NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Update #HealthCareHomes : Download info for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS)

A Health Care Home is an existing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) — or Aboriginal clinic or health service — that cares for people with long-term conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, heart and lung conditions.

Mainstream general practices can also be Health Care Homes.

Under a two-year trial beginning in late 2017, up to 200 practices around Australia, including ACCHS, will become Health Care Homes.”

Download the Health Care Homes brochure for Indigenous patients

 Read over 18 NACCHO Health Care Homes Articles

” Up to 65,000 Australians will soon be receiving improved care for their ongoing chronic conditions, with the expansion of the Turnbull Government’s trial of Health Care Homes.

An additional 168 general practices and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) will offer Health Care Home services from today, building on the 22 clinics already in the trial.

Additional practices are expected to sign on in the coming weeks.

Patients with two or more chronic conditions – such as diabetes, arthritis and heart and lung conditions – are eligible to enrol at a Health Care Home to receive integrated, team-based care.”

The Hon Greg Hunt Minister for Health

Download Press Release

Hon Greg Hunt Press release Health Care Homes

 

Health Care Homes underway

In an important reform for primary care in Australia, close to 200 Health Care Homes around Australia are now enrolling patients.

These practices and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) will provide better coordinated and more flexible care for up to 65,000 Australians who are living with chronic and complex health conditions.

The stage one trial of Health Care Homes will run until November 2019.

What is a Health Care Home?

A Health Care Home is an existing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) — or Aboriginal clinic or health service — that cares for people with long-term conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, heart and lung conditions.

Mainstream general practices can also be Health Care Homes.

Under a two-year trial beginning in late 2017, up to 200 practices around Australia, including ACCHS, will become Health Care Homes.

Health Care Homes is an Australian Government-funded program. It’s about giving people with long-term conditions the best possible care for their health needs.

Here are some of the good things about Health Care Homes:

My own care plan — my doctor talked to me about my health needs. Then we came up with a plan which suits me and my health.

My own care team — my care team at my clinic are there for me if I want to have a yarn or if I have any health worries.

Connecting my care — I still see my doctor and Aboriginal health worker. When I need to, I go to the physio or my heart or kidney doctor. But my care team makes sure that all the care I receive is connected.

Care that’s right for you

If you have long-term health conditions, there are a lot of things to keep an eye on symptoms, your medicines, visits to the clinic and to other doctors, like your heart or kidney doctor.

Wouldn’t it be good if there was one team looking after all this for you?

That’s what Health Care Homes is all about. If you become a Health Care Homes’ patient, you will have your own care team.

Your care plan

The care team will talk to you about a care plan. This plan contains all the care you receive from your usual doctor, Aboriginal health worker and others. It includes health goals — like eating healthy food, quitting smoking or keeping an eye on your diabetes.

With this plan, all the people who look after you can see the same information about your health anytime they need to.

So can you and your family members or carers.

That way, when you see your heart doctor or kidney doctor you won’t have to explain about any new medicines or anything that’s changed since your last visit. Your doctor can see it all on your care plan.

What if I like everything just the way it is?

You can keep going to your clinic and still see the doctors and Aboriginal health workers who know you.

You don’t have to change anything that you like about your care.

But if you become a Health Care Homes’ patient, your care will be better organised. And if something changes in the future, you and your care team can change your care or medicines in a way that works for you.

For more information:

Talk to your Aboriginal health worker or clinic about Health Care Homes.

health.gov.au/healthcarehomes-consumer

Coordinated care for people with chronic conditions

Inforgraphic illustrating the 'Better Coordinated' Health Care Homes process

One in four Australians have at least two chronic health conditions1. For these people, our health system can seem hard to navigate and disjointed. Different health professionals and services work in isolation from each other; care is often un-coordinated; and patients can find it difficult to get to different services and appointments.

A Health Care Home is a general practice or Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) that coordinates care for patients with chronic and complex conditions.

People with chronic and complex conditions, who could benefit from Health Care Homes’ flexible, coordinated care can enrol as Health Care Homes patients.

What are the benefits for patients?

Inforgraphic illustrating 'Your Care Team' under the Health Care Homes trial

  • My care team — you have a committed care team, led by your usual doctor.
  • My shared care plan — with the support of your care team, you will develop a shared care plan. This plan helps you have a greater say in your care; and makes it easier for all the people who look after you, both inside and outside the Health Care Home, to coordinate your care.
  • Better access and flexibility — with a care team behind you, you have better access to care. Health Care Homes can also be more responsive and flexible. If you want to talk to someone in your care team, you won’t always need an appointment with your GP. You might call or message the practice team. Or they might call you to see how you’re going.
  • Better coordinated — your care team will do more to coordinate all your care from your usual doctor, specialists and other health professionals.

Inforgraphic illustrating 'Your Shared Care Plan' under the Health Care Homes program for easier coordination of your chronic conditions

Can I become a Health Care Home patient?

If you

  • have a Medicare card
  • have a My Health Record or are willing to get one
  • would benefit from the Health Care Home model of care
  • and are assessed as eligible by a participating Health Care Home

then you could enrol as a patient.

If you would like to become a Health Care Home patient, ask your GP if their practice is a Health Care Homes.

More about Health Care Homes

What will it cost me if I become a Health Care Homes’ patient?

Ask your doctor or practice receptionist about this. Some people don’t have any out-of-pocket expenses when they go to see their doctor; while others are asked to pay a contribution. This will be the same under Health Care Homes.

What if I don’t want to change my care? I like everything just the way it is.

Joining Health Care Homes is voluntary. You don’t have to become a Health Care Home patient.

If you do sign up for Health Care Homes, you can keep seeing the doctors you know and trust.

The benefit of Health Care Homes is that it makes it easier for all the people who look after you — from your doctor to your specialist doctors and others — to share information about your health and to coordinate care based on your needs.

My doctor and my usual clinic already coordinate my care. Why should I sign up for Health Care Homes?

Doctors and practices already work hard to coordinate care for their patients.

The Health Care Homes’ trial gives practices the opportunity to improve the services they provide and the flexibility of these services.

For example, Health Care Homes’ patients can see their practice nurse, without needing to see their GP for every visit.

Health Care Homes will also give patients better access to appointments with either their GP or another member of their care team.

No two patients are the same. Health Care Homes helps doctors and clinics tailor care to each patient.

The government pays Health Care Homes in a different way, to reflect the responsive, flexible way in which they look after their patients.

I already have a GP management plan, a team care management plan or mental health treatment plan. What will happen to these if I join Health Care Homes?

These plans will form the basis of your new shared care plan. For example, if you have a GP management plan, you will continue to be eligible for up to five allied health services each calendar year.

With Health Care Homes, can I see my doctor whenever I want to?

Some Health Care Homes will keep their appointment schedules free at certain times, so that Health Care Homes’ patients can drop in, or get an appointment that day.

But every Health Care Home will be different. Ask your doctor or practice receptionist how this will work in your practice.

If after-hours access is important to you, ask about this too.

Another advantage of Health Care Homes is that patients may not always have to physically come in to the practice to receive care. Instead, patients may be able to Skype, call or email the practice.

If I am enrolled in a Health Care Home can I see another doctor?

When you are at home, you should always try to go to your Health Care Home. If you are travelling, however, you can see another doctor.

What if I get really sick? Or go to hospital?

If you get really sick, your care team will continue to care for you. They may also work with you to adjust your care plan as needed.

If you go to hospital, the care team will follow up with the hospital.

How does Health Care Homes fit in with state-funded isolated travel and accommodation allowance payments?

Being a Health Care Homes’ patient will not affect your eligibility for any state-based isolated travel and accommodation allowance payments.

Can I stop being a Health Care Homes’ patient?

Yes, you can withdraw from your Health Care Home. However, it is a good idea to first talk to your care team if you are unhappy about any aspect of your care. They might be able to help.

If you withdraw from Health Care Homes, you will not be eligible to reapply during the stage one trial, which runs from October 2017 to December 2019.

I am Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander. Will my care change under Health Care Homes?

If your local ACCHS or the practice you usually visit becomes a Health Care Home you can ask your doctor or practice receptionist for more information about Health Care Homes.

A brochure for Indigenous consumers is also available Fact sheets and brochures web page.

If you enrol as a Health Care Home patient then your care team at the practice will coordinate your care, from visits to the GP, through to specialist visits, scripts, blood pressure checks, physiotherapy, podiatry and other health services.

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services around Australia will also become Health Care Homes.

Each Health Care Home will also work with the integrated team care (ITC) program arrangements for chronic care; and will coordinate other health services provided by state, territory and local governments or by community groups.

More information for consumers is available on the fact sheets and brochures web page.

For health professionals’ information, go to Health Care Homes for health professionals.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Healthcarehome : Live webinar 17 Nov : Becoming a Health Care Home

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General practices and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) in selected regions around Australia can now apply for stage one of Health Care Homes ( see 10 Regions below)

On Thursday 17 November, 10.30-11.30 AEDT, the Department of Health will host a live webinar entitled Becoming a Health Care Home.

This is a chance for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations health professionals, practice managers/owners and the health sector to learn more and ask questions about Health Care Homes.

To participate online, you do not need to register.

Simply refer to the webinar participation instructions for more information.

If you are in Canberra and would like to be part of the studio audience, register by emailing healthcarehomes@health.gov.au.

If you cannot attend or participate on Thursday 17 November, the webinar will be available the week after the webcast at health.gov.au/healthcarehomes

Learn more and have a say in this important reform. Save the date now!

Apply to become a Health Care Home

General practices and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) in selected regions around Australia can now apply for stage one of Health Care Homes.

Health Care Homes will improve the provision of care for people with chronic and complex conditions. Participating general practices and ACCHS will play a vital role in shaping this important reform.

Ten Primary Health Network (PHN) regions have been selected for stage one. They are Perth North; Northern Territory; Adelaide; Country South Australia; Brisbane North; Western Sydney; Nepean Blue Mountains; Hunter, New England and Central Coast; South Eastern Melbourne; and Tasmania.

To apply, a general practice or ACCHS must:

  • Be located in one of these ten PHN regions
  • Meet the eligibility and assessment criteria set out in the application form and guidelines.

Applications close Thursday 15 December 2016.

Refer to the Health Care Homes information booklet and factsheets

PDF version: Health Care Homes information booklet – PDF 533 KB
Word version: Health Care Homes information booklet – Word

health.gov.au/healthcarehomes

#healthcarehomes

healthcarehomes@health.gov.au

Live webinar: Becoming a Health Care Home

Add to your calendar now!

Thursday 17 November, 10.30-11.30 AEDT

The relevant areas are:

 

Western Australia 1. Perth North
Northern Territory 2. Northern Territory
South Australia 3. Adelaide

4. Country SA

Queensland 5. Brisbane North

 

New South Wales 6. Western Sydney

7. Nepean Blue Mountains

8. Hunter, New England and Central Coast

Victoria

Tasmania

9. South Eastern Melbourne

10.Tasmania

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #HealthcareHomes :No cap amendments a victory for commonsense and for patient health says our Health Peak groups

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” The Department of Health advises that the payment factsheet on the Health Care Home website has been updated to make it clearer that there is no hard cap on the capability for GPs to bill MBS for services not related to an enrolled patient’s chronic conditions. “

Janet Quigley A/g First Assistant Secretary Health Systems Policy Division email advice to stakeholders 8 November

 ”  The amendment is “a victory for commonsense and for patient health . Anyny move to reintroduce the capped consults in any subsequent rollout of the Health Care Homes initiative would be met with strong concern from health sector stakeholders.

RDAA Vice President, Dr John Hall, welcomed the Government’s amendment.

 ” Health Care Homes is a major reform of primary health care and aims to reshape the management of chronic and complex conditions by placing patients at the centre of care with general practice and Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS).

The Turnbull Government has allocated over $100m to support the rollout of stage one, which aims to enrol up to 65,000 patients in 200 medical practices in 10 regions across Australia.”

Press Release Sussan Ley last week

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #healthcarehomes

Tender closes 15 December : $100m to support the rollout of stage one

Based on clinical advice, it is expected that for the vast majority of patients the number of fee for service episodes of care will be small, and billing patterns for these services will be monitored in Stage 1 to inform national rollout.

This does not change the existing planning or policy.  The expectation is that all general practice health care associated with the patient’s chronic conditions, previously funded through the MBS, will be funded through the bundled payment.

Additional fact sheets will be made available in the coming days.

The Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) press release

The Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) has welcomed an amendment made by the Federal Government to its Health Care Homes regime, following concerns expressed by RDAA and other health sector organisations.

A fact sheet originally posted on the Australian Government Department of Health’s website stated that patients with chronic conditions who are registered for chronic care consults under the Health Care Homes trial, would only be allowed a maximum of 5 non-chronic disease related consults under their Health Care Homes arrangement (in addition to their chronic care consults).

But following concerns expressed by RDAA and other groups, including the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP), the fact sheet was amended to read:

“Based on clinical advice it is expected that for the vast majority of patients the number of fee-for-service episodes of care, in addition to the bundled payment, will be small. The number of fee-for-service episodes of care will not be capped or restricted, and will be monitored during stage one of Health Care Homes.”

No cap amendments a victory for commonsense and for patient health says our Health Peak groups

RDAA Vice President, Dr John Hall, welcomed the Government’s amendment, calling it “a victory for commonsense and for patient health”.

But he warned that any move to reintroduce the capped consults in any subsequent rollout of the Health Care Homes initiative would be met with strong concern from health sector stakeholders.

“Under the original wording of the regime — which involved capping the number of non-chronic disease related visits under Health Care Home arrangements — chronic care patients unable to afford any further ‘non-chronic’ consults without Medicare assistance would be more likely to present to their local hospital’s Emergency Department for the care they require” he said.

“This would not only have seen patients going to the hospital for health concerns more appropriately and cost-effectively seen in a general practice setting, but it would also have increased the patient load (and pressure) on many hospitals, particularly those in rural and remote settings.

“Given this concern, we have welcomed the Government’s amendments.

“But we remain concerned that the original requirement around non-chronic visits signals that the real intent of the Health Care Homes initiative may not really be about improving patient access to care — it may be more about making budget savings.

“We sincerely hope this is not the case, and we are keen to work with the Government to ensure that improving access to care for patients remains at the centre of this initiative.”

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1. NACCHO Interim 3 day Program has been release
2. The dates are fast approaching – so register today
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NACCHO Aboriginal Health #healthcarehomes Tender closes 15 December : $100m to support the rollout of stage one

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 ” Health Care Homes is a major reform of primary health care and aims to reshape the management of chronic and complex conditions by placing patients at the centre of care with general practice and Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHS).

The Turnbull Government has allocated over $100m to support the rollout of stage one, which aims to enrol up to 65,000 patients in 200 medical practices in 10 regions across Australia.”

Press Release Sussan Ley

Medical practices can apply for stage one of Health Care Homes

More information on the application process is available on the Tenders and Grant page

Read 10 NACCHO Articles about Health Care Homes Here

The Minister for Health, Sussan Ley, today announced that medical practices in selected regions around Australia can apply for stage one of Health Care Homes.

In stage one, Health Care Homes will be rolled out in selected regions from July 2017.

Ms Ley said: “Health Care Homes aims to deliver more flexible care for people with chronic and complex conditions.

“This has never been more important with one in five Australians living with two or more chronic conditions.

“Health Care Homes allows for team-based, integrated and co-ordinated care for patients and gives greater flexibility to design individual care plans for patients and co-ordinate care services to support them.”

Ms Ley said Health Care Homes is an important reform of primary health care services, which are the first and most common point of contact for most Australians.

It demonstrated the Turnbull Government’s commitment to a healthier Medicare.

Ms Ley said: “We are implementing Health Care Homes to find a better way of delivering Medicare for Australians with chronic illnesses.”

Last year the Government invested more than $21 billion in Medicare to ensure all Australians had access to affordable universal healthcare and Medicare funding is expected to grow by another $4 billion over four years.

Under the Health Care Home model, practices will be given a monthly bundled payment for delivery of effective care to patients with chronic and complex health conditions.

Ms Ley acknowledged that doctors and health professionals had played a key role in introducing the concept of the Health Care Home model.

Health Care Home services will be delivered in implementation sites from 1 July 2017 until 30 June 2019 in the first stage. Evaluation of Health Care Homes in these regions will inform refinement of the new model of care and its suitability for broader rollout.

Ms Ley said: “I encourage all accredited general practices and ACCHS organisations in the selected regions to apply to participate in the trials, which are held on a voluntary basis.”

General practices and ACCHS in these regions can now apply for stage one of Health Care Homes: Perth North; Northern Territory; Adelaide; Country South Australia; Brisbane North; Western Sydney; Nepean Blue Mountains; Hunter, New England and Central Coast; South Eastern Melbourne; and Tasmania.

More information on the application process is available on the Tenders and Grant page

The department is seeking applications from eligible organisations within ten Primary Health Network regions for a restricted competitive grants program consisting of one off payments of $10,000 (GST exclusive) each. This funding round will identify eligible organisations to participate in Stage 1 of the implementation of Health Care Homes. This payment is intended to incentivise participation and facilitate readiness for a program start date of 1 July 2017.

Under this model, eligible patients with chronic and complex health conditions will voluntarily enrol with a participating medical practice known as their Health Care Home. This practice will provide patients with a ‘home base’ for the ongoing coordination, management, and support of their conditions. Patients will nominate a preferred clinician within the Health Care Home and a tailored care plan will be developed by the clinician in partnership with the patient.

Stage 1 of the model will be implemented across ten Primary Health Network (PHN) regions that were selected to provide a good cross section of metropolitan, regional, rural and remote locations, and to leverage chronic disease programs operating in these regions.