NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosingTheGap #NT #Housing #Jobs : AMSANT , Central and Northern Land Councils join 40 peaks having equal say in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of a ‘refreshed’ #ClosingtheGap policy.

“Closing the Gap was well meaning and policy makers were genuine in wanting to achieve equality for our peoples.

However, we also said from the outset that the problem was that only governments had been involved in negotiations of the agreement and only the views of governments about what had to be done and how to achieve it were included

Our people weren’t asked or given any role in Closing the Gap.

Now it looks like governments and both major parties have finally realised that it was a mistake to exclude us and that this is an important reason why the policy failed

More than anything else we were determined that in the next phase, we must be in charge of our own development

Now the election is over, we will make sure we stay at the decision making table. It’s a big shift, but it’s critical for our people.”

Central Land Council policy manager Josie Douglas said while this is good news “it wouldn’t have happened except for the hard work of nearly 40 members of national and state/territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies, including the Central and Northern land councils and the NT’s Aboriginal Medical Services Association.

SEE CLC Facebook Page 

“ This historic achievement of a hard-fought partnership between peak Aboriginal organisations and governments on Closing the Gap should be celebrated.

From this day forward, expert Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices in health, education and community services will be working as equal partners with COAG in crafting the best solutions to achieve better life outcomes within our communities.

The health disparities and widening gaps between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and other Australians are unacceptable and as leaders in our fields, we are ready to do the hard work to reverse these trends.”

The journey of Aboriginal representatives to the table where the policy decisions are made has been long and difficult.

Pat Turner, CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) said the joint council meeting was “a culmination of many years of negotiations and hard work.

Download the CTG FACT Sheet and Partnership Agreement from Here

CTG Final fact sheet (1)

– Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap 2019-2029[73948]

Read full NACCHO Coverage of Closing the Gap Peaks

Jobs with the CTG Peak body secretariat will be advertised here 4 June  

Ten years after Australian governments launched Closing the Gap it looks like Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples finally have a real say about the policy.

The policy was meant to improve their lives by getting Australian governments to work together, but has mostly failed because it was designed without Aboriginal representatives in the room.

The first joint Closing the Gap council meeting between the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) and a coalition of national Aboriginal peak bodies in late March in Brisbane promises to turn a decade of failure into success.

The joint council has 12 representatives elected by the coalition of peaks, a minister nominated by the Commonwealth and each state and territory government, plus one representative from the Australian Government Association.

The council was set up under a historic partnership agreement under which the peak bodies will, for the first time, have an equal say in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of a ‘refreshed’ Closing the Gap policy.

In 2008, the COAG signed up to an agreement which for the first time had national targets and committed state and federal governments to reducing the gap in life expectancy, infant mortality, access to early childhood education, educational achievement and better employment outcomes.

This raised some hopes but, for the last five years, each time a Prime Minister reported to the federal parliament on the progress of Closing the Gap they had to admit that most of the targets were not on track to be achieved.

That does not mean that there had been no progress at all, but Aboriginal Territorians know that their lives are not much better than they were 10 years ago, especially when it comes to housing and jobs.

Early last year, public servants invited these organisations to workshops to ask them what they thought about Closing the Gap.

Like most others, CLC representatives left the workshops feeling that the governments had already made up their minds and were going to repeat the mistake they made over a decade ago and exclude them from their proposed ‘refresh’ of the policy.

Last October, the NACCHO asked the CLC and other peak bodies across Australia for help to try and stop the governments from deciding on a new Closing the Gap policy without Aboriginal representatives.

“We were up for it because we know how hard life is for our people and that we couldn’t afford governments to keep making decisions about us without us,” Ms Douglas said.

“We couldn’t afford the harm that means for our people and the waste – just look at the federal government’s punitive and failed work for the dole scheme.

“We wrote to Prime Minister Scott Morrison, the state premiers and Chief Minister Michael Gunner, asking them not to agree to changes to the Closing the Gap policy without us,” she said.

The coalition of peaks asked to be signatories to a formal Closing the Gap partnership agreement on behalf of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

They met with Mr Morrison last December and he changed his mind.

“We didn’t expect that,” Ms Douglas said.

The partnership agreement on Closing the Gap they signed three months later came with a Commonwealth grant paying the costs of the coalition for being in the partnership.

In May this year, also for the first time, the coalition met to work out what should be in a new Closing the Gap policy.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #ClosingTheGap Prime Minister Scott Morrison announces new #ClosingtheGap Partnership Agreement 2019-2029 with 40 Indigenous peak bodies able to engage and negotiate as equal partners with governments to design and monitor Closing the Gap.

“The Closing the Gap Partnership Agreement will focus all of our efforts to deliver better health, education and employment outcomes for Indigenous Australians.

It recognises that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples must play an integral part in making the decisions that affect their lives. This agreement will put Indigenous peoples at the heart of the development and implementation of the next phase of Closing the Gap, embedding shared decision making and accountability at the centre of the way we do business.

In order to effect real change, governments must work collaboratively and in genuine, formal partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples because they are the essential agents of change. The change we all want to see will only come if we work together.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the new Closing the Gap Partnership Agreement between the Federal Government, states, territories and the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations (Coalition of Peaks) would ensure decision makers worked closer than ever to deliver real change for Indigenous Australians.

Download the CTG FACT Sheet and Partnership Agreement from Here

CTG Final fact sheet (1)

– Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap 2019-2029[73948]

“The historic Partnership Agreement means that for the first time Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, through their peak bodies, will share decision making with governments on Closing the Gap.

Closing the gap is not just about targets and programs. It is about making sure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples can share in the decision making about policies and programs that impact on them and have a real say over their own lives.

The Partnership Agreement is a significant step forward in this direction and the Coalition of Peaks is looking forward to working closely with the Council of Australian Governments to honour our shared commitment to closing the gap.”

Patricia Turner (CEO of NACCHO ) on behalf of the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations said almost 40 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies across Australia had come together as partners with governments on Closing the Gap. See Also NACCHO Press Release Part 2

PRIME MINISTER

THE HON. SCOTT MORRISON MP

MINISTER FOR INDIGENOUS AFFAIRS
SEN. THE HON. NIGEL SCULLION
 

PATRICIA TURNER
ON BEHALF OF THE COALITION OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEAK ORGANISATION

PARTNERING WITH INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS TO CLOSE THE GAP

Read all NACCHO COAG Articles Here 

An historic agreement is set to change the way governments and Indigenous Australians work together on Closing the Gap.

The Agreement was developed collaboratively with the Coalition of Peaks, the largest group of Indigenous community controlled organisations, and committed to by all levels of government. It builds on the December 2018 decision by the Council of Australian Governments to  establish a formal partnership on Closing the Gap between governments and Indigenous Australians.

The partnership will include a Joint Council on Closing the Gap, which for the first time will include ministers nominated by jurisdictions, together with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives chosen by the Coalition of Peaks.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion will co-chair the first meeting of the Joint Council alongside Pat Turner, CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and on behalf of the Coalition of Peaks.

“The Joint Council represents an historic step forward in the practical working relationship between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and governments,” Minister Scullion said.

“This is the first time Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives and ministerial leaders have met formally as part of a Joint Council to progress the Closing the Gap agenda and improve the lives of Indigenous Australians no matter where they live.

“To support this historic partnership, we will deliver $4.6 million to the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations to ensure the representatives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are able to engage and negotiate as equal partners with governments to design and monitor Closing the Gap.

“This is a new way of doing business that reflects that the top-down approach established in 2008 while well-intentioned, did not truly seek to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Australians. We enter this partnership recognising that Canberra cannot change it all and that we need more then lofty goals and bureaucratic targets.

“Finalising the refresh of the Closing the Gap framework and monitoring its implementation over the next ten years is critical to the future and prosperity of all Australians.

“We are committed to working closely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Australia to improve the lives of Indigenous Australians.”

Patricia Turner on behalf of the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations said almost 40 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies across Australia had come together as partners with governments on Closing the Gap.

The refreshed Closing the Gap framework and targets will be finalised through the Joint Council by mid-2019, ahead of endorsement by COAG. The Joint Council will meet for the first time on 27 March 2019 in Brisbane.

“Closing the gap is not just about targets and programs. It is about making sure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples can share in the decision making about policies and programs that impact on them and have a real say over their own lives.

“The Partnership Agreement is a significant step forward in this direction and the Coalition of Peaks is looking forward to working closely with the Council of Australian Governments to honour our shared commitment to closing the gap.”

Part 2

Download a copy of this NACCHO Press Release

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) has welcomed the signing of an historic Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap between the Commonwealth Government, State and Territory Governments and the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies.

The announcement will be made at the first Joint Council Meeting between the new partners in Brisbane

The Coalition of Peaks is made up of around forty Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisations that have come together to negotiate with governments and be signatories to the Partnership Agreement.

NACCHO Chief Executive, Pat Turner, said the Agreement means that for the first time Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, through their peak body representatives, will share decision making with governments on Closing the Gap.

“For some time now, NACCHO, along with other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations have been calling for a greater say with governments on efforts to close the unacceptable gaps in life outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the broader community,” said Ms Turner.

“The Coalition of Peaks believe that shared decision making between governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled representatives in the design, implementation and monitoring of Closing the Gap is essential to closing the gap”.

The Partnership Agreement sets out how governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peaks bodies will work together to agree a refreshed national agreement on Closing the Gap, including any new Closing the Gap targets and implementation and monitoring arrangements.

Ms Turner said the Partnership Agreement also marks the establishment of a new, Joint Council on Closing the Gap that will be co-chaired by a Minister and a representative of the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Bodies.

“We look forward to a hardworking and constructive partnership with the Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments to secure better outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples,” said Ms Turner.

The Partnership Agreement can be accessed at After 8.00am : https://www.naccho.org.au/ programmes/coalition-of-peaks/

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #RefreshTheCTGRefresh News : Dr @mperkinsnsw #ClosingtheGap failures are firmly rooted in racism and Nicholas Biddle From @ANU_CAEPR 4 lessons from 11 years of #ClosingtheGap reports

 

1. Some targets are easier than others

2. The life-expectancy measure is unpredictable

3. On-track one year, off-track the next

4. Indigenous Australians in the city and country have different needs

5.Closing the Gap Failures are firmly rooted in racism

” Scott Morrison last week became the fifth prime minister to deliver a Closing the Gap report to parliament – the 11th since the strategy began in 2008. Closing the Gap has aimed to reduce disadvantage among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with particular respect to life expectancy, child mortality, access to early childhood education, educational achievement and employment outcomes.

Almost every time a prime minister delivers the report, he or she states the need to move on from a deficits approach.

Which is exactly what Morrison did this time. But he also did something different. Four of the seven targets set in 2008 were due to expire in 2018.

So last year, the government developed the Closing the Gap Refresh – where targets would be updated in partnership with Indigenous people.

Nicholas Biddle ANU : Four lessons from 11 years of Closing the Gap reports : See in full Part 1 Below 

Read NACCHO Closing the Gap response and download the report

” Once again, minimal progress has been made towards closing the gap on Indigenous disadvantage.

Racism has been mentioned as an issue, but exactly how does racism make a contribution to this “unforgivable” state of affairs ?.

The answer is in the criminal justice system. Studies have shown mass incarceration has a profoundly negative effect on the health, education, and employment of families and communities-and Indigenous Australians are the most incarcerated group on Earth.

The US, the mother of all jailers imprisoned 655 people per 100,000 in 2018. Australia imprisoned 164 non Indigenous people and 2481 Indigenous people per 100,000. Western Australian imprisoned 3663 Aboriginal people per 100,000.

In 1991, when the report on Aboriginal Deaths in Custody was handed down, 14% of all prisoners were First Nations people.  By last year, the figure was 28%. ”

Lesson 5 Dr Meg Perkins is a registered psychologist, researcher and writer : See Part 2 Below

First Published in The Conversation 

The current report and the work leading up to it has led to new targets, such as a “significant and sustained progress to eliminate the over-representation of Aboriginal children in out-of-home care” and old targets framed differently.

For example, the headline new outcome for families, children and youth is that “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children thrive in their early years”. This is on top of more specific targets such as having 95% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander four-years-olds enrolled in early childhood education by 2025 – which this year is on track.


Read more: Closing the Gap is failing and needs a radical overhaul


Looking back on the past 11 years, there are several things we’ve learned. This includes those targets that seem easiest to meet, as well changes in the demographics of the population that complicate the measuring of the targets. Below are three lessons from the last decade of the policy.

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/74BbT/1/

1. Some targets are easier than others

The targets where there has been some success tend to be those where government has more direct control. Consider the Year 12 attainment compared to the employment targets. To increase the proportion of Indigenous Australians completing year 12, the Commonwealth government can change the income support system to create incentives to not leave school, while state and territory governments can adjust the school leaving age.

That is not to downplay the efforts of parents, teachers, community leaders, and the students themselves. But, there are some direct policy levers.

To improve employment outcomes, on the other hand, discrimination among employers needs to be reduced, human capital levels increased, jobs need to be in areas where Indigenous people live and to match the skills and experiences of the Indigenous population. These are solvable policy problems with the right settings and community engagement. But, they are substantially more complex.


Read more: Three reasons why the gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians aren’t closing


2. The life-expectancy measure is unpredictable

The main target has always been related to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander life expectancy. The 2019 report shows the target of closing the gap by 2031 is not on track.

Unfortunately, the life expectancy target is one of the more difficult to measure, as it uses multiple datasets that are potentially affected by different ways Indigenous people are counted in the census and changing levels of identification. The most recent estimates, based on data for 2015-17, are that life expectancy at birth is 71.6 years for Indigenous males and 75.6 years for Indigenous females.

While the gaps with the non-Indigenous population of 8.6 years and 7.8 years respectively are smaller than they were in 2010-12 (the previous estimates) the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and most demographers suggest extreme caution around the interpretation of this change. The ABS writes:

While the estimates in this release show a small improvement in life expectancy estimates and a reduction in the gap between 2010-2012 and 2015-2017, this improvement should be interpreted with considerable caution as the population composition has changed during this period.

More people have been identifying as being Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander over recent years. What’s more, the newly identified Indigenous people tend to have better outcomes on average (across health, education, and labour market outcomes) than those who were identified previously. This biases our estimates, making it appear there is more rapid progress than there might otherwise be.


Read more: Three charts on: the changing status of Indigenous Australians


The Closing the Gap framework was implicitly designed around improving the circumstances of the 2008 Indigenous population relative to the 2008 non-Indigenous population. However, both populations have changed substantially over the intervening years. There has been a growth of the non-Indigenous population due to international migration. It is hard to measure and track differences in changing populations.

3. On-track one year, off-track the next

There is also the yearly reporting cycle. The target of child mortality, for instance, no longer appears to be on track. This is despite it being on track in previous years. Yearly fluctuations make it hard to gauge the effectiveness of long-term policy settings.

For other indicators, such as employment, the data is available far less frequently than it could be, and we are less able to judge the effect of individual policies and interventions. Having said that, in my view, the sophistication and nuance with which data in the Closing the Gap reports has been presented has improved considerably.

It seems most policies prioritise Indigenous Australians living in remote areas than those in the city. David Clode/Unsplash

4. Indigenous Australians in the city and country have different needs

This isn’t always reflected in policy settings. The current report shows many outcomes are worse in remote compared to non-remote Australia. It also makes the point (though less frequently), that the vast majority of Indigenous Australians live in regional areas and major cities. This creates a tension between relative and absolute need. Unfortunately, the policy responses of government often don’t get that balance right.

Take the signature policy proposal announced with the current report – a suspension or cancelling of HECS debt for teachers who work in remote schools. What the policy ignores is that the vast majority of Indigenous students live outside remote Australia, that outcomes for Indigenous students in non-remote areas are well behind those of non-Indigenous students, and that the schools Indigenous students attend in non-remote areas tend to be very different from those of non-Indigenous students.


Read more: Infographic: Are we making progress on Indigenous education?


Attracting and keeping more high quality teachers in remote areas is a worthwhile policy aim. Alone, it is not sufficient.

The current report and speech by the prime minister states that “genuine partnerships are required to drive sustainable, systemic change” and that the government needs “to support initiatives led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to address the priorities identified by those communities”.

These are admirable goals. But, they require significant resources, a genuine engagement with the evidence (even if it isn’t positive), taking the Uluru Statement from the Heart seriously, and real ceding of control to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

5.Closing the Gap Failures are firmly rooted in racism

Some people think Aboriginal people must be uniquely anti-social and/or make very bad choices, but research tells us the majority of people in prison are suffering from severe cognitive impairments and/or mental health issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder and major depression.

Why are we punishing people with disabilities for behaviour that may not be intentional ?.

When we look at children in school, we find three times as many Aboriginal children are suspended from school than non-Aboriginal children. Some of the special purpose schools in NSW are filled with Aboriginal children only.

Many youth detention centres in the country have 100 per cent Aboriginal inmates. Why are so many Aboriginal children being suspended from school and set on the road to crime and punishment, and what happens to white Australian children who are not able to behave appropriately in the classroom ?.

It seems mainstream Australian children are referred to health professionals when they have difficulties at school. They are seen as suffering from learning disabilities, autism, or ADHD. Speech therapists and other allied health professionals work to help them catch up with peers and stay in school.

Due to intergenerational disadvantage, Indigenous people often don’t have the resources to find a therapist to assist their child. People born before 1972 were not guaranteed a place in school, and so grand parents may not have had much education.

Parents may have left school in Year 8 or 9 and are not familiar with developmental norms or disabilities. If they know that their child is falling behind at school, they often do not have the money to pay for expensive psychological assessments, which cannot be done in Medicare. Without an assessment, and a diagnosis , the school cannot make allowances for a child with brain-based disabilities.

The racist policies of the past have left many Aboriginal people disadvantaged when it comes to dealing with the education system. If their child is having difficulties, suspensions are often the consequence. Once suspended and out on the street, racism sets in again.

Aboriginal children are searched and arrested more often. We will never close the disadvantage gap until we can offer support to the children of young people. We need to raise the age criminal responsibility from 10 to 15 years, and spend money on supporting children, not punishing them.

Dr Meg Perkins

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #closingthegap Download @AIHW report summarises evidence on progress towards the seven #CTG targets . These include: child mortality, school attendance, literacy and numeracy, employment, and life expectancy.

 

” This report provides detailed information and analyses on the Closing the Gap targets, including the key drivers of change underpinning these targets.

This report provides context for policy debate and discussion for the Closing the Gap Refresh, a joint initiative of the Council of Australian Governments (COAG).

Today’s report summarises evidence on progress towards the seven Closing the Gap targets. These targets include: child mortality, school attendance, literacy and numeracy, employment, and life expectancy. Read the full report:

Download the 300 Page report HERE

AIH W Closing the Gap Targets Report

Information on this COAG initiative, and additional resources with updated data on the COAG targets are available at the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet website.

  • Contents
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • Symbols
  • Chapter 1: Overview
    • 1.1 Closing the Gap targets and progress
    • 1.1.1 About the targets
    • 1.1.2 Current picture and progress
    • 1.2 Key drivers of change
    • 1.3 Key themes across the targets
      • 1.3.1 Social determinants are critical
      • 1.3.2 Remoteness has a relatively large impact
      • 1.3.3 Improved access to services is needed
      • 1.3.4 Investment is needed across the lifecourse
      • 1.3.5 Interactions between outcomes are important
      • 1.3.6 Need more evidence on ‘what works’
    • 1.4 Data limitations
    • 1.5 Future target setting
    • 1.6 References
  • Chapter 2: Child mortality target
    • Summary
    • 2.1 Background
    • 2.2 Current picture and progress
      • 2.2.1 National data on child mortality
      • 2.2.2 Child mortality by state and territory
      • 2.2.3 Age of childhood death
      • 2.2.4 Causes of death
    • 2.3 Key drivers of child mortality
      • 2.3.1 Evidence from the literature
      • 2.3.2 Evidence from new AIHW analyses
    • 2.4 Data limitations and measurement issues
      • 2.4.1 Child deaths data
      • 2.4.2 Population and births data
      • 2.4.3 Cause of death classifications
      • 2.4.4 Data on key determinants
    • 2.5 Bringing it together
      • 2.5.1 An overview
      • 2.5.2 Examples of opportunities for further progress
    • 2.6 References
  • Chapter 3: Early childhood education target
    • Summary
    • 3.1 Background
    • 3.2 Current picture and progress
      • 3.2.1 National data on enrolment and attendance
      • 3.2.2 Enrolment and attendance by state and territory
      • 3.2.3 Attendance by remoteness
    • 3.3 Key drivers of participation in ECE
      • 3.3.1 Evidence from the literature
      • 3.3.2 Evidence from AIHW analysis of the LSIC
    • 3.4 Data limitations and measurement issues
      • 3.4.1 Comparable enrolment and attendance rates
    • 3.5 Bringing it together
      • 3.5.1 An overview
      • 3.5.2 Examples of opportunities for further progress
    • 3.6 References
  • Chapter 4: School attendance target
    • Summary
    • 4.1 Background
    • 4.2 Current picture and progress
      • 4.2.1 National data on school attendance
      • 4.2.2 School attendance by state and territory
      • 4.2.3 School attendance by remoteness
      • 4.2.4 Patterns of student attendance
    • 4.3 Key drivers of school attendance
      • 4.3.1 Evidence from the literature
      • 4.3.2 Evidence from new AIHW analysis
    • 4.4 Data limitations and measurement issues
      • 4.4.1 Reporting on days of attendance
      • 4.4.2 Measuring student attendance rates
      • 4.4.3 Measuring students achieving 90% or more attendance
      • 4.4.4 Survey and longitudinal data sets
    • 4.5 Bringing it together
      • 4.5.1 An overview
      • 4.5.2 Examples of opportunities for further progress
    • 4.6 References
  • Chapter 5: Literacy and numeracy target
    • Summary
    • 5.1 Background
    • 5.2 Current picture and progress
      • 5.2.1 National data on literacy and numeracy
      • 5.2.2 Literacy and numeracy outcomes by state and territory
      • 5.2.3 Literacy and numeracy outcomes by remoteness
      • 5.2.4 Progress towards the literacy and numeracy target
      • 5.2.5 Improvements in mean NAPLAN scores
    • 5.3 Key drivers of literacy and numeracy
      • 5.3.1 Conceptual framework on influences on child development
      • 5.3.2 Drivers based on analysis of NAPLAN data
      • 5.3.3 Drivers based on other literature
      • 5.4 Data limitations and measurement issues
    • 5.4.1 Use of the NMS
      • 5.4.2 Participation in NAPLAN testing
    • 5.5 Bringing it together
      • 5.5.1 An overview
      • 5.5.2 Examples of opportunities for further progress
    • 5.6 References
  • Chapter 6: Year 12 or equivalent attainment target
    • Summary
    • 6.1 Background
    • 6.2 Current picture and progress
      • 6.2.1 National data on Year 12 or equivalent attainment
      • 6.2.2 Year 12 or equivalent attainment by geographic area
      • 6.2.3 Patterns of Year 12 or equivalent attainment
    • 6.3 Key drivers of Year 12 attainment
      • 6.3.1 Evidence from literature
      • 6.3.2 Evidence from new AIHW analysis of NATSISS data
    • 6.4 Data limitations and measurement issues
      • 6.4.1 Frequency of data
      • 6.4.2 Census data (main data source)
      • 6.4.3 Survey data (supplementary data source)
      • 6.4.4 Apparent retention rates
      • 6.4.5 Identifying drivers of Year 12 attainment
      • 6.4.6 Administrative data on educational attainment
      • 6.4.7 Components of Year 12 or equivalent attainment
    • 6.5 Bringing it together
      • 6.5.1 An overview
      • 6.5.2 Examples of opportunities for further progress
    • 6.6 References
  • Chapter 7: Employment target
    • Summary
    • 7.1 Background
    • 7.2 Current picture and progress
      • 7.2.1 National data on employment
      • 7.2.2 Patterns of employment
    • 7.3 Key drivers of Indigenous employment
      • 7.3.1 Key drivers in the literature
      • 7.3.2 Evidence from new AIHW analysis
      • 7.3.3 Trends in Indigenous employment drivers
    • 7.4 Data limitations and measurement issues
      • 7.4.1 Frequency of Indigenous employment data
      • 7.4.2 Use of employment rates
    • 7.5 Bringing it together
      • 7.5.1 An overview
      • 7.5.2 Examples of opportunities for further progress
    • 7.6 References
  • Chapter 8: Life expectancy target
    • Summary
    • 8.1 Background
    • 8.2 Current picture and progress
      • 8.2.1 National life expectancy
      • 8.2.2 Life expectancy by jurisdiction and remoteness
      • 8.2.3 Mortality patterns and trends
      • 8.2.4 Fatal burden of disease
    • 8.3 Key drivers of mortality and life expectancy
      • 8.3.1 Social determinants and risk factors
      • 8.3.2 Contribution of risk factors to the fatal burden
      • 8.3.3 Health system interventions
    • 8.4 Data limitations and measurement issues
      • 8.4.1 Deaths and population data
      • 8.4.2 Frequency of Indigenous life expectancy estimates
    • 8.5 Bringing it together
      • 8.5.1 An overview
      • 8.5.2 Examples of opportunities for further progress
    • 8.6 References

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosetheGap Media Alert : PM #ClosingTheGap Report Monday on track for disaster, with only one of seven targets to end #Indigenous disadvantage ?

 

” Malcolm Turnbull’s crucial 10th ­annual Closing the Gap report on Monday is on track for disaster, with only one of seven targets to end indigenous disadvantage set to be achieved amid questions about the program’s relevance.

Targets to close the gap on child mortality rates, early childhood education, school attendance, literacy, employment and life expectancy are either unlikely to or definitely will not be met, key data obtained by The Australian shows. As with last year’s report, only Year 12 attainment rates are on track to halve the gap for ­indigenous Australians aged 20-24 by 2020.”

From Todays Australian

Monday 12 Feb, the PM provides his #ClosingtheGap report to Parliament 11.00 am

 ” The 10-year review launched yesterday suggests the program’s health targets be retained but that they be “complemented by targets or reporting on the inputs to those health targets”, as well as calling for a specific increase in health ­infrastructure and spending, and for greater First Nations participation in decision-making.”

Download NACCHO Press Release and 40 Page report

The trends are contained in an Australian Institute of Health and Welfare assessment distributed to participants at a hastily called two-day summit bringing together prominent indigenous Australians in Canberra to consider a Closing the Gap “refresh”, including expanding the number of ­targets.

That summit ended in bitterness yesterday with a formal statement from the powerful four Northern Territory Land Councils denouncing it as peremptory and rushed. “Governments had 10 years to get it right,” the statement from the chairmen of the Northern Land Council, Central Land Council, Tiwi Land Council and Anindilyakwa Land Council said. “Ten years ago, they did not talk to us.

After 10 years of failure why are they rushing us now? Why don’t they give us time to consult our people and elected members properly about these life and death issues?”

The NLC and CLC will not hold their next executive meetings until June, by which time the government plans to have completed its refresh — leaving the two councils unable to present their proposals to their members.

The pushback came after a 10-year review of the Council of ­Australian Governments scheme found it had been marred by poor accountability and a lack of ­indigenous policy input, and was badly implemented from the ­beginning.

Malcolm Turnbull angered participants at the Parliament House launch of that study yesterday when he left to meet another commitment halfway through.

Labor indigenous affairs spokesman Patrick Dodson called the Prime Minister’s departure “indicative of the deafness, the absolute derision and the ­contempt which this government is meting out to the Aboriginal people”.

Reconciliation Australia co-chair Tom Calma, who launched the Close the Gap steering committee’s review after Mr Turnbull had gone, admitted the departure “wasn’t a surprise” but said it was “unfortunate he had to leave; it’s never a good look when we’ve all come together”. Further fire came with the revelation the government hopes to conduct 14 regional indigenous consultations in ­coming weeks as it pushes ahead with its refresh.

The regional process would mirror last year’s multi-million-dollar Referendum Council regional dialogues on indigenous constitutional recognition, whose results at Uluru were dismissed out of hand by Mr Turnbull.

Critics say the government could find it hard to encourage participants in the earlier process to show up for more of the same, having believed the resulting Uluru Statement from the Heart contained practical measures for improving indigenous outcomes — including its parliamentary ­advisory voice and treaty mechanism.

Kyllie Cripps, acting director at the University of NSW indigenous law centre, said the fact latest Closing the Gap figures closely mirrored last year’s was a case of governments “pretending they’re doing something when they’re not”.

“This has been a constant criticism of Closing the Gap reporting, because it’s a reduplicating of data that’s already out there,” Dr Cripps said. “It would easily cost $200,000 to produce the report each year, which is money that could be better put elsewhere, for instance a women’s refuge or other services.”

Referendum Council member and UNSW pro-vice chancellor Megan Davis described the report as “regulatory ritualism, pretending to fix something when you’re not”.

Bill Shorten said Mr Turnbull’s “disdainful attitude” towards the Uluru Statement was perpetuating the poor outcome. “The idea that you could paternalistically, in the Prime Minister’s office, make decisions on behalf of hundreds of thousands of Australians without them being involved in the ­decision-making, is just guaranteed (to not work),” the Opposition Leader said.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Your Guide to #ClosetheGap Week Includes #ClosingtheGap #CtGRefresh @KenWyattMP ” Better #Indigenous Health ” @AusHealthcare Editorial

Understanding and respecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures—our strengths, traditions and our family, kinship, values and knowledge—is a fundamental foundation for better Indigenous health.

Consideration of the social and cultural determinants of health is vital, because a strong connection to culture correlates with good health, through strengthened identity, resilience and social and physical wellbeing.

In the words of the Prime Minister, we are committed to doing things with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, not to them, empowering local community solutions and better personal choices.

This will require the involvement of individuals, families, communities and Aboriginal organisations at all levels, in shaping the future and achieving improved health.

The Closing the Gap refresh and the next Implementation Plan will be important opportunities to build on what we have learned, and help ensure our people live better, longer and healthier lives and are able to achieve their full potential.”

Extract from Minister Ken Wyatt’s ” Better Indigenous Health ” overview in this weeks the AHHA’s  #ClosetheGap Magazine Read in Full Part 4  below

Download a copy HERE : AHHA CTG 2018 Feature

Part 1 Your #ClosetheGap Week Guide

Thursday 8 th February the #ClosetheGap Campaigns Parliamentary Breakfast 7.00 AM event and the launch of a ten-year review: the #ClosingtheGap Strategy and Recommendations for Reset.

The Prime Minister has established a group of 10 Aboriginals to inform governments this week on the next phase of the #ClosingtheGap agenda. #CTGRefresh

The Aboriginal panel will meet from 7th – 8th February.

Ministers will join the Indigenous group on the afternoon of Thursday 8th.

Friday 9th February , The 10 Indigenous participants will formally present the gathering’s proposals to the Council of Australian Governments #COAG meeting.

Monday 12 Feb, the PM provides his #ClosingtheGap report to Parliament 11.00 am

Tuesday 13 February several key events to mark 10 years since the Apology, including the public concert on the lawns of Parliament House – hosted by The Healing Foundation. #Apology10

Read 454 NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ClosetheGap articles last 6 years

NACCHO This week Monday #WorldCancerday #CloseTheGap

Tuesday Aged Elder Care #CloseTheGap

Wednesday Aboriginal Children’s Health #ClosetheGap

Part 2 #ClosingTheGap #RefreshCTG

From NACCHO Post

This is a great opportunity for people to share their ideas and opinions”

Andrea Mason, Co-Chair Indigenous Advisory Council and CEO of NPY Women’s Council

Share your views

Submissions close 5pm 31 March 2018

 ” The Australian Government, on behalf of the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), is asking all Australians for their views to help construct the next phase of the Closing the Gap agenda and has released a COAG discussion paper to support ongoing consultations that have been held this year and will continue into 2018.

Over the past decade, important progress has been made in improving health, employment and education outcomes for First Australians since Australian governments agreed to a Closing the Gap framework to address Indigenous disadvantage.

However, it is clear that the Closing the Gap agenda can be better designed and more effectively delivered. This is a view shared among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, governments and the broader community.”

Download the Discussion paper

ctg-next-phase-discussion-paper

Part 3 #Refresh CTG Example from NACCHO Member Congrees Alice Springs

Congress Alice Springs notes the Council of Australian Government’s (COAG’s) commitment in their meeting of 9 June 2017 to refreshing the Closing the Gap (CtG) agenda, “focussing on a strength-based approach that supports Indigenous advancement, working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples”.

As a leading Aboriginal community controlled health service with over forty years of experience in delivering improvements in services and outcomes for Aboriginal people1 in Central Australia, Congress is submitting this paper to the Taskforce that has been established in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet to progress this important work.

The paper is framed around five key structural reforms to the CtG process and on eight specific social and cultural determinants of health and well being

Download HERE

Congress-input-to-CtG-Refresh-Process-FINAL-24-January-2018

 Part 4 Minister Ken Wyatt’s ” Better Indigenous Health ” overview in this weeks the AHHA’s  #ClosetheGap Magazine

Download a copy HERE : AHHA CTG 2018 Feature

The February 2018 issue was released today. It focuses on ‘Close the Gap’ and features articles including:

  • Better Indigenous health—Ken Wyatt see in full below
  • Aboriginal patient journey mapping tools—Flinders University, University of Adelaide, Port Augusta Hospital and Regional Health Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital
  • Walk with us—Janine Mohamed, CATSINaM
  • Nutrition from first foods—Dympna Leonard
  • Check today, see tomorrow—Hugh Taylor and Mitchell Anjou, University of Melbourne

Understanding and respecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures—our strengths, traditions and our family, kinship, values and knowledge—is a fundamental foundation for better Indigenous health.

The Turnbull Government understands that significant factors contributing to higher rates of premature death and chronic illnesses among our people lie largely outside the traditional health system.

Consideration of the social and cultural determinants of health is vital, because a strong connection to culture correlates with good health, through strengthened identity, resilience and social and physical wellbeing.

We know that over one-third of the average health gap between Indigenous and non- Indigenous people is the result of social determinants—the implications of housing, employment, justice and education.

This rises to over 50% when combined with risky behaviours such as tobacco and alcohol use, poor diet and physical inactivity.

In 2017, the Government led the My Life My Lead consultations across the nation, listening to people, and government and non-Government agencies, sharing their experiences around the social and cultural determinants of health, with around 600 attending 13 forums.

We heard that to make significant overall improvements in Indigenous lives, including their health, we need to:

• recognise the importance of culture, family and country;

• partner with communities to build capacity;

• recognise and address the impacts of underlying trauma; and

• lift access to health, education, employment and social services.

There is a need to address systemic racism and enhance cultural competency.

The 2017 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework highlighted some areas of success: There has been a 44% decline in Aboriginal circulatory disease death rates between 1998 and 2015, and a 47% decline in kidney deaths; there has been a longer term 33% decline (1998–2015) in child mortality and a recent 9% drop in smoking rates.

However, we can, and must, do better.

Among my Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health priorities are:

• Renal health—reducing the incidence of kidney disease, with a strong focus on early intervention.

• Maternal and child health—making sure we give babies through to teenagers the best possible start in life by developing a 0–17 years approach to social, physical and emotional wellbeing.

• Men’s health—considering more of the social and cultural determinants of health.

• Eye and ear health—working on the causes of preventable blindness and hearing loss, including tackling otitis media.

• Preventable hospital admissions—with a strong focus on early intervention to keep people out of hospital.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men’s life expectancy is 10 years shorter than non- Indigenous males.

While smoking rates have improved significantly, they remain high and contribute to the largest burden of Indigenous ill health.

The $116.8 million (2015–16 to 2017–18) Tackling Indigenous Smoking program aims to further reduce these rates.

The gap in the blindness rate in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over 40, compared to non-Indigenous Australians, has halved between 2008 and 2016. The Australian Government is investing $76 million from 2013 – 14 to 2020–21 to build on this improvement.

A comprehensive approach to childhood hearing loss is combining prevention, early treatment and management of ear infections, supported by an investment of $76.4 million from 2012–13 to 2021–22.

In addition, providing a culturally safe and respectful environment within mainstream health services can help improve access to health care, as well as the effectiveness of that care.

Between July 2013 and June 2015, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples were discharged from hospital against medical advice at seven times the rate of non-Indigenous people and were more likely to leave the emergency department without waiting to be seen.

I am pleased to be partnering with organisations including the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, the Australian Indigenous Doctor’s Association and the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges to help reduce the barriers to accessing health care.

The initial focus includes improving how the health system works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, ranging from enhanced cultural awareness and training for staff, through to reducing any forms of institutionalised racism.

The Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2016–2026, sponsored by the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council, commits all state and territory governments to embedding the principles of cultural respect into the health system.

The next Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan, due in 2018, will recognise the importance of culture in finding solutions, and focus on the factors that promote resilience, foster a sense of identity and support good mental and physical health and wellbeing for individuals, families and communities.

In the words of the Prime Minister, we are committed to doing things with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, not to them, empowering local community solutions and better personal choices.

This will require the involvement of individuals, families, communities and Aboriginal organisations at all levels, in shaping the future and achieving improved health.

The Closing the Gap refresh and the next Implementation Plan will be important opportunities to build on what we have learned, and help ensure our people live better, longer and healthier lives and are able to achieve their full potential.