NACCHO and @RACGP National Guide to a preventative health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people : 2 new podcasts released #MentalHealth Dr #TimSenior and #Smoking Professor David Thomas @MenziesResearch Plus Interview Dr @normanswan

 ” There’s quite a lot that is in new in this third edition. We surveyed general practitioners across Australia and got a fantastic response rate. And so we came up with new topics that were about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, preventing child maltreatment, family abuse and violence, lung cancer, as well as some more emphasis on the health of young people.

But of course the existing topics which comprise the vast bulk of primary healthcare and preventive interventions like screening for alcohol, early detection of diabetes, promoting stop smoking, the benefits of immunisation, child health, like picking up anaemia early in children who are at risk, these things were revised to reflect changes in research literature.”

Dr Sophie Couzos is one of the editors of the guide. Sophie is an Associate Professor in General Practice and Rural Medicine at James Cook University in Queensland, and the project lead on the new national guide

 ” Many of the problems that confront Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders are social, they are about identity, they are about self-determination, they are about poverty and disadvantage, they are about access to education.

You might not blame a GP for thinking, well, what am I going to do about all those, because those are the upstream causes of the problems that Aboriginal people can confront, not all, but can confront.

But you are arguing presumably that there are just simple things that GPs could do that would make a difference without having to change the world.”

Norman Swan Radio full Radio National Interview with Dr Sophie Couzos See Part 2 below

2 National Guide podcasts have been released this month:

bit.ly/2DZ5pzm

A/Prof Peter O’Mara, NACCHO Chair John Singer Minister Ken Wyatt & RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel launch the National guide at Parliament house 28 March

A new guide for Aboriginal preventive health was recently  released by the RACGP and NACCHO . It’s aimed at stopping conditions from developing before they occur, and also secondary prevention, which is existing conditions, from getting worse, and that’s through screening, testing and the like.

And that is made easier when a general practitioner is clued in about what conditions the people they are treating are more likely to develop.

That’s especially important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are at increased risk of a variety of medical problems, not least being type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

That is what has prompted the development of this preventative health guide for GPs and Aboriginal healthcare services. The guide outlines health checks doctors can do, questions to ask that are aimed at picking up some of these preventable conditions.

Download the Guideline and supporting documentation

Part 2 Sophie Couzos: It’s a pleasure to be here, thanks Norman.

Norman Swan: What is the significance of this guide? You’d think that doctors should know what to do about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in terms of what to check and so on. Why do you need a guide like this?

Sophie Couzos: There’s a lot of evidence to show that doctors and healthcare providers could do a lot better in offering preventive health assessments or health checks to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

One of the reasons is that healthcare providers just don’t know what they should offer, how they should have a conversation, what they should talk about, what are the priority issues.

There’s a lot of variability and there’s a lot of clinical practice uncertainty as well. So when we developed the national guide way back in 2000, the late, great Dr Puggy Hunter and myself got together and thought, well, let’s provide some evidence-based guidelines to help healthcare providers offer the right sort of assessment for Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

Norman Swan: This is presumably not just for doctors and Aboriginal health workers in Aboriginal medical services, very specific community controlled organisations of which I think there are 300 outlets around Australia. Presumably a significant percentage of Aboriginal people go to regular general practitioners, so it’s for regular GPs too who’ve got Aboriginal patients.

Sophie Couzos: Absolutely. I call them mainstream general practices and they have an important role to play.

Norman Swan: There is a totally unacceptable gap, depending how you measure it, of between 11 and 17 years, that’s the life expectancy gap, but there’s all sorts of other gaps as well in terms of heart disease, kidney disease, child development and so on, and you take that comprehensive lifespan approach in this preventative guide.

Sophie Couzos: Prevention really starts from the antenatal period, and there’s preventive interventions at every point, and there’s a tremendous opportunity when a patient presents to a healthcare service provider to use that time to consider how disease can be prevented and what sort of risk factors can be identified in order to pick up conditions that may be asymptomatic, and that means that a person might have a disease and not know it, and so a preventive health check is there to pick that up. Or to have a discussion about preventing disease completely. A great example for that intervention is immunisation.

Norman Swan: Many of the problems that confront Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders are social, they are about identity, they are about self-determination, they are about poverty and disadvantage, they are about access to education.

You might not blame a GP for thinking, well, what am I going to do about all those, because those are the upstream causes of the problems that Aboriginal people can confront, not all, but can confront.

But you are arguing presumably that there are just simple things that GPs could do that would make a difference without having to change the world.

Sophie Couzos: Absolutely. I mean, problems like low birth weight can be prevented.

When you say that some aspects of Aboriginal health seem to be overwhelming for healthcare providers, well, simple things like a good antenatal care, good quality healthcare and preventive healthcare and patient-centred care can make a huge difference to health outcomes, and this is the purpose of the national guide, is to make the evidence for these sorts of interventions and choices that healthcare providers can make to improve quality care, to make it easy, make it accessible.

Norman Swan: So as you said at the beginning, it’s been going for a while. This is the third edition. What’s new in the third edition?

Sophie Couzos: There’s quite a lot that is in new in this third edition. We surveyed general practitioners across Australia and got a fantastic response rate. And so we came up with new topics that were about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, preventing child maltreatment, family abuse and violence, lung cancer, as well as some more emphasis on the health of young people.

But of course the existing topics which comprise the vast bulk of primary healthcare and preventive interventions like screening for alcohol, early detection of diabetes, promoting stop smoking, the benefits of immunisation, child health, like picking up anaemia early in children who are at risk, these things were revised to reflect changes in research literature.

You’d think that Australia really had this right, you’d think that our Australian healthcare system is already configured around patient-centred care, but it isn’t. So there’s a lot of work to be done in improving Aboriginal people’s access to preventive healthcare, primary healthcare.

Norman Swan: So when you talk about poor access, Sophie, what are you talking about?

Sophie Couzos: I’m talking about two pieces of information that is regularly released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare which shows that access to Medicare and access to the PBS, which is the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, is much less on a per capita basis for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples than it is for other Australians.

Norman Swan: So for the level of ill health, they are underutilising what’s available.

Sophie Couzos: Yes, that’s right…

Norman Swan: And I think we’ve covered this before some years ago with the late Gavin Mooney where in fact suburbs like Toorak, Armadale, Vaucluse, Nedlands, have much higher proportion to use of these Medicare and PBS items and paradoxically they are healthier, and if you look at postcodes for Aboriginal people they are at a very low level.

Sophie Couzos: That’s right, and here’s an easy example for you, the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, for every dollar that a non-Indigenous Australian spends or is expended, only 63c is spent on an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person. That is really astonishing, given the three times rate of morbidity and disease that exists in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

Norman Swan: So circling back to the guide, this identifies people who might need statins or anti high blood pressure tablets or other treatments, and increase the access to them.

Sophie Couzos: Absolutely, and having that continuity of care with your patient.

Norman Swan: Sophie, thanks for joining us.

Sophie Couzos: It’s a real pleasure, thanks Norman.

Norman Swan: Dr Sophie Couzos is project lead on the National Guide to Preventive Health Assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People, and a public health physician who works with the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council. The third edition of the national guide is being launched on Wednesday at Parliament House, and it will also be available on the website of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, NACCHO .

 

 

Minister @KenWyattMP launches NACCHO @RACGP National guide for healthcare professionals to improve health of #Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients

 

All of our 6000 staff in 145 member services in 305 health settings across Australia will have access to this new and update edition of the National Guide. It’s a comprehensive edition for our clinicians and support staff that updates them all with current medical practice.

“NACCHO is committed to quality healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, and will work with all levels of government to ensure accessibility for all.”

NACCHO Chair John Singer said the updated National Guide would help governments improve health policy and lead initiatives that support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You can Download the Guide via this LINK

A/Prof Peter O’Mara, NACCHO Chair John Singer Minister Ken Wyatt & RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel launch the National guide at Parliament house this morning

“Prevention is always better than cure. Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

Minister Ken Wyatt highlights what is new to the 3rd Edition of the National Guide-including FASD, lung cancer, young people lifecycle, family abuse & violence and supporting families to optimise child safety & wellbeing : Pic Lisa Whop SEE Full Press Release Part 2 Below

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) have joined forces to produce a guide that aims to improve the level of healthcare currently being delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and close the gap.

Chair of RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Associate Professor Peter O’Mara said the third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (the National Guide) is an important resource for all health professionals to deliver best practice healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.

“The National Guide will support all healthcare providers, not just GPs, across Australia to improve prevention and early detection of disease and illness,” A/Prof O’Mara said.

“The prevention and early detection of disease and illness can improve people’s lives and increase their lifespans.

“The National Guide will support healthcare providers to feel more confident that they are looking for health issues in the right way.”

RACGP President Dr Bastian Seidel said the RACGP is committed to tackling the health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

“The National Guide plays a vital role in closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health disparity,” Dr Seidel said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should have equal access to quality healthcare across Australia and the National guide is an essential part of ensuring these services are provided.

“GPs and other healthcare providers who implement the recommendations within the National Guide will play an integral role in reducing health disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, and ensuring culturally responsive and appropriate healthcare is always available.”

The updated third edition of the National Guide can be found on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website.

 

Free to download on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website:

http://www.racgp.org.au/national-guide/

and NACCHO

Part 2 Prevention and Early Diagnosis Focus for a Healthier Future

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians

The critical role of preventive care and tackling the precursors of chronic disease is being boosted in the latest guide for health professionals working to close the gap in health equality for Indigenous Australians.

Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, today launched the updated third edition of the National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Prevention is always better than cure,” said Minister Wyatt. “Already one of the most widely used clinical guidelines in Australia, this new edition includes critical information on lung cancer, Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and preventing child and family abuse and violence.

“The National Guide maximises the opportunities at every clinic visit to prevent disease and to find it early.

“It will help increase vigilance over previously undiagnosed conditions, by promoting early intervention and by supporting broader social change to help individuals and families improve their wellbeing.”

The guide, which was first published in 2005, is a joint project between the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners RACGP).

“To give you some idea of the high regard in which it is held, the last edition was downloaded 645,000 times since its release in 2012,” said Minister Wyatt.

“The latest edition highlights the importance of individual, patient-centred care and has been developed to reflect local and regional needs.

“Integrating resources like the national guide across the whole health system plays a pivotal role in helping us meet our Closing the Gap targets.

“The Turnbull Government is committed to accelerating positive change and is investing in targeted activities that have delivered significant reductions in the burden of disease.

“Rates of heart disease, smoking and binge drinking are down. We are on track to achieve the child mortality target for 2018 and deaths associated with kidney and respiratory diseases have also reduced.”

The National Guide is funded under the Indigenous Australian’s Health Programme as part of a record $3.6 billion investment across four financial years.

The RACGP received $429,000 to review, update, publish and distribute the third edition, in hard copy and electronic formats.

The National Guide is available on the RACGP website or by contacting RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health on 1800 000 251 or aboriginalhealth@racgp.org.au.

 

 

 

Aboriginal #SexualHealth News : Minister @KenWyattMP to launch the third edition NACCHO and @RACGP National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’

 

” In the fifth part of a series focusing on the coming third edition of the ‘National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’, newsGP looks at Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ sexual health and prevention from blood-borne viruses.”

The third edition of the National Guide will be launched next Wednesday 28 March by Minister Wyatt at Parliament House Canberra see content details Part 2 below

RACGP Website here

NACCHO Aboriginal Sexual Health 40 Previous articles

The NACCHO/RACGP National Guide is a resource created for primary healthcare practitioners to help them deliver best practice preventive healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people anywhere in Australia.

The National Guide is user-friendly with information that is accurate and relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities. It is supported by evidence-based recommendations, good practice points, and child, youth and adult lifecycle wall charts with age-specific recommendations.

New topics 3 edition :

• Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

• Interventions to prevent child maltreatment – optimising child health and wellbeing

• Antenatal care section is now expanded

• Family abuse and violence

• Lung cancer

• Young people lifecycle summary wall chart to complement the existing child and adult charts.

Download

National-Guide-prerelease-info-Flyer-2017

Part 1 : Sexual health education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Edited by Morgan Liotta

The National Guide details several resources that aim to empower Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities through greater levels of sexual health education.

Sexually transmitted infection (STI) and blood-borne virus (BBV) rates within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations can often be difficult to identify and diagnose, due to certain cultural beliefs and a potential lack of access to appropriate healthcare in remote areas. But education and culturally appropriate primary healthcare play an essential role in helping to increase diagnosis these communities

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation’s (NACCHO) and the RACGP’s National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (National Guide) states that the prevalence and incidence of some STIs can also be challenging to estimate accurately due to under-identification of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status, but that rates are increasing.

The National Guide advocates for interventions by healthcare professionals to help decrease rates of STIs and BBVs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Routine screening, education on and accessibility of condoms, hepatitis B and human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programs, and needle and syringe exchange programs, can all contribute to early diagnoses and prevention of STIs and BBVs, as well as appropriate management for those diagnosed with infection.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are over-represented in prison populations and have high rates of receptive sharing of syringes, both risk factors for acquiring hepatitis C. As a consequence, the hepatitis C notification rate among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has increased by more than 20% between 2012–16, while remaining stable in non-Indigenous Australians. With new, effective treatments now available for hepatitis C, eliminating the stigma associated with the infection is a crucial strategy.

Recent research reveals that gonorrhoea notifications are seven times more common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than for non-Indigenous Australians. The chlamydia notification rate in major cities was found to be nearly three times as high among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than non-Indigenous Australians, increasing to five times higher in remote areas.

In addition, rates of syphilis are again increasing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, after declining up to 2010.

Video added by NACCHO

The National Guide reports that rates of HIV were more than two times higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples than for non-Indigenous Australians in 2015, and that infectious syphilis notifications have increased significantly due to a 2015 outbreak in Far North Queensland. Current syphilis infection in northern Australia is considered ‘out of control’ in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander healthcare organisations.

One example of safe-sex education is the Condom tree program in Western Australia, which aims to reduce cost barriers and feelings of shame and embarrassment by providing free condoms in local communities.

The Department of Health recently released a series of videos voiced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to help promote STI prevention in their communities. Initiatives such as these videos are designed to help reduce feelings of shame or stigma Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may have attached to STIs and/or BBVs.

A diverse range of support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and healthcare workers, including a comprehensive HIV resource, is available for communities throughout Australia.

The National Guide details more resources, with the aim of empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities through greater levels of sexual health education and the provision of high-quality culturally appropriate primary care.

The National Guide covers further information on sexual health in the following chapters:

  • Sexual health and blood-borne viruses
  • Antenatal care
  • The health of young people
  • Alcohol
  • Family abuse and violence

The National Guide was conceived by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) in 2001, and is now in its third edition being developed in partnership by NACCHO and The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP).

Part 2 What is the National Guide? Edition 3

Who is it for?

All health professionals delivering primary healthcare for the benefit of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Why use it?

• To help prevent disease, detect early and unrecognised disease, promote health, and consider broader social interventions, while allowing for local and regional variations.

• For evidence-based recommendations and good practice points.

• For the child, young people and adult lifecycle wall charts with age-specific recommendations.

• For the resource lists.

When will it be published?

The third edition of the National Guide and following associated resources will be available in early 2018:

• National Guide website – improved design and usability

• National Guide recommendations – limited print run for ACCHSs

• National Guide evidence base – downloadable PDF.

What’s happening in 2018 to accompany the launch of the

National Guide?

• The third edition of the National Guide will be distributed to NACCHO Affiliates and health services.

• NACCHO and RACGP will be hosting workshops across Australia to support implementation of the National Guide.

What’s new in the third edition?

New topics:

• Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

• Interventions to prevent child maltreatment – optimising child health and wellbeing

• Antenatal care section is now expanded

• Family abuse and violence

• Lung cancer

• Young people lifecycle summary wall chart to complement the existing child and adult charts.

How to access the National Guide:

The third edition of the National Guide will be March 28

Free to download on the RACGP website and the NACCHO website:

http://www.racgp.org.au/national-guide/

and http://www.naccho.org.au

For further information, contact

RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health on 1800 000 251 or aboriginalhealth@racgp.org.au

NACCHO @RACGP Aboriginal Health and #Nutrition : The next RACGP NACCHO National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal people will examine the health effects of food insecurity.

 ” In the second of a series focusing on the coming third edition of the RACGP NACCHO National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, newsGP examines the health effects of food insecurity.

The National Guide suggests interventions to improve food security include school-based nutrition programs, structured workshops, cooking classes, demonstrations and community kitchens.

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the RACGP’s National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people will cover further information on food insecurity in these chapters:

  • Overweight and obesity
  • Physical activity
  • Diabetes prevention
  • Child health: Growth failure
  • Oral and dental health

To be launched at Parliament House Canberra 28 March by Minister Ken Wyatt

Ms Morgan Liotta Morgan is a newsGP staff writer

The next RACGP NACCHO National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal people will examines the health effects of food insecurity.

Food insecurity can be attributed to various physical and economic factors present in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including limited food supplies, and lack of affordability of quality produce and nutritional education.

Traditional bush foods are a source of nutrition for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in remote communities; however, when they are not available communities can rely heavily on community store and take away food.

A recent study by the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) reveals that a third of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are not consuming adequate amounts of fresh fruits and vegetables, while rates of sugar consumption are high.

Sugar consumption was targeted in recent public health campaigns initiated by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, such as Rethink sugary drink and Apunipima Cape York Health Council’s

Sugary drinks proper no good – Drink more water Youfla, both of which aimed to raise awareness about the detrimental health outcomes of over-consumption of sugar.

With access to supplies and lack of education part of the issue of food insecurity, financial burden is often also a significant factor for many residents of remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities where, in comparison with urban centres, prices for fresh food can be up to 70% higher. Residents may have no choice but to opt for cheaper, less nutritious options.

Limited awareness of nutrition may also contribute to poorer health outcomes, with people’s diets influenced from an early age.

Together, all of these circumstances can result in various adverse health outcomes, including overweight and obesity, diabetes, failure to thrive in children, dental health and kidney disease.

Research from 2014–15 showed an association between dietary behaviour and other socioeconomic and health characteristics. For example, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples aged 15 and older who were employed were more likely than those who were unemployed to report adequate fruit intake (48% compared with 39%).

Evidence also suggests that people who experience poverty are more likely to maximise calories per dollar spent. Foods rich in fats, refined starches and sugars represent the lowest-cost options, with healthy options like lean meats, grains and fruits and vegetables more expensive.

Engaging and participating in traditional food management has been established as a contributing factor for improved social and emotional wellbeing. In addition to the benefits of consuming traditional foods, participating in the sharing of knowledge and traditional practices has been shown to have significant benefits for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities in urban settings, as well as rural and remote areas.

The Council of Australian Governments’ (COAG) National strategy for food security in remote Indigenous communities aims to promote strategic action for Aboriginal health workers and GPs working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to improve food security. The strategy states that this effort requires ‘a multi-faceted and coordinated approach from all levels of government, [Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander] people and the non-government and private sectors to develop and implement effective and targeted actions.’

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) report, A picture of overweight and obesity in Australia, shows that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and low socioeconomic populations are more likely to be overweight. As a result, the burden of diet-related chronic disease is high among people in these communities. This outcome can be traced back to issues with food security.

The National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (National Guide) suggests that interventions to improve food security include school-based nutrition education programs, structured workshops, cooking classes, demonstrations and community kitchens (including peer-to-peer education). Evidence suggests these programs can improve participants’ food security through developing cooking, shopping and budgeting skills, and can also reduce social isolation.

Initiatives such as fruit and vegetable delivery programs (eg the Good Tucker All Round program at Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation) and community-led programs that grow nutritious, sustainable produce for community members can also assist with improving food security.