NACCHO #NNW2016 Aboriginal Health and Nutrition : What works to keep our mob healthy and strong?

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” More effective action is urgently required in order to reduce the unacceptable health inequalities experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

During National Nutrition Week, 16-22 October 2016 NACCHO highlights food insecurity and nutrition-related chronic conditions are responsible for a large proportion of the ill-health experienced by Australia’s First Peoples who, before colonisation, enjoyed physical, social and cultural wellbeing for tens of thousands of years. Food and nutrition programs, therefore, play an important role in the holistic approach to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Key Recommendations

  1. Consistent incorporation of nutrition and breastfeeding advice into holistic maternal and child health care services.
  2. Creation of dedicated positions for Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people to be trained and supported to work with their local communities to improve food security and nutrition.
  3. Development of strategies which increase access to nutritious food, such as meal provision or food subsidy programs, should be considered for families experiencing food insecurity.
  4. Adoption of settings-based interventions (e.g. in schools, early childhood services and sports clubs) which combine culturally-appropriate nutrition education with provision of a healthy food environment.

The evidence suggests that the most important factor determining the success of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander food and nutrition programs is community involvement in (and, ideally, control of) program development and implementation.

Working in partnership with Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander health professionals and training respected community members to deliver nutrition messages are examples of how local strengths and capacities can be developed. Incorporation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge and culture into program activities is another key feature of strength-based practice which can be applied to food and nutrition programs.”

Food and nutrition programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians: what works to keep people healthy and strong?

Download full report food-and-nutrition-programs-aboriginal-what-works

The authors would also like to acknowledge the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) for their contribution to this work.

Deeble Institute for Health Policy Research, Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA), Canberra.

Nutrition Australia, the country’s leading non-profit nutrition organisation and creators of the Healthy Eating Pyramid, is challenging all Australians to take the pledge to eat more veg during National Nutrition Week, 16-22 October 2016.

With an alarming 96% of Australians failing to eat their recommend daily intake of vegetables, Nutrition Australia’s Try For 5 theme encourages all Australians to discover new ways to add veg to their day.

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The recommended daily intake for people over 4 years of age is around 5 serves of vegetables and legumes a day (75g per serve), yet data from the Australia Bureau of Statistics shows that the average Australian eats around half that amount.

“It’s the food group that we eat the least, yet it’s the one we should eat from the most!” said Lucinda Hancock, Accredited Nutritionist and CEO of Nutrition Australia Vic Division.

“Whether they’re fresh, frozen or canned, eating a rainbow of vegetables every day is one of the easiest things we can do to improve our health and wellbeing.”

“Vegetables are full of vitamins, minerals, fibre and antioxidants which all help keep our minds and bodies working day-to-day, and reduce our risk of chronic disease in the future.”

President of Nutrition Australia, Rob Rees said “Our Healthy Eating Pyramid has been advising Australians to eat a diet of mostly plant foods, including vegetables and legumes, for over 30 years. Sadly, we know that most Australians don’t eat the balanced diet that’s recommended by the Pyramid, and this is why we’re seeing such high rates of diet-related diseases.”

“In fact the average Australian gets over a one third of their daily kilojoules (energy) from ‘junk foods’, like biscuit and cakes, confectionery, take away foods, sugary drinks and alcohol,“ said Mr Rees .

Nutrition Australia is supporting the Try For 5 goal with 3 key strategies to boost vegetable intake:

 

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Eat a rainbow

Eating a variety of vegetables each day exposes us to a wide range of nutrients for better health. We should eat different coloured vegetables every day because each colour carries its own set of unique health-promoting properties called ‘phytochemicals’ that give vegetables their colour, flavour, taste and even smell.

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Try something new

Trying new things is a great strategy to boost your vegetable intake. Whether that’s trying new vegetables, a new recipe, or trying vegetables in a way that you normally don’t consume them like at breakfast or in a snack. Experimenting with vegetables and preparing foods can give you the knowledge, skills and confidence to easily prepare vegetables to suit your tastes, which makes you more likely to buy, cook and consume them.

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Love your legumes

2016 is International Year of the Pulse (another term for legumes) and they are a cheap and versatile source of fibre, protein plus many other important nutrients. We should have 2–3 serves of legumes a week for health benefits.

Sibylla Stephen is one half of children’s band, Teeny Tiny Stevies, who are ambassadors for National Nutrition Week 2016.

Mum-of-two Sibylla and her bandmate and sister, Beth, are releasing the animated video for their song “I Ate A Rainbow” during National Nutrition Week, which was written as a tool to help parents teach their children about why we should eat different coloured vegetables every day.

And it’s a perfect match with the storybook, I’m having a rainbow for dinner published by Nutrition Australia’s Queensland Division.

“I’m thrilled to be an ambassador for National Nutrition Week because I think we can all do with learning some new quick and easy ways to feed ourselves and our families with vegetables,” Sibylla said.

“My children are four and one, and their relationship with food changes as they get older. It can be incredibly frustrating to get them to eat their veggies, but I always encourage them to try different veggies cooked in different ways, and learn what they do and don’t like.

“As parents we try so hard to make sure our kids are well nourished, but the stats show that we’re not taking our own advice. I think ‘eating a rainbow’ is a great message for children and adults alike!”

Report continued

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan takes a “whole-of-life” approach to improving health outcomes. Priority areas include maternal health and parenting; childhood health and development; adolescent and youth health; healthy adults and healthy ageing.

This Policy Issues Brief provides a synthesis of the evidence for food and nutrition programs at each of these life stages. It answers questions such as, what kind of food and nutrition programs are most effective for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples? And, how should these food and nutrition programs be developed and implemented?

Nutrition research has been criticised for focusing too much on quantifying dietary risks and deficits, without offering clear solutions.

Increasingly, Aboriginal organisations are calling for strength-based approaches, which utilise community assets to promote health and wellbeing.

Evidence-based decision-making must consider not only what should be done, but also how food and nutrition policies and programs can be developed to support the existing strengths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

National Nutrition Week runs from 16-22 October 2016. Click here for recipes, tips and resources to discover new ways to add veg to your day.

How you can share positive health messages and  stories about Aboriginal Community Controlled Health issues ? Closing this week for advertising and editorial

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Editorial Opportunities : We are now looking to all our members, programs and sector stakeholders for advertising, compelling articles, eye-catching images and commentary for inclusion in our next edition.Maximum 600 words (word file only) with image

More info and Advertising rate card

Contact editor Colin Cowell 0401 331 251

or email nacchonews@naccho.org.au

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REGISTER HERE

 

NACCHO #Health Press Release : #AIHW reveals the extent of the health crisis facing Aboriginal communities

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“In a wealthy country such as Australia, I am appalled by the unacceptable gap in the health of Aboriginal people and non-Aboriginal people.  More than one-third (37%) of the diseases or illness experienced by Aboriginal people are preventable.

“We need to act before another generation of young Aboriginal people have to live with avoidable diseases and die far too young.

If we are serious about turning this crisis around we need sustained investment in evidence-based programs for Aboriginal people, by Aboriginal people, through Aboriginal community controlled health services –  a model we know works.

Matthew Cooke Chair of NACCHO pictured above with Vice Chair Sandy Davies 

New figures show that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience ill health at more than double that of non-Indigenous Australians.

The peak Aboriginal health organisation, the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) said the report highlights the urgent need for a rethink on actions to address the already known and growing crisis in Aboriginal health.

The report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) released today shows Aboriginal Australians experience a burden of disease at 2.3 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians.

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Download the report aihw-australian-burden-of-disease-study

NACCHO Chair, Matthew Cooke, said it is the first ever in-depth study of the scale of disease in Indigenous communities.

See AIHW Press Release

“It’s given us a clearer picture of the real impact for Aboriginal communities of poor health in terms of years of health lives lost, quality of life and wellbeing and what the risks factors really are,” Mr Cooke said.

“It’s shown that we still have a massive challenge to address the overwhelming level of non-fatal burden in mental health in particular – which makes up 43 per cent of non-fatal illness in men and 35 per cent of these conditions in women.

The AIHW report found that injuries, including suicide, heart disease and cancer are the biggest causes of death in Aboriginal people. Levels of diabetes and kidney disease are five and seven times higher in Aboriginal people than non-Aboriginal people.

Mr Cooke said the report must trigger a rethink on how health programs are funded and delivered to Aboriginal people.

“The risk factors causing health problems include tobacco use, alcohol use, high body mass, physical inactivity, high blood pressure, high blood glucose and dietary factors – all of which can be addressed with the right programs on the ground and delivered by the right people.

“All levels of government should urgently act on this evidence; we need to see these findings translated into programs, policies and funding priorities that are proven to work. Too many programs aimed at addressing Aboriginal health are still fragmented, out of touch with local communities, unaffordable or inaccessible.

“If we are serious about turning this crisis around we need sustained investment in evidence-based programs for Aboriginal people, by Aboriginal people, through Aboriginal community controlled health services –  a model we know works.”

How you can share positive good news stories about Aboriginal Community Controlled Health ?

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Editorial Opportunities

We are now looking to all our members, programs and sector stakeholders for advertising, compelling articles, eye-catching images and commentary for inclusion in our next edition.

Maximum 600 words (word file only) with image

More info and Advertising rate card

agm

REGISTER HERE

NACCHO Aboriginal Health 27 key Save a dates like #marmotoz #FASDAwarenessDay and #NACCHOAGM2016

Save

Qand a

Sir Michael Marmot will be on tonight 29 August  QandA talking social determinants

Background

As the generators and implementers of policies that underpin improved population health outcomes (Marmot and Bell, 2012).

NACCHO encourages the Commonwealth to recognise that the social determinants of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their ensuing health inequities are significantly influenced by broad social factors outside the health system.

NACCHO asserts that the Commonwealth is well positioned to identify those factors and act upon them through policy decisions that improve health – supported by current evidence – in housing, law & justice and mining & resource tax redistribution, for example.

1. Closing dates 15 October for next edition 16 November

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Newspaper

To be distributed at the NACCHO AGM and Members meeting 2016

AGM 2016

Editorial and advertising opportunities

front Page - Copy

Editorial Proposals 15 October 2016
Final Ads artwork 31 October 2016
Publication date 16 November 2016

More Info HERE

2.Celebrate #IndigenousDads Registrations now open

ONLY a few Weeks to go / Limited numbers

Aboriginal Male Health National -NACCHO OCHRE DAY

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This year NACCHO is pleased to announce the annual NACCHO Ochre Day will be held in Perth during September 2016. This year the activities will be run by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) in partnership with both the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) and Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service Inc.

Beginning in 2013, Ochre Day is an important NACCHO Aboriginal male health initiative. As Aboriginal males have arguably the worst health outcomes of any population group in Australia.

NACCHO has long recognised the importance of addressing Aboriginal male health as part of Close the Gap by 2030.

  • There is no registration cost to attend the NACCHO Ochre Day (Day One or Two)
  • There is no cost to attend the NACCHO Ochre Day Jaydon Adams Memorial Oration Dinner, (If you wish to bring your Partner to this Dinner then please indicate when you register below)
  • All Delegates will be provided breakfast & lunch on Day One and morning & afternoon tea as well as lunch on Day Two.
  • All Delegates are responsible for paying for and organising your own travel and accommodation.

For further information please contact Mark Saunders;

REGISTRATION / CONTACT PAGE

2. CATSINAM International Indigenous Workforce Meeting

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More info HERE

3. NACCHO Members Conference AGM: Save a date  : 6-8 December 2016  Melbourne Further details

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The NACCHO AGM conference provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia
  • INFO CONTACT REGISTER

FASD                         More info www.nofasd.org.au

5.National Stroke week kits are now available for ACCHO’s

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Registrations are open
National Stroke Week is the Stroke Foundation’s annual awareness campaign taking place from September 12 – 18. Taking part in Stroke Week is a great chance to engage in a fun and educational way with your workplace, friends, sporting or community group.
SPEED SAVES
This Stroke Week we want all Australians to know the signs of stroke and act FAST to get to treatment.
Time has a huge impact on stroke and we need your help to spread this message. A speedy reaction not only influences the treatment available to a person having a stroke but also their recovery. Most treatments for stroke are time sensitive so it is important we Think F.A.S.T. and Act FAST!
Get your Stroke Week kit NOW
Whether you are an office, hospital, community group or support group, there are lots of ways you can be involved in Stroke Week 2016 like:
• Organise an awareness activity
• Fundraise for the Stroke Foundation
• Host a health check
There’s no cost for your Stroke Week kit which includes posters, a campaign booklet and resources as well as social media kit and PR support.
Act FAST and register NOW at: 

6.Call for applications research project

Research

Details here

7.National Conference: Closing the Prison Gap: Building Cultural Resilience

WHEN: 10-11 October 2016

WHERE: Mantra on Salt Beach, Gunnamatta Avenue, Kingscliff, NSW

WHO TO CONTACT: Meg Perkins mperkinsnsw@gmail.com Mobile 0417 614 135

The Closing the Gap: Building Cultural Resilience national conference will look closely at issues around changing the Australian criminal justice system while celebrating grassroots, community-led and unfunded activities being undertaken by First Nations People.

Australia has a long history of over-incarceration of First Nations peoples, beginning with the first Aboriginal Protection Act in Victoria in 1869, and culminating in the abuses at the Don Dale Juvenile Detention Centre in the Northern Territory in 2016.

It is obvious that we need to make changes in the Australian criminal justice system – studies on risk and protective factors have shown that cultural resilience is a major factor involved in protecting new generations from the trauma and disadvantage of the past.

Cultural resilience was first mentioned in the literature by Native American educators who noticed that their students on the reservation succeeded, in spite of poverty and exposure to substance abuse and lateral violence, when they were supported by traditional tribal structures, spirituality and cultural practices.

The theory of cultural resilience suggests that the practice of culture creates a psychological sense of belonging and a positive

8. Biennial National Forum from 29 Nov – 1 Dec 2016 Canberra ACT

IAHA

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), a national not for profit, member based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health organisation, is holding its biennial National Forum from 29 Nov – 1 Dec 2016 at the Rex Hotel in Canberra.

The 2016 IAHA National Forum will host  a diverse range of interactive Professional Development workshops and the 2016 IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards and Gala Dinner.

The fourth IAHA Health Fusion Team Challenge, a unique event specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health students, will precede the Forum.

Collectively, these events will present unique opportunities to:

  • Contribute to achieving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health equality
  • Be part of creating strengths based solutions
  • Build connections – work together and support each other
  • Enhance professional and personal journeys
  • Celebrate the successes of those contributing to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

All workshop participants will receive a Certificate of Attendance, detailing the duration, aims and learning outcomes of the workshop, which can be included in your Continuous Professional Development (CPD) personal portfolio.

Register HERE

9. NATSIHWA  6th & 7th of October 2016

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On the 6th & 7th of October 2016 NATSIHWA is holding the bi-annual National Conference at the Pullman Hotel in Brisbane. The conference is the largest event for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and health practitioners.

The theme for this year’s conference is “my story, my knowledge, our future”

my story – health workers and health practitioners sharing their stories about why they came into this profession, what they do in their professional capacity and what inspires them.

my knowledge – being able to gain new knowledge and passing knowledge onto others by sharing and networking.

our future – using stories and knowledge to shape their future and the future of their communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and health practitioners are our valuable frontline primary health care workers and are a vital part of Australia’s health care profession. This conference will bring together health workers and health practitioners from across the country.

Register now and get the early bird special. Each registration includes a ticket to the awards dinner.

Register Now     Book Accomodation

 10. VACCA Cultural Awareness Training – Book Now!

Looking to deepen your cultural journey?

VACCA’s Training and Development Unit offers a range of programs to external organisations working in the field of child and family welfare, to strengthen relationships with Aboriginal organisations, families and communities.

VACCA delivers cultural awareness training throughout the year for people interested in developing cultural competency.

Registrations are now open for August.

See the flyer for all details and how to register for these sessions.

Microsoft Word - VACCA Training - Cultural Awareness Flyer web.d

All enquiries can be emailed to: trainingevents@vacca.org

 

11. HealthinfoNET Conferences, workshops and events

Upcoming conferences and events.

Conferences, workshops and events

  • 17th International Mental Health Conference – Gold Coast, Qld – Wednesday 10 to Friday 12 August 2016 – this conference will provide a platform for health professionals such as, clinical practitioners, academics, service providers and mental health experts, to discuss mental health issues confronting Australia and New Zealand.
  • 2016 National Stolen Generations Conference – Gold Coast, Qld – Wednesday 24 to Friday 26 August 2016 – this conference aims to provide an educational platform to the wider community and endeavours to assist in a sensitive and culturally appropriate way with healing the spirit, mind and body of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • Working with Children and Young People through Adversity – Parramatta, NSW – Friday 29 August 2016 – this one-day workshop equips participants with a framework for working therapeutically with children and young people who are experiencing personal diversity. The key focus of this workshop is working with children and young people with a diagnosis of serious illness.
  • Quality Assurance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Medical Services (QAAMS) – The workshop program will include full training for people undertaking competency certification for the first time and competency update for those previously trained. The workshop program will also allow for interactive group sessions, presentations from services and education about diabetes care. Darwin, NT – Wednesday 7 and Thursday 8 September 2016
  • RHD
  • Acute Rheumatic Fever & Rheumatic Heart Disease Education Workshop – The workshop is designed for key health staff involved in the diagnosis and management of people with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in the NT. Darwin, Northern Territory (NT) – Thursday 20 October and Friday 21 October 2016.
    Workshop – Acute Rheumatic Fever& Rheumatic Heart Disease Education Workshop (16 CME/CPD hours)
    Date: 20-21 October 2016
    Time: 08:00 – 16:30 (each day)
    Location: John Matthews Building (Building 58) Menzies, Royal Darwin Hospital Campus, Darwin
    Course overview: The rheumatic heart disease workshop is designed for key health staff involved in the diagnosis and management of people with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in the Northern Territory. This workshop will engage participants with a combination of objective driven information sessions, and consolidate that knowledge with a series of targeted clinical and practical case studies.
  • Hurting, helping and healing workshop – This workshop aims to bring attention to the mental health and wellbeing of individuals suffering from ‘at risk’ mental states. Perth, WA – Wednesday 23 November 2016.
  • Mental Health Assessment of Aboriginal Clients – This workshop aims to improve the cultural competencies of participants. The workshop will be delivered across Australia. Please refer to the link for the locations and dates.
  • National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation member’s conference 2016 – This conference is planned to take place in Melbourne,

The CheckUP Forum
2 September, Brisbane
The health system is on notice – transform or be transformed. The forces for change are driving innovation from within and disruption from outside the system. #health2020 represents a new health economy in which value and outcomes, not volumes, matter and where an engaged, informed health consumer is the major driver of value and activity. Find out more here.

Health Law Seminar: Improving patient outcomes
8 September, Sydney
Book your place now for the FREE Health Law Seminar: Improving Patient Outcomes jointly presented by AHHA, the Australian College of Health Service Management (ACHSM) and Holman Webb. A number of expert speakers will present and discuss health law issues in relation to improving patient outcomes. Find out more here.

Mid North Coast Local Health District Rural Innovation and Research Symposium
15-16 September, Coffs Harbour
The Mid North Coast Local Health District (MNCLHD) Rural Innovation and Research Symposium will showcase how innovation and research is embedded into MNCLHD’s everyday work practices. MNCLHD’s focus is on creating a connected health environment – One Health System For You. The Symposium will showcase innovation, research and programs that support integrated care, communication, connectivity and access to services across the health spectrum. The Early Bird registration special closes at midnight on Sunday 14 August. Find out more here.

Health Planning and Evaluation Course
10-11 October, Brisbane
QUT Health is delivering a new course for individuals seeking to develop skills and knowledge in the planning of health services and the translation of health policy into practice. Delivered over two block periods, each block consisting of two days, this new course has been developed and will be delivered by experts in health planning, policy and evaluation. AHHA members are entitled to a 15% discount on the course fees. Read more.

RACMA – Harm Free Health Care Conference
10-11 October, Brisbane
The theme for the Royal Australasian College of Medial Administrators conference this year is “Harm Free Health Care”. This conference is designed to challenge and debate whether health care can be Harm Free and what practical approaches can be considered. As one of their flagship events, the RACMA Annual Scientific Meeting is expected to attract around 250 delegates to Brisbane who will be a mixture of senior managers, clinical specialists with management roles, researchers, educators, policy makers, and health ministry and health provider executives. This year they have an international keynote speaker, Samuel Shem M.D who is also a renowned author sharing his experience at the conference. Find out more here.

Sidney Sax Medal Dinner
19 October, Brisbane
The Sidney Sax Medal is awarded to an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the development and improvement of the Australian healthcare system in the field of health services policy, organisation, delivery and research. Join us celebrate the awarding of the 2016 Sidney Sax Medal at a networking dinner following the AHHA AGM. The dinner will also feature Sean Parnell, Health Editor at The Australian as the guest speaker. Find out more here.

Stepped Care Models for Mental Health Workshop
28 October, Sydney
Primary Health Networks have been funded by the Commonwealth to facilitate implementation of stepped care models in  Australian mental health services. Effective implementation will require partnerships, resources, new and redefined models and services. With no clear national guideline or agreement on what stepped care models should look like, and the need for a strong coalition across jurisdictions and providers to drive implementation, PHNs do not have a clear road map. This workshop will bring together key players to understand what has been learned to date in the development and implementation of stepped care models and the way forward to effective implementation in the Australian health care system. Find out more here.

Connect with NACCHO

Improving NACCHO communications to members and stakeholders

To reduce the number of NACCHO Communiques we now  send out on Mondays  an executive summary -Save the date on important events /Conferences/training , members news, awards, funding opportunities :

Register and promote your event , send to

NACCHO 2015-16 Federal Budget : Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) funding implications

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Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS)

This section is available as a DOWNLOAD in the NACCHO BUDGET REPORT

Although not a budget announcement, the recent announcements of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy funding have implications for the Sector’s business model.

NACCHO recently prepared a submission to the Senate Inquiry into Commonwealth Indigenous Advancement Strategy tendering processes.

This submission was developed based on surveys with Member Services and the outcomes made available on the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet website.

NACCHO surveyed (94) Member Services throughout April, following the announcement of the IAS funding outcomes.

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NACCHO has found that:

  • Funding for ACCHSs has been reduced by approximately $112,884 through the IAS funding from the (4000) grants received in the 2014-15 financial year.
  • Most of the program categories were retained overall, but re-allocated between ACCHSs. The absence of funding for Men’s Health and Prevention programs is notable.
  • Many services did not apply due to the confusing templates and miscommunications from the Department with the ACCHSs.
  • Fifty percent of the 94 Services NACCHO surveyed did not apply for funding.

PIC 2

Based on the data provided by the Department, NACCHO found that the largest percentage of funding was provided to the Business sector ($53,842,646) equating to 67 per cent of the total funding committed. The Other Health organisations, church, charity and non for profit, Business for Profit, Government Departments and Sporting group categories that are not Aboriginal specific organisations were awarded 73 per cent of the total expenditure under the IAS.

NACCHO has calculated a reduction of IAS funding allocations of $1,202,919,558 overall to essential frontline services including for services for Social Emotional Wellbeing, Alcohol and Drugs, Bringing Them Home, Men’s Health, Youth and Early Years.

The reduction of total funds available in this 2014-15 year of $3,818,923,735 means an overall reduction of 51.4 percent in the Indigenous Affairs portfolio.

NACCHO will lobby for SEWB, AOD and Men’s health programs in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet to return to the Department of Health as result of these outcomes.

 

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June/July edition is being produced now

Download our Advertising rate card here NACCHO Newspaper Advertising Rate Card

or online enquiries and contact info CLICK HERE

 

NACCHO Healthy Futures Report Card released: Aboriginal community-controlled health services a model of good practice

 

New Microsoft Publisher Document (3)

“Aboriginal Community Controlled health services continue to be the best way to provide primary care to Aboriginal people and are making the biggest gains in closing the gap, The report card launched today shows that Aboriginal Community Controlled health services continue to improve in all areas that measure good practise in primary health care.

“This means our services are achieving good health outcomes for the Aboriginal people they serve “

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At the launch of the Healthy Futures Report Card today, NACCHO chairperson Matthew Cooke ( pictured above)

DOWNLOAD THE HEALTHY FUTURE REPORT CARD HERE

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations continue to improve on all key performance indicators that measure good practice in primary health care, said the peak Aboriginal health body today.

At the launch of the Healthy Futures Report Card today, NACCHO chairperson Matthew Cooke said the report showed that Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services were improving in all 16 key performance indicators.

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“Aboriginal people have shown time and time again that they prefer community controlled services because of the unique and culturally appropriate environment they provide. Demand for these services is growing at an extremely high rate of 6 per cent per year.

“This shows that we need to continue to invest in this model for primary health care which is proving to be so effective. We welcome Ministers Ley and Nash’s recent recognition of the important work of community controlled health services by guaranteeing government funding for another three years.

“With this increase in demand we are also experiencing a chronic shortage of health workers in many of our services and long waiting lists for special care so funding certainty for our services is essential.”

However, Mr Cooke said that preventative health programs as well as primary health care are needed to close the gap.

“Chronic disease is way out of proportion for Aboriginal people compared with other Australians.

“We also need preventative programs which address risk factors for chronic disease, such as by reducing smoking rates.

“Many of these core preventative programs fall under the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet’s Indigenous Advancement Strategy and unfortunately it is not yet clear whether they will be approved.

“We’re urging the Government to urgently provide funding certainty for these essential preventative programs.

NACCHO Close the Gap day :The Portrayal of Aboriginal Health in Selected Australian Media

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One of the factors impacting on the relationship of Indigenous Australians with mainstream society is the way in which the media portray Indigenous people and issues. There is growing research that suggests negative media portrayals in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and that this type of racism has a major impact on the health of Indigenous Australians

Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media Melissa J. Stoneham Curtin University

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (herein referred to as Indigenous Australian) comprise three percent of the Australian population (Australian Government, 2013). Distributed across the continent, Indigenous Australians are one of the most linguistically and culturally diverse populations in the world. It is commonly acknowledged that health outcomes for this group are lower than those of non-Indigenous Australians.

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT HERE  : The Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media Melissa J. Stoneham Curtin University

NACCHO Aboriginal health and racism: Marcia Langton the nature of my Q and A apology to Andrew Bolt

Photograph above Australia Day Canberra 2012 Colin Cowell

Although progress has been made in closing the gap, Indigenous Australians continue to experience a lower life expectancy with the current gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous estimated at 11.5 years for males and 9.7 years for females (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2010). Traditionally, the responsibility for tackling ill health has fallen to the health sector. While delivering health to those in need is one of the social determinants of health, the high burden of illness in many cases is due to the poor environmental conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age.

These unequal conditions are, in turn, a product of bad politics, poor social policies and programs, and unfair economic arrangements (World Health Organisation, 2008).

According to Calma (2013), the poor health of Indigenous Australians is a result of a failure to realise the right to health for Indigenous Australians. Indigenous Australians have not had the same opportunities to be as healthy as other Australians or been able to take effective action to remedy long-standing and substantial health inequalities due to the relationship with mainstream society and services.

Making sense of the cultural health status of Australian Indigenous peoples requires an understanding of the relationship between the colonisation process, trauma, and its impact on health. The trauma, grief, pain, and anger that have resulted from the assimilation, segregation, and protectionist policies of the past are still present in the lives of Australian Indigenous people (Hearn & Wise, 2004).

A parallel consideration is the definition that Australian Indigenous peoples have of health. The Social and Emotional Wellbeing Framework, developed by the Australian Government, acknowledges that wellbeing is part of a holistic understanding of life, integrating the life-death-life cycle. It recognises this whole-of-life view of health is essential to achieve positive life outcomes for Australian Indigenous peoples (Department of Health and Ageing, 2004).

Although not recognised as a specific wellbeing factor within the above document, land has a powerful and persuasive underlying influence on Australian Indigenous wellbeing (Garnett & Sithole, 2007). The dispossession of Australian Indigenous people from their land and the subsequent loss of social, cultural, and financial capital has had a devastating effect on the health of Indigenous people worldwide (Hearn & Wise, 2004).

One of the factors impacting on the relationship of Indigenous Australians with mainstream society is the way in which the media portray Indigenous people and issues. There is growing research that suggests negative media portrayals in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and that this type of racism has a major impact on the health of Indigenous Australians (Coffin, 2007; Larson, Gillies, Howard & Coffin, 2007; Sweet, 2009).

Similarly, in New Zealand, a number of mass media studies identified that Mãori health is often framed in the deficit model (Robson & Reid, 2001); the media are routinely reporting that the Mãori peoples are over-represented in national disease statistics (Rankine et al., 2008) and are persistently constructed as sicker and poorer than members of the dominant cultural group (Moewaka Barnes et al., 2005). Nairn, Pega, McCreanor, Rankine, and Barnes (2006) also looked at media representation of Māori peoples in New Zealand and highlighted a number of examples where the media perpetuated racist discourse by using language that framed stories in a particular way (e.g. Stoneham: Portrayal of Indigenous Health Published by Scholarship@Western, 2014 needy, passive objects of settler help), using only selective facts while leaving out crucial information, and excluding or conforming Mãori stories to fit a certain ideology.

This study aimed to examine the media portrayal of Indigenous Australians’ public health issues in selected media over a 12-month period. The objective was to determine the extent to which the portrayal was negative, positive, or neutral.

You can hear more about Aboriginal health and Close the Gap at the NACCHO SUMMIT

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The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits.

A good way of demonstrating how economically valuable ACCHS are is to showcase our success at a national summit.

REGISTRATIONS NOW OPEN

SUMMIT WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO

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NACCHO Healthy Futures Summit Melbourne 24-26 June 2014 : Invitation to submit abstracts

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On behalf of the NACCHO Board and Secretariat it is my pleasure to invite you to submit an abstract to the NACCHO Healthy Futures Summit at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre 24-26 June 2014.

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ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ABSTRACT PORTAL

The importance of our NACCHO member Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS) is not fully recognised by governments.

The economic benefits of ACCHS has not been recognised at all.

We provide employment, income and a range of broader community benefits that mainstream health services and mainstream labour markets do not. ACCHS need more financial support from government, to provide not only quality health and wellbeing services to communities, but jobs, income and broader community economic benefits.

A good way of demonstrating how economically valuable ACCHS are is to showcase our success at a national summit.

SUMMIT WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO REGISTER

NACCHO would like to demonstrate to the government at this summit how investing more in ACCHS is the best way of promoting better health more employment, more jobs and greater community economic benefits.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS ONLINE

NACCHO Healthy futures Summit-Melbourne 24-26 June 2014

NACCHO invites abstracts submission from its members the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholder organisations to showcase policy frameworks, best practice and investment in Aboriginal Health.

The delegates will be a representation from all over Australia in clinical practice, policy and research.

IMPORTANT DATES

Call for Abstracts open 25 February
All Abstracts Due 21 Mar 2014
Abstract Notifications 4 April 2014
Presenter Registration Due 18 April 2014
Early bird registrations open 25 February 2014
Early-Bird registrations Closes 18 April 2014
Program released 4 April 2014
Exhibition and sponsorship 16 May 2014
NACCHO 2014 Summit 24 -26 June 2014

Program Streams

1.Economic Development

  • Economic models of investment  into Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
  • Economic models of investment through partnership
  • Income generation through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations
  • Brokerage Modelling with Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

2.Health Reform

2.1 Workforce

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • National, State, Regional and Local Workforce Needs Analysis
  • Models of success
  • Recruitment and Retention Strategies
  • Mentoring Programs
  • Workforce Innovation Partnership
  • Career pathways that incorporate Scope of Practice within ACCHO’s

2.2 Continuous Quality Improvement

  • Affiliate Registered Training Organisations Capacity Building of ACCHO’s through scope of practice
  • Accreditation
  • Clinical Standards

3.Healthy Futures

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • Clinic Practice/frontline servicing
  • Mental Health
  • Social Emotional Wellbeing
  • Drug & Alcohol
  • Mums & Babies
  • Women’s Health
  • Men’s Health
  • Oral Health
  • Aged Care
  • Disabilities
  • Adolescent
  • Sexual Health

4.Youth

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • Investment in Youth by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations
  • Career pathways within an ACCHO, Affiliates and key stakeholders
  • Youth Leadership
  • Mentoring
  • Healthy Lifestyles and Youth
  • Health Promotion Strategies

5.Research & Data

Abstract that demonstrates best practice within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, Affiliates and key stakeholders that reflect these themes:

  • Population Health
  • Best practice models
  • Gap and Needs analysis
  • Research within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations
  • Research Partnerships
  • Health Information
  • Importance of Data
  • Cultural protocols into practice
  • What’s the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Data telling us?

General guidelines for submissions

  • Abstracts will only be accepted by submitting through the online process below .
  • Abstracts must be a maximum of 300 words .
  • All abstracts must be original work.
  • The abstract will contain text only; no diagrams, illustrations, tables or graphics.
  • All presenting authors must register and pay for their registration for the conference by 18 April 2014 otherwise the presentation will be removed from the program.
  • The NACCHO advisory group reserves the right to accept and reject abstracts for inclusion in the program and allocate to a format that may not have been initially specified by the author/presenter.
  • The conference organisers will not be held responsible for submission errors caused by internet service outages, hardware or software delays, power outages or unforeseen events.
  • It is the responsibility of the presenting author to ensure that the abstract is submitted correctly. After an author has submitted their abstract, they should check their abstract was uploaded successfully.
  • All authors will receive notification of the outcome of their submission on 4 April 2014.
  • Responsibility for the accuracy of abstracts rests with the author.
  • Where there are co-authors, only one abstract is to be submitted. The presenting author is responsible for ensuring the co-authors agree with and are aware of the content before submitting the abstract.
  • An abstract which does not adhere to these requirements will not be accepted

ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ABSTRACT PORTAL

For further information contact the NACCHO SUMMIT TEAM 02 6246 9300 or EMAIL

NACCHO Aboriginal Health news: Diabetes is set to “bankrupt the Australian health system”,

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Professor Alex Brown, head of the Aboriginal Research Unit at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, said a majority of adults over 50 in some Indigenous communities will have it.

“It is probably the leading cause of preventable blindness in Aboriginal Australia,” he said.

A MASSIVE rise in diabetes is set to “bankrupt the Australian health system”, experts warned today after the release of a World Diabetes Atlas showing the looming health catastrophe.

As published in NEWS LTD

Twenty years ago, an alarming rise in the disease led to forecasts it would reach 100 million cases worldwide this year – instead it has rocked to 382 million and is on a trajectory to reach almost 600 million by 2035, or 1 in 10 people.

There will be more than five million deaths from the disease this year and the bill for care, medication and treatment will hit US$548 billion. Plus there are an estimated 175 million cases that are undiagnosed.

Release of the report ahead of the World Diabetes Congress in Melbourne next month shows 1.7 million Australians now have it, a similar number are at risk and by 2035 some 2.3 million Australians will have it.

Congress chairman Professor Paul Zimmet of the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute said it was a looming catastrophe.

“Unless we do something about it, it is going to have very severe effects on the national economy,” he said.

“Along with obesity it is the largest public health issue the world faces, with the potential to actually bankrupt the Australian health system.”

  The most common form of diabetes – Type 2, which is associated with lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise – was previously only seen in adults but now is being seen in children in Australia.

Complications can include heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, feet problems leading to amputation, sleep apnoea, and fatty liver. It is also on track to overtake alcohol as the major cause of cirrhosis of the liver.

The atlas shows South East Asia and the Western Pacific as the regions with the highest rates, with up to one in three adults in Pacific island of Tokelau having the disease.

It also shows the heavy impact the disease is having on indigenous peoples around the world as lifestyles and diet change, such as various American Indian tribes as well as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Professor Alex Brown, head of the Aboriginal Research Unit at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, said a majority of adults over 50 in some indigenous communities will have it.

“It is probably the leading cause of preventable blindness in Aboriginal Australia,” he said.

He noted a move by Aboriginal elders in the Kimberley to revert to traditional lifestyles and diet has seen significant improvements in the disease rate but this was unlikely to be a wide-scale solution.

President of the International Diabetes Federation Sir Michael Hirst said diabetes is a disease of development.

“The misconception that diabetes is ‘a disease of the wealthy’ is still held, to the detriment of desperately needed funding to combat the pandemic,” he said.

“Today, on World Diabetes Day, we must continue to increase awareness of the importance of a healthy diet and physical activity. Crucially, environments must be created that lay the foundations for healthy living.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Cancer risk greater for Indigenous Australians-AIHW report download

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Indigenous Australians being approximately 50% more likely to die from cancer than non-Indigenous Australians….with lung cancer at the top of the rankings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have higher rates of new cancer cases and cancer deaths than non-Indigenous Australians, according to a report released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) and Cancer Australia.

Cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia: an overview is the first comprehensive summary of cancer statistics for Indigenous Australians.

DOWNLOAD ORDER COPY

The report details the leading causes of cancer deaths for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

AIHW spokesperson Justin Harvey said Indigenous Australians also had lower survival rates after a cancer diagnosis than non-Indigenous Australians.

‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples diagnosed with cancer between 1999 and 2007 had a 40% chance of surviving for at least 5 years, compared with 52% for non-Indigenous Australians,’ Mr Harvey said.

Cancer Australia CEO Professor Helen Zorbas said the report highlighted the significant impact that cancer had on the Indigenous population.

‘Whilst incidence rates for cancer overall were marginally higher for Indigenous Australians, mortality and survival differences between the two population groups are far more striking with Indigenous Australians being approximately 50% more likely to die from cancer than non-Indigenous Australians,’ Professor Zorbas said.

Mr Harvey said that while lung cancer was at the top of the rankings for both groups, differences emerged after that.

‘After lung cancer, the two most common causes of cancer death among Indigenous Australians are cancer of the liver and breast cancer (in females). For non-Indigenous Australians, the most common causes are lung cancer, followed by bowel and prostate cancer (in males),’ Mr Harvey said.

Professor Zorbas said the report emphasised the important work that needs to be undertaken to address the disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

‘The findings of this report underscore the continuing action needed in health promotion, research and health service delivery to best meet the cancer prevention and treatment needs of Indigenous Australians,’ Professor Zorbas said.

The AIHW is a major national agency set up by the Australian Government to provide reliable, regular and relevant information and statistics on Australia’s health and welfare.

Cancer Australia provides national leadership in cancer control to improve outcomes for those affected by cancer their families and carers.

Canberra, 1 October 2013

Further information: AIHW—Mr Justin Harvey, tel. (02) 6249 5057, mob. 0450 677 562

Cancer Australia—Mr Simon Thomas, tel. (02) 9357 9401 or 0438 209 833

For media copies of the report: 02 6249 5048/02 6249 5033 or email Helpdesk-Media@aihw.gov.au

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NACCHO JOB Opportunities:

Are you interested in working in Aboriginal health?

NACCHO as the national authority in comprenhesive Aboriginal primary health care currently has a wide range of job oppportunities in the pipeline.

Register your current or future interest with our HR TEAM HERE

NACCHO member news Press Release: Aboriginal health service in NT bringing all community together for mediation forum

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Historic images of Congress 2010  campaign to Stop the Violence in Centralia Australia

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“This is the start of a dialogue on a number of issues of concern, primarily violence, but not as an Aboriginal specific issue, but as an issue for the whole community.”

Congress Deputy CEO Des Rogers (picture above)

PRESS RELEASE

Tuesday September 10

from 6.30pm until 8.30pm in the Theatrette at Centralian Senior College.

Congress Alice Springs , who are the leading Aboriginal primary health care provider in  Central Australia, are holding the forum in partnership with CASSE to promote an interactive dialogue between all groups in the Alice Springs community.

The aim is find solutions that will make the region a happier, healthier, safer environment in which to live and raise a family.

CASSE, which stands for “creating a safe, supportive environment” are partnering with Congress, who also provide extensive social and emotional wellbeing services, to understand and address issues of violence and underlying trauma that currently exist within the community.

A respected and experienced panel made up of psychoanalysts and psychiatrists with experience in community mediation at an international level, together with Aboriginal leaders, the mayor and a local leader of business have been assembled for the forum.

Lord John Alderdice, Professor Stuart Twemlow and Justice Jenny Blokland will be visiting Alice Springs to participate as panel members, while William Tilmouth, Donna Ah Chee, Julie Ross and Damien Ryan make up the local contingent.

Lord Alderdice and Professor Twemlow will add a global perspective to the forum with their experience in peace negotiations in Northern Ireland and successful violence reduction projects in the USA respectively.

Facilitated by Ms Olga Havnen, the event will be recorded by NITV.

After hearing from the panel, members of the community will be invited to discuss their concerns in a question and answer session in an opportunity to look at what we have, where we are at and where we

The  televised public forum on Tuesday September 10 from 6.30pm until 8.30pm in the Theatrette at Centralian Senior College. The event is open to the public and will be enriched by attendance and representation from all sections of the community

For further information regarding the Walk In My Shoes Public Forum please contact:

Marah Prior, Executive Assistant, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Aboriginal Corporation

PO Box 1604 Alice Springs NT 0871 | T. 08 8951 4401 | F. 08 8959 4717 | E. execsec@caac.org.au

A related public forum will be held in Melbourne on Saturday 7 September entitled

“Reconciliation Australia – Psychological Perspectives.”

Lord John Alderdice and Professor Stuart Twemlow will also be presenting at this forum.

Lord John Alderdice, psychiatrist and psychoanalytic psychotherapist, previously Speaker of the Northern Ireland Assembly, currently Convener of Liberal Democrat Party in the House of Lords, who played a significant role in initiating the dialogues that led to the Good Friday Accord and peace in Northern Ireland.

Professor Stuart Twemlow, Psychoanalyst, Professor of Mental Health Prevention, University of Kansas; an international authority in the application of psychoanalytic principles and systemic interventions to the prevention of bullying and violence.