarf Foundation, an organisation which provides education and life skills programs to Aboriginal boys and young men, is receiving government funding. The Liberals and Nationals have failed to provide funding for a similar program for girls and women.

Labor also recommitted to:

  • Returning Me-Mel (Goat Island) to its traditional owners as a priority – Me-Mel has enormous significance to Indigenous communities and was home to the Wangal people when Captain Arthur Phillip and the First Fleet arrived in Sydney Cove in 1788. The Liberals and Nationals promised to return Me-Mel in October 2016, but the transfer has still not taken place.
  • Establishing Walama Court – A court for indigenous offenders in the District Court jurisdiction, at a time when Aboriginal incarceration rates are worse in NSW than either at the time of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody or in 2011.
  • Delivering dedicated Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage Act – NSW is the only state in Australia without standalone legislation to protect Aboriginal cultural heritage.
  • Establishing a Myall Creek massacre education and cultural centre – Providing up to $3 million to help establish an education and cultural centre at the historic Myall Creek massacre site in northern NSW, supporting one of the state’s most well-known reconciliation projects.
  • Flying the Aboriginal Flag on the Harbour Bridge – For 40 years, the Aboriginal flag has flown as a proud symbol for Indigenous Australians. A Daley Labor Government will fly the Aboriginal flag with the flags of Australia and New South Wales on the Harbour Bridge.
  • Funding up to six scholarships for Indigenous medical doctors – The scholarship will be delivered through the highly successful Shalom Gamarada Indigenous Residential Scholarship Program. This program is sponsored by Sydney’s Jewish community and Shalom College at the UNSW. It has been successful in its goal to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians through higher education and by increasing the number of Indigenous professionals, especially in the critical area of Indigenous health.

4.2 NSW : ACCHO’s in Northern NSW partner with TAFE NSW to support and service qualifications that upskill the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care workforce

THE first Indigenous cohort of health practitioners is set to graduate from TAFE.

Sixteen health care practitioners travelled from across the north coast to TAFE NSW Port Macquarie to celebrate the milestone and the finalisation of their Certificate IV in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Care Practice.

Originally Published HERE

Once they complete the remaining 300 workplace clinical hours of the 18-month course, they will be the first-ever student cohort in the NSW North Coast to graduate with the nationally-recognised qualification.

The students – all of whom already work as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) health practitioners and identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander – completed their sixth and final block of the course’s theory component last week. The big milestone was celebrated with a dinner at The Mercure restaurant.

TAFE NSW manager service delivery Aboriginal health, Daniel Morrison, said everyone was delighted to finish the face-to-face training blocks, each of which they travelled to TAFE NSW Port Macquarie to undertake.

“I am really proud of my students for achieving such a momentous milestone. I know they will be valuable community members with the skills and knowledge they’ve gained over the past 12 months,” he said.

“The TAFE NSW Certificate IV in Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander Health Care Practice empowers practitioners to offer streamlined care to patients, upskilling them to provide professional practice work in a clinical setting. The overarching goal is to improve health outcomes for our communities and families.”

TAFE NSW partners with the Aboriginal Medical Service and several Local Area Health Districts to support and service qualifications that upskill the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care workforce.

5. Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO opens new tulaminakali Health clinic in Devenport 

6. ACT : Beds at the troubled Ngunnawal Bush Healing Farm are likely to lay empty for longer after the government back tracked on plans to look for a provider for a residential program by early this year.

The $12 million custom-built facility in Canberra’s Tidbinbilla Valley – opened in late 2017 – was originally designed as an eight-bed residential facility for Indigenous people.

The government controversially abandoned the Indigenous community’s proposal for a residential drug and alcohol centre after it was revealed the area was not zoned for clinical services.

However it maintained plans for a residential program on the site to facilitate a “reconnection with the land and culture”.

But more than a year after it opened, clients are still bussed to and from daily activities at the farm. Just 34 participants have taken part since it opened.

A briefing for estimates hearings prepared by ACT Health in October revealed the government planned to put a tender out for a residential program at the farm by early 2019. But the government has since confirmed those plans are on hold.

It will not decide the future of the farm until the delayed “healing framework” – which was due for completion in January 2019 – is completed and a wide ranging review is handed down in October.

The government says there are separate plans to open a residential drug and alcohol facility for the Indigenous community.

“ACT Health will consider all findings and recommendations of the review as it rolls out to determine the most appropriate next steps for the [bush healing farm],” an ACT Health spokeswoman said.

She said the work was being done in close collaboration with members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body, United Ngunnawal Elders Council as well as other stakeholders.

The government has denied the purpose of the farm was ever to include clinical services, but stakeholders have disputed that.

Winnunga Aboriginal Health Service and Gugan Gulwan Youth Aboriginal Corporation walked away from the program in 2017 after it emerged no clinical services would actually be offered on-site.

The spokeswoman said, “The primary purpose of the [bush healing farm] is to provide an additional service to support a person’s reconnection with the land and culture and empower them to make new and more positive choices.

“The current operational model of the [bush healing farm] was not intended as a clinical model of alcohol and other drug withdrawal.

“However, the government recognises the need for Aboriginal specific services for withdrawal and rehabilitation and is at the same time progressing this work.”

The spokeswoman said that at the time of writing the estimates brief, the government anticipated the healing framework would be finalised by early 2019.

When that did not happen, the plans to put out a tender were scrapped.

“In addition, ACT Health initiated the review of the [bush healing farm] in September 2018, which will review the services, program design and delivery and governance of the facility,” she said.

“The review will build upon success and learnings to date and talk to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community about the best way forward for this service.

“The review is well underway and key stakeholders are contributing their views and aspirations for the [bush healing farm], which will inform next steps.

“During this review, further assessment will take place to determine the best way forward to provide a residential program, and the government will consider any changes as recommended by the review throughout the year.”

7. WA : AHCWA  headed to Bunbury last week to deliver the Certificate II in Family Wellbeing to a group of 10 students. 

 

Well done to everyone on the successful completion of their training

8. VIC : MDAS ACCHO : Mallee Mums find support and strength in each other


A new mum’s group at Mallee District Aboriginal Services is working with new and first-time parents to access better services – and build their mutual support networks at the same time.

The group was set up in response to suggestions from new mums last year, and organiser Maternal and Child Health Koori Maternity Services Assistant Nikita Morganson says it’s gone from strength-to-strength.

“It’s been fantastic for the mums involved to find a place and a network where they feel safe and supported,” Nikita said.

“This is a safe place where they have found they can come and yarn and be open with each other.
“We have special guests come to have conversations with the mums regarding anything to do with babies.

“We had the librarian come along to discuss the benefits of reading to baby, we also had the chemist come in to discuss myths and facts about products for babies and breastfeeding mums.”

Nikita said the group mixed formal and cultural activities, participating in sessions such as parents’ First Aid and other events within the community, with the support of one another.

“We’re also planning for Aunty Marilyne Nicholls to come along and do some cultural yarning with the mums and we’re hoping that might bring in some new faces as well,” she said.

Nikita said the mothers involved with the group were finding more confidence by supporting each other, even outside the group activities, bringing closeness and strength.

The new mums’ group is open to mums with new babies (whether first-time or not) and meets on Fridays (during school terms).

More information about what is available from the program contact Nikita Morganson at MDAS on (03) 5032 8600.

NACCHO Deadly Good Members News : Aboriginal Health #InternationalWomensDay #IWD2019 : #MorePowerfulTogether  Our tribute to our 10 Women NACCHO Board of Directors and 71 #ACCHO CEO’s of our majority female workforce

1.National : Donnella Mills – Chair NACCHO and Wuchopperen Health Service   

2.NT: Donna Ah Chee Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

3.NSW: LaVerne Bellear Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service

4.TAS: Raylene Foster Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation

5.NT: Olga Havnen Danila Dilba Health Service

6.VIC: Karen Heap Ballarat & District Aboriginal Co-operative

7.SA: Vicki Holmes Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia

8.WA: Lesley Nelson South West Aboriginal Medical Service

9.ACT: Julie Tongs Winnunga Nimmityjah Health and Community Service

10. QLD: Gail Wason Mulungu Primary Health Care Service

Aboriginal women are the best advocates and leaders for health and wellbeing in their own families and in the broader community.

They are proving to be effective role models, mentors and influencers for the next generation of Aboriginal female leaders.

Recently NACCHO CEO Pat Turner told a women’s leadership summit

As mothers, aunts, grandmothers, sisters and daughters, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have culturally and historically always played a pivotal role in supporting and caring for families in our communities so working in the health sector was a natural progression.

For over 47 years Indigenous health activists like Dr Naomi Mayers, Coleen Shirley (Mum Shirl) Smith AM MBE, Jill Gallagher AO, Vicki O’Donnell, Pamela Mam, and the late Mary Buckskin have been just some of our leaders who have successfully advocated for community controlled, culturally respectful, needs based approach to improving the health and wellbeing outcomes of our people.

See previous NACCHO #IWD Tribute HERE 

As a result of their leadership and years of commitment as role models they have now paved the way for 10 women to be on the NACCHO board, 71 Indigenous women promoted to CEO’s out of 145 Organisations who employ over 6,000 staff with a majority being Indigenous woman

Our ACCHO network has successfully provided a critical and practical pathway for the education, training and employment for many Indigenous women.But much more needs to be done to develop viable career pathways to graduate more Indigenous women doctors, nurses and allied health professionals.

Last year NACCHO, RANZCOG and other medical college Presidents met with the Minister for Indigenous Health and other ministers in Canberra who are all determined to do everything possible to Close the Gap in health outcomes.

Creating career pathways for Indigenous women in our workforce will be a good starting point to continue supporting the theme ” More powerful together ”

1.National : Donnella Mills – Chair NACCHO and Wuchopperen Health Service QLD 

Donnella is a Torres Strait Islander woman with ancestral and family links to Masig and Nagir in the Torres Strait.

She is a Cairns–based lawyer with LawRight, a Community Legal Centre which coordinates the provision of pro-bono civil legal services to disadvantaged and vulnerable members of the community. Donnella is currently the project lawyer for the Wuchopperen Health Justice Partnership through a partnership with LawRight. This innovative Health Justice Partnership is an exciting model of providing access to justice, where lawyers and health professionals collaborate to provide better health outcomes and access to justice for patients with legal issues.

Donnella said she was “very excited about the opportunity to contribute to working the new Chairperson, the new board and the NACCHO Executive to drive the national health debate, develop community led solution, and to champion why Community-Controlled is the pinnacle model in achieving greater autonomy and self-determination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Utilising a legal lens in which to view health, social justice, human rights, and access to justice, my commitment is to deliver expanded and enhanced innovative health services that are community driven and community led, addressing core systemic social determinant issues that have a direct impact on our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

2.NT: Donna Ah Chee CEO Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

Ms Ah Chee is the Chief Executive Officer of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Aboriginal Corporation, the Aboriginal community controlled primary health care service in Alice Springs.

Ms Ah Chee is a Bundgalung woman from the far north coast of New South Wales and has lived in Alice Springs for over 25 years.

She has been actively involved in Aboriginal affairs for many years, especially in the area of Aboriginal adult education and Aboriginal health. In June 2011, Ms Ah Chee moved to Canberra to take up the position of Chief Executive Officer of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation before returning to Congress in July 2012.

Ms Ah Chee convened the Workforce Working Party under the Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Forum, was Chairperson of the Central Australian Regional Indigenous Health Planning Committee, a member of the Northern Territory Child Protection External Monitoring Committee and jointly headed up the Northern Territory Government’s Alcohol Framework Project Team.

She currently sits on the National Drug and Alcohol Committee and at a local level, represents the Congress on the People’s Alcohol Action Coalition.

3.NSW: LaVerne Bellear CEO Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service

LaVerne Bellear a descendant from the Nunukle Tribe of south-eastern Queensland, grew up in the northern part of the Bundjalung Nation (north coast New South Wales).

LaVerne strongly believes that empowering Aboriginal people will create opportunity to make better informed decisions and choices regarding personal management of health care, ultimately resulting in better health outcomes. LaVerne has extensive experience in Aboriginal health, having worked in community health, Aboriginal controlled health services and as the Director, Aboriginal Health, Northern Sydney Local Health District.

Recently, LaVerne has taken up the position of CEO, Aboriginal Medical Service Cooperative at Redfern, New South Wales.

She has been a state representative on a number of working parties and committees concerning Aboriginal health. LaVerne has a Bachelor of Business, a Professional Certificate in Indigenous Research in Training and Practices and is studying a Master of Public Health at The University of New South Wales.

4.TAS: Raylene Foster Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation

Raylene Foster is a palawa women from the Cygnet area. She commenced her career in hospitality, becoming a chef, and then moved into adult teaching within the TAFE institute.

Raylene took on a six-month secondment to Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre in 1995 and stayed; she has now been with the TAC for over 20 years

She’s had varying roles within the TAC, including the Director of the Aboriginal Community School, Workforce Development Officer, Emotional and Social Wellbeing Coordinator and over the past 15 years the Manager of the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre in the South, which includes the Aboriginal Health Service.

Raylene has a Graduate Certificate in Administration and an Advanced Diploma in Human Resources, as well as Diploma of Alcohol and Other Drugs and Mental Health and a facilitator in the SMART Recovery program. Raylene is passionate about children’s wellbeing and keeping families connected to break the cycle of institutionalisation, separations and trauma-related illnesses.

Raylene’s Abstract For This Months Rural Health Conference in Hobart 

See Website 

The Aboriginal cultural camp was an initiative that commenced in 2016 for Tasmanian registrars, GPs and members of the Tasmanian Aboriginal community. We wanted to go beyond the basic requirements of attendance at cultural training, to offer an immersion in to Aboriginal culture, on Aboriginal country, with mutual benefit for the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities.

The camp is held annually at trawtha makuminya, Aboriginal-owned land in the Central Highlands of Tasmania, from a Friday afternoon until a Sunday afternoon. Registrars, General Practitioners, Practice Staff and General Practice Training Tasmania staff and family members attend, in addition to the TAC staff Camp Organisers and Caterers, Cultural and Land Educators, Elders and community members.

The weekend involves an official welcome speech, dance and music, yarning around the campfire, guided walks with discussion about Aboriginal history, the land and stone tools, kayaking, basket weaving, hand stencilling, clap stick making, and a session of “You Can’t Ask That”. There is a medical education session and participants hear from an Aboriginal Health Worker and Aboriginal Enrolled Nurse about the services offered by the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre.

There is a lot of informal discussion about culture and life stories shared by both the adults and the children.

The feedback given to date, both informally and through the evaluation forms, is overwhelmingly positive. Participants value the beautiful location, the opportunity to spend time with community members outside the clinical setting, the obvious connection to country displayed by the Aboriginal community and the sharing of stories in a cultural exchange.

5.NT: Olga Havnen CEO Danila Dilba Health Service Darwin 

Olga is of Western Arrente descent and grew up in Tennant Creek. Her great-grandfather was Ah Hong, a Chinese cook who worked on the Overland Telegraph Line[2] whose partner was an Aboriginal woman in Alice Springs.

Their daughter Gloria, Havnen’s grandmother, was the first Aboriginal woman to own a house in Alice Springs. Havnen’s father was a Norwegian sailor who jumped ship in Adelaide and her mother, Pegg lived in Tennant Creek. Havnen went to boarding school in TownsvilleQueensland.[3]

Olga Havnen has held positions as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Programs Co-ordinator for the Australian Red Cross, Senior Policy Officer in the Northern Territory Government’s Indigenous Policy Unit, Indigenous Programs Director with the Fred Hollows Foundation, and Executive Officer with the National Indigenous Working Group.

And was the Coordinator General of Remote Service Provision from 2011 until October 2012, when the Northern Territory Government controversially abolished the position.[4]

She released one report which detailed deficiencies in Northern Territory and Commonwealth Government’s service provision to remote communities in the Northern Territory.[5]

She is currently the Chief Executive Officer of the Danila Dilba Health Service in Darwin, an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service.[1]

Havnen gave evidence at the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory critical of the outcomes and delivery of the Northern Territory National Emergency Response, commonly referred to as the Intervention stating “the experience of the Intervention was such a debacle you’d never want that repeated, but I do think that there is a role for the federal government in here in the Northern Territory”,

6.VIC: Karen Heap Ballarat & District Aboriginal Co-operative : Chair VACCHO 

Karen Heap, a Yorta Yorta woman, has been the CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative for 12 years and brings with her a vast amount of knowledge and skillsets procured from extensive experience within the Aboriginal Service Sector.

Karen Heap was recently the winner of the Walda Blow Award ( pictured above )

This award was established by DHHS in partnership with the Victorian Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People, in memory of Aunty Walda Blow – a proud Yorta

Yorta and Wemba Wemba Elder who lived her life in the pursuit of equality.

Aunty Walda was an early founder of the Dandenong and District Aboriginal Cooperative and worked for over 40 years improving the lives of the Aboriginal community. This award recognises contributions of an Aboriginal person in Victoria to the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people.

Karen ensures the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people are always front and centre.

Karen has personally committed her support to the Ballarat Community through establishing and continuously advocating for innovative prevention, intervention and reunification programs.

As the inaugural Chairperson of the Alliance, Karen contributions to establishing the identity and achieving multiple outcomes in the Alliance Strategic Plan is celebrated by her peers and recognised by the community service sector and DHHS.

Karen’s leadership in community but particularly for BADAC, has seen new ways of delivering cultural models of care to Aboriginal children, carers and their families, ensuring a holistic service is provided to best meet the needs of each individual and in turn benefit the community.

7.SA: Vicki Holmes Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia

Vicki Holmes is an Aboriginal woman descended from the Tanganekald and Western Aranda clan. Vicki has been with Nunkuwarrin Yunti for 32 years where she has had many roles; her first position was the medical receptionist but she also did whatever was needed including home visits, transport and hospital visits.

In 1986, Vicki became the Health Coordinator and while in this role programs such as women’s health, HIV, diabetes, mental health and social/welfare support expanded and developed. In 2010, Vicki became the CEO of Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia. As CEO of Nunkuwarrin Yunti, she holds positions on the Boards of NACCHO, the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Research Excellence in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health (REACCH), and First Peoples National Congress.

Her vision for Nunkuwarrin Yunti is around what she calls the four Cs: Community, Communication, Caring, Consistency. Vicki has always been passionate about the social and emotional wellbeing of the Aboriginal community.

8.WA: Lesley Nelson CEO South West Aboriginal Medical Service

SWAMS are united by the drive and passion to provide culturally safe, accessible and holistic health care to the Aboriginal people of the South West. WA

As an organisation, they continue to attract and employ culturally appropriate and professional staff members. SWAMS employs over 70 staff members including specialist Aboriginal Health Practitioners, Dietitians, Nurses, Midwives, Mental Health workers and Social Workers and because of this, we are able to provide a large and diverse range of services to the community.

In addition to this, they strive to create Aboriginal career pathways and opportunities across the sector and maintain a positive percentage of ATSI employees

Last year as preparations got underway for the South West Aboriginal Medical Service’s 20th anniversary, centre chief executive officer Lesley Nelson has reflected on how far indigenous health has advanced in the South West in that time.

Ms Nelson said the centre started small with a handful of staff and a desire to improve Aboriginal health outcomes in the region.

Over the next 20 years, it expanded with clinics in Bunbury, Busselton, Manjimup, Collie and Brunswick.

“We started after local elders held discussions with a number of key groups about developing a culturally appropriate service to address the health-related issues of the South West’s Indigenous population,” she said.

“Since then we’ve gone from strength-to-strength, offering a number of employment opportunities in the sector, training programs and improved health outcomes.”

Ms Nelson said the local service played an important role in the community.

“Being based in a number of country towns ensured locals can access our services conveniently, especially if they lack transport options to the bigger cities,” she said.

“We offer an important service because we intervene and manage issues early on and slowly we are improving the health of the South West Noongar people.

“We are also standing out nationally when it comes to maternal and child health.”

Moving forward, SWAMS are keen to continue growing, participating in more research studies and working collaboratively with other similar services to offer a whole of community approach to improved health.

9.ACT: Julie Tongs Winnunga Nimmityjah Health and Community Service

Julie Tongs OAM has been the Chief Executive Officer of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services since 1998.  Julie has more than 30 years experience working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs and in particular has extensive experience in advising, formulating, implementing and evaluating public health initiatives, programs and policy at a local, regional and national level.

Julie has been a national leader and strong advocate of quality improvement initiatives within the Aboriginal Community Controlled sector.

Julie is the recipient of a number of awards, including the ACT Governor General’s Centenary Medal and the ACT Indigenous Person of the Year. In 2011 Julie received the ACT Local Hero Award within the Australian of the Year Awards 2012, and in 2012 Julie was honoured with the Medal of the Order of Australia.

Julie’s vision is that Winnunga continues to build on its reputation as a national leader in the provision of holistic primary health care services delivered in a culturally appropriate environment that achieves improved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Julie is committed to ensuring that Winnunga offers services that are delivered consistent with best practice standards.

10 .QLD: Gail Wason Mulungu Primary Health Care Service

We see the best way to build capacity and capability within our corporation is by encouraging strong leaders, maintaining effective governance, ensuring strong systems, and keeping focused on accountable performance management.

Mulungu help our clients to make informed decisions. We work in health but we also work across education and job opportunities. Our model supports individuals who want to do the best for themselves, their family and their community.’

CEO Gail Wason.

Gail is the Chief Executive Officer of Mulungu Primary Health Care Service in Mareeba. She has over 25 years’ experience in Aboriginal affairs and health, and an unwavering commitment to improving the health and wellbeing of her community.

Gail strives to ensure that the community has access to the full range of high quality, culturally appropriate primary health care services that empowers clients to fully participate in the management of their own health.

She has served as QAIHC’s Far North Queensland Director and Chairperson of QAIHC’s Finance Committee and has worked closely with the Board for many years.

Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre is an Aboriginal community-controlled health organisation working to improve the lives of Indigenous people in and around Mareeba.

The centre was established in 1991 and incorporated under the CATSI Act in 1993.

The rural town of Mareeba—a word from local Aboriginal language meaning ‘meeting of the waters’—is located on the Atherton Tablelands where the Barron River meets Granite Creek. Traditionally Muluridji people inhabited this land.

‘Although the bright lights of Cairns are only 65 kilometres away we feel like a stand-alone, small country town,’ says chair of the Mulungu board of directors (and valued volunteer) Alan Wason. ‘We have a population of 10,000 and our own identity separate from Cairns.’

The town of Mareeba may be a little tucked away but it has much to offer, including Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre—a bright, open, modern building—which employs a large professional staff who work as a team and support each other. Everyone is passionate about providing top quality holistic health care to the community through Mulungu’s programs and services.

Mulungu’s mission is to provide comprehensive primary health care to the community in culturally, socially and emotionally appropriate ways. It’s about handing back power to the people to manage their own health, wellbeing and spiritual needs. So as well as providing clinical health care services Mulungu ‘auspices’ other important primary health care programs, including the Mareeba Children and Families Centre (CFC), Mareeba Parent and Community Engagement (PaCE) Program, and the Mareeba Young and Awesome Project (MY&A).

The MY&A Project tackles the problem of binge drinking in the community. Its aim is to motivate young people (aged 12 to 25) to get involved in constructive activities that they might enjoy—and to get them away from drinking alcohol. This two-year project is funded by the Australian Government.

‘We help our clients to make informed decisions,’ says Gail Wason. ‘We work in health but we also work across education and job opportunities. Our model supports individuals who want to do the best for themselves, their family and their community.’

It’s all about changing and improving lives.

To learn more about Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service visit http://mulungu.org.au.

 

 

 

NACCHO Members #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #NT @AMSANTaus @DanilaDilba @CAACongress #QLD #Gidgee Healing @DeadlyChoices @Wuchopperen #TAS #VIC Wathaurong ACCHO @VAHS1972 #NSW Katungul #WA @TheAHCWA #ACT

1.1 National : NACCHO Acting Chair, Ms Donnella Mills welcomes announcement of a $125 million Indigenous Health Research Fund over the next ten years 

1.2 National : The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (HealthInfoNet) is a leading online source of knowledge and information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

2.1. VIC : Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) ACCHO see red for a good cause

2.2 Vic: Victorian Aboriginal Health (VAHS) promotes health services to Melbourne Uni Indigenous Students

2.3 Vic : Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-op Week 1 of #iDareYa with Spark Health discussing health and goal setting.

3.1 QLD : Congratulations to the Apunipima ACCHO team in Aurukun NFQ who completed Mental Health First Aid training in community last week.

3.2 QLD : Gidgee Healing ACCHO Allied Health Exercise Physiologist runs WIO (Work it Out) program

3.3 QLD : Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen) Diabetes Education Program on the Rise in Cairns

3.4 QLD : St.George Queensland Reds today announces a partnership with Deadly Choices, the preventative health program of the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health.

4.1 WA: Wangkatjungka community in the remote Kimberley are now able to access important health services in a $3.66 million brand new clinic

4.2 WA : AHCWA and  Ngangganawili Aboriginal Health Service run men’s and women’s sexual health workshops at remote Wiluna 

5.1 NT : AMSANT : Central Australia Academic Health Science Network [CAASHN], John Paterson praises the Commonwealth funding announcement $125 million over 10 years 

5.2 NT Danila Dilba/Deadly Choices ACCHO hosted a game of (EDOR) at Casuarina Senior College with participants from STARS Foundation and Army Regiment 1 CSR.

5.3 NT : Team Congress ACCHO at the ASR&WC run

6. NSW : Katungul’s ACCHO : ‘Strong Women’s Program’ is an inclusive, holistic health program that brings together women from our local community aged 45+ on a weekly basis to improve physical, social and emotional well being.

7. ACT : Another step forward – signing of the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Agreement

8. TAS: palawa kani to run a stall and workshops at Hobart Language Day / International year of Indigenous Languages

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : NACCHO Acting Chair, Ms Donnella Mills welcomes announcement of a $125 million Indigenous Health Research Fund over the next ten years 

“ NACCHO has always supported Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands, and we have always included health research in that call.

This is a first step in recognising that evidence-based research in the hands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers is a real game changer in investment in the health of our people and our communities.

NACCHO looks forward to working in partnership to achieve practical benefits in research, and the translation of that research into real action on the ground.”

Yesterdays announcement of a $125 million Indigenous Health Research Fund over the next ten years has been welcomed by NACCHO Acting Chair, Ms Donnella Mills.

Read or download the full NACCHO Press Release 

NACCHO Press Release Indigenous Futures Health Announcement

1.2 National : The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (HealthInfoNet) is a leading online source of knowledge and information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

The nationally used web resource has been acknowledged as an essential element of infrastructure contributing to Australia’s efforts to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

The HealthInfoNet is the first resource of its kind in the world and is guided by strong commitments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives.

The HealthInfoNet publishes a number of newsletters to keep health professionals up to date with reports, health promotion and health practice resources along with tools to help staff carry out their roles.

Follow this link to see the latest Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers newsletter or sign up to our other health topic newsletters.

CLICK HERE 

NACCHO is a HealthInfoNet Advisory Board member and would welcome your feedback about how our ACCHO’s can be better supported by this site :

CONTACT NACCHO

2.1. VIC : Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) ACCHO see red for a good cause

There was a distinct shade of red at Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) on last week – and not just because it was Valentine’s Day.

It was also Wear Red Day with staff at MDAS getting into the spirit of the Heart Research Australia awareness day.

“Heart Disease is still the leading cause of death in Australia- but is also a disease that is largely affected by lifestyle,” MDAS allied health co-ordinator Crystal Kirby said.

“We’ve got some fantastic programs getting under way that focus on lifestyle change, so we thought it was a great opportunity to raise some awareness and get the community on board.”

Ms Kirby said MDAS had two eight-week programs starting to target heart health a “Kicking Butts” quit smoking program and a “Road to Deadly Health” program for people living the chronic disease.

MDAS is also restarting its weekly Heart Foundation walking group.

“By improving your lifestyle, including your diet and level of fitness, you can minimise your risk of getting cardiovascular disease,” Ms Kirby said.

Heart disease kills one Australian every 28 minutes and Heart Foundation research shows Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 70 per cent more likely to die from circulatory diseases.

Heart Health Australia’s Wear Red Day raises funds for research and everyone dressing in red at MDAS this week made a gold coin donation to the cause.

2.2 Vic: Victorian Aboriginal Health (VAHS) promotes health services to Melbourne Uni Indigenous Students

Bonnie and Lena are at their old stomping ground this morning at Melbourne Uni sharing what services VAHS has to offer to all the new Indigenous students!

#StaySmokeFree #DeadlyChoices #BePositive

2.3 Vic : Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-op Week 1 of #iDareYa with Spark Health discussing health and goal setting.

They also checked in with Wathaurong Health Team in the clinic and did our fitness testing.

Keeping in mind the whole time we are measuring change not results over the 6 weeks.

3.1 QLD : Congratulations to the Apunipima ACCHO team in Aurukun NFQ who completed Mental Health First Aid training in community last week.

This week, Apunimpima’s Aurukun facility was the venue for a three day training course on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health First Aid. The course provides skills and techniques for assisting and supporting people who are developing a mental health problem, experiecing worsening of an existing mental health problem, or in a mental health crisis.

This nationally accredited course was co-facilitated by Bernard David, Apunipima’s Social and Emotional Wellbeing Program Community Implementation Manager and Theresa Elliot from National Employment Services Association.

As well as Apunipima staff, the course was also open to community members and staff from local community organisations.

Further Mental Health First Aid training courses are already planned in Coen, Hope Vale, Napranum and Mapoon.

3.2 QLD : Gidgee Healing ACCHO Allied Health Exercise Physiologist runs WIO (Work it Out) program

The photo below is from the WIO (Work it Out) program that our Gidgee Healing Allied Health Exercise Physiologist – Asher Pomerenke and Tayla West Chong – AHA runs weekly.

If people don’t know what the Work It Out program supports, is for Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander people who have been diagnosed or are at risk of having a Chronic Disease.

The program is delivered by Allied Health professionals, working together to support each client’s health journey through chronic disease self-management and rehabilitation.

By coming to Work It Out, our clients have seen improvements in their
– confidence in managing their health and wellness
cardiovascular fitness
– balance and movement in day to day tasks
– mental health and well being

If you think you would like to be apart of this program please, make an appointment to see one of our doctors, to get a referral to the Work It Out program.

3.3 QLD : Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen) Diabetes Education Program on the Rise in Cairns

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Cairns region seeking diabetes education at Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen) has increased by 36% in 2018 according to data from the Cairns based Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service.

Wuchopperen is home to a number of Allied Health professionals including a diabetes educator, dietician, podiatrist, optometrist and exercise physiologist who work in partnership to create plans with our clients who are currently living with diabetes or at risk of developing diabetes.

Diabetes Educator for Wuchopperen, Tony Pappas says it is encouraging to see clients find value in attending the Allied Health education sessions increasing in the community.

“Diabetes is such an enormous issue for people in Cairns and it is really important to manage the risk early. The Wuchopperen Diabetes Education Sessions aren’t just for people who are already living with diabetes, they can be a great tool for those at risk of developing diabetes too. Understanding how to reduce your risk of diabetes is essential if we are going to see a reduction in our trend towards unhealthy lifestyles and the detrimental impacts this can have on our overall wellbeing.

Taking simple steps like reducing our intake of sugary drinks, adding exercise to your daily life and making healthy food choices can have a huge impact on your likelihood of developing diabetes.

Having less sugary drinks and food also supports healthy teeth, healthy skin and healthy weight,” says Tony.

During the Diabetes Education Sessions, clients are able to discuss any issues they might be having managing their diabetes or changing their habits. The ultimate goal of these sessions is to work with clients on preventing diabetes. Diabetes can damage blood vessels and nerves, effect your vision and increase your risk of amputation, stroke, kidney damage and puts you at a greater risk of heart attack.

“Diabetes is the fastest growing chronic illness in the world and a variety of studies have shown it effects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people more acutely, specifically in regard to type 2 diabetes.

At Wuchopperen we want to work with all our clients to put their health in their hands and provide holistic services. We provide clients with wrap around services and are able to link our clients with our vast number of services to ensure they are getting the most out of our comprehensive, holistic health service, and education plays a huge role in that,” says Tony.

3.4 QLD : St.George Queensland Reds today announces a partnership with Deadly Choices, the preventative health program of the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health.

The Reds and the Queensland Rugby Union will help deliver the program throughout the State. For the past eight years the QRU has run a successful mentoring program for Indigenous students in the communities of Cherbourg, Woorabindah and Yarrabah.

Reds players Moses Sorovi, from Yam Island in the Torres Strait, and Duncan Paia’aua will be ambassadors for Deadly Choices.

Queensland Minister for Health and Minister for Ambulance Services, The Hon. Dr Steven Miles MP launched the partnership last night, the first time a rugby union team has been part of the ground-breaking initiative.

“The Palaszczuk Government’s $16 million expansion of the Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program is a commitment to positive change among Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities,” confirmed Minister Miles.

“It’s about closing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Queenslanders and we commend the Queensland Reds for adding Deadly Choices to its existing Indigenous engagement portfolio.

“The rollout of Deadly Choices has the potential to reach approximately 165,000 individuals, which speaks volumes for the outstanding possibilities of the Queensland Reds-Deadly Choices partnership.”

Queensland Rugby Union Chief Executive Officer David Hanham said: “This is a natural extension of the great work the QRU has been doing in Indigenous communities for almost a decade.

“Deadly Choices is an inspiring program and we look forward to being part of that inspiration.”

Moses Sorovi said: “I feel very proud playing in our Indigenous jersey and it’s going to be really inspiring for us as layers to see kids wearing that jersey as part of the Deadly Choices program.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson said:  “This partnership will bring life-changing benefits for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples right across Queensland.

“Moses, Duncan and the entire Reds squad will assist in educating youth about the importance of taking a preventative approach to their health, and living healthy lifestyles. This includes reducing the negative impacts of smoking and drinking alcohol, and advocating consistent attendance at school.

“It provides the kids a chance to make positive decisions around being a deadly student. It’s about our young ones looking at the opportunities available, with education being the passport towards achieving their dreams.”

 

4.1 WA: Wangkatjungka community in the remote Kimberley are now able to access important health services in a $3.66 million brand new clinic

Residents of the Wangkatjungka community in the remote Kimberley are now able to access important health services in a brand new clinic.

The $3.66 million expanded Wangkatjungka Health Centre is a fit-for-purpose and culturally secure clinic that will transform the way patients access hospital treatment and clinic appointments.

New clinic offers culturally appropriate and secure care for Aboriginal patients

Additions include private consult rooms, a resuscitation bay and pathology services

  Clinic includes family room with area set aside for elders to prepare bush medicines

It includes a separate emergency resuscitation bay with its own pathology space, three consult rooms, a family group room and separate waiting areas for men and women. There is also a purpose-built ambulance bay and ramp at the front of the building, plus future capacity in the design for home dialysis treatment.

The family group room will enable families to come together to discuss healthcare treatment, and includes a sink and bench to allow for the preparation of bush medicine by elders and family members.

The layout has been carefully planned so that men and women can be seen and treated in completely separate spaces, if required, for cultural security.

The clinic is open Monday to Thursday from 10am-2pm, with registered nurses providing acute and emergency treatment along with regular appointments for maternal and child health, immunisations, sexual and reproductive health, chronic conditions and other services.

Visiting community health nurses and GPs provide weekly and fortnightly clinics for a range of important services including mental health, child health and midwifery. Wangkatjungka’s regular visiting dental, paediatric, renal and ear, nose and throat clinics will also be held at the new centre.

The Wangkatjungka Health Centre is part of a $22.2 million project to upgrade eight Aboriginal clinics in some of the most remote communities in Western Australia. Clinics have already been completed in Bayulu, Noonkanbah, Mulan and Billiluna in the Kimberley and Yandeyarra in the Pilbara. The Jigalong and Looma clinic upgrades are expected to be completed in 2019.

As noted by Health Minister Roger Cook:

“The new clinic is a modern and welcoming place for the local Aboriginal community to receive healthcare, and I am pleased to hear that the first patients have already been through the doors.

“We know that providing healthcare that offers appropriate cultural security to Aboriginal patients encourages people to seek treatment when they otherwise might not. This results in short and long-term health benefits.”

As noted by Kimberley MLA Josie Farrer:

“The local WA Country Health Service team has worked closely with the Wangkatjungka community on every aspect of the design and fit-out of this new health centre to ensure the community will feel safe, secure, respected and welcome.

“I am pleased the residents in this remote community have a new fit-for-purpose and culturally secure clinic, it will transform the way they access healthcare close to home.”

4.2 WA : AHCWA and  Ngangganawili Aboriginal Health Service run men’s and women’s sexual health workshops at remote Wiluna 

Luke and Meagan have been out and about again, this time heading back to Wiluna to support three Young Deadly Free (YDF) Educators to run men’s and women’s sexual health workshops at Ngangganawili Aboriginal Health Service.
The program is gaining momentum with 22 community members attending the workshops. Fantastic work by the YDF Educators, one of the biggest turnouts ever!

5.1 NT : AMSANT : Central Australia Academic Health Science Network [CAASHN], John Paterson praises the Commonwealth funding announcement $125 million over 10 years 

The Chairperson of the Central Australia Academic Health Science Network [CAASHN], John Paterson, has praised the Commonwealth announcement today of a $125 million over 10 years boost to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research.

“Minister Hunt’s announcement today puts Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research into our hands—into the hands of community controlled health research and delivery,” said Mr Paterson.

“In years to come, this will be acknowledged as a major shift in the way in which research is governed, and will set benchmarks in how research is initiated, how it is developed, how it is carried out and how research results are implemented.

“This new decade-long approach will set best practice for the future of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research across the nation—and as a national program we will truly see Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research without borders.

“For the first time, as well, Minister Hunt cited tackling the social determinants of health as a key issue in Closing the Gap in health outcomes—a profound acknowledgement of the root causes of so much that faces our people.

“For years so much of research into the health of our people has been carried out by major research institutes and universities. While these groups have increasingly recognised the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander input, this Indigenous Health Research Fund now sets best practice in putting our people at the forefront.”

The $25 million fund will be directed by an Aboriginal task force led by Dr Alex Brown from SAHMRI in Adelaide and Professor Misty Jenkins from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne with representation from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled sector.

5.2 NT Danila Dilba/Deadly Choices ACCHO hosted a game of (EDOR) at Casuarina Senior College with participants from STARS Foundation and Army Regiment 1 CSR.

This gave both organisations exposure towards Traditional Indigenous games which was thoroughly enjoyed by all. Danila Dilba/Deadly Choices are working with the STARS Foundation and Army Regiment 1 CSR to support and enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls and young women to make healthy and active choices towards realising their full potential in all aspects of their development and wellbeing. #deadlychoices

5.3 NT : Team Congress ACCHO at the ASR&WC run

6. NSW : Katungul’s ACCHO : ‘Strong Women’s Program’ is an inclusive, holistic health program that brings together women from our local community aged 45+ on a weekly basis to improve physical, social and emotional well being.

Elements of the program include weekly sessions at the gym with qualified trainers through to catered lunches, arts and crafts and everything in between.

This program is kicking off in March so if you or someone you know might be interested, give Christine a call on 0455 100 650 or 02 4476 2155.

 

7. ACT : Another step forward – signing of the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Agreement

The partnership between Canberra’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community and the ACT Government continues to strengthen with the formal signing of the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Agreement 2019-2028. 

The Agreement, signed today, builds on the strength of the previous Agreement (2015-2018) and sets the long term direction in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs in the ACT. It outlines how the ACT Government, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community and our non-government partners will work together to meet the social, cultural and economic needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Chief Minister, Andrew Barr; Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs, Rachel Stephen-Smith;   Chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body, Katrina Fanning; and Head of the ACT Public Service, Kathy Leigh signed the Agreement in the presence of Government and community members.

Chief Minister Andrew Barr said the new Agreement reinforces the ACT Government’s commitment to selfdetermination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Canberrans, and to recognising and responding to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in the ACT.

“Over the course of the ten-year Agreement we will make significant progress in improving lives and outcomes for the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community. This Agreement also pays respect to the special place of Australia’s first people in our inclusive community, and commits us to doing more to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the ACT and to celebrate the world’s oldest living cultures.”

Katrina Fanning, Chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body said, “We have theopportunity in the ACT to lead the nation in closing the gap in life outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and collectively we are committed to this. This Agreement reflects what our community knows to be true, that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander led decision making is the key to closing the gap.”

Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs Rachel Stephen-Smith thanked the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body for its deep engagement with the community over the last year in workshops and consultations to set the priorities in this Agreement.

“The community and government are working in partnership, and these priorities will drive initiatives across government to bring about change. Over the life of the Agreement we will be reporting regularly on progress and working with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community on new programs and challenges.” Ms Stephen-Smith said.

The Agreement commits the ACT Government and community partners to self-determination as the guiding principle in the delivery of programs and services and are working in partnership with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to address matters that are important to them.

Its four core focus areas are Children and Young People, Cultural Integrity, Inclusive Community and Community Leadership. Further significant focus areas of the agreement cover Connecting the Community, Life Long Learning, Economic Participation, Health and Wellbeing, Housing, and Justice.

The Agreement artwork, ‘Strength in Community,’ was commissioned from Canberra artist Leah Brideson and was on display for the first time at the signing event.

The Agreement is available on the Strong Families portal here: https://www.strongfamilies.act.gov.au/home

8. TAS: palawa kani to run a stall and workshops at Hobart Language Day / International year of Indigenous Languages

We will have a bigger presence this year in the International year of Indigenous Languages, and hope as many people as possible can come along to experience and share in the language of Tasmanian Aborigines

NACCHO Members Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #NT @AMSANTaus @DanilaDilba @NRHACEO #TAS #QLD @ATSICHSBris @DeadlyChoices @Apunipima #VIC @VAHS1972 #NSW Katungul and Wellington ACCHos #SA Pika Wiya #WA @TheAHCWA #ACT

1.1 Back ACCHO medical services to #closethegap

1.2 National : In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input! Survey closes 15 February

1.3 National : SRWF inaugural Pat Turner Scholarship awarded

2. TAS : Deadly Ninja Warrior helps the Tasmanian FIAAI Tackling Smoking Team spread the message of the benefits of healthy choices.

3.1 WA : AHCWA and the WA Primary Health Alliance (WAPHA) signed an MOU

3.2 WA : AHCWA :  Do you want to be an Aboriginal Health Worker?

4.1 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service are active members of the “Welcome Here Project ” #LGBTIQ

4.2 NSW : Katungul ACCHO credited with changing the life of Mark Scott who was using heroin for 14 years, in prison on-and-off for 14 years and an alcoholic for 17 years

5.1 VIC : VAHS ACCHO Coming soon: Aboriginal Seniors Games!!

6. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO leads the way for independent review into the “health” of Canberra’s prison

7.QLD : Apunipima’s ACCHO Mossman Gorge Clinic shares success of ACCHO’s with James Cook University’s School of Medicine and The University of Saskatchewan’s College of Medicine.

8.1 NT : National Rural Health Alliance promotes Sunrise ACCHO clinic at Bullman

8.2 NT: AMSANT and Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin offer ideas on how to increase the retention of Aboriginal Health Workers

9. SA:  Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation officially reopened the doors to the Davenport Health Clinic on Monday, January 14.

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 Back ACCHO medical services to #closethegap

” The widening and persistent deficit in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is arguably the nation’s biggest policy failure, but Aboriginal communities are fighting back and showing how to close the gap, .

When the very first Aboriginal medical service opened its doors in a small shopfront in Sydney’s inner-city Redfern in 1971, the leaders who launched it showed enormous guts, resourcefulness and vision to address the very poor health of their people.

Almost five decades later, there are now about 145 such medical services located around Australia, with the vast majority run by boards comprised of Aboriginal people. Each year, they provide care to around 350,000 people.

Despite the efforts of these trailblazers, Aboriginal people are still missing out on primary and preventative health care, and this explains why we are failing as a nation to close the gap and achieve Aboriginal health equality.

And Australia is doing far worse than other countries that have a similar history of dispossession and colonisation. ”

Dr Paul Cleary is Oxfam Australia’s Indigenous policy and advocacy lead.

Professor Ian Ring AO is a distinguished expert in public health and epidemiology.

Read full article Here 

The Government’s justifying more funding into mainstream services by arguing that ACCHS only service around half of the Indigenous population ignores the strong preference of Indigenous people for community-controlled health.

Most of the services are at maximum capacity and there are many places where due to location and distance it is simply not possible to attend an ACCHS – the answer is increased investment not less,”

To make matters worse, the government seems to be giving preference to the mainstream sector in order to address Aboriginal health needs says Pat Turner, the chief executive of the peak body NACCHO

1.2 National : In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input! Survey closes 15 February

Survey until 15 Feb 2019 : To participate in a short survey, please CLICK HERE

Please tell us your ideas for

-improving quality of 715 health checks

-clinical software -implementation of the National Guide

-culturally responsive healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

More info 

1.3 National : SRWF inaugural Pat Turner Scholarship awarded

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) has welcomed the creation and awarding of the Pat Turner Scholarship Program by The Sir Roland Wilson foundation to six scholars. Pat Turner is the current CEO of NACCHO.

NACCHO Acting Chair Donnella Mills said, “the scholarship is named after Pat and will provide for Australian Public Service employees to complete full time post-graduate study at the Australian National University or Charles Darwin University. This honour for Pat is a testament to her years of hard work, resilience and advocacy for Indigenous peoples.”

Pat’s career as a public servant included many great achievements. She was the Deputy Secretary of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Deputy CEO of ATSIC at its inception. She was also responsible for setting up the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation when working in the Dept of Prime Minister & Cabinet.

After winning the Monash Chair of Australian Studies, Georgetown University she moved to Washington DC as Professor of Australian Studies.

She was the inaugural CEO of NITV and was appointed NACCHO Chief Executive Officer in April 2016.

The Sir Roland Wilson PhD scholarship program has recently been extended to now include the Patricia Turner Scholarship program.

The Foundation decided to name it after an influential, significant and impressive Indigenous woman. She was considered a trailblazer in the APS and her legacy of encouraging her staff to seek out and undertake educational opportunities was certainly something to be celebrated.

That Pat came from humble beginnings and had to repeatedly prove herself against a system of societal inequality, was somewhat reminiscent of Sir Roland Wilson’s beginnings. He was from a very working-class background and was awarded a scholarship to study at Oxford.

In August 2018 SRWF held selection interviews for the inaugural Pat Turner Scholarship. We had 17 APS agencies participating and actively promoting the opportunity to their staff. Each participating agency conducted its own internal selection process and 13 nominations were forwarded to us. The Selection committee shortlisted 11 applicants to interview.

NACCHO congratulates the recipients and wished them well in their chosen fields of studies.

The scholarships were awarded to:

Anthony Cowley Department of Social Services Master by Research CDU

Craig Leon Department of Human Services Master by Research ANU

Martin Dallen Department of Agriculture & Water Resources Master of Forestry ANU

Peter (PJ) Bligh Department of the Environment & Energy Master of Economic Policy ANU

Steve Munns Department of Human Services PhD ANU

Deborah Katona Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Master of Public Policy CDU

2. TAS : Deadly Ninja Warrior helps the Tasmanian FIAAI Tackling Smoking Team spread the message of the benefits of healthy choices.

JACK WILSON or as he’s known, The Deadly Ninja Warrior was in Tasmania during the month of January to help the FIAAI Tackling Smoking Team spread the message of the benefits of healthy choices.

Jack is mostly known for his athleticism and skills on the widely popular TV show Ninja Warrior but he is also passionate about educating and inspiring communities to be the best versions of themselves.

Jack started his Tasmanian journey down South at the Huon Valley PCYC sharing his story and engaging with the kids in a workout at a community event in partnership with the South East Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation.

The event also incorporated a large number of other community organisations and services, such as the Tasmania Fire Service, SES, Misha’s Mates, Quit Tasmania, Tasmanian Aboriginal Legal Service, The Heart Foundation plus many more.

Jack’s next appearance was at The Link Youth Health Service in Hobart City with 17 eager attendees.

Duncan Giblin, AOD worker stated ‘Jack was down to earth and engaged really well with the young people who attended. Jack encouraged people to seek help to address the barriers in their lives and to be persistent when things seemed hard.’

Leaving the youth inspired, Jack headed just around the corner to another youth group to spread the message even further. ‘It was a very engaging session’ said Simon, Team Leader at Youth Arts and Recreation Centre.

Simon continued to state that ‘The intimate audience of young people and youth workers listened curiously which sparked many questions to Jack ranging from his time on Australian Ninja Warrior to running the New York Marathon.”

Jack and the Tackling Smoking Team then headed north to visit a Detention Centre and the Launceston PCYC to further reiterate this important message and put them through their paces with a deadly ninja workout.

Ashley’s Detention Centre Program Coordinator told the tobacco action workers that “Jack’s visit had really inspired the young people. “

40 keen participants attended the event at the Launceston PCYC with one participant lucky enough to engage in a one on one training session with Jack after the event. Aaron Gornalle of Launceston now hopes to make it onto the next season of Australian Ninja Warrior.

The final hoorah landed Jack and the team on Flinders Island at the Furneaux Islands Festival where Jack took a huge portion of the Island’s youth through a large scale ninja obstacle course and discussed that in order to be at your peak, there is no room for unhealthy habits like smoking!

3.1 WA : AHCWA and the WA Primary Health Alliance (WAPHA) signed an MOU

This week , AHCWA and the WA Primary Health Alliance (WAPHA) signed an MOU with the key objective for both parties to adopt a shared and coordinated approach in seeking to address the health and wellbeing needs of the Aboriginal population in WA in the most efficient and effective manner possible.

(L-R): Learne Durrington, WAPHA CEO; Des Martin, AHCWA CEO; Dr Richard Choong, WAPHA Chairperson; and Vicki O’Donnell, AHCWA Chairperson

3.2 WA : AHCWA :  Do you want to be an Aboriginal Health Worker?

AHCWA can help you achieve this, places are still open for the 2019 intakes.

Becoming an Aboriginal Health Worker will allow you to work within the health care setting to assist your community to access and receive the appropriate care they require.

Contact adminmembersupport@ahcwa.org for more information.

4.1 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service are active members of the “Welcome Here Project ” #LGBTIQ

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service are active members of the “Welcome Here Project”.

What is this project, you ask, well the Welcome Here Project is the new Safe Place Project.

The Safe Place Project started in 1998 in response to high levels of street based violence directed at Lesbian, Gay, Bi, Trans, Intersex and Queer (LGBTIQ) people.

Local businesses signed up to become a ‘Safe Pace’ by putting a sticker in their shop front to let LGBTIQ community members know they could seek refuge if they were under the threat of violence.

Check out the deadly staff and their support for the LGBTIQA+ community!

4.2 NSW : Katungul ACCHO credited with changing the life of Mark Scott who was using heroin for 14 years, in prison on-and-off for 14 years and an alcoholic for 17 years

“My name is Mark Scott but my mates call me Baldy. I’m a Wiradjuri man and I’m pretty open with my past – if by sharing my story, I can help someone else then that’s a good thing.

I was using heroin for 14 years, in prison on-and-off for 14 years and an alcoholic for 17 years and I’m only 56.

I credit Katungul for the life I live today. Rohan Moreton (Katungul Drug and Alcohol Community Support Worker) convinced me to go up to Oolong House in Nowra (Oolong House provides residential treatment for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal men who wish to regain their lives and manage problems linked to alcohol and other drugs) and since I graduated from that program I’ve been drug and alcohol free.

I have my own place to live, I got my driver’s license, and I even present two hours a week on 2SeaFM community radio. What makes me most proud though is that I’m back in touch with my kids and grandkids.

I meet with Katungul’s AOD team every week in Eden because they keep me grounded and remind me of how far I’ve come. I own the word ‘no’ now”

5.1 VIC : VAHS ACCHO Coming soon: Aboriginal Seniors Games!!

Want to get out of the house or know a family member who does. Whilst getting active, meeting new people and most importantly having fun! Then come along and check it out. This is a program not to be missed.

When: Wednesday’s starting March 6th
Time: 10am-2pm
Where: Aborigines Advancement League (Thornbury)

Need help registering? Want to learn more about the games?
Come along to our registration and info day on the 27th Feb 12-2pm at VAHS Preston. Lunch provided!

Follow the link to register for the games! https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/senior

Any questions contact:03  8459 0932

6. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO leads the way for independent review into the “health” of Canberra’s prison

In its submission to the Moss review, the Winnunga Aboriginal Health Care service said that the “bashing, care, treatment and death of Steven Freeman [had been] characterised by a lack of transparency, accountability and of secrecy

Recommendations from the independent Moss review “So Much Sadness In Our Lives” which examined the 2016 death in custody of indigenous detainee Steven Freeman.

The 2016 death in custody of Steven Freeman sharply focussed attention on Canberra’s prison “

An independent review into the “health” of Canberra’s prison, the first of its type for any Australian correctional centre, is inviting public submissions and commentary as part of an extensive report to be tabled in the ACT Assembly mid-year.

Independent prison review invites submissions from the Canberra public CREDIT:JAY CRONAN

Submissions are now open, and close on May 1.

The ACT Inspector of Correctional Services said that the “healthy prison review” welcomes input from all interested parties including corrections staff, community organisations, unions and the academic community.

Detainees at the prison are also invited to submit, anonymously if wished, with a stated preference by the inspectorate for all submissions to directly address one or more of the four “pillars” of the review framework.

These pillars include:

  • prison safety;
  • respect;
  • purposeful activity; and
  • rehabilitation and preparation for release.

Submissions should not raise complaints about the treatment or conduct of named individuals although anonymous case studies are permitted.

The inspectorate’s role, in reporting directly to the ACT Assembly, is to deliver an independent assessment of Canberra’s prison and services.

The role was established as a government response to the recommendations from the independent Moss review “So Much Sadness In Our Lives” which examined the 2016 death in custody of indigenous detainee Steven Freeman.

The 2016 death in custody of Steven Freeman sharply focussed attention on Canberra’s prison

The prison treatment of Freeman over a lengthy period prior to his death highlighted deficiencies in the prison’s systems, facilities and detainee treatment.

These issues included the mixing of remandees with sentenced prisoners, prisoner boredom, poor CCTV surveillance coverage, a lack of opportunities to learn a skill or trade, illicit drug use, and the delivery of health services.

In its submission to the Moss review, the Winnunga Aboriginal Health Care service said that the “bashing, care, treatment and death of Steven Freeman [had been] characterised by a lack of transparency, accountability and of secrecy”.

The prison’s inspector, Neil McAllister, is permitted to conduct unannounced visits to all correctional centres, including the cells underneath the ACT court buildings.

He works alongside, but separate from, other oversight mechanisms such as the ACT Human Rights Commission, the ACT Ombudsman, the Public Advocate and the prison’s official visitors.

Primarily, his review is seeking to ascertain whether vulnerable detainees at the prison, such as those with mental health issues or cognitive impairment, are being held safely, and whether staff are able to work in a “safe and supportive” environment.

It will also examine whether human rights and dignity are respected within the prison.

It will seek to determine whether detainees are “able, and expected to engage in activity that is likely to benefit them”.

Finally, it will assess whether prisoners have access to programs and services which will assist and prepare them for a life outside the prison.

Submissions can be addressed to the office of the inspector of correctional services at http://ics@act.gov.au.

7.1 QLD : Apunipima’s ACCHO Mossman Gorge Clinic shares success of ACCHO’s with James Cook University’s School of Medicine and The University of Saskatchewan’s College of Medicine.

This week the team at Apunipima’s Mossman Gorge Clinic spent time with representatives from James Cook University’s School of Medicine and The University of Saskatchewan’s College of Medicine.

The Canadian visitors have spent their time in Australia learning more about Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHO).

Visiting a number of services across North Queensland which has given them a good insight.

“Health care for Indigenous people in Canada is delivered in a far more traditional way than what we have seen here. I am impressed by the level of consultation and how different disciplines work together to deliver the best results for the patient.” said Carlyn Seguin, who oversees the Global Health Certificate at the University of Saskatchewan.

Students studying the Global Health Certificate with the University of Saskatchewan have the opportunity to apply for an international placement as part of the program. Placements in Australia are facilitated by James Cook University’s School Of Medicine, a partnership that is now entering its fourth year.

“JCU’s partnership with the University of Saskatchewan provides a valuable opportunity to develop a collective global voice for Indigenous health needs, concerns and successes.” said Tarun Sen Gupta, Professor of Health Professional Education at James Cook University.

7.2 QLD : At ATSIHS ACCHO Brisbane get your Deadly Choices All Star Shirt

Just in…the limited edition  Choices All Stars shirts. Get in quick to get yours at your health check (715)!

Contact us Visit HERE 


8.1 NT : National Rural Health Alliance promotes Sunrise ACCHO clinic at Bullman

Positive signs of No Sugar (Zoro Coke and water ) in Indigenous communities but there is a long way to go. The link between excessive sugar levels in soft drinks and diabetes, chronic disease is well established. More effort is required in remote communities

8.2 NT: AMSANT and Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin offer ideas on how to increase the retention of Aboriginal Health Workers

“In [these] clinics, the decisions are made at the local community level and the response is fairly quick.

In the government clinics, I’d imagine there’s a hierarchical structure and people get frustrated.

Training put strains on some hopeful AHWs, with more demands on them today to travel away from their base clinics — which are also often their home communities — to learn in Alice Springs or Darwin.

This puts a lot of strain on families, particularly families with young kids and single parents.

Once trainees graduate, many get burned out by the job, especially those working in remote locations.

Often did not get perks like cheap accommodation offered to police officers or doctors

The real challenge is to encourage and offer the proper incentives and renumeration to reward those who do want to undertake that particular work in rural and remote Northern Territory,” he said.

The salaries of Aboriginal health practitioners also needs to be reviewed.”

The chief executive of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT, John Paterson, said the data might hint at how the workers felt more supported in Aboriginal-community-controlled health clinics.

FROM the ABC

The Northern Territory is the only place in the nation with falling numbers of health sector workers trained to bridge cultural gaps between First Nations and non-Indigenous people.

Key points:

  • NT Health is losing Aboriginal Health Workers
  • This may be partly due to difficult training requirements
  • Others may be moving into health streams like nursing or medicine

Data obtained by the ABC shows the number of registered Aboriginal Health Workers in the NT fell almost 17 per cent over six years, even though almost a third of the Territory’s population is Indigenous.

All of those losses came from the public health sector, rather than private or Aboriginal-controlled health services.

‘I get to help my mob’

Kiara Peacock is one year into her traineeship as an Aboriginal Health Worker (AHW) at the Aboriginal-community-controlled health clinic, Danila Dilba.

The Larrakia woman used to work in HR but jumped at the chance when the traineeship position came up in Darwin.

“I get to help my mob,” Ms Peacock said.

“We have more of an understanding with the cultural side of things, with communicating to our patients and understanding them as well.”

That is incredibly important in a place like the Territory, which has the biggest proportion of Indigenous people per capita in Australia and many different language groups often not spoken by non-Indigenous doctors and nurses.

Another Danila Dilba trainee, Darren Braun, said he believed Indigenous patients felt more able to open up to him because of their shared culture and his grasp on the language Kriol.

“I find that in consults, if a doctor is doing consults first and we do it after, we get more information than what a doctor can do,” he said.

Yet Ms Peacock and Mr Braun are entering the profession at a time when the overall numbers of AHWs working in the Territory is dwindling.

Data obtained by the ABC shows the number of registered workers in the NT fell from more than 250 in 2012 to just 211 in 2018.

The data follows a recent study by the Australian National University that found the Territory was the only jurisdiction in the country where the numbers of these workers had declined in the past decade.

ANU researcher Alyson Wright found at a national level, retiring workers were not being replaced by younger workers.

The ABC crunched the data by ANU and – in terms of workers per Indigenous person – Victoria and South Australia now have the highest proportion of workers, with Queensland, Western Australia and the NT trailing on relatively similar levels.

What sector are the workers leaving?

Danila Dilba chief executive Olga Havnen said the numbers of AHWs at the clinic had been relatively stable over the last decade.

She said they had achieved that by prioritising traineeships.

Data shows numbers of AHW working in non-government clinics like Danila Dilba had slightly increased since 2012, with the overall decline in numbers all coming from the government sector, NT Health.

NT Health — which operates clinics in Darwin through to very remote Indigenous communities — has lost a staggering 61 of these workers since 2012.

The department did not respond to questions from the ABC about whether this is directly related to the closure of NT Health Clinics.

However, in a statement, a spokesperson said the loss was not due to redundancies.

“While our numbers are declining, we have not cut positions,” the spokesperson said.

He said there were many factors behind the decline, including changes to the training requirements for AHWs in the Territory and a very low completion rate by trainees.

This is something experienced by Ms Peacock — while she is based in Darwin, she has to travel an hour for her studies every month to Batchelor.

“If anything would stop me doing this job personally, it’s the location of where I study,” she said.

“Some of us are quite young. We’ve only just got our Ps. Some don’t even have a car themselves or transport. Some of us come from places like [the remote community] Maningrida.”

Is there a silver lining to the trend?

The NT Health spokesperson said the department was, “developing a workforce strategy that will have a clear career path with the appropriate support mechanisms to attract and retain” the workers.

“Including looking at ways Aboriginal students are supported while they are studying, often away from their country,” they said.

Yet despite the decline in numbers, the spokesperson said some of the workers leaving are moving into other health streams like nursing or medicine.

That is something Ms Havnen from Danila Dilba has noticed.

“So I’m hoping that what people is doing is taking slightly different career paths,” she said.

Mr Paterson agreed this was a positive step forward, but that the growth of Indigenous people into these other roles should not come at the loss of AHWs in the Territory.

“We’ve got to get that balance right,” he said.

9. SA:  Pika Wiya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation officially reopened the doors to the Davenport Health Clinic on Monday, January 14.

The clinic has been closed for several months due to a “lack of staff and the ongoing problem with the recruitment of doctors”, but is now back in business, giving Davenport residents a closer option for their health requirements.

Pika Wiya CEO Alan Morris said the return of the health clinic was “long overdue”.

“We decided to address the needs out here,” Mr Morris said.

“For the first six months, we’ll be seeing and assessing what those needs will be by looking at the patient numbers coming through.

“We’re very happy to be back out here.”

Pika Wiya’s healthcare is available to the Aboriginal population in Port Augusta and surrounding towns, with about 3200 active customers and patients accessing the medical service.

With the Port Augusta centre on Dartmouth Street facing an influx of patients during the summer months, Pika Wiya began working towards reopening the Davenport clinic.

Mr Morris said Pika Wiya’s board, as well as the Davenport community, were keen for the clinic to reopen.

“Patients could have transport issues. They might not be able to access (the Port Augusta centre),” Mr Morris said.

“We’ve spent a lot of money on doing up the clinic, so it’s in pretty good nick.”

Davenport community members gathered at the clinic on Monday morning to celebrate the opening, with staff hosting a barbecue breakfast.

Mr Morris said the event was a good opportunity to let the community know that the doors were officially open.

“It was just a chance for us to say ‘here we are, we’re back and we’re going to be operating again’,” he said.

The Davenport Health Clinic is open on Monday afternoons from 2-4pm, and Wednesday and Fridays from 9am-12:30pm

Patients will have access to general practitioners and Aboriginal health workers at the refurbished clinic.

For more information about the clinic, contact 8642 2556.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Children Good News stories : #QLD @Wuchopperen @ATSICHSBris @DeadlyChoices #VIC @VAHS1972 #NSW Redfern AMS ACCHO #SA @AHCSA_ #WA @TheAHCWA #NT

1.1 National : In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input!

1.2 National The Fourth Action Plan of the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children (2009-2020 ) launched

2. 1 QLD : ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane launches Deadly Kindy Program 2019

2.2 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Health Service Parenting Programs Make A Difference to Cairns Families

3. NSW : Redfern ACCHO Aboriginal Medical Service : School’s back this week! – Is your mob up to date with immunisations?

4. SA : AHCSA : Health survey for 16-29 year olds to give young people a voice

5. NT : Will $7.9 million be enough to address chronic hearing problems in Territory children?

6.1 WA : AHCWA and students from Curtin University came out to Midvale to conduct Ear Health Checks for all the children

6.2 WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service (PAMS) : Children in your car ? Fines of up to $1,000 if you are smoking

7. VIC : VAHS JUNIOR 12-15 years Pre-Season for Life is coming in 2019!

 

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input!

Survey until 15 Feb 2019 : To participate in a short survey, please CLICK HERE

Please tell us your ideas for

-improving quality of 715 health checks

-clinical software -implementation of the National Guide

-culturally responsive healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

More info 

1.2 National The Fourth Action Plan of the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children (2009-2020 launched

This is the first Action Plan under the Framework that has a standalone focus on improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are either at risk of entering, or in contact with child protection systems.

This is in recognition of the fact that the rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care is ten times that of non-Indigenous children,”

Assistant Minister for Children and Families, Michelle Landry 

Today (30 Jan ) at the launch of the 4th Action Plan under the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009-2020, SNAICC Director Natalie Lewis presented our new resource, The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle: A guide to support implementation.

” The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle (ATSICPP) aims to keep children connected to their families, communities, cultures and country while ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people participate in decisions about their children’s care and protection.

SNAICC – National Voice for our Children has developed a Guide to Support Implementation of the ATSICPP. Based on the new resource, SNAICC has held workshops with state and territory government child protection practitioners and policy makers, to support better implementation of the Child Placement Principle.”

Download the Fourth Action Plan HERE 

dss-fourth-action-plan-v6-web-final

The Fourth Action Plan of the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children (2009-2020) has been launched by the Government today following endorsement by state and territory Community Services Ministers across Australia.

The National Framework was established by the Australian Government in partnership with states and territories and the non-government sector, as a long-term national approach to ensure the safety and wellbeing of Australia’s children.

Minister for Families and Social Services, Paul Fletcher, says that the launch of the Fourth Action Plan is the next critical step in improving the way we, as a nation, care for and protect Australia’s children.

“The guiding philosophy of the National Framework is that protecting children is everyone’s business,” Minister Fletcher said.

“The endorsement of this Action Plan demonstrates that all levels of government across Australia are committed to working together to improve the safety and wellbeing of Australia’s children and young people.”

“Through this final Action Plan under the National Framework, we will build on and embed the important reform work under the National Framework to date, and continue to work towards providing a safe, nurturing environment for all children and young people.”

1.3 National : Healthy lunches for our kids going back to school

Healthy Lunchbox Week is a Nutrition Australia initiative that aims to inspire parents and carers across Australia to create healthy lunchboxes their children will enjoy.

Did you know children consume around 30% of their daily food intake at school? Most of this comes from the contents of their lunchbox. What children eat during their day at school plays a crucial role in their learning and development.

Healthy Lunchbox Week helps families prepare healthy lunchboxes by:

  • inspiring healthy lunchbox ideas and recipes
  • ensuring a healthy lunchbox balance across core food groups
  • awareness of lunchbox food hygiene and safety

We know each state starts their school year at a different time.

Healthy Lunchbox Week dates are based on the week before the first state goes back to school.

Check out our #HealthyLunchboxWeek website for recipes, inspiration and more!

https://www.healthylunchboxweek.org/

2. 1 QLD : ATSICHS Brisbane launches Deadly Kindy Program 2019

 

What is a Deadly Kindy?

A Deadly Kindy is a kindergarten program for children aged 3 to 5 years old. We understand the importance of your child’s kindergarten year in preparing them for their transition to school.

Our children: are connected and culturally safe: immersed in programs that value and build on languages and practices brought from their families.

  • Connections: to culture and community are key drivers for program design: supported and influenced by community and elders.
  • Needs are identified early: receiving health checks upon enrolment (or before) enrolment, and work with speech and occupational therapists weekly, affording early assessment and intervention.
  • Our educators: are continually upskilled: working alongside therapists.
  • Innovative programs: leveraging ATSICHS Brisbane’s comprehensive educational, health and human allied services and resources, to wrap around our children and families.
  • Families are crucial to a child’s development: our specialist teams and programs target and strengthen the capacity of families.

What will my child learn?

At kindy your child will learn through play. They will explore, create, investigate, experiment, imagine, extend their knowledge and develop relationships with others. They will be given opportunities to gain confidence in social settings, to develop relationships and become resilient negotiators. Going to kindy will help your child learn early literacy and numeracy concepts and develop communication skills to help their reading and writing.

The Deadly Kindy difference

Our Deadly Kindys have a focus on supporting and strengthening children’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identity through programs that are inclusive of the children’s culture, language and learning styles. As a parent or carer of a young child, you are the main influence on your child’s development. Deadly Kindy exists to help you with this important role.

Our program is based on the Queensland Kindergarten Curriculum Guidelines (QKCG). Deadly Kindy values the importance of play-based programs and is child centered, driven by observations of the children and also input from families and the community.

Children’s healthy development is vital for their learning and wellbeing and lays the foundation for a happy and healthy life. Families have access to a range of ATSICHS Brisbane services and programs including:

  • Health promotion materials and activities on dental health, healthy eating and physical activity and health, child development and parenting information.
  • Child and family health services, such as maternal health nurses and child health checks.
  • Primary health care services such as speech pathology, occupational therapy and nutrition groups, young mothers’ groups, fatherhood programs and Aboriginal health programs.
  • Child and adolescent mental health services including therapy for children and parents.
  • Allied health: services such as occupational therapists, speech pathologists and other allied health staff provide an allied health program to build the skills and knowledge of staff and parents to support children’s development. Activities include:
    • developmental screening
    • staff development sessions
    • parent consultations
    • parent and child group programs
    • short-term intervention for children.

Find out more or book a  place

For more info or to book your place call 3239 5381.

KINDY IS A DEADLY CHOICE!

For more info or to book your place call 07 3239 5381.

Get a free pre-Kindy health check and enrol today!

You can bring your child in for a free, pre-Kindy health check. Enrol them in Kindy and get a FREE Deadly Choices shirt!

BOOK YOUR PRE-KINDY HEALTH CHECK

Talk to our receptionists at one of our clinics to find out more today.

Logan Clinic

41 Station Road, Logan Central QLD 4114, phone: 3240 8940

Loganlea Clinic

Unit 4, 653 Kingston Road, Loganlea QLD 4131, phone: 3239 5355

Browns Plains

Village Square | 20-24 Commerce Dr, Browns Plains QLD 4118, phone:  3239 5300

Remember we now also open Saturdays from 8.30am – 4.30pm

For all other clinics.

2.2 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Health Service Parenting Programs Make A Difference to Cairns Families


Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen) has been providing a variety of parenting programs to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in the Cairns region to develop parenting skills and reduce the prevalence of mental health, emotional and behavioural problems in children.

In 2018, Wuchopperen saw 29 families graduate from our key parenting programs including Circle of Security, Parenting Under Pressure, and Triple P. Each program focuses on a different element of parenting and the many challenges of raising children at various ages.

Lorna Baker, Manager of Wuchopperen’s Children and Family Centre says the parenting programs not only develop the confidence of parents, but also of the children.

“We see huge changes in the families who participate in our parenting programs. The children are a lot more confident, and a number of our parents ask our educators for additional activities to do with their children at home.

The programs are all about creating positive relationships between parents and children and giving parents the tools to do this. The programs also provide parents with a support group of other people who might be going through similar issues,” says Lorna.

Following the huge success of the programs focused on families run by Wuchopperen in 2018, 2019 is set to be a great year for Wuchopperen and our clients.

“Throughout 2018 we had to establish an additional playgroup to accommodate the number of families coming through Wuchopperen. It is really great to see the progress of all the families and how our team is able to cater to the individual needs of everyone who walks through our doors,” says Lorna.

The team at Wuchopperen’s Children and Family Centre consists of Early Childhood Educators, Family Support Workers and Child Health Workers who can provide a holistic service to all our families.

3. NSW : Redfern ACCHO Aboriginal Medical Service : School’s back this week! – Is your mob up to date with immunisations?

4. SA : AHCSA : Health survey for 16-29 year olds to give young people a voice

Great work happening down at Survivalay in Semaphore by the AHCSA team.

Health survey for 16-29 year olds to give young people a voice

5. NT : Will $7.9 million be enough to address chronic hearing problems in Territory children?

AS the hot sun beats down on the red dirt of Bathurst Island, three-year-old Joel Heenan sits inside a renovated shipping container outside the community’s health clinic.

To see all images view WEB

From the NT News

The steel rectangle been transformed into an audiology booth, allowing young Tiwi Islanders to get their ears tested by specialists.

Clutched in Joel’s tiny hands is a picture book with bright illustrations of dogs, babies and sheep. He slowly flips through the pages from the warm comfort of his uncle’s lap.

From behind a closed door a button is pressed and a warbling high-pitched sound fills the room.

Joel doesn’t hear it. He’s distracted, fiddly. The sound continues to ring. He still isn’t sure.

Finally, he looks up — and is treated with the sight of a bouncing toy as a reward. A cheeky grin from Joel but the test is no laughing matter.

The fact is at only three-years-old, little Joel already has moderate hearing loss.

JOEL’S mum, Rowena Tipiloura has four kids. Two of them have problems with their ears.

Joel has a hole in his right eardrum, something which may soon need an operation. Joel’s big sister had an operation to patch up a burst eardrum when she was only six.

“After the patch, it’s been much better,” Rowena says of her older child.

“Joel is not too bad, he talks a lot at home. Knows his fruit, animals, loves his uncles.

“They got a little problem.”

Rowena’s not worried about her youngest child’s hearing, believing it is good enough to get by.

It’s not neglect, not disinterest, not out of a lack of compassion for Joel.

Rowena clearly loves her son — it’s obvious in the tender way she holds him, the way she strokes his short, fluffy hair and the way she lights up when she talks about his love of family. Rowena wants the best for Joel.

But his ears just aren’t her biggest concern. Not when it’s so normal for people to be hard of hearing in her community. Not where there are so many other significant health concerns to worry about.

JOEL is one of 425 Australian kids under the age of three taking part in an ear health study with the Menzies School of Health Research.

The program has been running for nearly seven years and, so far, the findings paint a disturbing picture about the ear health of kids living in remote Territory communities.

One toddler in the study has had an active infection and burst eardrum for six months. He’s only 18-months-old.

And in another case, an ear infection was recently detected in a four-week old baby.

Aboriginal kids have the highest rates of otitis media, a middle ear infection which can cause hearing loss, in the world.

According to federal health figures, only five per cent of one-year-old indigenous kids living in remote communities have bilateral normal hearing. This means 95 per cent of one-year-old indigenous kids living in remote communities can’t hear normally out of one or both of their ears.

Last year, thousands of hearing specialists services were provided to Aboriginal children and other young people in the NT.

But still, nine in 10 Aboriginal kids under the age of three in remote Territory communities have ear disease. Most of them will develop hearing loss which will affect their early brain development and set them on a path of disadvantage.

Early diagnosis and treatment in the first 1000 days of a child’s life can treat the disease but that rarely happens.

Disturbingly, just 13 per cent of the 2000 cases Menzies researchers recently examined and prescribed antibiotics for were followed up using best practice.

Which means just 13 per cent of the kids in desperate need of treatment are getting what they need.

In 2019 the $7.9 million Hearing for Learning program will be rolled out across remote communities in the NT.

The five-year initiative aims to address chronic hearing problems in Territory kids and is jointly funded by the NT Government, Federal Government and the Balnaves Foundation.

It’s expected to reach 5000 Territory children, with a focus on kids under three.

Infections are hard to pick up in babies because they rarely show signs of being in pain, which is why frequent checks are vital.

Led by Australia’s first indigenous surgeon — ear, nose and throat specialist Dr Kelvin Kong and Menzies School of Health Research professor Amanda Leach — the program will train and employ community members to help diagnose and treat ear disease and hearing problems in local children.

But how can this program work when so many before it have failed?

Prof Leach is realistic about the challenges facing service delivery in remote areas and is concerned at how many people fail to follow up with treatment.

“The guidelines say the children (prescribed antibiotics) should be seen within a week to make sure the ears aren’t getting worse, but that isn’t happening,” she says.

Prof Leach says ear disease is so common in remote Territory communities, it’s “normal” for young kids to struggle to hear.

Sadly, this “normalising” of the condition means parents don’t worry when their children show signs of hearing loss or “pus” ears.

In remote communities, Prof Leach says indigenous families face so many immediate health concerns — like rheumatic heart disease, hunger, housing instability — that issues with hearing quickly falls down the priorities list.

Sisters Mary Pilakui, 3, and sister Latoya Pilakui, 8, wait for Mary’s hearing test. They live in a house with 10 kids and eight adults. Housing security is a real concern in their community.

“Ear disease to a large extent is poorly understood and underestimated as a health issue in remote communities, they are dealing with a lot of other things,” Prof Leach says.

“The resources to deal with this issue are totally inadequate.

“It’s just overwhelmed with other issues in the clinic, and I think the families are probably very busy with things as well.”

Many people living remote don’t have reliable cars to travel to a health clinic, and as it’s not a service which can be delivered in homes, explains Prof Leach.

Even if they get to the clinic, ear specialists only visit remote communities every few months so the responsibility for checking ears falls to clinic staff.

And staff are often overwhelmed with other checks or not properly trained to use specialist equipment.

Even if they do remember, ear tests aren’t always pleasant — and a wiggly, irritated, and crying child rarely provides clear ear test results.

But Prof Leach is optimistic this new program can succeed where others have failed.

She says chronic ear conditions in remote communities won’t be cured by flying in more specialists but by upskilling community members who have strong connections with local families.

“The question is — how can we bolster resources within the community so there’s an expert within the community every day — so there is someone there to look at these kid’s ears, do those follow ups, support the family and support the fly in-fly out services that are still needed,” she says.

After a six-month training program, trained locals will act like the “glue” between primary healthcare providers, fly-in, fly-out specialists, families and the kids.

These workers might not have a medical degree but they have an established relationship with families and can note down red flags for follow-ups.

“If we do this well, it should work, and it should be a good model for communities to take more — more control of the country child healthcare — it’ll better inform the community, the family, the children, themselves,” she says.

MENZIES research nurse Beth Arrowsmith has been studying the ears of remote Territory kids for about five years.

Menzies research nurse Beth Arrowsmith checks the ears of Mary Pilakui, 3. She’s been studying the ears of remote NT kids as part of the program for about five years.

In all that time, she’s seen no “real improvements” in the rates of ear infections.

Ms Arrowsmith says until remote indigenous Australians are no longer living in poverty, ear infections will continue to plague them.

“We put it down to the social determinants of health, it’s overcrowding, its poor hygiene, its nutrition, the availability of services, specialists — all of those things combined,” she says.

“You’re talking about ear disease, it’s not a new thing. Any headway is very slow to make.

“It will be a very long time — the housing is inefficient, there is overcrowding. We spoke to a mum the other day who had 18 people in their house. 10 kids and eight adults.

“How can you possibly keep clean in that environment?”

Audiologist Janine Pisula says ear disease in indigenous communities isn’t a new issue, but it is a serious one.

“We’ve got to remember that the community brings up a child,” she says.

“And the community is so used to people with ear disease that they automatically do things to accommodate them.”

Ms Pisula wants the focus put back on ears — as hearing loss can impact a child’s potential.

“Kids with better hearing speak better, more clearly — they find it easier to learn, to understand the world around them,” she says.

“Hearing loss can impact someone for their whole life.”

Young kids with hearing loss are more likely to fall behind in school, become disconnected from their peers, and struggle to build relationships as they grow older.

And older people with hearing problems are more likely to feel depressed and develop dementia.

MURRUPURTIYANUWU Catholic School on Bathurst Island welcomes kids from preschool to year 13.

For nearly all of the students enrolled at the community school, English is not their first language — with the majority of indigenous kids speaking Tiwi at home with their families.

Deputy principal Stacey Marsh says hearing problems are a “huge” issue at the small school, but the kids themselves aren’t keen to wear aids that make them stand out.

“We don’t know if it’s the language barrier or the ears,” she says.

“When children can’t hear you, they can’t learn. It’s very hard to get the message across.”

Teacher Caroline Bourke has been at the Bathurst Island school for about three years and is worried about the long-term opportunities for kids on the island.

Of the indigenous population behind bars in the NT, 90 per cent have hearing loss.

It’s a troubling statistic which shows a clear downward spiral.

“(Poor) hearing is an enormous problem, it impacts big time on what they’re able to take home from lessons,” Ms Bourke says. “It’d have to be the biggest problem we face.”

She estimates 60 per cent of the kids at the school have trouble hearing, but says any new program set up to tackle the issue will have to go to the families — instead of expecting families to travel into the clinic.

One solution she sees is hearing tests and treatment options rolled out at school, which should improve the treatment rates of young kids.

IN the metal audiology booth, little James Orsto, 3, rolls a blue plastic truck along the table in front of him.

His mum, Gregorianna Orsto, watches her boy’s slow calculated movements from a chair just an arm’s length away.

James Orsto, 2.5, has his hearing tested in Bathurst Island.

From the other side of the screen, Janine Pisula presses a button and the same high-pitched warbling tune which alluded Joel echoes across the tiny room.

Instantly, James stops, and points at where he knows a toy is about to jump around.

Straight away, the tiny Tiwi Islander is greeted with the sight of a bouncing teddy.

He grins, and quickly returns to the toy truck in front of him.

Gregorianna smiles at her boy. James is her youngest son and his hearing is a priority.

“It’s very important,” says Gregorianna.

“(James) has no problems with his ears, he’s chatty at home.

“He’s really helpful at home, he can say ‘Mummy’, ‘Daddy’, ‘tea’ — he loves drinking tea.”

Gregorianna’s older boy, Angelo, had problems with “pus ears” when he young, so she knows the warning signs of ear disease.

Her partner’s ears sometimes cause him pain, and his hearing is far from perfect.

She doesn’t want little James to have the same challenge, so when specialists visit Bathurst Island in a few shorts months, Gregorianna will make sure her youngest son has his ears checked.

She’ll do everything she can to make sure James’s future sounds bright.

6.1 WA : AHCWA and students from Curtin University came out to Midvale to conduct Ear Health Checks for all the children

Students from AHCWA’s Ear Health Training course attended the My World Childcare Centre in Midvale to practice their ear health skills on the little koolangka’s

My World Childcare Centre responded

Thank you so much to the lovely ladies from the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) and students from Curtin University who came out to Midvale to conduct Ear Health Checks for all our children today. We appreciate your time,effort and knowledge in looking after the health of our families.

6.2 WA : Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service (PAMS) : Children in your car ? Fines of up to $1,000 if you are smoking

Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service (PAMS) runs the Puyu Paki program and which is the Western Desert (Jigalong, Parnngurr, Punmu and Kunawarritji) ACCHO

Have you thought about who else is breathing in the smoke you put in your car? Puyu Paki – Don’t Smoke, Give it Up!

7. VIC : VAHS JUNIOR 12-15 years Pre-Season for Life is coming in 2019!


Last summer we brought you “Pre-Season for Life”, this year we are bringing it back in a JUNIOR version for young people aged 12-15!

All abilities & fitness levels are welcome, whether you play sport or not, join us for an afternoon of fun activities to get your body moving.

Details above, or for more info call 03 9403 3346.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : #NT @CAACongress #QLD @DeadlyChoices @IUIH_ #VIC MDAS ACCHO #NSW Yerin ACCHO and Tharawal #SA @DeadlyChoicesSA #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #WA ORD ACCHO #TAS

1.1 National : In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input!

1.2. National : Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) supports NACCHO and  Uluru Statement from the Heart

2.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Springs Health Promotion team and Redtails Pinktails Right Tracks Program partners with the Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF) to host a Warrior Run fun run/walk event

2.2 : NT : Survey  Health Literacy Among Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Males in the NT.

2.3 NT : Katherine West Health ACCHO Board calls for ear checks

2.4 NT : Danila Dilba mobile clinic team put on a BBQ and conducted health checks for kids before school starts, as well as general health checks and STI tests for other community members.

3.WA : AHCWA congratulates  Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Servicewho have recently passed ISO (International Organisation for Standardisation) accreditation.

4.1 Vic : Mallee District Aboriginal Services

5. 1 Qld : Deadly Choices Workshop in Brisbane attracts over 100 Deadly Choice workers

5.2 All the News from the Apunipima ACCHO mob on Cape York 

6.ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah (Strong Health) Aboriginal Health and Community Services Newsletter

7.1 NSW : Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation lead nurse in Byala team named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year award late last month.

7.2 NSW : Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Services, awarded a grant from the state government to expand the scope of its National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) services 

8. SA: From Deadly choices SA Which one is your favourite school guernsey from SAASTA Carnival at Alberton Oval?

9. Tas : Staying cool and safe in Tasmania

 

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input!

Survey until 15 Feb 2019 : To participate in a short survey, please CLICK HERE

Please tell us your ideas for

-improving quality of 715 health checks

-clinical software -implementation of the National Guide

-culturally responsive healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

More info 

1.2. National : Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) supports NACCHO and  Uluru Statement from the Heart

See all NACCHO Media coverage HERE

The Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) has endorsed the historic Uluru Statement from the Heart, which calls for a First Nations Voice to be enshrined in the Constitution and for a Makarrata Commission as a process for agreement making and truth telling.

PSA National President Dr Chris Freeman said PSA was proud to add its voice to the call for recognition of the First Peoples of Australia in the Constitution.

“PSA is committed to ongoing work to support the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. We support the Uluru Statement from the Heart’s call for constitutional reforms to empower people to have their views heard in relation to making laws and policies that affect their lives.

“We are proud to add our voice to this movement for a better future.”

Generational disadvantage continues to have a detrimental impact on the physical and mental health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“As the peak national body for pharmacists, PSA has long advocated for closing the gap by supporting pharmacists to play an active role in improving medication management for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,” Dr Freeman said.

“Pharmacists must work collaboratively with Aboriginal Health Organisations to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

PSA is collaborating with the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) on the Integrating Pharmacists within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to Improve Chronic Disease Management (IPAC) trial.

This pioneering project aims to improve chronic disease management by embedding pharmacists within Aboriginal Health Services.

PSA’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Services Pharmacist Career Pathway provides training and support to help pharmacists working in these services to optimise health for their patients.

PSA will be developing a Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) in 2019. The RAP will underpin the work PSA does with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and support members and staff to provide culturally safe workplaces and service

This weeks featured ACCHO good news story

2.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Springs Health Promotion team and Redtails Pinktails Right Tracks Program partners with the Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF) to host a Warrior Run fun run/walk event

On Tuesday evening, Congress Health Promotion and Redtails Pinktails Right Tracks Program partnered with the Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF) to host a Warrior Run fun run/walk event for the Alice Springs community.

Warrior run events are about bringing people of all ages and ability together to run in celebration of the great men in our lives. It is an opportunity to pay tribute to and acknowledge all the strong men in our families and communities, and to recognise the role our father, grandfathers, brothers, uncles, and men in the wider sphere play throughout our lives, in a strong and positive way.

Culturally, men have been seen as the strong protector and provider – the warrior.

However, in recent times, especially in some Aboriginal families and communities, the role, respect and value of men has been eroded and are losing some of their hierarchy, self-respect and significance.

This must change – and the Warrior Run celebrates and highlights the strong, proud and courageous men in our lives.

Despite the 40+ degree heat, the event was a total success, with over 200 ‘warriors’ attending to run or walk the 2km track and show their support for the message while celebrating a healthy lifestyle.

This included members from the wider Alice Springs community, including Aboriginal families, athletic runners, footy clubs and families, young people and children.

IMF ambassador Charlie Maher gave a very moving speech prior to the run’s start, speaking honestly from the heart about his own experiences with mental health – important messages for everyone, but especially the young men in the audience. Charlie works for the Clontarf Academy, and is currently mentoring young Indigenous men and women at Yirara College in Alice Springs.

 

Congress/Right Tracks’ Sarah Carmody was central to the success of the event, working hard to spread word throughout the community – and running the event seamlessly with help from the deadly Congress Health Promotions team.

Photo above from Damien Ryan

Sarah also shared important messages about health and wellbeing, and the importance of acknowledging the males in our lives.

The Warrior Run event marks a very positive start to another busy and productive 2019 for Congress.

2.2 : NT : Survey  Health Literacy Among Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Males in the NT.

The Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Gambling (AODG) Unit at Menzies School of Health Research is leading a research project relating to Health Literacy Among Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Males in the NT.

The aim of this study is to explore the interplay between health literacy, gender (specifically masculinities) and cultural identity among young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males aged 14-24 years living in the Northern Territory (NT), Australia.

Health literacy and gender are critical social determinants of health impacting on the lives of Indigenous people worldwide. Yet, very little is known about how these concepts shape the identities of young Indigenous men. This is a mixed-methods study involving a combination of surveys, yarning sessions and photo-voice methods.

The survey component involves using two survey instruments. Information collected through these surveys has potential to provide practitioners, organizations and governments with insights about health literacy at individual and population levels. In this instance, it will help to better develop and implement health and social services programs for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males.

We are sending the weblink to complete the survey out to our networks over the following few weeks. Please share with all young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males you know.

We are also able to facilitate group sessions (to complete the survey) with organizations that support young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males. If you are interested in a facilitator helping in this way please contact Ben Christie (Menzies) on 0447 414 160.

We have attached an Information Sheet for your reference. Feel free to get in touch if this project would be of interest and you would have some potential groups who would be interested.

All completed surveys are placed into a raffle for an iPad giveaway!

Click Here to Start the Survey

Thank you for your time and feedback. You are helping make us to better develop and implement health and social service programs for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males.

2.3 NT : Katherine West Health ACCHO Board calls for ear checks

Langa infection warning signs are pus coming out of the ear, paining ear, fever or even a green runny nose.
Ear checks at your local Health Centre are quick and easy.
#oneshieldforall

2.4 NT Danila Dilba mobile clinic team put on a BBQ and conducted health checks for kids before school starts, as well as general health checks and STI tests for other community members.

It was a great day out at the community at Knuckeys Lagoon today, with our Danila Dilba mobile clinic going out for the first time this year.

The team put on a BBQ and conducted health checks for kids before school starts, as well as general health checks and STI tests for other community members.Great to see the local community turning out and being able to access healthcare where they live.

Picture above Nathan McLean, Malcolm Laughton, Dr Mark Myerscough, Ahmi Narkle and Patricia Cooper

(L-R) Karina Wilson, Valerie Ganambarr, Sadie Mirlmin, Terry Wilson and Lindsay Watson (child in front) —

3.WA : AHCWA congratulates  Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Servicewho have recently passed ISO (International Organisation for Standardisation) accreditation: ISO 9001:2015.

OVAHS has successfully achieved independent recognition and Quality Management Certification from the world’s largest developer and publisher of International Standards for the 6th consecutive year.

An effective Quality Management System is what ensures OVAHS services meets a certain level of quality that is reliable, safe, consistent, meets client expectations, continuously improves and complies with the law.

Pictured (L-R) Trish Hill (Medical Records and Reception Manager), Sharon Benning (Deputy CEO), Derek Donohue (Acting Health Operations Manager), Angela Geddes (Acting Clinic Coordinator), Graeme Cooper (CEO), Cuong Luu (Operations Manager),
Absent: Fiona Baines (Health Operations Manager)

4.1 Vic : Mallee District Aboriginal Services

Jobs, events, news and more at MDAS? January 18, 2019 – https://mailchi.mp/d42a547f4e94/whats-new-at-mdas-january-18-1009005

5.Qld : Deadly Choices Workshop in Brisbane attracts over 100 Deadly Choice workers

Warren Snowdon MP with Adrian Carson and Donisha Duff at the Deadly Choices Workshop in Brisbane this week.

The Workshop is great with over 100 Deadly Choice workers from across QLD attending.

It is a terrific programme which is leading the way in preventative health for First Nations people not only in QLD, but now also in the NT, SA, NSW and Vic.

All thanks to the leadership from the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health based in Brisbane.

5.2 All the News from the Apunipima ACCHO mob on Cape York 

Coen Men’s Group

Last week the Men’s Group in Coen met for the first time in 2019.

Planning is underway for events and activities for the coming year.

Congratulations to the Apunipima team at the Wellbeing Centre in Coen for fostering a vibrant and enthusiastic Men’s Group.

Learning and Development Update CERT IV – Phlebotomy Training

Clara Salah, Tackling Indigenous Smoking Health Worker, is currently completing her Certificate IV In Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Care Practice. As part of that training Clara is required to become a proficient Phlebotomist.

Perfecting the skill of blood collection is not as easy as it sounds and requires a lot of hands on practice. Clara was able to spend a full working week with Sullivan and Nicolaides across multiple sites in Cairns.

Throughout the week, Clara was partnered with a Clinical Educator who provided direct supervision.

The ability to complete the training in Cairns with Sullivan and Nicolaides provides Apunipima staff with a cost effective way to complete training while exposing them to a wide variety of patients.

Integrated Team Care

Apunipima’s Integrated Team Care (ITC) Program helps Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who have a chronic disease to better manage their health through the provision of a Care Coordinator.

Your Care Coordinator will work closely with you, your doctor and other community services to help you access the care you need. The ITC Program and the services of the Care Coordinator are free.

Who can Access the ITC Program?

The ITC Program is open to  Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who:

  • Have a chronic disease
  • Have an ITC referral from their doctor
  • Have a Care Plan (GPMP)
  • Are having trouble accessing services
  • Are having trouble managing their condition

What is the next step?

To access the service clients will need to have a current Care Plan, along with an ITC referral and an ITC consent form. The client’s GP can organise this. Once Apunipima receive the paperwork, our Care Coordinator will be in touch with the client or their Health Worker.

6.ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah (Strong Health) Aboriginal Health and Community Services Newsletter

Download the Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter

winnunga ahcs newsletter december 2018

7.1 NSW : Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation lead nurse in Byala team named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year award late last month.

Matthew James knows all too well about the challenges that mental health can bring.

Mr James has assisted Macarthur’s Indigenous population as a mental health practisioner at the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation for the past year.

The nurse leads Tharawal’s Byala team, which supports people struggling with mental health issues, or drug and alcohol-related problems.

Byala means “Let’s talk” in the local Dharawal Aboriginal language.

Mr James was rewarded for his dedication to the cause when he was named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year award late last month.

The Orangeville resident said he was nominated for the award by a Thawaral colleague.

“I’m stoked, it was really nice to get recognition at a national level,” he said.

Matthew always makes people feel comfortable… he is amazing.

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation team manager Tina Taylor

He received the honour at an Australian College of Mental Health Nurses seminar in Cairns.

Mr James, who has more than 20 years of industry experience, joined the Tharawal team in October 2017.

He said his role included providing counselling, diagnosis reviews and medication for Indigenous people

“There is a huge amount of disadvantage here in Macarthur and there are challenges, such as helping people with trauma issues,” he said.

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation was formed in 1983 to provide medical and community health services to Indigenous people.

Mr James said Tharawal did a great job supporting Macarthur’s Indigenous community.

“Tharawal offers the leading Aboriginal health service in Australia,” he said.

“I am very proud of our work.”

Tharawal’s social and emotional well-being team manager Tina Taylor said Mr James was a great leader and compassionate with his clients.

“Matthew has brought a whole new dynamic to the team,” Ms Taylor said.

“He always makes people feel comfortable… he is amazing.”

For more information about these services, visit the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation Airds Facebook page.

7.2 NSW : Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Services, awarded a grant from the state government to expand the scope of its National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) services 

Local Aboriginal health service provider, Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Services, has been awarded a grant from the state government to expand the scope of its National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) services to Aboriginal people with a disability on the Central Coast, Darkinjung Country.

The $630,000 grant, provided by the NSW Department of Industry under the Making It Our Business program, will enable Yerin to offer increased disability support to the Coast’s Aboriginal community.

Yerin’s current disability services program, Muru Bara (Making Pathways), connects existing NDIS participants with information and assistance to help them access culturally responsive NDIS services.

As a registered NDIS provider, the grant will enable Yerin to build upon its existing program and establish an NDIS support team that will engage with community to increase NDIS participation and work to develop culturally responsive NDIS plans.

According to the latest NDIS Quarterly Report, Aboriginal people make up 5.4% of NDIS participants1, however this statistic does not reflect the number of Aboriginal people who are in need of disability support. The 2014-15 Australian Bureau of Statistics’ National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey revealed that almost half (45%) of Aboriginal people are living with a disability or long term-health condition2. Coupled with the fact that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience higher rates of disability than non-Indigenous people across all age groups3, it is clear that the community is in need of greater support.

Yerin Eleanor Duncan’s Chief Executive Officer, Belinda Field, said the funding will help the Aboriginal community-controlled organisation increase partnerships and choices for the community.

“This grant will allow Yerin Eleanor Duncan to address gaps that may have previously prevented Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from accessing culturally responsive NDIS services on the Central Coast,” Ms Field said.

“The team at Yerin will do this by helping participants to develop individual NDIS plans that are culturally responsive and by providing support to carers and their families,” she concluded.

Yerin services the local Aboriginal community by providing holistic primary health care, including GP, early childhood, chronic disease and mental health services. The organisation recently expanded its service offering with the opening of astate-of-the-art dental clinic and the launch of culturally responsive Out of Home Care services with the Ngaliya (We – You & I) Permanency Support Program, which aims to place Aboriginal children with Aboriginal foster carers.

  1. Report to the COAG Disability Reform Council for Q1 of Y6 Full report (September 2018)
  2. ABS – 4714.0 – National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, 2014-15
  3. ABS – 4433.0.55.005 – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People with a Disability, 2012
8. SA: From Deadly choices SA Which one is your favourite school guernsey from SAASTA Carnival at Alberton Oval?
9. Tas : Staying cool and safe in Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.@NACCHOChair Season’s Greetings and a very Happy #ChooseHealth New Year from all the NACCHO mob : Make @DeadlyChoices a #sugarfree 2019 New Year #SugaryDrinksProperNoGood

Season’s Greetings and a Happy New Year from the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

On behalf of NACCHO, the Board and our staff we wish you a safe, happy and healthy festive season.

Please note : Our Canberra Office Closes 20 December and Re Opens 4 January 2019

2018 has been a year of change, with many new members joining the NACCHO Board.

With change comes opportunity, 2019 will see many new and exciting developments as NACCHO continues to enhance better service for the sector.

We look forward to building strong relationships with you, maintain Aboriginal community control and work together in the new year to improve health and well-being outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

I hope you all have good health, happiness and a safe holiday season

Ms Donnella Mills Chair NACCHO

Click on our 2018 year in review

If the NACCHO Christmas card isn’t playing, click here to view in a web browser.

”  This campaign is straightforward – sugary drinks are no good for our health.It’s calling on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks.’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Cape York and throughout all our communities experience a disproportionate burden of chronic disease compared to other Australians.’

‘Regular consumption of sugary drinks is associated with increased energy intake and in turn, weight gain and obesity. It is well established that obesity is a leading risk factor for diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease and some cancers. Consumption of sugary drinks is also associated with poor dental health.

Water is the best drink for everyone – it doesn’t have any sugar and keeps our bodies healthy.’

Apunipima Public Health Advisor Dr Mark Wenitong

WATCH Apunipima Video HERE

“We tell ‘em kids drink more water; stop the sugar. It’s good for all us mob”

Read all 60 + NACCHO articles Health and Nutrition HERE

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/nutrition-healthy-foods/

 ” Let’s be honest, most countries and communities (and especially Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders ) now face serious health challenges from obesity.

Even more concerning, so do our kids.

While no single mission will be the panacea to a complex problem, using 2017 to set a new healthy goal of giving sugar the kick would be a great start.

Understand sugar, be aware of it, minimise it and see it for what it is – a special treat for a rare occasion.

This New Year’s, make breaking up with sugar your planned resolution.

“Hey sugar – it’s not me, it’s you…”

Alessandro R Demaio  Global Health Doctor; Co-Founded NCDFREE & festival21; Assoc. Researcher, University of Copenhagen and NACCHO supporter ( First Published 2016 see in full below )

We recommend the Government establish obesity prevention as a national priority, with a national taskforce, sustained funding and evaluation of key measures including:

  • Laws to stop exposure of children to unhealthy food and drink marketing on free to air television until 9.30 pm
  • Mandatory healthy food star rating from July 2019 along with stronger food reformulation targets
  • A national activity strategy to promote walking, cycling and public transport use
  • A 20 per cent health levy on sugary drinks

Australia enjoys enviable health outcomes but that is unlikely to last if we continue to experience among the world’s highest levels of obesity.

 CEO of the Consumers Health Forum, Leanne Wells

NACCHO Aboriginal #HealthStarRating and #Nutrition @KenWyattMP Free healthy choices food app will dial up good tucker

” Weight gain spikes sharply during the Christmas and New Year holiday period with more than half of the weight we gain during our lifetime explained just by the period between mid-November and mid-January.

Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA

 ” Labels that warn people about the risks of drinking soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages can lower obesity and overweight prevalence, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

The study used computer modelling to simulate daily activities like food and beverage shopping of the populations of three U.S. cities – Baltimore, San Francisco and Philadelphia.

It found that warning labels in locations that sell sugary drinks, including grocery and corner stores, reduced both obesity and overweight prevalence in the three cities, declines that the authors say were attributable to the reduced caloric intake.

The virtual warning labels contained messaging noting how added sugar contributes to tooth decay, obesity and diabetes.

The findings, which were published online December 14 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, demonstrates how warning labels can result in modest but statistically significant reductions in sugary drink consumption and obesity and overweight prevalence.”

Diabetes Queensland : Warning labels can help reduce sugary drinks consumption and obesity, new study suggests

 

Global recognition is building for the very real health concerns posed by large and increasing quantities of hidden sugar in our diets. This near-ubiquitous additive found in products from pasta sauces to mayonnaise has been in the headlines and in our discussions.

The seemingly innocuous sweet treat raises eyebrows from community groups to policy makers – and change is in the air.

Let’s review some of the sugar-coated headers from 2016 :

  • The global obesity epidemic continued to build while more than two-in-three Australian adults faced overweight or obesity – and almost one in four of our children.
  • Science around sugary drinks further solidified, with consumption now linked to obesitychildhood obesityheart diseasediabetes (type-2), dental caries and even lower fertility.
  • Australians were estimated to consume a staggering 76 litres of sugary drinks each since January alone, and new reports highlighted that as much as 15% of the crippling health costs associated with obesity could result from sugary drinks consumption.
  • Meanwhile around the planet, more countries took sound policy measures to reduce sugar consumption in their citizens. France, Belgium, Hungary, Finland, Chile, the UK, Ireland, South Africa and many parts of the United States implemented, continued or planned the implementation of pricing policies for sugary drinks.

In short, the over-consumption of sugar is now well recognised as a public health challenge everywhere.

With all this in mind and a New Year ahead, it’s time to put big words into local action. With resolutions brewing, here are seven helpful tips to breaking up with sugar in 2017.

1. Understand sugar

When it comes to sugar, things can get pretty confusing. Below, I shed some light on the common misunderstandings, but let’s recheck sugar itself – in simplest terms.

Sugar is a type of refined carbohydrate and a source of calories in our diet. Our body uses sugar and other sources of calories as energy, and any sugar that is not used is eventually stored as fat in our liver or on our bellies.

“Free sugars” are those added to products or concentrated in the products – either by us or by the manufacturer. They don’t include sugars in whole fruits and vegetables, but more on that later. For a range of health reasons, the World Health Organization recommends we get just 5% of our daily calories from free sugars. For a fully grown man or woman, this equates to a recommended limit to sugar consumption of roughly 25 grams – or 6 teaspoons. For women, it’s a little less again.

Consume more than this, and our risk of health problems rises.

2. Quit soft drinks

With 16 teaspoons of sugar in a single bottle serving – that’s more than 64 grams– there’s nothing “soft” about soft drinks. Including all carbonated drinks, flavoured milks and energy drinks with any added sugars, as well as fruit drinks and juices, sugary drinks are a great place to focus your efforts for a healthier 2018. Sugary drinks provide no nutritional value to our diets and yet are a major source of calories.

sugartax

What’s more concerning, evidence suggests that when we drink calories in the form of sugary drinks, our brains don’t recognise these calories in the same way as with foods. They don’t make us feel “full” and could even make us hungrier – so we end up eating (and drinking) more. In this way, liquid calories can be seen as even more troubling than other forms of junk foods. Combine this with studies that suggest the pleasure (and sugar spike) provided by sugary drinks may make them hard to give up – and it’s not difficult to see why many of us are drinking higher amounts, more often and in larger servings. This also makes cutting down harder.

The outcome is that anything up to one-seventh of the entire public cost of obesity in Australia could now result from sugary drinks. In other words, cut out the sugary drinks and you’ll be doing your own health a favour – and the health of our federal and state budgets.

3. Eat fruit, not juice

When it’s wrapped in a peel or a skin, fruit sugars are not a challenge to our health. In fact, the sugars in fruit are nature’s way of encouraging us to eat the fruit to begin with. Fruits like oranges, apples and pears contain important fibres. The “roughage” in our foods, this fibre is healthy in many ways but there are three in particular I will focus on. First, it slows our eating down; it is easy to drink a glass of juice squeezed from 7 apples, but much harder to eat those seven pieces whole. Second, it makes us feel full or satiated. And third, it slows the release of the sugars contained in fruit into our blood streams, thus allowing our bodies to react and use the energy appropriately, reducing our chances of weight gain and possibly even diabetes.

Juice, on the other hand, involves the removal of most of those fibres and even the loss of some of the important vitamins. What we don’t lose though, is the 21 grams or more than five teaspoons of sugar in each glass.

In short, eat fruit as a snack with confidence. But enjoy whole fruit, not juice.

4. Sugar by any other name

High-fructose corn syrup, invert sugar, malt sugar and molasses – they all mean one thing: sugar.

As the public awakens to the health challenges posed by sugar, the industry turns to new ways to confuse consumers and make ‘breaking up’ more difficult. One such way is to use the many alternative names for sugar – instead of the ‘s’ word itself. Be on the lookout for:

Evaporated cane juice, golden syrup, malt syrup, sucrose, fruit juice concentrate, dextrose and more…

5. Eat whole foods where possible

Tomato sauce, mayonnaise, salad dressings, gravies, taco sauces, savoury biscuits and breakfast cereals – these are just some of the many foods now often packed with hidden, added sugars.

study found that 74% of packaged foods in an average American supermarket contain added sugars – and there is little evidence to suggest Australia would be dramatically different. Added to food to make it more enjoyable, and moreish, the next tip when avoiding such a ubiquitous additive is to eat whole foods.

It’s hard to hide sugar in plain flour, or a tomato, or frozen peas. Buying and cooking with mostly whole foods – not products – is a great way to ensure you and your family are not consuming added sugars unaware.

6. See beyond (un)healthy claims

Words like “wholesome”, “natural” and “healthy” are clad on many of our favourite ingredients. Sadly, they don’t mean much.

Even products that are full of sugar, like breakfast cereals and energy bars, often carry claims that aim to confuse and seduce us into purchase. Be wary – and be sure to turn the package over and read the ingredients and nutrition labelling where possible (and if time permits).

7. Be okay with sometimes

The final but crucial message in all of this is that eating or drinking sugar is not a sin. Sugar is still a part of our lives and something to enjoy in moderation. The occasional piece of cake, or late night chocolate – despite the popular narrative painted by industry to undermine efforts for true pricing on sugar – these occasional sweet treats are not the driving challenge for obesity. The problem is that sugary drinks, and sugar in our foods, have become every day occurrences.

With this in mind, let’s not demonise sugar but instead let’s see it for what it is. Enjoy some juice or bubbles from time to time but make water the default on an everyday basis. With the average can of cola containing 39 grams or 9 teaspoons of sugar, be OK with sometimes.

Bitter truth

Let’s be honest, We now face serious health challenges from obesity.

Even more concerning, so do our kids.

Learn more about our ACCHO making Deadly Choices

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Xmas Final Edition 2018 Deadly Good News stories : Featuring many award winners #VIC @VACCHO_org @VAHS1972 #NSW #RedfernAMS @awabakalltd #QLD @IUIH_ @DeadlyChoices @Wuchopperen #NT @DanilaDilba ACT @WinnungaACCHO #WA @TheAHCWA #TAS

Picture above staff Santa Xmas Party at Wuchopperen ACCHO Cairns

1.1 National :  1.1 National :  Our CEO Pat Turner launches AIHW 4th Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) and is interviewed by Speaking Out

1.2 National : Pat Turner Scholarship winners announced

1.3 National : NACCHO launches all AGM speaker and sponsor interview on NACCHO TV

2.1 NSW : Redfern AMS wins Dreamtime Community Organisation of the Year 2018

2.2 Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle spreads the Christmas cheer with hamper deliveries

3.1 VIC : Deadly news! VAHS ACCHO very own Deadly Dan just won the 2018 Victorian Health award in Tobacco Prevention.

4.2 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Expands Exercise Program Into Local Schools

5. SA: The South Australian Government is committed to improving the opportunities and services available to Aboriginal South Australians.

6. WA : The WA Aboriginal Tobacco Control Strategic Leadership Team received the Bob Elphick Medal from the Australian Council on Smoking and Health (ACOSH

7. NT Danila Dilba Health Service Darwin wins Stan Grant Indigenous Employment Award recognises excellence in Indigenous employment initiatives and programs in the workplace.

8. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter launched

9. TAS : Tasmania Aboriginal Centre Training For Success end of program celebrations. Congratulations to all involved

 

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Closing date for next edition 23 January 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication 24 January Thursday /Friday

1.1 National :  Our CEO Pat Turner launches AIHW 4th Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) and is interviewed by Speaking Out

Last week, the AIHW celebrated the launch of our 4th Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP). This important occasion began with a Welcome to Country from Ngunnawal Elder Ms Violet Sheridan, followed by CEO Patricia Turner’s story and thoughts on reconciliation.

Listen to 18 minute interview with ABC Speaking Out

Ten years on from the introduction of the Close The Gap strategy, the push for a community-led partnership in policy development is as strong as ever.

But what are the prospects of gaining a seat at the government’s table?

Aunty Pat Turner has had a long and distinguished career in Indigenous Affairs, and in 1990, was awarded the Order of Australia for her service to the sector.

She is currently the CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), and shares her thoughts on the highs and lows of 2018.

1.2 National : Pat Turner Scholarship winners announced 

The Pat Turner Scholarship Program provides full pay scholarships for Australian Public Service employees to complete full time post-graduate study at the Australian National University or Charles Darwin University.

The scholarship program contributes to the improvement of Australian public policy by scholars researching complex topics of national significance and by building the leadership capabilities of Indigenous APS employees through targeted leadership training and networking opportunities.

The scholarship program is only available to Indigenous staff employed in participating APS agencies.

NACCHO CEO Patricia Turner, AM is the daughter of an Arrente man and a Gurdanji woman and was raised in Alice Springs.

Pat’s career as a public servant included many great achievements. She was the Deputy Secretary of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Deputy CEO of ATSIC at its inception. She was also responsible for setting up the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation when working in the Dept of Prime Minister & Cabinet.

After winning the Monash Chair of Australian Studies, Georgetown University she moved to Washington DC as Professor of Australian Studies. She was the inaugural CEO of NITV, and was appointed NACCHO Chief Executive Officer in April 2016.

Pat has actively promoted self-determination and social justice for Aboriginal people throughout her career.

MORE INFO

1.3 National : NACCHO launches all AGM speaker and sponsor interview on NACCHO TV

 

WATCH HERE 

2.1 NSW : Redfern AMS wins Dreamtime Community Organisation of the Year 2018

Awarded to a community not-for-profit organisation in recognition of their contribution to their local community or region in one or more of the following: leadership, advocacy, capacity building, partnerships, and wellbeing.

The Board of Directors, Chief Executive Officer and staff, would like to take this opportunity to thank the wider community for their continuous support over our 46 years of service delivery.

We endeavour to continue to reduce the health inequalities faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by empowering our community to make more informed decisions that will result in better health outcomes.

2.2 Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle spreads the Christmas cheer with hamper deliveries

 

The Christmas spirit is in the air at Awabakal Ltd as the organisation gets ready to surprise the Newcastle community with a surprise Christmas hamper delivery run this week.

Awabakal’s Board of Directors are excited to be partnering with Newcastle’s Telstra Business team, the Newcastle Knights and the Australian Defence Force to deliver 360 Christmas hampers to Awabakal’s community groups and individuals in need of support, including women, men and members of Mums and Bubs groups, Awabakal Preschool parents, and their aged care group and Elders.

Acting Chief Executive Officer of Awabakal, Toni Johnston has praised the community spirit of Telstra, Newcastle Knights and Australian Defence Force, saying the hamper run wouldn’t have been possible without their support.

“Our partners Telstra, Newcastle Knights and Australian Defence Force see the benefits of contributing to such a wonderful community initiative,” said Toni. “Telstra has been on board for three years and their staff volunteer their time to assist in the delivery of hampers. The Newcastle Knights and Australian Defence Force have kindly joined us for the first time and it’s great to see such great role models lend a helping hand during the festive season.”

“It takes a lot of different resources to pull together such a wonderful community initiative. We would like to thank our Board of Directors, corporate partners, volunteers and staff, Toll Group for couriering the hampers, Foodbank for supplying the hampers and of course our valued community members who access our services,” said Toni.

The hamper delivery will run throughout this week from Awabakal’s Head Office in Wickham, with Telstra, several Newcastle Knights players, and indigenous members of the Australian Defence Force assisting in delivering the hampers to the community.

3.1 VIC : Deadly news! VAHS ACCHO very own Deadly Dan just won the 2018 Victorian Health award in Tobacco Prevention.

Deadly Dan is a smoke free superhero. His motto is “You smoke you choke!” and he flies around country teaching the mob about the importance of making healthy choices and staying smoke free.

Deadly Dan includes a suite of expanding, culturally relevant, age-appropriate, teaching and learning resources including two editions of a beautiful illustrated children’s book (Deadly Dan at the League), a film and a growing base of lesson plans for schools. The latter two are readily accessible on the VAHS website.

Deadly Dan also has a costume and possum skin cloak which are equally important artefacts of this project, allowing for accessibility and interaction between children, families and community with this culturally respected and respectful superhero.

Deadly Dan at the League reflects on four important practices of effective health promotion education:
• excellent quality, culturally appropriate, evidence-based, ‘entertainment-education’ as the pivotal methodology relevant to young children and their families
• interrogates and affirms the power of both positive education and peer relationships as a critical influence in children and young people’s behaviour ( the Deadly Dan at the League film is especially strong on highlighting both aspects) https://www.vahs.org.au/deadly-dan/


• affirming self-determination including the active participation of community members as experts in the development of all resources (e.g. Aunty Diane Kerr and Jacqueline Morris in the design and creation of Deadly Dan’s Possum Skin Cloak 2017 ; and children of Bubub Wilam for Early Learning and Yappera Children’s Services and families for critical input into the development of the Deadly Dan at the League story book; and local Aboriginal children, young people and community members as actors and co-collaborators in the Deadly Dan film)
• collaborating with a diverse range of organisational partners, for broader communication and promotion of all Deadly Dan resources ( e.g.Darebin Schools’ and Early Years Services Professional Development of Deadly Dan at the League, held at the Aborigines Advancement League, 2018 in collaboration with Darebin City Council)

Developed as an early childhood Aboriginal health promotion tool, Deadly Dan at the League also allows teaching and learning of non-Aboriginal children about place-based Aboriginal history and culture.

Deadly Dan at the League strongly mirrors the principles and strategies of both Korin Korin Balit-Djak Aboriginal health, wellbeing and safety plan 2017–2027 and Marrung – The Aboriginal Education Plan 2016-2026.

3.2 VIC : VACCHO Ditching the sugary drinks! A Victorian Aboriginal sugary drinks ad is kicking goals.

First evaluation results from the Aboriginal Rethink Sugary Drink campaign show that these important health messages are resonating with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The evaluation published in the Health Promotion Journal of Australia highlights that the over half of people who saw the Aboriginal Rethink Sugary Drink ad cut down on their sugary drink intake and also agreed it had an important message for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

The Aboriginal campaign, developed by the Rethink Sugary Drink alliance, stresses how much sugar is loaded into sugary drinks and the health risks associated with regular consumption. The ad was seen to be more believable, to be more relevant and to have an important message for the Aboriginal community compared to the LiveLighter advertisement.

Louise Lyons, Director of the Public Health and Research Unit, Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), said the evaluation results demonstrate the cut through and value of having ads directed primarily at an Aboriginal audience. “Because this ad was developed in consultation with local Aboriginal people, it delivers a relevant and culturally appropriate message to our communities – sugary drinks are not good for our health and to go for water instead”.

Launched online in 2015 and broadcast on NITV in the same year, the Victorian-made ad is hitting the mark with Victorian Aboriginal communities and other Aboriginal communities around Australia.

Online surveys completed by 150 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander adults from around Australia showed that 60% of participants who had seen the ad reported that they drank less sugary drinks.

A key message of the ad is that there are 16 teaspoons of sugar in a regular 600mL bottle of soft drink. Almost two-thirds (64%) of survey respondents who had seen the ad previously were able to correctly identify the sugar content of regular soft drink, compared with less than half (49%) those who had not seen it previously.

Check out the latest campaign from Rethink Sugary Drink featuring Victorian Aboriginal community members sharing how cutting back on sugary drinks helped their health and wellbeing here!

4. 1 QLD : Institute for Urban Indigenous Health named joint winner in Indigenous Governance Awards

The quality of Indigenous governance was on show at a gala event in Melbourne last month

The Indigenous Governance Awards ‘identify, celebrate and promote effective Indigenous governance, which is about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people making and implementing decisions about their communities, lives and futures.’

After a rigorous judging process the winners of the 2 awards were selected from amongst 9 finalists.

In Category A, for incorporated organisations, the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (Windsor, QLD) and Nyamba Buru Yawuru (Broome, WA) were named joint winners.

The Warlpiri Education and Training Trust (Alice Springs, NT) won the Category B award for non-incorporated organisations. The Alekarenge Community Development Working Group (Ali Curung, NT) was highly commended in this category.

Professor Mick Dodson, the Indigenous Governance Awards Chair, commented on the calibre of finalists.

‘In the 14 years I’ve been involved with the Awards, I’ve seen the quality of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander governance practiced by the applicants rise and rise,’ Professor Dodson said.

‘This year, again, I can say that the finalists are the best we’ve ever had.’

The awards highlight success in leadership, good management, partnerships and brave, creative thinking.

 

South East Queensland is home to 38 per cent of Queensland’s and 11 per cent of Australia’s Indigenous people. The region has the largest and fastest growing Indigenous population in the nation and the biggest health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

In 2009, only a fraction of this population were accessing community controlled comprehensive primary health care.

The imperative to address these challenges shaped the blueprint for a ground-breaking new regional community governance architecture and the formation of a regional backbone organisation – the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH).

Critically, this contemporary regional model was underpinned by strong cultural foundations and goes back to traditional ways of being, doing and belonging, when for thousands of years, Aboriginal tribes and nations across South East Queensland came together to achieve shared and cross-territorial goals.

Through strengthened community self-determination, an entrepreneurial business model, and pioneering a brand new regional health ‘ecosystem’, IUIH has now been able to make the biggest single health impact of any Indigenous organisation in Australia, in the shortest time period, and with a national best practice standard of care.

In just nine years, the numbers of Indigenous clients accessing comprehensive and culturally safe care in South East Queensland has increased by 340 per cent (from 8000 to 35,000); annual health checks have increased by 4100 per cent (from 500 to 21,000); and, progress against Closing the Gap targets is being made faster than predicted trajectories.

Further challenges lie ahead. In response to even more rapid Indigenous population growth – expected to reach 130,000 in South East Queensland by 2031

IUIH is now exploring further transformative models which, if realised, have the potential to double its existing client population.

4.2 QLD : Wuchopperen ACCHO Expands Exercise Program Into Local Schools

 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited’s successful exercise program has expanded with a new partnership engaging two Cairns primary schools to tackle unhealthy lifestyles and obesity rates in children.

The Wuchopperen team will visit Cairns West and Balaclava Primary Schools every week to work with over 60 children in year five on exercise sessions and making healthy life choices.

Exercise Physiologist at Wuchopperen, Myles Hardy says the program is tackling unhealthy lifestyle factors and making long term change for children in our community.

“There is so much research out there which shows obesity and unhealthy lifestyles in childhood carry over into adulthood, resulting in an increase in the risk of developing chronic disease, and reducing overall life expectancy,” says Myles.

In Queensland alone, 27 per cent of children are overweight or obese and according to research from 2013, around 30 per cent of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children were overweight or obese.

“We want to work with young people to establish healthy habits in the younger years. Our program will focus on exercise, but will also have other members of the Wuchopperen team working with the kids in the program on mental health, nutrition and overall healthy lifestyle factors,” says Myles.

The program is now in its second week and will run until the end of the school term.

Wuchopperen also works with our Elders in the community to increase exercise and improve social and physical health outcomes, with a total of 976 sessions provided to both men’s and women’s groups in the last financial year.

“You’re never too young or too old to make change and start living a healthier life. We see people come through Wuchopperen who have never exercised before and start training in their 60s. It is really inspiring see people take their health in their own hands at any age, but the sooner we can get people focused on living a healthy life, the easier it is to implement life-long health habits,” says Myles.

Before starting any new exercise regime, Wuchopperen recommends consulting with a healthcare professional.

5. SA: The South Australian Government is committed to improving the opportunities and services available to Aboriginal South Australians.

To achieve this ambition, the government has developed the Aboriginal Affairs Action Plan that outlines a series of initiatives and actions for completion by agencies during 2019-20.

These actions fall within three objectives:

Creating opportunities for Aboriginal jobs and businesses

Improving the quality and the delivery of services to Aboriginal South Australians

Building strong and capable Aboriginal communities

To learn more about each objective and the actions within it, download the South Australian Government Aboriginal Affairs Action Plan 2019-2020 (PDF, 12434.23 KB).

Once available, progress updates will be published on this page

6. WA : The WA Aboriginal Tobacco Control Strategic Leadership Team received the Bob Elphick Medal from the Australian Council on Smoking and Health (ACOSH)

Members of the WA Aboriginal Tobacco Control Strategic Leadership Team from BRAMS, AHCWA, Wirraka Maya, GRAMS and QALT with staff members from ACOSH and the Hon. Roger Cook MLA

The WA Aboriginal Tobacco Control Strategic Leadership Team received the Bob Elphick Medal from the Australian Council on Smoking and Health (ACOSH), in recognition of a distinguished contribution to tobacco control in Western Australia.

Here are a few photos from the award ceremony.

Staff members from Wirraka Maya with their Bob Elphick medal

Acceptance speech from Tricia Pearce , Tackling Indigenous Smoking Coordinator from AHCWA.

7. NT Danila Dilba Health Service Darwin wins Stan Grant Indigenous Employment Award recognises excellence in Indigenous employment initiatives and programs in the workplace.

 

The Stan Grant Indigenous Employment Award recognises excellence in Indigenous employment initiatives and programs in the workplace. This year’s award was won by Danila Dilba Health Service! In a Recruitment Marketing Magazine exclusive, we interviewed their CEO Olga Havnen and HR Manager Sulal Mathai who shared how their employer branding efforts have made an impact.

Danila Dilba Health Service is an Aboriginal community-controlled organisation providing culturally-appropriate, comprehensive primary health care and community services to Biluru (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) people in the Yilli Rreung (greater Darwin) region of the Northern Territory.

Last year, the organisation launched their career pathways project as part of their HR strategy to promote Indigenous staffing across all levels in their organisation, including leadership positions. The project has been a huge success, with Indigenous employees now comprising 50 per cent of their overall workforce and 65 per cent of their executive leadership team

As Danila Dilba’s CEO, Olga Havnen explains, “our aim is to maintain our status as an employer of choice, both to attract talented employees and increase the professionalism and capability of employees at every level of the organisation. Our vision is to ensure continuing leadership by a well-qualified, skilled Indigenous management team.”

Danila Dilba offers traineeships, leadership opportunities, mentoring for emerging leaders, and has introduced new positions for safety and community liaison officers who engage with clients in their clinics. All their new positions are opportunities to bring more Indigenous employees on board.

Danila Dilba’s Indigenous Emerging Leadership program enables their Indigenous employees to put forward expressions of interest to receive formal mentoring opportunities through external pathways. This facilitates leadership pathways for these employees and eases their transition into these positions.

They also have a program called the Australian Nurse Family Partnership Program (ANSPP), a new home visiting social support service for Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander mothers and babies.

“The program is part of eight different Australian organisations, including Danila Dilba,” said Hiring Manager Sulal Mathai. “We are the only location where all our team members are Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander women. This makes a difference because they bring cultural appropriateness and understanding when visiting homes, which is a special outcome for the program.”

To promote all these great initiatives, they conducted an employer branding project with external specialists from Employment Office. Their employer branding project was amplified through digital initiatives, such as restructuring and updating their careers website, and showcasing their employees in various roles through written and video content.

“The project helped Danila Dilba strengthen our employer brand and market our unique employee value proposition across Australia. Along with the branding project we revamped our website and careers pages which helped us attract quality applicants to join Danila Dilba in 2018 across all levels of our organisation.”

Mathai measured their return on investment through analysing key metrics, such as visits to their careers website (which increased by 60%!). They also managed to fill 80% of their advertised opportunities, which was also a significant increase for them.

“Our employer branding initiatives have been very successful in ensuring we receive our fair share of quality talent. It’s helped us in both recruitment and retention. We’ve retained a greater number of employees as we’ve opened more leadership positions.”

Conducting an employer branding through external specialists enabled Danila Dilba to see the bigger picture and connect the dots.

“This made a big difference. We used to do things in a silo, and Employment Office’s Employer Branding specialists provided a unified approach. They were able to produce feature stories of our people and their successful career pathways, and use consistent wording to showcase our organisation, increasing the quality of our recruitment process and content.”

Mathai also implemented social media campaigns to showcase their employee profile story videos.

“Now, when we advertise, we don’t need to rely on recruitment partners. We received a large number of quality responses!”

“Employer Branding Specialists took a comprehensive approach that helped us to understand and amplify our brand, and the also conducted a talent competitor analysis of what similar organisations were doing with their employer brand. This helped us to ensure we are presenting a unique employer offering that was one step ahead of other primary healthcare providers in our state. We knew what our industry was doing and we could take a step forward to brand ourselves with more strength.

Winning the 2018 AHRI Stan Grant Indigenous Employment Award

As a community-focused Indigenous organisation, Danila Dilba’s goal was to promote Indigenous employment and career pathways across their whole organisation at all levels.

“We wanted to demonstrate our high-standard for employment,” said Mathai. “We applied for AHRI’s Stan Grant Indigenous Employment Award, one of Australia’s most prestigious awards for excellence in Indigenous employment initiatives in the workplace, to see how our practices stood in comparison to the rest of Australia. Through winning the award, we’re so pleased to demonstrate how we do well in this sector!”

“In Darwin, we cater to the community. But that doesn’t mean we want to limit our practices. We want to have world-class processes and practices, and continue to enhance the reputation and credibility of our organisation. Winning the award affirmed our knowledge that our HR and business practices should be recognised and celebrated. It’s proven the success of our Indigenous employment and career pathways.”

8. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter launched

Download Newsletter Winnunga AHCS Newsletter November 2018

9. TAS : Tasmania Aboriginal Centre Training For Success end of program celebrations. Congratulations to all involved

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : New @NACCHOChair Elected #QLD @DeadlyChoices @IUIH_ #VIC Njernda ACCHO #NSW Orange and Tharawal #SA @DeadlyChoices #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #WA Kimberley AMS

1.1 National : Donnella Mills Becomes Chairperson of the  National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Plus NACCHO Board changes 

1.2 National NACCHO AGM 2019 acknowledges years of ACCHO Service

1.3 National : Download NACCHO Annual Report 2017-2018

2.1 NSW : Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation nurse named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year.

2.2 NSW : Orange ACCHO Health Service continues efforts to improve Aboriginal health

3.Vic : Njernda ACCHO chronic care coordinator, Garry Giles is empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country to improve their health

4.1 QLD : IUIH and University of Queensland awarded Outstanding Collaboration in Higher Education and Training through Business Higher Education Round Table (BHERT).

4.2 QLD : Deadly Choices help celebrate 20th Anniversary of Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health and the 150th Anniversary of the town itself.

5. NT : Katherine West Health Board’s  Healthy Harold yarned with the Kids at Timber Creek about how to stay safe and healthy

6. SA : Deadly Choices SA mob exercise and eating health promotion

7. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Canberra download their October 2018 Newsletter

8. WA : NACCHO and Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Syphilis Test and Treat kits now available in the Kimberley region in Western Australia

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Donnella Mills Becomes Chairperson of the  National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Plus NACCHO Board changes 

I am very honoured and excited to be taking up the role of Chairperson for NACCHO. I would like to acknowledge the excellent leaders NACCHO has had in the past, I am following in the footsteps of some amazing people to continue the essential national conversation on community led health initiatives.

I believe Community Control is the key model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care and will see us achieving greater autonomy and self-determination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,

Donnella Mills pictured at NACCHO AGM this month in Brisbane thanking Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen) Chairperson, Donnella Mills has been recognised for her contribution to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, through her appointment as Chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO).

Donnella has served as the Deputy Chairperson of the NACCHO Board for the past 12 months and takes on the role of Chairperson following the 1 November resignation of John Singer.

When the new Board met for the first time after the AGM on 2 November, it fully endorsed the Deputy Chair, Donnella Mills to act in the role of Chairperson as set out in the NACCHO constitution.

NACCHO is the peak body for the Aboriginal Community Controlled health sector and represents 145 services, and 302 health centres across the country.

Donnella will work with the NACCHO Board to drive the national health debate in Australia, particular in regards to self-determination and community led solutions for closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Ms Mills is a Torres Strait Islander woman with ancestral and family links to Masig and Nagir in the Torres Strait. She is a Cairns-based lawyer with LawRight, a Community Legal Centre which coordinates the provision of pro bono civil legal services to vulnerable members of our community, as well as the Chairperson for Wuchopperen. She will use her previous experience in the legal and health care systems to address the issues facing our community in both Cairns, and on a national level.

“Health and legal issues are intrinsically linked. It is no coincidence Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – among the most incarcerated people in the world – also have some of the poorest health outcomes in the world. The provision of Community Controlled, holistic and culturally appropriate health care services really is a way to ensure a healthy future for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,” says Donnella.

CEO Pat Turner and the Board of NACCHO welcome her to the role of Chairperson and look forward to working with her over the next 12 months.

At the AGM, four new members were appointed to the new NACCHO Board. From Queensland, we are joined by Gail Wason, CEO of Mulungu Primary Health Care Service in Mareeba and Gary White, Chairman of Goondir Health Service in Dalby. From Victoria, we welcome Michael Graham, CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service and Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative.

The retiring members are: Adrian Carson and Kieran Chilcott from Queensland; and John Mitchell and Rod Jackson from Victoria. The Board thanks them all for their contribution to NACCHO over the years.

1.2 National NACCHO AGM 2019 acknowledges years of ACCHO Service

Congratulations on up to 40 years of service and the outstanding contribution by ACCHO Members .

On behalf of the NACCHO Board and 145 Members we also honour the community members and staff who were all seriously concerned about the availability of health care service to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living there regions many years ago

1.Presented to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service Mackay for 40 years of service WEBSITE 

2.Presented to Broome Regional Aboriginal Medical Service 40 years of service WEBSITE 

3.Presented to Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services 30 years of service WEBSITE 

4. Presented to Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Regional Health and Community Services 25 years of service WEBSITE 

Download a copy of all certificates

 J3291 – Member Services Anniversary certificates_v1

1.3 National : Download NACCHO Annual Report 2017-2018

Download from the NACCHO website 

2.1 NSW : Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation nurse named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year.

Matthew James knows all too well about the challenges that mental health can bring.

Mr James has assisted Macarthur’s Indigenous population as a mental health practisioner at the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation for the past year.

The nurse leads Tharawal’s Byala team, which supports people struggling with mental health issues, or drug and alcohol-related problems.

Originally published Here 

Byala means “Let’s talk” in the local Dharawal Aboriginal language.

Mr James was rewarded for his dedication to the cause when he was named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year award late last month.

The Orangeville resident said he was nominated for the award by a Thawaral colleague.

“I’m stoked, it was really nice to get recognition at a national level,” he said.

Matthew always makes people feel comfortable… he is amazing.

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation team manager Tina Taylor

He received the honour at an Australian College of Mental Health Nurses seminar in Cairns.

Mr James, who has more than 20 years of industry experience, joined the Tharawal team in October 2017.

He said his role included providing counselling, diagnosis reviews and medication for Indigenous people

“There is a huge amount of disadvantage here in Macarthur and there are challenges, such as helping people with trauma issues,” he said.

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation was formed in 1983 to provide medical and community health services to Indigenous people.

Mr James said Tharawal did a great job supporting Macarthur’s Indigenous community.

“Tharawal offers the leading Aboriginal health service in Australia,” he said.

“I am very proud of our work.”

Tharawal’s social and emotional well-being team manager Tina Taylor said Mr James was a great leader and compassionate with his clients.

“Matthew has brought a whole new dynamic to the team,” Ms Taylor said.

“He always makes people feel comfortable… he is amazing.”

For more information about these services, visit the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation Airds Facebook page.

2.2 NSW : Orange ACCHO Health Service continues efforts to improve Aboriginal health

IMPROVING the health of one of the region’s most vulnerable populations has been the focus for Orange Health Service during NAIDOC Week.

The hospital held its ceremony on Thursday, including a flag raising, acknowledgement of country, dancing and a barbecue lunch complete with cake, with more than 60 people in attendance.

Originally Published HERE

But general manager Catherine Nowlan said the full appreciation of the theme, ‘Because of her, we can’, came via a sustained effort for the entire week.

Health professionals shared stories about their own Aboriginal heritage and how the strong women in their lives inspired them to succeed in their adult careers, as well as about the Aboriginal patients they treated.

“One of our health leaders said she had the opportunity to meet the most wonderful Aboriginal lady and her family embraced her because she was part of the care team,” Ms Nowlan said.

“She said it was the simple things we do every day that make the difference.

“It’s all about creating a world worth living in and a responsibility to understand each other’s cultures.”

Orange Health Service has an Aboriginal component in its staff inductions on the need to involve the whole family in a patient’s treatment, as well as social conventions.

 “If you haven’t asked the question, how do you know? So it’s about giving the right and appropriate care.”

Orange Health Service general manager Catherine Nowlan

However, Ms Nowlan said there had also been extra training in July to help 370 staff members be more comfortable in asking patients when they arrived at the hospital as to whether they identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

“By asking the question, it helps us improve the identification of patients,” she said.

3.Vic : Njernda ACCHO chronic care coordinator, Garry Giles is empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country to improve their health

AS A Yorta Yorta man, Garry Giles knows family comes first.

Followed by housing, food, safety.

And finally, lingering right at the bottom, health.

It’s an unspoken yet age-old hierarchy not just for his mob, but Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) people across the country.

Originally Published HERE 

And while it’s seen him raised in a tight-knit community where aunties, uncles, cousins and siblings (blood-related or not) always had his back, it’s also a hierarchy that has caused endless heartache.

Because, as Njernda chronic care coordinator, Garry has seen how neglected health can lead to tragic outcomes, with clients, friends and family members taken too soon.

Currently, indigenous Australians are two to three times more likely to develop a chronic disease than non-indigenous people.

These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease.

And not only are Indigenous Australians more likely to have each of these conditions individually.

They are also more likely to have all three, and die from them.

But Garry is dreaming of a (hopefully not too distant) day when this gap is closed.

‘‘There is a huge need, our community is very sick,’’ he said.

‘‘And so many of our people seem to put their health on the backburner and don’t realise these diseases can be managed, they can be controlled.’’

Garry started working in his community when he was just 15 as a farmhand on an Indigenous farm.

He then cleaned for Berrimba Childcare Centre for five years before moving into home and community care for another five years.

From there he moved into health, completing a certificate III in ATSI health, and two years later he was an Aboriginal health worker with Njernda.

At that point, it wasn’t really a dream come true — a career in health had never been on Garry’s radar previously.

‘‘One of my aunties encouraged me to do it,’’ he said.

‘‘She said I had the compassion and the heart for it. If it weren’t for her, I probably wouldn’t have gone down this path.’’

Garry has now been chronic care coordinator for 12 months — but even in this specialised role, he still needs to keep a range of talents up to scratch.

‘‘I can be a counsellor one day, a driver or support worker the next,’’ he said.

‘‘But my main focus is chronic care. I book clients in and liaise with all allied health services.

‘‘This is a one-stop shop as a lot of our mob don’t tend to go through mainstream health services for their care — they prefer to come here.’’

Allied health staff connected to Njernda include podiatrists, dentists, endocrinologists, optometrists and child and maternal health practitioners.

As well as mental health, diabetes and drug and alcohol services.

It can sometimes feel like a 24-hour job for Garry.

‘‘Everyone is linked in some way, we’re all like family,’’ he said.

‘‘So you might run into someone in the supermarket and have a consultation there, because they just need that reassurance.

‘‘A lot of people don’t have any family, so we become that family. And while we try not to work outside our opening hours, if people have no one and are a bit scared, we’re more than happy to help.’’

Garry said education was key to better health for ATSI people.

And through his role at Njernda, he’s seen how proper support and guidance can lead to life-changing outcomes.

‘‘One of the best things is seeing people take more control of their lives,’’ he said.

‘‘A lot of our mob have low self esteem after facing so many barriers in life and a chronic illness is just another burden.

‘‘But we want to empower them to take steps to improve their health.

‘‘Because if they’re not well, they can’t help anybody — they won’t be there for their grandchildren. They won’t be there for their family.’’

4.1 QLD : IUIH and University of Queensland awarded Outstanding Collaboration in Higher Education and Training through Business Higher Education Round Table (BHERT).

Congratulations to IUIH and University of Queensland for receiving an Award last night for Outstanding Collaboration in Higher Education and Training through Business Higher Education Round Table (BHERT).

Receiving the award here is IUIH CEO Adrian Carson, Chair of the IUIH Board Aunty Lyn Shipway, UQ representative Leanne Coombe, and IUIH Director of Workforce Development Alison Nelson.

IUIH is the largest Aboriginal community-controlled, health organisation in Australia, and the largest employer of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in South East Queensland.

The partnership with UQ was designed to address indigenous health disadvantage by developing a generation of health professionals familiar with the special challenges within Indigenous health offering placements within a community controlled clinical setting.

The program has grown from providing placements to 30 students across 3 disciplines in 2010 to more than 350 students across 20 disciplines in 2017.

Congratulations to the team involved and thanks to all the students and team who have completed placements and contributed to this partnership.

4.2 QLD : Deadly Choices help celebrate 20th Anniversary of Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health and the 150th Anniversary of the town itself.

The DC team were on the road last week, in Cunnamulla for the 20th Anniversary of Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health and the 150th Anniversary of the town itself. They also launched Deadly Choices at Cunnamulla.

While in the region, they visited Charleville and Western Areas Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Community Health Limited and helped launch the Charleville Men’s Group, and joined them for a morning tea.

DC Ambassador Petero Civoniceva was a big hit with the locals and he can’t wait to get back out there again!

Too deadly everyone!

5. NT : Katherine West Health Board’s  Healthy Harold yarned with the Kids at Timber Creek about how to stay safe and healthy

Healthy Harold yarned with the Kids at Timber Creek about how to stay safe and healthy. One of the best ways to stay safe is to say no to drink driving.

The kids tried a driving game with beer goggles on to feel what it is like when a drunk person drives a car and everyone crashed 😱

It is dangerous to be driving a car, or be in the car with someone who is drunk.
If you are drinking give a sober person the keys to the car and always have a sober person to drive.

Keep your family and community safe
Drink Safe, Be Safe, Have a Deadly Time

#oneshieldforall
Life Education NT

6. SA : Deadly Choices SA mob exercise and eating health promotion

Having a workout buddy is a great advantage. Your workout partner could inspire and motivate you to reach your goal. Make that connection today!

#DeadlyChoicesSA #workout #friendship
📷 Power .aboriginal.programs

If you eat with other people you are more likely to eat regularly and healthy than those who eat alone or in front of the TV or computer.

#DeadlyChoicesSA #Eatinghealthyfact #healthytip

📷 Power .aboriginal.programs

7. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Canberra download their October 2018 Newsletter

 Download the Newsletter

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter October 2018 (3)

8. WA : NACCHO and Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Syphilis Test and Treat kits now available in the Kimberley region in Western Australia

 
NACCHO and the Australian Government Department of Health are working together to coordinate an $8.8 million response to address the syphilis outbreak in Northern Australia. 

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services is the latest ACCHS to participate in training conducted by Flinders University and the roll out of the Test and Treat kits.  

Results from traditional blood tests can take up to two weeks to be processed, which cause issues with people moving on before receiving treatment and potentially spreading the disease.  The Test and Treat kits allow instant diagnosis and if needed, immediate treatment.
Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services staff completing accredited training
Left to right
Tori Jamieson, KAMSC Sexual Health and Wellbeing Officer
Jarlyn Spinks, KAMSC Peer Education Support Officer
 
Tracey Kitaura, DAHS Aboriginal Health Worker (EN) Chronic Disease/STI/RHD
For further information please visit the NACCHO website https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/esr/