NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth : Download @AIHW BreastScreen Australia monitoring report :Download #Indigenous Resources from @CancerAustralia 

 

” Around 55% of women in the targeted age group of 50–74 participated in the BreastScreen Australia in 2015–2016 with more than 1.7 million screening. Breast cancer mortality has decreased since BreastScreen Australia began from 74 deaths per 100,000 women aged 50–74 in 1991 to 44 deaths per 100,000 women in 2015.

While Indigenous women experience a lower age-standardised incidence rate of breast cancer than non-Indigenous women (rate ratio of 0.9; AIHW 2017c), breast cancer is still the most common cancer diagnosed in Indigenous women. “

Download the full AIHW Report aihw-can-116

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #BreastCancerAwareness #getChecked : 1.Download #Indigenous Resources from @CancerAustralia 

Participation in BreastScreen Australia and breast cancer outcomes in Indigenous women

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women of Australia, hereafter respectfully referred to as Indigenous women, experience a high burden from breast cancer.

While Indigenous women experience a lower age-standardised incidence rate of breast cancer than non-Indigenous women (rate ratio of 0.9; AIHW 2017c), breast cancer is still the most common cancer diagnosed in Indigenous women.

Aspects of breast cancer and breast screening in Indigenous women are reported by the AIHW and others in various reports and publications, but considering these data individually is not as valuable as considering all available data collectively.

This chapter therefore brings together the BreastScreen Australia participation, incidence and mortality data that previously appeared in several places in this report, and supplements these with additional analyses on incidence, survival and mortality, as well as incorporating data and findings from other published sources.

5.1 Participation in BreastScreen Australia in Indigenous women

Indigenous status of women who participate in BreastScreen Australia is self-reported by women at the time of their screen.

In 2015–2016, participation of Indigenous women aged 50–74 in BreastScreen Australia was 39.1%, compared with the non-Indigenous rate of 54.3% (age-standardised).

Participation trends for Indigenous and non-Indigenous women are shown in Figure 5.1. Historical Indigenous participation rates have been recalculated using new Indigenous population estimates so that meaningful comparisons between reporting periods can be made (see Box 5.1).

Trend data show that the participation rates in Indigenous women aged 50–69 have increased, from around 32%–33% for all reporting periods between 2001–2002 and 2011–2012 to 38% in 2014–2015 and 39% in 2015–2016—although Indigenous women have always had a lower participation rate than non-Indigenous women (Figure 5.2).

Lower participation of Indigenous women may reflect a decreased opportunity to screen, compared with non-Indigenous women, and/or different screening behaviour of Indigenous women (that is, being less likely to screen even with the same opportunity to do so). There may also be a level of under-reporting of Indigenous status in BreastScreen data (as Indigenous status is self-reported by women at the time of their screen), which would also have the effect of lowering the apparent participation rate. This is because under-identification of Indigenous women in BreastScreen data would reduce the size of the numerator without affecting the denominator.

 

Figure 5.1: Participation of women aged 50–74 in BreastScreen Australia, by Indigenous status, 2015–2016 

Source: AIHW analysis of BreastScreen Australia data. Data for this figure are available in Table A1.8.

Figure 5.2: Participation of women aged 50–69 in BreastScreen Australia, by Indigenous status, 1996–1997 to 2015–2016

42 BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2018

Box 5.1: Indigenous populations

This report uses Indigenous population estimates based on the 2011 Census, which were the most recent estimates available at the time of preparation of this report.

New Indigenous population estimates were released by the ABS in 2014 based on the 2011 Census. These estimates included backcasts of the Indigenous population, as well as population projections to 2026. The backcast estimates of the Indigenous population were considerably larger than those previously published based on the 2006 Census.

This is in part due to improvements in Census coverage and enumeration of Indigenous Australians in the 2011 Census, and an increased likelihood that individuals identified themselves and their children as Indigenous. Historical Indigenous participation rates have been recalculated using these new Indigenous population estimates so that meaningful comparisons between reporting periods can be made over time. Rates presented in this report should not be compared with previously published rates that used population estimates based on the 2006 Census.

Results of a recent Queensland project, ‘Closing the Gap in Breast Cancer Screening’, suggest that different screening behaviour of Indigenous women may play a significant role in their lower participation rates. This project aimed to address barriers to screening for Indigenous women through culturally appropriate messages, art shows and partnerships with local Indigenous groups, in order to build trust, educate and support Indigenous women to attend BreastScreen Australia. The project reported an increase in Indigenous participation from 49% to 56% in 2 years.

Initiatives such as these are common to state and territory BreastScreen programs. These strategies and initiatives are designed to be culturally sensitive and appropriate to the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. They include dedicated and appropriate communication resources, group bookings for Indigenous women who would prefer to attend as a group, and the use of Indigenous artwork. BreastScreen workers liaise closely with Aboriginal Health Workers and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community groups to increase acceptance of screening.

In the last quarter of 2014–15, the Australian Government ran the National BreastScreen Australia Campaign to support the expansion of the program to women aged 50–74. The campaign included additional communication activities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consumers, with materials developed in consultation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Access to BreastScreen services for Indigenous women is a national policy feature of BreastScreen Australia, which has developed National Accreditation Standards (NAS) Measures to ensure that this policy feature is met by services accredited through BreastScreen Australia (see Box 3.3 for more information on NAS Measures and accreditation). These NAS Measures, along with other NAS Measures related to access and participation in BreastScreen Australia, underpin BreastScreen Australia’s aim to maximise the proportion of women in the target population who are screened every 2 years. Table 3.1 shows the NAS Measures related to participation.

5.2 Breast cancer outcomes in Indigenous women

The source of national cancer incidence data in Australia is the Australian Cancer Database (ACD), which is compiled from data supplied by state and territory cancer registries. The cancer registers rely on pathology forms as their primary source of information—which do not include Indigenous status in all states and territories. However, the cancer registers collect

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2018 43

information from additional sources, such as hospital records and death records, which allows for information on Indigenous status to be collected where possible.

The level of identification of Indigenous status in the ACD for the period 2009–2013 is considered sufficient to enable analysis in 5 jurisdictions, with data from New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia and the Northern Territory. While the majority (89.9%) of Australian Indigenous people live in these 5 jurisdictions, the degree to which data for these jurisdictions are representative of data for all Indigenous people is unknown (ABS 2012).

Analysis of data from these jurisdictions showed that, in 2009–2013, Indigenous women aged 50–74 had a lower incidence rate of breast cancer, at 251 new cases per 100,000 women, compared with 285 new cases for non-Indigenous women (Figure 5.3)—with a similar trend for all ages (99 compared with 111 per 100,00 women).

Note: Rates age-standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001; ‘Total’ rate includes women with a ‘not stated’ Indigenous status and is therefore greater than the ‘Non-Indigenous’ rate.

Source: AIHW Australian Cancer Database 2014. Data for this figure are available in Table A7.8.

Figure 5.3: Incidence of breast cancer in women aged 50–74 (New South West, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia and the Northern Territory), by Indigenous status, 2009–2013

Survival

Crude survival was also calculated, and found to be lower for Indigenous women, compared with non-Indigenous women—crude survival was 73.7% for Indigenous women of all ages, compared with 84.3% for non-Indigenous women of all ages during the period 2009–2013. Similarly, crude survival was lower in Indigenous women when restricted to women aged 50–74 (75.4% compared with 89.0% for non-Indigenous women).

Mortality

The source of mortality data is the AIHW National Mortality Database, in which information on Indigenous status is considered to be adequate for reporting for 5 jurisdictions: New South Wales, Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory.

In 2011–2015, the mortality rate from breast cancer was higher in Indigenous women aged 50–74, at 55 deaths per 100,000 women, compared with 46 deaths for non-Indigenous women (Figure 5.4). While participation in BreastScreen Australia has a direct effect on the incidence of breast cancer, additional factors come into play for mortality from breast cancer, such as the stage of cancer at diagnosis, and access to treatment.

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health Survey : To help more Aboriginal women to take part in mammographic screening

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Have your say about factors that can help more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to take part in mammographic screening

Please share and promote noting closing extended to 9 November

Survey Link    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/G3C6Z52

The University of Melbourne is currently undertaking a study on behalf of Cancer Australia to identify critical success factors for increasing mammographic screening participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women across Australia.

Cancer Council website Breast Cancer Screening

See previous NACCHO article

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health : Cancer support group leader urges her mob to get regular, free breast screens

The survey will contribute the following essential information to the study:

  • Information about local activities that have been undertaken to increase mammographic screening participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women; and
  • Examples of critical success factors contributing to increased participation.

Survey Link    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/G3C6Z52

Survey Target Group:  People involved in planning or implementing activities that include a focus on mammographic screening participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Survey Period: Responses to the survey are being sought between 18 October and 1 Nov

Plain Language Statement

We would like to ask you to participate in our survey identifying key components of successful programs that have been undertaken (or barriers for service providers without programs) to increase mammography participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

What is the study about?
This study is about building the evidence base to inform the development of mammographic screening strategies to increase the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Who can participate in the study?
Professionals with experience in coordinating programs to increase mammographic screening participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

In addition, professionals with relevant experience who have not implemented mammographic participation programs, and applicable barriers, can participate in the study.

What will I be asked to do?
We would like to invite you to complete a survey regarding your experience in coordinating (or being involved in) any program to increase mammographic screening participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. If you have not coordinated a program to increase mammographic screening participation, you are also invited to complete the survey, and explain the barriers to program implementation and delivery. Your input will help University of Melbourne to better understand the key components of these programs, relevant success factors, barriers and facilitators. This will then help inform future programs and service providers about ‘best practice’. The survey will take approximately 20 minutes.

Are there any risks if I participate?
There is a small possibility that others may be able to identify you from what you say. To minimise this risk, no identifying data is included in the findings of the study.

Your information will be confidential. Your name will be stored separately from any information. The survey data will be kept will be kept in a password-protected network at the university. The researchers will be the only people who can access these files. The information will be kept for five years after the research has been published and then will be destroyed.

Are there any benefits if I participate?
Your involvement in the survey will help University of Melbourne better understand what works and what doesn’t work and what is considered best practice, in terms of mammography participation strategies. Results from the study will also help inform the design and implementation of future interventions to improve mammography participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Results from the survey will be written up as a Cancer Australia report and may be published in journals or presented at conferences. This will help others to know about the results of the study.

Do I have to participate in the study?
Participation in this study is completely voluntary. If you decide that you do not want to be involved in the study you may withdraw at any time and have your information removed. You can also choose not to answer any of the questions asked and stop the survey at any time.

Who is funding the research?
The research is being funded by the Commonwealth government, through Cancer Australia, which is providing $161,700.

If you have any questions or if you can recommend others to receive the survey who are involved in planning or implementing these kinds of activities, please contact the University of Melbourne team by clicking here or using the contact information below.

Ms Angeline Ferdinand | Research Fellow | Centre for Health Policy |

Melbourne School of Population and Global Health

Level 4, 207 Bouverie Street, University of Melbourne 3010 T +61 3 8344 0660 | F +61 3 9348 1174 | E a.ferdinand@unimelb.edu.au |

W http://healthprograms.unimelb.edu.au/

How you can share  health messages stories about Aboriginal Community Controlled Health issues ?

Closing this week October 28

  • newspaper-promoEditorial OpportunitiesWe are now looking to all our members, programs and sector stakeholders for advertising, compelling articles, eye-catching images and commentary for inclusion in our next edition.Maximum 600 words (word file only) with image

More info and Advertising rate card

or contact nacchonews@naccho.org.au

NACCHO Aboriginal women’s health: New resource launched :My breast cancer journey: a guide for Aboriginal women and their families.

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The Minister for Health, The Hon Peter Dutton MP has announced the release of a new resource

My breast cancer journey: a guide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their families.

DOWNLOAD a COPY HERE

Picture above: For a limited time an exclusive Deadly Choices Breast Cancer jersey will be available for Aboriginal women who visit the Awabakal Aboriginal Primary Health Care Centre (AAPHCC) for a women’s health check.

This resource, launched at the inaugural Cancer Australia Pink Ribbon Breakfast, outlines the clinical management of early breast cancer to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women with breast cancer and their families.

My breast cancer journey: a guide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their families has been developed in response to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women highlighting the need for culturally appropriate, supportive breast cancer information. It contains practical information to help navigate the breast cancer journey and improve understanding about breast cancer, treatment options and follow-up care.

This resource has been created in collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women with various stages of breast cancer, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women working in the health sector and family and friends of women diagnosed with breast cancer.

An online version can be viewed here. My breast cancer journey: a guide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their families.

To order a hard copy version please call 02 93579400 or order online.

Find out more: Information about breast cancer for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Need help about breast cancer or the location of your nearest ACCHO on your SMARTPHONE or IPAD

Info Download the new NACCHO Health APP HERE

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NACCHO Aboriginal women’s health:Deadly Choices goes pink for breast cancer and women’s health awareness

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Awabakal Newcastle Aboriginal Co-operative and the Hunter Breast Cancer Foundation have formed a partnership that aims to raise awareness of women’s health in the local Aboriginal community.

For a limited time an exclusive Deadly Choices Breast Cancer jersey will be available for Aboriginal women who visit the Awabakal Aboriginal Primary Health Care Centre (AAPHCC) for a women’s health check.

The initiative is part of Awabakal’s Deadly Choices program which was introduced to the Hunter in August this year and aims to improve Aboriginal health by educating and empowering local Aboriginal people to make healthy choices.

Since the program was introduced the organisation has seen a 630% increase in the number of Aboriginal people undergoing health checks. The success of this program can be placed, in part, on the highly-prized and very exclusive Awabakal Deadly Choices jerseys, which can only be claimed following a health check at the AAPHCC.

Awabakal Chief Executive Officer, Don MacAskill, said that the partnership with the Hunter Breast Cancer Foundation would bring breast cancer and women’s health awareness to the forefront of Aboriginal health.

‘Breast cancer is a serious disease with one in eight women diagnosed nation-wide. It doesn’t discriminate between the indigenous and non-indigenous populations, which is why partnerships like this are so important in our attempts to tackle chronic disease in the local Aboriginal community,’ Mr MacAskill said.

Hunter Breast Cancer Foundation President, Rosalie Taggart, said the region would benefit from the additional support of Awabakal and its community to promote health awareness.

‘The Awabakal Deadly Choices program is an excellent model that really encourages people to think about their health and take proactive steps. This is an exciting partnership that we hope will encourage all levels of breast cancer support to work with Awabakal to improve local Aboriginal health,” she said.

The Hunter Breast Cancer Foundation provides grass root support for people undergoing treatment for breast cancer. Since January of this year the Foundation has provided more than 600 post-operative comfort cushions, 178 professional cleaning services and 69 lawn care services. Volunteer drivers have undertaken 338 trips travelling 26,683 kms taking patients to and from treatment appointments.

For information: Awabakal Chief Executive Officer, Don MacAskill, 0408 617 116

Hunter Breast Cancer Foundation President, Rosalie Taggart, 0423 222 059

Need help about breast cancer or the location of your nearest ACCHO on your SMARTPHONE or IPAD

Info Download the new NACCHO Health APP HERE

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