NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : #NSW @DeadlyChoices Katungul ACCHO @awabakalltd #Yerin ACCHO #NT @CaaCongress @DanilaDilba #SA @DeadlyChoicesSA @NunkuYunti #VIC @VACCHO_org #WA

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner joined an amazing line up of experience in all endorsing community controlled for all Australians at our discussions at PHMOZ

2.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Batemans Bay making Deadly Choices by opening gym for clients

2.2 NSW : Yerin ACCHO on central coast is leading the way in Aboriginal health promotion by holding an ACCHO Commmunity Health Expo 

2.3 NSW : The Awabakal Ltd Quit Crew visited Nikinpa Aboriginal Child & Family Centre last week to do a presentation about TIS (Tackling Indigenous Smoking).

3.1 NT : Congress Alice springs : Skills boost “the best medicine” for Aboriginal health as ten Aboriginal Health Practitioner Trainees graduate

3.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin Deadly Choices team visits the Garaworra Supported housing program

4. VIC : VACCHO staff get a run down on the 2018 Victorian election campaign

5.1 SA : The Deadly Choices team are out on the APY lands supporting one of our partners the PAFC Power Aboriginal Program

5.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO Newsletter January-July edition 2018.

6. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Aurukun was a hive of healthy activity last weekend with the annual River to Ramp Fun Run and Walk. 

7 WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Matters – Men’s Health Marmun Pit stop flyer.

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.National : Our CEO Pat Turner joined an amazing line up of experience in all endorsing community controlled for all Australians at our discussions at PHMOZ : With Donna Ah Chee CEO and Doctor John Boffa Congress Alice Springs and Doctor Tim Senior 

 

2.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Batemans Bay making Deadly Choices by opening gym for clients

The Batemans Bay Katungul Gym has now been officially opened.

Big thanks to Preston Campbell for attending and speaking on behalf of IUIH & Deadly Choices.

Preston talked to the community about his story & why spaces like these are so important for our Physical & Mental health

What a great turn out to the Katungul Batemans Bay Gym opening.

WATCH VIDEO 

Always important to have the community support. Once you complete a 715 Health Check and receive your Deadly Choices shirt you’ll have access to the gym. #DeadlyChoices

2.2 NSW : Yerin ACCHO on central coast is leading the way in Aboriginal health promotion by holding an ACCHO Commmunity Health Expo 

Will you be joining us for our Community Health Expo next month?

Come along and learn about what health care services Yerin Incorporating Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Centre offers to the Central Coast Aboriginal community.

REGISTER FOR FREE: https://yerin-community-health-expo.eventbrite.com.au

This event offers the Central Coast Aboriginal community an opportunity to actively engage with their health and wellbeing and learn more about the culturally appropriate health care services that are available to them.

2.3 NSW : The Awabakal Ltd Quit Crew visited Nikinpa Aboriginal Child & Family Centre last week to do a presentation about TIS (Tackling Indigenous Smoking).

The presentation included a Smokerlyzer demonstration to show the CO (carbon monoxide) reading in the bloodstream.

Thank you to everyone who attended the presentation!

If your organisation is interested in educating your workforce about the damages of smoking, give the Quit Crew a call on (02) 4918 6400.

We can provide the tools to support smokers to cut back or quit smoking.

3 NT : Congress Alice springs : Skills boost “the best medicine” for Aboriginal health as ten Aboriginal Health Practitioner Trainees graduate

A record number of Aboriginal Health Practitioners [AHPs] will today graduate from the Congress AHP Traineeship program; a partnership with Batchelor College.” Congress’ General Manager – Health Services, Tracey Brand said today.

“Ten Aboriginal Health Practitioners from our AHP Traineeship program – including three from our bush clinics – will graduate with their Certificate IV Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Practice) and two senior AHPs will graduate with a Diploma in Aboriginal Primary Health Care.

“Aboriginal Health Practitioners are a strategic priority for our workforce. AHPs are critical to the work of Congress in delivering culturally safe and responsive comprehensive primary health care to our people” said Ms Brand.

Aboriginal Health Practitioners are recognised nationally as a fundamental component of Aboriginal comprehensive primary health care. As well as providing primary health care, AHPs provide cultural security and safety, disease prevention and health promotion, and local community knowledge.

They work within multidisciplinary health care teams to achieve better health outcomes for Aboriginal people and play a key role in facilitating relationships between other health professionals to provide care that meets the client’s physical, social, emotional and cultural needs.

Tallira Anderson is one of the ten graduates. “As a young mum, I was inspired to become an Aboriginal Health Practitioner to be a role model for my daughter.”

“Growing up seeing too many of my family with preventable chronic illnesses, I want to make a difference. I am now a graduate AHP and proud to be working in the new Congress Northside clinic.” said Ms Anderson.

“Following a challenging period in recruiting AHPs in 2016, Congress embarked on a mission to develop our own and launched the Congress AHP traineeship program. The graduations this week are evidence of the program’s success.” continued Ms Brand.

“AHP graduates are to be congratulated on their achievement in attaining their qualification.

“Congress now employs 21 AHPs across our town and remote clinics and will continue to invest in the AHP workforce by employing a minimum of three AHP trainees each year.”

 

3.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO Darwin Deadly Choices team visits the Garaworra Supported housing program
Tracey from our Deadly Choices team visits the Garaworra Supported housing program run by Anglicare NT every fortnight on Mondays and helps prepare some Good Quick Tukka.
Yesterday Corn, Zucchini & Carrot fritters were on the menu.
Thanks to Alberto Dhamarrandji and his little sister Anneka Dhamarrandji, Jackson Mills and Serena Morgan pictured here for helping out #deadlychoices #AnglicareNT

4. VIC : VACCHO staff get a run down on the 2018 Victorian election campaign
Victoria has been a leader for Aboriginal Affairs across Australia. The state has embraced the concept of selfdetermination for Aboriginal people, recognising it is the only policy to produce real and sustainable outcomes for Community.
Download a PDF copy VACCHO-STATE-ELECTION-2018-WEB
Since 2006 there have been a number of strategies and frameworks that have been co-designed with Aboriginal leaders and their communities. They prioritise areas including education, health, human services, economic participation, child protection and leadership.
These community-led reforms across Victoria are improving Aboriginal People’s lives. We are seeing healthier babies and mums, more young people completing year 12, and a large increase in immunisation rates for Aboriginal children across the state.

Our communities have the solutions, and we will continue to ensure our voice is heard in achieving better health outcomes for all Victorians. It is vital that the partnerships between Community and government continues. Keep walking with us.

We ask for:
• Multi-partisan commitment to continue legitimate engagement with Aboriginal communities, and reforms
based upon self-determination.
• To honour existing plans, fund their implementation and ensure future policies are based on the principles
of self-determination.
• Continued support of Aboriginal involvement in strategic decision-making at all levels of government.

5.1 SA : The Deadly Choices team are out on the APY lands supporting one of our partners the PAFC Power Aboriginal Program

WillPower Program community visits 2 Amata  Ernabella Mimili Indulkana
 Massive thx to all students & teachers 4 hosting us, it’s been an amazing few days with more to come

5.2 SA : Nunkuwarrin Yunti ACCHO Newsletter January-July edition 2018.

Download copy here Newsletter_Jan-July 2018

6. QLD : Apunipima ACCHO : Aurukun was a hive of healthy activity last weekend with the annual River to Ramp Fun Run and Walk. 

Almost 100 entrants ran, jogged or walked the seven kilometre course from Obon to the finish line at the picturesque Aurukun Landing.

Deputy Mayor Edgar Kerindun oversaw the race formalities and was on hand to congratulate the participants and winners at the finish line. The overall winner was Gabriel waterman, who set an impressive pace given the hot conditions.

The overall winner was Gabriel waterman, who set an impressive pace given the hot conditions.

The biggest smile of the day went to eight year old Althea Koomeeta, who won a push bike for winning her age group.

The success of events like this are the result of a large group of coommitted stakeholders working together. The River to Ramp Fun Run and Walk was supported by the following organisations: Skytrans, Rio Tinto, Glencore, ALPA, Island and Cape Stores, Kang Kang Café, Ercson, Preston Law, Apunipima, Cape York Employment, Koolkan School, PCYC Indigenous Programs, G&R Wills, Kondo Korp, Pikkuws Restaurant and Builders North.

7 WA : Derbarl Yerrigan Health Matters – Men’s Health Marmun Pit stop flyer.

 

With; Stan Masters – Aboriginal Health Practitioner, Derbarl Yerrigan Below is the Derbarl Yerrigans Marmun Pit stop flyer. They help men promote better health For more information about Marmun Pit Stop go to or 9421 3888

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NACCHOagm2017 #NSW #TAS #QLD #VIC #WA #NT #SA

 

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

2.QLD : APUNIPIMA Cape York Health Council’s Baby One Program highlighted at Growing Deadly families Forum

3. WA / AHCWA : Shot in the arm for vaccinations at Bega Garnbirringy Health Service 

4.1 VIC : VAHS Healthy Life Style Team Kirrip Six Week Challenge – Week Two has officially kicked off!

4.2 VIC : Mallee District Aboriginal Services Study will help target gambling

5.1 NSW Awabakal kicks off thier Healthy Lifestyle Challenge!

5.2 NSW : Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s Youth Vaccine Hip Hop video project

6. NT NATSIWA AMSANT 2017 Darwin Forum

7. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

8. Tas : Tasmania Aboriginal community and family events

9. View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National : 2017 NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM Registrations

 This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members’ Conference ‘Our Health Counts: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’.

NACCHO Conference Website

1.2 National : 2017 NACCHO National Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day registrations Darwin NT

Register HERE

 

2.QLD : APUNIPIMA Cape York Health Council’s Baby One Program highlighted at Growing Deadly families Forum.

APUNIPIMA Cape York Health Council’s Baby One Program has been highlighted at this month’s Queensland Clinical senate’s Growing Deadly families Forum.

The Forum focused on improving the health of Queensland’s indigenous women and families through a healthier start to life.

Apunipima’s johanna Neville and Florida Getawan told delegates about the council’s award-winning Indigenous-led Baby One Program, which is an integral part of antenatal care in Cape York. It runs from pregnancy until the baby is 1000 days old.

“Baby Baskets (full of useful and essential items) are integral feature of the Baby One Program, are provided to families at key times during pregnancy and the postnatal period,” Ms Neville told delegates.

“The baskets act as both an incentive to encourage families to engage with health care providers, as a catalyst to health education and as a means to provide essential items to families in Cape York.”

Ms Getawan, who helps deliver the Baby One Program in cairns and Kowanyama, said home visits make a difference when it comes to mothers receiving care.

“As a maternal and child-health worker I spend time educating pregnant women about healthy eating, what’s good and what’s not good for them during pregnancy such as the dangers of smoking, and safe sleeping for bubba”, she said.

“ I love doing home visits and yarning with mothers about healthy parenting, and being a support person for them in their own space.

“I love being there for families who are too shy to come to the clinic so, if I can, I engage with them in their own environment.

“I love watching mothers grow because I have had seven pregnancies myself and can relate to what they are going through, and I am able to develop a healthy relationship with them.”


3. WA / AHCWA : Shot in the arm for vaccinations at Bega Garnbirringy Health Service 

An Aboriginal health worker from Kalgoorlie is the latest to complete a program that teaches how to administer vaccinations to children.

The Bega Garnbirringy Health Service health worker graduated after taking part in the two-week course at the Nindila training Centre in Kalgoorlie.

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) launched the training program for Aboriginal health workers in partnership with the Communicable Disease Control Directorate at the Department of health in March 2015.

Since then, 34 Aboriginal health workers from across WA have been trained to administer vaccinations and promote immunisation.

AHCWA chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said the program had been initiated to improve immunisation rates amongst Aboriginal children in WA, which are the lowest in the country.

“Until this program was launched, only nurses and doctors were authorised to carry out immunisations,“ she said.

“By expanding the number of Aboriginal health workers trained to administer vaccinations to children, we hope to decrease the risk of our young people contracting preventable diseases.

“TRUST”

‘In addition, the added benefit of having Aboriginal health workers trained to conduct vaccinations means they can relate to Aboriginal children and gain the trust of their parents to help spread the message about the importance of immunisation.”

A WA Auditor General’s report published last December cited immunisation rates amongst Aboriginal children, infants and toddlers as lower than the national target. It suggested the training program had helped contribute to improvements in low immunisation rates among Aboriginal children, with rates for Aboriginal infants in several regions increasing by an average of 8,5% in the year from June 2015.

“We are thrilled that it appears this training program has already contributed to immunisation rates among Aboriginal children increasing significantly in some areas, “Ms Nelson-Cox said.

“We hope that as more Aboriginal Health Workers are trained, the rates will go up even further.

“We have received an overwhelming response from our Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations, who see the value in their AHW’s being trained to administer immunisations,” she said.

Courses are planned for Broom and Carnarvon later this year.

4.1 VIC : VAHS Healthy Life Style Team Kirrip Six Week Challenge – Week Two has officially kicked off!

Huge effort from all of our Challenge Champs who came to hear Luke give us some great information about eating well to live longer and stronger lives.

Everyone gave 110% in the workout and we can’t wait for next week! Keep smashing those goals and working towards building healthy habits every day.

Jandalee and Coz were our FitBit winners this week for their consistency and determination! Thanks to Medibank for donating the FitBits, we can’t wait to give one away every week.

Go for it Kirrip Challenge! You’ve got this!

#StaySmokeFree#hltChallenge#vahsHLT#BeDeadly

4.2 VIC : Mallee District Aboriginal Services Study will help target gambling

A study commissioned by Mallee District Aboriginal Services is helping to highlight the extent of problem gambling in the Mallee’s Aboriginal community – and identifying possible strategies and solutions.

The study, published by La Trobe University, was compiled from interviews conducted with 26 community members across the Mildura, Swan Hill and Kerang region earlier this year.
Pictured MDAS Gambler’s Help Counsellor Tiffany Griffin with Social and Emotional Wellbeing Manager Raelene Stephens

You can download the report here.

The report found that although gambling was identified as “a popular and pleasurable activity”, participants also noted it was a “respite from depression, loneliness, stress and sadness”, with some acknowledging it to be a cause of significant harm.

Although the study noted that tighter regulation by government would aid in reducing harm, other recommendations were more community-focussed.

The report found that there was a strong sense that for interventions to work, more open discussion about gambling was needed, in part to address shame, one of the biggest barriers identified to addressing harm.

MDAS chief executive officer Rudolph Kirby said the report would be used as a springboard to open community discussion on the issue of problem gambling.

“One of the main findings of the study, and one of the challenges we face, is that a lot of people don’t identify gambling itself as a problem in the first place,” Mr Kirby said.

“They might acknowledge they have money problems or health problems or family problems, but most people don’t see gambling as a problem in itself,” he said.

“Even when they do they’re often too embarrassed to say something or seek help because of the stigma around the issue.”

Mr Kirby said the report’s findings would be a catalyst for strengthening the delivery of support services, with the assistance of funding announced by the Victorian Government last month.

The project known as “It’s not all about the money” will be funded by the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation to allow MDAS and La Trobe University to work with other Elders and community members in Mildura, Swan Hill and Kerang to co-design and implement interventions.

MDAS Gambler’s Help Officer Tiffany Griffin said the work would focus on looking at how to increase the open conversations about gambling in the community.

“This is a great opportunity to first acknowledge the problem that we have, then get the community on-board to address the problem and preventing it being such a problem in future, as well,” Ms Griffin said.

“We want the community to be part of designing our education and support services so they are not only more aware of them, but feel comfortable in coming forward and asking for support for a problem they or a family member might have,” she said.

“The report also identified that one of the things that drew people to gambling venues, particularly bingo, was the opportunity to socialise and catch up with others, so opportunities for replacement activities is also an important factor that we can look at.”

The project will complement the support services already provided by Gambler’s Help MDAS.

The MDAS Social and Emotional wellbeing team can be contacted on (03) 5018 4100. Gambler’s Help services can also be access by calling 1800 858 858.

5.1 NSW Awabakal kicks off thier Healthy Lifestyle Challenge!

This week we kicked off our Healthy Lifestyle Challenge!

We had a good little bunch of starters at both our 7am and 10:30am sessions. It was so encouraging to see many of our local community members taking that sometimes scary 1st step towards improving their health.

It was awesome seeing some of our Dads team up with their sons, as Timana said ‘that’s leadership right there’.

Today was packed with fun, sweat and giggles.

It’s not too late to join us, please contact us for a rego form and make an appointment at medical to get your measurements done. Challenge yourself……

5.2 NSW : Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s Youth Vaccine Hip Hop video project

Recently the Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s Youth Vaccine Hip Hop video project was launched on YouTube.

The ‘Whatchya Gunna Do?’ video can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nW54z1cIYv8.

Through the combined efforts of locally talented youths and nationally recognised artists the project included the writing and recording of the song as well as filming the video clip with young people from throughout the Murrumbidgee Local Health District area.

The Murrumbidgee Local Health District has been eagerly awaiting the launch of ‘Whatchya Gunna Do?’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait people who visit a GP located in an AMS in the Murrumbidgee region (Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation, Griffith Aboriginal Medical Service or Viney Morgan) will be managed by the team at the relevant AMS.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait who visit a mainstream ‘non AMS’ General Practice, can be referred into the program to Marathon Health.

“We have been fortunate to be able to combine local youth talent with nationally recognised artists including Nooky and Nina Las Vegas,” Murrumbidgee Local Health District director of public health Tracey Oakman said.

“The youth wrote the lyrics, sang the song and participated in the video, all with the support of producer  Rahj Conkas, lyric writer Nooky and radio host, DJ and producer Nina Las Vegas,” Mrs Oakman said.

The inspiration behind the project was the Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s desire to see young people educated on the importance of vaccination.

The Murrumidgee Local Health District recently announced that the local area has the highest rate of Human Papillomavirus vaccinations across the nation and would like to see the region take the top spots when it comes to other vaccinations too.

In Australia free vaccinations from the National Immunisation Program are provided to children (at 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 months and 4 years), adolescents (Year 7 at school) and older people (Aboriginal people over 50 and others over 65 years).  Additionally free vaccines are available to people with specific medical conditions.

LAUNCH: A hip hop video has been released to promote vaccination.

LAUNCH: A hip hop video has been released to promote vaccination.

“The aim of the video is to engage with high school age youth to get them thinking about the importance of immunisation,” Mrs Oakman said.

The launch last Saturday was held as part of Wagga Wagga City Council’s Youth Week celebrations.

Mrs Oakman said the project originally came about thanks to an idea from a local health worker.

“The project is the brainchild of Leanne Sanders, Aboriginal Immunisation Health Worker,” Mrs Oakman said.

“Leanne realised many youth do not recognise the importance of being vaccinated and proposed the Hip Hop video as a way of reaching them.”

For more information on vaccinations visit the Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s website at http://www.mlhd.health.nsw.gov.au, the Murrumbidgee Local Health District’s Facebook page or by speaking to your local health professional.

The ‘Whatchya Gunna Do?’ video can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nW54z1cIYv8.

6. NT NATSIWA AMSANT 2017 Darwin Forum

Our busy schedule had the NATSIHWA professional development team land in Darwin this week to facilitate a forum to a group of Aboriginal Health Practitioners who work in a variety of roles from education to management.

A passionate and dedicated group of health professionals shared their experiences working in the Top End and engaged with our Guest Presenters, who delivered some current education to assist them in their practice.

Our members  provided valuable historical insights into the Aboriginal Health Worker role and how they continue to work diligently to advance this valuable profession across the NT.

The AMSANT Leadership and Workforce Development Team presented an outstanding informative session and received positive feedback from all attendees.

Many thanks to Jeaneen for your warm welcome to Larrakia Country, and our guest presenters for your time and commitment in assisting us to facilitate our forums.

Thanks to the Darwin mob for coming along and providing your feedback for us to take back to Canberra.  It is so rewarding to journey with you, to hear your voices and witness such strong representation in the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health & education sector. Kudos to you all !

Photo Above L-R: Darwin forum presenters Vanessa McAndrew IBA, Marea Fittock RHD and Stehen Thompson ASD.
AMSANT Present at Darwin Forum
Photo Above L-R: Karrina DeMasi, Patrick Johnson and Sharon Wallace.
AMSANT presenters Patrick Johnson, Sharon Wallace and Karrina DeMasi provided particiapnts at NATSIHWA Darwin Forum with a powerful presentation on AMSANT services, leadership, workforce and policy.

All were impressed by their dedication and achievments, especially the NATSIHWA  team. We would like to give a huge shout out to the AMSANT Team and also thank you for allowing us to share your information with our all our readers.

 

7. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

 
Doug Milera, CEO of Tauondi College proudly demonstrates the college as a newly minted smoke-free environment. This means a healthier space for students and staff alike! Too deadly Tauondi. #BeHealthyBeSmokefree
8. Tas : Tasmania Aboriginal community and family events
Members of the Aboriginal community and our family’s, we are hosting one of three up-coming gatherings next – Friday, 6:00pm, 1 September 2017 at piyura kitina (Risdon Cove).
We are looking for Aboriginal community volunteers to help out for the community dinner. If your able to volunteer next Friday, please contact Kira or Rose at the TAC on – 03 62340700, 1800 132 260.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our ACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT

1.QLD :Deadly Kindies give Indigenous children a great start

2.WA : Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS) Women have Healthy futures and a yarn

3. SA : Newsletter from the Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

4. VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team solid workout

5. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs Speaking out

6. NSW  : Yerin Newsletter 2nd Edition July 2017

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.QLD :Deadly Kindies give Indigenous children a great start

“We know that getting kids prepared for and engaged in education directly impacts the health and wellbeing of themselves, their families and their communities long into the future,”

And while these Kindy Kits give kids all the items they need for a day at kindy, making sure they are kindy-ready also relies on providing them with access to the range of services available through the IUIH Model of Care.

Such services include speech therapy, audiology and eye health checks to make sure they can participate and develop the skills they will need when they go to school.

We are already experiencing huge demand for the Deadly Kindykits.

Thanks to the support of ambassadors Johnathan Thurston and Beryl Friday, we are looking forward to this campaign resulting in more kids being up to date with their health checks, more kids being able to access additional health services they need, and more kids enrolling in kindy.”

IUIH CEO Adrian Carson said Deadly Kindies recognised the importance of education as a key social determinant of health.

Education Minister Kate Jones and ambassador Johnathan Thurston today officially launched a new campaign to get more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander enrolments in kindergarten.

Ms Jones said ‘Deadly Kindies’ – launched at C&KKoobara Aboriginal and Islander Kindergarten in Zillmere – was about giving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children a better start to health and education.

“We want all Queensland children to get the best start to their education,” Ms Jones said.

“Deadly Kindies will encourage families to register their interest for kindy at their three and four-year-old’s health check.

“Families will be given an opportunity to register their young children for kindy and they will also receive a free Deadly Kindy Kit.

“The Kit includes kindy backpack, hat, blanket, sheet, lunchbox, library bag, water bottle and T-shirt.

“Families will also receive any necessary support and information they need to go ahead and enrol in a local kindergarten.

“The program ensures each child receives any health care required as a result of their eye, ear and other physical health assessment, which in turn ensures they can maximise their learning at kindy.“

Ms Jones said the Palaszczuk Government had invested $1.5 million to deliver the program through the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health.

“The campaign’s strength lies in its holistic approach to supporting Indigenous children, by linking better start to health with a better start to education,” she said.

“Deadly Kindies is part of our efforts to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kindergarten participation in Queensland to at least 95 per cent by 2018, up from 93.1 per cent in 2016.

“I thank football star Johnathan Thurston and netball star Beryl Friday for their invaluable support as official ambassadors for the Deadly Kindies campaign.”

More information: www.deadlykindies.com.au

2.WA : Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS) Women have Healthy futures and a yarn

Indigenous women from across Geraldton are converging at Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (GRAMS) three times a week to enjoy craft, cuppas, and connection.

The women meet in the GRAMS ‘shed’ from 9.30am to 1.30pm on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays to make items ranging from wreaths and quilts to bunting and bags.

GRAMS CEO Deborah Woods welcomed all Indigenous women to join the craft sessions, regardless of their artistic ability.

“The craft group is a really lovely way for Indigenous women to come together, to not only be creative but also to enjoy the camaraderie of working together creatively,” Ms Woods said.

“There are real social and mental health benefits in bringing people together to enjoy each other’s company while working on something creative and productive.

“Aside from the satisfaction in producing craftworks, we also enjoy all sorts of conversations – from sometimes deep and profound topics to the outright hilarious.”

Ms Woods said women who were not into craft were also welcome to attend to help produce a hot daily soup.

Attending the craft group is free, and includes access to tea and coffee facilities.

Anyone who takes part must first have completed a full women’s health check, get their flu shots and also have a GRAMS care plan.

The group encourages donations of craft wares, including artificial flowers, material off cuts, broken tiles and any craft equipment.

For more information, or to donate goods please, contact Volunteer Felicity Mourambine on 0484 138 155.

3. SA Newsletter from the Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti

Download the 10 Page

Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti Newsletter

newsletter-june2017v2-rs

4. VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team solid workout

Great job to everyone who came in at 7:30am and smashed out a solid workout! You all smashed it And especially good job to Raylene from Bendigo & District Aboriginal Co-Operative & Rudy from Mallee District Aboriginal Services who came all the way to have an awesome session!

#vahsHLT #BeBrave #BePositive #BeStrong #StaySmokeFree

Aboriginal Quitline : Victorian Aboriginal Health Service : Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc : National Best Practice Unit Tackling Indigenous Smoking

5. ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs Speaking out

 ” The Australian Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion announced on 7 July that it was his intention from July 2018 only Aboriginal owned, managed and controlled organisations and businesses would be funded by the Commonwealth to deliver services under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

This decision by the Minister is one of the most profoundly important policy decisions to have been made for years in relation to the delivery of services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs 

Watch NACCHO TV Interview with Julie Tongs

Read download 20 page  Winnunga AHCS Newsletter July 2017

In making the announcement Minister Scullion said it was a decision taken on the back of incontrovertible evidence that the best outcomes being achieved under the IAS were those that were being delivered by local, community focused Indigenous managed and led organisations and businesses.

The Minister effectively asserted that the evidence was in, and that the practice of Governments in turning to mainstream and church based businesses, ahead of Aboriginal organisations, was producing sub-optimal outcomes for Aboriginal people and that the Commonwealth would from the beginning of the next financial year only make funding under the IAS available to Aboriginal businesses.

The next step in this process must be its extension to other programs and funding including of Indigenous specific programs managed by the States and Territories and of funding dispersed through the Public Health Network.

It was perhaps no coincidence that the Minister’s announcement coincided with the tenth anniversary of the disastrous and racist bi partisan ‘intervention’ in the Northern Territory.

Ms Pat Anderson, one of the authors of ‘Little Children are Sacred’ and currently chairperson of the Lowitja Institute has previously summarised the rationale of Minister Scullion’s decision to turn to Aboriginal organisations for the delivery of services as being that one of the most important determinants of health is ‘control’.

She said: ‘Practically this means any policy aimed at reducing the disadvantage of our communities must ask itself how it will increase the ability of Aboriginal people, families and communities to take control over their own lives.’

This is the point I have made repeatedly to ACT Government Ministers and officials, most particularly and forcefully in recent times in relation to the exclusion of any Aboriginal community involvement in programs such as Strengthening Families, A Step Up for Our Kids,

Through care, supported housing, care and protection, childcare, aged care or justice. The default practice in the ACT is for the Government to turn to precisely the organisations that Minister Scullion has said the evidence shows produce sub-optimal outcomes for Aboriginal people, namely non-Aboriginal mainstream businesses and church backed businesses. Organisations which the Minister has now said will, on the basis of all the evidence, no longer be funded by the Commonwealth.

6. NSW  : Yerin Newsletter 2nd Edition July 2017

VIEW ALL PAGES HERE

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #SA #NT #WA #VIC #NSW #QLD

1.SA Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA awarded $500,000 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services grant

2. NSW : Awabakal Medical Services “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” health workshops for students

3.1 QLD New partnership between AFL Gold Coast Suns and Deadly Choices 715 Health Checks

3.2 QLD : 90th anniversary of 270km walk to be marked by ceremony and re-enactment

4.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team , Deadly Dan and Smoke Free Super Heroes

5.WA : First National first Aboriginal Affairs roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress .

6.NT  Additional $1.6m for Indigenous language interpreters

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.SA Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA awarded $500,000 New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services grant

Local Aboriginal families with young children will benefit from new services after Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service was successful in gaining a $500,000 grant earlier this month.

FROM Whyalla News

The New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services program is an initiative of the Commonwealth Government’s Department of Health, and aims to deliver antenatal, postnatal and early childhood services targeting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with children under five yearsn old. Nunyara plans to use the funding to improve the health care of children from antenatal care right through until they attend primary school.

The health service currently have a part time Aboriginal Maternal Infant Care (AMIC) Practitioner and access to a Midwife one day per week.

The funding would increase the hours of these two positions as well as create four new jobs.  Nunyara will employ a Child Health Coordinator, Child Health Nurse, AMIC Trainee and Transport Officer to support the new program.

Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service chief executive officer Cindy Zbierksi said the team anticipates they can “more than double” Nunyara’s service delivery outputs relating to improved access and outcomes for under five-year-olds.

“We can increase the child health checks by at least doubling them in the first six months and increase childhood immunisation by 20 percent,” she said.

The provision of a Transport Officer in the new program will also assist clients to attend specialist appointments in Port Augusta, who have more Paediatric and Obstetric services than Whyalla.

Mrs Zbierski said this has been an issue in the past, as travelling to Port Augusta is less than 100 kilometres away so clients do not qualify for the Patient Assistance Transport Scheme.

Nunyara is working on converting one of its buildings into a space for this service and plans to have the team fully operational by the end of 2017. Nunyara is located at 17/27 Tully St, Whyalla

2. NSW : Awabakal Medical Services “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” health workshops for students

IRRAWANG High School Indigenous students were treated to some famous faces this week, with some Indigenous stars visiting the school to run a health workshop with the students

From News of the Area

The workshop was all about “Tackling Indigenous Smoking” and has been generously funded by the Awabakal Medical Services and facilitated by No Limit Management.Students were treated to three special guests who spoke to the crowd.

Cody Walker, a professional footballer in the NRL with the Sydney Rabbitohs is a proud man of Bundjalung and Yuin Heritage.

George Rose, a former NRL player, played for Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles, with whom he won the 2011 NRL premiership, and also Melbourne Storm and Sydney Roosters.

He played for the Walgett Aboriginal Connection in several Koori knockouts and is a proud Kamilaroi man.

International Indigenous model Samantha Harris, a respected Dunghutti woman, joined the football stars to run the workshop group for the morning.

Each of the guests spoke of their life journeys and reinforced to the students the dangers of smoking, encouraging them to maintain a fit and healthy lifestyle and stand up to peer pressure.
The students took part in fun, but physical team and confidence building activities, working together to reach outcomes.

The guest stars gave the students an opportunity at the end of the workshop for photos and autographs.

Matt Chaffey, Year 10 student from Medowie said “I really appreciated the mentors coming to our school.”

“From what they told us, it makes me more determined to never smoke.”

Well done to the staff and students for another unique and creatively managed experience for the students at Irrawang High School.

3.1 QLD New partnership between AFL Gold Coast Suns and Deadly Choices 715 Health Checks

The Deadly Choices  Gold Coast SUNS jersey will be free for community members when they have a full 715 Health Check Kalwun on the Gold Coast

The Deadly Choices  Gold Coast SUNS jersey will be free for community members when they have a full 715 Health Check Kalwun on the Gold Coast

3.2 QLD : 90th anniversary of 270km walk to be marked by ceremony and re-enactment

On Wednesday 28 June more than 100 people, including a support crew of cooks, a nurse, counsellor, community workers and volunteers, will set out to walk from Taroom, 290km west of Maryborough, to Woorabinda – more than 270km to the north – over eight days.

The Trek will be kicked off by a Healing Ceremony on Bundulla Station, the site of the former Taroom Aboriginal Settlement, which was closed down in 1927 because of the threat of flooding from a nearby irrigation scheme.

See full history HERE

The Taroom Aboriginal Settlement, also known as Taroom Aboriginal Reserve, was established as a government-operated reserve on a site on the Dawson River, east of the township of Taroom in 1911. The settlement was established under the Aboriginals Protection and Restriction of the Sale of Opium Act 1897, which enabled direct government control over the lives of Aboriginal people in Queensland, including forced removals to designated reserves. Under the direction of a superintendent, the settlement housed Aboriginal people from different language groups and regions of Queensland, who lived within a highly regulated and tightly controlled institutional environment until its closure in 1927.[1]

Inhabitants at the time were forced to move to what is now Woorabinda Aboriginal Shire, 170km south west of Rockhampton.

Most of them walked.

The purpose of the Healing Ceremony is to pay respect to those hundreds of Elders, men, women and children and to lay wreaths at a memorial at the site.

Trek walkers are expected to travel from Woorabinda, Yarrabah, Palm Island, Cherbourg and other central Queensland communities, and will include non-Indigenous participants.

This year marks the 90th anniversary of the walk and the third year of re-enacting the walk.

Media is welcome to attend. For more information or to arrange interviews, please contact Christine Howes on 0419 656 277.

4.VIC : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team , Deadly Dan and Smoke Free Super Heroes

This week the VAHSHLT were hanging out at Yappera Children’s Service Co-Operative reading Deadly Dan at the League and talking about the importance of staying smoke free!

At our Coach program we are educating the kids about healthy lifestyles and are creating a next generation of smoke free super heroes!!

#youSmokeYouChoke #StaySmokeFree Aboriginal Quitline Quit Victoria Department of Health & Human Services, Victoria

 

 5.WA : First National first Aboriginal Affairs roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress .

State and territory Aboriginal affairs leaders say it is inevitable the federal government will need to have treaty negotiations with indigenous people.

Representatives from Western Australia, the ACT, the Northern Territory, South Australia and Victoria met on Friday for the first roundtable meeting in seven years to discuss their progress on Aboriginal affairs.

WA Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt, who is indigenous, said each state faced similar issues including housing, treaties, Aboriginal representation and land tenure.

“It’s an opportunity now for states and territories to have a much better understanding of what we’re all doing, and co-operate a lot more to create more opportunities for Aboriginal people,” he told reporters on Friday.

“We’re seeing a lot more happening in the space of Native title, constitutional recognition and closing the gap.”

Mr Wyatt met with SA Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Minister Kyam Maher, ACT MLA Rachel Stephen-Smith, NT MLA Chansey Paech and Member for Geelong Christine Couzens.

Roundtable meetings are expected to continue once or twice a year, with discussions towards the end of 2017 to focus on how states and territories will use land vested in Aboriginal communities to better create economic development.

Mr Wyatt said treaty conversations were occurring with Nyoongar people from WA’s South West region, and acknowledged this was happening across Australia.

“What Uluru has shown is that Aboriginal Australia is very keen to have this conversation about treaties elevated,” he said.

“It has created a new pressure on the commonwealth government to engage in an area that perhaps, may be new to them.” Mr Maher said a state treaty could be announced by the end of the year and that bilateral agreement would have a federal impact.

“When states and territories talk with one voice it helps solve problems,” he said.

 

6.NT  Additional $1.6m for Indigenous language interpreters

The Coalition Government is providing the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) with an additional $1.6 million to expand its successful Indigenous Interpreting Project.

See Background  Health NT Research TeleinterpretingServices

Indigenous language interpreters play an essential role in ensuring First Australians have access to a fair legal system, as well as government and community services. Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said 11 per cent of First Australians spoke an Indigenous language as their main language at home.

“In some parts of Australia, English is the third or fourth language spoken, clearly demonstrating the need for widely available interpreting services,” Minister Scullion said.

“This $1.6 million investment will ensure the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters is able to meet the growing need for accredited Indigenous language interpreters in regional and remote Australia, particularly in the health and justice sectors.

“The authority’s Indigenous Interpreting Project has already enjoyed considerable success.

Since 2012, it has led to 96 accreditations being awarded to Indigenous interpreters across 25 languages.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #WA #VIC #SA #NSW #QLD #NT #TAS #ACT

Photo above : South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)  staff at a recent community meeting for the new Busselton outreach clinic opening today are (from left) Aboriginal Health Worker Talicia Jetta, Playgroup Leader Gwen Gray and Indigenous Outreach Worker Janene Gray. See story 1 below

1.Western Australia :  South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

2.Victoria: Victorian Aboriginal Health Service

3. South Australia  : Nunkuwarrin Yunti

4. NSW : Redfern AMS and Galambila/Durri/Werin

5.Queensland : Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation 

6. Northern Territory :  Danila Dilba Health Service /AMSANT

7. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

8. Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service ACT

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate

or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media             Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

Picture above : The Free NACCHO App contains a geo locator, which will help you find the nearest Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (302 Clinics ) in your area and

 Provides heath information online and telephone on a wide range of topics and where you can go to get more information or assistance should you need urgent help

Download details HERE

1.Western Australia :  South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

“Being able to provide quality health care to our community is vital. It’s about building capacity to our services, so our clients have more opportunities to access support,” Ms Nelson said.

“We are proud that Busselton is our fourth outreach clinic located in the South West, including Brunswick Junction, Collie and Manjimup.

“SWAMS is pleased the Busselton clinic will operate from the Busselton Health Campus, as this prime location means easier access to additional services for our clients, if needed.”

SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said the new clinic, located at the Busselton Health Campus, would enable SWAMS to improve access to primary health care services for the Noongar community.

New SWAMS Busselton outreach clinic to boost services

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) will boost services in Busselton with the opening of its new outreach clinic today .

SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said the new clinic, located at the Busselton Health Campus, would enable SWAMS to improve access to primary health care services for the Noongar community.

The Busselton clinic will operate from 10 am to 4 pm on Mondays and Thursdays, and include a Women’s Health Clinic on the last Thursday of every month.

Clients will have access to GP’s, Aboriginal Health Workers and Indigenous Health Workers on-site, with referrals to other specialised SWAMS staff available.

“SWAMS supports Aboriginal health through a range of tailored programs and services, which can include bulk billing, patient transport and home visits,” Ms Nelson said.

“This clinic would not be possible without the support of the WA Country Health Service (WACHS) and our partnership with GP Down South, for our chronic disease program.

“Establishing an outreach clinic in Busselton further cements SWAMS’ vision to provide high-quality, holistic and accessible services to the South West Aboriginal community. SWAMS looks forward to collaborating with other agencies on this vision.”

2.Victoria: Victorian Aboriginal Health Service

From VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Page

Or watch NACCHO TV interview with Laura Thompson

Regional Co-ordinator Healthy Lifestyle and Tobacco Cessation VAHS

Hear out stories, share our stories

Close the Gap Day is on the 17 March and in the lead up to this event, Oxfam have worked with VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team  to share the stories of two of our very own VAHS staff members, Uncle Reg Thorpe and Jacob Nelson. Jacob’s story will follow in the coming weeks.

Their stories are emotional and powerful reminders of how many Aboriginal people in Victoria, are more likely to experience poorer health outcomes than non-Aboriginal people.

Uncle Reg’s story focuses on his love for his family, the importance of self-care and the benefits of physical activity and living a healthy lifestyle.  As well as, the important role all staff at VAHS play in caring for the Community.

https://youtu.be/_dqc1z_qFgQ

3. South Australia  : Nunkuwarrin Yunti

Closing the Gap Day

Closing the Gap Day is approaching and with it comes various community events. These events are aimed at bringing people together to share information and to take action to reduce health inequality.

The Northern Health Network are holding a Closing the Gap Day from 11.30am- 2.30pm on Thursday 23rd March at Tauondi College, Lipson Street, Port Adelaide.

There will be free entertainment, lunch provided and a range of community stalls.

 4. NSW : Redfern AMS and Galambila/Durri/Werin

 

The Hon Ken Wyatt meeting with Redfern AMS chair Sol Bellear and CEO Laverne Bellear 

Aboriginal medical services have proved the longevity of Aboriginal people, so we need the bigger spread and more Aboriginal medical services probably in the next 5-10 years.

We probably need another 100 to 150 Aboriginal medical services throughout the whole country, in cities and remote communities as well, so we’ll be pressuring Ken to make available more funds for the establishment of Aboriginal Medical Services.

”The Aboriginal Medical Service in Redfern is pleased to have Ken Wyatt as the new Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health, but have called for improvement.

Sol Bellear AM, Chair  of the Aboriginal Medical Service in Redfern

View NACCHO TV 30 Minute Doco About Redfern AMS

The Minister meeting with AMS Staff and board members

The Minister meeting Laurel Robinson and Beverly Briggs ( members of the Sapphires )

LAUREL ROBINSON, Beverly Briggs and Naomi Mayers are the three original members of the Sapphires, the first popular Aboriginal all-female group. The movie based on the band’s story is now the most successful Australian film of 2012. Laurel’s son Tony Briggs wrote the play it is based on, and adapted that into a screenplay.

The film depicts the Sapphires as Australia’s answer to the Supremes, and how they were talent-spotted to perform soul numbers for the troops in Vietnam.

March 2017 Eora Elders Olympics

Now in it’s third year, the March 2017 Eora Elders Olympics provided Elders like the Redfern AMS team with an opportunity to enjoy and participate in sporting activities that will promote good health and active ageing.

The Elder Olympians engage in modified sporting activities, competing in a friendly environment. Elders are also connected to expert advice relating to health and well-being to address their nutritional, physical and recreational needs in the lead up, during and after each event which empowers Elders to live healthily

4. NSW : Galambila/Durri/Werin

The READY MOB Tackling Smoking and Healthy Lifestyles team are passionate about raising the awareness of the health impacts of tobacco smoking and chronic disease in Aboriginal communities and promoting positive lifestyle changes.

READY MOB is: Really Evaluate And Decide Yourself Make Ourselves Better.

The name also signifies that the team is READY to work with the community to promote healthy lifestyles.

READY MOB staff can travel to your community in the Mid North Coast to provide health promotion and education about smoking and healthy lifestyles and run healthy lifestyle program and activities. If you would like invite

READY MOB team to your community please email readymob@galambila.org.au or 0428 277 941.

We promised you our first ‘Deadly ‘n’ Ready’ film clip from your youth! In this clip, the youth of the mid borth coast taking the first steps in ‘breaking up with smokes’. Are you ready to end your relationship with Smokes? drop into your Local Aboriginal Medical Service for support 2day. #deadlynready #readymob #smokefreecommunity #buttoutkidsabout

VIEW here and/or  Like the Ready Mob Facebook Page

 

Galambila AMS Coffs Harbour

Durri AMS

Werin AMS  Port Macquarie

 5.Queensland : Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation 

 ” International women’s day is an opportunity for recognition and celebration of women’s achievements in Yarrabah and the wider community,”

To me, ‘Be Involved, Lead the Way’, means to continue to mentor women as up and coming leaders and advocators for change.”

Sue Andrews (pictured above ) from Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation  .GYHSAC is a community-run health organisation , NACCHO member at Yarrabah FNQ delivering primary and preventative health care programs.

Aboriginal Health Workers leadership are very active in the community : NACCHO files

The announcements for Yarrabah’s Young Woman of the Year and Woman of Year were highlights of a program of local speakers at a luncheon to mark International Women’s Day this year.

Nominees included Thelma Yeatman, Sue Andrews, Kirra-Lei Kynuna and Bryanna Smith.

Winners, Gwenneth Yeatman and Destiny Kynuna, said they were honoured to be recognised by their peers, colleagues, families and friends.

Speakers on the day said the theme ‘Be involved, lead the way’ held particular resonance for them.

“International Women’s Day acknowledges and respect all the women from around the world for their contribution to their country and, importantly, their families,” Yarrabah Cr Nadine Cannon said.

Traditional Owner group Gunggandji-Mandingalbay Yidinji also said the day was significant.

“International Women’s Day is a global movement created to unite, empower and inspire women globally to change perceptions, dispel myths, destroy stereotypes and create equality for all women,” Gunggandji-Mandingalbay Yidinji Peoples PBCAC CEO Helen Tait said.

“It’s a step into creation, to allow women to build confidence and step out of their comfort zone into their greatness to live a life aligned with their passion and to be bold.

“Be the change, disrupt the norm and link arms with like-minded women to be the creators of change for the next generation.

“‘Being involved and leading the way’ means to inspire others to connect with their passion, align with their values and live life on purpose.

“Great leaders don’t set out to be a leader, they set out to make a difference.

6. Northern Territory : Danila Dilba Health Service /AMSANT

A Northern Territory Aboriginal health service is working to improve the way Indigenous mothers access health care during their pregnancy and is improving generational health practices along the way.

Aboriginal health practitioner and team leader at the Danila Dilba centre in Palmerston, Tiana McCoy, said a success of the clinic’s model had been using Indigenous healthcare workers to connect with women who would not access health care otherwise.

Photo: Natalia Moore-Deagan says the Indigenous health workers are one reason she goes to Danila Dilba. (ABC News: Lucy Marks)

 A Northern Territory Aboriginal health service is working to improve the way Indigenous mothers access health care during their pregnancy and is improving generational health practices along the way.

Aboriginal health practitioner and team leader at the Danila Dilba centre in Palmerston, Tiana McCoy, said a success of the clinic’s model had been using Indigenous healthcare workers to connect with women who would not access health care otherwise.

“The family support workers who go out into the community and engage the women into the service they become familiar with who people are and they really do come in and they’re comfortable coming in which is excellent,” she said.

Some women access the mother’s clinic for the first time during a monthly gestation diabetes testing session, but healthcare workers are using the three-hour clinic to screen for other conditions and educate the women on general health in an environment that provides a culturally safe service.”The family support workers who go out into the community and engage the women into the service they become familiar with who people are and they really do come in and they’re comfortable coming in which is excellent,” she said.

Some women access the mother’s clinic for the first time during a monthly gestation diabetes testing session, but healthcare workers are using the three-hour clinic to screen for other conditions and educate the women on general health in an environment that provides a culturally safe service.

“They can come in and access the midwives to do their antenatal checks, they can use that time for their children to access other services within the clinic,” Ms McCoy said.

As a result, she said women were engaging with the clinic throughout their whole pregnancy.

“We try and aim for seven antenatal visits throughout the pregnancy, we’re actually hitting that mark, if not more, so for mum and baby that’s huge,” she said.

“It means we’ve got better health outcomes, we’ve got better birth weights and they can access the other services as well so it’s definitely a huge success with engaging the women within our services.”

Tiana McCoy

First time mother Lez Hall, 20, went with her partner to the clinic for the first time and said the service made her feel secure.

“For my first time it’s good to have a midwife with me and everything, so it’s good for my first pregnancy,” Ms Hall said.

“I don’t know much about pregnancy because it’s my first time so it’s good that I know that they’ll tell me what I have to do throughout my nine months.”

Others patients, like 23-year-old Natalia Moore-Deagan, return for their antenatal and diabetes checks, which they only access through the Danila Dilba clinic.

“One of the main reasons [I only come here] is they have Indigenous health workers,” she said.

Ms Moore-Deagan is in the last trimester of her third pregnancy and said she had learnt to improve her health during pregnancy.

“It’s good, it’s healthy, my whole pregnancy for three of my children now has been very healthy and no problems,” she said.

“I’ve learnt to eat healthy, drink healthy and also take my iron tablets.”

The clinic has diagnosed seven cases of gestational diabetes in the past six months and after going on to received treatment and education about diet and exercise, four of women had babies of a healthy weight.

“We’ve seen ladies come in with their first pregnancy they ended up on oral medication and the second pregnancy, they’re diet control so that’s a good step,” Sumaria Corpus said.

The senior gestational diabetes educator said she was working to treat pregnant women and also educate them to prevent future generation from developing diabetes and associated health problems.

“As we’re seeing a lot of young people, from the age of nine years onwards, with diabetes, so this is the best place to stop that chain effect, giving them the right information, giving them the right support so people can make a choice of change and that’s the biggest thing.”

While all the are in Canberra

our Delegates and at the enjoying  in Alice Springs

7. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

Watch Video and hear spoken word here

The TAC is an Aboriginal community organisation developed in the early 1970s and funded by the federal government since 1973. It was incorporated as the Aboriginal Information Service in November 1973 and changed its name to Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (TAC) in August 1977.TAC represents the political and community development aspirations of the Tasmanian Aboriginal community. For an account of its early development see here and here.

Some of its main achievements include:

  • Negotiation of Aboriginal land returns in 1995, 1999, 2005
  • Return of ancestral remains from overseas and Australian institutions
  • Legislative recognition of Aboriginal cultural fishing rights
  • Apology to the Tasmanian Stolen Generations
  • Financial compensation to members of the Stolen Generations
  • Negotiation of land purchases for community ownership
  • Establishment of a range of Aboriginal community services
  • Retrieval and revival of Tasmanian Aboriginal language
  • Improved accountability of Aboriginal heritage protection
  • Establishment of the only Aboriginal Registered Training Organisation in Tasmania
  • Establishment of Tasmanian government services to members of the Aboriginal community

We provide the following services:

  • Community advocacy
  • Cultural heritage programs including land based activities and camps
  • Emotional and social wellbeing programs
  • Exercise and nutrition programs
  • Housing advocacy and home buyers assistance
  • Land management programs on returned lands
  • Law reform and community legal education
  • Legal Service – see here
  • Music and cultural festivals
  • Nutrition advice
  • Palawa kani language retrieval and revival program
  • Prison visiting
  • Publications and publication support
  • Registered training for Aboriginal Health Workers and Cultural Heritage Workers
  • Youth diversion program

8. Winnunga ACT

 Launch Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service’s new Aboriginal Domestic Violence Safety Plan.

 ” New resources have been created for the ACT’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to better support victims and perpetrators of domestic and family violence.

Today I helped launch Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service’s new Aboriginal Domestic Violence Safety Plan.”

Deputy Chief Minister, Yvette Berry, says new resources have been created for the ACT’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to better support victims and perpetrators of domestic and family violence

Picture Above : From NACCHO TV Interview with Julie Tongs Watch Here

The initiative by Winnunga is one of twelve projects that received funding as part of the 2015-16 ACT Women’s Safety Grant Program.

With its $80,710 grant, Winnunga has taken a leading role in helping prevent abuse by developing six fact sheets for the ACT’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

These culturally sensitive resources will provide invaluable information about the support services available to both the victims and perpetrators of domestic and family violence.

The fact sheets will support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to be better informed.

There is much work still to be done as a community to provide more coordinated and effective support for victims, and to hold perpetrators to account. I look forward to continuing to work closely with Winnunga to help prevent domestic and family violence.

Winnunga received the largest grant from the 2015-16 ACT Women’s Safety Grant program, designed to assist community organisations play their part in eliminating domestic and family violence.

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