NACCHO Aboriginal Health Workforce #refreshtheCTGRefresh : @IAHA_National and @HealthInfoNet Launch at #IAHA_Forum18 the first film in a series titled ‘Leading in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health

“Sharing the films with our communities, stakeholders and our International guests will showcase the commitment our workforce has in addressing racism in the health and education sectors, valuing and respecting the critical role that allied health graduates and students can play

The purpose of the video project was to capture stories and vital information from allied health students and graduates on their successes, challenges and career development enablers.”

 IAHA CEO, Donna Murray pictured below at launch with HealthInfoNet Director, Professor Neil Drew

Last Friday Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) and the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (HealthInfoNet) released the first of a series of films (funded by BHP) showcasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health professionals.

The films are focused on promoting allied health workforce development including allied health careers, support available and needed for success with individuals sharing their experiences from a cultural and professional perspective who are contributing to an inter-professional leadership approach to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Watch HERE

The first film titled ‘Leading in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health’ was launched at the International Indigenous Allied Health Forum in Sydney – the first event of its kind hosted by IAHA.

The Forum is hosting many First Nations visitors, welcomed from North America, Canada, the Pacific, and New Zealand. The film demonstrates the importance of investing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the allied health workforce and how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander graduates and students are leading in the sector

Ms Murray said “These stories will be key resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and communities considering a health career and for employers looking to improve their cultural safety and responsiveness in ensuring high quality services and workforce development strategies, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples”.

“IAHA has had a long standing partnership with HealthInfoNet, who have been a significant leaders in sharing and supporting Indigenous Health research and policy and are vital partners in transforming systems” said Ms Murray.

HealthInfoNet Director, Professor Neil Drew, said “We were delighted to work with IAHA, to meet inspiring people who are shaping their journeys in different ways and different professions, but who will actually deliver the improvements in health that have been talked about for so long.  We’re proud to be delivering resources to support them and increase their impact in and for communities.

We’ve been developing a strong in-house film capability. The team co-created the films with IAHA and we are delighted the first in the series has been shared today, with an Australian and international audience”.

The rest of the series will be released throughout 2019 and will be available on the IAHA website https://iaha.com.au/ and the IAHA YouTube channel and the HealthInfoNet site https://healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/learn/health-facts/multimedia-knowledge-exchange-products/

NACCHO Promotion Watch NACCHO TV 

VIEW HERE 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #CloseTheGap Workforce and Training : @IAHA_National and the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance #NT @AMSANTaus launch the Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Academy #NTAHA

 

“Investment and support from our local organisations, employers and governments will ensure the success of the Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Academy (NTAHA)

Schools, students and community need to know this will be a secure and sustainable approach to building our local workforce, many of whom will stay in our communities’ long term

A key principle of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan is Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community control and engagement, with culture the main overarching priority.

 The NT Aboriginal Health Academy has been unsuccessful in gaining the financial support it requires. However, we have had strong support from key stakeholders such as NT Department of Education, NT Department of Health, Charles Darwin University, Flinders University and the Industry Skills Advisory Council NT “

AMSANT CEO John Paterson

Picture above Creating a strong pathway for their 20 deadly Indigenous youth in to health

 ” This partnership with AMSANT to grow and develop the nation’s future leaders in health is critical to the success of the Academy. Growing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce is critically important in providing sustainable, culturally-responsive holistic healthcare.

An increase in the number of qualified Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals is needed to positively address workforce shortages in rural and remote communities across the NT.

Already, we are seeing students and their families engaging, and young mothers re-engaging in education through the Academy. They see it as a more flexible and meaningful pathway to sustainable employment in our communities .

If Governments are truly committed to Closing the Gap then there needs to be greater support shown for community-driven initiatives like the NT Aboriginal Health Academy,”

IAHA CEO Donna Murray.

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) and the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT)  launch the Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Academy (NTAHA).

The Health Academy will increase the number of young Aboriginal people completing year 12 and entering into the health workforce.

This project is an innovative community led learning model that is about re-shaping and redesigning how training is delivered to Aboriginal students in high school years.

The model is strengths based and centered on ensuring training and education is delivered in a way that embeds the centrality of culture and has a holistic approach to health and wellbeing.

The model is designed to work collaboratively across health disciplines and sectors. There is an urgent, real need for health professions in sectors such as primary health care, disability, mental health, allied health, medicine and aged care; for providing a sustainable education, training and workforce development approach in the Northern Territory.

From Wednesday opening

“If Governments are truly committed to Closing the Gap then there needs to be greater support shown for community-driven initiatives like the NT Aboriginal Health Academy,” said Ms Murray.

ENDS

Indigenous Allied Health Australia is a national member-based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health organisation.

AMSANT is the peak body for Aboriginal community-controlled health services (ACCHSs) in the Northern Territory and has played a pivotal role in advocating for and supporting the development of community-controlled health.

 

NACCHO #HealthElection16 #IAHA says a vote for rural and remote health is a vote for health equality

Nicole - Copy

“I have endured a number of the inequalities and challenges people living in rural and remote communities face every day. My mother fell sick when I was 3 years old. With no available healthcare centre she was moved six hours away to Dubbo to access the care she needed. Within ten days of my mother becoming sick, she passed away. She passed so suddenly that many of my family did not get to see her as she was so far away”.

“People living in rural communities do not have access to important allied health services such as dentistry, occupational therapy, dietitians, which require people to travel great distances to get this care. Without this access it could lead to chronic disease and have future impacts on health and wellbeing,”

IAHA member and social work student Nicola Barker, a Ngemba Murriwarri woman from Brewarrina in far west NSW, understands these struggles all too well.

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), a national, not for profit member-based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health organisation, is calling on major parties and their candidates to increase investment in remote and rural allied health services this election.

The current level of remote and rural healthcare spending is inadequate to equitably meet the essential allied healthcare needs of those living in remote and rural areas.

As stated by the National Rural Health Alliance, there is currently a $2 billion deficit in rural and remote healthcare spending which includes a collective $1.45 billion deficit in allied health services when including dental and pharmacy. This has real implications on the everyday lives of remote and rural Australians, especially Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

IAHA affirms that access is more than just physical or geographical access, it also includes the cultural, economic and social factors which all impact on whether Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people use allied health services.

IAHA

Group shot of IAHA members at a Leadership workshop Rainbow Valley Alice Springs

“Remote and rural workforce models must be community driven and meet the needs of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,” says IAHA CEO, Donna Murray. “Investment that supports community aspirations, including building a strong remote and rural Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce, is critical.”

Before heading to the polls this election, IAHA would like to encourage voters to look at where their local candidates stand on remote and rural allied health care and health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

NACCHO would like thank IAHA for support of our

Aboriginal Health Newspaper

IAHA

Save a date : Register for Allied Health-IAHA and Nursing -CATSINaM professional development

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Indigenous Allied health Australia (IAHA), a national not for profit, member-based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health organisation, is holding its 2015 National Conference, Allied Health – Stepping into Action on 1 – 2 December 2015 at the Pullman Cairns International in Cairns, Queensland. 
 
“Our national conference recognises and values the interprofessional diversity and collaboration required to really make a difference as we work together to achieve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health equality,” said IAHA CEO Ms Donna Murray. “We are excited to provide this unique professional development opportunity that will bring together so many people from different disciplines and sectors working towards the same goal.”
 
At this 2 day conference, delegates from a diverse range of health disciplines and sectors will:
  • Experience national and international perspectives from Indigenous keynote speakers in the allied and wider health, research, education and community sectors;
  • Develop professional and personal skills and knowledge through interactive workshops that focus on interprofessional approaches to motivational interviewing, autism spectrum disorders, resilience and reflective practice, eye health, managing change, Indigenous research, culturally safe and responsive practice and collaborative team-based problem solving;
  • Explore innovation in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and allied health at over 20 concurrent presentations;
  • Build and strengthen relationships and experience national networking opportunities; and
  • Celebrate success at the IAHA 2015 National Indigenous Allied Health Awards and Gala Dinner.
If you are interested in finding out more, or registering to attend the conference, please visit the IAHA 2015 National Conference website at www.iahaconference.com.au or contact IAHA on 02 6285 1010.
 
CATSanIM 168

Cultural Safety Training for full and associate Members only December 2nd and 3rd 2015, Brisbane (1.5 days)

$300 per person (GST exclusive)

CATSINaM is very excited to offer a Members version of the Cultural Safety Training we encourage our stakeholders to attend. It will be run by the same facilitators, Sharon Gollan and Kathleen Stacey, and is for Full and Associate members only. As Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives, you will experience the same content as our non-Indigenous stakeholders, but some aspects of the process will be a different as we are talking about our lived experience of racism and cultural safety.

The workshop will strengthen your skills in understanding, managing and responding to racism, with a particular focus on institutional racism and the concept of whiteness. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants find the workshop experience enlightening and validating, while also empowering and supportive as it acknowledges their journey, and values and strengthens their resilience.

CATSINaM will subsidise some aspects of the workshop but there is a per participant cost to attend. It will go ahead if we have at least 22 booked participants, with a total of 30 places available. While it is being held in Brisbane, Members from anywhere are very welcome to attend. Please, book early and make sure the workshop can go ahead – the cut-off date for registrations is November 17th.

We hope you decide to be a participant in this inaugural event. We will send out more information on the exact location and the workshop timing.

In the meantime, please contact the CATSINaM office to book a place.

If you would like another Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander colleague who is not a CATSINaM Member to attend, they are also welcome. The non-Member cost is $400 (GST exclusive).

IAHA:Improving Indigenous mental health outcomes is a collaborative effort

 MEDIA RELEASE from Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA)

During Mental Health Week, on World Mental Health Day, Wednesday 10 October 2012, Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) calls for a comprehensive, culturally safe, interprofessional approach to mental health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffer a higher burden of emotional distress and mental illness than that experienced by the wider community.” said Ms Faye McMillan, Chairperson of IAHA. “The social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, which includes their mental health, is influenced by multiple, complex factors.

This demands a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach that takes into account the holistic view of health held by many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

“No single health profession alone will be able to meet the complex mental healthcare needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,” said Ms McMillan. “In order to truly make a difference and improve mental health outcomes for our people, we will all need to work together.”

IAHA is committed to building and supporting the allied health workforce to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health outcomes.

“Our members come from a diverse number of allied health professions who can positively impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health outcomes.” said Ms McMillan. “We have social workers, psychologists, occupational therapists and now Indigenous Mental Health Practitioners – all of whom, individually and collaboratively, can play a part in improving mental health.”

“I encourage all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to think outside the square and consider a career in allied health, you can really make a difference.” said Kylie Stothers, an Aboriginal social worker living in Katherine, NT.

“Mental illness and suicide are huge issues for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, family and communities, particularly in rural and remote areas. We need more allied health professionals out here on the ground in order to successfully tackle these issues.”

IAHA acknowledges the Mental Health Council of Australia’s theme for Mental Health Week 2012, “Whoever you are or wherever you live, you’re not alone”. Unfortunately this statement implies equitable access to mental health services and support structures, which is not always the case.

“Access to mental health services means more than just availability or geographic location of a service.” said Ms McMillan. “Access to mental health services is also influenced by the appropriateness, affordability and acceptability of the service. Providers of mental health services, including allied health professionals, must ensure that they deliver culturally competent mental healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It is imperative that health professionals have a comprehensive understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues, particularly as they pertain to mental health.”

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) is the national peak body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health professionals and students.

For more information, please contact Craig Dukes on 02 6285 1010.