NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Jobalerts : Features this week @NACCHOAustralia Coalition of 40 Peaks 3 Positions #ClosingTheGap Secretariat @VACCHO_org Director Policy @ahmrc CEO #NT @AMSANTaus @CAACongress #QLD @IUIH_

Before completing a job application please check with the ACCHO that the job is still open

ACCHO Training News

IAHA and SARRAH together are committed to address systemic problems and promoting innovative sustainable models

1. Job/s of the week 

1.1 The Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peaks Bodies on Closing the Gap is recruiting to establish a policy and secretariat team. Applications close June 17

1.2 VACCHO Executive Director – Research, Evaluation & Strategic Policy

1.3 AHMRC Chief Executive Officer for the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW.

2.Queensland

    2.1 Apunipima ACCHO Cape York

    2.2 IUIH ACCHO Deadly Choices Brisbane and throughout Queensland

    2.3 ATSICHS ACCHO Brisbane

    2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS

3.NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

   3.1 Congress ACCHO Alice Spring

   3.2 Miwatj Health ACCHO Arnhem Land

   3.3 Wurli ACCHO Katherine

   3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

4. South Australia

4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

5. Western Australia

  5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

  5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 

7.New South Wales

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

7.3 Katungul ACCHO 

8. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO 

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

Family Case worker to join the team at our Pinangba Cape York Family Centre.

Children’s Ground 

  • Early Years Educators – Alice Springs
  • Project Officer – Communications, Partnerships & Investments – part time – Abbotsford
  • Project Officer – Communications, Partnerships & Investments – full time – Abbotsford
  • Social Enterprise Coordinator – Darwin

Over 302 ACCHO clinics See all websites by state territory 

NACCHO Affiliate , Member , Government Department or stakeholders

If you have a job vacancy in Indigenous Health 

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media

Tuesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Wednesday

 ACCHO Training News : 

IAHA and SARRAH together are committed to address systemic problems and promoting innovative sustainable models

If you live in rural or remote Australia your chances of accessing allied health services if and when you need them are much worse than for other Australians. If you are Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, your chances are even worse.

Many of our health and social service systems work well, but there are persistent gaps and systemic shortfalls. These have real impacts on people. For many their quality of life, health and recovery from illness or accident is compromised because of who they are and where they live.

“If you need help to speak, swallow or walk again after a stroke, if you have experienced family trauma and need mental health care, if you have problems with your teeth, hearing, eyesight, have a debilitating back injury, or a thousand other conditions, you probably need help from an allied health professional”, said Cath Maloney, SARRAH’s acting CEO.

“If you need allied health services, whether it’s through the health system, aged care, other community services or the NDIS, it shouldn’t make a difference if you are Indigenous or not. It shouldn’t make a difference whether you live in Meekatharra, Rockhampton or Toorak, but it does”, said Nicole Turner, IAHA Chairperson.

Services that many people, especially in our major population centres, expect are available can be rare, impossible to access or simply do not exist in many communities. These communities also tend to be where the rates of chronic disease, premature deaths and avoidable hospitalisations are highest, and where preventive health care is low or non-existent.

The evidence is there. It gets reported regularly. But being used to hearing about a problem does not make the impact any less for those who experience it, does not make it normal or justify it continuing.

National Reconciliation Week, which closed this week, is a time to reflect on the serious disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and other Australians, the causes that have led and continue to reinforce that disparity. More importantly, it’s time to address it.

Our commitment needs to be tangible. IAHA and SARRAH together are committed to address systemic problems and promoting innovative sustainable models that:

  • Improve access to reliable, affordable, culturally safe and responsive allied health services and reducing the disadvantage experienced by people living in rural and remote communities, particularly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
  • Promote the funding and program coherence needed to ensure allied health services are able to establish and operate sustainably in rural and remote communities; and
  • Recognise the improved outcomes in health and wellbeing available through allied health inclusive, person and community-centred primary health care services.The new Federal Government and all governments across Australia have the opportunity to work together, work with and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and for rural and remote communities across Australia to ensure fair access to the health services all Australians need. This would be a real step in respecting the intent of Reconciliation week.

Read / Download  2 job opportunities with IAHA

2019 Engagement Officer – IAHA 260519 (2)

2019 IAHA Business Manager Duty Statement Final

1.1 Jobs of the week

The Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peaks Bodies on Closing the Gap is recruiting to establish a policy and secretariat team. Applications close June 17

This is an exciting opportunity to be part of a small, high calibre and dynamic team to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders from across the country in the negotiations, agreement, implementation and monitoring of a new National Agreement on Closing the Gap, and as partners with the Council of Australian Governments.

Further information on the Coalition of Peaks and our work on Closing the Gap with COAG is here:

Information on these 4 positions and how to apply are available here: ­

 https://www.seek.com.au/NACCHO-jobs.

Location: ACT
Up to $80,000 per annum plus 15% superannuation
  • Attractive salary plus 15% superannuation and salary packaging
  • Full-time, fixed-term contract for 3 years
  • Friendly team and great location

Administration Officer to act as a point of contact for the Secretariat and perform administration duties.

Location:ACT 
Up to $100,000 per annum plus 15% superannuation
  • Attractive salary plus 15% superannuation and salary packaging
  • Full-time, fixed-term contract for 3 years
  • Friendly team and great location

Supporting the Secretariat of the Coalition of Peaks.

Senior Policy Officer

Location: ACT

 $140,000 per annum plus 15% superannuation

  • Attractive salary plus 15% superannuation and salary packaging
  • 2 positions available. Full-time, fixed-term contract for 3 years
  • Friendly team and great location

The Secretariat to the Coalition of Peaks will provide high level and comprehensive policy and strategic advice.

Applications are sought by 17 June 2019.

The positions are for three years and are made possible by a grant from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet under the Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap.

The positions are hosted by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, however the policy and secretariat team are there to support all members of the Coalition of Peaks.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are strongly encouraged to apply.

Should you have any questions about the positions, please don’t hesitate to contact alice.kemble@naccho.org.au

VACCHO Executive Director – Research, Evaluation & Strategic Policy

About the Organisation

The Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) is the peak body for the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people living in Victoria and is a centre of expertise, policy advice, training, innovation and leadership.

VACCHO is entering a new exciting chapter of its existence, experiencing growth and change in a significant time of self-determination and Community Control. VACCHO advocates for strength-based approaches to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people.

As a result of this change, the organisation has created four new Executive Director roles to lead and drive a stronger presence helping the community, and leading the state in improving Aboriginal Health.

This is an exciting opportunity for dynamic and energetic leaders to nurture and lead VACCHO and their teams across four units of educational services; research and policy; member and workforce support; and corporate services and to make a difference and create positive change in Victorian Aboriginal communities.

About the Opportunity

The Executive Director Research, Evaluation and Strategic Policy is a full-time, 3-year contract position based in Collingwood in Melbourne’s inner northern suburbs.

This position will form part of the highly motivated Executive Team of VACCHO and head up one of the newly formed units within the organisation redesign. You will be responsible for the implementation and transition to the new structure and play a key role in the change management process underpinning successful change.

The Research, Evidence and Strategic Policy Unit leads the development of well-reasoned, evidence-based policy and advocacy to ensure that VACCHO and its members are strategically positioned to improve the Aboriginal community’s health and wellbeing outcomes.

Some of your key areas of accountability will include:

  • Leading and implementing the VACCHO data and research strategy to expand the organisation’s data collection and support data sovereignty;
  • Supporting and implementing a collaborative approach with Members and key stakeholders that results in more strategic use, interpretation and analysis of meaningful data within the sector; and
  • Developing a strategy to ensure all VACCHO policy position statements and advocacy are informed by evidence-based practice, knowledge and research.

This is an Aboriginal Designated Position, classified under ‘special measures’ of section 12 of the Equal Opportunity Act 2010. Only Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people are eligible to apply.

To view the Position Description with the full role overview and list of accountabilities and selection criteria, please click ‘apply now’.

The remuneration package for this position is set between $140,000-$150,000 + super, commensurate with the skills and experience that you are bringing to the role.

You will also have access to a range of additional benefits including salary packaging (up to $15,999), additional annual leave and great work-life balance!

Located on Sackville Street in Collingwood, the VACCHO office is a close walk to Victoria Park station and tram stops as well as the cafes and great coffee spots on Smith Street and Brunswick Street.

This is a rare and exciting opportunity. If you want to be a part of the strategic decision making that will help close the gap in Aboriginal health in Victoria,

Apply Now.

AMSANT Research Project Officer – Trauma Informed Care Project – Alice Springs / Darwin Applications close: 14 June, 2019. 

AMSANT’s SEWB/Culturally responsive trauma informed care program team is seeking a researcher with expertise in action research and knowledge/interest in culturally responsive trauma informed care (CRTIC) approaches within Aboriginal primary health care to implement an exciting action research project that will evaluate CRTIC implementation in community controlled health service.

This role requires a commitment to collaborative Aboriginal led approaches to improving effectiveness of health service delivery and strong organisational skills.

The successful applicant will be joining an experienced and dynamic team and an organisation that is supporting a growing community controlled sector in the NT.

Contract Type: 0.6 Full Time Equivalent (part-time role) for 24 months.

Salary: An appropriate salary will be negotiated based on the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications. Generous salary packaging is also available.

Location: Alice Springs (preferable) / Darwin (negotiable).

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

Download a copy of the Position Description and selection criteria from www.amsant.org.au or click on the attachment below.

How to apply for this jobYour application must address the selection criteria and include your CV, a cover letter and details of two referees. Email applications to hr@amsant.org.au using the subject line: Research Project Officer – Trauma Informed Care Project application via EthicalJobs.

For further information contact Human Resources on 08 8944 6666.
Supporting materials FINAL Position Description_Research Officer – Trauma Informed Care (Culturally Responsive).pdf

AHMRC Chief Executive Officer for the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW.

About AH&MRC

We are looking for a Chief Executive Officer for the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW. The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC ) is the peak representative body and voice of Aboriginal communities on health in NSW. We represent our members, the Aboriginal Community

Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) that deliver culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care to their communities.

Aboriginal Community Control has its origins in Aboriginal people’s right to self-determination. This is the right to be involved in health service delivery and decision-making according to the protocols or procedures determined by Aboriginal communities based on the Aboriginal definition of health:

Aboriginal health means not just the physical well-being of an individual but the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole Community in which each individual is able to achieve their full potential as a human being thereby bringing about the total wellbeing of their Community. It is a whole of life view and includes the cyclical concept of life-death-life.
About the Job
The CEO will be responsible to the Board of Directors (the ‘Board’) for implementing strategic and operational policy and for the continued growth and viability of the organisation. The primary purpose of the role is to develop and grow the organisation’s services to members and to provide strategies and advice to the Board. In addition, the position is accountable for managing the day-to-day operations of all business units and operating in the best interests of members.

The position also performs the function of Company Secretary to the Board of AH&MRC.
Responsibilities

  • AH&MRC governance
  • Business operations
  • Strategic planning
  • Financial management
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Risk management
  • People management
  • Reporting
  • Company secretary functions

About You
To be successful you will have;

  • Tertiary qualifications in Business / Law / Health and/or extensive Executive Management experience
  • Comprehensive knowledge of relevant legislation, policies and procedures related to Aboriginal Community and Controlled Health organisations
  • Analytical and problem-solving skills in a complex environment
  • Ability to lead, motivate and manage a team, demonstrating effective understanding and experience in human resource management, leadership and motivational skills at strategic and operational levels
  • Demonstrated high level interpersonal skills in relationship management, establishing and maintaining partnerships and negotiation skills with internal and external stakeholders
  • A knowledge of and understanding of Aboriginal (and Torres Strait Islander) societies and cultures and an understanding of the issues, particularly in the health area which are affecting Aboriginal people as well as a demonstrated ability to communicate sensitively and effectively with Aboriginal people.

We Offer

  • Generous professional development opportunities
  • Salary sacrificing
  • Flexible working arrangements

The constitution provides that there is a requirement for the CEO to be an Aboriginal person and to demonstrate an understanding of and commitment to AH&MRC objectives, and Aboriginal community.

A competitive remuneration package that reflects the senior nature of this role will be negotiated.

The application form 

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Mount Isa Health Services Operations Manager (Identified position)

Gidgee Healing is currently seeking a Mount Isa Health Services Operations Manager (Identified position). This position is full time and based in Mount Isa with required travel to remote communities.

If you are passionate about the health in the Mount Isa community and want to make a difference we want to hear from you!

ABOUT GIDGEE HEALING: 

Gidgee Healing (Gidgee’) is an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service, with our strategic direction determined by a Board of Directors comprising Aboriginal people from across the region, as well as two skills-based Directors. Gidgee’s organisational mission and vision statements demonstrate a commitment to providing holistic and culturally appropriate health services, underpinned by a philosophy of community participation, and a with a strong focus on care coordination.

POSITION SUMMARY:

The Mt Isa Health Services Operations Manager is responsible for the operational management of Primary Health Care Clinics, Maternal and Child Health Service and transportation services within Mt Isa to ensure the delivery of efficient and effective primary health care services.

This includes responsibility for line management in the implementation of:

  • Cultural integrity of service delivery
  • Service delivery in line with the Model of Care
  • Effective Staff Management practices

The scope of the position includes management, human resources management and health service quality assurance and delivery.

It is a genuine occupational requirement that this position be filled by an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person. One of the referees should be an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who can attest to the applicant’s background, knowledge, skills and experience as they relate to the cultural capabilities.

THE LIFESTYLE:

The Mount Isa region is the gateway to the Outback of Queensland, offers a relaxed and casual lifestyle, with a wealth of camping and exploring, scenic national parks, gorges, as well as top river, lake and open water fishing and recreation.

This position closes COB Sunday 9th June 2019

If this position interests you and you would like to review the Position Description please contact People and Culture Team Leader, Priscilla Kondolo.

Direct Line: 07 4749 6508

Mobile: 0436 814 790

APPLY HERE

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General Practitioner and Senior Medical Officer – OVAHS

About the Organisation

The Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Service (OVAHS) provides a comprehensive Primary Health Care service to Aboriginal people in the East Kimberley region in Western Australia using a holistic approach that includes a high standard of service delivery, the promotion of social justice and the overcoming of the health issues that affect so many people in the region.

Preventative and public health programs include Maternal and Child Health, Women’s Health, Chronic Disease, Sexual Health and along with the OVAHS Social Support Unit which offers AOD, Mental Health Services, health promotion and education programs in the areas of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders prevention, smoking cessation, chronic disease prevention, childhood health promotion and sexual health.

OVAHS provides a fulfilling and stimulating work environment in a diverse range of areas for those seeking an exciting career in Indigenous Health.

About the Opportunities

OVAHS now has a number of fantastic opportunities available within their team of dedicated health professionals in Kununurra,WA:

  • 2 x General Practitioners (Full-time, ongoing)
  • 1 x Senior Medical Officer – Permanent full-time (or option to FIFO, 2 months on, 2 months off, with some flexibility around roster)

The successful candidates will be Vocationally Registered GP (FRACGP, FACRRM, or equivalent) and be eligible for registration as a medical practitioner in WA. Demonstrated experience in general practice is also essential.

The Senior Medical Officer is a senior management position responsible for ensuring the smooth operation of clinical services. As such, a background in performance management and experience in the professional development and supervision of staff is a requirement for this role.

Importantly, you will be committed to providing culturally sensitive healthcare and demonstrate an interest in working closely with Aboriginal communities, to understand their health issues and work with them to find solutions.

To view the position description for these positions, please click ‘apply now’.

About the Benefits

OVAHS is an organisation that truly values its team, and is committed to improving employee knowledge, skills and experience. It offers a stable, safe and supportive work environment with a large, multi-disciplinary team including doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, an audiologist, dietitian, mental health workers and a social support unit.

A highly attractive remuneration package is on offer circa $400,000 + super (pro-rata if FIFO arrangements), commensurate with qualifications and experience. This includes a fixed salary of $250,000 + super (pro-rata for FIFO), plus a range of benefits to significantly increase the value of your overall remuneration package including:

Specific benefits include:

  • Paid medical insurance and registration
  • Salary packaging options
  • No on call or weekend work is required
  • Quality Staff housing with all utilities included + NBN internet
  • Fully maintained 4WD Vehicle with fuel for work and personal use (within 100km of Kununurra)
  • 5 weeks Annual leave (pro rata)+ additional Christmas/New Year break of up 10 days
  • Generous Study leave and allowance
  • Relocation assistance
  • 17.5% leave loading (paid at the end of 12 months continual service)
  • Annual flight allowance to Perth (paid at the end of 12 months continual service)
  • Public holidays as paid days off
  • Sociable hours (Mon-Fri 8am-4.30pm)

Additionally, working at OVAHS in Kununurra has lifestyle benefits that are unique to the Kimberley Region. With Australia’s most stunning landscapes on your doorstep and an incredible outdoor lifestyle on offer, the Kimberley is the place to be to make the most of life’s adventures.

This is an excellent opportunity to develop your skills, advance your career and enhance your cultural knowledge in a stunning outback location. Make a positive difference – Apply Now!

General Practitioners – Sunrise Health Katherine Region

About the Opportunity

Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is now seeking two General Practitioners to join their dedicated team in the Katherine Region of the Northern Territory.

These roles are being offered on a permanent full-time basis, however shared job arrangements (such as 2 months on, 2 months off) would be considered. We also require a GP from early May to early September 2019 each year.

Working as part of a multi-disciplinary team, led by the Director of Public Health and Planning, this position is responsible for providing direct primary healthcare services, support for and sharing of skills with other health centre staff, and participating in key primary healthcare initiatives and community consultation.

You will work across a number of the nine communities that Sunriseservices, primarily carrying out clinic-based work. The extended team you’ll work with on a day to day basis includes a range of Allied Health Professionals who provide both clinical and health promotional activities.

About the Benefits

If you’re looking for an opportunity to contribute to the improved health of remote Aboriginal communities, this could be the position for you!

Your dedication will be rewarded with a highly attractive base salary circa $250,000 – $280,000 plus super and a range of benefits including:

  • 6 weeks leave per year;
  • Up to 10 days study leave;
  • Phone and laptop;
  • Vehicle for work and personal use;
  • Annual housing allowance of $20,000 while in Katherine;
  • Accommodation for any overnight stays while working in the communities;
  • Salary packaging options up to $15,899 per packaging year; and
  • Annual flight back to your point of hire.

Working at Sunrise Health Service and living in the Katherine region has lifestyle benefits that are unique to the Northern Territory. With the Katherine Gorge on your doorstep and an incredible outdoor lifestyle on offer, combined with some of the best fishing in the world, the Northern Territory is the place to be to make the most of life’s adventures.

For more information and to apply, please click “Apply Now”.

2.1 JOBS AT Apunipima ACCHO Cairns and Cape York

The links to  job vacancies are on website


www.apunipima.org.au/work-for-us

As part of our commitment to providing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Brisbane with a comprehensive range of primary health care, youth, child safety, mental health, dental and aged care services, we employ approximately 150 people across our locations at Woolloongabba, Woodridge, Northgate, Acacia Ridge, Browns Plains, Eagleby and East Brisbane.

The roles at ATSICHS are diverse and include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Registered Nurses
  • Transport Drivers
  • Medical Receptionists
  • Administrative and Management roles
  • Medical professionals
  • Dentists and Dental Assistants
  • Allied Health Staff
  • Support Workers

Current vacancies

2.4 Wuchopperen Health Service ACCHO CAIRNS 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited has been providing primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for over 35 years. Our workforce has a range of professional, clinical, allied health, social emotional wellbeing and administration positions.

  • We have two sites in Cairns and a growing number of supplementary services and partnerships.
  • We have a diverse workforce of over 200 employees
  • 70 percent of our team identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people

Our team is dedicated to the Wuchopperen vision: Improving the Quality of Life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. If you would like to make a difference, and improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, please apply today.

Expressions of Interest

We invite Expressions of Interest from:

  • Aboriginal Health Workers
  • Clinical Psychologists
  • Dietitians
  • Diabetes Educators
  • Exercise Physiologists
  • Medical Officers (FAACGP / FACCRM)
  • Registered Nurses
  • Midwives
  • Optometrists
  • Podiatrists
  • Speech Pathologists

In accordance with Wuchopperen’s privacy processes, we will keep your EOI on file for three months.

 Current Vacancies

NT Jobs Alice Spring ,Darwin East Arnhem Land and Katherine

3.1 JOBS at Congress Alice Springs including

More info and apply HERE

3.2 There are 20 + JOBS at Miwatj Health Arnhem Land

 

More info and apply HERE

3.3  JOBS at Wurli Katherine

More info and apply HERE

3.4 Sunrise ACCHO Katherine

Sunrise Job site

4. South Australia

   4.1 Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc

Nunkuwarrin Yunti places a strong focus on a client centred approach to the delivery of services and a collaborative working culture to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients. View our current vacancies here.

NUNKU SA JOB WEBSITE 

5. Western Australia

5.1 Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc. is passionate about creating a strong and dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander workforce. We are committed to providing mentorship and training to our team members to enhance their skills for them to be able to create career pathways and opportunities in life.

On occasions we may have vacancies for the positions listed below:

  • Medical Receptionists – casual pool
  • Transport Drivers – casual pool
  • General Hands – casual pool, rotating shifts
  • Aboriginal Health Workers (Cert IV in Primary Health) –casual pool

*These positions are based in one or all of our sites – East Perth, Midland, Maddington, Mirrabooka or Bayswater.

To apply for a position with us, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • Detailed CV
  • WA National Police Clearance – no older than 6 months
  • WA Driver’s License – full license
  • Contact details of 2 work related referees
  • Copies of all relevant certificates and qualifications

We may also accept Expression of Interests for other medical related positions which form part of our services. However please note, due to the volume on interests we may not be able to respond to all applications and apologise for that in advance.

All complete applications must be submitted to our HR department or emailed to HR

Also in accordance with updated privacy legislation acts, please download, complete and return this Permission to Retain Resume form

Attn: Human Resources
Derbarl Yerrigan Health Services Inc.
156 Wittenoom Street
East Perth WA 6004

+61 (8) 9421 3888

 

DYHS JOB WEBSITE

 5.2 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS)

https://kamsc-iframe.applynow.net.au/

KAMS JOB WEBSITE

6.Victoria

6.1 Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

 

Thank you for your interest in working at the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

If you would like to lodge an expression of interest or to apply for any of our jobs advertised at VAHS we have two types of applications for you to consider.

Expression of interest

Submit an expression of interest for a position that may become available to: employment@vahs.org.au

This should include a covering letter outlining your job interest(s), an up to date resume and two current employment referees

Your details will remain on file for a period of 12 months. Resumes on file are referred to from time to time as positions arise with VAHS and you may be contacted if another job matches your skills, experience and/or qualifications. Expressions of interest are destroyed in a confidential manner after 12 months.

Applying for a Current Vacancy

Unless the advertisement specifies otherwise, please follow the directions below when applying

Your application/cover letter should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • A brief discussion on why you feel you would be the appropriate candidate for the position
  • Response to the key selection criteria should be included – discussing how you meet these

Your Resume should include:

  • Current name, address and contact details
  • Summary of your career showing how you have progressed to where you are today. Most recent employment should be first. For each job that you have been employed in state the Job Title, the Employer, dates of employment, your duties and responsibilities and a brief summary of your achievements in the role
  • Education, include TAFE or University studies completed and the dates. Give details of any subjects studies that you believe give you skills relevant to the position applied for
  • References, where possible, please include 2 employment-related references and one personal character reference. Employment references must not be from colleagues, but from supervisors or managers that had direct responsibility of your position.

Ensure that any referees on your resume are aware of this and permission should be granted.

How to apply:

Send your application, response to the key selection criteria and your resume to:

employment@vahs.org.au

All applications must be received by the due date unless the previous extension is granted.

When applying for vacant positions at VAHS, it is important to know the successful applicants are chosen on merit and suitability for the role.

VAHS is an Equal Opportunity Employer and are committed to ensuring that staff selection procedures are fair to all applicants regardless of their sex, race, marital status, sexual orientation, religious political affiliations, disability, or any other matter covered by the Equal Opportunity Act

You will be assessed based on a variety of criteria:

  • Your application, which includes your application letter which address the key selection criteria and your resume
  • Verification of education and qualifications
  • An interview (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • Discussions with your referees (if you are shortlisted for an interview)
  • You must have the right to live and work in Australia
  • Employment is conditional upon the receipt of:
    • A current Working with Children Check
    • A current National Police Check
    • Any licenses, certificates and insurances

6.2 Mallee District Aboriginal Services Mildura Swan Hill Etc 

 

MDAS Jobs website 

6.3 : Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-Operative 2 POSITIONS VACANT

.

http://www.rumbalara.org.au/vacancies

 

7.1 AHMRC Sydney and Rural 

 

Check website for current Opportunities

7.2 Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service 

Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service (GWAHS) is an entity of Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service. GWAHS provides a culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care service for the local Aboriginal communities of western Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains. GWAHS provides multidisciplinary services from sites located in Mt Druitt and Penrith.

The clinical service model includes general practitioners (GPs), Aboriginal Health Workers and Practitioners, nursing staff, reception and transport staff. The service also offers a number of wraparound services and programs focused on child and maternal health, social and emotional wellbeing, Drug and Alcohol Support, chronic disease, as well as population health activities.

GWAHS is committed to ensuring that patients have access to and receive high quality, culturally appropriate care and services that meet the needs of local Aboriginal communities.

WEBSITE

7.3 Katungul ACCHO

Download position descriptions HERE 

8. Tasmania

 

 

TAC JOBS AND TRAINING WEBSITE

9.Canberra ACT Winnunga ACCHO

 

Winnunga ACCHO Job opportunites 

10. Other : Stakeholders Indigenous Health 

We have an exciting opportunity for an energetic, passionate and highly capable Family Case worker to join the team at our Pinangba Cape York Family Centre.

In this role you will visit and assess high needs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Families at high risk of breakdown due to alcohol and drug use who also have secondary related mental and/or physical health issues. Supplementing this you will also manage their transition back to community living which will include coordinating any additional support services they may require to have a seamless re-integration.

For more information and to apply, please visit our website

bluecare.mercury.com.au

Or Contact Shirley Sues During Business hours on 0740822420

Children’s Ground 

Align your career with a compelling cause. Help to create an Australia free from extreme poverty and inequity by applying for one of our career vacancies or volunteer opportunities.

  • Early Years Educators – Alice Springs
  • Project Officer – Communications, Partnerships & Investments – part time – Abbotsford
  • Project Officer – Communications, Partnerships & Investments – full time – Abbotsford
  • Social Enterprise Coordinator – Darwin

More Info Apply Here 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #RefreshTheCTGRefresh News : Dr @mperkinsnsw #ClosingtheGap failures are firmly rooted in racism and Nicholas Biddle From @ANU_CAEPR 4 lessons from 11 years of #ClosingtheGap reports

 

1. Some targets are easier than others

2. The life-expectancy measure is unpredictable

3. On-track one year, off-track the next

4. Indigenous Australians in the city and country have different needs

5.Closing the Gap Failures are firmly rooted in racism

” Scott Morrison last week became the fifth prime minister to deliver a Closing the Gap report to parliament – the 11th since the strategy began in 2008. Closing the Gap has aimed to reduce disadvantage among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with particular respect to life expectancy, child mortality, access to early childhood education, educational achievement and employment outcomes.

Almost every time a prime minister delivers the report, he or she states the need to move on from a deficits approach.

Which is exactly what Morrison did this time. But he also did something different. Four of the seven targets set in 2008 were due to expire in 2018.

So last year, the government developed the Closing the Gap Refresh – where targets would be updated in partnership with Indigenous people.

Nicholas Biddle ANU : Four lessons from 11 years of Closing the Gap reports : See in full Part 1 Below 

Read NACCHO Closing the Gap response and download the report

” Once again, minimal progress has been made towards closing the gap on Indigenous disadvantage.

Racism has been mentioned as an issue, but exactly how does racism make a contribution to this “unforgivable” state of affairs ?.

The answer is in the criminal justice system. Studies have shown mass incarceration has a profoundly negative effect on the health, education, and employment of families and communities-and Indigenous Australians are the most incarcerated group on Earth.

The US, the mother of all jailers imprisoned 655 people per 100,000 in 2018. Australia imprisoned 164 non Indigenous people and 2481 Indigenous people per 100,000. Western Australian imprisoned 3663 Aboriginal people per 100,000.

In 1991, when the report on Aboriginal Deaths in Custody was handed down, 14% of all prisoners were First Nations people.  By last year, the figure was 28%. ”

Lesson 5 Dr Meg Perkins is a registered psychologist, researcher and writer : See Part 2 Below

First Published in The Conversation 

The current report and the work leading up to it has led to new targets, such as a “significant and sustained progress to eliminate the over-representation of Aboriginal children in out-of-home care” and old targets framed differently.

For example, the headline new outcome for families, children and youth is that “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children thrive in their early years”. This is on top of more specific targets such as having 95% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander four-years-olds enrolled in early childhood education by 2025 – which this year is on track.


Read more: Closing the Gap is failing and needs a radical overhaul


Looking back on the past 11 years, there are several things we’ve learned. This includes those targets that seem easiest to meet, as well changes in the demographics of the population that complicate the measuring of the targets. Below are three lessons from the last decade of the policy.

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/74BbT/1/

1. Some targets are easier than others

The targets where there has been some success tend to be those where government has more direct control. Consider the Year 12 attainment compared to the employment targets. To increase the proportion of Indigenous Australians completing year 12, the Commonwealth government can change the income support system to create incentives to not leave school, while state and territory governments can adjust the school leaving age.

That is not to downplay the efforts of parents, teachers, community leaders, and the students themselves. But, there are some direct policy levers.

To improve employment outcomes, on the other hand, discrimination among employers needs to be reduced, human capital levels increased, jobs need to be in areas where Indigenous people live and to match the skills and experiences of the Indigenous population. These are solvable policy problems with the right settings and community engagement. But, they are substantially more complex.


Read more: Three reasons why the gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians aren’t closing


2. The life-expectancy measure is unpredictable

The main target has always been related to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander life expectancy. The 2019 report shows the target of closing the gap by 2031 is not on track.

Unfortunately, the life expectancy target is one of the more difficult to measure, as it uses multiple datasets that are potentially affected by different ways Indigenous people are counted in the census and changing levels of identification. The most recent estimates, based on data for 2015-17, are that life expectancy at birth is 71.6 years for Indigenous males and 75.6 years for Indigenous females.

While the gaps with the non-Indigenous population of 8.6 years and 7.8 years respectively are smaller than they were in 2010-12 (the previous estimates) the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and most demographers suggest extreme caution around the interpretation of this change. The ABS writes:

While the estimates in this release show a small improvement in life expectancy estimates and a reduction in the gap between 2010-2012 and 2015-2017, this improvement should be interpreted with considerable caution as the population composition has changed during this period.

More people have been identifying as being Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander over recent years. What’s more, the newly identified Indigenous people tend to have better outcomes on average (across health, education, and labour market outcomes) than those who were identified previously. This biases our estimates, making it appear there is more rapid progress than there might otherwise be.


Read more: Three charts on: the changing status of Indigenous Australians


The Closing the Gap framework was implicitly designed around improving the circumstances of the 2008 Indigenous population relative to the 2008 non-Indigenous population. However, both populations have changed substantially over the intervening years. There has been a growth of the non-Indigenous population due to international migration. It is hard to measure and track differences in changing populations.

3. On-track one year, off-track the next

There is also the yearly reporting cycle. The target of child mortality, for instance, no longer appears to be on track. This is despite it being on track in previous years. Yearly fluctuations make it hard to gauge the effectiveness of long-term policy settings.

For other indicators, such as employment, the data is available far less frequently than it could be, and we are less able to judge the effect of individual policies and interventions. Having said that, in my view, the sophistication and nuance with which data in the Closing the Gap reports has been presented has improved considerably.

It seems most policies prioritise Indigenous Australians living in remote areas than those in the city. David Clode/Unsplash

4. Indigenous Australians in the city and country have different needs

This isn’t always reflected in policy settings. The current report shows many outcomes are worse in remote compared to non-remote Australia. It also makes the point (though less frequently), that the vast majority of Indigenous Australians live in regional areas and major cities. This creates a tension between relative and absolute need. Unfortunately, the policy responses of government often don’t get that balance right.

Take the signature policy proposal announced with the current report – a suspension or cancelling of HECS debt for teachers who work in remote schools. What the policy ignores is that the vast majority of Indigenous students live outside remote Australia, that outcomes for Indigenous students in non-remote areas are well behind those of non-Indigenous students, and that the schools Indigenous students attend in non-remote areas tend to be very different from those of non-Indigenous students.


Read more: Infographic: Are we making progress on Indigenous education?


Attracting and keeping more high quality teachers in remote areas is a worthwhile policy aim. Alone, it is not sufficient.

The current report and speech by the prime minister states that “genuine partnerships are required to drive sustainable, systemic change” and that the government needs “to support initiatives led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to address the priorities identified by those communities”.

These are admirable goals. But, they require significant resources, a genuine engagement with the evidence (even if it isn’t positive), taking the Uluru Statement from the Heart seriously, and real ceding of control to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

5.Closing the Gap Failures are firmly rooted in racism

Some people think Aboriginal people must be uniquely anti-social and/or make very bad choices, but research tells us the majority of people in prison are suffering from severe cognitive impairments and/or mental health issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder and major depression.

Why are we punishing people with disabilities for behaviour that may not be intentional ?.

When we look at children in school, we find three times as many Aboriginal children are suspended from school than non-Aboriginal children. Some of the special purpose schools in NSW are filled with Aboriginal children only.

Many youth detention centres in the country have 100 per cent Aboriginal inmates. Why are so many Aboriginal children being suspended from school and set on the road to crime and punishment, and what happens to white Australian children who are not able to behave appropriately in the classroom ?.

It seems mainstream Australian children are referred to health professionals when they have difficulties at school. They are seen as suffering from learning disabilities, autism, or ADHD. Speech therapists and other allied health professionals work to help them catch up with peers and stay in school.

Due to intergenerational disadvantage, Indigenous people often don’t have the resources to find a therapist to assist their child. People born before 1972 were not guaranteed a place in school, and so grand parents may not have had much education.

Parents may have left school in Year 8 or 9 and are not familiar with developmental norms or disabilities. If they know that their child is falling behind at school, they often do not have the money to pay for expensive psychological assessments, which cannot be done in Medicare. Without an assessment, and a diagnosis , the school cannot make allowances for a child with brain-based disabilities.

The racist policies of the past have left many Aboriginal people disadvantaged when it comes to dealing with the education system. If their child is having difficulties, suspensions are often the consequence. Once suspended and out on the street, racism sets in again.

Aboriginal children are searched and arrested more often. We will never close the disadvantage gap until we can offer support to the children of young people. We need to raise the age criminal responsibility from 10 to 15 years, and spend money on supporting children, not punishing them.

Dr Meg Perkins

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #RefreshtheCTGRefresh : Read and /Or Download #ClosingtheGap response Press Releases from Pat Turner NACCHO CEO @June_Oscar @congressmob @closethegapOZ @amapresident @RACGP @RecAustralia @Change_Record @Mayi_Kuwayu

Close the Gap Campaign

AMA

RACGP

Reconciliation Australia

Change the Record

AMSANT Darwin

Mayi Kuwayu /ANU

Greens

Introduction NACCHO Closing the Gap response CEO Pat Turner AM 

On the floor of Parliament yesterday, the Prime Minister spoke of a change happening in our country: that there is a shared understanding that we have a shared future- Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, together. But our present is not shared. Our present, and indeed our past is marred in difference, in disparity. This striking disparity in quality of life outcomes is what began the historic journey of the Closing the Gap initiatives a decade ago.

But after ten years of good intentions the outcomes have been disappointing. The gaps have not been closing and so-called targets have not been met. The quality of life among our communities is simply not equal to that of our non-indigenous Australian counterparts.

Yes change must come from within our communities, but change must also come from the whole of Australia. We must change together.

The time has come for our voices to be heard and for us to lead the way on Closing the Gap. We are ready for action. ”

Pat Turner AM is the CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

But I’m ever hopeful that change is near. I was heartened by the statement made by the Prime Minister yesterday on the floor of Parliament. For the first time, I heard a genuine acknowledgement of why the Closing the Gap outcomes seem steeped in failure. I heard an acknowledgement that until Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are brought to the table as equal partners, the gap will not be closed and progress will not be made. This is a view that our community has expressed for many years – a view I am encouraged has finally been heard.

Historically, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community leaders have not been equal decision-makers in steering attempts to close the unacceptable gaps between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and the broader community. Our struggle as community-controlled organisations to even gain a voice at the table  – let alone for governments to actually listen to us – has long been at the crux of the disappointing progress.

Last year, an accord on the first stage of the Closing the Gap Refresh languished because discussions were not undertaken with genuine input from community members. We turned an important corner in December when an historic agreement was reached to include a coalition of peak bodies as equal partners in refreshing the Closing the Gap strategy.

We now need to ensure that the agreement blossoms into genuine action.

We simply cannot let this opportunity to make a real difference to the lives of our people slip by. Government cannot be allowed to drag the chain on this until it becomes another broken promise.

We are doing the heavy lifting and have drafted a formal partnership agreement for the Commonwealth, state and territory governments to consider. We are determined to do all that we can to fulfil COAG’s undertaking to agree formal partnership arrangements by the end of February.

The agreement sets out how we all work together and have shared and equal decision making on closing the gap. We are confident that a genuine partnership will help to accelerate positive outcomes to close the gaps.

The lack of progress under Closing the Gap is the lived reality of our people on the ground everyday. They are being robbed of living their full potential. Sadly, attending the funerals of people in our community – including increasingly young people taking their own lives – is all too common.

A coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies from across the nation has formed to be signatories to the partnership arrangements. We are now almost 40* service delivery, policy and advocacy organisations, with community-control at our heart. This is the first time our peak bodies have come together in this way.

Our coalition brings a critical mass of independent Indigenous organisations with deep connections to communities that will enhance the Closing the Gap efforts. We are a serious partner for government. We want to ensure our views are considered equal and that we make decisions jointly.

We cannot continue to approach Closing the Gap in the same old ways. The top-down approach has reaped disappointing results as evidenced by the lack of progress of previous strategies to reach their targets.

We must not lose sight of the most crucial point of Closing the Gap, which is to improve the everyday lives of our people. We must ensure our people are no longer burdened with higher rates of child mortality, poorer literacy, numeracy and employment outcomes and substantially lower life expectancies.

Yesterday on the floor of Parliament, the Prime Minister said that this will be a long journey of many steps. And I say, we have been walking for centuries. We have journeyed far and we will keep walking forward and climbing up until we reach a place where we are all on equal ground.

I also heard the Leader of the Opposition say that the burden of change needs to be carried by non-Indigenous Australians in acknowledging that racism still exists, that our justice system is deeply flawed and that generational trauma cannot be ignored.

Yes change must come from within our communities, but change must also come from the whole of Australia. We must change together.

The time has come for our voices to be heard and for us to lead the way on Closing the Gap. We are ready for action.

1 .Close the Gap Campaign

“We have had so many promises and so many disappointments. It’s well and truly time to match the rhetoric. We cannot continue to return to parliament every year and hear the appalling statistics,

 Last December, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), led by the Prime Minister, agreed to a formal partnership with peak Indigenous organisations on Closing the Gap.

We strongly support the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak bodies that has formed to be signatories to the partnership agreement with COAG, and for them to share as equal partners in the design, implementation and monitoring of Closing the Gap programs, policies and targets.

This partnership really does have the potential to be a game changer. It means active participation in decisions about matters that affect us. It will allow the voices of Indigenous Australians at community, local and national levels to be heard. “

The Co-Chairs of the Close the Gap Campaign, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner June Oscar AO and the Co-Chair of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples Rod Little, say that commitment must be followed by action.

It was imperative for Australian governments to have an agreement in place by the end of February with the coalition of more than 40 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and justice groups, so all stakeholders can get onto the “nitty gritty” of the Closing the Gap Refresh with new targets set to be finalised by mid year. ”

National Family Violence Prevention Legal Services (FVPLS) Forum convenor Antoinette Braybrook 

Download CTG Press Release

1.Close the Gap response to CTG

2.AMA

“After more than a decade, the lack of resourcing and investment in the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples continues to see unacceptable gaps across a range of outcomes.

The lack of sufficient funding to vital Indigenous services and programs is a key reason for this.”

The AMA supports the comments made by Ms Pat Turner, CEO of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) who said: ‘While our people still live very much in third-world conditions in a lot of areas still in Australia … we have to hold everybody to account’.

Closing the Gap targets are vital if we are to see demonstrable improvements in the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The call for a justice target and a target around the removal of Aboriginal children should be considered.

The AMA welcomes the decision of the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) to agree a formal partnership with us on Closing the Gap. This is an historic milestone in the relationship between Governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.” 

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone

Download the AMA Press Release

2 AMA Closing the Gap progress disappointing

See all NACCHO AMA posts

3.RACGP

‘This year’s Closing the Gap report reminds us that whilst we are making important progress, we are still not doing enough for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

It’s critical we get this right. Our people deserve to live full and healthy lives, like every other Australian. We know the best way to achieve this is when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have a say in the decisions that impact them.

Governments must acknowledge the critical role of primary healthcare and particularly the culturally responsive care offered by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in Closing the Gap “

Chair of RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, Associate Professor Peter O’Mara, told newsGP he welcomes the Prime Minister’s commitment to establishing a formal partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples on the Closing the Gap Strategy.

Read full Press Release HERE

Read NACCHO RACGP articles HERE

4.Reconciliation Australia

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders and peak bodies have been demanding a greater say in the policy priorities, and design and implementation of programs around the CTG since its inception over a decade ago. Today’s commitment by the Prime Minister, supported by the Opposition Leader, is welcome albeit overdue, and builds on the COAG commitment in December.

It is simple common sense that people, who live each day with the problems CTG is trying to address, will have the greatest knowledge and understanding of the causes and solutions to these problems “

Karen Mundine, CEO of Reconciliation Australia, said her organisation was disappointed by the failure but remained hopeful that a bipartisan commitment to a greater First Nations’ voice in the planned refresh of the CTG would lead to more effective programs being delivered in partnership with communities.

Download the Press Release

4.Reconciliation Aust CTG Response

5.Change the Record

 “Change the Record calls on the Prime Minister to listen to the majority of        Australians who believe governments must act to close the gap on justice, as shown by the 2018 Australian Reconciliation Barometer results.

“Almost 60% of Australians want the Federal Government to include justice in Closing the Gap, and 95% agree our people should have a say in matters that affect us,”

In the past year the Government engaged selected stakeholders in a nation-wide consultation, however many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations were excluded. Change the Record stands in support of the Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled peak bodies as they push for a formal partnership agreement to finalise the Closing the Gap Refresh.

This historic step to make our peak bodies equal partners with Government is critical to our self-determination and to Closing the Gap,”

Change the Record co-chair Damian Griffis.

Download the CTG Press Release

5. Change the Record

6. AMSANT Darwin

We would have loved to be part of those discussions about what to prioritise. We absolutely support education being a top priority target, but we need to ensure we are also prioritising some of those targets such as housing.”

You are not going to get kids to go to school if they haven’t had a decent night’s sleep because of an overcrowded house, you are not going to get kids to go to school if they haven’t got food in their tummy … you ain’t going to get kids to go to school if parents are not encouraging them to go to school due to lack of support services for parents”,

John Paterson AMSANT Darwin

From SMH Interview

7.Mayi Kuwayu /ANU

 ” The refreshed targets help us focus on progress and achievement. Most of these refreshed targets are not dependent on how things are going within the non-Indigenous population (they are not moving targets) — they are absolute, fixed targets that we can work towards. For example, the old target of “halve the gap in employment by 2018” is replaced by “65 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth (15-24 years) are in employment, education or training by 2028”.

Further, the refreshed targets are evidence-based and appear to be achievable.

This is a change from the original targets which the evidence showed could never have been met. They were always going to fail. This is a problem because it has reinforced the idea held by many in the wider Australian community that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander inequality was “too big of a problem” and could never be overcome. Or even worse, it supported the myth that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people themselves were the problem

Ray Lovett, Katherine Thurber, and Emily Banks are part of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program at the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University, and conduct research on the social and cultural determinants of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.

Their approach is to conduct research in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, communities, and organisations, and to frame research using a strengths-based approach, where possible. Follow the program @Mayi_Kuwayu Professor Maggie Walter is the Pro Vice-Chancellor Aboriginal Research and Leadership at the University of Tasmania.

 Read Article in Full 

8.Greens

” Mr Morrison’s closing the gap address was paternalistic and patronising and a clear indication that he doesn’t get it.

Mr Morrison lectured the Parliament about co-design and collaboration but he does not practice what he preaches

The Coalition was dragged kicking and screaming to a co-design approach and the Government’s failure to listen when the process started was in fact the reason we are so delayed with the Close the Gap refresh.

You would think that he was the first person to think of collaboration and co-design!

Senator Rachel Siewert 

Download the Greens CTG Press Release

8.Greens Party CTG Response

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #refreshtheCTGRefresh 2 of 2 : Download the #COAG 9 page statement on the #ClosingTheGap refresh

 ” One of the lessons governments have learned over the last ten years is that effective programs and services need to be designed, developed and implemented in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

We must place collaboration, transparency, and accountability at the centre of the way we do business with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia. Working in genuine partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is fundamental to Closing the Gap.

All governments remain committed to engaging with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and other stakeholders to finalise and implement the Closing the Gap Refresh “

From the COAG Statement

1.Download CTG COAG 6 Page Statement

2.Download CTG  COAG 3 Page Draft Targets Outcomes

3. Download COAG Communique Dec 12

Where we actually let Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians lead the discussion, determine the outcome, own the outcome,”

The Victorian premier, Daniel Andrews, said the partnership provided a meaningful opportunity, the “likes of which we’ve not seen before”. From The Guardian 

“We can’t close the gap unless we do this in partnership with Aboriginal people,” he told reporters on Wednesday.

“I think the wording of what we’re doing so far on Closing the Gap is good but we have to talk funding at some stage.”

The Northern Territory chief minister, Michael Gunner, said on Wednesday it was a vital partnership and initiative could not afford to “go off the rails again”.

“ COAG’s commitment to a genuine formal partnership approach between the government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples on the Closing the Gap strategy is a welcome step in the right direction

This is something that we’ve long campaigned for – because involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in decisions that affect their lives will lead to far better outcomes.

We as a sector are looking forward to working with the Prime Minister and COAG to negotiate and agree the refreshed framework, targets and action plans which will be finalised through the committee by mid-2019.

NACCHO Chief Executive Officer Pat Turner AM see NACCHO Press Release HERE

In December 2016, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to refresh the Closing the Gap agenda ahead of the tenth anniversary of the agreement and four of the seven targets expiring in 2018.

In June 2017, COAG agreed to a strengths-based approach and to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples were at the heart of the development and implementation of the next phase of Closing the Gap.

In 2018, a Special Gathering of prominent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians presented COAG with a statement setting out priorities for a new Closing the Gap agenda. The statement called for the next phase of Closing the Gap to be guided by the principles of empowerment and self-determination and deliver a community-led, strengths-based strategy that enables Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to move beyond surviving to thriving.

Since the Special Gathering identified priorities, all governments have worked together to develop a set of outcomes and measures for inclusion in the Closing the Gap Refresh. COAG has now agreed draft targets for further consultation to ensure they align with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities’ priorities and ambition as a basis for developing action plans.

PARTNERSHIPS WITH ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER AUSTRALIA

COAG recognises that in order to effect real change, governments must work collaboratively and in genuine, formal partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as they are the essential agents of change.

This formal partnership must be based on mutual respect between parties and an acceptance that direct engagement and negotiation will be the preferred pathway to productive and effective agreements. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples must play an integral part in the making of the decisions that affect their lives – this is critical to closing the gap.

COAG will ensure that the design and implementation of the next phase of Closing the Gap is a true partnership. Governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people will share ownership of and responsibility for a jointly agreed framework and targets and ongoing monitoring of the Closing the Gap agenda.

The refreshed Closing the Gap agenda recognises and builds on the strength and resilience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities.

CLOSING THE GAP – A VISION FOR THE FUTURE

Closing the Gap requires us to raise our sights from a focus on problems and deficits, to actively supporting and realising the full participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the social and economic life of the nation. COAG recognises there is a need for a cohesive national agenda focussed on important priorities for enabling Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, children and communities to thrive.

COAG has listened to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and stakeholders. COAG has heard there is a need to focus on the long term and on future generations, to strengthen prevention and early intervention initiatives that help build strong families and communities, and to prioritise the most important events over the course of a person’s life and the surrounding environment.

COAG acknowledges Closing the Gap builds on the foundation of existing policies and commitments within the Commonwealth and each state and territory. Closing the Gap does not replace these policies, but provides a people and community centred approach to accelerate outcomes.

COMMUNITY PRIORITIES FOR THE NEXT TEN YEARS

The Special Gathering Statement to COAG in February 2018 recommended the priority areas for the next phase of Closing the Gap:

 Families, children and youth

 Housing

 Justice, including youth justice

 Health

 Economic development

 Culture and language

 Education

 Healing

 Eliminating racism and systemic discrimination.

All priority areas are important and interconnected, and COAG is committed to achieving positive progress in all areas.

The Commonwealth, states and territories have consulted widely on these priorities. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities, peak bodies, service providers, technical experts and members of the public had the opportunity to provide their views on the future of Closing the Gap.

In considering where to set targets, there was a focus on the priority areas that lend themselves to the design of specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound targets. This focus on evidence and data enables COAG to effectively track progress over time.

CROSS SYSTEM PRIORITIES

Governments must deepen their relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This means understanding what matters to communities and continuing to build capability for genuine collaboration and partnership, acknowledging the differing priorities and challenges in different places across urban, regional and remote Australia.

All Australian governments are committed to working cooperatively in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and their communities, to positively transform life outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

COAG recognises that progress reports over the past decade confirm that closing the gap in remote Australia requires particular focus, recognising the rich cultural strengths as well as the need for targeted approaches to address disadvantage in these areas.

COAG acknowledges that culture is fundamental to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ strength and identity. COAG further acknowledges the impacts of historical wrongs and trauma faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and families.

All Australian governments recognise the need to address intergenerational change, racism, discrimination and social inclusion (including in relation to disability, gender and LGBTIQ+), healing and trauma, and the promotion of culture and language for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. These will be taken into account as cross system priorities for all policy areas of the Closing the Gap agenda. Cross system priorities require action across multiple targets.

REFRESHED TARGETS

The Commonwealth, states and territories share accountability for the refreshed Closing the Gap agenda and are jointly accountable outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. COAG commits to working together to improve outcomes in every priority area of the Closing the Gap Refresh.

The refreshed Closing the Gap agenda will commit to targets that all governments will be accountable to the community for achieving. This approach reflects the roles and responsibilities as set out by the National Indigenous Reform Agreement (NIRA), and specified in respective National Agreements, National Partnerships and other relevant bilateral agreements.

While overall accountability for the framework is shared, different levels of government will have lead responsibility for specific targets. The lead jurisdiction is the level of government responsible for monitoring reports against progress and initiating further action if that target is not on track, including through relevant COAG bodies.

The refreshed framework recognises that one level of government may have a greater role in policy and program delivery in relation to a particular target while another level of government may play a greater role in funding, legislative or regulatory functions. Meeting specific targets will require the collaborative efforts of the Commonwealth, states and territories, regardless of which level of government has lead responsibility. Commonwealth, state and territory actions for each target will be set out in jurisdictional action plans, and may vary between jurisdictions. COAG acknowledges that all priority areas have interdependent social, economic and health determinants that impact the achievement of outcomes and targets.

Through a co-design approach, jurisdictional action plans will be developed in genuine partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, setting out the progress that needs to be made nationally and in each jurisdiction for the targets to be met. Action plans will clearly specify what actions each level of government is accountable for, inform jurisdictional trajectories for each target and establish how all levels of government will work together and with communities, organisations and other stakeholders to achieve the targets. Starting points, past trends and local circumstances differ, so jurisdictions’ trajectories will vary and may have different end-points.

COAG recognises that promoting opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to be involved in business activities contributes to economic and social outcomes for families and communities, and has committed to publishing jurisdiction specific procurement policies, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment and business outcomes annually.

PUBLIC ACCOUNTABILITY

Closing the Gap is a whole-of-government agenda for the Commonwealth and each state and territory. To provide direct accountability to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the Australian public as a whole, each jurisdiction will report publicly each year on its Closing the Gap strategy. The Prime Minister will make an annual statement to parliament.

Governments will engage with the community to develop a meaningful framework for transparently tracking and reporting progress with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders.

INDEPENDENT REVIEW

The Productivity Commission’s Indigenous Commissioner will conduct an independent review of progress nationally and in each jurisdiction every three years. All governments will provide input into the Productivity Commission’s review, taking into account differences between urban, regional and remote areas.

The Closing the Gap targets may be subject to refinement, where appropriate, through the review of the NIRA and periodic Productivity Commission reviews.

WHERE WE ARE GOING FROM HERE

A new formal partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, through their representatives, will be established by the end of February 2019.

Building on the work undertaken to date, working through this new partnership, the Commonwealth, and states and territories, will by mid 2019:

 finalise all draft targets;

 review the NIRA; and

 work with the Productivity Commission’s Indigenous Commissioner to develop an independent, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led approach to the three-yearly comprehensive evaluation and review of progress nationally and in each jurisdiction.

One of the lessons governments have learned over the last ten years is that effective programs and services need to be designed, developed and implemented in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. We must place collaboration, transparency, and accountability at the centre of the way we do business with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia. Working in genuine partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is fundamental to Closing the Gap.

All governments are committed to broadening and deepening their partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities over the lifetime of the refreshed agenda. This includes strengthening mechanisms to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have an integral role in decision making and accountability processes at the national, regional and local levels, building on existing arrangements and directions within different jurisdictions.

To guide the development of Commonwealth, state and territory action plans by mid-2019, COAG has endorsed a set of Implementation Principles informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities:

Shared Decision-Making – Implementation of the Closing the Gap framework, and the policy actions that fall out of it, must be undertaken in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Governments and communities should build their capability to work in collaboration and form strong, genuine partnerships in which

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples can be an integral part of the decisions that affect their communities.

Place-based Responses and Regional Decision Making – Programs and investments should be culturally responsive and tailored to place. Each community and region has its own unique history and circumstances. Community members, Elders and regional governance structures are critical partners and an essential source of knowledge and authority on the needs, opportunities, priorities and aspirations of their communities.

Evidence, Evaluation and Accountability – All policies and programs should be developed on evidence-based principles, be rigorously evaluated, and have clear accountabilities based on acknowledged roles and responsibilities. Governments and communities should have a shared understanding of evidence, evaluation and accountability.

Targeted investment – Government investments should contribute to achieving the Closing the Gap targets through strategic prioritisation of efforts based on rigorous evaluation and input from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, especially as it relates to policy formation, outcomes and service commissioning.

Integrated Systems – There should be collaboration between and within Governments, communities and other stakeholders in a given place to effectively coordinate efforts, supported by improvements in transparency and accountability.

WHERE WE HAVE COME FROM – TEN YEARS OF CLOSING THE GAP

In 2008, COAG agreed to the NIRA to implement the Closing the Gap agenda. In signing the agreement, governments acknowledged that a concerted national effort was needed to address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander disadvantage in key areas.

At the time, Closing the Gap was the most ambitious commitment ever made by governments to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. However, the agreement was negotiated with little to no input from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and without an adequate understanding of the mechanisms and timeframes needed to deliver lasting change. It also perpetuated a deficit-based view that framed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policy as a series of responses to disadvantage and inequality, and under-emphasised the strength and agency of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

While some progress has been made to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with respect to life expectancy, child mortality, educational achievement, employment and early childhood education, only three of the seven current targets were on track at the agreement’s ten-year anniversary in 2018. There is a shared view among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the broader Australian community and Australian governments that we must do better.

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

Public engagement on the Refresh has been led by the Commonwealth at the national level, and by states and territories at the local and regional levels.

COAG Public Discussion Paper and Consultation Website:

In December 2017 the COAG public discussion paper and Closing the Gap Refresh consultation website were launched, with the website open for feedback and submissions from the public until the end of April

  1. Feedback from the website, including over 170 major submissions, was collated and used to inform the technical workshop process and COAG’s consideration of target areas for the next phase of the agenda.

Special Gathering of Prominent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians:

In February 2018, COAG leaders agreed that the priority areas identified in the statement of the Special Gathering would form the basis for remaining community consultations on the Refresh. The Special Gathering priority areas were tested in the national roundtables and other engagement processes led by the Commonwealth from February 2018 and have been strongly supported by stakeholders.

Consultations: The Commonwealth held 18 national roundtables in state capitals and regional centres across the country, ending with a national peaks workshop in Canberra in April. Roundtables sought feedback from participants on the priorities identified in the Special Gathering statement. Over 1,000 people were directly engaged through the meetings and roundtables hosted by the Commonwealth in this first phase of public engagement.

In May and June 2018 the Commonwealth hosted a series of technical workshops to develop potential targets and indicators for the refreshed agenda. The workshops brought together academics, business and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community experts and data custodians with Commonwealth and state officials in a co-design process structured around the Special Gathering priority areas. The first technical workshop in May was attended by officials from all jurisdictions and over 70 subject matter experts, including representatives from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and communities, academics and practitioners. A similar number attended the second technical workshop in June, which had a stronger emphasis on data issues and technical design.

A second series of national roundtables were conducted to test the analysis arising from the initial consultations, submissions and technical workshops. This phase of consultation sought to return to stakeholders who had previously been engaged in the process or lodged submissions to the public consultation website, including members of the Redfern Alliance, national peak bodies, national service providers, and other individuals and organisations. The outcomes of this phase of consultations were fed into discussions between governments in the lead up to the COAG meeting in December 2018.

States and territories held consultations over the same period to ensure views from across the country were heard and incorporated into the Refresh.

All governments remain committed to engaging with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and other stakeholders to finalise and implement the Closing the Gap Refresh