NACCHO Affiliate and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : National watch Pat Turner #QANDA #NSW GWAMS @ahmrc #VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @Apunipima @DeadlyChoices #WA Wirraka Maya #SA #NT @MiwatjHealth #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #TAS

1.1 National : Did you miss our CEO Pat Turner on Q and A this week ? Watch HERE

1.2 National :  Keynote speakers announced for NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference 2019 in Melbourne next week Has your ACCHO Registered ?

1.3 National : ACCHO’s invited to attend Health Data Portal Co-design Workshops: September – October 2019

1.4 National iSISTAQUIT “implement Supporting Indigenous Smokers To Assist Quitting” program is starting now, and we need your help and ideas – so here is how you can help us.

2.I NSW : The ANFPP team at Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service hosted morning tea with the Aunties from Baabayn

2.2 NSW : AH&MRC launches new website 

3.VIC : VACCHO and the Aboriginal breast screening project in partnership with BreastScreen Victoria.

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Baby One Program health worker training

4.2 QLD : AFL Brisbane Lions superstar leads Deadly Choices campaign to increase 715 Health Checks 

5. SA : The Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement, Dr Roger Thomas, is commencing State-wide consultation to seek the views of Aboriginal communities to improve relations between government and Aboriginal people.

6.WA : Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

7. NT : Check out what the awesome Miwatj Health AMS TIS team in Gapuwiyak have been up to over the recent school holiday break.

8. ACT : Ms Julie Tongs, CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service has calls on Ms Rosie Batty AO to assist with advocacy

9. TAS : Heather Sculthorpe NAIDOC Speech 2019

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Did you miss our CEO Pat Turner on Q and A this week ? Watch here

WATCH HERE

Panellists: Linda Burney, Shadow Minister for Indigenous Australians; Julian Leeser, Co-Chair of Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition; Jacinta Price, Director of Indigenous Program, CIS; Patricia Turner, CEO of National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation; and Sally Scales, Uluru Statement Delegate. (who replaced Noel Pearson at the last moment )

 From transcript panellist Pat Turner, a legendary figure in Indigenous affairs:

“We survived here for 60,000 years before the last 200 and we’ve been devastated more in the last 200-plus than the 60,000 years before that … we want to have the right to share the power and to make the decisions about the future of our people in our own country.”

Jacinta Price thought the debate “distracts us from what’s really going on” – issues such as violence and suicide in Indigenous communities.

Pat Turner shot back.

A distraction?

“It hasn’t distracted me because we’re working very hard to close the gap. And to ensure that Aboriginal voices are at the table in negotiations with government as equals.”

She concluded: “We’re waiting for no one. We’re getting on with the job.”

1.2 National :  Keynote speakers announced for NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference 2019 in Melbourne next week Has your ACCHO Registered ?

We are very fortunate this year to have an illustrious line-up of speakers and are expecting to host around 200 male delegates from across the country.

 The conference aims to increase access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males to primary health care services, and participation in healthy lifestyle activities within the community.”

Mr John Paterson, CEO of Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) and spokesperson for OCHRE DAY

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) will hold its seventh annual Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference on 29-30 August at Pullman On the Park, Melbourne.

This year’s conference will focus on three aspirational topics around Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men being: in-control, innovative and influential.

The NACCHO Ochre Day Conference is an important event that draws attention to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health issues and their impact on their social and emotional health in a holistic way.  The enduring theme for the conference is – Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It!

The NACCHO Ochre Day Conference was established in 2012 to provide a strategic focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health issues in a holistic way

Read or Download  full press release here

For further information on the conference and to register online, click here.

1.3 National : ACCHO’s invited to attend Health Data Portal Co-design Workshops: September – October 2019

A series of co-design workshops will be conducted around Australia during September and October 2019. The co-design workshops will allow health service representatives to:

  • Gather input for future nKPI, OSR, HCP and QLIK Interactive Report enhancements based on your July-August 2019 reporting experience; and
  • Discuss Stage 2 OSR requirements and how to effectively gather the required data.

Co-design workshop locations, dates and venue details are set out here :

How to register for a co-design workshop

An Eventbrite invitation was sent to all health services on 26 July 2019. If you would like an invitation sent to you please send us your name and email address to indigenousreporting@health.gov.au. Seats are strictly limited and fill up quickly so please register ASAP.

Cost:

Like all previous Portal co-design workshops conducted in 2017, 2018 and February-March 2019, travel, accommodation and expenses to attend a co-design workshop is at your health services’ expense.

Do you have other colleagues who want to attend?

This email invitation can only be used by you. If you want a colleague to attend, please email us their name and email address to indigenousreporting@health.gov.au

Please note that due to a high level of interest we request that no more than two people from your health service attend, where possible. This will ensure we have a wide representation from the sector attending the co-design workshops.

Not able to attend?

Consultation is an important part of developing the Portal. If you are unable to attend a co-design workshop, you can still contribute. Details of how to do this will be communicated to you soon.

More Information:

If would like more information about the co-design workshops, please contact us at indigenousreporting@health.gov.au

1.4 National iSISTAQUIT “implement Supporting Indigenous Smokers To Assist Quitting” program is starting now, and we need your help and ideas – so here is how you can help us.

Our focus is to improve health providers’ (HP) provision of smoking cessation care for pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Download the full poster

Poster-iSISTAQUIT call for resources

We are currently developing our training materials into an on-line format, making social media resources, and exploring effective ways of recruiting services.

Register your interest: We invite Aboriginal Health Services, Tackling Indigenous Smoking Sites, and Mainstream Health Services to be Partner Services of the iSISTAQUIT team in implementing iSISTAQUIT, to take the iSISTAQUIT_survey or email iSISTAQUIT@newcastle.edu.au and we will arrange a call or zoom meeting

Become an Advisor: We are looking for Advisors to support us developing:

  1. a) The online training format for Health Professionals and /or
  2. b) The social media campaign.

Send us your resources: To develop the media campaign, we are looking for resources that are provided to pregnant women to support smoking cessation (print, digital, video or social media).

If you have developed resources or have examples that you give to pregnant women or ideas for messages for quitting in pregnancy, please contact us and/or send your resources iSISTAQUIT@newcastle.edu.au

2. I NSW : The ANFPP team at Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service AHS hosted morning tea with the Aunties from Baabayn

The Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) is a nurse-led home visiting program that supports women pregnant with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander child to help them become the best mum possible.

ANFPP mums are offered support and guidance during early pregnancy and on into their baby’s infancy and toddlerhood. The ANFPP is an important early investment in the future of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in local communities.

We are part of the Australian Government’s commitment to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

It was a great morning yarning about the program and showing them around our new office.

2.2 NSW : AH&MRC launches new website 

The AH&MRC Board of Directors and staff are delighted to announce the launch of our new website. The website is the next phase of the AH&MRC rebrand, with the logo being announced in September 2018.

VIEW new website HERE

“We have gone through a transition period and we now have a clear direction of our organisation, with a website as the representation.” says Scott Monaghan, Chairperson of the Board of AH&MRC

The AH&MRC website has been created to promote success stories from the sector, job openings and local events, professional learning opportunities, accredited courses, research development and more.

“We want members and the community to use the website to keep up to date.” concluded Mr Monaghan.

The August Edition of Message Stick is out now!

Read about the new AH&MRC website, the Closing the Gap on Indigenous Health Conference, the PHN and ACCHS Roundtable and opportunities to work with AH&MRC and our members.

Read more here >> http://bit.ly/33QDlw8

3.1 VIC : VACCHO and the Aboriginal breast screening project in partnership with BreastScreen Victoria.

Our COO Helen Kennedy and Susan Forrester are with Gina Bundle from The Womens at our ICAP Forum modeling one of the many breastscreening shawls currently being designed by so many of our incredible women around Victoria. this Aboriginal breastscreening project is done in partnership with BreastScreen Victoria.

Gunditj Corp staff members Charmaine Clarke and Sherry Johnstone with our Susan Forrester showing off the incredible artworks created by local Gunditjmara women that will be used in our Aboriginal breastscreening shawl project with BreastScreen Victoria

These beautiful shawls will be used to keep our women culturally safe and strong during screening sessions.

If you want to know more about this project contact us on 03 9411 9411.

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Baby One Program health worker training

In a recent edition of Apunipima ACCHO Cape Capers there was mention of the training taking place at the Cairns office, with the Nutritionist Team providing workshops based around increasing knowledge on nutrition in the communities for pregnant women, mums and infants.

The Baby One Program and Bump 2 Bubba teams took on meaningful discussions, cooking sessions, team building exercises and workshops around ways to improve resources and processes in getting the ‘better health’ message across.

It was clear that the group provided valuable ideas for the future and gained more insights into what will be key messages for the Cape’s future health.

4.2 QLD : AFL Brisbane Lions superstar leads Deadly Choices campaign to increase 715 Health Checks 

5. SA : The Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement, Dr Roger Thomas, is commencing State-wide consultation to seek the views of Aboriginal communities to improve relations between government and Aboriginal people.  

Dr Thomas has already undertaken some targeted consultation with Aboriginal stakeholders.

This has developed an engagement reform proposal for his State-wide consultation.

Premier Steven Marshall committed in his Aboriginal Affairs Action Plan released in December 2018 to develop a model to facilitate and enable better engagement between the Government and Aboriginal communities and for Aboriginal views to be more represented in government decision-making.

The Premier said it was critical that the views of Aboriginal peoples were heard across all levels of government.

“I am committed to ensuring Aboriginal South Australians are adequately represented in the decisions that affect them,” said the Premier.

Dr Thomas urged Aboriginal South Australians to get involved in the consultation process.

“I encourage all Aboriginal people, communities and organisations to share their views, by attending a consultation session, or to provide written feedback on the recommended model,” Dr Thomas said.

The Commissioner has developed eleven draft guiding principles as a reference point for the discussion and development of potential models of Aboriginal engagement:

Once the Commissioner has consulted with Aboriginal communities over the coming three months, a report will be presented to the Premier for Cabinet to consider.

Aboriginal South Australians are encouraged to have their say during the consultation process, and can do so via a number of channels:

1. Attend a consultation:

The Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement will visit many sites across South Australia, and lead the consultation with Aboriginal people, organisations and representatives, over the next three months. To find out more information about the Commissioner’s visits across South Australia, arrange a meeting, or to request more information, contact the Office of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement (OCAE) or visit dpc.sa.gov.au/aboriginal-engagement

2. Provide written feedback:

Feedback Forms will be provided at all the consultation meetings. Alternatively, you may submit your feedback online. Detailed written submissions are also welcome and can be emailed to the Office of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement at AboriginalEngagement@sa.gov.au

3.Call

Office of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement:

Free call: 1800 931 733

6.1 WA : Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

Recently it was Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Awareness Day, and we’re sharing the last story in our series profiling inspirational people leading the charge to make FASD history in the Pilbara in collaboration with Telethon Kids, BHP Western Australia and Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation.

Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD, through supporting their partners not to drink during pregnancy.

After watching, please SHARE this video with your networks to help raise awareness of the role that men can play in the prevention of #FASD.

7.1 NT : Check out what the awesome Miwatj Health AMS TIS team in Gapuwiyak have been up to over the recent school holiday break.

Listen up! Come check out what our awesome TIS team in Gapuwiyak have been up to over the school holiday break. It’s great to see djamarrkuli have fun and learn about ngarali (tobacco) and healthy lifestyles.

And sports

Miwatj AMS TIS worker Thomas Guyula from Gapuwiyak, is passionate about educating and helping people understand the dangers of smoking!

8. ACT : Ms Julie Tongs, CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service has calls on Ms Rosie Batty AO to assist with advocacy

Ms Julie Tongs, CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service has called  on Ms Rosie Batty AO, to use her address at the annual EMILY’s List Oration to be held in Canberra on Wednesday 21 August to urge the ACT Government to reverse its decision to defund the ACT Legal Aid Commission’s specialist family violence service.

Julie Tongs noted that Aboriginal women are vastly over-represented as victims of crime including as victims of domestic violence. She said:

“The most recent data reveals an Aboriginal woman is 35 times more likely to be hospitalised due to domestic violence related assault than a non-Aboriginal woman.”

Julie Tongs further noted the Legal Aid Commission has assisted hundreds of women a year, including many Aboriginal women, who have been subjected to violence and abuse.

Download the full Press Release HERE

WNAHCS Media Release 2019 – Rosie Batty

9. TAS : Heather Sculthorpe NAIDOC Speech 2019

The national theme for NAIDOC this year is Voice, Treaty, Truth. This is a summary of the Aboriginal community demands in the Statement From The Heart developed at Uluru 2 years ago.

Achieving these goals, based on the recognition of Aboriginal people in the Australian Constitution, is regarded by some as the basis for reconciliation – as enabling Aborigines and non-Aborigines to move forward together towards a better future.

The proposal for a ‘Voice to Parliament’ is the most controversial of these demands. The former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull immediately dismissed the idea calling it a third chamber of the federal Parliament: the Senate, the House of Representatives, and the Aboriginal Voice. In fact it would have only the power to advise and so would be less a decision making body than the former Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission which did have some power to determine policy and make financial decisions.

Instead of the risky business of trying to get changes agreed to the Australian Constitution, many are now advocating State level treaty making as a means of changing the power imbalance between Aboriginal people and the State. That would have to go very much further than the simple wording changes to State Constitutions made by the Tasmanian Parliament and others which simply state the obvious fact that Aborigines were the first people of this country.

A treaty would need to cover matters like the return of lands, a guaranteed income through a share of the gross domestic product of the country or a similar formula, and protections for Aboriginal language and culture. The benefits of a treaty were summed up by Michael Mansell in his book about treaty and statehood as follows:

Aboriginal communities need essential and fundamental tools to replicate what once was – an ordered, civilised, united Aboriginal society that took care of its own and managed its affairs – and restore it in a modern world. The fundamental tools needed include land ownership, empowerment, financial guarantees, cultural integrity and self-determination. The longer Aboriginals are denied these essential assets the longer we will see despair and frustration, and the more we will have to revisit the consequences of disadvantage.

We would expect these fundamental requirements to be additional to basic services provided to everyone in Australia like health, housing and education. These service areas are still failing Aboriginal people, starting from the significant gap in life expectancy.

How do we reach equivalent life outcomes for our people without becoming just like white people, without becoming assimilated into the values and lifestyle of those who invaded our lands and nearly destroyed our people?

We start by the truth-telling referred to in the Uluru Statement. We’ve seen the beginning of that process in the massacre mapping of the continent by Dr Lyndall Ryan and others, decades after the first version of Lyndall’s book on Aboriginal Tasmania was published. We see it increasingly in the story telling of Aboriginal writers, play wrights and song writers like puralia meenamatta/Jim Everett, Cheryl Mundy, Nathan Maynard, and Dewayne Everett-Smith. And in the art works and photographs of Ricky Maynard, Janice Ross Lowery Maynard, Rodney Gardner and many others. And now in the curriculum materials in Tasmanian schools through the highly praised ORB multi-media package.

Truth telling must start with being clear that this country and this State were not settled peacefully but through violence and treachery. In our case, the treachery occurred when our Old People were persuaded to give up their guerrilla war against the invaders and board the boats bound for Flinders Island. They were persuaded that this was the only way to prevent the rest of their people being slaughtered and that they would soon return to their home lands. Instead most of them died on Flinders Island.

This is how Walter George Arthur described the treachery in 1846, writing from Wybalena on Flinders to Queen Victoria in London, England:

The humble petition of the free Aborigines Inhabitants of Van Diemen’s Land now living upon Flinders Island …That we are your free children that we were not taken prisoners but freely gave up our country to Colonel Arthur then the Governor after defending ourselves, Your petitioners humbly state to your Majesty that Mr Robinson [George Augustus] made for us and with Colonel Arthur an agreement that we have not lost from our minds since and we have made our part of it good. Your petitioners humbly tell Your Majesty that when we left our own place we were plenty of people, we are now but a little one.

In any normal human understanding, this must surely be an undertaking to make a peaceful settlement with a treaty. Lutruwita/Tasmania is well over due to make good on this promise. And not just any promise: an undertaking between equal sovereigns.

What the Education Department’s ORB lacks is Aboriginal decision making and control, things that the national Coalition of Peak Close the Gap organisations has stressed to be every bit as important as targets and indicators. As recognised by the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody nearly 3 decades ago, it is the lack of Aboriginal control and decision making that has resulted in the disparities in life outcomes so prevalent today. Let’s keep in mind that this is the main area that needs to improve if we are to get anywhere near reconciliation in this country.

We are very pleased that so many people keeping coming back year after year to help us mark the start of NAIDOC week. In the future we may be able to use this occasion to celebrate together but for now at least we must use the occasion as a reminder that we still have a long way to go.

Nayri nina-tu.

Heather Sculthorpe

 

 

NACCHO and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : @NACCHOChair #NAIDOC2019 theme speaks to NACCHO’s priorities #voice, #treaty and #truth Plus Feature @DeadlyChoices #QLD #NSW #VIC  #WA #NT #SA #ACT  #TAS  

1.1 National : NACCHO Press Release : NAIDOC week theme speaks to NACCHO’s priorities voice, treaty and truth.

1.2 National : Our CEO Pat Turner meets with Northern Land Council to highlight the work of the Coalition of Peaks / Closing the Gap 

1.3 National : OCHRE Day Registrations open for the National Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne August 29 to 30 

  2.1 NSW  : AH&MRC  Communique to Stakeholders: AH&MRC Acting Chief Executive Arrangements

2.2 Katungul ACCHO : It pays in more ways than one to have a 715 Health Check

2.3 NSW : Survey of Aboriginal patient experience people admitted to NSW public hospitals.

3.1 VIC : VACCHO meets with the Victorian Minister of Mental Health 

3.2 VIC : VAHS would like to congratulate our staff member Chris Saunders who was crowned Mr. NAIDOC 2019.

FEATURE 4. QLD : Queensland’s Indigenous life expectancy gap is now the lowest in Australia, shows the overall positive impact the Brisbane-based Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) Deadly Choices is having among communities

5.1 WA : Aboriginal health Research Alliance in Kimberley big winners with Lotterywest grant of $2,920,185

5.2 WA : KAMS Aboriginal youth representatives met with Roger Cook MLA to share recommendations from Empowered Young Leaders forums in the Kimberley.

6. SA : AHCSA proudly launch their newest and deadliest resource, the ‘Deadly Sights’, a Communicare and MBS guide for the ACCHO Sector.

7. NT AMSANT’S 25 YEARS of health leadership conference 7-8 August 2019, Alice Springs 

8. ACT The June 2019 edition 17 pages of the Winnunga AHCS Newsletter is available

9.TAS : NAIDOC events in nipaluna ( Hobart ) and pataway ( Launceston )

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 NACCHO Press Release : NAIDOC week theme speaks to NACCHO’s priorities #voice, #treaty and #truth

“ NACCHO encourages the government to accelerate the call for a Voice to Parliament and supports a Makarrata Commission to supervise the treaty process as necessary steps towards true reconciliation. The voice will respond to both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s exclusion from the constitution and will help include our say in the development of significant laws and policies that affect our lives.

We work with Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) across the nation for the sustainable delivery of comprehensive primary healthcare services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.  Over the years, we have seen the increased accessibility and quality of services and medicines across states and territories.

It is our collective challenge along with our Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services sector to make a real difference in Closing the Gap. As we celebrate NAIDOC week, let’s continue our national conversations around voice and treaty grounded in truth-telling. Speaking truth to our country’s past will lay a strong foundation for a brighter, stronger and more equitable future for all.”

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills said, “The NAIDOC theme speaks to NACCHO’s priorities. Having an Indigenous voice to Parliament is an important step in protecting and ensuring the interests of Indigenous communities are represented at the highest levels of government

Download or read the NACCHO Press Release HERE

NACCHO NAIDOC Week 2019 Media Statement FINAL (1)

 

1.2 National : Our CEO Pat Turner meets with Northern Land Council to highlight the work of the Coalition of Peaks / Closing the Gap

Left to right :  NLC CEO Marion Scrymgour, NACCHO CEO Pat Turner and NLC Senior Policy Trish Rigby 

Left to right  : NLC Chairman Sam Bush-Blanasi, NACCHO CEO Pat Turner , NLC Deputy Chairman John Christopherson and AMSANT CEO John Paterson

2.3 National : OCHRE Day Registrations open for the National Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne August 29 to 30

Registrations for this year’s Ochre Day Men’s Conference are now live!

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Ochre Day Men’s Health conference provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to share knowledge, design concepts and strengthen relationships that all work to directly improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men..

To register for this year’s Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference in Melbourne, please proceed to follow the below link.

Ochre Day Accommodation

To take advantage of the Ochre Day conference room rates which have been arranged with Pullman on The Park, Melbourne, please proceed to follow the link below.

NACCHO OCHRE DAY WEBSITE 

2.1 NSW  : AH&MRC  Communique to Stakeholders: AH&MRC Acting Chief Executive Arrangements

Dear Stakeholders,

On the 3rd of July 2019, interviews will be taking place for the recruitment to the Chief

Executive Officer position at the AH&MRC until such time as the appointment is finalised the following arrangements are in place, Ms Tania Brown will be acting as the Chief Executive Officer and Mr Avnit Raj will be acting as the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of the AH&MRC.

On behalf of the AH&MRC Board of Directors and the staff at the AH&MRC we would like to thank Raylene for her dedication, direction and commitment that she has provided to the

AH&MRC and we wish Raylene all the best and great success as the Chief Executive Officer of Awabakal Aboriginal Medical Service.

2.2 Katungul ACCHO : It pays in more ways than one to have a 715 Health Check

Congratulations to Kaiden Fernando and Sean Kinchela who are the winners of Katungul’s Deadly Choices Deadly Blues Origin experience.

Kaiden and Sean had their 715 Health Check at Katungul, picked up a Deadly Blues jersey and automatically went into the draw to win an all expenses paid trip to Sydney to see the final State of Origin game this month.

Pictured: Katungul Admin Team Leader, Cherie Russel and Director of Community Services, Angela Nye draw the winners today in our Batemans Bay clinic!

2.3 NSW : Survey of Aboriginal patient experience people admitted to NSW public hospitals.

BHI and the Centre for Aboriginal Health are working together to collect the experiences and outcomes of care for Aboriginal people admitted to NSW public hospitals.

For the first time, every adult patient who identifies as Aboriginal will be invited to provide feedback on their admitted patient or maternity care experience during 2019.

The Adult Admitted Patient Survey asks Aboriginal people who have recently been admitted to a NSW public hospital for feedback about their experiences of care. This survey is mailed out to people about three months after the end of their hospital stay.

The Maternity Care Survey asks Aboriginal women who recently gave birth in a NSW public hospital about the care they received. This survey is mailed out to women about three months after their baby is delivered.

The results of these surveys will provide hospitals with valuable information about what they are doing well and where they can improve care to better meet the needs of Aboriginal people.

BHI previously published a Patient Perspectives report on the experiences of care for Aboriginal people, which drew on data from almost 2,700 Aboriginal patients who were admitted to a NSW public hospital in 2014.

Healthcare in Focus 2017 examined healthcare in the context of three important dimensions of performance – accessibility, appropriateness and effectiveness – for more than 60 measures and one third of these measures related to the experiences and outcomes of Aboriginal people.

To find out about upcoming releases of survey results that reflect the experiences of Aboriginal people, please refer to our Reports Plan.

3.1 VIC : VACCHO meets with the Victorian Minister of Mental Health 

Acting CEO of VACCHO Trevor Pearce and Hon. Martin Foley Minister for Mental Health met this week to confirm new resourcing so VACCHO can support Community consultations into the Royal Commission in Mental Health Services.

Trevor believes that we need “…to support strong Aboriginal voices and input.”

See background story Melbourne’s Indigenous people in grips of mental health crisis

3.2 VIC : VAHS would like to congratulate our staff member Chris Saunders who was crowned Mr. NAIDOC 2019.

VAHS sponsored Chris to participate as an candidate in this year’s Mr. NAIDOC.

VAHS would also like to congratulate all other winners and all the nominees from last night’s event. No doubt all the winners will make the Victorian Aboriginal Community proud during NAIDOC 2019.

Sports Person – Marissa Williamson
Miss NAIDOC – Yirgjhilya Lawrie
Mr NAIDOCs – Chris Saunders
NAIDOC Patron Uncle Jack Charles

*Photo source – 3KND

4. QLD : Queensland’s Indigenous life expectancy gap is now the lowest in Australia, shows the overall positive impact the Brisbane-based Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) Deadly Choices is having among communities

The State Government’s 2018 Closing the Gap report card, which indicates Queensland’s Indigenous life expectancy gap is now the lowest in Australia, shows the overall positive impact the Brisbane-based Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) is having among communities.

IUIH’s flagship Deadly Choices engagement and health promotion program is considered the most recognised Indigenous brand in Australia, and welcomed almost 600 participants at this year’s Junior Murri Carnival, which started this week at Brendale’s South Pine Sporting Complex.

The inaugural 2-day Junior and Senior Murri Netball Carnival began Thursday at the State Netball Centre in Nathan.

As with all Deadly Choices initiatives, mandatory health checks need to have taken place before confirmation of each individual registration to these free events.

The directive is one wholeheartedly supported by notable Deadly Choices Ambassadors, former Brisbane Broncos, Queensland and Australian rugby league players Steve Renouf and Petero Civoniceva, plus fellow former NRL Dally M Player of the Year Preston Campbell.

The trio will be joined by another former NRL representative and newly appointed Deadly Choices Ambassador, Brenton Bowen; Olympic weightlifter, Brandon Wakeling; NRLW representative, Tallisha Harden; former Olympic sprinter Patrick Johnson, plus Reds rugby players Moses Sorovi and Duncan Paia’aua.

“Participation in any Deadly Choices program requires individuals to commit to a comprehensive health check and complementing health management plan, so there’s strong health values associated with the brand,” confirmed Renouf.

“This is a brilliant school holiday initiative which has become one of our most frequented events among local communities.

“We get real outcomes across the whole spectrum of the community; from infants, adolescents and our elders, everyone is positively affected.

“This program enables us to motivate kids into ideal lifestyle choices with respect to nutrition, exercise and education.”

There’s added anticipation surrounding the future successes of the Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival, as youngsters aged 3-4 years are already being indoctrinated into the Deadly Choices ways, through the highly successful Deadly Kindies Program.

Over a 12-month period (2017-18), this initiative recorded 300 percent increases in kindy enrolments across Queensland, which is music to the ears of Deadly Kindies Ambassador, Johnathon Thurston.

‘I’m a Dad to four little ones and I know just how important Kindy is,’ confirmed Thurston.

‘At Kindy our kids get to play and learn and get ready to go to school.’

Education is a vital pillar in the pro-active health pursuits of Deadly Choices, which is assisting IUIH to provide a national blueprint towards greater life expectancy among Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

“Deadly Choices is well engrained within communities throughout South-east Queensland, ensuring members are healthy, active and obviously educated around what needs to be done to be living a very healthy lifestyle for themselves and their families,” added Civoniceva.

“Programs like the Junior Murri Carnival will hopefully light the fire within our little people in what they want to achieve in life and make positive steps towards achieving those goals and chasing their dreams.”

Testament to this mantra is Preston Campbell, who despite his diminutive frame escalated himself to cult status in the NRL, claiming the 2001 Dally M Player-of-the-Year title and securing a 2003 premiership ring with the Penrith Panthers.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices,” confirmed Campbell.

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back. I love being at events like the Junior Murri Carnival, spending time and staying connected with community.”

The Netball component to this year’s Junior Murri Carnival will take place as a stand-alone event at the home of the Queensland Firebirds, the all-new Queensland State Netball Centre in Nathan.

Held on July 5-6, the junior girls will participate in clinics and educational sessions with the Firebirds and Deadly Choices teams, before participating in the Netball Carnival on the final day of the event.

The inaugural Senior Open Women’s competition will run alongside the juniors, with major plans being discussed towards greater participation in 2020 and beyond.

5.1 WA : Aboriginal health Research Alliance in Kimberley big winners with Lotterywest grant of $2,920,185

  • Lotterywest has awarded a grant of $2,920,185 towards the establishment of the Kimberley Aboriginal Health Research Alliance
  • Alliance aims to co-ordinate research and improve health in the Kimberley region

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt has welcomed the establishment of the Kimberley

Aboriginal Health Research Alliance, made possible by a grant of $2,920,185 from Lotterywest.

The Aboriginal-led alliance consists of six organisations representing Kimberley-wide Aboriginal communities, research institutes, universities and health service providers.

The founding members of the alliance are Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services, WA Country

Health Service, Rural Clinical School of Western Australia, The University of Notre Dame Australia – Nulungu Research Centre, Telethon Kids Institute and the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia.

The focus of the alliance will be in promoting Aboriginal-led research methodologies, building the capacity of Aboriginal researchers, and monitoring the implementation of health research in the Kimberley.

The grant from Lotterywest will contribute towards support staff, developing training and resources, information technology and other supports to create avenues for community involvement in research and health services.

Comments attributed to Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt:

“It is fantastic that through Lotterywest, the McGowan Government is able to support the establishment of the Kimberley Aboriginal Health Research Alliance.

“All the organisations that will form part of the alliance have a strong track record in both research and in delivering better health outcomes for people in the Kimberley.

“The research that will come about as a result of this investment will improve service delivery, health care practice and improved health outcomes for the Kimberley region.”

5.2. WA : KAMS Aboriginal youth representatives met with Roger Cook MLA to share recommendations from Empowered Young Leaders forums in the Kimberley.

They focused on collaboration & ensuring young Aboriginal people are heard & their actions are supported into the future

The Kimberley region is one of 12 sites across Australia selected by the Australian Government to participate in The National Suicide Prevention Trial.

The 12 locations chosen for the Trial have a higher than average suicide rate and this major trial aims to find the most effective approaches to suicide prevention for at-risk populations and share this knowledge across Australia.

Each year about 3,000 Australians take their lives and the suicide rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders is about twice that of non-Indigenous people.

The Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial is helping to develop a model of suicide prevention that meets the unique and culturally-sensitive needs of the region’s Aboriginal communities.

The communities involved are: Broome, Bidyadanga, Dampier Peninsula, Derby, Fitzroy Crossing, Halls Creek, Kununurra, the Kutjunka region and Wyndham.

Preventing suicide is a complex problem and a one-size-fits-all strategy for dealing with the challenge may not be the best approach. This is exactly what this prevention trial is all about.

SEE WEBSITE 

6. SA : AHCSA proudly launch their newest and deadliest resource, the ‘Deadly Sights’, a Communicare and MBS guide for the ACCHO Sector.

A fantastic effort by the Eye Health Team and Quality Systems Team here AHCSA

7. NT AMSANT’S 25 YEARS of health leadership conference 7-8 August 2019, Alice Springs 

Our Health, Our Way – 25 Years of Health Leadership Conference, at the Alice Springs Convention Centre in the Northern Territory.

We are hoping to get a big turnout from members to celebrate and showcase the success of our sector.

Member’s rate of $300, which includes the Gala Dinner.

If you are interested to put a stall at the conference, please contact us or for any other enquiries please feel free to contact Mia Christophersen – mia.christophersen@amsant.org.au

or on mobile – 0429 991 763.

ACCOMMODATION

Attendees wanting to book their accommodation can find a 20% discount (best available rate at the time)
by typing the code below or by calling 08 8950 8022 / emailing: doubletreealicesprings.reservations@hilton.com

DISCOUNT CODE: GCONA

REGISTRATION

[ CLICK HERE ]

8. ACT The June 2019 edition 17 pages of the Winnunga AHCS Newsletter is available

Read Download HERE

Winnunga_AHCS_Newsletter_June_2019 Winnunga_AHCS_Newsletter_June_2019

9.TAS : NAIDOC events in nipaluna ( Hobart ) and pataway ( Launceston )

Launceston