NACCHO OCHRE DAY:The new generation of Aboriginal males is making generational changes

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Next Thursday 8 th August at Old Parliament House Canberra over 100 Aboriginal males from around Australia will be there to help  NACCHO launch its Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint 2013-2030, and sitting in the audience will be Jordan Lovegrove (pictured above) who has been busy all this week in Adelaide designing the NACCHO Blueprint brochure.

With the Blueprint all about “Aboriginal male Healthy futures for generational change” Jordan is really what the strategy is all about and below we highlight his journey for change.

In the forward to the Blueprint NACCHO chair Justin Mohamed states

NACCHO has long recognised the importance of an Aboriginal male health policy and program to close the gap by 2030 on the alarming Aboriginal male mortality rates across Australia.

Aboriginal males have arguably the worst health outcomes of any population group in Australia.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to Aboriginal male health and wellbeing

NACCHO, its affiliates and members are committed to building upon past innovations and we require targeted actions and investments to implement a wide range of Aboriginal male health and wellbeing programs and strategies.

This blueprint sets out how the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services sector will continue to improve our rates of access to health and wellbeing services by Aboriginal males through working closely within our communities, strengthening cultural safety and further building upon our current Aboriginal male health workforce and leadership

The Blueprint will be available online Thursday at approx. 1.00 pm after the launch

For details of the  event

Jordan Lovegrove is a Ngarrindjeri young man and one of Dreamtime Public Relations’ talented graphic designers. He has hand-drawn art on the computer for various organisations around Australia, designed many print and promotional merchandise items, and built various websites.

Whilst completing Year 12, Jordan knew he wanted a career in design and website development. Dreamtime PR employed him as an Apprentice and he has since completed his Apprenticeship in 18 months instead of 3 years. Due to these outstanding results, Jordan has been nominated for National Apprentice of the Year and is currently a Finalist in the DFEEST 2013 SA Training Awards.

Since joining Dreamtime PR, Jordan has also participated in FaHCSIA’s National Indigenous Leadership Program 2011-12, attended Dynamic Web Training in Melbourne, enjoyed art development training from a local Elder, and undertaken various other on-the-job training activities.

Jordan is one of Dreamtime PR’s ‘star’ Indigenous trainees and is a valuable contributor to projects across Australia which are addressing the inequality of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people nationwide.

Dreamtime PR’s MD, Janet Craig, is very proud of Jordan and is looking forward to promoting him to a role in the near future where he will train other Indigenous trainees like himself.

Dreamtime PR was formed in 2002 with the primary objective of employing and mentoring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people like Jordan to deliver culturally appropriate visual communications for organisations across Australia. I encourage you to check out their website at http://www.dreamtimepr.com/

NACCHO health news:More action needed on alcohol misuse among Aboriginal people in Ceduna SA

The CEO of the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA), Mrs Mary Buckskin (pictured above)  has called for more action to address the problem of alcohol misuse among Aboriginal people in the Ceduna area in the far west of South Australia.

“AHCSA supported the findings and recommendation of the 2011 report of the State Coroner following the inquest into a number of alcohol-related deaths in the area,” she said.

“We are pleased that some of the recommendations have been implemented. In particular, the expansion of the sobering-up shelter managed by Ceduna-Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service is clearly better meeting the need.”

However, Mrs Buckskin stressed that much more must be done, as clearly problems persist. “There is a need for a more strategic approach involving Aboriginal communities and their organisations in Ceduna and surrounding areas, as well as Yalata and Oak Valley.

“Currently, some actions taken by some agencies are ad hoc rather than being part of an overall strategy, and are not necessarily helping the problem.

“There is no single magic bullet to address it. What is required is a range of strategies developed with appropriate consultation, and introduced in a coordinated way.

“We need strategies to reduce the availability of alcohol; we need strategies to ensure that people with alcohol problems have access to health services where they can be properly assessed and offered treatment; we need appropriate rehabilitation services for individuals and families,” Mrs Buckskin said.

She added that people who have alcohol-related brain damage need to be properly assessed and provided with appropriate services.

“Above all, it must be recognised that the people at most risk of alcohol-related harm or death come from the communities further west. A comprehensive strategy to deal with alcohol problems in the Ceduna area must include supporting people to return to their country and ensuring that the communities concerned are adequately resourced to support this happening.

“While this will require significant resources, in the long run a coordinated comprehensive strategy will save lives and money. And this is really an issue of human dignity,” Mrs Buckskin said.

The Aboriginal Health Council of SA Inc. (AHCSA) is the peak body representing Aboriginal community controlled health and substance misuse services, and Aboriginal health advisory committees across South Australia. AHCSA is an affiliate of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

ENDS. For further information contact: Mrs Mary Buckskin, Chief Executive Officer, Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia Inc., 08 8273 7200.

NACCHO tribute :Aboriginal Health Council of SA in ANZAC DAY tributes

 CEO Mary Buckskin thanks Board Member Les Kropinyeri

CEO Mary Buckskin thanks Les Kropinyeri

$1 million has been fundraised to erect a Memorial for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia at the Torrens Parade Ground in South Australia.

“When Australia went to war, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people went to war voluntarily to fight for our own country,” said Corporal Les Kropinyeri, returned serviceman and Board Member of the Aboriginal Health Council of SA Inc.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people used Afghan names or any other name to enlist as service men and women.

“We didn’t have to go to war – we wanted to go to war to fight for our country and to protect what we have for all Australians,” Les Kropinyeri said.

This is the story that is often unheard – the story of our Indigenous Australians who numbered in their thousands to fight for freedom.

According to Reconciliation Australia, over 3,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and women enlisted in World War II and over 800 are known to have served in World War I. The true number is likely to be much higher. There are up to 7,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander veterans and war widows in the Australian community today, and more than 800 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians currently serve with distinction in the Australian Defence Forces.

Les Kropinyeri who went into the Defence Force in April 1967, served in Vietnam from 1968-69 in the 9th Batallion of the Royal Australian Regiment, five months before the end of his voluntary 2-year national service.

He recalls the infantry, ‘Charlie Company’, where he was in charge of a section of men within the 7th Platoon, comprising ten in all, including a rifle section, a gun section and forward scouts.  Les Kropinyeri was a Section Commander and proud of it.

Les Kropinyeri has since served his community and all Australians well including as a Board Member of the Aboriginal Health Council of SA Inc.

Chairperson of the Council Mr John Singer pays particular respect on behalf of the Board to Les Kropinyeri and his fellow Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service men and women on this ANZAC Day, 25 April 2013.

Led by Sir Eric Neale, $1 million has been fundraised to erect a Memorial for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia at the Torrens Parade Ground in South Australia. Les Kropinyeri says this is a first because most other states have only erected memorials for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of their own states.

A Committee was formed comprising retired, non-active service men and service women including Les Kropinyeri, Gill Green, Frank Clarke, Francis Lampard (Deputy Chairperson), Marj Tripp (Chairperson), Bill Hignett, Bill Denny, Mike Mummery, Garth Dodd (representing Janine Haynes), Elaine Lomas, Lowitja O’Donoghue, Rossalyn Cox, Mark Waters, Eunmi Parke, Ian Smith, and Barry Forrest. This Committee decided to record all the names of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia who served on any war, and the list is growing.

Names have been gathered from everywhere with Elders Groups being the main contributors. “There will be a roll somewhere in time when we have completed the list,” said Les Kropinyeri.

Considering the funds raised through Sir Eric Neale, it was decided to erect a Memorial and now the Committee is concentrating on completing the bronze statues of male and female Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who served in the wars. It is expected that the Memorial will be unveiled in November 2013.

The Aboriginal Health Council of SA Inc. would like to honour Les Kropinyeri and all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander veterans on this ANZAC Day 2013. Mr John Singer, Chairperson said, “We are suitably proud of Les Kropinyeri and his fellow returned service men and women, and the fact that they voluntarily fought for our country and freedom.”

The Aboriginal Health Council of SA Inc. (AHCSA) is the peak body representing Aboriginal community controlled health and substance misuse services, and Aboriginal health advisory committees across South Australia. AHCSA is an affiliate of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

ENDS. For further information contact: Mrs Mary Buckskin, Chief Executive Officer, Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia Inc., 08 8273 7200.