NACCHO #SaveADate 27 May @kwmlaw Virtual event / webinar : National Reconciliation Week 2020 #NRW2020 ” Conversations from The Heart ” #UluruStatement featuring Professor Megan Davis, Dean Parkin, Donnella Mills & Fiona McLeod AO SC

 ” The theme for National Reconciliation Week 2020 (#NRW2020) – In This Together – is now resonating in ways which could not have been foreseen when it was announced last year, but certainly reminds us that whether in a crisis or in reconciliation, we are all #InThisTogether.

In this special edition of Field Notes, KWM Community Impact’s webinar series, we are honoured to welcome Professor Megan Davis, Dean Parkin, Donnella Mills and Fiona McLeod AO SC for Conversations From The Heart. See Bio below “

In May 2017, the Uluru Statement from the Heart arose from a constitutional convention of 250 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander delegates achieving a consensus on Indigenous recognition. The Uluru Statement was an invitation to walk with and alongside Indigenous Australia.

KWM is pleased to facilitate a further conversation for our clients and our people, to coincide with #NRW2020, to explore the Uluru Statement, the concept of reconciliation and the empowerment of First Nations peoples.

See previous 40 + NACCHO Aboriginal health and Uluru statements posts

We will delve into what constitutional recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples might look like, the mechanics of constitutional reform, what reconciliation means for all Australians and the progress made, as well as what the justice system looks like on the frontline for First Australians.

Please join us for what will be an engaging, thought-provoking and memorable conversation.

Wednesday 27 May 2020
12.30pm to 1.30pm AEST

Webinar
Details to be sent the day prior to acceptances only

Please note to register replace the ” Donnella Mills ” info on the form with your own info 

REGISTER HERE

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear from some of Australia’s leading voices and acclaimed experts on Indigenous affairs, justice and reconciliation, as we gather for #NRW2020.

Our Panellists & Friends of KWM

Professor Megan Davis is Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous UNSW and a Professor of Law, UNSW Law. Professor Davis was elected by the UN Human Rights Council to UNEMRIP in 2017. Professor Davis currently serves as a United Nations expert with the UN Human Rights Council’s Expert Mechanism on the rights of Indigenous peoples based in UN Geneva. Megan is an Acting Commissioner of the NSW Land and Environment Court. Professor Davis is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences. She is a member of the NSW Sentencing Council and an Australian Rugby League Commissioner. Professor Davis was Director of the Indigenous Law Centre, UNSW Law from 2006-2016. Professor Davis is an expert consultant to KWM.

Dean Parkin is from the Quandamooka peoples from Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) in Queensland. He was involved in the negotiations leading to a Native Title determination in 2011 and continues to work with his community on this journey. Dean has a Bachelor of Arts (Politics and Journalism) from the University of Queensland. An experienced independent management consultant, Dean has worked across the public, corporate, not-for-profit and political sectors. He has advised a range of clients on strategy, engagement and co-design, including the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, Palladium, Coles, the Referendum Council and Jawun. In addition to extensive experience in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs, he has commercial experience both in Australia and the UK. Mr Parkin is also an expert consultant to KWM.

Donnella Mills is a proud Torres Strait Islander woman with ancestral and family links to Masig and Nagir. Donnella is a member of James Cook University Council, Director of Wuchopperen Health Service and Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation – NACCHO.  She is a Cairns-based lawyer with LawRight, a Community Legal Centre which coordinates the provision of pro-bono civil legal services to disadvantaged and vulnerable members of the community.  Donnella is currently the project lawyer for the Wuchopperen Health Justice Partnership. This innovative HJP is an exciting model of care providing access to justice in a community controlled setting, where lawyers and health professionals collaborate to achieve improved health, social, emotional and spiritual well-being outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

 

Our Moderator

 

Fiona McLeod AO SC is a Senior Counsel practising in the areas of commercial and public law matters. Fiona is a leader of the national and international legal profession having led the Law Council of Australia, Australian Bar Association, Victorian Bar and Australian Women Lawyers. In 2017 she devised and, with the support of a Steering Committee, led the Justice Project, a landmark research project undertaken by the Law Council into access to justice impacts on vulnerable groups in Australia launched in 2018. She was appointed to the Victorian Honour Roll of Women in 2014, was awarded the AWL Woman Lawyer of the Year in 2018 and she was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) in 2020.

NACCHO Aboriginal Community Control and #Justice Health : @NACCHOChair Donnella Mills full speech at the @_PHAA_   #JusticeHealth2019 Conference #ClosingtheGap #justicereinvestment

” Given ACCHOs commitment to providing services based on community identified needs, it is not surprising, then, to learn that we are starting to address justice inequities by developing innovative partnerships with legal services.

Health justice partnerships are similar to justice reinvestment in that they target disadvantaged population groups and are community led. They differ in that funding is not explicitly linked to correctional budgets and secondly, the primary population groups targeted through these partnerships are those people at risk of poor health.[i]

Health justice partnerships in the ACCHO context address people’s fears and distrust about the justice system, by providing a culturally safe setting in which to have conversations about legal matters.

I believe that the development of collaborative, integrated service models such as Law Yarn can provide innovative and effective solutions for addressing not only the overrepresentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the justice system, but also the health gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Selected extracts from Donnella Mills Acting Chair of NACCHO keynote speaker 9 April 

See PHAA #JusticeHealth2019 Website

Aboriginal community control and justice health

A justice target has been proposed to focus government efforts towards closing the gap on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ overrepresentation in the justice system.

Discussion of the role of community leadership to address this serious issue must begin with a commitment to self-determination, community control, cultural safety and a holistic response. Aboriginal community controlled health services understand the interplays between intergenerational trauma, the social determinants of health, family violence, institutional racism and contact with the justice system.

As trusted providers within their communities, they deliver services based on community identified needs.

The presentation explores how the principles, values and beliefs underpinning the Aboriginal community controlled health service model provide the foundations for preventing and reducing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the justice system

I would like to acknowledge that the land we meet on today is the traditional lands for the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation, and that we respect their spiritual relationship with their Country.

I also acknowledge the Gadigal people as the traditional custodians of this place we now call Sydney. Their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Gadigal people today.

This is also true for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples that are here this morning. We draw on the strength of our lands, our Elders past and on the lived experience of our community members.

For those who don’t know me, I am a proud Torres Strait Islander woman with ancestral and family links to Masig and Nagir.

I thank the Public Health Association of Australia for welcoming me here so warmly. I am delighted to be here today to share ideas with you on a topic that I care so deeply about.

Scene setting

Some of you may be aware that, late last month, a Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap was signed between the Council of Australian Governments and the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies.

The agreement sets out how governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives will work together on targets, implementation and monitoring arrangements for the Close the Gap strategy.

NACCHO and almost 40 other peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander bodies negotiated the terms and conditions of this historic agreement on the understanding that when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are included and have a real say in the design and delivery of services that impact on them, the outcomes are far better. This understanding informs the premise of my presentation.

I am here to talk to you about how the principles, values and beliefs underpinning the Aboriginal community controlled service model provide the foundations for preventing and reducing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the justice system.

But first, a little bit about NACCHO, for those of you who are unfamiliar with our work.

NACCHO, which stands for the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, is the national peak body representing 145 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations – ACCHOs – across the country, on Aboriginal health and wellbeing issues.

Our members provide about three million episodes of holistic primary health care per year for about 350,000 people.

In very remote areas, our services provide about one million episodes of care in a twelve-month period. Collectively, we employ about 6,000 staff (56 per cent whom are Indigenous), which makes us the single largest employer of Indigenous people in the country.

SLIDE 2: Rates of representation in prisons and youth detention facilities

It is timely to come together and consider justice health issues in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. It is likely that, for the first time, a justice target may be included in the Close the Gap Refresh strategy.

I am heartened to know that, for the first time, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies will guide the finalisation of targets and oversee the strategy’s implementation, monitoring and evaluation. I am hopeful that, for the first time, we can begin to address the issues and see some improvements.

All of you hear today will have read and heard the shocking statistics, the increasing rates of incarceration among Indigenous Australians.

Last month it was reported that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men are imprisoned at a rate 14.7 times greater than non-Indigenous men, and for women the rate is even higher, 21.2 times higher than non-Indigenous women.[ii]

Our women represent the fastest growing population group in prisons; their imprisonment rate is up 148% since 1991.[iii]

Imprisoning women affects the whole community. Children may be removed and placed in out-of-home care. Research has found there are links between detainees’ children being placed into out-of-home care and their subsequent progression into youth detention centres and adult correctional facilities.[iv] Communities suffer, and the cycle of intergenerational trauma and disadvantage is perpetuated.

Figures on the incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in detention facilities reveal alarmingly high trends of overrepresentation:

  • On an average night in the June quarter 2018, nearly 59% of young people aged 10–17 in detention were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, despite Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people making up only 5% of the general population aged 10–17.
  • Indigenous young people aged 10–17 were 26 times as likely as non-Indigenous young people to be in detention on an average night.[v]

A concerning factor is the link between disability and imprisonment. A Senate Inquiry found that about 98% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners also have a cognitive disability.[vi]

People living with physical disabilities such as hearing loss, and people with undiagnosed cognitive or psycho-social disabilities may struggle to negotiate the justice system and their symptoms are likely to be correlated with their offending behaviours, and receive punitive responses rather than treatment and care.

SLIDE 3: Overrepresentation – causal factors

Our experiences of incarceration are not only dehumanising. They contribute to our ongoing disempowerment, intergenerational trauma, social disadvantage, and burden of disease at an individual as well as community level. Indeed, ‘imprisonment compounds individual and community disadvantage.’[vii]

The question – why Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are overrepresented in prisons – is complex. It can partly be explained by exploring how structural, geographic, historic, social and cultural factors intersect and impact individuals’ lives.

While people have some agency in how they respond to the circumstances they are born into, they are also constrained by many generations’ experiences of marginalisation, discrimination, poverty and disadvantage. This is particularly relevant and disturbing when one considers Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ experiences in navigating the justice system.[viii]

Issues of access and equity also disadvantage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in their dealings with the justice system. Some of these may relate to their geographical location – remote and very remote regions have limited legal services. Given the limited service infrastructure available in remote settings, geography also determines people’s access to community based options.

Some of the other barriers faced by our people relate to the lack of language interpreters and inappropriate modes and technologies of communication. People have different levels of English language literacy and IT capacities. These factors can result in peoples’ experiences of structural discrimination in the justice system and result in miscarriages of justice.[ix]

We have heard of the over-policing of Indigenous Australians and how this impacts on their exposure to the justice system. In his submission to the Senate Inquiry into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experiences of law enforcement and justice services, Chief Justice Martin referred to ‘systemic discrimination’ through over-policing:

Aboriginal people are much more likely to be questioned by police than non-Aboriginal people. When questioned they are more likely to be arrested rather than proceeded against by summons. If they are arrested, Aboriginal people are much more likely to be remanded in custody than given bail. Aboriginal people are much more likely to plead guilty than go to trial, and if they go to trial, they are much more likely to be convicted. If Aboriginal people are convicted, they are much more likely to be imprisoned … and at the end of their term of imprisonment they are much less likely to get parole … So at every single step in the criminal justice process, Aboriginal people fare worse than non-Aboriginal people.[x]

There are other contributing factors that explain the overrepresentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the justice system. The inadequate resourcing of Aboriginal community controlled legal services plays a major role in the growing level of unmet need in communities.[xi] As noted by the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Services:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people don’t just need access to more legal services; they need greater access to culturally appropriate legal services. … Cultural competency is essential for effective engagement, communication, delivery of services and the attainment of successful outcomes.[xii]

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ experiences of institutional racism and discrimination, the trauma caused to members of the Stolen Generations and entire families and communities, which continues today with increasing numbers of children being placed in out-of-home care, contribute to the distrust, fear and unwillingness of many people to engage with legal services.

The Senate Inquiry into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experiences of law enforcement and justice services heard that ‘for Aboriginal people in particular, there is this historical fear of about walking into a legal centre’.[xiii]

Governments’ inertia and lack of commitment to genuinely addressing the issues have contributed to a worsening situation. The National Indigenous Law and Justice Framework 2009-2015 was never funded, attracted no buy in from state and territory governments, and the review findings of the Framework were never made public.

SLIDE 4: Justice reinvestment

Increasing funding for the corrective service sector will not and does not address the issue of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the justice system. As Allison and Cunneen note, ‘the solutions to offending are found within communities, not prisons.’[xiv] They are referring to justice reinvestment, a strategy and an approach, whereby correctional funds – a portion of money for prisons – are diverted back into disadvantaged communities.

The concept of justice reinvestment centres on the belief that imprisoning people does not address the causal factors that give rise to their exposure to the justice system. Ignoring the causal factors leads not only to recidivism and repeat incarceration, it also reproduces intergenerational cycles of disadvantage and exposure to the justice system.

Reinvesting the money into community identified and led solutions not only addresses causation; it also strengthens communities. Depending on the project, justice reinvestment may not only help to reduce people’s exposure to the justice system; it may also improve education, health, and employment outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Allison and Cunneen’s analysis of justice reinvestment projects in Northern Australia shows how the underpinning principles of this approach reaffirm self-determination and strengthen cultural authority and identity. Justice reinvestment projects address the driving factors of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ interactions with the justice system: their historical experiences of colonisation, discrimination, dispossession and disempowerment.[xv]

It is encouraging to note that in its 2016 report of the inquiry into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services, the Finance and Public Administration References Committee recommended that the Commonwealth Government support Aboriginal led justice reinvestment projects.[xvi] In December 2017, the Australian Law Reform Commission recommended that Commonwealth, state and territory governments should provide support for:

  • the establishment of an independent justice reinvestment body; and
  • justice reinvestment trials initiated in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.[xvii]

SLIDE 5: Closing the gap on justice outcomes: best practice approach

Emerging out of these inquiries is a growing understanding that closing the gap on justice outcomes must begin with a commitment to self-determination, community control, cultural safety and a holistic response.

Appropriately resourced, culturally safe, community controlled services are essential for addressing these barriers. Best practice approaches for developing solutions to preventable problems of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the justice system must begin with enabling their access to trusted services that are governed by principles and practices of self-determination, community control, cultural safety and a holistic response.[xviii]

NACCHO’s member services – the ACCHOs – embody these principles. The cultural safety in which ACCHOs’ services are delivered is a key factor in their success. They provide comprehensive primary care consistent with clients’ needs.

This includes home and site visits; provision of medical, public health and health promotion services; allied health, nursing services; assistance with making appointments and transport; help accessing child care or dealing with the justice system; drug and alcohol services; and providing help with income support.

The Aboriginal Community Controlled Health model of care recognises that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples require a greater level of holistic care due to the trauma and dispossession of colonisation, dispossession and discrimination, which are linked to our poor health outcomes and over-representation in prisons.

ACCHOs understand the interplays between intergenerational trauma, the social determinants of health, family violence, and institutional racism, and the risks these contributing factors carry in increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ exposure to the criminal justice system. We understand the importance of comprehensive health services that are trauma informed; and providing at risk families with early support. Within the principles, values and beliefs of the Aboriginal community controlled service model lie the groundwork for our communities’ better health outcomes.

SLIDE 6: Health justice partnerships

Given ACCHOs commitment to providing services based on community identified needs, it is not surprising, then, to learn that we are starting to address justice inequities by developing innovative partnerships with legal services.

Health justice partnerships are similar to justice reinvestment in that they target disadvantaged population groups and are community led. They differ in that funding is not explicitly linked to correctional budgets and secondly, the primary population groups targeted through these partnerships are those people at risk of poor health.[xix]

Health justice partnerships in the ACCHO context address people’s fears and distrust about the justice system, by providing a culturally safe setting in which to have conversations about legal matters.

In testimony given to a Senate Inquiry, an ACCHO representative describes how:

We form relationships with the health services and actually provide a legal service, for example, within the Aboriginal medical service. We have a lawyer embedded in the Aboriginal medical service in Mount Druitt so that when the doctor sees the person and they mention they have a housing issue – ‘I’m about to get kicked out of my place’ – they can say, ‘Go and see the lawyer that is in the office next door.’[xx]

ACCHOs are increasingly recognising the benefits of working with legal services to develop options that enable services to be delivered seamlessly, safely, and appropriately for their communities. Lawyers may be trained to work as part of a health care team or alternatively, health care workers may be upskilled to start a non-threatening, informal conversation about legal matters with the clients, which results in referrals to pro bono legal services.

 Case study: Law Yarn

As a lawyer and Chair of the Cairns-based Wuchopperen Health Service, I was aware of the need to provide better legal supports for my community. In conversations with local Elders and LawRight, Wuchopperen entered into a justice health partnership in 2016. LawRight is an independent, not-for-profit, community-based legal organisation which coordinates the provision of pro bono legal services for individuals and community groups.

The aim of the partnership was to improve health outcomes by enhancing access to legal rights and early intervention. Initially, it was decided that, as community member and lawyer employed by LawRight, I would provide the free legal services at Wuchopperen’s premises.

One of the challenges of justice health partnerships is ongoing funding, and in 2017 we were forced to close our doors for several months. We knew the partnership was addressing a real need in our community, so we submitted a funding proposal to the Queensland Government, and received funding of $55,000 to trial ‘Law Yarn’.

Law Yarn is a unique resource that supports good health outcomes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. It helps health workers to yarn with members of remote and urban communities about their legal problems and connect them to legal help. A handy how-to guide includes conversation prompts and advice on how to capture the person’s family, financial, tenancy or criminal law legal needs as well as discussing and recording their progress.

Representatives from LawRight, Wuchopperen Health Service, Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Service and the Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Legal Services came together and created a range of culturally safe resources based on LawRight’s successful Legal Health Check resources.

SLIDE 8: Law Yarn – your law story

SLIDE 9: Four aspects of Law

These symbols have been created to help identify and represent the four aspects of law that have been identified as the most concerning for individuals when presenting with any legal issues. If these four aspects can be discussed, both the Health worker and Lawyer can establish what the individual concerns are and effectively action a response.

Each symbol is surrounded by a series of 10 dots; these dots can be coloured in on both the artwork and the referral form by the Health worker to help establish what areas of law their clients have concerns with.

SLIDE 11: Launch of Law Yarn

Law Yarn was officially launched at Wuchopperen Health Service, Cairns, on 30 May 2018 by the Queensland Attorney General as a Reconciliation Week Event.

The trial has been funded to 30 June 2019 and will be comprehensively evaluated by independent academic researchers who specialise in this field.

Legal and health services throughout Australia have expressed interest in this holistic approach to the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. And we are hopeful that the evaluation findings will support the rollout of our model to ACCHOs across Australia.

In conclusion, I believe that the development of collaborative, integrated service models such as Law Yarn can provide innovative and effective solutions for addressing not only the overrepresentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the justice system, but also the health gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Address the legal problems, and you will have better health outcomes. Justice health partnerships provide a model of integrated service delivery that go to the heart of the social determinants of health, key causal factors contributing to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ over-exposure to the justice system.[xxi] With Aboriginal community control at the front and centre of service design, these partnerships are able to deliver both preventive law and preventive health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

SLIDE 12: Thank you

[i] Health Justice Australia. 2017. Integrating services; partnering with community. Submission to national consultation on Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

[ii] https://www.lawcouncil.asn.au/media/media-releases/recommendations-to-reduce-disproportionate-indigenous-incarceration-must-not-be-ignored

[iii] Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[iv]. Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[v] Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. 2018. Youth detention population in Australia. AIHW Bulletin 145.

[vi] Ibid., 2010 Senate Inquiry into hearing health in Australia.

[vii] Australian Human Rights Commission. 2009. Social Justice Report, pp. 53-54, cited in Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House.

[viii] Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[ix] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House; Law Council of Australia. 2018.

[x] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House. Testimony from Chief Justice Martin.

[xi] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House; Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[xii] National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service, Submission No. 109 to ALRC, 60, cited in Law Council of Australia. 2018. The Justice Project, Final Report – Part 1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

[xiii] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House, p. 31. Testimony from Ms Porteous, NACLC, Committee Hansard, 23 September 2015, p. 28.

[xiv] Allison, Fiona and Chris Cunneen. 2018. Justice Reinvestment in Northern Australia. The Cairns Institute Policy Paper Series, p. 5.

[xv] Allison, Fiona and Chris Cunneen. 2018. Justice Reinvestment in Northern Australia. The Cairns Institute Policy Paper Series, p. 8.

[xvi] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House.

[xvii] Australian Law Reform Commission. 2017. Pathways to Justice—An Inquiry into the Incarceration Rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, Final Report No 133, p. 17.

[xviii] Thorburn, Kathryn and Melissa Marshall. 2017. The Yiriman Project in the West Kimberley: an example of justice reinvestment? Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse, Current Initiatives Paper 5; McCausland, Ruth, Elizabeth McEntyre, Eileen Baldry. 2017. Indigenous People, Mental Health, Cognitive Disability and the Criminal Justice System. Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse. Brief 22; AMA Report Card on Indigenous Health 2015. Treating the high rates of imprisonment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as a symptom of the health gap: an integrated approach to both; Richards, Kelly, Lisa Rosevear and Robyn Gilbert. 2011. Promising interventions for reducing Indigenous juvenile offending Ibid. Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse, Brief 10.

[xix] Health Justice Australia. 2017. Integrating services; partnering with community. Submission to national consultation on Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

[xx] Finance and Public Administration References Committee. 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experience of law enforcement and justice services. The Senate: Australian Parliament House, p. 31. Testimony from Ms Hitter, Legal Aid NSW, Committee Hansard, 23 September 2015, p.28

[xxi] Ibid., p. 4; Chris Speldewinde and Ian Parsons. 2015. Medical-legal partnerships: connecting services for people living with mental health concerns. 13th National Rural Health Conference, Darwin; Barry Zuckerman, Megan Sandel, Ellen Lawton, Samantha Morton. Medical-legal partnerships: transforming health care. 2008. The Lancet, Vol 372.

Aboriginal Health #Budget2019 2 of 5 CEO Pat Turner NACCHO Press Release and @NACCHOChair Donnella Mills #NACCHOTV Interview : Funding for #IndigenousHealth Absent from Federal Budget

This weeks NACCHO Budget Coverage 

Post 1: NACCHO Intro #AusVotesHealth #Budget2019

Post 2: NACCHO Chair Press Release

Post 3:  Health Peak bodies Press Release summary

Post 4 : Government Press Releases

Post 5 : Opposition responses to Budget 2019 

Read all Budget 2019 Posts 

Part 1 Acting Acting Chair Donnella Mills discusses #Budget2019

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) is disappointed at the lack of funding allocated in the 2019-2020 federal budget for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services and the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector. 

The gap between the health outcomes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians will continue to persist unless there is a significant commitment to supporting the work of Aboriginal community controlled health organisations,

NACCHO has long called for an increase to the baseline funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to support the sustainable delivery of high quality, comprehensive primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities. 

We know that closing the gap will never be achieved until primary health care services are properly funded and our clinics have good infrastructure and are fit for purpose; until our people are living in safe and secure housing; until there are culturally safe and trusted early intervention services available for our children and their families; and until our psychological, social, emotional and spiritual needs are acknowledged and supported.

The physical and mental health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities needs to be a priority for the Australian government. Our communities suffer disproportionately higher rates of suicide, cancer, kidney disease and obesity compared to non-Indigenous Australians,”

We are disappointed that the Federal funding commitment does not match this critical need,” she said.

We call on the all political parties to put Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and full funding of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector at the heart of their election commitments. ” 

Pat Turner CEO NACCHO

Read and or DOWNLOAD Full NACCHO Budget Press Release Here

News from #NACCHOagm2017 143 #ACCHO members vote in new NACCHO Chair and Deputy Chair

At the 2017 NACCHO Members AGM here in Canberra yesterday 143 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations operating 302 ACCHO clinics throughout Australia voted Mr John Singer from South Australia the new NACCHO Chair and Ms Donnella Mills from Cairns his new Deputy Chair.

Outgoing Chair Matthew Cooke from Queensland and his Deputy Sandy Davies from WA congratulated the new chair and deputy who in return presented both Matthew and Sandy with special gifts from the members for their  many years of service to the NACCHO board

All Photos Colin Cowell and above Geoff Bagnall

A formal media press release will be released next week but in the interim here are some background notes on both John and Donnella

John Singer Chair Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia

Photo above : John Singer has a strong interest in Aboriginal Male Health and in 2013 was the co founder of our annual NACCHO Ochre Day event

John’s family is from Ngaangtjara, Pitjantjatjara and Yankunyatjara Lands, which is the cross border area of Northern Territory, South Australia and Western Australia.

He began working in community control at the Ceduna Koonibba Aboriginal Health Service where he started his health worker training, which he later completed in the late 1980s with the Nganampa Health Council.

John worked in Community Administration from 1989 to 1996 at Iwantja, Fregon, Pukatja and Papunya. In 1997, he became the Manager of Iwantja Clinic, which is one of Nganampa Health Council’s clinics.
In 2000, he was appointed Director of the Nganampa Health Council and still holds this position.

Over the years, John has participated on several Boards and Committees, including NACCHO. Was on the Board of the Aboriginal Health Council of SA Inc. (a representative since 1998 and Chairperson 2005, 2006–2009), Country Health SA, and the Anangu Remote Health Alliance (influential in establishing this group in 2005; Chairperson 2005 and 2006).

He has a good understanding of governance, community control and government structures, and is very committed to improving the health and well being of Aboriginal people.
” The Deadly Choices program’s intent is to provide a measurable difference in addressing Aboriginal health issues. 

“Aboriginal people have far higher mortality rates than the average population and die at much younger ages. Despite government intentions to ‘close the gap’, the problem isn’t getting any better,

Chronic disease and preventable health conditions are taking a toll on our communities and we need to find innovative ways to move the dial toward better health outcomes.

We hope, with support from the Port Adelaide Football Club, our Deadly Choices initiative will encourage our young people to take responsibility and stop smoking, stay active and look after their own wellbeing, and that of their families.”

Aboriginal Health Council of SA chairperson John Singer talking national partnerships (pictured above )

SEE NACCHO POST HERE

BACKGROUND : Donnella Mills Chair Wuchopperen Health Service: 

 Donnella as a LawRight lawyer presented at #NACCHOagm2017 on the current practices and highlights of the Wuchopperen Health Justice Partnership

Health Justice Partnerships

Building on Wuchopperen Health Service’s comprehensive suite of services, March 2016 saw the commencement of the Wuchopperen Health Justice Partnership through a partnership with LawRight (formerly Queensland Public Interest Law

Clearing House). LawRight is an independent community legal centre delivering services throughout Queensland.

Evidence confirms that health needs and legal needs often overlap, and legal advocacy improves social conditions which impact on people’s health — legal issues such as housing, income, decision-making frameworks and access to legal rights.

‘Virtually all legal needs (ranging from housing to domestic violence) are directly or proximally connected to health status.’ [Zuckerman, Sandel, Lawton & Morton, The Lancet 2008]. A Health

Justice Partnership provides ‘holistic legal assistance to vulnerable people in a health care setting’. [Health Justice Australia 2016,

http://www.healthjustice.org.au/what-are-health-justice-partnerships%5D.

Health Justice Partnerships are effective models of service delivery for disadvantaged communities, as evidence confirms that most vulnerable people do not or cannot access legal services directly.

Moreover, addressing legal issues in a health setting enables holistic, client-centred practices.

Since 2016, LawRight and Wuchopperen have built the capacity of each other’s staff and community to identify health harming legal needs and positively impacted over 200 patients. The Queensland

Department of Justice and Attorney-General have further invested in this model to evaluate its impact, to develop culturally appropriate resources and to collaborate effectively with