NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Keep Your Spirit Strong – Social and Emotional Wellbeing campaign for our mob

Keep Your Spirit Strong – Social and Emotional Wellbeing campaign for our mob

The “Keep Your Spirit Strong” communications project by the Australian Government Department of Health aims to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to prioritise their social and emotional wellbeing.

The project focuses on encouraging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to:

  • recognise the importance of social and emotional wellbeing
  • look after each other and check in with their family, friends and community
  • share their thoughts and feelings when they are not feeling well
  • seek information and help when they need it
  • connect with the support services that are available.

There are 3 video animation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders that has been developed to support a new national social and emotional wellbeing and mental health awareness project: Keep Your Spirit Strong.

This stakeholder kit includes resources such as videos, social media content and images, case studies, and key messages.

Here you will find suggested social media content for the Keep Your Spirit Strong project. This includes social tiles, GIFs and video animations.

There are a number of fact sheets about COVID-19 mental health support for communities and the sector

Information services that can assist you in finding the right support for you or a loved one include Head to Health and WellMob. These are digital hubs which provide options depending on your needs and preferences. Here you can find phone numbers, websites, apps, forums and online learning options to help you through difficult times. Gayaa Dhuwi also has a range of resources.

Please share this content with your networks to support the project and raise the awareness around social and emotional wellbeing and mental health support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

Woolworths: a case study of the commercial determinants of health – and how communities can fight back

Croakey has published an article on the Woolworths Dan Murphy alcohol store in Darwin.

Introduction by Croakey: Woolworths is drawing widespread fire over its plans for a huge Dan Murphy’s alcohol outlet in Darwin, with more than 138,000 signatories to an online petition opposing the development, and luminaries such as Lowitja Institute chairperson Pat Anderson AO and journalist Jeff McMullen adding to the public opprobrium.

However, this corporate assault on public health is just one example of how the commercial determinants of health undermine community wellbeing, according to the article below by Dr Aletha Ward from the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Centre of Health Research at the University of Southern Queensland.

And it is also an example of how effective community campaigning can tackle these commercial determinants of health – as well as how corporates can do so much damage to their own brands in such cases (for example, see the Australian Financial Review article, ‘Woolworths’ reputation on the line over Darwin liquor plans’).

Read the full article here

ACT – Two Senior Policy Officer positions at NACCHO

  • Senior Policy Officer: This role provides evidence-based policy expertise to support the community-controlled sector on contemporary health and SEWB policies. For further information and to apply for this position click here.

 

  • Senior Policy Officer: This role provides evidence-based policy expertise to support the community-controlled sector on contemporary mental health and SEWB policies. For further information and to apply for this position click here.

The closing date for the applications for these two positions is on 14 January 2021.


 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Cancer screening saves lives! It helps to keep our communities strong, safe and healthy

Cancer screening saves lives! It helps to keep our communities strong, safe and healthy

It’s really important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to keep taking care of our health, even during a pandemic.

COVID-19 has been on everyone’s mind and the safety of our communities has been a major priority. Cancer screening may have been put off or forgotten during this time.

However, cancer screening really does make a big difference to the health of our community members and families. When cancer is found early, treatment can be a lot more effective.

National screening programs are available in Australia for breast cancerbowel cancer and cervical cancer.

For further information about the campaign click here.

 

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report: Alcohol, tobacco and other drugs in Australia 

The consumption of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs is a major cause of preventable disease and illness in Australia. This report consolidates the most recently available information on alcohol, tobacco and other drug use in Australia, and includes key trends in the availability, consumption, harms and treatment for vulnerable populations. Further, information on a range of health, social and economic impacts of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use are highlighted.

This release includes data relating to COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic up to November 2020.

For other data and information from this period, please see our AIHW COVID-19 resources.

Aboriginal hands holding can of Bundaberg Rum & cigarette

Image source: ABC News website.

The 2021 Antimicrobial Academy -Improve antibiotic use and management of infections in your community

An exciting opportunity exists for 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care professionals to enroll in the inaugural Hot North Antimicrobial Academy 2021. 

The Antimicrobial Academy is a fully subsidised 9-month online program for Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander health care workers (pharmacists, doctors, nurses or Aboriginal Health Practitioners) to build on their understanding and expertise in antibiotic resistance and to support further leadership of antibiotic use in our communities.

Further details available via the HOT NORTH Website, Opportunities Page, Antimicrobial Academy click here

The deadline for the submission have been extended till Sunday 20 December 2020. Please email statewide.ams@health.qld.gov.au or medicines@naccho.org.au or call (07) 3646 1886 for further information.

Tropical Australian Academic Health Centre & Hot North Improving Health Outcomes in the Tropical North Antimicrobial Academy 2021 banner

IHF Young Executive Leaders: Call for 2021 applications now open

Young executive leaders who have proven outstanding merit in healthcare management can have the chance to exchange with peers on capital healthcare issues, as well as to interact with talented thought leaders from all around the world. Through IHF Young Executive Leaders program, participants will build sustainable relationships and expand their network internationally. As a group, they will discuss current trends, challenges and opportunities for the young healthcare leaders of today, creating an environment for vibrant and exciting dialogue.

Through the IHF Young Executive Leaders program, participants will build sustainable relationships and expand their professional network. As a group, they will discuss current trends, challenges and opportunities for the young healthcare leaders of today, creating an environment for vibrant and exciting dialogue.

Through this program, the 2021 cohort will share experiences and work together on a topic related to the 2021 IHF World Hospital Congress which will take place in Barcelona with the overarching theme “PEOPLE ON BOARD: TRANSFORMING HEALTHCARE. Blending Agility, Responsiveness, Resilience.” 

Young executive leaders wishing to join the IHF YEL initiative can submit their applications until 25 January 2021.

For further info click here.

Award for Don Dale youth detention centre in the NT shows Indigenous-led, youth-justice solutions work

Amnesty International Australia welcomed the news that Danila Dilba – which took over the health services at Don Dale youth detention centre in the Northern Territory – has won the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) Justice Without Borders International Award.

“This shows us that our people know what’s best for them, and Indigenous-led solutions like Olga Havnen and her team’s program at Danila Dilba are available to governments around the country,” Amnesty International Australia Indigenous Rights Advisor, Rodney Dillon said.

“The solutions to youth offending – and actually addressing the over representation of Indigenous people in Australia’s jails – are already there. We just need our State and Territory Governments to listen to the experts, like the IJJO.

“All the evidence shows that diversion, and getting kids out of watchhouses and bail houses is what’s effective on youth crime.

“With the right wrap around services in place, like those Danila Dilba provide, there is simply no reason not to raise the age of criminal responsibility.”

Danila Dilba Health Service logo

 
NSW – Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, Full Time – Glen Innes
 
Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Caseworker (Aboriginal designated position)

Are you of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent?

Do you already live in the Glen Innes district or looking for a tree change away from the hustle of the city and the pandemic? Are you looking for a cooler climate? Do you want to hike through the Washpool National Park, which offers wilderness walks, camping, and horse riding in stunning World Heritage surrounds? Do you want to learn to fossick for sapphires and topaz?

Do you possess formal qualifications in health, welfare, social work, alcohol and other drugs or related area at a TAFE level (Certificate IV minimum) or above and/or have substantial experience in any of these areas?

Would you like to become part of a great team providing culturally appropriate primary health care services to Aboriginal people and communities living in Glen Innes and surrounding districts?

Glen Innes offers an attractive lifestyle including a well serviced and friendly rural community, laid back living, short commuting times, affordable housing, easy access to NSW north coast beaches and larger regional centres, and terrific recreational and sporting facilities. The Glen Innes district has a deep cultural and spiritual significance for traditional owners, the Ngoorabul people.

Applicants must obtain a job package and address the selection criteria in the position description as well as attach a current resume to their application. 

On-going applications for this position will be accepted.

Job Package: Belinda Butler bbutler@armajun.org.au  0267 219 777 Enquiries: Jenny Ryan jryan@armajun.org.au   0267 219 777  www.armajun.org.au

NSW – OzChild in Blacktown/Campbelltown

Aboriginal Practice Lead

The position will be a part of our Dhiiyaan Mirri (family of stars), OzChild’s Bridging Cultures Unit (BCU) and will support their Functional Family Therapy Child Welfare (FFT-CW), Multi systemic Therapy for Child Abuse and Neglect (MST-CAN) and Treatment Foster Care Oregon (TFCO) Teams at Blacktown and Campbelltown. The position will be based a min of 2 days per week at each location, however this can be flexible based on need.

The Aboriginal Practice Lead Position within OzChild will work to ensure that participating First Nation families can benefit from these Evidence Based Models (EBMs), and from time to time other programs that OzChild may deliver in the future. The Aboriginal Practice Lead will also facilitate access and receive support in a timely and culturally responsive manner.

Working with OzChild’s Teams, for the effective delivery of OzChild Services to First Nations Children, Young People and their Families /Kin /Carers, the Aboriginal Practice Lead will contribute from intake through to completion (when required) to the provision of culturally responsive services and a culturally safe working environment through consultation and engagement with OzChild staff, First Nations Peoples, stakeholders and relevant Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations.

To apply for the position click here.

Cairns, Adelaide or Alice Springs – CRANAplus

Professional Officer, Workforce Development Nursing

A senior position in our Workforce Development programs, driving initiatives to support Nursing across remote and regional Australia.

This position is responsible for professional knowledge contribution, project management, and industry networking to strengthen resources and pipelines encouraging and supporting nurses in rural and / or remote practice.

Be sector aware and reactive to the needs of the remote health workforce.

  • Contribute professional knowledge and experience to a range of projects and priorities engaged by the Office of the Chief Operating Officer, including contribution to the development of consultation papers and position statements.
  • Strategic and operational management of CRANAplus programs, including remote areas nurse (RAN) certification program and RAN standards, fellowship, awards, and scholarships, conference abstract committee, and other programs identified in the annual busines plan.
  • Develop and drive Continuous Professional Development initiatives, including:
    – Author or curate clinical articles or updates for the quarterly CRANAplus Magazine
    – Professional Services guest presenter webinar series
    – Contribute to the development of on-line or e-resources for CRANAplus members and wider community stakeholders
    – Participate in the delivery of professional development workshops, as required, to remote workforces.

To submit your application, please email your resume to kati@crana.org.au, outlining your alignment to the above four criteria. This position will close as of Monday 11 January 2021.

For the position description click here.

 

 

AHW and patient Wuchopperen Health Service

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Community best placed to deliver human services

AHW and patient Wuchopperen Health Service

Community best placed to deliver human services

Earlier this week (Wednesday 25 November) NACCHO CEO Pat Turner appeared as a panelist the ABC’s The Drum. Pat Turner described why the  NACCHO COVID-19 communication strategy was so successful “it was done at the local level through NACCHO’s 143 members because they know the community and know what sort of messaging will resonate in the community and they know the behaviours of people, there were things that we said like ‘don’t share your smokes and don’t share your drinks’ because we know people do that. It was a way of making sure the messaging that was going out was really going to resonate with the people in those regions and that’s why we did it ourselves, our members did a great job and we were able to do it because we have a long established relationship with the communities and therefore they trust the messaging that comes from us.

The interviewer asked Pat Turner “how do you say to government ‘you’ve had a crack at closing the gap, let us have a try – how do you shake the cage of government and say ‘look you’ve got to let the community do its own delivery of human services because frankly with the best will in the world, Commonwealth government you’re rubbish at it.'”

screen shot of Pat Turner on ABC The Drum

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner AM. Image source: ABC The Drum.

Praise for hospital models of care

The St John of God Midland public hospital, which has just celebrated its firth birthday, has been praised for developing models of care in providing Aboriginal health services and building a strong relationship with local community groups. Aboriginal engagement and cultural advisors work across the hospital’s wards to assist patients and their families and assist with post discharge planning. St John of God Midland Public Hospital has created significant links with the local community, and works closely with local health agencies, community service providers and patient support groups and provides important outreach and in-reach services to patients.

To view the Government of WA’ s media release click here.

AHW talking to middle aged Aboriginal patient

Image source: St John of God Midland Public Hospital website.

Child removal Catch-22

Life with Archie

Laugh and cry as you listen to Aboriginal mum Carly and her husband Luke talk about raising their beautiful little four year old boy Archie who has a number of disabilities. Carly talks about her pregnancy, the birth of Archie, learning of his various disabilities, therapy, navigating the NDIS and more. Listen here to the interview on an episode of the Too Peas In A Podcast podcast.

toddler Archie eating sandwich blue plastic bib and Aboriginal colours headband

Archie as a baby. Image source: carlypuck Instagram.

Social media racism affects mental health

In her 2015 book, The Internet of Garbage, Sarah Jeong writes: “The internet is experienced completely differently by people who are visibly identifiable as a marginalised race or gender. It’s a nastier, more exhausting internet, one that gets even nastier and even more exhausting as intersections stack up.” When it comes to racism (and all of its intersections), the exhaustion of experiencing it in our own lives is being increasingly compounded by its visablity online.  To be clear: as a person who is victimised by systemic racism, it’s never your responsibility to adapt. But there are ways to take back control when things feel overwhelming.

To view the article on ABC Life click here.

graphic of Aboriginal person with sweat on forrid looking at iPhone

Image source: ABC Life website.

Ngarrindjeri woman awarded grant

Murray Bridge woman Brooke Vanzati has been awarded a grant to support her study by Flinders University Rural Health SA. Funded and awarded by the rural health departments of the three SA universities – Flinders University, the University of Adelaide and the University of SA, the bursary is open to any Aboriginal Health Professional, Practitioner or Worker who is currently working in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service in rural or remote SA.

To view the article in full click here.

photo of Brooke Vanzati standing next to Flinders University signage

Brook Vanzati. Image source: The Murray Valley Standard.

Cultural support for hospital patients

Around 3% (more than 10,000) of the NSW Central Coast’s population is of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent, with numbers steadily rising as more people move to the region to be close to family and to access better employment opportunities and healthcare. The region has one of the fastest growing Aboriginal populations according to data from the last two Censuses.

Nunyara Aboriginal Health Unit provides an important service to local hospitals and the community. Aboriginal liaison officers Jody Milson and Wayne Merritt have explained, “We work out of all hospitals in the Health District and at Woy Woy we concentrate on patients in rehabilitation, sub-acute and transitional care,” Milson said. “We provide cultural support to Aboriginal patients and help them in engaging with staff. “Some of them have been newly diagnosed and need that one on one support.”

To view the full article in the Coast Community News click here.

external image of Nunyara Aboriginal Health Unit NSW

Image source: Unique Building Partners website.

feature image text 'child protection system sets First Nations people with disability up to fail, photo of Aboriginal youth leaning on wire gate and broken wire fence in desert landscape

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Child protection system sets PWD up to fail

feature image text 'child protection system sets First Nations people with disability up to fail, photo of Aboriginal youth leaning on wire gate and broken wire fence in desert landscape

Child protection system sets PWD up to fail

First Nations people with disability (PWD) will tell the Disability Royal Commission this week about the structural violence they experience in the child-protection system around Australia. “We are among the most seriously disadvantaged members of the Australian community, and are also experts on the impact of policies on us,” says First Peoples Disability Network CEO Damian Griffis.

“This week, a number of First Nations people with disability will give evidence about the different racist and ableist systems that harm our children.” Mr Griffiths says the child protection system is “hostile and complicated.  Child removal is an ever present threat, and reality in our communities. It has become part of the community vernacular, and families live with the legacies of trauma from the removal of their parents and grandparents,” he says. 

Health Justice Australia CEO Donnella Mills says the current child protection system risks setting people with disability and their families up to fail, “First Nations people with disability and their families in contact with child protection systems face multiple, intersecting problems that result from intersectional and institutional discrimination,” she says. 

To view the full article click here.

placards against steps with Hands off our kids, black babies belong with black families

Image source: The Guardian.

Infectious skin diseases researcher awarded

The Australian Museum Eureka Awards (the “Oscars of science”) celebrate research and innovation, leadership, science engagement and school science. “Science is at the core of everything we do and we are committed to supporting and showcasing the work of Australian scientists,” Australian Museum Research Institute Professor Kristofer Helgen said.

The Emerging Leader in Science award went to Associate Professor Asha Bowen, who is Head of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases at the Telethon Kids institute. Her work over the years has significantly changed the way indigenous children with skin infections are treated.

To listen to Associate Professor Bowe being interviewed on ABC RN Breakfast with Fran Kelly click here.

portrait of Associate Professor Asha Bowen standing outside on path with trees in the background

Image source: RHD Action.

Parents fear child services

Treating mental health episodes more like a physical injury could help prevent the long-term removal of children of Indigenous parents with a disability, a national inquiry has heard. Mental health worker Christine May has told a hearing of the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability that when a parent with a mental illness had a psychotic episode and needed to stay in hospital it should be regarded as a period of treatment. “If I broke my leg I wouldn’t have an order taken out on my child,” she said.

Unless parents are deemed dangerous, Ms May said, they shouldn’t have to fight to keep their children when services could provide treatment for them to become well and be re-assessed. She recommended the Queensland Health program Cultural Healing she works for be expanded across the state.

To view the full article click here.

young Aboriginal child in shadows outside with tricycle and parts of other play equipment visible

Image source: SBS NITV website.

Increased clinical trial access for regional Australia

Much is riding on $125 million in Federal Government funding, announced in the recent budget and aimed at addressing this disparity and providing access to life-saving clinical trials in the regions. “This funding is our last chance to get it right, to deliver a higher level national health system,” said Sabe Sabesan, a doctor who was central to developing Queensland’s model of delivering medical support to regional communities via telehealth. His program has paved the way for the next step towards making clinical treatment trials available to all patients regardless of their location.

Oncologist Craig Underhill is hopeful the clinical trials would not only drive an improvement in cancer outcomes but enable research in other chronic health areas affecting regional patients, such as geriatric oncology, Indigenous health and palliative care.

To view the article in full click here.

health professional at desk conducting telehealth session

Image source: National Rural Health Alliance online magazine, Partyline.

Lung cancer signs free webinar

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) estimated trend lines indicate a significant increase in the lung cancer incidence and mortality rates for Indigenous Australians over time. For non-Indigenous Australians, the age-standardised incidence rate for lung cancer has been relatively stable, while the mortality rate has fallen. Estimated trend lines indicate a significant decrease in the lung cancer mortality rate for non-Indigenous Australians.

Symptoms of lung cancer are often vague and can be overlooked, however, early and rapid investigation and referral is necessary for optimal patient outcomes. How can GPs give themselves the best chance of identifying possible lung cancer in busy primary care practice?

Cancer Australia invites you to join them in an upcoming webinar on investigating symptoms and signs of lung cancer in primary care: Symptoms and signs that might be lung cancer – a new guide to optimal investigation and referral in general practice – 7.00pm-8.00pm (AEDT) Wednesday 2 December 2020.

T join the FREE webinar click here and to learn about Cancer Australia’s new resource Investigation symptoms of lung cancer: a guide for all health professionals click here.

doctor's hand pointing to x-ray of lung

Image source: SBS News website.

Good Medicine Better Health resources survey

NPS MedicineWise is are seeking Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consumer input to assist the development of Good Medicine Better Health (GMBH) consumer resources. Lived experience, and preferred format and learning styles will help us to develop consumer driven, culturally appropriate and accessible resources that deliver key information about quality use of medicines. 

To view the invitation for consumers to share their lived experience and/or community experience of a range of health issues click here and to access the link to the consumer participation survey click here.

The purpose of the survey is to elicit information about age, region (metro, regional, rural or remote), education level, willingness to be involved and preferred contact details. The GMBH team will then contact willing participants to arrange one-on-one phone interviews, online focus groups or workshops.

portrait shot Aboriginal woman and Aboriginal boy and girl, Good Medicine Better Health banner

Image source: NPS MedicineWise.

Native millet could change lives

Native millet on Gamilaraay country in western NSW is the most economically viable native grain for future farm enterprises, a University of Sydney study has found. The University of Sydney Institute of Agriculture study is the most comprehensive trial of Indigenous paddock-to-plate produce in Australia and was done in consultation with local communities and Black Duck Foods, owned by Aboriginal foods expert Bruce Pascoe. The one-year research project into the environmental, economic and cultural viability of growing native grains for bread on Gamilaraay country near Moree and Narrabri was released on 9 November 2020.

“Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay country in north-west NSW is one of the largest Aboriginal language groups in Australia, and they are proudly known as grass people,” said Dr Angela Pattison, study leader from the University of Sydney Institute of Agriculture and Plant Breeding Institute at Narrabri.

To view the full article click here.

loaf of bread on breadboard, bread being broken between fingers, man and woman in crop field

Image source: The University of Sydney website.

NT  Darwin and Palmerston region – Danila Dilba Health Service

Multiple positions: Head of ICT, Dietitian, Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist, Mental Health Nurse, Community Support Worker

Danila Dilba Health Service is going through a dynamic period of expansion and growth. As a result of robust growth in services and in order to meet increasing client need, they are looking for people to join their team and be part of delivering important services to the Darwin and Palmerston region.

These are important roles where you’ll be able to contribute to improving the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians. Danila Dilba will provide great learning opportunities and give you the chance to grow your skills and progress your career.

For further information and to apply click here. Applications close Monday 7 December 2020.Danila Dilba Health Service logo

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: ‘Game changer’ e-prescriptions are coming

feature tile - Aboriginal hands in pharmacy clicking iPad

‘Game-changer’ e-prescriptions are coming

Electronic prescriptions (or e-prescriptions) are being rolled out in stages across Australia after being used in Victoria during the pandemic. E-prescriptions have been common in countries such as the United States and Sweden for more than ten years. In Australia, a fully electronic paperless system has been planned for some time. Since the arrival of COVID-19, and a surge in the uptake of telehealth, the advantages of e-prescriptions have become compelling. To read more about what e-prescriptions are, how they work, their benefits and what they mean for paper prescriptions click here.

feature tile - Aboriginal hands in pharmacy clicking iPad

Image source: Australian Pharmacist.

Electronic prescription roll out expanded

The big news in digital health in recent weeks has been the expansion of Australia’s roll out of electronic prescriptions to metropolitan Sydney, following the fast-track implementation in metropolitan Melbourne and then the rest of Victoria as a weapon in that state’s battle against the COVID-19 pandemic. There was also some rare movement in the secure messaging arena, with a number of clinical information system vendors and secure messaging services having successfully completed the implementation of new interoperability standards that will hopefully allow clinicians and healthcare organisations to more easily exchange clinical information electronically. The road to secure messaging interoperability has been a tortuous one to say the least, but movement does seem to be occurring. At least 19 separate systems have successfully fulfilled the Australian Digital Health Agency’s requirements, with the vendors now getting ready to release the capability in their next versions. It is expected these will start to roll out over the next few months.

To view the full PULSE+IT article click here.

image of hand with phone held to scanning machine

Image source: PULSE+IT website.

Lack of physical activity requires national strategy

A new report finding Australians are not spending enough time being physically active highlights the need for action on a national, long-term preventive health strategy, according to AMA President, Dr Omar Khorshid. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) report found that the majority of Australians of all ages are not meeting the minimum levels of physical activity required for health benefits, and are exceeding recommended limits on sedentary behaviour.

The AMA is working with the Federal Government on its proposed long-term national preventive health strategy, which was first announced by Health Minister Greg Hunt in a video message to the 2019 AMA National Conference almost 18 months ago. Dr Khorshis said “As a nation, we spend woefully too little on preventive health – only about 2 per cent of the overall health budget. A properly resourced preventive health strategy, including national public education campaigns on issues such as smoking and obesity, is vital to helping Australians improve their lifestyles and quality of life.”

To view the AMA’s media release regarding the physical activity report click here.

image of arms of Aboriginal person in running gear bending to tie shoelaces along bush trail

Image source: The Conversation.

KAMS CEO appointed to WA FHRI Fund Advisory Council

The McGowan Government has today announced the make-up of the Advisory Council of WA’s Future Health Research and Innovation (FHRI) Fund. The FHRI Fund was the centerpiece of the State Government’s commitment to drive research and innovation in WA by providing the State’s health and medical researchers and innovators with a secure and ongoing source of funding. Vicki O’Donnell, CEO, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service Ltd (KAMS), is one of seven eminent Western Australians appointed to the Advisory Council to provide high-level advice to the Health Minister and the Department of Health.

To view the Government of Western Australia’s media release click here.

portrait photo of Vicki O'Donnell, KAMS CEO in office

Vicki O’Donnell, CEO KAMS. Image source: ABC News.

PLUM and HATS help save kids hearing

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families are being encouraged to use an Australian Government toolkit to ensure young children are meeting their milestones for hearing and speaking. The rates of hearing loss and ear disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are significantly higher than for the non-Indigenous population. Between 2018–19 and 2022–23, almost $104.6 million will be provided for ear health initiatives to reduce the number of Indigenous Australians suffering avoidable hearing loss, and give Indigenous children a better start to education.

The Parent-evaluated Listening and Understanding Measure (PLUM) and the Hearing and Talking Scale (HATS) have been developed by Hearing Australia in collaboration with Aboriginal health and early education services. As part of a $21.2 million package of funding over five years from 2020–21 to advance hearing health in Australia, the 2020–21 Budget includes an additional $5 million to support early identification of hearing and speech difficulties for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, and embed the use of PLUM and HATS Australia-wide.

To view the Department of Health’s media release click here.

young Aboriginal child having his ear checked by health professional

Image source: The Wire website.

Illawarra Aboriginal Corporation receives research grant

The University of Wollongong (UOW) had announced the recipients of the Community Engagement Grants Scheme (CEGS). CEGS is uniquely focused on addressing the challenges faced by communities and taking action to create real and measurable outcomes. The CEGS projects are dedicated to serving communities on a range of issues that matter in the real world. Some areas of focus are health and wellbeing, disability and social services, culture and multiculturalism, Indigenous and local history and communities.

This year, the University awarded grants to three innovative community partners and UOW academics to support their research and outreach projects. Among the recipients is the Illawarra Aboriginal Corporation and senior Aboriginal researcher and anthropologist, Professor Kathleen Clapham. Their project, titled ‘Amplifying the voices of Aboriginal women through culture and networking in an age of COVID19’ aims to address women’s isolation, restore networks, and nurture the exchange of Aboriginal knowledge and traditional practices.

To view the University of Wollongong’s media release click here.

portrait shot of Professor Kathleen Clapham University of Wollongong

Professor Kathleen Clapham, UOW. Image source: UOW website.

LGBQTISB suicide prevention

Indigenous LGBQTISB people deal with additional societal challenges, ones that can regularly intersect and contribute to the heightened development of depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug problems, and a heightened risk of suicide and suicidal behaviour. Dameyon Bonson, an Indigenous gay male from the NT and recognised as Indigenous suicide prevention subject matter expert, specifically in Indigenous LGBQTI+ suicide, will be presenting ‘An introduction to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous Australian) LGBQTISB suicide prevention’ from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm (ACST) on Tuesday 10 November 2020

For more information about the event and to register click here.image of Dameyon bonson and Indigenous LGBTIQSB Suicide Prevention - An Introduction course banner

Dead quiet to award winner in only two years

“The first year we were almost dead quiet … word of mouth and occupational health is what grew us, and now we’ve been able to really branch into Indigenous health and Closing the Gap initiatives,” said Practice Manager Olivia Tassone. At just 22-years-old, Tassone is also a part-owner of the company, along with former footballed Des Headland and others. Being privately owned gives Spartan First a flexibility that other companies in the same space don’t have. “One of the benefits of being a being a private business is we don’t really have a lot of red tape to jump over. If we want to start making a change, then we can just do it,” Tassone said.

To view the full article click here.

Practice Manager Olivia Tassone standing in front of Spartan building

Spartan Practice Manager Olivia Tassone. Image source: National Indigenous Times website.

Tackling Indigenous Smoking with Prof Tom Calma

Tobacco smoking is the most preventable cause of ill health and early death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It is responsible for 23 per cent of the gap in health burden between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.

The Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) program aims to improve life expectancy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples by reducing tobacco use.

Professor Tom Calma, National Coordinator, leads the TIS program which has been running since 2010.  Under the program local organisations design and run activities that focus on reducing smoking rates, and supports people to never start smoking. Activities are:

  • evidence-based — so they are effective, and
  • measurable — so we can tell that they work.

feature tile elderly Aboriginal woman sitting on a chair in desert setting

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News – COVID-19 highlights health inequalities

feature tile elderly Aboriginal woman sitting on a chair in desert setting

COVID-19 highlights health inequalities

The COVID-19 crisis has turned a spotlight on existing health, social and economic inequities in Australia and internationally and been a stark reminder of the importance of the social determinants of health, and the need to prioritise support for marginalised individuals and groups in our community.

People with pre-existing health conditions, and those from lower-socioeconomic communities and marginalised groups are at greater risk of experiencing the worst effects of the pandemic compared with those from non-marginalised communities.

When people contract COVID-19 and have pre-existing conditions such as heart disease, obesity and asthma, they’re more likely to experience respiratory failure and death. Respiratory infections such as COVID-19 are more easily transmitted among lower-socioeconomic communities who typically live in more crowded conditions. COVID-19 pandemic recovery should include more funding for local community-led initiatives such as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-led response which has successfully emphasised health equity through all stages of the pandemic to ensure low rates of infection.

To view the full Monash University LENS article click here.

Turning up for alcohol and drug education

Scott Wilson who works with the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (ADAC), SA has been profiled to give an insight into ‘what excellence in drug and alcohol care looks like’. Scott said, “I would love to see an ADAC all around the country because I think unless you’ve got a group that has that role of helping and coordinating, then you just have piecemeal attempts. Everyone’s just struggling in isolation.”

To view the full article click here.

large group of Aboriginal men on country undertaking ADAC training

ADAC alcohol and drug education. Image source: Croakey website.

Paramedic degree offered for first time in NT

Paramedics will soon be able to train in the NT thanks to a new partnership between Charles Darwin University (CDU) and St John NT. St John NT’s CEO Judith Barker said the NT was one of the country’s most interesting and diverse locations, giving paramedics the opportunity to develop skills and experience with complex medical cases, high speed trauma, and delivery of care in extreme and isolated conditions. CDU Vice-Chancellor Professor Simon Maddocks said that CDU was uniquely positioned to explore issues of national and regional importance such as tropical medicine, Indigenous health and mental health.

To view the full article click here.

four Aboriginal female paramedics standing in front on an ambulance

Image source: Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) Facebook p

SA Eyre Peninsula child health initiative

Indigenous children have some of the highest levels of preventable diseases in the world. Eyre Peninsula communities will benefit from a new partnership between the Starlight Children’s Foundation and Masonic Charities SA/NT, which will help bridge the gap in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians living in rural and remote communities. Masonic Charities have committed $900,000 to the Starlight Children’s Foundation over the next three years, allowing them to roll out the Healthier Futures Initiative in SA on a permanent basis. As part of the program Starlight personnel will accompany health professionals, keep the children present and entertained, and aim to provide a positive overall experience.

To view the full article in the West Coast Sentinel News click here.

health worker checking Aboriginal child's throat

Image source: The Australian.

Barriers to hepatitis C treatment

Research on the hepatitis C treatment intentions of Aboriginal people in WA has been published in the October issue of the The Australian Health Review, a peer-reviewed journal of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association. The study found there are substantial hurdles to achieving hepatitis C elimination in Aboriginal communities, including lack of knowledge and concerns about the stigma of seeking treatment. Stable housing was also an important pre-requisite to seeking treatment because Aboriginal people who were homeless were much more focused on day-to-day problems of living on the street, including lack of regular sleep, physical exhaustion and daily anxiety. 

To view the research paper click here.

4 Aboriginal people against graffitied wall with words HEP C is Everyone's Business

Image source: Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc. website.

Suicide Prevention white paper

Suicide rates in Australia have continued to rise over the last decade. The challenge to bend this curve is immense, especially in the context of COVID-19 and the recent bushfire season, which have disrupted lives and impacted the psychological health of Australians. The need for evidence-based solutions has never been more important. Black Dog Institute is pleased to present a white paper which shares critical insights from emerging research and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander lived experience evidence that explores contemporary issues and offers innovative responses.

To view the white paper in full click here.

graffiti of Aboriginal man's face in red, yellow & black

Image source: Australian Human Rights Commission.

ITC Program helps health system navigation

The Integrated Team Care (ITC) Program is one of Northern Queensland Primary Health Network’s (NQPHN’s) funded initiatives under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Northern Australia Primary Health Limited (NAPHL) delivers the program throughout northern Queensland. Without the program, many Indigenous people would struggle to access the health care they need to manage their chronic or complex health conditions.

The ITC Program was established to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with complex chronic diseases who are unable to effectively manage their conditions to access one-on-one assistance for the provision of coordinated, multidisciplinary care.

To view the article click here.

Aboriginal health worker taking blood pressure of Aboriginal man

Image source: PHN Northern Queensland website.

NSW/ACT GP in Training of the Year award

Dr Josephine Guyer has won the RACGP’s NSW/ACT General Practitioner in Training of the Year award.

Currently working at the Myhealth Liverpool clinic, Dr Guyer has completed terms at the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation in Airds, the Primacare Medical Centre in Roselands and Schwarz Family in Elderslie. In 2017 she received the RACGP’s Growing Strong Award and has embraced that ethos in her GP training.

RACGP Acting President Associate Professor Ayman Shenouda congratulated Dr Guyer, saying “Dr Guyer brings extraordinary strength and resilience to her training and work as a GP. Her background as a registered nurse for almost 20 years, cultural experience as a proud Wiradjuri woman and the fact that she is the parent of three teenagers means that she comes to the role of general practice with valuable life experience that will help her care for patients from different walks of life. Providing responsive and culturally appropriate care is absolutely essential and Dr Guyer is perfectly placed to do just that.”

To view the full Hospital and Healthcare article click here.

Dr Josephine Guyer holding RACGP NSW/ACT GP in Training of the Year award

Dr Josephine Guyer. Image source: Hospital and Healthcare website.

Food security webinar

Access to sufficient, affordable nutritious food is important for the health of rural and remote communities. With the recent bush fires, floods and now the COVID-19 pandemic, traditional supply chains have been interrupted and rural and remote communities that are already at risk of food insecurity, are being impacted even further. Early this year the National Rural Health Alliance (NRHA) conducted a webinar covering a range of perspectives on current challenges in ensuring food security for households in rural and remote communities, including from an Indigenous health perspective and considered policy and practical solutions to address the issue well into the future.

The recording of the NRHA webinar called A virtual conversation: affordable and nourishing food for rural and remote communities during COVID-19 and beyond is available for free here.

four Aboriginal children with oranges

Image source: NPY Women’s Council website.

SA ACCHO funding to improve disability services

Four Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) will share in $1 million of federal government funding to improve disability services across SA’s Eyre Peninsula and the Far West.

Ceduna’s Yadu Health Aboriginal Corporation, Tullawon Health Service at Yalata, Oak Valley Aboriginal Corporation and Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service at Whyalla were awarded the funding under the banner of the South Australian West Coast ACCHO Network. The funding will go towards a two-year ‘Aboriginal DisAbility Alliance’ project aimed at supporting Aboriginal communities to access culturally appropriate disability services.

To view the full article in the West Coast Sentinel click here.

painting re yellow black two stick figures & one stick figure in a wheelchair

Image source: NITY website.

Mental Health Month

October is Mental Health Month and as part of the 2020 World Mental Health Day campaign, Mental Health Australia is encouraging everyone to make a promise to “Look after your mental health, Australia.” It is a call to action for the one in five Australians affected by mental illness annually, and for the many more impacted by the current COVID-19 pandemic, and the increased uncertainty and anxiety that has ensued. The more individuals and organisations who commit to promoting mental health awareness this month and support the campaign, the more we reduce the stigma surrounding mental ill health and play our part in creating a mentally healthy community.

To view the media release click here.words Mental Health Month October in blue and red lettering logo

Image Source: Department of Health

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: The Long Cry of Indigenous People’s to be heard – a defining moment in Australia

The Long Cry of Indigenous People’s to be heard!

Australia and the World Annual Lecture.

Pat Turner, AM CEO NACCHO and Lead Convenor of the Coalition of Peaks National Press Club Speech:        The Long Cry of Indigenous People’s to be heard -a defining moment in Australia.

I would like to start by acknowledging the country and traditional owners of the land we are meeting on today.

We are meeting on Ngunnawal country.

I pay my respects to the Elders past and present; and thank them for their continuing openness to have us live, work and meet on their land.

The Indigenous practice of acknowledging your place, and the place you are on, is something that has existed for thousands of generations. It is a way of being heard.

Acknowledgment of Country is about respecting and hearing the unwritten history of place. It is an assertion of our unceded sovereignty.

I would also like to thank Professors Sally Wheeler; Brian Schmidt; Paul Pickering and Mark Kenny of the Australian National University for inviting me to give this year’s ‘Australia and the World,’ annual lecture.

I also thank the National Press Club for supporting this important national conversation.

Our shared cry to be heard

Indigenous peoples across the globe share similar histories.

We share deep attachments to our land, our cultures, our languages, our kin, and families.

These attributes have developed over millennia to harmonise with the natural environment, manage and sustain natural resources, and to facilitate meaningful and healthy lives.

They reflect core values that have served us, and the wider world, remarkably well.

Indigenous peoples also share histories of colonisation, violent dispossession, overt and disguised racism, trauma, extraordinary levels of incarceration, and genocidal policies including child removal, assimilation, and cultural and linguistic destruction.

These histories were — and are — real and alive, both in the way we see the world and in the political and social structures that have been imposed upon us.

In last year’s Boyer Lectures, Rachel Perkins quoted the poet Oodgeroo Noonuccal: ‘Let no-one say the past is dead. The past is all around us’.

And Rachel cited her father, my uncle, Charles Perkins, who would say: ‘We cannot live in the past; the past lives in us’.

In other words, we cannot forget the past. We all must work to make sense of it, to come to terms with it.

We must work to overcome the inter-generational consequences that are all too real for so many Indigenous peoples.

In his 1968 Boyer Lectures, anthropologist, Bill Stanner, identified the propensity of non-Indigenous Australians to not see, to forget, and to actively disremember the consequences of colonisation.

He termed this ‘the Great Australian Silence’. What he didn’t say, but it was inferred, is that this structural silence necessarily means also shutting out Indigenous voices.

Four years later, Stanner quoted Dr Herbert Moran, surgeon, medical innovator, and first captain of the Wallabies, who wrote in 1939:

We are still afraid of our own past. The Aborigines we do not like to talk about. We took their land, but then we gave them in exchange the Bible and tuberculosis, with for special bonus alcohol and syphilis. Was it not a fair deal? Anyhow, nobody ever heard them complain about it.

Portrait of Patricia Turner, an Aboriginal health advocate who is CEO of NACCHO, in her office in Canberra. Picture by Sean Davey for The Australian

Nobody ever heard them complain about it!

Of course, we know now that there has been a long history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander complaint, protestation, resistance, resolve and repudiation.

Two hundred and fifty years ago, Lieutenant James Cook ordered his sailors to open fire on two remonstrating Gweagal men as he came ashore.

From that day to the present day, courageous Indigenous men and women have sought to be heard regarding the ownership and meaning of this land and the rights of its First Peoples.

Pemulwuy, Yagan, Multeggerah, Truganini, William Cooper, Bill Ferguson, Eddie Mabo, Charles Perkins, Jack Davis, Lowitja O’Donoghue, and others confronted and broke through Stanner’s Great Australian Silence.

However, for the most part, our lived experience has been that we have not been heard.

Hearing us involves more than merely being allowed to speak.

It involves more than merely listening.

It requires respectful engagement, two-way communication, and ultimately action.

It requires the non-Indigenous majority — most importantly governments — to act on what they have been told, and to explain their actions in response.

It is the essential ingredient in shared decision-making of policies, of programs, and crucially it is the essential ingredient for our self-determination.

Download the full speech here: PAT TURNER – AUSTRALIA AND THE WORLD ANNUAL LECTURE – 30.09.20

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Sector has got pandemic ‘by the horns’

Dr Mark Wenitong standing new tropical foliage in Apunipima Cape York Health Council shirt

Our Sector has got the pandemic ‘by the horns’

Enlisting local initiatives, networks and the lessons of the past, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services were quick off the mark when coronavirus came. Their success to date is a powerful testimony to the importance of Indigenous leadership in narrowing the health gap, experts say.

“We have the basic infrastructure, and probably one of the best primary healthcare models in the world, some of the best public health experts in the world,” says Dr Mark Wenitong, a longtime health officer on Cape York. “The ‘vulnerability’ of our remote communities is much more related to longstanding under-investment in health infrastructure than our people as individuals. Don’t discount us as major players in the Australian health system.”

To view the full article in The Citizen click here.

external image of the Victorian Aboriignal Health Service in Fitzroy

The Victorian Aboriginal Health Service in Fitzroy. Image source: The Citizen.

Durri ACMS rebuild getting back on track

The $5.6 million rebuild of the Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service (ACMS) in Kempsey is getting back on track after progress was delayed by nine months due to staffing issues. The work is expected to start in February 2021 with a temporary medical centre to be set up at Kempsey District Hospital. The rebuild will feature modern facilities focused on key Indigenous health needs, including neonatal, chronic illness and mental health care.

To view the ABC News article relating to the rebuild click here.

DRA Architects sketch of new Durri medical centre

Image source: ABC News.

$25 million for safe use of medicines

The federal government has announced a $25 million investment in a Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) for research to improve the safe use of medicines and medicines intervention by pharmacists.

“The new Quality, Safety and Effectiveness of Medicine Use and Medicine Intervention by Pharmacists MRFF Grant Opportunity will support the Quality Use of Medicine and Medicine Safety National Health Priority, and is part of the Government’s significant ongoing investments aimed at improving access to medicines and the safe use of medicines in the community. On World Pharmacists Day, our Government acknowledges the outstanding work of Australia’s pharmacists and pharmacy staff in communities across the nation.”

To read the Minister for Health, Greg Hunt’s media release click here.

range of different coloured pills and tablets

Image source: The Guardian.

TGA rules prescription required for e-cigarettes

Young Australians will be protected by the interim decision of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) to ensure that e-cigarettes and vaping fluids containing nicotine are only available on prescription, Australian Medical Association (AMA) President, Dr Omar Khorshid, said today. “The TGA has recognised the significant risks that come with using e-cigarettes, and the lack of evidence for their role as a quit smoking aid,” Dr Khorshid said.

To view the AMA media release click here

person vaping

Image source: Curtin University news and events.

Funding to protect Victorian mental health and AOD services

The Victorian Government has announced an additional $21 million in funding to ensure mental health and alcohol and other drugs services, including Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations have increased COVID-19 safe protections in place.

To view the media release click here.

industrial site person sitting head on knees with beer bottle by side

Image source: Alcohol Rehab Guide.

Funding for Victorian Aboriginal Family Violence sector

The Victorian Government is boosting Aboriginal-led family violence prevention and responses so that more Aboriginal Victorians can access culturally sensitive support when and where they need it. $18.2 million will be made available to Aboriginal organisations and community groups through the Dhelk Dja Family Violence Fund to provide culturally appropriate responses for both victim survivors and those using or at risk of using violence in the home, including emergency support, family counselling and behaviour change support. Organisations and community groups will be granted funding over two years, giving them more certainty in planning how they deliver family violence services that are tailored to the needs of their communities.

To view the media release click here.

person holding palm to camera with word ENOUGH written on palm of hand

Image source: NITV website.

Extra $13 million for community nursing

The Commonwealth government has allocated an additional $13 million for community nursing to provide remote health professional accessibility to instruction, services and mental health care. An additional $8 million will be supplied to assist employment opportunities for nurses in primary healthcare.

For more information on the $13 million funding click here.

Inala Indigenous Health Service staff attending to patient

Image source: Queensland Health.

ACCHO gambling research webinar

Mallee District Aboriginal Services and Gippsland and East Gippsland Aboriginal Services, in collaboration with La Trobe University have conducted two exploratory studies on gambling. 50 Aboriginal people in regional Victoria were interviewed to identify benefits and harms associated with gambling and what community members thought should be done in response. Using social practice theory, findings of the research will be presented and some of the interventions recommended by research participants will be outlined in a free webinar to be presented by Darlene Thomas, Mallee District Aboriginal Services and Sarah MacLean, La Trobe University on Wednesday 20 September from 12.30–1.30 pm.

To register for the webinar click here.Aboriginal woman with hand across shoulder of Aboriginal woman looking sad

National youth survey report released

Mission Australia has released its National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Report: Youth Survey 2019. This report draws on the findings of its Youth Survey 2019 and highlights the views, concerns, experiences and aspirations of 25,126 young people, 1,578 of whom identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. In response to the findings, the report also provides a range of recommendations.

For more information, please read the media release, report and infographic.

Aboriginal man & Aboriginal child looking at laptop

Image source: Mission Australia website.

QLD – Cairns – Wuchopperen Health Service Ltd

FT Deputy Chief Executive Officer 

An exciting opportunity is available for the position of Deputy Chief Executive Officer in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service based in Cairns.

This full-time, permanent position is responsible for the strategic leadership, direction, management and coordination of the portfolio of Deputy Chief Executive Officer, including the areas of Health Services and Service Integration.

To view the position statement click here.  Applications close 5.00 pm Monday 5 October 2020.

VIC – Shepparton – Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-operative Ltd.

FT Woongi Social and Emotional Wellbeing Program Manager x 1

The Woongi SEWB Program Manager is responsible for managing and delivering on the key objectives of the Woongi service.

The successful applicant will provide leadership and utilise effective work practices that enhance the operation, planning and delivery of culturally appropriate, community based, Alcohol & Other Drugs (AOD) and Social and Emotional Wellbeing (SEWB), Bringing Them Home Re-connections and Traditional Healing Services including early intervention and prevention.

FT Woongi Social and Emotional Wellbeing Group Programs Coordinator x 1

The SEWB Group Programs Coordinator is responsible for coordinating the delivery of a structured program of evidence informed SEWB groups (cultural, healing, recovery and rehabilitation) for clients, families and the broader community, impacted by AOD misuse and/or mental health.

To view the position descriptions for the above vacancies click here. Applications close at 4.00 pm on Friday, 9 October 2020.external view of Rumbalara logo emu against a clinic & Rumbalara logo - emu against curve of black, yellow & red curves

National Centre for Clinical Research on Emerging Drugs (NCCRED) virtual symposium

Innovations in therapeutic practice for methamphetamine use disorder

The 2020 symposium will focus on innovations in therapeutic practice for methamphetamine disorder. The symposium brings together leading national researchers, including presentations from recipients of NCCRED’s Round 2 Seed Funding Program. Recipients will share the most up-to-date aspects of their work and research around methamphetamine and emerging drug use.

11am Friday 20 November 2020

For more details regarding the symposium click here.

crystal methamphetamine

Image source: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: RHD Endgame Strategy virtual launch this Thursday, 24 September at 9am

RHD Endgame Strategy virtual launch

The End Rheumatic Heart Disease Centre of Research Excellence (END RHD CRE) invites you to attend the virtual launch of the RHD Endgame Strategy: The blueprint to eliminate rheumatic heart disease in Australia by 2031.

You can join the session this Thursday 24 September via Zoom, as the Strategy is launched by The Hon. Greg Hunt, MP, Minister for Health, alongside Ms Pat Turner AM, CEO of NACCHO, and Professor Jonathan Carapetis AM, leading RHD expert and senior author of the RHD Endgame Strategy.

In Australia over 5,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are living with RHD, and without urgent action, it is estimated that this number will more than double by 2031. The Endgame Strategy assesses existing and potential strategies to both prevent the next generation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from developing RHD; and improve the quality of life and outcomes for those already living with the disease.

9.00–9.30 am AEST – Thursday, 24 September 2020 – Zoom webinar

Registration is essential, so secure your spot by clicking here.

RHD Endgame Strategy launch banner

WA – East Perth and Mirrabooka

FT Aboriginal Liaison Officer x 2

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service has two Aboriginal Liaison Officer positions available. The primary responsibility of the role is to provide support, care co-ordination and advocacy to Aboriginal clients who are admitted to, already in or are being discharged from hospitals, and are Derbarl Yerrigan clients.

To view the position description click here. Applications close 5.00 pm Monday 28 September 2020.

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service logo & photo of employee at office desk answering the phone

Image source: Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service website.

Feature tile - First Nations-lead pandemic reponse a triumph - two Aboriginal boys holding a sign 'too dangerous to stop in Wilcannia'

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: First Nations-led pandemic response a triumph

Feature Story

Telethon Kids representatives, including Dr Fiona Stanley, have written to The Lancet, describing Australia’s First Nations-led response to COVID-19 as ‘nothing short of a triumph’. Since the beginning of the pandemic in Australia, there have been only 60 First Nations cases nationwide. This represents only 0.7% of all cases, a considerable under-representation, as First Nations people make up 3% of the total population. Only 13% of First Nations cases have needed hospital treatment, none have been in intensive care, and there have been no deaths.

These results have shown how effective (and extremely cost-effective) giving power and capacity to Indigenous leaders is. The response has avoided major illness and deaths and avoided costly care and anguish.

To read the letter published in The Lancet click here.

Wiradjuri man appointed as a Professor

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) has welcomed the appointment of Peter O’Mara as a Professor of Newcastle University. The Chair of the RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Faculty, Professor O’Mara is Director of the University’s Thurru Indigenous Health Unit and a practicing GP in an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation, Tobwabba Aboriginal Medical Service. Professor O’Mara said becoming a GP was not something he grew up believing was possible, “I always had a strong interest in science, but in my early years I believed in the stereotypical view that studying and practicing medicine was for other people – doctors’ children and wealthy families.”

To view the full article about Professor O’Mara click click here.

Professor Peter O'Mara speaking into a microphone at a lecturn

Image source: GP News.

Face masks for our mob

The Australian Government Department of Health has developed an information sheet called How to keep our mob safe using face masks.

To access the editorial click here.

Aaron Simon standing against wall painted with Aboriginal art, wearing an Aboriginal art design face mask

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

Racial Violence in the Australian health system

The statistical story of Indigenous health and death, despite how stark, fails to do justice to the violence of racialised health inequities that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples continue to experience. The Australian health system’s Black Lives Matter moment is best characterised as indifferent; a “business as usual” approach that we know from experience betokens failure. In an article published in The Medical Journal of Australia a range of strategies have been offered, ‘not as a solution, but as some small steps towards a radical reimagining of the Black body within the Australian health system; one which demonstrates a more genuine commitment to the cries of “Black Lives Matter” from Blackfullas in this place right now.’

To read the full article click here.

back of BLM protester holding sign of face of Kevin Yow Yeh who dies in custody at 34 years

Image sourced Twitter @KevinYowYeh.

Water fluoridation required

Poor oral health profoundly affects a person’s ability to eat, speak, socialise, work and learn. It has an impact on social and emotional wellbeing, productivity in the workplace, and quality of life. A higher proportion of Australians who are socially disadvantaged have dental caries. Community water fluoridation is one of the most effective public health interventions of the 20th century. Its success has been attributed to wide population coverage with no concurrent behaviour change required. The authors of a recent article in The Medical Journal of Australia have said the denial of access to fluoridated drinking water for Indigenous Australians is of great concern and have urged the Commonwealth government to mandate that all states and territories maintain a minimum standard of 90% population access to fluoridated water.

To view the full article click here.

close up photo of three Aboriginal children smiling

Image source: University of Melbourne website.

Torres Strait communities taking back control of own healing

Torres Strait Island communities are leading their own healing by addressing the trauma, distress and long-term impacts caused by colonisation. The island communities of Kerriri, Dauan and Saibai will host a series of healing forums coordinated by The Healing Foundation, in conjunction with Mura Kosker Sorority Incorporated; the leading family and community wellbeing service provider in the Torres Strait. Identifying the need for healing in the Torres Strait, Mura Kosker Sorority Incorporated Board President Mrs Regina Turner said: “We believe that the forums will provide Torres Strait communities a voice for creating their own healing solutions.”

To view the Healing Foundation’s media release click ere.

Wabunau Geth dance group from Kaurareg Nation

Wabunau Geth dance group from Kaurareg Nation. Image source: The Healing Foundation.

New tool to manage healthcare trial

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples can trial a new tool to help them manage their healthcare with the launch of a pilot program in Perth of the GoShare digital platform which has supported over 1,000 patients so far. Launched by the Minister for Indigenous Australians, the Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, the pilot program enables doctors, nurses and other clinicians at St John of God Midland Public Hospital in Perth to prescribe a tailored information pack for patients. The electronic packs may include video-based patient stories, fact sheets, apps and tools on a range of health and wellness topics. They are prepared and adapted according to the patient’s health literacy levels and are being sent by email or text to improve their integrated care and chronic disease self-management.

To view the Australian Digital Health Agency’s media release click here.

GoShare Healthcare digital platform logo - clip art hand or hand

Image source: Healthily website.