NACCHO Aboriginal health conferences : Innovative ways to improve the quality of Aboriginal health care

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Innovative ways to improve the quality of health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders will be front and centre at a national conference being held in Melbourne on March 17 and 18.

Experts from around Australia will address the Lowitja Institute 2nd National Conference on Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health.

AND Abstract submissions and registrations are now open for the NACCHO Summit in June 2014

SEE LINKS BELOW

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PRES RELEASE: Lowitja Institute 2nd National Conference on Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health.

Among those in attendance will be the institute’s chair, renowned advocate for disadvantaged Australians Ms Pat Anderson.

Also present will be the CEO of the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council and Lowitja Institute board member, Selwyn Button; the scientific director of the National Centre for Quality Improvement in Indigenous Primary Health Care, Professor Ross Bailie; and the program leader for the institute’s Healthy Start, Healthy Life program, Associate Professor Gail Garvey. Since 2007 Associate Professor Garvey has led a research program which has explored high cancer mortality rates in Indigenous Australian communities.

Australia’s national institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research, the Lowitja Institute is the only research organisation focused solely on the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Named in honour of Dr O’Donoghue AC, CBE, DSG the institute brings together world-leading researchers, policy makers and experts in cutting-edge service delivery, enabling collaborative health research that will make a real difference to people’s lives. The board has a majority Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander membership and comprises highly skilled and experienced professionals from health, education, indigenous and community sectors.

“Our vision is to achieve equity in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their voice informs all of our activities, whether we’re conducting community-based research or setting our strategic direction,” the chief executive officer, Lyn Brodie, said.

“We’re also developing a new generation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health researchers, through acollaborative approach developed over 15 years with the Cooperative Research Centres for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health.”

At every stage of the institute’s research, Aboriginal communities or organisations, health services, academic institutions and government agencies work together to set priorities, conduct research and put findings into practice.

Ms Brodie said continuous quality improvement involves regular reflection and refinement to improve processes and outcomes that will provide quality health care. Research has found that integrating CQI into the operations of primary health care providers yields substantial benefits to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

“Our goal is to make CQI everyone’s business,” she said. The national conference will provide opportunities for participants to: Share knowledge about how best to embed CQI into everyday practice, ensuring better access to high-quality and comprehensive health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples including health promotion, dental health, social emotional wellbeing, alcohol and drug programs.

Learn about successful CQI examples and how best to transfer this knowledge to others in the field.

Renowned Aboriginal actor and director Kylie Belling, from The Sapphires, will MC the event. -continuesHighlights of the two-day program include a addresses by Dr Hung The Nguyen, a GP and censor for the>National Faculty of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health; and the First Assistant Director of the Indigenous and Rural Health Division in the Federal Department of Health, Ms Samantha Palmer, who will provide evidence and information from Commonwealth-funded evaluations that show the effectiveness of CQI programs.

Dr Mark Wenitong will deliver the closing remarks. The senior medical advisor at Apunipima Cape York Health Council, Dr Wenitong specialises in clinical governance and strategic primary health-care planning, was noted as one of the 50 most influential doctors in Australia by Australian Doctor magazine in 2005.

Delegates will include service providers, such as community-controlled services and government agencies, along with researchers, health industry representatives and policy makers.

The conference will be followed by the biennial Congress Lowitja 2014, which opens on March 19, and “Is Racism the New Black?”, a comedy panel event featuring comedy stars Charlie Pickering, Libbi Gore and Meshel Laurie and acclaimed

Melbourne playwright, scriptwriter, musician, actor and director Richard Frankland on March 20.

For additional information go to http://www.lowitja.org.au/cqi-2014 or call (03) 8341 5555.

You can hear more about Aboriginal health at the NACCHO SUMMIT

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The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits.

A good way of demonstrating how economically valuable ACCHS are is to showcase our success at a national summit.

SUMMIT WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO

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NACCHO Healthy Futures Summit Melbourne 24-26 June 2014 : Invitation to submit abstracts

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On behalf of the NACCHO Board and Secretariat it is my pleasure to invite you to submit an abstract to the NACCHO Healthy Futures Summit at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre 24-26 June 2014.

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ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ABSTRACT PORTAL

The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits.

A good way of demonstrating how economically valuable ACCHS are is to showcase our success at a national summit.

SUMMIT WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO REGISTER

NACCHO would like to demonstrate to the government at this summit how investing more in ACCHS is the best way of promoting better health more employment, more jobs and greater community economic benefits.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS ONLINE

NACCHO Healthy futures Summit-Melbourne 24-26 June 2014

NACCHO invites abstracts submission from its members the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholder organisations to showcase policy frameworks, best practice and investment in Aboriginal Health.

The delegates will be a representation from all over Australia in clinical practice, policy and research.

IMPORTANT DATES

Call for Abstracts open 25 February
All Abstracts Due 21 Mar 2014
Abstract Notifications 4 April 2014
Presenter Registration Due 18 April 2014
Early bird registrations open 25 February 2014
Early-Bird registrations Closes 18 April 2014
Program released 4 April 2014
Exhibition and sponsorship 16 May 2014
NACCHO 2014 Summit 24 -26 June 2014

Program Streams

1.Economic Development

  • Economic models of investment  into Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
  • Economic models of investment through partnership
  • Income generation through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations
  • Brokerage Modelling with Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

2.Health Reform

2.1 Workforce

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • National, State, Regional and Local Workforce Needs Analysis
  • Models of success
  • Recruitment and Retention Strategies
  • Mentoring Programs
  • Workforce Innovation Partnership
  • Career pathways that incorporate Scope of Practice within ACCHO’s

2.2 Continuous Quality Improvement

  • Affiliate Registered Training Organisations Capacity Building of ACCHO’s through scope of practice
  • Accreditation
  • Clinical Standards

3.Healthy Futures

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • Clinic Practice/frontline servicing
  • Mental Health
  • Social Emotional Wellbeing
  • Drug & Alcohol
  • Mums & Babies
  • Women’s Health
  • Men’s Health
  • Oral Health
  • Aged Care
  • Disabilities
  • Adolescent
  • Sexual Health

4.Youth

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • Investment in Youth by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations
  • Career pathways within an ACCHO, Affiliates and key stakeholders
  • Youth Leadership
  • Mentoring
  • Healthy Lifestyles and Youth
  • Health Promotion Strategies

5.Research & Data

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • Population Health
  • Best practice models
  • Gap and Needs analysis
  • Research within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations
  • Research Partnerships
  • Health Information
  • Importance of Data
  • Cultural protocols into practice
  • What’s the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Data telling us?

General guidelines for submissions

  • Abstracts will only be accepted by submitting through the online process below .
  • Abstracts must be a maximum of 300 words .
  • All abstracts must be original work.
  • The abstract will contain text only; no diagrams, illustrations, tables or graphics.
  • All presenting authors must register and pay for their registration for the conference by 18 April 2014 otherwise the presentation will be removed from the program.
  • The NACCHO advisory group reserves the right to accept and reject abstracts for inclusion in the program and allocate to a format that may not have been initially specified by the author/presenter.
  • The conference organisers will not be held responsible for submission errors caused by internet service outages, hardware or software delays, power outages or unforeseen events.
  • It is the responsibility of the presenting author to ensure that the abstract is submitted correctly. After an author has submitted their abstract, they should check their abstract was uploaded successfully.
  • All authors will receive notification of the outcome of their submission on 4 April 2014.
  • Responsibility for the accuracy of abstracts rests with the author.
  • Where there are co-authors, only one abstract is to be submitted. The presenting author is responsible for ensuring the co-authors agree with and are aware of the content before submitting the abstract.
  • An abstract which does not adhere to these requirements will not be accepted

ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ABSTRACT PORTAL

For further information contact the NACCHO SUMMIT TEAM 02 6246 9300 or EMAIL

NACCHO summit media NITV The Australian :Call for both sides to close the Aboriginal gap

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Kevin Rudd and Tony Abbott will today be urged to put Aboriginal health on their agendas this election campaign.

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation chairman Justin Mohamed said yesterday it was disappointing the focus on Aboriginal affairs so far had been on education and economic development with barely a mention of the need to improve indigenous health.

WATCH INTERVIEW WITH NITV HERE

“Addressing Aboriginal education and employment and stimulating economic development are critical issues, but our people must be healthy for them to come to fruition,” Mr Mohamed said at the body’s inaugural National Aboriginal Primary Health Care Summit in Adelaide.

“We still have a massive health gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians, with a life expectancy up to 17 years different.

“We can’t afford to take the focus off improving the health of our people, and many in our communities are waiting to see concrete policies and commitments from all parties in this area.”

Mr Mohamed said NACCHO’s 10-point Investing in Healthy Futures for Generational Change gave a framework for all political parties to work with.

“We have concrete evidence that Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands is what is really making the difference in achieving better health outcomes for our people,” he said.

He pointed to the improvements in Aboriginal child birth weights, maternal health and management of chronic diseases recorded by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare in their Healthy for Life Report Card.

“We need to capitalise on these gains,” he said. “We can’t be complacent when it comes to Aboriginal health and we need to see all political parties take it seriously.