NACCHO and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : National @NACCHOChair #NSW @Walgett_AMS #VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @Apunipima #WA South West #SA PLAHS #NT @CAACongress @DanilaDilba #Tas Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

1.1 National : NACCHO Chair meets Productivity Commissioner to discuss current evaluation of Indigenous government policies and programs

1.2 AMA President in National Press Club address supports Uluru Statement from the Heart

1.3 National Chair of AMSANT and CEO of of Anyinginyi Aboriginal Health Corporation Barbara Shaw will deliver the opening plenary for the Indigenous Health Justice Conference in Darwin

2. NSW : The Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service and the Dharriwaa Elders Group have both expressed concerns about saltwater solution for drought and the potential effect on community health.

3. VIC : VACCHO partners with other peak health organisations to develop and support 8 actions for a A Healthier Start for Victorians Strategy

4.1  QAIHC will hold Youth Health Summit in September

4. 2 Qld : The Apunipima ACCHO TIS Team launches smoke-free signage at Charkil Om in Napranum Cape York 

5. WA : South West Aboriginal Medical Service in partnership to upgrade youth centre

6. SA : PLAHS ACCHO and Port Lincoln community come together for this year’s NAIDOC Week events .

7.1 NT : Congress CEO, Donna Ah Chee delivering the powerful history of the Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program 

7.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin mobile clinic provides back to school health checks for Palmerston Indigenous Village

8. TAS : Two seats should be set aside for Tasmanian Aboriginal MHAs to be chosen by Aboriginal people in an enlarged State Parliament, traditional owners say.

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : NACCHO Chair meets Productivity Commissioner to discuss  current evaluation of Indigenous government policies and programs

Donnella Mills Acting Chair of NACCHO this week met in Cairns with Romlie Mokak Productivity Commissioner to discuss the current Indigenous evaluation strategy : pictured above Left to Right Donnella , Romlie , Wuchopperen Chair  Sandra Levers and CEO Dania Ahwang

The Australian Government has asked the Productivity Commission to develop a whole-of-government evaluation strategy for policies and programs affecting Indigenous Australians, to be used by all Australian Government agencies. The Commission will also review the performance of agencies against the strategy over time.

They will consult widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, communities and organisations, and with all levels of government. We will also consult with non-Indigenous organisations and individuals responsible for administering and delivering relevant policies and programs.

The Commission released an issues paper to guide people in preparing a submission. It sets out some of the issues and questions the Commission has identified as relevant at the early stage of the project. Participants should provide evidence to support their views, including data and specific examples where possible.

The paper was released on 26 June 2019.

Initial submissions are due by Friday 23 August 2019.

More info Submissions HERE

1.2 AMA President in National Press Club address supports Uluru Statement from the Heart

 “The ongoing failure to address Indigenous health is also unforgivable and unacceptable. There are immediate things we can do to turn things around.

The AMA supports the Uluru Statement from the Heart. The Australian Parliament must make this a national priority.

Giving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people a say in the decisions that affect their lives would allow for healing through recognition of past and current injustices. It would underpin all Government endeavours to close the health and life expectancy gap.

We need to also look at and address the broader social determinants. This requires cooperation and unity of purpose from all relevant Ministers and portfolios.

We must take out the politics and fearmongering. We must do the right thing by the First Australians. The AMA welcomed the stated intent of the Minister for Indigenous Australians, Ken Wyatt, to hold a referendum on Constitutional recognition for Indigenous peoples.

It is time for unity. Let’s build on that. ”

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, who addressed the National Press Club as part of Family Doctor Week, 

Download full speech HERE

AMA President Press Club Address

1.3 National Chair of AMSANT and CEO of of Anyinginyi Aboriginal Health Corporation Barbara Shaw will deliver the opening plenary for the Indigenous Health Justice Conference in Darwin

Also speaking will be Donella Mills (Chair) Lawyer and A/Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), Donella is leading the development of Health Justice Partnerships in North Queensland and is recognised nationally as a leader in this field in the Indigenous context.

 Indigenous Health Justice Conference, 13 & 14 August 2019. #NILC2019 #IHJC2019

Download the full program HERE 

2. NSW : The Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service and the Dharriwaa Elders Group have both expressed concerns about saltwater solution for drought and the potential effect on community health.

Key points:

  • Residents and some experts are concerned about the health implications of bore water high in sodium
  • It may taste bad, but there are no regulated health-based limits on sodium levels in drinking water
  • A process of reverse osmosis is used to take sodium out of drinking water, but councils are worried about the cost

Chairman of the Elders Group Clem Dodd said the bore water was not healthy.

“You got to have water. I don’t care who you are — animal or person, you can’t go without water,” he said.

“But too much salt in it [is not good] … you got to get good water.”

The salt in the Bourke and Walgett bore water meets the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines but it exceeds the aesthetic (taste) limit.

There is no health-based sodium limit in those guidelines.

Health authorities contacted local doctors about potential health implications for patients with kidney disease, high blood pressure, heart failure, or who are pregnant.

‘Too much salt’

Jacqui Webster, a salt reduction expert from the George Institute for Global Health, has been working with the Walgett community on improving health outcomes there.

She said, while most salt in the average diet came from food, high salt levels in drinking water was a genuine health concern in these communities.

“Too much salt in the diet increases blood pressure, and increased blood pressure is one of the key contributors to premature death from heart disease and stroke in Australia,” Dr Webster said.

“You’ve got a high proportion of the community who are Aboriginal people, and we know Aboriginal communities already suffer disproportionately from high rates of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney disease.

“It’s really important that poor diets — including the high sodium content of the water — are addressed.”

Dr Webster said sodium could also make the drinking water taste unpleasant and people may turn to sugary drinks instead, which could compound health issues.

 Read full report HERE 

3. VIC : VACCHO partners with other peak health organisations to develop and support 8 actions for a A Healthier Start for Victorians Strategy

This consensus statement outlines practical recommendations to the Victorian Government to turn the tide on obesity. The focus is on children and young people to give them the best chance for a healthier start to life.

Download: A Healthier Start for Victorians – Summary (PDF, 701 KB)

Download: A Healthier Start for Victorians – Full Report (PDF, 2 MB)

A Healthier Start for Victorians has been developed by the Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Roundtable and is supported by a broad base of health and wellbeing organisations.

 

Over the past two decades, Victorian adult obesity rates have increased by 40 per cent and today two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese. Almost one in four Victorian children are overweight or obese.

The combined impact of poor diet and being overweight or obese is one of Victoria’s greatest health challenges.

Overweight and obesity, unhealthy diets and physical inactivity are avoidable risks for chronic health conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and several cancers.

A Healthier Start for Victorians lists eight practical recommendations to the Victorian Government to turn the tide on obesity.

These recommendations focus on children and young people to give them the best chance for a healthier start to life. They are as follows.

Action to prevent obesity in Victoria

1.Engage and support local communities to develop and lead their own healthy eating and physical activity initiatives

These should be community-based and focus on local areas or population groups with the highest rates of overweight and obesity.

2.Protect children from unhealthy food and drink marketing

This includes prohibiting advertising, promotion and sponsorship in publicly owned and managed places. Priority should be given to areas around schools, children’s sporting events and activities, and public transport.

3.Implement a statewide public education campaign to encourage healthy eating

This should focus on population groups with the highest rates of overweight and obesity.

4.Implement initiatives to improve family diets, particularly in children’s early years

This should focus on increasing food literacy and prioritising specific population groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

5.Support schools to increase students’ physical activity and physical literacy

This should take a whole-of-school approach, be reflected in the curriculum and be supported by training and professional development.

6.Increase the scope of and strengthen compliance with the existing School Canteens and Other School Food Services Policy

This should take a whole-of-school approach, be reflected in the curriculum and be backed by a monitoring and enforcement framework.

7.Develop a whole-of-government policy that requires healthy food procurement

This should incorporate the Healthy Choices guidelines and apply to all publicly owned and managed facilities and settings.

8.Develop and implement a strategy to get Victorians walking more

This should emphasise the need for walking infrastructure and urban design to make it safer and easier for people to walk to local destinations like shops, public transport, and schools.

Recommendations should be supported by an overarching Victorian obesity prevention plan that is overseen by a ministerial taskforce. This will ensure a whole-of-government approach to addressing obesity prevention as a Victorian health priority.

4.1  QAIHC will hold Youth Health Summit in September

Addressing disparity amongst our youth, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisation (ATSICCHO) Model of Care is designed to be responsive to the needs of the communities that we serve.

According to the 2016 ABS Census data, one third of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders are aged between 15–34 years. As such, it is vital that we monitor the health of this cohort to support a stronger First Nations culture in Australia’s future.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people are overrepresented in youth justice, and alcohol and other drugs are at harmful levels of use. Childhood obesity, rheumatic heart disease, social and emotional distress, and trauma are also present at high rates. To support our young people to thrive, physically and mentally, QAIHC and its Member Services are developing a Youth Health Strategy 2019–2022.

Central to the development of the Strategy is the QAIHC Youth Health Summit 2019. The Summit will be held in Brisbane on 12 September and is intended to be an open conversation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people (ages 18-25) about their current state of wellbeing.

The Summit will be focussing on Calm Minds, Strong Bodies, Resilient Spirit addressing a range of topics including:

  • Exercise
  • Nutrition
  • Healthy relationships
  • Support networks
  • Mental health
  • Sexual health
  • LGBTQI needs
  • Chronic disease.

Sessions will be facilitated in an environment of cultural safety to promote honest and free discussions between delegates.

If you’re an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person aged 18-25 living in Queensland and want to express an interest in attending, go to

Website 

4.2 Qld : The Apunipima ACCHO TIS Team launches smoke-free signage at Charkil Om in Napranum Cape York 

The TIS Team launched smoke-free signage at Charkil Om in Napranum. Professor Tom Calma, National Coordinator for the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program unveiled the signage alongside HAT member Roy Chavathun and Sonia Schuh PHC Manager.

TIS staff Dallas McKeown, Neil Kaigey, Darlene Roberts and Lorna Bosen hosted the launch and provided health information to those present.

5. WA : South West Aboriginal Medical Service in partnership to upgrade youth centre

The Bunbury PCYC unveiled its newly renovated youth space on Monday, July 15, designed to foster positive social and emotional development for local youth.

The upgrade is the product of a partnership between the youth centre, South West Aboriginal Medical Service, Breakaway Aboriginal Corporation and the Red Cross, with financial support from the City of Bunbury.

Originally published HERE

The upgrade included new interiors, a pool table, an air hockey table, a games console, a TV and lounges to complement the existing sporting facilities available at the Bunbury PCYC, which is used by more than 100 people weekly.

The Bunbury PCYC is one of 19 community youth centres in WA and provides a number of activities and accredited training programs for youth people of all ages.

South West Aboriginal Medical Service chief executive officer Lesley Nelson said the space was bound to have a positive impact on both the social and emotional development of local youth.

“The environment in which young people spend their time has been found to decisively impact on a young person’s health and development,” she said.

“We currently host a very active and engaged youth program at the Bunbury PCYC so we have been able to involve them directly in the planning of this space.

“With their help, we have been able to design an area that has a really positive energy, a space that encourages social development and active participation.”

Breakaway Aboriginal Corporation chair Renee Pitt echoed Ms Nelson’s sentiments and said the nature of the all inclusive programs allowed youth to come together in a positive environment.

“Breakaway and their partners are creating a safe environment where the kid’s involvement has given them ownership of the space, care and responsibility,” she said.

“The programs and activities that are being offered is emphasising the uniqueness of coming together that has not been available previously until now.

6. SA : PLAHS ACCHO and Port Lincoln community come together for this year’s NAIDOC Week events .

NAIDOC Week in 2019 had the theme of ‘Voice, Treaty, Truth’ with Port Lincoln celebrations beginning with the community march along Tasman Terrace on July 5.

Aboriginal Family Support Services hosted a dress up disco for children at the Mallee Park Clubrooms on July 9 before the annual Community Cookout was held at the Mallee Park Wombat Pit the following day, hosted by Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service.

The annual event involved PLAHS preparing foods including kangaroo stew and wombat while Centacare Port Lincoln provided a barbecue and a morning tea area was organised by Port Lincoln Red Cross.

PLAHS health promotions officer and NAIDOC Week Committee member Morgan Hirschausen said the weather was not ideal but the event was well supported.

Port Lincoln Aboriginal Community Council, with support from Gidja Club held the Elders Lunch at the Grand Tasman Hotel on Thursday, which was attended by about 30 elders.

The council’s indigenous community links manager Heather Hirschausen-Cox said they were happy with the turnout and the event continued to be an important part of NAIDOC Week.

7.1 NT : Congress CEO, Donna Ah Chee delivering the powerful history of the Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program 

Congress CEO, Donna Ah Chee delivering the powerful history of the Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) at the tenth annual conference. ANFPP is a nurse-led home visiting program that supports families pregnant with an Aboriginal child to help them become the best parents possible.

ANFPP Team Congress! Pictured here with CEO, Donna Ah Chee; General Manager Health Services, Tracey Brand and Chief Medical Officer Public Health, Dr John Boffa

7.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin mobile clinic provides back to school health checks for Palmerston Indigenous Village

This week the Mobile Clinic spent time with the Palmerston Indigenous Village to provide back to school health checks for kids. They put on a BBQ lunch, face painting and a jumping castle! Children participating in the health check received a back pack to prepare them for their return to school.

8. TAS : Two seats should be set aside for Tasmanian Aboriginal MHAs to be chosen by Aboriginal people in an enlarged State Parliament, traditional owners say.

“If successful, Tasmania will be the first State to guarantee an Aboriginal voice in the parliament,” 

New Zealand has done it for 150 years. The State of Maine in the US has 3 seats for Indians. It’s time for Tasmania to catch up and lead the rest of Australia.

The change would enable Aborigines to speak for the dispossessed and powerless and participate in governing Tasmania.”

Tasmanian Land Council spokseman Michael Mansell said the move would be an Australian first

See Full Report 

Under the proposal, a separate electoral roll would be created to elect indigenous representatives from a single electorate encompassing the entire state.

The proposal has been put forward jointly by the Elders Council of Tasmania Aboriginal Corporation, Cape Barren Island Aboriginal Association, Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre and the Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania, and will be presented on Monday to a parliamentary committee conducting an inquiry into the number of seats in the lower house.

Download the Submission HERE

No. 13 Joint Submission Aboriginal Organisations_Redacted

Their submission likens the idea to parliaments in the US state of Maine, and in New Zealand, where designated seats have been set aside for Maori representatives since 1867.

The groups said their proposal was “about improving representative democracy in Tasmania” .

“Providing for political representation of a people denied such access for over 200 years is overdue,” it said.

“It can be argued the political system in Tasmania has been racially prejudiced against Aboriginal representation . The system is geared against Aboriginal people effectively participating in parliamentary democracy.”

While it acknowledges the concept would give more value to a single vote in an Aboriginal electorate than a vote in one of the five existing lower house seats, it said dispossession and discrimination had left Aboriginal people “without a sound land and economic base, and a modicum of justice” .

“Political representation is more crucial for the survival and welfare of Aboriginal people than it is for any other sector in Tasmania,” the submission read.

The groups said the state’s constitution should be amended to create the Aboriginal electoral roll and designated seats in parliament, even if the push to increase the number of MHAs was rejected.

Twenty submissions have been lodged with the inquiry, which held its first public hearing in Launceston last month.

Premier Will Hodgman told the committee that a 35-seat House of Assembly would require an estimated $7.9 million to set up and about $7.2 million in extra ongoing costs each year.

 

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