NACCHO Aboriginal Health ” Tackling Indigenous Smoking ” : New Year #healthyfutures #quit message from Tom Calma

tom
 ” I want to say some more about New Year Eve resolutions or pledges.  Common among smokers around the world is the pledge they make to give up.  

This is great, but the common experience is that within a couple of months the pledge is put on the back burner and old habits re-emerge.  Now is a good time to mount a campaign to talk to your constituents about the “give up the smokes pledge” and encourage them to call Quitline or visit their doctor to talk about developing a strategy and getting support to quit and stay quit.

It would be great for colleagues to get on the Yarning Place and share successful strategies and to post success stories.  We might even want to host a pledge board and to monitor people’s pledges in three and six months’ time.

It has been a big year of learning and successes; please stay safe and healthy over the festive period and enjoy quality family time, drink alcohol responsibly and be smoke free of course “

Professor Tom Calma, National Coordinator for Tackling Indigenous Smoking, in his final Monthly Message of the year : Included in the National Best Practice Unit for Tackling Indigenous Smoking Update of the 12 December 2016 see below , is urging all Aboriginal organisations to take control and resolve in 2017 to implement smoke free workplaces.

  ‘Our mob have the right to work in a smoke free environment just like everyone else in this country.’
 
Visit the Tackling Indigenous Smoking portal on Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet to access resources to help you achieve smoke free workplaces,homes, cars and events:
 asite
 
For those individuals who are thinking of making a ‘give up smokes pledge’ this New Year, there are several supports available, including:
·         Quitline – 13 78 48
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·         The QuitNow website: http://www.quitnow.gov.au/internet/quitnow/publishing.nsf/Content/home for other resources
·         Your Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and /or Tackling Indigenous Smoking regional team can provide you with smoking cessation support.
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Hi colleagues,

 

Tackling smoking in the workplace is often put in the ‘too hard basket’.  In 2016 this is no longer excusable.

 
If we want to make significant inroads into tackling our smoking rates, we must have the courage and will to take control of our workplaces and have Board members, CEOs and Managers and staff step up and set an example to their communities.  Our mob have the right to work in a smoke free environment just like everyone else in this country.

On the 30 November this year, the Commonwealth Department of Health celebrated 30 years of being smoke free.    Think of the benefits to all those working in this Department over these three decades.   Health lead the way in the Commonwealth, with all other Departments becoming smoke free by 1988.  Public and private sector offices implemented their own smoke free policies in the mid-1990s.  Why is it that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, corporations and workplaces are either not smoke free, or do not enforce smoke free policies?
 
The Smoke Free Workplace Policy currently operating in the Department bans smoking and use of e-cigarettes/personal vaporisers within 15 metres of all health buildings at all time.  There may be elements of this Policy that you can draw on, including ideas on the assistance available to staff to quit.   So when you work with or interact with an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation or group encourage them to develop a smoke free policy and give them some guidance on how to do it.

The TIS Portal includes resources on smoke free spaces: 
http://www.aodknowledgecentre.net.au/aodkc/aodkc-tobacco/tackling-indigenous-smoking/resources-that-work/tools-and-resources-to-support-activities-that-work.    I encourage you to engage with colleagues on the Yarning Place to share strategies and ideas for smoke free workplace success.

The 30 November was also the fourth anniversary of commencement of Australia’s world-leading tobacco plain packaging measures.  If we can be world leading on tobacco control for all Australians, we can become leaders in Indigenous tobacco control to save our people, our culture and our languages.

As this is my last message for 2016 I would urge you to place at the top of your New Year resolutions list adopting and enforcing smoke free workplace policies in your organisation and encouraging and helping our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to also realise these goals.
 
I want to say some more about New Year Eve resolutions or pledges.  Common among smokers around the world is the pledge they make to give up.  This is great, but the common experience is that within a couple of months the pledge is put on the back burner and old habits re-emerge.  Now is a good time to mount a campaign to talk to your constituents about the “give up the smokes pledge” and encourage them to call Quitline or visit their doctor to talk about developing a strategy and getting support to quit and stay quit.   It would be great for colleagues to get on the Yarning Place and share successful strategies and to post success stories.  We might even want to host a pledge board and to monitor people’s pledges in three and six months’ time.
 
It has been a big year of learning and successes; please stay safe and healthy over the festive period and enjoy quality family time, drink alcohol responsibly and be smoke free of course. J  
 
Regards TOM
 
cost-of-smokes
 

NACCHO Tackling Indigenous Smoking NEWS : DOH tender for National Best Practice Unit for TIS

Smoking

Tobacco smoking is the most preventable cause of ill health and early death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and is responsible for around one in five deaths,”

Through the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), the Australian government has committed to six targets to close the gap in disadvantage between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians across health, education and employment.

Two of these targets relate directly to the health portfolio: to close the gap in life expectancy within a generation (by 2031); and to halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade (by 2018).”

SEE NACCHO REPORT HERE

As the federal government seeks to raise the average lifespan of Indigenous individuals closer to levels enjoyed by the rest of the population smoking remains under the gun, blamed for one-fifth of the Indigenous death rate.

A recent Health Department tender seeks to add a national organisation to run a drive against smoking by Aboriginal and Torres St Island individuals, to complement existing anti-tobacco regional programs run under the banner of Tackling Indigenous Smoking.

The organisation or consortium chosen to support the current TIS program will be referred to as the National Best Practice Unit for TIS.

Closing date for applications is September 1, Melbourne-based tenders specialist TenderSearch says. Contract execution is listed for October-November and release of operational guidelines for January-February 2016.

Download the 2 Tender documents here

Health-010-1516 – RFT

Health-010-1516 – DRAFT Contract for Services

The NBPU managing supervisory body will be expected to work mainly with grant recipients funded under the TIS program for regional tobacco control activities, with support and leadership from Professor Tom Calma, the national co-ordinator tackling Indigenous smoking.

The to-do list starts with developing and maintaining operational guidelines for tobacco use reduction among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It will provide organisational support to grant recipients responsible for implementing evidence-based approaches to tobacco control.

It will help them develop and implement performance indicators and data collection methods, and

The NBPU will facilitate workforce development for the project, disseminating evidence and information on best practice, building a community of practice, and promoting a culture of evaluation and continuous improvement for the TIS program. There will also be advice and assistance to the department.

“Tobacco smoking is the most preventable cause of ill health and early death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and is responsible for around one in five deaths,” the tender document said.

“Through the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), the Australian government has committed to six targets to close the gap in disadvantage between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians across health, education and employment.

“Two of these targets relate directly to the health portfolio: to close the gap in life expectancy within a generation (by 2031); and to halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade (by 2018).

“Under the COAG National Healthcare Agreement, Australian governments have committed to halve the daily smoking rate among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults (18 or older) from 44.8 per cent in 2008 to 22.4 per cent by 2018.

“Work to reduce high rates of smoking has resulted in a reduction of seven percentage points since 2002, accompanied by a significant increase in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have never smoked.”

Indigenous-specific activities were required because the strong history and impact of mainstream action in Australia had failed to deliver equivalent reductions in smoking rates within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, the tender document said.

The Medical Journal of Australia noted recently that the Talking About the Smokes health project from the Menzies School of Health Research indicated that the majority of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander smokers want to quit.

 

NACCHO live RURAL HEALTH TV alert: Rural Health Policy into the Future

World-No-Tobacco-Day

Panel includes: Dr Tom Calma AO – National Coordinator, Tackling Indigenous Smoking (pictured above second from left at our recent SMOKE FREE event)

Join Dr Norman Swan and a panel of rural health leaders and advocates as they discuss remote and rural health policy, trends, developments, needs and gaps.

What are the policies we need for equal health outcomes for people in rural and remote communities, and how can we ensure a highly-trained, up-to-date and supported rural-based health workforce? Which policies are working, and which aren’t? What needs to change? Are we making the best use of the scarce rural health dollar?

Join the discussion and share your views. What do you want Health Ministers and politicians to hear from those living and working across rural and remote regions?

Panel includes: Dr Tom Calma AO – National Coordinator, Tackling Indigenous Smoking, Alison Fairleigh – Manager Rural Services, Mental Illness Fellowship of NQ Inc., Prof Sabina Knight – Director of MICRRH, Remote Area Nurse and Dr Jenny May – GP Tamworth NSW, Rural GP Academic and past Chair of NRHA.

LIVE on the Rural Health Channel (Channel 600 on VAST):
Thursday 8th August 2013
8pm NSW, ACT, QLD, VIC & TAS
7.30pm SA & NT
6.00pm WA

Participate:

We encourage participation through comments and questions to the panel during the live program.

Contact details are as follows:

SMS: 0408 408 932

Email

Twitter: follow @ruralhealthed and tweet using #ruralhealth

The program will be repeated and will be made available online. For more information visit the program webpage Rural Health Policy into the Future