NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #ElderCare : @KenWyattMP launches @genrontologyau #ATSIAAG Report : Assuring equity of access and quality outcomes for older Aboriginal peoples: What needs to be done

“This report details valuable recommendations to improve aged care access for our First Peoples and I commend the Australian Association of Gerontology and its special Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group.

It highlights the importance of respect for culture, to instill confidence in older First Nations people, and I look forward to its findings helping guide the development of effective pathways to quality aged care.”

The report was launched by Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt at Parliament House on Wednesday.

A new report is calling for an expansion of specialist targeted services for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and more work to embed cultural safety in mainstream care to improve the aged care system for Indigenous Australians.

Photo above : From left: Graham Aitken, Ken Wyatt, Ros Malay and James Beckford Saunders at the launch of a report focused on improving aged care access and quality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Download here

ASSURING EQUITY OF ACCESS FOR OLDER Aboriginal people

Elder Facts

In the 2016 Census, 649,171 people identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, representing 2.8% of the population – up from 2.5% in the 2011 Census, and 2.3% in 2006.

Although the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population has a much younger age profile and structure than the non-Indigenous population, the median age of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is gradually rising.

The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 65 years and over is only 4.8%, much smaller than for non-Indigenous people at 16%.

However, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 55 years and over is increasing, and is projected to more than double from 59,400 in 2011 to up to 130,800 in 2026.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders need access to culturally appropriate services, and they generally want to be cared for in their communities where they are close to family, and where they can die on their land.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face ongoing challenges finding services that are appropriate to their needs and circumstances, and often have problems accessing services where they exist.

Press Release

The Australian Association of Gerontology report also recommends strategies to improve the ability of the aged care workforce to provide more appropriate care, an expansion of advocacy services and a more appropriate needs assessment process.

The report was developed by the AAG’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group (ATSIAAG) with findings from its national workshop in Perth in November 2017 that explored barriers to equity in access and outcomes in aged care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

A lack of service connectivity, the challenges vulnerable groups experience with consumer directed care and My Aged Care, high costs and gaps in policy, education and advocacy are among roadblocks to access and equity outlined in the report.

The report was launched by Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt at Parliament House on Wednesday.

“This report details valuable recommendations to improve aged care access for our First Peoples and I commend the Australian Association of Gerontology and its special Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group,” Minister Wyatt said.

“It highlights the importance of respect for culture, to instil confidence in older First Nations people, and I look forward to its findings helping guide the development of effective pathways to quality aged care.”

ATSIAAG co-chair Graham Aitken said he was delighted Minister Wyatt gave the report the prominence it deserved.

“We are looking forward to seeing a response from government to the suggestions put forward in the report,” he said.

 

Fellow ATSIAAG co-chair Ros Malay said the report was timely given the work underway to develop an action plan for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people under the Aged Care Diversity Framework, which was launched in December.

“The report has some great ideas that could be picked up in the action plan,” Ms Malay said.

The report was launched during a ATSIAAG roundtable of key stakeholders from government agencies, academia, aged care, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations who discussed how better data would drive improved aged care for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

A greater uptake of evidence from research and data to ensure greater understanding of the aged care service and support needs of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and how they can best be met is another strategy proposed in the report.

Mr Wyatt said understanding how better data could build a better aged care system for the nation’s First Peoples was a priority for the Turnbull Government.

“Following last year’s Australian National Audit Office report into Indigenous aged care, we have taken steps to improve data,” he said.

AAG CEO James Beckford Saunders said a report from this week’s roundtable would be published within the next few months.

Access the report, Assuring equity of access and quality outcomes for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: What needs to be done, here

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #MensHealthWeek 3 of 3 #OchreDay2018 News 1. @GregHuntMP announces a National Male Health Strategy to support the health of men and boys 2. @MyHealthRec Men encouraged to connect with their health with a #Myhealthrecord

During 2018 Men’s Health Week it is important to remember that in Australia, like most countries, males have poorer health outcomes on average than females.

More males die at every stage of life. Males have more accidents, are more likely to take their own lives and are more prone to lifestyle-related chronic health conditions than women and girls at the same age.

This is why I am announcing today, the beginning of a process to establish a National Male Health Strategy for the period 2020 to 2030. “

The Hon. Greg Hunt Minister for Health full press release Part 1

The AMA welcomes today’s announcement of the establishment of a 10-year National Male Health Strategy that will target the mental and physical health of men and boys.

The AMA called for a major overhaul of men’s health policy in April this year, including a new national strategy to address the different expectations, experiences, and situations facing Australian men.

Australian men are less likely to seek treatment from a general practitioner or other health professional, and are less likely to have the supports and social connections needed when they experience physical and mental health problems

We look forward to engaging with the Turnbull Government to develop initiatives to address the reasons why men are reluctant to engage with GPs, and the consequence of that reluctance, and to invest in innovative models of care than overcome these barriers “

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said the AMA was pleased that the Federal Government recognised that Australian males have poorer health outcomes, on average, than Australian females. In full Part 2 below

Encouraging men to discuss their health with their doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare specialist can be difficult.

My Health Record supports and assists men to have these conversations, enabling better connected care and, ultimately, better health outcomes,”

My Health Record gives men and the broader community the capacity to upload important health information including allergies, medical conditions and treatments, medicine details, test results and immunisations; supporting them in remembering the dates of tests, medicine names, or dosages “

Australian Digital Health Agency Chief Medical Adviser Clinical Professor Meredith Makeham said My Health Record provided many valuable benefits for men. in full Part 3 Below

NACCHO Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek and #OchreDay2018 Launch :

Download 30 years 1988 – 2018 of Aboriginal Male Health Strategies and Summit recommendations

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launched its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

The two day conference is free: To register

Part 1 Greg Hunt press release

The Australian Government will establish a decade-long National Male Health Strategy that will focus on the mental and physical health of men and boys.

During 2018 Men’s Health Week it is important to remember that in Australia, like most countries, males have poorer health outcomes on average than females.

More males die at every stage of life. Males have more accidents, are more likely to take their own lives and are more prone to lifestyle-related chronic health conditions than women and girls at the same age.

This is why I am announcing today, the beginning of a process to establish a National Male Health Strategy for the period 2020 to 2030.

Building on the 2010 National Male Health Policy, the strategy will aim to identify what is required to improve male health outcomes and provide a framework for taking action.

The strategy will be developed in consultation with key experts and stakeholders in male health, and importantly, the public will be invited to have a say through online consultation later this year.

Australian men and boys are vital to the health and happiness of their families and communities, but need to pay more attention to their own mental and physical wellbeing.

During Men’s Health Week, men are encouraged to talk about their health with someone they trust.

I encourage all men to take time this week to think about their own health and wellbeing and participate in events happening across the country.

The Turnbull Government provides funding to a number of organisations that focus on the health of men and boys including Men’s Health Information Resource Centre at Western Sydney University, Andrology Australia and the Australian Men’s Health Forum.

The National Male Health Strategy builds on and complements the National Women’s Health Strategy 2020 to 2030 I announced at the National Women’s Health Summit in February.

Part 2 AMA WELCOMES NATIONAL MALE HEALTH STRATEGY

The AMA welcomes today’s announcement of the establishment of a 10-year National Male Health Strategy that will target the mental and physical health of men and boys.

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said the AMA was pleased that the Federal Government recognised that Australian males have poorer health outcomes, on average, than Australian females.

“In Australia, men have a life expectancy of approximately four years less than women, and have a higher mortality rate from most leading causes of death,” Dr Bartone said.

“Australian men are less likely to seek treatment from a general practitioner or other health professional, and are less likely to have the supports and social connections needed when they experience physical and mental health problems.

“An appropriately-funded and implemented National Male Health Strategy is needed to deliver a cohesive platform for the improvement of male health service access and men’s health outcomes.

“This does not mean taking funding away from women’s health strategies. Initiatives that address the health needs of one gender should not occur at the expense of the other.

“Men and women should be given equal opportunity to realise their potential for a healthy life.

“The AMA congratulates Health Minister, Greg Hunt, for his decision to begin the process to establish a National Male Health Strategy for the period 2020 to 2030.

“We look forward to engaging with the Turnbull Government to develop initiatives to address the reasons why men are reluctant to engage with GPs, and the consequence of that reluctance, and to invest in innovative models of care than overcome these barriers.

“Compared to women, Australian men not only see their GP less often but, when they do see a doctor, it is for shorter consultations, and typically when a condition or illness is advanced.

“Men’s Health Week is an opportune time for Australian men to do something positive for their physical or mental health – book in for a preventive health check with a trusted GP, get some exercise, have an extra alcohol-free day, or reach out to check on the wellbeing of a mate.”

The AMA Position Statement on Men’s Health 2018 is at https://ama.com.au/position-statement/mens-health-2018

Background

  • Australian men are more than twice as likely to die in a motor vehicle accident than Australian women.
  • Men have a lower five-year survival rate for all cancers than women.
  • Australian men experience approximately 75 per cent of the burden of drug-related harm.
  • More than three in four suicide deaths in Australia are men, and intentional self-harm is the leading cause of death in men under 54 years of age.
  • Men are more likely to be in full-time work and may have less time for medical appointments.
  • Men are traditionally employed in high-risk jobs, especially in the trades, transport, construction, and mining industries.
  • Australian men are twice as likely as Australian women to exceed the lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol consumption, with one in four men drinking at a rate that puts them at risk of alcohol-related disease.

 

Part 3

Creating a My Health Record is one way men can be proactive about their health and make it a priority this Men’s Health Week, running between June 11 – 17.

My Health Record is a secure online summary of a person’s health information that can be accessed at any time by the individual and their healthcare providers.

Australian Men’s Shed Association Executive Officer David Helmers said My Health Record will make it easier for men who may find visiting healthcare professionals difficult or uncomfortable.

“We know that men often avoid having conversations about their health – particularly when those conversations involve visiting a healthcare provider.

“My Health Record takes some of the pain out of keeping a consistent record of our health and is a great platform for ongoing health management.

“Right from the get-go males are more likely to be involved in accidents or become ill, so as we age, it becomes even more important to stay on top of health information,” Mr Helmers said.

33 year-old Nick Morton was forced to take a serious look at his overall health after suffering a heart attack while working in North Queensland.

“I had a rupture in my artery wall – it was a big wake-up call going into cardiac rehab and I was the youngest by 20 years. I ended up really thinking about my health and becoming more aware of my medical history so I registered with My Health Record,” Mr Morton said.

After Nick returned to the family doctor back in his home state, his Melbourne based doctor was able to securely log onto My Health Record and view Nick’s Queensland medical history.

“It helped me having a digital copy of everything instead of having to go to my GP or cardiologist with a binder full of all my records,” Mr Morton said.

All Australians will have the benefit of receiving a My Health Record before the end of 2018, unless they choose not to have one.

Getting familiar with what is included in an individual’s personal record can assist in being prepared in an emergency like the one Nick Morton experienced. Nick now advocates a more proactive approach.

“I thought I was in control of my health and took it for granted like most blokes my age. There’s no excuse not to keep track of your health. Go to your GP and ask about my Health Record.”

Australian Digital Health Agency Chief Medical Adviser Clinical Professor Meredith Makeham said My Health Record provided many valuable benefits for men.

“Encouraging men to discuss their health with their doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare specialist can be difficult.”

“My Health Record supports and assists men to have these conversations, enabling better connected care and, ultimately, better health outcomes,” Dr Makeham said.

My Health Record gives men and the broader community the capacity to upload important health information including allergies, medical conditions and treatments, medicine details, test results and immunisations; supporting them in remembering the dates of tests, medicine names, or dosages.

A major advantage of having a My Health Record is individuals having 24-hour, 7 day per week access to their own health information.

For further information visit www.myhealthrecord.gov.au or call 1800 723 471

NACCHO Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek and #OchreDay2018 Launch : Download 30 years 1988 – 2018 of Aboriginal Male Health Strategies and Summit recommendations

1989 National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS)

1994 National Aboriginal Health Strategy: An Evaluation 1989

1999 The 1st National Indigenous Male Health Convention, held at Ross River Homestead

2000 NSW Aboriginal Male Health Plan

2002 Dr Mark Wenitong Indigenous Male Health Report for OATSIH

2002 National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002) Dr Mick Adams

2003 National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

2008 National Aboriginal Male Health Summit -Ross River NT 22 Key Recommendations

2009 Federal Governments response (12 Months later ) to 2008 Summit recommendations

2010 Review of Indigenous Male Health by HealthInfoNet

2010 National Male Health Policy Supporting Document -Social determinants

2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 

2013 – 2030 NACCHO BluePrint for Aboriginal Male Healthy Futures for generational change

 2013 -2018 National NACCHO Ochre Day Summits  : Registrations and program open for this years 2018 event in Hobart  

The two day conference is free: To register

 

Please note these entries below are only a snap shot of the thousands of Aboriginal Health reports and strategies published over the past 30 years

If you feel we have missed any important documents etc. that you feel we should add

Please Contact : Colin Cowell Editor Email nacchonews@naccho.org.au

1989 National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS)

“Health to Aboriginal peoples is a matter of determining all aspects of their life, including control over their physical environment, of dignity, of community self-esteem, and of justice. It is not merely a matter of the provision of doctors, hospitals, medicines or the absence of disease and incapacity.”

The National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS) was developed by the National Aboriginal Health Strategy Working Group in 1989 following extensive national consultations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, organizations and communities and with governments.

It was a landmark document providing agreed direction for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy in Australia.

In July 2003, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council stated that the NAHS was ‘never fully implemented [but] remains the key document in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

It is extensively used by health services and service providers and continues to guide policy makers and planners.’

Detailed Information:
Key priorities identified in the 1989 National Health Strategy included building community control of Aboriginal health services, increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation in the health workforce, reforming health system and increasing funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services.

The strategy also supported increased community education, health promotion and prevention, improvement of the effectiveness and adequacy of essential services such as sewerage, water supply and communication, and building effective intersectoral collaboration.

It noted that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities must participate in research to ensure it is ethical and research findings must be monitored and reviewed to ensure implementation.

1994 National Aboriginal Health Strategy: An Evaluation 1989

Download 1994 health_eval_execsum

1999 The 1st National Indigenous Male Health Convention, held at Ross River Homestead

Provided an opportunity for Indigenous males from around Australia to express their views and share their experiences of health. Delegates to the Convention explored strategies to improve the health and well-being of Indigenous males, their families and their communities.

Download the Report 1999 growing_up_as_an_indigenous_male

2000 NSW Aboriginal Male Health Plan :

WHAT WE KNOW WORKS IN ABORIGINAL MEN’S HEALTH

Download 2000 NSW ATSI Male Health

1.Addressing men’s health through separate gender strategies to women’s health

Developing separate strategies for men’s health and women’s health can be highly effective in the short term. If a men’s health clinic is not at a main health centre but is housed a few blocks away, Aboriginal men are more at ease, are more likely to consult a male doctor for a specific problem, and are more likely to return for follow up. The concept of separate gender strategies also applies to health promotion.

2.Employing more men within the NSW health sector

There are fewer Aboriginal male health workers compared to Aboriginal female health workers. Aboriginal male health workers may draw Aboriginal men to primary health care facilities, because men feel more comfortable accessing services where they know they can talk to another man about men’s business. Increasing the number of Aboriginal male health workers within primary health care settings is therefore desirable

3. Making health services relevant for Aboriginal men, their lives and interests

The achievement of Aboriginal men in sport has been a source of great pride and many Aboriginal men are able to demonstrate community leadership through this success. Sports and fitness programs are an important part of Aboriginal community development in general. This is especially true for the health of young people, as sports and fitness programs are likely to contribute to their physical and emotional wellbeing. Physical fitness programs can form a focus for active life skills, as opposed to negative coping mechanisms such as alcohol and substance abuse and other destructive behaviours.

4. Providing incentives for Aboriginal men to be involved

Successful programs often provide some kind of incentive to Aboriginal men to encourage them to become involved. This might be access to the local golf course, or to the local gym; or it could be providing a meal to encourage a more informal atmosphere and sense of fellowship.

5. Developing services within the terms set down by local men

A program or service will have greater success if it aims to be relevant to the needs of local Aboriginal men. For example: in one area, Aboriginal men were embarrassed about seeing a female health worker in a sexual health clinic; so they worked together to establish a separate clinic in a location where they felt more comfortable. As a result attendance increased by 600 per cent.

6.Recognising men’s role in Aboriginal society and how that role influences their health

The role of men in Aboriginal society has changed tremendously in only a few generations. Aboriginal men have experienced a loss of their traditional role in both society and family. This results in despair, shame, and a sense of inadequacy. Some men feel that they cannot contribute to their communities any more. This can be influenced by programs and services that highlight a positive role for Aboriginal men in their communities and families.

7.Addressing the high costs of medication

Compared to non-Aboriginal men, Aboriginal men suffer a higher burden of ill health, and have a significantly lower income, so the cost of medication is an important issue. Aboriginal men need to be informed about any benefits they are eligible for, which can reduce the cost of medication.

8. Increasing the numbers of medical practitioners with an understanding of, and time to deal with, Aboriginal men’s needs

Local medical practitioners should be encouraged to work closely with local Aboriginal health workers, and to develop partnerships with them. In local areas is it essential to increasing the number of health practitioners who understand the needs of local men, and whom local men feel comfortable consulting.

9. Working in partnership

Partnerships are about working collaboratively in an environment based on respect, trust, and equality.

Aboriginal health workers across NSW need to be encouraged to provide the kinds of programs and services that most benefit Aboriginal men in their communities, through partnership between health service delivery and projects of community interest.

10. Developing an evidence base to improve services

Research is needed to develop an evidence base on which to improve service delivery for Aboriginal men.

Issues in need of further research include: how to integrate men’s health programs into existing Aboriginal primary health care services; how to increase the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in the research process; how to better target research that aims to improve Aboriginal men’s health; how to improve access to health services for Aboriginal males in urban, rural and remote areas; and what strategies and programs provide the best health outcomes for Aboriginal men. There also needs to be greater encouragement to publish existing research.

2002 Dr Mark Wenitong Indigenous Male Health Report report for OATSIH

This report by Dr Mark Wenitong was commissioned by the Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health in response to the continuing need for accessible information around the needs and issues facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males

Download 2002 Wenitong malehealthprelim

Approximately half of Australia’s Indigenous population is male. Knowledge of the status of their health, although not complete due to limitations on Indigenous identification, is an area of acute need.

A ‘gendered approach’ to health is not a new idea and it is becoming more apparent that gender is a key determinant of health in Australia.

The interaction between gender and health has been well recognised and has proved very useful with respect to women’s health. It may be possible to achieve better health access and outcomes for Indigenous males by considering this approach.

This report is an overview of Indigenous male health. It takes account of the:

  • historical, social and cultural background of Indigenous males and its relationship to health and behaviour;
  • fact that Indigenous males do not necessarily want a complete isolationist approach, and regard Indigenous women and family as a significant support and integral part of their health;
  • documented lack of Indigenous males in the health workforce at all levels.

2002 National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002) Dr Mick Adams

Download 2002 Indigenous Male Health – Adams Mick

2003 National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

This National Strategic Framework is not a replacement of the 1989 NAHS.

It is a complementary document, which addresses contemporary approaches to primary health care and population health within the current policy environment and planning structures. It aims to guide government action over the next ten years through a coordinated, collaborative and multi-sectorial approach supported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health stakeholder organisations.

Download 2003 nsfatsihcont

Development

This National Strategic Framework was developed following consultation on the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Strategy: Draft for Discussion, February 2001, produced by the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council (NATSIHC).

The Draft for Discussion was based on the 1989 NAHS and the report of its 1994 evaluation.

It took into account the recommendations of the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, the Bringing Them Home Report, submissions made to the House of Representatives Inquiry into Indigenous Health and its final report entitled Health is Life. It also considered existing state and territory, regional and local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policies, strategies and plans. All these have been fundamental to shaping this National Strategic Framework.

NATSIHC comprises members from the Commonwealth Government, the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council representing State and Territory governments, NACCHO, ATSIC, the TSRA, the Australian Indigenous Doctors Association, the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and individuals with specific expertise appointed by the Commonwealth Minister responsible for health. The chairperson of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) also sits on NATSIHC as an ex officio member.

2008 National Aboriginal Male Health SummitRoss River NT 22 Key Recommendations

Inteyerrkwe Statement

We the Aboriginal males from Central Australia and our visitor brothers from around Australia gathered at Inteyerrkwe in July 2008 to develop strategies to ensure our future roles as grandfathers, fathers, uncles, nephews, brothers, grandsons, and sons in caring for our children in a safe family environment that will lead to a happier, longer life that reflects opportunities experienced by the wider community.

We acknowledge and say sorry for the hurt, pain and suffering caused by Aboriginal males to our wives, to our children, to our mothers, to our grandmothers, to our granddaughters, to our aunties, to our nieces and to our sisters.

We also acknowledge that we need the love and support of our Aboriginal women to help us move forward.”

In 2008 with the national focus on the NT intervention over 400 Aboriginal males from around to participate in a men’s Health Summit at the Ross River Camp

There was a need for Aboriginal men to get back control and understanding of their roles as fathers, uncles, brothers and sons in caring for children in a safe family environment that leads families and the community having a happier, healthier, longer life that reflects opportunities experienced by the wider community

Download 90 Page Report

2008 National Male Health Summit of Reports 1 and 2

Download the media report from summit

Final report Media Coverage 2

There has been over a decade of work by Aboriginal men to establish male health in the policy debates, but as I will outline later I feel we now need to move beyond the policy struggle to implementing the vision.

Patrick Dodson has been quoted that: “There has been a process of undermining the role and status of Aboriginal men within our society since the early days of Australia’s colonisation and continuing in recent commentary around the Northern Territory Intervention”.

When you add to this the rapid changes in the role of males within that colonising society and the consequent dislocation of non-Aboriginal males and their struggle to define new self-images, it is no wonder that Aboriginal males may struggle to make sense of the contemporary world.

And if those critical views of us as Aboriginal males are expressed with no effort to understand our cultural values, or the pressures caused by the colonial relationships and contemporary social transformations, then we become alienated from this society.

This alienation is at the core of the struggle for male health and wellbeing, as it acts to debase men, stripping away their dignity and the meaning in their lives.

We therefore need to confront these social relationships that shape our health.

Out of the hundreds of ideas that have been discussed and developed over the last three days at Ross River, some of the key recommendations that have come out of this forum are as follows:

  1. Establishment of community-based violence prevention programs, including programs specific to Aboriginal men.
  2. Establishment of places of healing for Aboriginal men, including men’s shelters/’sheds’, short term ‘drying out’ places for men, and more resources for long-term rehabilitation of Aboriginal men with alcohol and other drug problems, preferably within their own community. Also ‘half-way’ houses to either give ‘time out’ or time to move slowly back into work/family/training, preferably to be run by Aboriginal men.
  3. Tax-free status for three years for identified communities for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal professionals to attract much-needed doctors, health workers, teachers and police. Also incentives to employ Aboriginal people in similar positions.
  4. Building the capacity of Aboriginal men in literacy and numeracy to access locally-based jobs, and better support for establishing local Aboriginal-controlled businesses to tap into the minerals boom, agriculture, aquaculture or whatever business activity is relevant to their traditional country. Also the linking of education and training to locally-based employment.
  5. ‘Unfinished business’ – This Summit calls on the Federal Government and the Northern Territory Government to respond to its final report within three months (by the end of September, 2008).

See all 22 recommendations in this next section

 

2009 Federal Governments response (12 Months later ) to 2008 Summit recommendations

Download Government Response

2009 Federal Government Response malehealthsummitjun09

2010 Review of Indigenous Male Health by HealthInfoNet

Download

2010 Indigenous Male Health Healthindonet

2010 National Male Health Policy Supporting Document -Social determinants

SOCIAL DETERMINANTS AND KEY ACTIONS SUPPORTING MALE HEALTH

2010 Social determinants revised 170510

2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 was developed to provide an overarching framework which builds links with other major Commonwealth health activities and identifies areas of focus to guide future investment and effort in relation to improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

On 30 May 2014 Senator the Hon Fiona Nash, Assistant Minister for Health, announced that an Implementation plan would be developed outlining the Commonwealth’s coordinated efforts to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes.

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 (online)
PDF version: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 – PDF 6280 KB

2013 – 2030 NACCHO BluePrint for Aboriginal Male Healthy Futures for generational change

NACCHO has long recognised the importance of an Aboriginal male health policy and program to close the gap by 2030 on the alarming Aboriginal male mortality rates across Australia.

Aboriginal males have arguably the worst health outcomes of any population group in Australia.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to Aboriginal male health and wellbeing

NACCHO, its affiliates and members are committed to building upon past innovations and we require targeted actions and investments to implement a wide range of Aboriginal male health and wellbeing programs and strategies.

We call on State, Territory and Federal governments to commit to a specific, substantial and sustainable funding allocation for the NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint 2013-2030

 

This blueprint sets out how the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services sector will continue to improve our rates of access to health and wellbeing services by Aboriginal males through working closely within our communities, strengthening cultural safety and further building upon our current Aboriginal male health workforce and leadership.

We celebrate Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children

The NACCHO 10-Point Blue print Plan is based on a robust body of work that includes the Close the Gap Statement of Intent and the Close the Gap targets, the National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002), NACCHO’s position paper on Aboriginal male health (2010) the 2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP), and the NACCHO Healthy futures 10 point plan 2013-2030

These solutions have been developed in response to the deep-rooted social, political and economic conditions that effect Aboriginal males and the need to be addressed alongside the delivery of essential health care.

Our plan is based on evidence, targeted to need and capable of addressing the existing inequalities in Aboriginal male health services, with the aim of achieving equality of health status and life expectancy between Aboriginal males and non-Aboriginal males by 2030.

This blueprint celebrates our success so far and proposes the strategies that governments, NACCHO affiliates and member services must in partnership commit to and invest in to ensure major health gains are maintained into the future

NACCHO, our affiliates and members remain focused on creating a healthy future for generational change and the NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint 2013-2030 will enable comprehensive and long-term action to achieve real outcomes.

To close the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal males and non-Aboriginal within a generation we need achieve these 10 key goals

1. To call on government at all levels to invest a specific, substantial and sustainable funding allocation for the, NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint plan 2013-2030 a comprehensive, long-term Aboriginal male Health plan of action that is based on evidence, targeted to need, and capable of addressing the existing inequities in Aboriginal male health

2. To assist delivering community-controlled ,comprehensive primary male health care, services that are culturally appropriate accessible, affordable, good quality, innovative to bridge the gap in health standards and to respect and promote the rights of Aboriginal males, in urban, rural and remote areas in order to achieve lasting improvements in Aboriginal male health and well-being

3. To ensure Aboriginal males have equal access to health services that are equal in standard to those enjoyed by other Australians, and ensure primary health care services and health infrastructure for Aboriginal males are capable of bridging the gap in health standards by 2030.

4. To prioritise specific funding to address mental health, social and emotional well-being and suicide prevention for Aboriginal males.

5. To ensure that we address Social determinants relating to identity culture, language and land, as well as violence, alcohol, employment and education.

6.To improve access to and the responsiveness of mainstream health services and programs to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s health  services are provided commensurate Accessibility within the Primary Health Care Centre may mean restructuring clinics to accommodate male specific areas, or off-site areas, and may include specific access (back door entrance) to improve attendance and cultural gender issues

 7.To provide an adequate workforce to meet Aboriginal male health needs by increasing the recruitment, retention, effectiveness and training of male health practitioners working within Aboriginal settings and by building the capacity of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

8 To identified and prioritised (as appropriate) in all health strategies developed for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) including that all relevant programs being progressed in these services will be expected to ensure Aboriginal male health is considered in the planning phase or as the program progresses. Specialised Aboriginal male health programs and targeted interventions should be developed to address male health intervention points across the life cycle continuum.

9. To build on the evidence base of what works in Aboriginal health, supporting it with research and data on relevant local and international experience and to ensure that the quality of data quality in all jurisdictions meets AIHW standards.

10. To measure, monitor, and report on our joint efforts in accordance with benchmarks and targets – to ensure that we are progressively reaching our shared aims.

NOTE : Throughout this document the word Male is used instead of Men. At the inaugural Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health Gathering-Alice Springs 1999, all delegates present agreed that the word Male would be used instead of the word Men. With the intention being to encompass the Male existence from it’s beginnings in the womb until death.

Throughout this document the word Aboriginal is used instead of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. This is in line with the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) being representative of Aboriginal People. This does not intend to exclude nor be disrespectful to our Brothers from the Torres Strait Islands.

 2013 -2018 NACCHO Ochre Days : Registrations open for this years event in Hobart  

 First Ochre Day Canberra 2013 with present and past 2 NACCHO chairs

The week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offers a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

Canberra 2013

Brisbane 2014

Adelaide 2015

Perth 2016

Darwin 2017

Hobart 2018

Reports from all

 

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Events and Conferences :To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO launches its National #OchreDay2018 Men’s Health Summit program and registrations

The week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offers a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

19 June 21 St Century Aboriginal Health Research

21st Century Aboriginal Health Research

The Aboriginal Health College is thrilled to be hosting a showcase of Aboriginal Health Research projects. This event is the first in a series of educational seminars promoting best practice in Aboriginal Health Research by exploring community engagement, Aboriginal Governance, evidence-based practice and how researchers achieved success working with community.

Please join us to hear from the SEARCH team at the Sax Institute, the POCHE Centre’s Adjunct Associate Professor Kylie Gwynne and University of Wollongong’s Professor Kathleen Clapham.

Bookings

2 – 4 July 2018 First Nations Governance Forum; :  Canberra

Museum of Australian Democracy
Old Parliament House, Canberra

As Australia’s national university, ANU has an obligation to constructively contribute to the discussion of policy reform and processes of significant issues concerning Indigenous Australia.

The University seeks to reignite national debate about Australia’s First Nations governance models and their contribution to policy. We are in a unique position to facilitate an International Indigenous-led discussion, with academic rigour, on some of the most challenging issues affecting the country.

We recognise that the academic expertise on these issues is distributed among universities around Australia and the world and welcomes contributions from interested parties.

Forum details

In 2018 ANU will host the First Nations Governance Forum with a goal to provide a series of policy options relevant to Australia through learning from models in other colonial settler states that demonstrate Indigenous peoples leadership in the governance of their affairs. The Forum will include a welcome dinner, keynote presentations, a series of high-level panel discussions and workshop sessions.

The Forum will be hosted with the support of Australia’s Federal Indigenous parliamentarians, Indigenous leaders, academics, government, leading international policy makers and other interested stakeholders. The Forum will consider First Nations governance reform in Australia and, share the experiences of Indigenous people in comparable jurisdictions including Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada, USA and Scandinavian countries. The Forum will build on the extensive work undertaken on this issue including the Report of the Expert Panel on Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution (2012), the Report of the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (2015) and the Uluru Statement from the Heart (2017).

Attendance options

Broad participation in the Forum from across the community is encouraged and supported. The Forum is a public event. Attendance is free (though attendees will be responsible for their own expenses including travel, accommodation and meals). The Forum will also be live-streamed and recorded to ensure remote access.

The following attendance options are available:

  1. Onsite
    An Expression of Interest process will be conducted for a limited number of seats available at the Museum of Australian Democracy. Complete the Expression of Interest form by 13 June. Applicants will be selected across representative groups and notified in the first week of June.
  2. Live-stream at ANU
    A facilitated, live-streamed broadcast will be hosted at Llewellyn Hall on the ANU campus. Those who are unsuccessful in registering a place at the Museum of Australian Democracy are encouraged to register to attend this event at Llewellyn Hall.
  3. Remote live-streaming
    The Forum will also be live-streamed across the internet, ensuring access for everyone. Register your interest to participate in the national live-stream.

* Note: the Forum is a public event and will be live-streamed and recorded, and research may be conducted using data obtained from the event. Live-stream analytics data from the event may be collected and used in research.

EVENT WEBSITE

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

July 11-12 National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference in Sydney.

When the National NAIDOC Committee announced the 2018 Theme: Because of Her, We Can in November 2017 there was a huge round of applause around Australia particularly from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women.

Amongst those women were Christine Ross, Sharon Kinchela and Chris Figg who all agreed we needed to celebrate this fabulous theme.

So, with great excitement Ngiyani Pty Ltd announced they would host a National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference to be held on 11 – 12 July 2018 at UNSW Kensington Campus Sydney. They are utlising the services of Christine Ross Consultancy as the Project Manager.

For all event enquires please call 1300 807 374 or email christine.ross@live.com.au

Only 200 spots left. Go to the Registration Site

Download HERE

October 30 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day 27-28 August

More info

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AFL @AlcoholDrugFdn #NRW2018 #WorldNoTobaccoDay : Senator Bridget McKenzie Minister for Sport and Rural Health supports Redtails Pinktails #SayNoMore Drugs, #Smoking and #FamilyViolence #SayYesTo #Education #Employment #Family #Community

 

 ” Over the weekend Senator Bridget McKenzie had a chat pregame to local Central Australia Redtails before they took on Darwin’s TopEnd Storm curtain raiser to AFL Sir Doug Nicholls Indigenous round , a 6 hour broadcast on Channel 7 nationally : The Redtails and PinkTails Right Tracks Program is funded by the Local Drug Action Teams Program ”

See Part 1 Below

Part 2 Say No more to Family Violence all players link up

Part 3 #WorldNoTobaccoDay May 31 launched in the Alice

 ” Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,”

Watch video launch in the

The Minister for Rural Health, Senator Bridget McKenzie was also is in Alice Springs to launch the next phase of the National Tobacco Campaign and said that smoking related illness devastates individuals, families and the wider community : see Part 3 below

PART 1

Arrernte Males AFL Opening Ceremony

Arrernte women AFL Opening Ceremony

Part 1 The Australian Government and the ADF are excited to welcome an additional 92 Local Drug Action Teams, in to the LDAT program

The Senator with Alcohol and Drug Foundation CEO Dr Erin Lalor and  General Manager of Congress’ Alice Springs Health Services, Tracey Brand in Alice Springs talking about the inspirational Central Australian Local Drug Action Team at Congress and announcing 92 Local Drug Action Teams across Australia building partnerships to prevent and minimise harm of ice alcohol & illicit drugs use by our youth with local action plans

WATCH VIDEO of Launch

The Local Drug Action Team Program supports community organisations to work in partnership to develop and deliver programs that prevent or minimise harm from alcohol and other drugs (AOD).

Local Drug Action Teams work together, and with the community, to identify the issue they want to tackle, and to develop and implement a plan for action.

The Alcohol and Drug Foundation provides practical resources to assist Local Drug Action Teams to deliver evidence-informed projects and activities. The community grants component of the Local Drug Action Team Program may provide funding to support this work.

Each team will receive an initial $10,000 to develop and finalise a Community Action Plan and then to implement approved projects in your community. Grant funding of up to a maximum of $30k in the first year and up to a maximum of $40k in subsequent years is also available to help deliver approved projects in Community Action Plans. LDAT funding is intended to complement existing funding and in kind support from local partners.

LDATs typically apply for grants of between $10k and $15k to support their projects

 

See ADF website for Interactive locations of all sites

The power of community action

Community-based action is powerful in preventing and minimising harm from alcohol and other drugs.

Alcohol and other drugs harms are mediated by a number of factors – those that protect against risk, and those that increase risk. For example, factors that protect against alcohol and other drug harms include social connection, education, safe and secure housing, and a sense of belonging to a community. Factors that increase risks of alcohol and other drug harms include high availability of drugs, low levels of social cohesion, unstable housing, and socioeconomic disadvantage. Most of these factors are found at the community level, and must be targeted at this level for change.

Alcohol and other drugs are a community issue, not just an individual issue.

Community action to prevent alcohol and other drug harms is effective because:

  • the solutions and barriers (protective/risk factors) for addressing alcohol and other drugs harm are community-based
  • it creates change that is responsive to local needs
  • it increases community ownership and leads to more sustainable change

Part 2 Say No more to Family Violence all players link up

Such a powerful message told here in Alice Springs today as the Redtails Football Club, Top End Storm football club, link arms with the Melbourne Football Club, Adelaide Football Club for the NO MORE Campaign AU before the AFL Indigenous Round started.

WEBSITE Link up and say ‘No More’

 

 Watch Channel 7 Coverage of this special statement from all players

Part 3 #WorldNoTobaccoDay May 31 launched in the Alice

Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,”

Watch the ABC TV Interview HERE

Watch video of launch in the Alice

Successful Tobacco Campaign Continues

Tobacco smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in Australia and the Coalition Government is further committing to reduce the burden on communities.

The Minister for Rural Health, Senator Bridget McKenzie was in Alice Springs to launch the next phase of the National Tobacco Campaign and said that smoking related illness devastates individuals, families and the wider community.

“In the lead up World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, today I am pleased to launch the next phase of the Coalition Government’s highly successful campaign Don’t Make Smokes Your Story,” Minister McKenzie said.

“The latest phase of Don’t Make Smokes Your Story continues to focus on Indigenous Australians aged 18–40 years who smoke and those who have recently quit. The campaign also concentrates on pregnant women and their partners with Quit for You, Quit for Two.

“An evaluation of the first two phases of the campaign revealed they had successfully helped to reduce smoking rates.

“More than half of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants who saw the campaign took some action towards quitting smoking — and 8 per cent actually quit.

“These are very promising stats, however, we must continue to support and encourage those Australians who want to quit, but need help.”

The launch of the next phase of the campaign aligns with World No Tobacco Day and this year’s theme is Tobacco and heart disease.

“Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in Australia, killing one person every 12 minutes,” Minister McKenzie said.

“There is a clear link between tobacco and heart and other cardiovascular diseases, including stroke — a staggering 45,392 deaths in Australia can be attributed to cardiovascular disease in 20151.

“Latest estimates show that tobacco use and exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke not only costs the lives of loved ones, but it costs the Australian community $31.5 billion in social — including health — and economic costs.”

“The Coalition Government, along with all states and territories, has made significant efforts to reduce tobacco consumption across the board.

“For example, we know that tobacco is the leading cause of preventable disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accounting for more than 12 per cent of the overall burden of illness.

“The Coalition Government has recently invested $183.7 million continuing to boost the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program to cut smoking and save lives.

“This comprehensive program has helped to cut the rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people smoking and we want to build on this success.

“The Government’s investment in this program highlights our long-term commitment to Closing the Gap in health inequality.”

The ABS report Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Smoking Trends, Australia, 1994 to 2014-15, reported a decrease in current (daily and non-daily) smoking rate in those aged 18 years and older from 55 per cent in 1994 to 45 per cent in 2014-15, which shows Indigenous tobacco control is working.

For help to quit smoking, phone the Quitline on 13 7848, visit the Department of Health’s Quitnow website or download the free My Quitbuddy app.

Your doctor or healthcare provider can also help with information and support you may need to quit.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #WorldHypertensionDay @strokefdn High #bloodpressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob with 47% having high #stroke risk

 

 ” But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer of our mob because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

A staggering 82 percent of those, found to have high blood pressure, were not aware prior to taking the health check and were referred to their doctor for a further assessment.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are between two and three times as likely to have a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians which is why increasing stroke awareness is crucial.

Too many Australians couldn’t spot a stroke if it was happening right in front of them.

We know that in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities this awareness is even lower.

We want all Australians, regardless of where they live or what community they’re from, to learn the signs of stroke.”

Stroke Foundation and Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Project

 ” Naomi and Rukmani’s stroke rap runs through vital stroke awareness messages, such as lifestyle advice, learning the signs of stroke, and crucially the need to seek medical advice when stroke strikes.

Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song and remember the FAST message – it could save their life,”

Stroke Foundation Queensland Executive Officer Libby Dunstan 

Naomi Wenitong  pictured with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media

Listen to the new rap song HERE

                                       or Hear

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated

NACCHO has published over 90 articles Aboriginal health stroke prevention and recovery READ HERE

“It can happen to anyone — stroke doesn’t discriminate against colour, it doesn’t discriminate against age “

Photo above Seith Fourmile, Indigenous stroke survivor campaigns for culture to aid in stroke recovery

” Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who experience and die from cardiovascular disease at much higher rates than other Australians.

What you don’t know can hurt you. Heart disease and strokes are the biggest killers of Australians, and the biggest risk factor for both of them is high blood pressure.

But high blood pressure – known to doctors as ‘hypertension’ – is a silent killer because there are no obvious signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it. “

John Kelly CEO-National, Heart Foundation

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, when compared with other Australians, are:

  • 1.3 times as likely to have cardiovascular disease
  • three times more likely to have a major coronary event, such as a heart attack
  • more than twice as likely to die in hospital from coronary heart disease
  • 19 times as likely to die from acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart Disease
  • more likely to smoke, have high blood pressure, be obese, have diabetes and have end-stage renal disease.

It was World Hypertension Day yesterday  and the Stroke Foundation is determined to slash stroke numbers in Australia – with your help.

Today kicks off Australia’s Biggest Blood Pressure Check for 2018 and communities are being urged to take five minutes out of their day for a potentially life-saving blood pressure check.

More than 4.1 Million Australians are living with hypertension or high blood pressure, putting themselves at serious and unnecessary risk of stroke.

Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half (48 percent) if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.

The major concern with high blood pressure is many people don’t realise they have it. It has no immediate symptoms, but over time, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of stroke and heart disease.

How you can help?

  • Encourage your family and friends to take advantage of a free check.
  • Help spread the word via social media:  Research has shown the number of strokes would be practically cut in half if high blood pressure alone was eliminated.
  • Get your free health check today! https://bit.ly/2ps1UOn #WorldHypertensionDay

  • I am urging you – no matter what age you are – to have a blood pressure check regularly with your ACCHO GP (General Practitioner), pharmacist or via a digital health check machine.
  • Stroke strikes in an instant, attacking the brain. It kills more women than breast cancer and more men than prostate cancer and leaves thousands with an ongoing disability, but stroke is largely preventable by managing blood pressure and living a healthy lifestyle.
  • Stroke Foundation and SiSU Wellness conducted more than 520,000 digital health checks throughout 2017, finding 16 percent of participants had high blood pressure putting them at risk of stroke

Given there will be 56,000 strokes in Australia this year alone, if we can reduce high blood pressure we will have a direct and lasting impact on the rate of stroke in this country.Yours sincerely,

Sharon McGowan
Chief Executive Officer
Stroke Foundation

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Sugartax : @4Corners #Tippingthescales: #4corners Sugar, politics and what’s making us fat #rethinksugarydrinks @janemartinopc @OPCAustralia

On Monday night Four Corners investigates the power of Big Sugar and its influence on public policy.

“How did the entire world get this fat, this fast? Did everyone just become a bunch of gluttons and sloths?”  Doctor

The figures are startling. Today, 60% of Australian adults are classified as overweight or obese. By 2025 that figure is expected to rise to 80%.

“It’s the stuff of despair. Personally, when I see some of these young people, it’s almost hard to imagine that we’ve got to this point.”  Surgeon

Many point the finger at sugar – which we’re consuming in enormous amounts – and the food and drink industry that makes and sells the products fuelled by it.

Tipping the scales, reported by Michael Brissenden and presented by Sarah Ferguson, goes to air on Monday 30th of April at 8.30pm. It is replayed on Tuesday 1st of May at 1.00pm and Wednesday 2nd at 11.20pm.

It can also be seen on ABC NEWS channel on Saturday at 8.10pm AEST, ABC iview and at abc.net.au/4corners.

See Preview Video here

 ” In 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2 years and over consumed an average of 75 grams of free sugars per day (equivalent to 18 teaspoons of white sugar)1. Added sugars made up the majority of free sugar intakes with an average of 68 grams (or 16 teaspoons) consumed and an additional 7 grams of free sugars came from honey and fruit juice. “

NACCHO post – ABS Report abs-indigenous-consumption-of-added-sugars 

Amata was an alcohol-free community, but some years earlier its population of just under 400 people had been consuming 40,000 litres of soft drink annually.

The thing that I say in community meetings all the time is that, the reason we’re doing this is so that the young children now do not end up going down the same track of diabetes, kidney failure, dialysis machines and early death, which is the track that many, many people out here are on now,”

NACCHO Post : Mai Wiru, meaning good health, and managed by long-time community consultant John Tregenza.

See Previous NACCHO Post Aboriginal Health and Sugar TV Doco: APY community and the Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation

4 Corners Press Release

“This isn’t about, as the food industry put it, people making their own choices and therefore determining what their weight will be. It is not as simple as that, and the science is very clear.” Surgeon

Despite doctors’ calls for urgent action, there’s been fierce resistance by the industry to measures aimed at changing what we eat and drink, like the proposed introduction of a sugar tax.

“We know about the health impact, but there’s something that’s restricting us, and it’s industry.”  Public health advocate

On Monday night Four Corners investigates the power of Big Sugar and its influence on public policy.

“The reality is that industry is, by and large, making most of the policy. Public health is brought in, so that we can have the least worse solution.”  Public health advocate

From its role in shutting down debate about a possible sugar tax to its involvement in the controversial health star rating system, the industry has been remarkably successful in getting its way.

“We are encouraged by the government here in Australia, and indeed the opposition here in Australia, who continue to look to the evidence base and continue to reject this type of tax as some sort of silver bullet or whatnot to solve what is a really complex problem, and that is our nation’s collective expanding waistline.” Industry spokesperson

We reveal the tactics employed by the industry and the access it enjoys at a time when health professionals say we are in a national obesity crisis.

“We cannot leave it up to the food industry to solve this. They have an imperative to make a profit for their shareholders. They don’t have an imperative to create a healthy, active Australia.”  Health advocate

NACCHO post – Sixty-three per cent of Australian adults and 27 per cent of our children are overweight or obese.

 “This is not surprising when you look at our environment – our kids are bombarded with advertising for junk food, high-sugar drinks are cheaper than water, and sugar and saturated fat are hiding in so-called ‘healthy’ foods. Making a healthy choice has never been more difficult.

The annual cost of overweight and obesity in Australia in 2011-12 was estimated to be $8.6 billion in direct and indirect costs such as GP services, hospital care, absenteeism and government subsidies.1 “

 OPC Executive Manager Jane Martin 

BACKGROUND

 ” This campaign is straightforward – sugary drinks are no good for our health. It’s calling on people to drink water instead of sugary drinks.’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Cape York experience a disproportionate burden of chronic disease compared to other Australians.’

‘Regular consumption of sugary drinks is associated with increased energy intake and in turn, weight gain and obesity. It is well established that obesity is a leading risk factor for diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease and some cancers. Consumption of sugary drinks is also associated with poor dental health.

Water is the best drink for everyone – it doesn’t have any sugar and keeps our bodies healthy.’

Apunipima Public Health Advisor Dr Mark Wenitong

Read over 48 NACCHO articles Health and Nutrition HERE

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/nutrition-healthy-foods/

Read over 24 NACCHO articles Sugar Tax HERE  

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/sugar-

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @VACCHO_org @Apunipima join major 2018 health groups campaign @Live Lighter #RethinkSugaryDrink launching ad showing heavy health cost of cheap $1 frozen drinks

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Junkfood #Sugarydrinks #Sugartax @AMAPresident says Advertising and marketing of #junkfood and #sugarydrinks to children should be banned

NACCHO Aboriginal Youth Health News @KenWyattMP launches Aboriginal Youth Health Strategy 2018-2023, Today’s young people, tomorrow’s leaders at @TheAHCWA

“ The youth workshops confirmed young people’s biggest concerns are often not about physical illness, they are issues around mental health and wellbeing, pride, strength and resilience, and ensuring they can make the most of their lives

Flexible learning and cultural and career mentoring for better education and jobs were highlighted, along with the importance of culturally comfortable health care services.

While dealing with immediate illness and disease is crucial, this strategy’s long-term vision is vital and shows great maturity from our young people.”

Federal Minister for Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt, AM launched AHCWA’s Western Australia Aboriginal Youth Health Strategy 2018-2023, Today’s young people, tomorrow’s leaders at AHCWA’s 2018 State Sector Conference at the Esplanade Hotel in Fremantle. Read the Ministers full press release PART 2 Below

See Previous NACCHO Post

NACCHO Aboriginal Health @TheAHCWA pioneering new ways of working in Aboriginal Health :Our Culture Our Community Our Voice Our Knowledge

“If we are to make gains in the health of young Aboriginal people, we must allow their voices to be heard, their ideas listened to and their experiences acknowledged.

Effective, culturally secure health services are the key to unlocking the innate value of young Aboriginal people, as individuals and as strong young people, to become our future leaders.”

AHCWA Chairperson Vicki O’Donnell said good health was fundamental for young Aboriginal people to flourish in education, employment and to remain socially connected.

Download the PDF HERE

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) has this launched its new blueprint for addressing the health inequalities of young Aboriginal people.

“The Turnbull Government is proud to have supported this ground-breaking work and I congratulate everyone involved,” Minister Wyatt said.

“Young people are the future, and thinking harder and deeper about their needs and talking to them about how to meet them is the way forward.”

Developed with and on behalf of young Aboriginal people in WA, the strategy is the culmination of almost a decade of AHCWA’s commitment and strategic advocacy in Aboriginal youth health.

The strategy considered feedback from young Aboriginal people and health workers during 24 focus groups hosted by AHCWA across the Kimberley, Pilbara, Midwest-Gascoyne, Goldfields, South-West, Great Southern and Perth metropolitan areas last year.

In addition, two state-wide surveys were conducted for young people and service providers to garner their views about youth health in WA.

During the consultation, participants revealed obstacles to good health including boredom due to a lack of youth appropriate extracurricular activities, sporting programs and other avenues to improve social and emotional wellbeing.

Of major concern for some young Aboriginal people were systemic barriers of poverty, homelessness, and the lack of adequate food or water in their communities.

Significantly, young Aboriginal people shared experiences of how boredom was a factor contributing to violence, mental health problems, and alcohol and other drug use issues.

They also revealed that racism, bullying and discrimination had affected their health, with social media platforms used to mitigate boredom leading to issues of cyberbullying, peer pressure and personal violence and in turn, depression, trauma and social isolation.

Ms O’Donnell said the strategy cited a more joined-up service delivery method as a key priority, with the fragmentation and a lack of coordination in some areas making it difficult for young Aboriginal people to find and access services they need.

“The strategy provides an opportunity for community led solutions to repair service fragmentation, and open doors to improved navigation pathways for young Aboriginal people,” she said.

Ms O’Donnell said the strategy also recognised that culture was intrinsic to the health and wellbeing of young Aboriginal people.

“Recognition of and understanding about culture must be at the centre of the planning, development and implementation of health services and programs for young Aboriginal people,” she said.

“AHCWA has a long and proud tradition of leadership and advocacy in prioritising Aboriginal young people and placing their health needs at the forefront.”

Under the strategy, AHCWA will establish the Aboriginal Youth Health Program Outcomes Council and local community-based Aboriginal Youth Cultural Knowledge and Mentor Groups.

The strategy also mandates to work with key partners to help establish pathways and links for young Aboriginal people to transition from education to employment, support young Aboriginal people who have left school early or are at risk of disengaging from education; and work with local schools to implement education-to-employment plans.

More than 260 delegates from WA’s 22 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services are attending the two-day conference at the Esplanade Hotel Fremantle on April 11 and 12.

Over the two days, 15 workshops and keynote speeches will be held. AHCWA will present recommendations from the conference in a report to the state and federal governments to highlight the key issues about Aboriginal health in WA and determine future strategic actions.

The conference agenda can be found here: http://www.cvent.com/events/aboriginal-health-our-culture-our-communities-our-voice-our-knowledge/agenda-d4410dfc616942e9a30b0de5e8242043.aspx

Part 2 Ministers Press Release

A unique new youth strategy puts cultural and family strength, education, employment and leadership at the centre of First Nations people’s health and wellbeing.

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt AM today launched the landmark Western Australian Aboriginal Youth Health Strategy, which sets out a five-year program with the theme “Today’s young people, tomorrow’s leaders”.

“This is an inspiring but practical roadmap that includes a detailed action plan and a strong evaluation process to measure success,” Minister Wyatt said.

“It sets an example for other health services and other States and Territories but most importantly, it promises to help set thousands of WA young people on the right path for healthier and more fulfilling lives.”

Produced by the Aboriginal Health Council of WA (AHCWA) and based on State wide youth workshops and consultation, the strategy highlights five key health domains:

    • Strength in culture – capable and confident
    • Strength in family and healthy relationships
    • Educating to employ
    • Empowering future leaders
    • Healthy now, healthy future

Each domain includes priorities, actions and a “showcase initiative” that is already succeeding and could be replicated to spread the benefits further around the State.

Development of the strategy was supported by a $315,000 Turnbull Government grant, through the Indigenous Australians Health Program.

“I congratulate AHCWA and everyone involved because hearing the clear voices of these young Australians is so important for their development now and for future generations,” the Minister said.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Including #Tullawon AMS @DeadlyChoices @CAACongress @Apunipima #Anyinginyi NT @June_Oscar #WomensVoices

1.1 National  : NACCHO Chair attends opening of Yalata Blue House 

1.2 MIMS-NACCHO Partnership

2.1 QLD :  Talkin Tukka : What’s a healthy lifestyle in Cape York?

2.2 QLD : Patrick Johnson becomes a Deadly Choices Ambassador

2.3 : June Oscar heads for Queensland Wiyi Yani U Thangani #WomensVoices project

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs takes part in CTG Refresh

3.2 NT : Anyinginyi Health supports Tennant Creek alcohol restrictions ,they  must be longer and tougher

Includes new Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up Video Tennant Creek kids  

4.WA : Earbus and South West Aboriginal Medical Service performs checks for Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School Students 

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.1 National  : NACCHO Chair attends opening of Yalata Blue House 

NACCHO Chairperson John Singer was invited by NACCHO member Tullawon Health Service to the launch and opening of the “Yalata Blue House “ for men’s health, social, and cultural activities.

Media Report from Here

The new men’s shed at Yalata SA is set to provide men in the community a space to talk openly about any issues they may be facing.

The ‘Yalata Blue House’ was officially opened last month with a group of about 25 men attending the unveiling.

Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia project officer Joshua Riessen has been involved in the creation of the men’s shed at Yalata and said it was “great” to see it opened.

“I help the men drive activities and health activities such as around the ‘no smoking’ message – it is a place where we want to spread that message and hope to change attitudes slowly,” he said.

“There was a women’s equivalent, a mum’s and bubs space, where women could come together and talk about any issues and we wanted something for the men too.

“It is a safe space and place to talk about any health issues, and it is also a platform for visiting GPs to go over and talk to the men about their health and make sure they are not ashamed to talk about any issues.”

Mr Riessen said the shed project had been in the works for the past few months and was planned in conjunction with community leaders and organisations.

He estimated men from as young as 16 to those in their 70s would use and benefit from the new space.

Mr Riessen said the creation of the men’s shed would have a positive impact on the Yalata community.

“As well as being a safe space to talk, the men will also undertake activities such as arts and crafts, for example traditional painting, and woodwork,” he said.

“They can go to the shed to do these things and sell their items, which can generate some revenue to put back into the house to keep the activities going.”

An estimated 40 men have already been through the shed between its unveiling and the recent official opening and Mr Riessen said the reaction from community members had been “very positive”.

“They are really opening up about personal health issues and are having discussions with the other men,” he said.

“People feel comfortable in the shed and it also helps to bring the community together.”

 1.2 MIMS-NACCHO Partnership

MIMS is partnering with NACCHO to provide all their clinics access to the most up-to-date and relevant medicines information through eMIMS.

Download and share this info : MIMS-NACCHO discount offer

MIMS is proud to partner with NACCHO and work together to achieve health equality for Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and contribute to the Close the Gap Campaign.

By joining our efforts, we strive to ensure that all Australians live a long, healthy and happy life.  eMIMS is a trusted and well-established resource, and remains your complete guide to Product Information, Consumer Medicine Information, Product Images, Drug Interactions and PBS information for all registered medicines in Australia.

MIMS is offering all clinics a discounted rate for eMIMS subscriptions at $165.00 incl. GST per user.

This is a generous discounted offer, our standard single user price for eMIMS is $299.00.

To take advantage of this offer and support this MIMS and NACCHO partnership:

Please email Kumar Singh at kumar.singh@mims.com.au with your order details

(your name, clinic name, clinic address, phone number, eMIMS Cloud or Classic, and how many users you will need at the clinic)

eMIMS is available as two platforms:

eMIMSCloud needs internet connection

  • Internet-based and can be accessed from wherever you are on any internet abled device.
  • In eMIMSCloud you will find additional content such as tools and calculators to help you make decisions based on evidence based parameters.
  • Drug Allergy interactions checker.
  • With eMIMS Cloud there is nothing to install or update
  • No updates are required by you.

eMIMS Classic does not rely on internet connection

  •  eMIMS Classic can be installed on a network or single PC/laptop.
  • You will be provided with a license key which will activate your subscription.
  •  MIMS will provide you with a DVD in April August and December; monthly medicines information updates need to be manually downloaded and installed for months other than when you receive a DVD. MIMS will provide you with an email each month to notify you that the updated information
  • You do not need to logon to eMIMS Classic – you simply need to open it and leave it open during working hours.
  •  Downloaded to sit on your hard drive from a DVD.

 

2.1 QLD :  Talkin Tukka : What’s a healthy lifestyle in Cape York?

A new Indigenous media project launching today will bring listeners all the latest information, thanks to a new partnership between Black Star Radio and Apunipima Cape York Health Council.

Talkin Tukka is the program. Inspired by Black Star’s regular Bush Tukka segments, the new program is about our healthy Indigenous foods and a whole lot more! It also focuses on other healthy foods available for Indigenous people to blend with their wild caught and harvested bush tukka: the best of our traditional and modern knowledge.

Talkin Tukka also features health experts, food and nutrition experts, including for women’s, men’s and children’s health. It will build and support the great movement for good health we see across the Cape, providing ideas, information and positive health messages for Indigenous families.
The partnership is a great fit for Apunipima and Black Star, who each blend traditional and cutting-edge knowledge in all they do.

Apunipima Cape York Health Council represents 17 communities in the Cape and into the Torres Strait. It provides culturally appropriate, community-controlled primary health care and advocacy services in 11 of those communities and plans to build a primary health care Centre in each community over the coming years. A dedicated personnel of health practitioners and indigenous health staff services are always on call or standby to handle any emergency.

Black Star Radio, operated by Queensland Remote Aboriginal Media (QRAM) also operates across Cape York – in 16 locations, along with a further eight communities in remote Queensland. Also owned and managed by community, our role is to provide essential and reliable radio services “as good as the services that people in our capital cities take for granted”. Black Star takes an innovative approach to remote Indigenous broadcasting, using the latest digital and online technologies combined with the might and reach of broadcasting, to support communication within and between communities.

Both organisations are central to life in the Cape and the program will be heard widely. It’s a “must take” category program across the Black Star network of stations, which means all Black Star communities in the Cape will get the show, with their local programming resuming at 10 am.
QRAM/ Black Star Director Neville Reys and CEO of Apunipima Paul Stephenson, signed the 12-month contract today.

Neville Reys said “this is a wonderful new show for our listeners across the Cape. There’s no other health show that understands the healthy aspects of our lifestyle in the Cape, our fish and other wild food – and also the difficulties we have with getting access to other healthy food.”
Paul Stephenson for Apunipma said, “the partnership between Black Star Radio and Apunipima will see both organisations working closely with communities seeing lasting benefits in the areas of health nutrition and health improvement”.

2.2 QLD : Patrick Johnson becomes a Deadly Choices Ambassador

Honoured to meet the Deadly Team at the Kalwun Health Clinic on my second day as a Deadly Choices Ambassador. #deadlychoices

Great to catchup with the Kalwun Men’s Health Group for a yarn and a feed. #deadlychoices

2.3 : June Oscar heads for Queensland Wiyi Yani U Thangani #WomensVoices project

We’re heading to Queensland for the Australian Human Rights Commission‘s Wiyi Yani U Thangani #WomensVoices project. We’ll be in Brisbane on Saturday at the WOW Australia festival, before heading to Logan and Mt Isa.

We’re looking forward to hearing from Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women & girls.

Your valuable contribution will help identify key challenges and priorities and help influence positive change for our children and the future generations

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs takes part in CTG Refresh

Co-Chair Jackie Huggins with Josie Douglas from the Central Land Council, Donna Ah Chee – CEO of Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (CAAC) and Mischa Cartwright (Director Stakeholder Engagement & Communications Office of Aboriginal Affairs – NT Department of Local Government & Community Services).

The Closing The Gap Refresh Roundtables moved to Alice Springs last week. Co-Chair Jackie Huggins participated in the discussions with attendees.

Jackie met with celebrated Arrernte elder Margaret Kemarre Turner OAM (pictured).

 

3.2 NT : Anyinginyi Health supports Tennant Creek alcohol restrictions ,they  must be longer and tougher

In early 2018 the Thumbs Up! team visited Tennant Creek to deliver a community workshop for children focussing on alcohol and other drugs awareness.

The first day of their visit coincided with the tragic assault of a young girl and after speaking to community Elders and prominent citizens it was agreed that the workshop should go ahead. This powerful song is the result, written and sung by the children with

Media Report

Aboriginal corporations in Tennant Creek have asked the Northern Territory’s new Liquor Commission for tougher alcohol restrictions in the town, with a view to making them permanent.

The commission held a public consultation in Tennant Creek on Wednesday about whether the restrictions, which were extended by three months in March, should be relaxed or retained.

Proposed alcohol quantities (per person/day):

  • 1x six-pack of beer or pre-mix
  • 1x carton mid-strength or light beer
  • 1x bottle of wine
  • 1x one-litre cask wine
  • 1x fortified wine
  • No spirits
  • No alcohol for sale on Sundays

Tighter controls on takeaway alcohol were imposed in the remote town in February, in response to police figures showing an increase in alcohol-fuelled crime and the alleged rape of a toddler.

In a joint submission, the Anyinginyi Health, Julalikari Council, and the Papulu Apparr-Kari language centre told the commission they want a further reduction in alcohol quantities available for sale.

They said they would like those new restrictions to be in place for at least 12 months, with the possibility of making them permanent.

“We do not believe the restrictions are adequate… they have achieved little in terms of reducing alcohol consumption in our community,” the submission read.

The three Aboriginal corporations also want pubs, clubs, and bottle shops in the town to be held accountable for “degrading” environmental standards on their premises, including toilet and bathroom facilities.

“We remind the commission that we are not a community of animals and everyone in our municipality is entitled to the minimum standards of environmental health,” the submission said.

“Unless licensees are capable of delivering a standard that most Australians would regard as acceptable, they should not hold a liquor licence.”

Up to $300 paid for 2-litre cask of wine

The Aboriginal corporations want random inspections of licensed premises and licensees who sell alcohol to intoxicated customers, banned drinkers, and pregnant women should be held accountable.

A discussion about the number of pubs, clubs and bottle shops in Tennant Creek, compared to the town’s population size, was also needed, said Barbara Shaw, general manager of Anyinginyi Health.

“Reducing the number of alcohol outlets will certainly go a long way to managing the problem,” Ms Shaw said.

According to the submission, black-market alcohol sales are not being properly monitored, with people paying up to $300 for a two-litre cask of wine.

“We are also experiencing greater levels of sly grog-running. More effort needs to be applied to monitoring illegal alcohol activities,” the submission said.

The group is also calling for police and security staff in Tennant Creek to undertake a cross-cultural training course.

This would provide them with “a better understanding of local Aboriginal social structures and the attendant norms and practices that define the Warumungu world view,” the submission stated.

The Aboriginal corporations want therapeutic support and “wrap-around” programs for people who end up on the Banned Drinkers Register (BDR) because of chronic alcoholism.

They have asked the commission to refer to the Tennant Creek Alcohol Management Plan and Action Plan 2014-2017, which reflects a “great amount of community consultation” and outlines strategies to reduce alcohol-related harm.

4.WA : Earbus and South West Aboriginal Medical Service performs checks for Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School Students

The students of Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School in Glen Iris recently received a helping hand from one of Western Australia’s premier health services.

Media Report

The Earbus Foundation of WA visited the school and provided free hearing checks on Thursday, March 22.

Djidi Djidi students Kassie Allan and Deakin Williams were lucky enough to have their traditional indigenous designs placed on the bus.

Earbus chief executive officer Paul Higginbotham said the service first came to the school in November 2016, assisted by the South West Aboriginal Medical Service.

“When we drove in, the kids’ faces just lit up because this is the first time they have seen it like this,” he said. “Our job is to make sure that if they have got an ear problem it doesn’t turn into hearing loss.”

Through its Community Giving Fund, Aurizon presented the Earbus with a $20,000 grant. The funding allowed the health service to visit schools across the South West.

Piacentini and Sons also made a contribution to the Earbus service

Minister @KenWyattMP launches NACCHO @RACGP National guide for healthcare professionals to improve health of #Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients

 

All of our 6000 staff in 145 member services in 305 health settings across Australia will have access to this new and update edition of the National Guide. It’s a comprehensive edition for our clinicians and support staff that updates them all with current medical practice.

“NACCHO is committed to quality healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, and will work with all levels of government to ensure accessibility for all.”

NACCHO Chair John Singer said the updated National Guide would help governments improve health policy and lead initiatives that support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can Download the Guide via this LINK

A/Prof Peter O’Mara, NACCHO Chair John Singer Minister Ken Wyatt & RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel launch the National guide at Parliament house this morning

“Prevention is always better than cure. Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

Minister Ken Wyatt highlights what is new to the 3rd Edition of the National Guide-including FASD, lung cancer, young people lifecycle, family abuse & violence and supporting families to optimise child safety & wellbeing : Pic Lisa Whop SEE Full Press Release Part 2 Below

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) have joined forces to produce a guide that aims to improve the level of healthcare currently being delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and close the gap.

Chair of RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Associate Professor Peter O’Mara said the third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (the National Guide) is an important resource for all health professionals to deliver best practice healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

“The National Guide will support all healthcare providers, not just GPs, across Australia to improve prevention and early detection of disease and illness,” A/Prof O’Mara said.

“The prevention and early detection of disease and illness can improve people’s lives and increase their lifespans.

“The National Guide will support healthcare providers to feel more confident that they are looking for health issues in the right way.”

RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel said the RACGP is committed to tackling the health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

“The National Guide plays a vital role in closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health disparity,” Dr Seidel said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should have equal access to quality healthcare across Australia and the National guide is an essential part of ensuring these services are provided.

“GPs and other healthcare providers who implement the recommendations within the National Guide will play an integral role in reducing health disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, and ensuring culturally responsive and appropriate healthcare is always available.”

The updated third edition of the National Guide can be found on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website.

 

Free to download on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website:

http://www.racgp.org.au/national-guide/

and NACCHO

Part 2 Prevention and Early Diagnosis Focus for a Healthier Future

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians.

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, today launched the updated third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Prevention is always better than cure,” said Minister Wyatt. “Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

“The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.

“It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

The guide, which was first published in 2005, is a joint project between the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners RACGP).

“To give you some idea of the high regard in which it is held, the last edition was downloaded 645,000 times since its release in 2012,” said Minister Wyatt.

“The latest edition highlights the importance of individual, patient-centred care and has been developed to reflect local and regional needs.

“Integrating resources like the national guide across the whole health system plays a pivotal role in helping us meet our Closing the Gap targets.

“The Turnbull Government is committed to accelerating positive change and is investing in targeted activities that have delivered significant reductions in the burden of disease.

“Rates of heart disease, smoking and binge drinking are down. We are on track to achieve the child mortality target for 2018 and deaths associated with kidney and respiratory diseases have also reduced.”

The National Guide is funded under the Indigenous Australian’s Health Programme as part of a record $3.6 billion investment across four financial years.

The RACGP received $429,000 to review, update, publish and distribute the third edition, in hard copy and electronic formats.

The National Guide is available on the RACGP website or by contacting RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health on 1800 000 251 or aboriginalhealth@racgp.org.au.