NACCHO Aboriginal Health scholarships: Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme close 15 January

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Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme

Applications open now; close 15 January 2017

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme (PHMSS) is available to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who are studying a course in ATSI health work, allied health, dentistry/oral health, medicine, midwifery or nursing.

It is an Australian Government initiative designed to encourage and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Dr Puggy Hunter – NACCHO Chairperson 1991-2001 BIO

Dr. Arnold “Puggy” Hunter was a pioneer in Australian Aboriginal health and recipient of the 2001 Australian Human Rights Medal.

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 150 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996.

He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council.

He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

Puggy had a long and passionate role in the struggle for justice for Aboriginal people. He was born in Darwin in 1951, where his parents had fled Broome and Western Australian native welfare policies.[1]

Numerous Australian scholarships are named in his honour.

He was quoted in Australian Parliament as saying: “You white people have the hearing problems because you do not seem to hear us

Application form

Online application form 

Applications are open now; close on 15 January 2017.

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course.
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

ACN receives high volume of applications; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship scheme is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

 

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship awarded to Queensland paramedic

PH winner

Source of contribution

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship provides financial assistance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are intending to enrol or are enrolled in undergraduate studies in a health-related discipline.

It was established in recognition of Dr Arnold “Puggy” Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

CASSIE Luck, of Mooloolah, has been awarded a scholarship funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing to pursue a paramedic career through the University of the Sunshine Coast.

Mrs Luck, 32, completed USC’s Tertiary Preparation Pathway Program (TPP) last year.

She will receive the Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship, which entitles her to $15,000 each year for the duration of her Paramedic Science degree at USC.

“The scholarship will help pay for my university fees and textbooks and also take the pressure off from having to work four days a week while studying full-time,” she said.

Mrs Luck, who has worked in retail and as a receptionist, said she had wanted to become a paramedic since she graduated from Beerwah State High School in 1997.

“I have enjoyed getting back into study through the TPP program,” she said.

“USC has a great atmosphere with great tutors, lecturers and facilities

Real “good news” stories: Aboriginal healthcare a passion for Emily Hunter

Emily-Hunter-MAIN

 Ms Hunter’s father,the late Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter, was the Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and was an adviser to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs and its inquiry into Indigenous health.

NACCHO:Real stories of real people who are working to deliver better health outcomes for Aboriginal people

The significant contribution made to Aboriginal healthcare in the Kimberley has made Notre Dame Nursing graduate, Emily Hunter, a well respected community member in the eyes of her patients.

More information

Ms Hunter said she was “very proud” of being recognised as an Aboriginal Registered Nurse in her local community and would like to encourage more nurses and healthcare professionals to consider working in rural and remote Western Australia.

After graduating from The University of Notre Dame Australia’s Broome Campus in 2004, Ms Hunter completed her graduate program at Broome Hospital where she is currently employed as a Registered Nurse.

She divides her time between the emergency department and triage which puts her in close contact with nearly all of Broome’s inbound and outbound patients.

Over the past eight years at Broome Hospital, Ms Hunter has applied her clinical knowledge to many areas including the general ward, theatre, day surgery, paediatric ward, outpatients, infection control and the medical imaging department.

Despite the challenges of working in a regional location, Ms Hunter says she thoroughly enjoys her role and takes pride in delivering quality healthcare.

“I think the best part about working in country health is the initial help you give someone as well as the hands-on nature of the job,” Ms Hunter said.

“Being an Aboriginal woman and having lived in the Kimberley my whole life, I’m known to many of our patients who can relate to me and place their trust in me to look after them.

“Having witnessed the lack of quality healthcare present in many Aboriginal communities throughout my childhood, I felt compelled to enter into a career where I could assist in providing these essential services to Aboriginal people.”

Ms Hunter, a mother of three, first enrolled in a Bachelor of Education at Notre Dame’s Broome Campus to seek a career in primary school teaching after working as a bookkeeper for several years.

However, she said something inside her told her to follow in her father’s footsteps and enter the field of Aboriginal healthcare.

Ms Hunter’s father, Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter, was the Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and was an adviser to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs and its inquiry into Indigenous health.

For his significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health he received an honorary doctorate from James Cook University and has an Australian Government funded scholarship, the Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship, named in his honour which assists Indigenous undergraduate students studying health-related disciplines.

Ms Hunter said the support she received from her family gave her the values of compassion, respect and tolerance. She also acquired extensive local knowledge and vital communication skills from her family, which are important in her role.

“My parents always expressed to us the value of education and they were extremely supportive of me and my career goals,” Ms Hunter said.

“As with anything in life, to achieve success you need to put in the hard work. With Notre Dame offering the Bachelor of Nursing program on its Broome Campus, there’s more opportunity for students in the Kimberley to study this course and work in an extremely rewarding area.

“The support I had from the Broome community and people from the Kimberley region was priceless and really enhanced my learning experience at Notre Dame.”

Thinking of studying Nursing at Notre Dame’s Broome Campus? For course information and contact details, please visit http://www.nd.edu.au/broome/courses or call the Prospective Students Office on (08) 9433 0555.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Michelle Ebbs: Tel (08) 9433 0610; Mob 0408 959 138
Leigh Dawson: Tel (08) 9433 0569; Mob 0405 441 093