NACCHO at the National Press Club

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Yesterday NACCHO’s Chair Justin Mohamed gave an address to a packed room and national television audience at the National Press Club about the economic value of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.

His speech focused on, among other things, what needs to be done to close the gap, how ACCHOs can help close that gap, and called on the Federal Government to renew funding with appropriate indexation in the May Budget. He also called on the Government to carefully consider the implications of any changes to the Racial Discrimination Act.

IF YOU MISSED THE ADDRESS YOU CAN WATCH IT HERE  OR  READ A TRANSCRIPT HERE

Lots of media covered the event including the following:

Indigenous-run clinics in plea for mercy on federal cuts

The Australian
By Patricia Karvelas

832502-73c1b800-ba27-11e3-a72e-6df7cab5700aDoctor Nadeem Siddiqui with Sharney Fernando and her daughters Kyarna, 2, and Jayla, 1, at the Winnunga clinic in Canberra. Picture: Gary Ramage   Source: News Corp Australia

INDIGENOUS-run health services provide jobs for more than 3200 Aboriginal people and are the main source of Aboriginal employment in many communities, a new report has found.

The report says the 150 Aboriginal community controlled health organisations provide pay rates above the average for Aboriginal Australians, offer genuine career paths and boost education levels thanks to on-site training.

The chairman of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Justin Mohamed, said the centres were “major contributors to closing the appalling health gap ­between Aboriginal and non-­Aboriginal Australians’’.

“The ripple effect of healthy Aboriginal communities cannot be underestimated,’’ he said. “Healthy communities keep our kids in school, keep our adults in the workforce and provide a greater opportunity for particip­ation in broader society.

“Ultimately, that means redu­cing welfare dependency, reducing criminal justice rates and diverting people from the need for more expensive healthcare such as hospital admissions.”

Mr Mohamed urged the federal government to quarantine such centres from any cuts in next month’s budget as about $300 million of funding ends this financial year.

“Today’s report provides the evidence that Aboriginal community controlled health organisations have important eco­-nomic benefits well beyond the, not insignificant, primary purpose of providing healthcare to Aboriginal people,” he said.

“Yet our funding is insecure, reporting requirements onerous and any new health funding for Aboriginal health is often diverted into mainstream services which ­simply don’t have the same runs on the board with Aboriginal health as our services do.’’

Mr Mohamed called on Tony Abbott to revive a now-expired national partnership agreement with the states and territories on indigenous health. There was an economic incentive for all governments to help indigenous people become healthier, he said.

There is a life expectancy gap — of 10.6 years for men and 9.5 years for women — between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

Lifting life expectancy rates over 20 years would result in a $11.9 billion net increase in government revenue, mainly from tax payments, including a $4.7bn saving in social security and health costs.

The Prime Minister’s Indigenous Advisory Council is looking at what fat can be trimmed from federal government spending on Aboriginal programs.

Earlier yesterday, the chairman of the advisory council, Warren Mundine, said money matters were on the agenda at the council’s meeting with Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion in Sydney.

Mr Mundine urged the Abbott government to quarantine from possible cuts programs relating to indigenous mental health issues and smoking.

The report released yesterday highlights the Winnunga health service in Canberra, a large primary healthcare service provider catering for the region’s Aboriginal population.

Capacity constraints hamper service delivery and limit medical specialist services. The report says there is a strong case for a second clinic in north Canberra, based on rapid Aboriginal population growth and health needs.

Winnunga chief executive Julie Tong said the clinic was overwhelmed, with the client base rising from 80 to 129 a day because of population growth.

“An Aboriginal community health service gives ownership to the community,” she said. “We’ve built the service on ­client need.”

Aboriginal health group warns against changes to Racial Discrimination Act

ABC
By Anna Henderson

Indigenous health groups have levelled a warning at the Federal Government that planned changes to federal race discrimination laws could impact on the health of Aboriginal patients.

The Government wants to ban racial vilification but remove the provisions making it unlawful for someone to publicly offend, insult, or humiliate others based on their race.

In a speech at the National Press Club in Canberra, Justin Mohamed, the chairman of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), called for the Government to re-think the changes.

“Racism does contribute to poor health outcomes for our people,” he said, arguing it particularly impacted on mental health.

He said Aboriginal staff and patients experience racism within the health system and they should be protected under the existing law.

“I would like to take this moment to remind the Prime Minister of the commitment he made to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,” he said.

“Carefully consider the broader implications of any changes that weaken protections against racist behaviour in this country.”

Calls for Indigenous medical services to be quarantined from budget cuts

Indigenous health advocates maintain the May budget will reveal whether the government is truly committed to Indigenous affairs.

Future funding for 150 Aboriginal medical services across the country remains in limbo with the existing agreement due to expire in June.

Mr Mohamed said health services must be quarantined from budget cuts, and the funding uncertainty is affecting staff and patients.

“There is a ripple effect. When you’ve got that financial cloud over your head it’s hard to deliver,” he said.

Aboriginal medical services operate in urban, regional and remote communities and NACCHO says it received $300 million in federal funding this financial year.

Mr Mohamed said “funding is not keeping up with demand”.

He also urged the Federal Government to acknowledge the Aboriginal health workforce that is employed through the medical services.

The services employ over 5,000 people nationwide, including 3,500 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders.


IF YOU MISSED THE ADDRESS YOU CAN WATCH IT HERE  OR  READ A TRANSCRIPT HERE


NACCHO at the National Press Club – Watch it LIVE

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NACCHO Chair, Justin Mohamed will give an address at the National Press Club today about the wide ranging value of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations.

If you are not able to secure a ticket you can watch it live on ABC1 or ABC 2
http://www.abc.net.au/news/abcnews24

or hear it on ABC News Radio 1026 from 12.30pm today.
Don’t miss it.

NACCHO at the National Press Club – Get your tickets now!

NACCHO Chair Justin Mohamed will be giving an address at the National Press Club in Canberra on Wednesday 2nd April.

Justin will be launching a report on the economic benefits of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector and talking about how to close the health gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians.

Tickets are selling fast so get in quick if you want to secure
an individual ticket or a table.

Book now!!

naccho_invite

NACCHO at National Press Club April 2 : Investing in Aboriginal community controlled health makes economic $ense

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On 2 April the NACCHO chair Justin Mohamed will be appearing at the National Press Club in Canberra

Watch live on ABC-TV at 12.30 pm (see below)

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New Microsoft Word Document (5)

 

 

“Investing in Aboriginal Community Control makes economic $ense”

The good news is that ACCHS deliver the goods – not only health gains, but also substantial economic gains.

 In all the rhetoric about Closing the Gap, what is missing from the picture is this —  the ACCHS network of clinics, community health centres and health-based co-operatives throughout Australia generates substantial  economic value for Aboriginal people and their  communities. ACCHS are a large-scale employer of Aboriginal people. This provides  real income and economic independence for many people. They contribute enormously to raising the education and skill levels of the Aboriginal workforce.

Investing in ACCHS is a good business proposition. It provides value for money and is highly cost-effective for four main reasons:

ACCHS deliver primary health care that delivers results

 Like your local GP does but more effectively for Aboriginal people because  the ACCHS model combines the best of clinical know-how with culturally enriched local knowledge and wisdom. It takes care of the whole person, not separate body parts. People work as part of a team that includes Aboriginal Health Workers, allied health,  and social and emotional wellbeing counsellors   in the front line. GPs as well, although not always. It runs health promotion and health screening to identify and treat health problems before they get serious. It organises access to medical specialists and hospitals if necessary. The ACCHS model considers individuals and families as part of a community and it responds effectively to community-based needs and issues.

This model of health care works for Aboriginal people. Evidence-based inquiries and reports show that ACCHS outperform mainstream services in terms of treatment and prevention. They reduce the need for highly expensive hospital-based services. And they  save lives.

ACCHS employment boosts Aboriginal education and training levels

 ACCHS employ people with high skill levels. Most have tertiary level qualifications and several have multiple qualifications. This increases the  education and skill base of the Aboriginal workforce.  Organisational  pathways in ACCHS are based on continuing and further education.  The message is that ACCHS have education benefits. A single investment by government in ACCHS  deals effectively with the  two main problems in Aboriginal communities – high unemployment and low levels of education.

BOOKINGS

NACCHO Close the Gap day :The Portrayal of Aboriginal Health in Selected Australian Media

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One of the factors impacting on the relationship of Indigenous Australians with mainstream society is the way in which the media portray Indigenous people and issues. There is growing research that suggests negative media portrayals in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and that this type of racism has a major impact on the health of Indigenous Australians

Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media Melissa J. Stoneham Curtin University

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (herein referred to as Indigenous Australian) comprise three percent of the Australian population (Australian Government, 2013). Distributed across the continent, Indigenous Australians are one of the most linguistically and culturally diverse populations in the world. It is commonly acknowledged that health outcomes for this group are lower than those of non-Indigenous Australians.

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT HERE  : The Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media Melissa J. Stoneham Curtin University

NACCHO Aboriginal health and racism: Marcia Langton the nature of my Q and A apology to Andrew Bolt

Photograph above Australia Day Canberra 2012 Colin Cowell

Although progress has been made in closing the gap, Indigenous Australians continue to experience a lower life expectancy with the current gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous estimated at 11.5 years for males and 9.7 years for females (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2010). Traditionally, the responsibility for tackling ill health has fallen to the health sector. While delivering health to those in need is one of the social determinants of health, the high burden of illness in many cases is due to the poor environmental conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age.

These unequal conditions are, in turn, a product of bad politics, poor social policies and programs, and unfair economic arrangements (World Health Organisation, 2008).

According to Calma (2013), the poor health of Indigenous Australians is a result of a failure to realise the right to health for Indigenous Australians. Indigenous Australians have not had the same opportunities to be as healthy as other Australians or been able to take effective action to remedy long-standing and substantial health inequalities due to the relationship with mainstream society and services.

Making sense of the cultural health status of Australian Indigenous peoples requires an understanding of the relationship between the colonisation process, trauma, and its impact on health. The trauma, grief, pain, and anger that have resulted from the assimilation, segregation, and protectionist policies of the past are still present in the lives of Australian Indigenous people (Hearn & Wise, 2004).

A parallel consideration is the definition that Australian Indigenous peoples have of health. The Social and Emotional Wellbeing Framework, developed by the Australian Government, acknowledges that wellbeing is part of a holistic understanding of life, integrating the life-death-life cycle. It recognises this whole-of-life view of health is essential to achieve positive life outcomes for Australian Indigenous peoples (Department of Health and Ageing, 2004).

Although not recognised as a specific wellbeing factor within the above document, land has a powerful and persuasive underlying influence on Australian Indigenous wellbeing (Garnett & Sithole, 2007). The dispossession of Australian Indigenous people from their land and the subsequent loss of social, cultural, and financial capital has had a devastating effect on the health of Indigenous people worldwide (Hearn & Wise, 2004).

One of the factors impacting on the relationship of Indigenous Australians with mainstream society is the way in which the media portray Indigenous people and issues. There is growing research that suggests negative media portrayals in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and that this type of racism has a major impact on the health of Indigenous Australians (Coffin, 2007; Larson, Gillies, Howard & Coffin, 2007; Sweet, 2009).

Similarly, in New Zealand, a number of mass media studies identified that Mãori health is often framed in the deficit model (Robson & Reid, 2001); the media are routinely reporting that the Mãori peoples are over-represented in national disease statistics (Rankine et al., 2008) and are persistently constructed as sicker and poorer than members of the dominant cultural group (Moewaka Barnes et al., 2005). Nairn, Pega, McCreanor, Rankine, and Barnes (2006) also looked at media representation of Māori peoples in New Zealand and highlighted a number of examples where the media perpetuated racist discourse by using language that framed stories in a particular way (e.g. Stoneham: Portrayal of Indigenous Health Published by Scholarship@Western, 2014 needy, passive objects of settler help), using only selective facts while leaving out crucial information, and excluding or conforming Mãori stories to fit a certain ideology.

This study aimed to examine the media portrayal of Indigenous Australians’ public health issues in selected media over a 12-month period. The objective was to determine the extent to which the portrayal was negative, positive, or neutral.

You can hear more about Aboriginal health and Close the Gap at the NACCHO SUMMIT

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The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits.

A good way of demonstrating how economically valuable ACCHS are is to showcase our success at a national summit.

REGISTRATIONS NOW OPEN

SUMMIT WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO

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NACCHO Close the Gap Day : Will Government funding of $800 M be enough to Close the Aboriginal health Gap ?

Peter

Updated at 7.00 Pm 18 March 2014 the above heading should read

Will Government funding of $1.3 billion  be enough to Close the Aboriginal health Gap ?

See Official Press Release below after the SBS interview

The government is responding to the call to Close the Gap with around $800 million in grant funding to organisations for Indigenous specific primary health and allied health care, the majority of which are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs).

ACCHOs deliver culturally appropriate and sustainable primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Many communities have different cultures and histories so different needs may need to be addressed by locally developed, specific strategies,” .

Says Assistant Minister for Health Senator Fiona Nash  talking with SBS this week (refer official press release below for funding details)

This is Justin Mohamed statement about the need to Close the Gap

Unless the critical social issues of housing, education and self-determination that contributed to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health inequality were adequately addressed, along with health funding, then it could take many generations to Close the Gap.

“In many rural, remote and urban areas we have many generations of a family living under one roof with high unemployment ,low income, no food in the fridge and the kids unable to attend school or do their homework because of the overcrowded living conditions.

The Aboriginal community controlled health services operate on multiple levels, and contribute significantly not just to cutting edge primary health care services, but to addressing some of the key social determinants as well, such as meaningful, employment, training, and leadership development.

The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) to Close the Gap is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits

Justin Mohamed NACCHO chair will be speaking at the National Press Club 2 April

“Investing in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health makes economic sense

PRESS CLUB BOOKINGS

For a country rich in resources and opportunity, the Indigenous people of Australia do not share the same fortune when it comes to health.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders can expect to live 10-17 years less than non-Indigenous Australians. The babies of Aboriginal mothers are twice as likely to die as other Australian babies, and in general Indigenous Australians experience higher rates of preventable illness such as heart disease and diabetes.

These are startling statistics from a country that enjoys the privilege of having one of the highest life expectancies in the world. For a country rich in resources and opportunity, the Indigenous people of Australia do not share the same fortune when it comes to health.

The reasons for the gap in Indigenous health are complex. Decades of discrimination, inaccessible health services, a misrepresentation of Indigenous Australians working in the health industry and failure to address root causes such as substandard education, housing and infrastructure all contribute.

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Oxfam’s National Close the Gap day is March 20, a day designed to create awareness, spark conversation and remind politicians on the inequality of health care that exists in our own country.

Close the GAP WEBSITE for events

Last year 145,000 people registered to support the campaign by holding a small event, like a morning tea, to discuss Indigenous health with family, friends and colleagues.

Oxfam Australia’s Indigenous Rights Policy Advisor Andrew Meehan says support of the campaign has helped put Indigenous health back on the agenda with government officials. “Registered events this year have now hit a record of 1060, showing an undeniable groundswell of support from everyday Australians expecting governments to keep their promise to invest in Indigenous health. It’s clear Australians care about this issue and expect our leaders to act,” Meehan said.

In 2008 The Council of Australian Government set a series of goals to decrease the general gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Earlier this year the progress of these goals were reviewed. In the areas of health, the goal of closing the life expectancy gap by 2031 has seen little improvement. Only the Northern Territory looks set to achieve this goal. More optimistic though is the goal of halving the gap in Indigenous mortality rates in children under five. If the current rate of improvement continues this goal is set to be achieved by 2018.

A number of aid organisations and humanitarian groups are working tirelessly to do their bit to close the gap, One Disease at a Time is a not for profit organisation with the vision to systematically target and eliminate one disease at a time. Currently in its sights is scabies, a highly contagious skin disease which affects seven out of ten children Indigenous children before their first birthday. Left untreated, scabies can lead to chronic disease and even death.

It can be disfiguring, children are forced to miss school and employment and personal relationships can be impacted. “Recognising the importance in giving kids the best start in life, one of our core program goals is to reduce scabies rates in children under five years old. Among children living in households with crusted scabies, we have seen an 88 per cent reduction in their time spent in hospital for scabies,” says founder of One Disease at a Time Dr Sam Prince.

One Disease at a Time work closely within communities to achieve their goals, something Meehan says is a critical element in closing the gap. “We’re pushing the government to invest in community controlled health. These are the people better placed to identify the services that are actually required. Focusing on this area is also an investment in jobs, giving these people an opportunity into a health career path,” he says.

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The PM Tony Abbott recently released at the Closing the Gap Report in Canberra with Tom Calma and Justin Mohamed above

DOWNLOAD PM 2014  REPORT

DOWNLOAD THE CLOSE THE GAP CAMPAIGN REPORT

Assistant Minister for Health Senator Fiona Nash says the government is responding to the call with around $800 million in grant funding to organisations for Indigenous specific primary health and allied health care, the majority of which are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs). “ACCHOs deliver culturally appropriate and sustainable primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.  Many communities have different cultures and histories so different needs may need to be addressed by locally developed, specific strategies,” she says.

Further to this, a $1.3 billion dollar investment in 2013-14 has been pledged for health projects including child and maternal health and the management of chronic diseases with specific focus on reducing the factors that create risk for disease including smoking and diet.

Dr Prince believes the secret to success in closing the gap is sharing stories of hope. “These will serve to ignite change in Indigenous communities, amongst the next generation of medical practitioners, and Australians as a whole.”

OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE From Senator Nash’s Office

What current government initiatives are in place to tackle the gap in Indigenous health care?

As most parents will know, healthy children are happier and more responsive, both at home and at school.
We are committed to getting kids into school, adults into work and ensuring the ordinary rule of law applies in communities.
This is important and cannot be achieved without a continued focus on good health.
In order to contribute to closing the gap in health outcomes the Government is providing around $1.3b in 2013-14 for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander healthactivities including:
·   child and maternal health services to give children a great start to their life, education and employment opportunities;
·   effective approaches to preventing and managing chronic disease especially in relation to reducing the factors that create risk for disease including smoking, healthy food and lifestyle;
·    ensuring a well-functioning and culturally appropriate health system and specific strategies and approaches to combat areas of concern such as trachoma, STIs, eye health and ear health.
The Government will provide around $800m in grant funding to organisations for Indigenous specific primary health and allied health care, the majority of which are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs).
ACCHOs deliver culturally appropriate and sustainable primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.  Many communities have different cultures and histories so different needs may need to be addressed by locally developed, specific strategies.
The Government is working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations, and with state and territory governments, to implement programmes to reduce the disparities in life expectancy and health outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and non-Indigenous Australians.
We are seeking change – improved access and outcomes across the breadth and depth of the health sector.

ON CLOSE THE GAP DAY March 20 show your support

by changing your Facebook or Twitter profile to CLOSE THE GAP

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You can hear more about Aboriginal health and Close the Gap at the NACCHO SUMMIT

summit-2014-banner

The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits.

A good way of demonstrating how economically valuable ACCHS are is to showcase our success at a national summit.

SUMMIT WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO

NACCHO 2014 Summit news: Partnership opportunities to sponsor NACCHO SUMMIT open today

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Why you should be considering

The 2014 NACCHO Healthy Futures Summit

for sponsorship and exhibition opportunities

The NACCHO 2014 Summit in June at the Melbourne Convention Centre offers an unparalleled opportunity for you to build relationships with NACCHO, our affiliates, stakeholders, government and our 150 Aboriginal community controlled health organisations that are committed to improving Aboriginal health and Closing the Gap by 2030.

The theme this year is:
“Investing in Aboriginal community controlled health makes economic sense.” After reading this newsletter and obtaining our Summit Partnership and Exhibition Opportunities prospectus, we think you will agree that a sponsorship investment in the NACCHO 2014 Health Summit “makes economic sense”.

Delegates at the Summit will be looking for partnerships, products and services that will help them improve delivery of comprehensive primary health care for their patients and communities and the overall cost efficiency of their service finance and administrative delivery.
Become a sponsor and take advantage of the many excellent sponsorship and exhibition opportunities that are available to promote your organisation at Australia’s most prestigious and well-attended Aboriginal health conference.

What you will achieve by sponsoring and exhibiting?

Achieve profile and brand enhancement through your association with, and support for Australia’s national authority in comprehensive Aboriginal primary health care.

Your involvement in, and contribution to the NACCHO 2014 Summit will help you meet your business objectives:

  • Network and exchange knowledge to better identify community wants and needs
  • Identify prospective health sector supply and partnership opportunities
  • Promote how your product or service will enhance the delivery of a sustainable Australian Aboriginal health sector
  • Support Australia’s Aboriginal health capabilities by providing insightful, relevant and practical information to your clientele about your brand values and attributes
  • Build community relationships and increase your company networks within the Australian Aboriginal health sector
  • Increase sales through direct promotion of your business
  • Promote your staff, products and services among the Aboriginal  health businesses and service industries

NACCHO 2014 SUMMIT Objectives

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NETWORK with the movers and shakers of the Aboriginal health sector

LEARN about the latest research and developments in Aboriginal health

SHARE experiences and ideas with forward thinkers

MEET with clinicians, researchers, industry innovators and others who share the desire to deliver better health to all
BENEFITS OF PARTNERSHIP NACCHO Member Services and state territory Affiliates will be attending the Summit so this is a perfect opportunity to interact with delegates first hand.
It is a unique opportunity for government, non-government organisations, and private industry to promote their products and services to NACCHO member services from all over Australia.

OPPORTUNITIES INCLUDE

To obtain a copy of the NACCHO SUMMIT 2014 SPONSORS PROSPECTUS call NACCHO now or complete enquiry form here – See more at: http://www.naccho.org.au/events/summit-sponsors-exhibition

PLATINUM EAGLE

Only ONE available (Price on application)

This is the premier opportunity for your organisation to become the major sponsor of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation’s (NACCHO) 2014 Healthy Futures Summit. Your organisation will have an exclusive profile for the period leading up to the Summit and at the event, with your organisation’s logo displayed in conjunction with the Summit logo.
THE BENEFITS

  • One complimentary exhibition stand (3m x 3m) in your preferred position from the spaces available.
  • The chance to prominently display your corporate banner (to be provided by your organisation) in the main plenary room during the Summit.
  • Your organization’s name/logo will be displayed in conjunction with the Summit logo in a prominent position at the Summit to ensure maximum exposure.
  • As well as the following acknowledgement; “The NACCHO2014 Healthy Futures Summit  is proudly supported by our Platinum Sponsor (your Company Name/logo Displayed Here)”.
  • Acknowledgement as Platinum Sponsor in publicity associated with the Summit marketing.
  • Your organisations logo will be prominently featured on a range of print materials (excluding pads, pens, name badges, lanyards and satchels).
  • Acknowledgement as the Platinum Sponsor of the Summit on the website with a short organisational profile and a link to your organization’s website.
  • Your logo will be displayed on the cover of the Summit program as the principle sponsor of the summit.
  • Your logo will be displayed on the Summit name badges as the principle sponsor of the summit.
  • An opportunity to address the Summit in plenary sessions.
  • The opportunity to include a suitable promotional item or a piece of literature (one flyer or brochure) in the Summit satchel.
  • Your organisation will receive two complimentary satchels with all the Summit information and materials.
  • Three complimentary full  Summit delegate registrations,
  • You will also receive an additional two complimentary to the Welcome Event and Dinner with a reserved table.
  • Your organisation will have access to SUMMIT delegate information

GOLD KANGAROO

Only ONE available (price on application) This is an opportunity for your organisation to become the Gold Sponsor of the NACCHO’s 2013 Summit. Your organisation will have a high exposure for the period leading up to the event, with your organisation’s name and logo displayed in conjunction with the Summit logo.

TRADE EXHIBITION BOOTH

$ 3,520 Inc. GST

You will have the opportunity to offer your products and services to the entire delegation as well as all of the summit break hospitality will be held in the exhibition area. Delegates will also be encouraged to visit all stands if the Expo passport sponsorship is taken up.

SPACES ARE LIMITED AND SELL FAST (as at 9 March only 24 left)

  SILVER PLATYPUS and BANDICOOT on PASSPORTS Only TWO Available

This is an opportunity not to be missed, become one of two Silver Platypus and Bandicoot Passport Sponsors of the NACCHO2014 Healthy Futures Summit. Each delegate will be given your passport at the beginning of the Summit and, if they visit of the booths and have their passport stamped they are eligible to win one of several major prizes drawn at the end of the Summit.
MORNING & AFTERNOON BREAK

Only Three Available Become the Morning & Afternoon Break Sponsor for a day at the NACCHO 2014 Summit
LUNCH

Only THREE Available Become the Lunch Sponsor of the NACCHO 2014 Summit for a day.
SATCHEL

Only ONE Available

Get your business logo mobile, as this sponsorship option allows your organisation to become the Satchel Sponsor. These quality satchels will be handed to all delegates and exhibitors at the Summit.
PADS & PENS

Only One Available

Take a firm grasp of this marketing opportunity. Become the pads & pens Sponsor at the NACCHO 2014 Summit.
ADVERTISING in Summit handbook

For an additional cost you can have an advertisement printed in the Summit Handbook

. FULL PAGE ADVERTISEMENT                   $ 700 + GST

HALF PAGE ADVERTISEMENT                   $ 500 + GST (must be landscape)

QUARTER PAGE ADVERTISEMENT           $ 400 + GST (must be portrait)

All advertisements will be printed in colour and must be according to your specifications.
For further information and pricing contact:

Josh Quarmby NACCHO SUMMIT TEAM Partnership:

Contact: 02 6246 9345

or email

Or for more information complete the enquiry form HERE

NACCHO Aboriginal Health :The high cost of healthy eating in remote communities

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I feel strongly that we should as a nation have some kind of way of giving people in remote parts ccess to fresh food at capital city supermarket prices. It wouldn’t cost us much in relative terms,”

“We give a huge diesel fuel rebate to mining companies and yet we don’t invest in the health of people, particularly children.”

She advocates a junk food tax to reduce the cost of fresh food and encouraging more locally produced food

University of SA Professor Kerin O’Dea

The Ngaanyatjarra Health Service (NACCHO member) provides health care to 2300 people living in a dozen communities across the Great Victorian and Gibson Deserts of central WA.

Chief executive Brett Cowling said the burden of chronic disease was “huge” and still growing in many remote areas.

But he said the problem was being tackled, and in some cases reversed, by the communities themselves

PICTURE ABOVE : Foodbank WA runs breakfast programs in more than 400 schools across the state, providing shelf-stable food and working with communities to make positive health behaviour changes.

WOULD you pay about $9 for six mushrooms  at your  supermarket in Perth? Or a similar amount for a piece of broccoli?

Probably not – but this is what people living in some of the most remote parts of WA are being asked to fork out for fresh produce.

The cost of fruit and vegetables in some of the state’s indigenous communities can be as much as three to four times that of supermarkets in Perth.

It is a cited as one of the reasons for the high rate of chronic health problems, including obesity, diabetes and renal failure, in Aboriginal communities.

As Published NEWS LTD

FACTS

Aboriginal people and diabetes

– Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have the fourth highest rate of type 2 diabetes in the world.

– It is estimated 10-30 per cent of Indigenous Australians may have the condition, but many are undiagnosed.

– Rates are between three and five times higher compared to non-Indigenous people in all age groups over 25 years.

– 39 per cent of the Aboriginal population over the age of 55 has diabetes.

– Deaths from diabetes were seven times more common for Indigenous people than for non-Indigenous people between 2006 and 2010.

– Hospitalisations for kidney complications among Indigenous people are 29 times higher than for other Australians.

Source: Diabetes WA

University of South Australia researcher Kerin O’Dea wants nutritious food to be subsidised and for doctors in remote areas to prescribe food like medicines.

University of SA Professor Kerin O'Dea.

University of SA Professor Kerin O’Dea. Source: News Limited

“I feel strongly that we should as a nation have some kind of way of giving people in remote parts ccess to fresh food at capital city supermarket prices. It wouldn’t cost us much in relative terms,” she said.

“We give a huge diesel fuel rebate to mining companies and yet we don’t invest in the health of people, particularly children.”

She advocates a junk food tax to reduce the cost of fresh food and encouraging more locally produced food.

The idea of subsidising fresh fruit and vegetables was supported by Winthrop Professor Jill Milroy of the Poche Centre for indigenous Health at the University of Western Australia.

“Getting good, healthy food is really important and it needs to be addressed. It probably has to be subsidies because there is a lot of cost factors in getting food up there,” she said.

Department of Health nutrition policy adviser Dr Christina Pollard said the cost of healthy food was up to 29 per cent higher in rural areas compared to capital cities.

Welfare recipients also need to spend 50 per cent of their disposable income to achieve a healthy diet compared with 15 per cent nationally, the author of the Department’s Food Access and Cost Survey said.

“To get the food there, to keep it fresh and of good quality costs a lot more,” the adjunct researcher at Curtin University said.

“Food in general is more expensive, but healthy food is disproportionately expensive, particularly things like fruit and vegetables which need to be transported under refrigeration and don’t have a long shelf life.”

The Ngaanyatjarra Health Service provides health care to 2300 people living in a dozen communities across the Great Victorian and Gibson Deserts of central WA.

Chief executive Brett Cowling said the burden of chronic disease was “huge” and still growing in many remote areas.

But he said the problem was being tackled, and in some cases reversed, by the communities themselves.

At community-owned stores the price of fresh food is being kept low by not applying transport costs and in some areas full-strength soft drinks have been pulled from the shelves.

“Subsidies are  being discussed, and are an option, but I have seen the same results through good community governance and where the community have worked towards that outcome themselves,” he said.

“That always has to be best possible solution.”

Outback Stores was established six years ago to ensure food security in remote communities and today manages 10 community-owned shops in Western Australia.

Chief executive Steve Moore said by keeping the cost of fresh food low consumption of fruit and vegetables was up 13 per cent compared to last year.

The sale of water bottles has also more than doubled since the firm did a deal with Coca-Cola Amatil to sell 600ml bottles of its Mount Franklin water for $1.

“I don’t believe a subsidy or a tax will solve the problem,” he said. “We are making ground, but it’s small steps. It’s time and education  that  will make the difference.

“People are more aware of what they should and shouldn’t consume. Restricting products has never worked because people will just travel to get it.”

Foodbank WA runs breakfast programs in more than 400 schools across the state, providing shelf-stable food and working with communities to make positive health behaviour changes.

As well as getting around the high costs by supplying frozen and tinned produce, Foodbank encourages residents of remote communities to use bushtucker.

“Traditional methods are important and it’s important culturally to keep those going,” Stephanie Godrich, Foodbank WA regional strategy co-ordinator, said.

“We need to acknowledge that Aboriginal people have a lot to offer us.”

Sugar

What is in a 600ml bottle of cola?

65.4 grams of sugar – The equivilant of 16 teaspoons

1044 kilojoules (100 per cent of energy comes from sugar)

How much sugar is in your favourite drink?

600ml Cola

– 16 teaspoons of sugar

600ml Iced Coffee Chill

– 14 teaspoons of sugar

600ml Orange juice

– 16 teaspoons of sugar

600ml Choc Chill

– 13 teaspoons of sugar

600ml Powerade

– 11 teaspoons of sugar

375ml Cola

– 10 teaspoons of sugar

350ml Apple juice

– Nine teaspoons of sugar

375ml Lemonade

– Eight teaspoons of sugar

500ml Lemon Ice Tea

– Eight teaspoons of sugar

250ml Red Bull

– Seven teaspoons of sugar

300ml V8 Juice

– Six teaspoons of sugar

500ml Vitamin Water

– Five teaspoons of sugar

300ml fresh cow’s milk

– Four teaspoons of sugar

Source: Livelighter.com.au

 

NACCHO health political alert : Minister Dutton tells NACCHO board he awaits audit to decide the future of the health system.

Peter

Health Minister Peter Dutton and Indigenous Health Minister Senator Fiona Nash  (pictured above meeting with the NACCHO Board at Parliament House  Canberra yesterday) told the NACCHO board they are awaiting the findings of the budget Commission of Audit, along with reviews of Medicare Locals and electronic health records, to decide the future of the health system.

Mr Dutton declared the system to be “riddled with inefficiency and waste” and foreshadowed changes to Medicare, with private health insurers likely to play a greater role and wealthy Australians asked to pay more for their care.

NACCHO will be reporting further outcomes from this meeting in the next 24 hours

Meanwhile in the Australian it is reported Treasury officials are working on a formula to determine whether health spending is sustainable

Tackling avoidable cost has to be at the heart of how the hospital system works : Sean Parnell From: The Australian

PUBLIC hospitals are wasting up to $1 billion a year and should be held to account for inefficient and substandard medical care, the Grattan Institute has warned.

In a report released last night, the think tank headed by long-time reform advocate Stephen Duckett has called for activity-based funding to be accompanied by measures that would reduce costs and rein in health inflation.

The institute’s report calls for states to exclude abnormally high costs from activity-based funding calculations to ensure the new average prices “drive hospital costs down towards achievable benchmarks”.

“But the reform won’t work on its own, the report concludes. “Tackling avoidable cost has to be at the heart of how the whole system works.

“Hospitals need data showing how much of their spending is avoidable and where that spending is concentrated.”

Last year, health fund Bupa and private hospital operator Healthscope entered into an Australian-first, quality-based funding system.

Under the arrangements Healthscope forgoes payment from the insurer if it makes a serious mistake treating any of its 3.5 million members, with reward payments likely to be considered in future for above-standard care.

Mr Dutton at the time welcomed the arrangements and said he expected providers to be more transparent and release data on avoidable costs.

“If we can bring that pressure to bear on both the public and private systems, we will end up with better health outcomes,” he said last October.

Mr Dutton has not taken the issue further and the so-called “budget emergency” has put any intergovernmental health reform talks on hold.

Treasury officials are working on a formula to determine whether health spending is sustainable.

NACCHO Chair JUSTIN MOHAMED will be telling the  Coalition Government at the NACCHO SUMMT  Investing in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health makes economic sense

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The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits.

A good way of demonstrating how economically valuable ACCHS are is to showcase our success at a national summit.

SUMMIT WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO

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NACCHO political alert: ‘Cut the cash and we won’t close the gap’ says Dr Ngiare Brown

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“I know that it has been said within the Coalition that health and education will have to take some funding hits,” Dr Brown said. “We cannot possibly progress this nation unless we are investing more in health and education, public health and education, so that we all have an equal opportunity at what that represents. I will absolutely be pushing the health bandwagon.”

Dr Ngiare Brown, Warren Mundine’s deputy on the government’s indigenous council, says ‘it’s often the layers of red tape and bureaucracy that suck up the resourcing’. Source: News Corp Australia Exclusive: Patricia Karvelas Photo: Ray Strange

ABORIGINAL doctor Ngiare Brown and  NACCHO  Executive Research Manager has vowed to use her new role as deputy head of Tony Abbott’s indigenous council to argue that cuts to indigenous health or education would be detrimental to efforts to close the disadvantage gap.

Dr Brown, who was in one of the first groups of Aboriginal medical graduates in Australia and previously an indigenous health adviser to the Australian Medical Association, was yesterday appointed as Warren Mundine’s deputy after receiving the backing of council members and the Prime Minister.

In an interview with The Australian, Dr Brown said she supported the priorities of the new council to boost school attendance and enhance economic independence. Given her background in health, she would also articulate the need for better health for indigenous people.

Mr Mundine said Dr Brown was a fantastic choice for deputy.

“I’m glad that all the council members and the PM support this move,” he said. “She’s very well experienced and she’s a great asset as deputy chair.”

In January, Mr Mundine said it was unrealistic to expect indigenous affairs spending to be immune from expected budget cuts and that, despite being the head of Mr Abbott’s indigenous advisory council, he could not cast a “force field” to exempt Aborigines from the broader budget agenda.

Dr Brown said she believed existing funding could be better spent, with less on bureaucracy, but urged that there be no net reduction in health and education.

“It is about school attendance but also performance and successful completion, pathways into opportunities into employment and further education,” she said.

“Being economically stable, too, all of those things we can’t do unless we are healthy. And the best model that we have for health service delivery in this country and comprehensive primary care are the Aboriginal community control health services.”

She said she was “absolutely” worried about cuts.

“I know that it has been said within the Coalition that health and education will have to take some funding hits,” Dr Brown said. “We cannot possibly progress this nation unless we are investing more in health and education, public health and education, so that we all have an equal opportunity at what that represents. I will absolutely be pushing the health bandwagon.”

She said if targets were to be achieved, cuts should not come from indigenous affairs.

“They should not be coming from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health,” she said. “They should not be coming from the public health system in particular nor the public education system. Because every child, every individual, every citizen has a right to those systems and they should be supported by government.”

She said waste on bureaucracy was concerning. “I am all about effectiveness and efficient spend,” she said. “But I am also about investment and if you look at community-based services they are extraordinary exemplars of how we can do it well and, in many instances, it’s often the layers of red tape and bureaucracy that suck up the resourcing.”

You can hear Dr Ngiare Brown speak at the NACCHO SUMMIT

summit-2014-banner

The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits.

A good way of demonstrating how economically valuable ACCHS are is to showcase our success at a national summit.

SUMMIT WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO

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