NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health News Alert : Our #OchreDay2018 Conference opens in Nipaluna (Hobart ) today with theme Aboriginal Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It!

 “The National Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chairperson John Singer, will today 27 August open the Ochre Day Conference -Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It! in Hobart 

The two-day conference will discuss how the sector that has an Aboriginal male population of over 350,000 can continue to Close the Gap in Aboriginal men’s health across Australia.

Ochre Day is an important Aboriginal male health initiative to help raise awareness as well as provide an opportunity to draw national public awareness to Aboriginal male health and social and emotional wellbeing.”

Picture above VACCHO mob flying to Hobart and Oliver Tye NACCHO Conference Team 

Download the full #OchreDay2018 Program here or read Keynote speakere Bio’s below

NACCHO Ochre Day Program_WEB 2018

NACCHO Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek and #OchreDay2018 Launch : Download 30 years 1988 – 2018 of Aboriginal Male Health Strategies and Summit recommendations

Read over 350 Aboriginal Male Health articles published by NACCHO last 6 years

Over the years, Ochre Day have had an impressive line-up of speakers and this year is no exception, some of the country’s leading Aboriginal Male Health thinkers, policymakers, clinicians, researchers, academics and practitioners are joined by health workers interested in learning about the latest medical advice, solutions and the practical aspects of cultural safety for our patients who still suffer institutional racism in our hospital system.

The annual event for almost 200 delegates, will feature NACCHO Chairperson John Singer will open the Conference, then delegates will hear an address from The Hon. Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health, then Mr John Paterson CEO of AMSANT will be speaking about the importance of women as partners in men’s health and Mr Rod Little from National Congress will discuss the progress of a treaty in the Australia as a keynote address for the Jaydon Adams Oration Memorial Dinner.

See Keynote Speaker Bio’s below or program for all

Ken Wyatt AM MP

Dr Mick Adams

John Singer

Dr Mark Wenitong

John Paterson

Deon Bird

Charlie Jia

Joe Williams

Rod Little

Kim Mulholland

Karl Briscoe

Last year 144 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) provided nearly 3 million episodes of care to over 340,000 clients.

It is clear that putting Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands is working. “Now we need to see more Aboriginal people have access to our culturally appropriate services that have been proven to be effective, efficient and affordable in more areas around Australia” Mr Singer said.

https://nacchocommunique.com/category/aboriginal-malemens-health/

Part 1 Our special thanks to our sponsors

Fred Hollows Foundation

MSD

NPS Medicinewise

Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

Heart Foundation

Tonic Health Media

ACT Government

Part 2 Speaker Bio’s noting Picture below 2017 Darwin 

 

Ken Wyatt AM MP

The Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP is the Federal Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health. He was born at Roelands Mission Farm, a former home for young Aboriginal children removed from their families, located near Bunbury in Western Australia (WA).

Ken’s heritage is Yamatji, with Irish ancestry on his father’s side, and Wongi and Noongar ancestry on his mother’s side. In 2015, Ken became the first Aboriginal member of the Federal Executive after being sworn in as the Assistant Minister for Health and Aged Care.

He made history again in 2016, as the first Aboriginal Minister to service in a Federal Government after being appointed as the Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.

Ken is an active member of the Health and Human Rights Committees and is the Chair of the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

Dr Mick Adams

Dr Mick Adams is Senior Research Fellow at the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet and Kurongkurl Katitjin at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia.

He is a descendent of the Yadhaigana/Wuthathi people of Cape York Peninsula in Queensland, the Gurindji people of central western Northern Territory with extended family relationships with the people of the Torres Straits.

Dr Adams is recognised and credited as one of the leading Aboriginal researchers on male health. Mick has worked in the health sector for over 30 years and has experiencing working in both government and community-controlled health service sector.

John Singer

John Singer was appointed as the Chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) in November 2017.

John is an experienced administrator and visionary thinker.

He worked in Community Administration from 1989 to 1996 at Iwantja, Fregon, Pukatja and Papunya. In 1997, he became the Manager of Iwantja Clinic, which is one of Nganampa Health Council’s 6 clinics.

In 2000, he was appointed Executive Director of the Nganampa Health Council and still holds this position today.

Mr Singer’s family is from Ngaanjatjarra, Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara Lands, which is the cross-border area of Northern Territory, South Australia and Western Australia.

He began working in community control at the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service where he started his health worker training, later completed in the late 1980s.

Dr Mark Wenitong

Mark is from the Kabi Kabi tribal group of South Queensland and is passionate about improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

To complement this passion and energy, Mark has extensive expertise and experience and has been involved in both clinical and policy work throughout his career. He is currently the Aboriginal Public Health Medical Officer at Apunipima Cape York Health Council, where he is working on health reform across the Cape York Aboriginal communities.

Mark has also previously been a Senior Medical Officer at Wuchopperen Health Services in Cairns, a Medical Advisor for the Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (OATSIH) in Canberra, the acting CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), and has worked in community development with World Vision in Papunya, Northern Territory.

Mark is a past president and founder of the Australian Indigenous Doctors Association and sits on numerous councils and committees. Previously a member on the National Health Committee  of the National Health and Medical Research Council, he is Chair of Andrology Australia – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health Advisory Committee, board member of Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and the AITHM.

Mark is heavily involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce and has helped develop several national workforce documents and sat on the COAG Australian Health Workforce Advisory Council. He is also involved in several research projects, and has worked in prison health, refugee health in East Timor, as well as studying and working in Indigenous health internationally.

In recognition of his achievements, Mark received the 2011 AMA Presidents Award for Excellence in Healthcare, the Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council Hall of Fame award in 2010 and more recently, was one of the chief investigators awarded the MJA best research journal article for 2012.

John Paterson

John Paterson is a born and bred Territorian, John’s family is affiliated with the Ngalakan tribe, located in the Roper River region.

John was appointed as the EO of AMSANT in June 2006 and immediately outlined his priorities for the organisation in the coming years.

“John’s goal is to strengthen and enhance our community-controlled health services in the NT so we can improve both the quality and duration of life for Aboriginal people,”

John says. “I’m particularly keen to help improve the mental health of the people in our region, with a holistic approach to primary health care.

“His other important agenda is to advocate vigorously for the further roll-out of the Primary Health Care Access program (PHCAP) to improve the access of Aboriginal people to comprehensive primary health care services.”

Deon Bird

Deon has been a part of the Institute of Urban Indigenous Healths (IUIH) MomenTIM program since 2015 as Facilitator and more recently has moved into a Workforce Development Role.

A proud Wakka Wakka man, Deon has developed an unwavering passion for this work around mens mental health, which has seen him become an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Mental Health.

Trainer as a part of his role with IUIH. Formerly, Deon was the Founder & CEO of the Australian Indigenous Youth Academy Inc.

AIYA was established in 2010 as a not-for-profit organization, which existed to ‘inspire future generations’ of Indigenous youth to achieve higher educational outcomes through a school-based traineeship program & healthy lifestyle initiatives.

Prior to his move to the not-for-profit and health services sector, Deon played professional rugby league in the English Super League for 11 years from 1996 to 2006.

Charlie Jia

Charlie is a proud Yindinji man (Cairns, North Queensland) and Torres Strait Islander. Charlie Jia has worked in private and public positions at local, state and national levels. His drive, commitment and passion are with his community, its people, friends and family.

Charlie sits on various committees representing his immediate community and is a founding member of the South East Queensland Indigenous Chamber of Commerce (SEQICC) and the inaugural President from 2006 to 2011.

He recently returned to the Chamber after moving to North Stradbroke Island to live and set up his small business, CJ’s Island Pizza which he still owns, being managed by his eldest son.

Charlie is the Regional Coordinator Men’s Mental Health overseeing MomenTIM which is one of many health-related programs delivered by the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health.

Joe Williams

Joe Williams is a Wiradjuri, 1st Nations man born in Cowra, raised in Wagga, NSW, having lived a 15-year span as a professional sports person, playing in the NRL for South Sydney Rabbitohs, Penrith Panthers and Canterbury Bulldogs before switching to professional Boxing in 2009.

As a boxer he is a 2x WBF World Jnr Welterweight champion and also won the WBC Asia Continental Title. Although forging a successful professional sporting career, Joe has battled the majority of his life with suicidal ideation and Bi Polar Disorder.

After a suicide attempt in 2012, he felt his purpose was to help people who struggle with mental illness.

Recently Joe developed a cultural wellbeing program which concentrates on First Nations people becoming the best version of themselves and released his autobiography titled Defying The Enemy Within; which not only tells his story, but offers practical wellbeing tips that anyone can implement in their lives to keep themselves mentally well.

Rod Little

Rod Little is from the Wilunyu-Amangu and Wajuk peoples of Geraldton and Perth areas of Western Australia and lives in Canberra.

He is the Co-chair of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples. Before this role he was a Director at Congress and has previously been an elected member and Chairperson of the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body since its inception in 2008.

He is a native title applicant and a member of a negotiation team of traditional owners’ negotiating long lasting outcomes for his mob through an alternative settlement agreement process with the Western Australian Government.

Rod has a long employment history in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs in education and senior leadership positions in social policy areas and has represented first peoples at international forums including the United Nations. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and the Commonwealth Peoples Forum.

He is passionate and committed to our peoples and improving their lives, particularly through advocating for our rights; equal education and health; and through consulting, encouraging and collaborating with our leaders, professionals and institutions.

Kim Mulholland

An Aboriginal descendant of the Larrakia Nation and Yanyuwa Clan group of the Northern Territory, Kim has lived a contrast between traditional Yanyuwa and contemporary Larrakia, granting him a unique insight and depth of understanding the rich tapestry that is our modern Aboriginal Australia.

Kim has a wealth of experience in community development & Aboriginal social & emotional wellbeing, and works from a unique integrative perspective with deep respect, drawing on lessons from his traditional cultural knowledge, and forging with principles in western education.

Karl Briscoe

Karl Briscoe is a proud Kuku Yalanji man from Mossman — Daintree area of Far North Queensland and has worked for over 17 years in the health sector at various levels of government and non-government including local, state and national levels which has enabled him to form a vast strategic network across Australia.

Karl has taken up the position as the Chief Executive Officer of NATSIHWA to progress and represent the invested interests of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Previous to NATSIHWA Karl was the Clinical Services Manager at the Galambila Aboriginal Health Service in Coffs Harbour.

He has a vast array of experience at Senior Executive levels including previous positions as the Executive Director of Indigenous Health and Outreach Services in Cape York and Torres Strait Hospital and Health Service, which provided the skills and knowledge to coordinate strategic intent to address the health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

NACCHO Save a date Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #OchreDay2018 #MaleHealth Program Released #NACCHOAgm2018 Presenters Wanted and Institute for Urban Indigenous Health @IUIH_ System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations and Expressions of Interest now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

Expressions of Interest to present see below 

NACCHO is now calling for EOI’s from Affiliates , Member Services and stakeholders for Case Studies and Presentations for the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

Download the Application

NACCHO Members Expressions of Interest to present to the Brisbane Conference 2018 on Day 1

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members Conference; ‘Investing in What Works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Health’. We are seeking EOIs for the following Conference Sessions.

Day 1 Wednesday 31 October 2018

Concurrent Session 1 (1.15 – 2.00pm) – topics can include Case Studies but are not limited to:

  • Workforce Innovation
  • Best Practice Primary Health Care for Clients with Chronic Disease
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Sustainable Growth
  • Harnessing Resources (Medicare, government and other)
  • Engagement/Health Promotion
  • Models of Primary Health Care and
  • Clinical and Service Delivery.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Regional, Rural or Remote.  Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes in either the Plenary or Breakout rooms.

OR

Table Top Presentations (2.00-3.00pm)

Presenters will speak from the lectern and provide a brief presentation on a key project or program currently being delivered by their service.

Presentation will be 10 minutes in duration-with 5 minutes to present and
5 minutes for discussion and questions from delegates.

How to submit an EOI

Please provide the following information and submit via email to NACCHO-AGM@naccho.org.au by COB Monday 21st August 2018.

  • Name of Member Service
  • Name of presenter(s)
  • Name of program
  • Name of session
  • Contact details: Phone | Mobile | Email

Provide the key points you want to cover – in no more than 500 words outline the program/ project/ topic you would like to present on. Describe how your presentation/case study supports the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference theme ‘Investing in what works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Healt

SUBMIT DAY 1

SUBMIT DAY 2 

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane 

Registrations are currently open for the inaugural Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, to be held on Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 August 2018 in Brisbane.

This conference will focus on IUIH’s successful approach to Closing the Gap in Indigenous health and would be of interest to people working in

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Services
• Primary Health Networks (PHNs)
• Health and Hospital Boards and management
• Government Departments
• the University Sector
• the NGO sectorCome along and gain fresh insights into the ways in which a cross-sector and integrated system can make real impacts on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as we share the research behind the development and implementation of this system.
Featuring presentations by speakers across a range of specialisations including clinic set up, clinical governance, systems integration, wrap around services such as allied and social health, workforce development and research evidence.
For more information you can
·         Watch this video –https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6O1pQfZMLnk
·         Visit the conference registration website –https://www.ivvy.com.au/event/IUIH18/
·         Call us (07) 3828 3600
·         Email events@iuih.org.au

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

Download HERE

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will appear via Video 

Please note this EVENT is now closed Fully Booked

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launched its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program

Download OCHRE DAY 2018 Program HERE

NACCHO Ochre Day Program_WEB 2018

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

 

 

 

Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

 

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location: 233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Events and Conferences :To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO launches its National #OchreDay2018 Men’s Health Summit program and registrations

The week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offers a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

19 June 21 St Century Aboriginal Health Research

21st Century Aboriginal Health Research

The Aboriginal Health College is thrilled to be hosting a showcase of Aboriginal Health Research projects. This event is the first in a series of educational seminars promoting best practice in Aboriginal Health Research by exploring community engagement, Aboriginal Governance, evidence-based practice and how researchers achieved success working with community.

Please join us to hear from the SEARCH team at the Sax Institute, the POCHE Centre’s Adjunct Associate Professor Kylie Gwynne and University of Wollongong’s Professor Kathleen Clapham.

Bookings

2 – 4 July 2018 First Nations Governance Forum; :  Canberra

Museum of Australian Democracy
Old Parliament House, Canberra

As Australia’s national university, ANU has an obligation to constructively contribute to the discussion of policy reform and processes of significant issues concerning Indigenous Australia.

The University seeks to reignite national debate about Australia’s First Nations governance models and their contribution to policy. We are in a unique position to facilitate an International Indigenous-led discussion, with academic rigour, on some of the most challenging issues affecting the country.

We recognise that the academic expertise on these issues is distributed among universities around Australia and the world and welcomes contributions from interested parties.

Forum details

In 2018 ANU will host the First Nations Governance Forum with a goal to provide a series of policy options relevant to Australia through learning from models in other colonial settler states that demonstrate Indigenous peoples leadership in the governance of their affairs. The Forum will include a welcome dinner, keynote presentations, a series of high-level panel discussions and workshop sessions.

The Forum will be hosted with the support of Australia’s Federal Indigenous parliamentarians, Indigenous leaders, academics, government, leading international policy makers and other interested stakeholders. The Forum will consider First Nations governance reform in Australia and, share the experiences of Indigenous people in comparable jurisdictions including Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada, USA and Scandinavian countries. The Forum will build on the extensive work undertaken on this issue including the Report of the Expert Panel on Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution (2012), the Report of the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (2015) and the Uluru Statement from the Heart (2017).

Attendance options

Broad participation in the Forum from across the community is encouraged and supported. The Forum is a public event. Attendance is free (though attendees will be responsible for their own expenses including travel, accommodation and meals). The Forum will also be live-streamed and recorded to ensure remote access.

The following attendance options are available:

  1. Onsite
    An Expression of Interest process will be conducted for a limited number of seats available at the Museum of Australian Democracy. Complete the Expression of Interest form by 13 June. Applicants will be selected across representative groups and notified in the first week of June.
  2. Live-stream at ANU
    A facilitated, live-streamed broadcast will be hosted at Llewellyn Hall on the ANU campus. Those who are unsuccessful in registering a place at the Museum of Australian Democracy are encouraged to register to attend this event at Llewellyn Hall.
  3. Remote live-streaming
    The Forum will also be live-streamed across the internet, ensuring access for everyone. Register your interest to participate in the national live-stream.

* Note: the Forum is a public event and will be live-streamed and recorded, and research may be conducted using data obtained from the event. Live-stream analytics data from the event may be collected and used in research.

EVENT WEBSITE

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

July 11-12 National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference in Sydney.

When the National NAIDOC Committee announced the 2018 Theme: Because of Her, We Can in November 2017 there was a huge round of applause around Australia particularly from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women.

Amongst those women were Christine Ross, Sharon Kinchela and Chris Figg who all agreed we needed to celebrate this fabulous theme.

So, with great excitement Ngiyani Pty Ltd announced they would host a National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference to be held on 11 – 12 July 2018 at UNSW Kensington Campus Sydney. They are utlising the services of Christine Ross Consultancy as the Project Manager.

For all event enquires please call 1300 807 374 or email christine.ross@live.com.au

Only 200 spots left. Go to the Registration Site

Download HERE

October 30 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day 27-28 August

More info

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney